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Sample records for air jet loom

  1. 47. Jet Lowe, Photographer, June 1978. STAFFORD LOOM, WITH R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Jet Lowe, Photographer, June 1978. STAFFORD LOOM, WITH R. W. ANDREWS PATENT PATTERN DEVICE, C. 1870, VIEW LOOKING FROM THE FRONT, SECOND FLOOR SOUTH. - Watkins Mill, County Highway MM, Lawson, Ray County, MO

  2. Synthetic Jets in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, C. S.; Chen, F. J.; Neuhart, D.; Harris, J.

    2007-01-01

    An oscillatory jet with zero net mass flow is generated by a cavity-pumping actuator. Among the three test cases selected for the Langley CFD validation workshop to assess the current CFD capabilities to predict unsteady flow fields, this basic oscillating jet flow field is the least complex and is selected as the first test case. Increasing in complexity, two more cases studied include jet in cross flow boundary layer and unsteady flow induced by suction and oscillatory blowing with separation control geometries. In this experiment, velocity measurements from three different techniques, hot-wire anemometry, Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), documented the synthetic jet flow field. To provide boundary conditions for computations, the experiment also monitored the actuator operating parameters including diaphragm displacement, internal cavity pressure, and internal cavity temperature.

  3. Experimental studies on an air-air jet exhaust pump

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    Industrial ventilation employing an air-air jet exhaust pump connected to a compressed-air line was investigated. The motive air supply pressure was maintained between 2 and 3 bar. A unique ejector housing was constructed to receive both the convergent-divergent primary nozzle and the mixing chamber. The entire unit adapts readily to any existing compressed-air system. The mixing chamber was so constructed that the length of its cylindrical section may be changed. Pressure variations along the mixing chamber were recorded, and this offered a valuable appreciation of the effects of the length-to-diameter ratios. Results indicate the influence of the supply air pressure and pressure ratio on the jet entrainment capacity and efficiency. It has also been shown that the present design is capable of achieving the maximum reported jet-pump efficiency of around 25% corresponding to a nozzle-to-mixing chamber area ratio of 0.15.

  4. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincke, J. R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C. G.

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing.

  5. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Multiple jet study data correlations. [data correlation for jet mixing flow of air jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Eberhardt, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Correlations are presented which allow determination of penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets injected normal to a ducted subsonic heated primary air stream. Correlations were obtained over jet-to-primary stream momentum flux ratios of 6 to 60 for locations from 1 to 30 jet diameters downstream of the injection plane. The range of geometric and operating variables makes the correlations relevant to gas turbine combustors. Correlations were obtained for the mixing efficiency between jets and primary stream using an energy exchange parameter. Also jet centerplane velocity and temperature trajectories were correlated and centerplane dimensionless temperature distributions defined. An assumption of a Gaussian vertical temperature distribution at all stations is shown to result in a reasonable temperature field model. Data are presented which allow comparison of predicted and measured values over the range of conditions specified above.

  7. Air plasma jet with hollow electrodes at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-05-15

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet with air is produced through hollow electrodes and dielectric with a hole of 1 mm diam. The plasma jet device is operated by injecting pressurized air into the electrode hole. The air plasma jet device at average powers less than 5 W exhibits a cold plasma jet of about 2 cm in length and near the room temperature, being low enough to treat thermally sensitive materials. Preliminary studies on the discharge characteristics and application tests are also presented by comparing the air plasma jet with the nitrogen and argon plasma jet.

  8. Role of air in granular jet formation.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Gabriel; Bergmann, Raymond; van der Meer, Devaraj; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2007-07-01

    A steel ball impacting on a bed of very loose, fine sand results in a surprisingly vigorous jet which shoots up from the surface of the sand [D. Lohse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 198003 (2004)10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.198003]. When the ambient pressure p is reduced, the jet is found to be less vigorous [R. Royer, Nature Phys. 1, 164 (2005)10.1038/nphys175]. In this Letter we show that p also affects the rate of penetration of the ball: Higher pressure increases the rate of penetration, which makes the cavity created by the ball close deeper into the sand bed, where the hydrostatic pressure is stronger, thereby producing a more energetic collapse and jetting. The origin of the deeper penetration under normal ambient pressure is found to lie in the extra sand fluidization caused by the air flow induced by the falling ball.

  9. Role of Air in Granular Jet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Gabriel; Bergmann, Raymond; van der Meer, Devaraj; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2007-07-01

    A steel ball impacting on a bed of very loose, fine sand results in a surprisingly vigorous jet which shoots up from the surface of the sand [D. Lohse , Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 198003 (2004)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.93.198003]. When the ambient pressure p is reduced, the jet is found to be less vigorous [R. Royer , Nature Phys. 1, 164 (2005)1745-248110.1038/nphys175]. In this Letter we show that p also affects the rate of penetration of the ball: Higher pressure increases the rate of penetration, which makes the cavity created by the ball close deeper into the sand bed, where the hydrostatic pressure is stronger, thereby producing a more energetic collapse and jetting. The origin of the deeper penetration under normal ambient pressure is found to lie in the extra sand fluidization caused by the air flow induced by the falling ball.

  10. Air plasma jet with hollow electrodes at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-05-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet with air is produced through hollow electrodes and dielectric with a hole of 5W exhibits a cold plasma jet of about 2cm in length and near the room temperature, being low enough to treat thermally sensitive materials. Preliminary studies on the discharge characteristics and application tests are also presented by comparing the air plasma jet with the nitrogen and argon plasma jet.

  11. Atmospheric pressure air-plasma jet evolved from microdischarges: Eradication of E. coli with the jet

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Kang, Won Seok; Hong, Yoo Beom; Yi, Won Ju; Uhm, Han Sup

    2009-12-15

    An atmospheric-pressure air-plasma jet operating at 60 Hz ac is presented. A plasma jet with a length of 23 mm was produced by feeding air through a porous alumina dielectric installed between an outer electrode and a hollow inner electrode. Microdischarges in the porous alumina are ejected as a plasma jet from the outer electrode through a 1 mm hole, showing that the temperature of the jet decreases to a value close to the room temperature. The jet disinfects E. coli cells very effectively, eradicating them with an exposure of a few seconds to the jet flame.

  12. Venturi Air-Jet Vacuum Ejector For Sampling Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gerald F.; Sachse, Glen W.; Burney, L. Garland; Wade, Larry O.

    1990-01-01

    Venturi air-jet vacuum ejector pump light in weight, requires no electrical power, does not contribute heat to aircraft, and provides high pumping speeds at moderate suctions. High-pressure motive gas required for this type of pump bled from compressor of aircraft engine with negligible effect on performance of engine. Used as source of vacuum for differential-absorption CO-measurement (DACOM), modified to achieve in situ measurements of CO at frequency response of 10 Hz. Provides improvement in spatial resolution and potentially leads to capability to measure turbulent flux of CO by use of eddy-correlation technique.

  13. The ADPI of cold air jets in an enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.T.; Knappmiller, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    The subject of this paper is the computational determination of the air diffusion performance index (ADPI) of a cold air jet in an enclosure. The jet outlet size, temperature, momentum, and Archimedes number were varied to produce a range of attached and separated flow regimes. The cooling load was produced by heating one of the room walls. The effect of using conventional and cold supply jets was investigated for two heat source locations. The results indicate that, for the type of diffuser and room configuration studied, an optimum ADPI was obtained when the jet separation distance is approximately equal to the room characteristic length. Room airflow conditions produced by conventional and cold air supply temperature air are almost identical to each other when the same separation distance criteria, i.e., same momentum flux, are used.

  14. Cold atmospheric pressure air plasma jet for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, J. F.; Price, R. O.; Bowman, A.; Chiavarini, R. L.; Stacey, M.; Schoenbach, K. H.; Mohamed, A.-A H.; Swanson, R. J.

    2008-06-16

    By flowing atmospheric pressure air through a direct current powered microhollow cathode discharge, we were able to generate a 2 cm long plasma jet. With increasing flow rate, the flow becomes turbulent and temperatures of the jet are reduced to values close to room temperature. Utilizing the jet, yeast grown on agar can be eradicated with a treatment of only a few seconds. Conversely, animal studies show no skin damage even with exposures ten times longer than needed for pathogen extermination. This cold plasma jet provides an effective mode of treatment for yeast infections of the skin.

  15. Cold atmospheric pressure air plasma jet for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, J. F.; Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Price, R. O.; Swanson, R. J.; Bowman, A.; Chiavarini, R. L.; Stacey, M.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2008-06-01

    By flowing atmospheric pressure air through a direct current powered microhollow cathode discharge, we were able to generate a 2cm long plasma jet. With increasing flow rate, the flow becomes turbulent and temperatures of the jet are reduced to values close to room temperature. Utilizing the jet, yeast grown on agar can be eradicated with a treatment of only a few seconds. Conversely, animal studies show no skin damage even with exposures ten times longer than needed for pathogen extermination. This cold plasma jet provides an effective mode of treatment for yeast infections of the skin.

  16. Supersonic moist air jet impingements on flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Miah Md. Ashraful; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2010-02-01

    Pronounced aeroacoustic resonances are exhibited in the flowfield where a jet emerges from an orifice or a nozzle and impinges on a solid surface. One instance where such resonances are produced is in a high speed jet impingement, such as in the space launch vehicle systems, jet-engine exhaust impingement, and in the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, etc. A highly unsteady flowfield leading to a drastic increase of noise level with very high dynamic pressure and thermal loads are noticed on nearby surfaces results dramatic lift loss, severe ground erosion and hot gas ingestion to the inlet in the jet engines. This highly unsteady behavior of the impinging jets is due to a feedback loop between the fluid and acoustic fields. In actual jet flow, the working gas may contain condensable gas such as steam or moist air. In these cases, the non-equilibrium condensation may occur at the region between nozzle exit and an object. The jet flow with non-equilibrium condensation may be quite different from that without condensation. Therefore, in this study, the effect of the non-equilibrium condensation of moist air on the axisymmetric under-expanded supersonic impinging jet on a vertical flat plate was investigated numerically.

  17. Characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental program to study the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling flows to obtain detailed and accurate data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport modeling for combustor flows is discussed. The work was also motivated by the need to investigate and quantify the influence of confinement and swirl on the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets. The flow facility was constructed in a simple way which allows easy interchange of different swirlers and the freedom to vary the jet Reynolds number. The velocity measurements were taken with a one color, one component DISA Model 55L laser-Doppler anemometer employing the forward scatter mode. Standard statistical methods are used to evaluate the various moments of the signals to give the flow characteristics. The present work was directed at the understanding of the velocity field. Therefore, only velocity and turbulence data of the axial and circumferential components are reported for inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows.

  18. Parameter investigation of air-driving fluid jet polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zong-Ru; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Pham, Loc Huu; Ho, Cheng-Fang; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Shiou, Fang-Jung

    2012-10-01

    Air-driving fluid jet polishing (FJP) technique was first presented in 2011. Slurry was drop out due to Venturi effect inside the atomizer which is the main component of air-driving FJP system, and was guided to mix with air flow by the nozzle. The Venturi effect and the added high speed air flow provide slurry more kinetic energy to impact the optical surface. Therefore, the air-driving FJP system has a rotational symmetrical Gaussian-like removal profile with lower air pressure and normal incidence configuration. In this paper, we investigate oblique incidence polishing to find the optimal material removal performance of the technique, including removal shape and depth and surface roughness. Different oblique angles ranged from 80 to 20 degree were tested. The air-driving FJP system was adapted upon a CNC machine, so not only single point polishing but also straight line polishing with constant feed rate can be carried out. We report on the performance of oblique air-driving FJP in different air pressure and processing time, and also the material removal of dynamic polishing for N-BK7, Fused Silica and ZERODUR®. The results indicate oblique incidence can get a Gaussian-like removal shape, and improve the surface roughness. The air-driving FJP not only has the advantages of conventional fluid jet polishing, such as no tool wears, cutter interference and debris deposition problems, but also has excellent material removal rate with lower energy.

  19. The role of air in granular jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Devaraj; Bergmann, Raymond; Caballero, Gabriel; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-11-01

    A steel ball impacting on a bed of very loose, fine sand results in a surprisingly vigorous jet which shoots out from the surface of the sand. When the ambient pressure is reduced, the jet is found to be less vigorous, which suggests that air should play an important role in the mechanism of jet formation. In our impact experiments it was found that the penetration depth of the ball strongly decreases with decreasing pressure, whereas all other results are consistent with the gravitational collapse of the cavity that is created upon impact. This limits the influence of air to the stage of void formation, in which the cavity is created by a balance of the initial potential energy of the sphere and the dissipation due to the drag the ball experiences when penetrating into the sand.

  20. Behavior of Water Jet Accompanied with Air Suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hironobu; Ishido, Tsutomu; Ihara, Akio

    In order to atomize a liquid, the authors have investigated the behavior of air-water jets. In a series of experiments, we have discovered a strange phenomenon that the water jet accompanied with air suction from the free surface has made a periodic radial splash of water drop. The purpose of the present paper is to clear out the origin of this phenomenon and the behavior of water jet accompanied with air suction. The behavior of water jet has been photographed by a digital camera aided with a flashlight and high-speed video camera. Those experiments enable us to find the origin of a periodic radial splash due to a formation of single air bubble at the flow separation region inside the nozzle and due to explosive expansion of the bubble after injected in the free space. In order to analyze the radial splash of water, we have conducted the equation of spherical liquid membrane. The numerical results obtained have been compared with the experimental results and good agreement has been obtained in radial expansion velocity.

  1. A wide-frequency-range air-jet shaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Robert W

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a description of a simple air-jet shaker. Its force can be calibrated statically and appears to be constant with frequency. It is relatively easy to use, and it has essentially massless characteristics. This shaker is applied to define the unstable branch of a frequency-response curve obtained for a nonlinear spring with a single degree of freedom.

  2. Forces Acting on a Ball in an Air Jet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Zendri, G.; Oss, S.

    2011-01-01

    The forces acting on a ball in an air jet have been measured using simple equipment. Such measurements allow quite a precise, non-ambiguous description and understanding of the physical mechanism which explains the famous levitating ball experiment. (Contains 7 figures.)

  3. Cold Micro-Plasma Jets in Atmospheric Pressure Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A. H.; Suddala, S.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2003-10-01

    Direct current microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) have been operated in air, nitrogen and oxygen at pressures of one atmosphere. The electrodes are 250 μm thick molybdenum foils, separated by an alumina insulator of the same thickness. A cylindrical hole with a diameter in the 100 μm range is drilled through all layers. By flowing gases at high pressure through this hole, plasma jets with radial dimensions on the same order as the microhole dimensions, and with lengths of up to one centimeter are generated. The gas temperature in these jets was measured by means of a micro-thermocouple. The lowest temperatures of close to room temperature were measured when the flow changed from laminar to turbulent. The results of spectral emission and absorption studies indicate high concentrations of byproducts, such as ozone, when the discharge is operated in air or oxygen. This work is supported by the U.S Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  4. Penetration of Air Jets Issuing from Circular, Square, and Elliptical Orifices Directed Perpendicularly to an Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, Robert S.; Callaghan, Edmund E.; Bowden, Dean T.

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the penetration of air jets d.irected perpendicularlY to an air stream. Jets Issuing from circular, square, and. elliptical orifices were investigated. and. the jet penetration at a position downstream of the orifice was determined- as a function of jet density, jet velocity, air-stream d.enaity, air-stream velocity, effective jet diameter, and. orifice flow coeffIcient. The jet penetrations were determined for nearly constant values of air-stream density at three tunnel-air velocities arid for a large range of Jet velocities and. densities. The results were correlated in terms of dimensionless parameters and the penetrations of the various shapes were compared. Greater penetration was obtained. with the square orifices and the elliptical orifices having an axis ratio of 4:1 at low tunnel-air velocities and low jet pressures than for the other orifices investigated. The square orifices gave the best penetrations at the higher values of tunnel-air velocity and jet total pressure.

  5. The Effect of Aerodynamic Heating on Air Penetration by Shaped Charge Jets and Their Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backofen, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present recent work modeling thermal coupling between shaped charge jets and their particles with air while it is being penetrated to form a crater that subsequently collapses back onto the jet. This work complements research published at International Symposia on Ballistics: 1) 1987 - Shaped Charge Jet Aerodynamics, Particulation and Blast Field Modeling; and 2) 2007 - Air Cratering by Eroding Shaped Charge Jets. The current work shows how and when a shaped charge jet's tip and jet particles are softened enough that they can erode in a hydrodynamic manner as modeled in these papers. This paper and its presentation includes models for heat transfer from shocked air as a function of jet velocity as well as heat flow within the jet or particle. The work is supported by an extensive bibliographic search including publications on meteors and ballistic missile re-entry vehicles. The modeling shows that a jet loses its strength to the depth required to justify hydrodynamic erosion when its velocity is above a specific velocity related to the shock properties of air and the jet material's properties. As a result, the portion of a jet's kinetic energy converted at the aerodynamic shock into heating transferred back onto the jet affects the energy deposited into the air through drag and ablation which in turn affect air crater expansion and subsequent collapse back onto the jet and its particles as shown in high-speed photography.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Hydrogen Air Supersonic Coaxial Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharavath, Malsur; Manna, Pulinbehari; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the turbulent structure of coaxial supersonic H2-air jet is explored numerically by solving three dimensional RANS equations along with two equation k-ɛ turbulence model. Grid independence of the solution is demonstrated by estimating the error distribution using Grid Convergence Index. Distributions of flow parameters in different planes are analyzed to explain the mixing and combustion characteristics of high speed coaxial jets. The flow field is seen mostly diffusive in nature and hydrogen diffusion is confined to core region of the jet. Both single step laminar finite rate chemistry and turbulent reacting calculation employing EDM combustion model are performed to find the effect of turbulence-chemistry interaction in the flow field. Laminar reaction predicts higher H2 mol fraction compared to turbulent reaction because of lower reaction rate caused by turbulence chemistry interaction. Profiles of major species and temperature match well with experimental data at different axial locations; although, the computed profiles show a narrower shape in the far field region. These results demonstrate that standard two equation class turbulence model with single step kinetics based turbulence chemistry interaction can describe H2-air reaction adequately in high speed flows.

  7. The influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, J.; Jícha, M.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with instigation of influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation. CFD approach was used for investigation and model geometry was based on small aircraft cabin mock-up geometry. Model was also equipped by nine seats and five manikins that represent passengers. The air jet direction was observed for selected ambient environment parameters and several types of air duct geometry and influence of main air duct geometry on jets direction is discussed. The model was created in StarCCM+ ver. 6.04.014 software and polyhedral mesh was used.

  8. 77 FR 59391 - Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways Corporation, United Air Lines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways...(a) and 343.2(c); Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways...

  9. An experimental investigation of gas jets in confined swirling air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongia, H.; Ahmed, S. A.; Mongia, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of jets in confined swirling flows which is of importance to designers of turbine combustors and solid fuel ramjets used to power missiles fired from cannons were examined. The fluid dynamics of gas jets of different densities in confined swirling flows were investigated. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are made with a one color, one component laser velocimeter operating in the forward scatter mode. It is shown that jets in confined flow with large area ratio are highly dissipative which results in both air and helium/air jet centerline velocity decays. For air jets, the jet like behavior in the tube center disappears at about 20 diameters downstream of the jet exit. This phenomenon is independent of the initial jet velocity. The turbulence field at this point also decays to that of the background swirling flow. A jet like behavior in the tube center is noticed even at 40 diameters for the helium/air jets. The subsequent flow and turbulence field depend highly on the initial jet velocity. The jets are fully turbulent, and the cause of this difference in behavior is attributed to the combined action swirl and density difference. This observation can have significant impact on the design of turbine combustors and solid fuel ramjets subject to spin.

  10. Investigation of Flow in an Axially Symmetrical Heated Jet of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley

    1943-01-01

    The work done under this contract falls essentially into two parts: the first part was the design and construction of the equipment and the running of preliminary tests on the 3-inch jet, carried out by Mr. Carl Thiele in 1940; the second part consisting in the measurement in the 1-inch jet flow in an axially symmetrical heated jet of air. (author)

  11. Penetration of Liquid Jets into a High-velocity Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelko, Louis J

    1950-01-01

    Data are presented showing the penetration characteristics of liquid jets directed approximately perpendicular to a high-velocity air stream for jet-nozzle-throat diameters from 0.0135 to 0.0625 inch, air stream densities from 0.0805 to 0.1365 pound per cubic foot, liquid jet velocities from 168.1 to 229.0 feet per second and a liquid jet density of approximately 62 pounds per cubic foot. The data were analyzed and a correlation was developed that permitted the determination of the penetration length of the liquid jet for any operation condition within the range of variables investigated.

  12. Local quenching phenomena of a lean premixed flat flame impinging with a pulsating air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahagi, Y.; Makino, I.

    2014-08-01

    Local quenching phenomena of a lean methane air premixed flat flame formed horizontally in a wall stagnating flow impinging with a pulsating air jet has been investigated experimentally. The burner system consists of 40mm inverted nozzle burner and a solid wall with 8mm diameter air jet placed in line vertically. The pulsating frequencies set up to 100Hz while the jet intensities generate up to 6 m/s by a loud speaker. Approximately '00mm disk shape flame front is curved by the pulsating air jet and the air jet impacting point is locally quenched. The fuel concentration of quenching start condition increases with increasing the intensity of air jet, because the increased jet intensity linked with the flame strain rate gain. For weak jet intensity range, the quenching hole becomes directly to develop the whole flame extinction. On the other hand, for moderate or strong jet condition, the flame can recover from the local quenching phenomena. In this condition, once the quenching hole creates, but the hole may close by the flame propagation or reigniting process. Then, the whole flame extinction limits are lower than no jet impacting condition depending on the circumstances.

  13. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  14. The Fluid Dynamics of Secondary Cooling Air-Mist Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández C., I.; Acosta G., F. A.; Castillejos E., A. H.; Minchaca M., J. I.

    2008-10-01

    out that a large proportion of fine drops would be prevented by the air-flow pattern from reaching the surface. The numerical analysis of air-mist jets under conditions relevant to secondary cooling had not been addressed before, and it constitutes a first step in an effort to develop a model to describe the dynamic and thermal interaction of dense-drop media with hot metallic surfaces.

  15. PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO JP-8 JET FUEL VAPORS AND EXHAUST AT AIR FORCE BASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and gro...

  16. Converging swirling liquid jets from pressure swirl atomizers: Effect of inner air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, D.; Raghunandan, B. N.

    2002-12-01

    Converging swirling liquid jets from pressure swirl atomizers injected into atmospheric air are studied experimentally using still and cine photographic techniques in the context of liquid-liquid coaxial swirl atomizers used in liquid rocket engines. The jet exhibits several interesting flow features in contrast to the nonswirling liquid jets (annular liquid jets) studied in the literature. The swirl motion creates multiple converging sections in the jet, which gradually collapse one after the other due to the liquid sheet breakup with increasing Weber number (We). This is clearly related to the air inside the converging jet which exhibits a peculiar variation of the pressure difference across the liquid sheet, ΔP, with We. The variation shows a decreasing trend of ΔP with We in an overall sense, but exhibits local maxima and minima at specific flow conditions. The number of maxima or minima observed in the curve depends on the number of converging sections seen in the jet at the lowest We. An interesting feature of this variation is that it delineates the regions of prominent jet flow features like the oscillating jet region, nonoscillating jet region, number of converging sections, and so on. Numerical predictions of the jet characteristics are obtained by modifying an existing nonswirling liquid jet model by including the swirling motion. The comparison between the experimental and numerical measurements shows that the pressure difference across the liquid sheet is important for the jet behavior and cannot be neglected in any theoretical analysis.

  17. Acoustic properties of supersonic helium/air jets at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, Dennis K.; Barron, W. D.; Vaddempudi, Appa R.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed with the objective of developing a greater understanding of the physics of hot supersonic jet noise. Cold helium/air jets are used to easily and inexpensively simulate the low densities of hot air jets. The experiments are conducted at low Reynolds numbers in order to facilitate study of the large-scale turbulent structures (instability waves) that cause most of the radiated noise. Experiments have been performed on Mach 1.5 and 2.1 jets of pure air, pure helium and 10 percent helium by mass. Helium/air jets are shown to radiate more noise than pure air jets due to the increased exit velocity. Microphone spectra are usually dominated by a single spectral component at a predictable frequency. Increasing the jet's helium concentration is shown to increase the dominant frequency. The helium concentration in the test chamber is determined by calculating the speed of sound from the measured phase difference between two microphone signals. Bleeding outside air into the test chamber controls the accumulation of helium so that the hot jet simulation remains valid. The measured variation in the peak radiated noise frequency is in good agreement with the predictions of the hot jet noise theory of Tam et al.

  18. The Effects of Very Light Jet Air Taxi Operations on Commercial Air Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the potential effects of Very Light Jet (VLJ) air taxi operations adding to delays experienced by commercial passenger air transportation in the year 2025. The affordable cost relative to existing business jets and ability to use many of the existing small, minimally equipped, but conveniently located airports is projected to stimulate a large demand for the aircraft. The resulting increase in air traffic operations will mainly be at smaller airports, but this study indicates that VLJs have the potential to increase further the pressure of demand at some medium and large airports, some of which are already operating at or near capacity at peak times. The additional delays to commercial passenger air transportation due to VLJ air taxi operations are obtained from simulation results using the Airspace Concepts Evaluation System (ACES) simulator. The direct increase in operating cost due to additional delays is estimated. VLJs will also cause an increase in traffic density, and this study shows increased potential for conflicts due to VLJ operations.

  19. [The correction to spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma jet with air engulfment].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-hua; Tang, Huang-zai; Tian, Kuo; Zhang, Guan-zhong

    2004-04-01

    A high-resolution, multi-line spectroscopic diagnostic system was used to detect two spectral line intensities in plasma jet simultaneously. The temperature profiles of an arc plasma jet issued into atmosphere and the concentrations of the air engulfment in the plasma jet were experimentally determined by means of the line absolute intensity method in this paper. The temperature profiles were obtained in two cases: the air engulfment in the plasma jet being considered and not being considered. The comparison of temperatures obtained in these two cases illustrates that the air engulfment in the plasma jet has considerable influence on spectroscopic diagnostic results. The neglect of the air engulfment brings on error in the temperature diagnostics with the absolute line intensity method. Especially in the region far away from the exit of the nozzle, the error is obvious.

  20. Break-up and atomization of a round water jet by a high-speed annular air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasheras, J. C.; Villermaux, E.; Hopfinger, E. J.

    1998-02-01

    The near- and far-field break-up and atomization of a water jet by a high-speed annular air jet are examined by means of high-speed flow visualizations and phase Doppler particle sizing techniques. Visualization of the jet's near field and measurements of the frequencies associated with the gas liquid interfacial instabilities are used to study the underlying physical mechanisms involved in the primary break-up of the water jet. This process is shown to consist of the stripping of water sheets, or ligaments, which subsequently break into smaller lumps or drops. An entrainment model of the near-field stripping of the liquid is proposed, and shown to describe the measured liquid shedding frequencies. This simplified model explains qualitatively the dependence of the shedding frequency on the air/water momentum ratio in both initially laminar and turbulent water jets. The role of the secondary liquid break-up in the far-field atomization of the water jet is also investigated, and an attempt is made to apply the classical concepts of local isotropy to explain qualitatively the measurement of the far-field droplet size distribution and its dependence on the water to air mass and momentum ratios. Models accounting for the effect of the local turbulent dissipation rate in the gas on both the break-up and coalescence of the droplets are developed and compared with the measurements of the variation of the droplet size along the jet's centreline. The total flux of kinetic energy supplied by the gas per unit total mass of the spray jet was found to be the primary parameter determining the secondary break-up and coalescence of the droplets in the far field.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flow Properties of Supersonic Helium-Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.; Veltin, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Heated high speed subsonic and supersonic jets operating on- or off-design are a source of noise that is not yet fully understood. Helium-air mixtures can be used in the correct ratio to simulate the total temperature ratio of heated air jets and hence have the potential to provide inexpensive and reliable flow and acoustic measurements. This study presents a combination of flow measurements of helium-air high speed jets and numerical simulations of similar helium-air mixture and heated air jets. Jets issuing from axisymmetric convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles are investigated, and the results show very strong similarity with heated air jet measurements found in the literature. This demonstrates the validity of simulating heated high speed jets with helium-air in the laboratory, together with the excellent agreement obtained in the presented data between the numerical predictions and the experiments. The very close match between the numerical and experimental data also validates the frozen chemistry model used in the numerical simulation.

  2. Influence of air pressure on the performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Min; Wu, Yun; Li, Ying-hong; Zong, Hao-hua; Song, Hui-min; Liang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) has a wide application prospect in the high-speed flow control field for its high jet velocity. In this paper, the influence of the air pressure on the performance of a two-electrode PSJA is investigated by the schlieren method in a large range from 7 kPa to 100 kPa. The energy consumed by the PSJA is roughly the same for all the pressure levels. Traces of the precursor shock wave velocity and the jet front velocity vary a lot for different pressures. The precursor shock wave velocity first decreases gradually and then remains at 345 m/s as the air pressure increases. The peak jet front velocity always appears at the first appearance of a jet, and it decreases gradually with the increase of the air pressure. A maximum precursor shock wave velocity of 520 m/s and a maximum jet front velocity of 440 m/s are observed at the pressure of 7 kPa. The averaged jet velocity in one period ranges from 44 m/s to 54 m/s for all air pressures, and it drops with the rising of the air pressure. High velocities of the precursor shock wave and the jet front indicate that this type of PSJA can still be used to influence the high-speed flow field at 7 kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51407197, 51522606, 51336011, 91541120, and 11472306).

  3. Cold atmospheric air plasma jet for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen F.; Price, Robert O.; Stacey, Michael; Swanson, R. James; Bowman, Angela; Chiavarini, Robert L.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2008-10-01

    By flowing ambient air through the discharge channel of a microhollow cathode geometry, we were able to sustain a stable 1.5-2 cm long afterglow plasma jet with dc voltages of only a few hundred volts. The temperature in this expelled afterglow plasma is close to room temperature. Emission spectra show atomic oxygen, hydroxyl ions and various nitrogen compounds. The low heavy-particle temperature allows us to use this exhaust stream on biological samples and tissues without thermal damage. The high levels of reactive species suggest an effective treatment for pathological skin conditions caused, in particular, by infectious agents. In first experiments, we have successfully tested the efficacy on Candida kefyr (a yeast), E.coli, and a matching E.coli strain-specific virus. All pathogens investigated responded well to the treatment. In the yeast case, complete eradication of the organism in the treated area could be achieved with an exposure of 90 seconds at a distance of 5 mm. A 10-fold increase of exposure, to 900 seconds caused no observable damage to murine integument.

  4. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Si-ze; Liu, Dongping; Song, Ying; Sun, Yue

    2013-05-15

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  5. APPLICATION OF JET REMPI AND LIBS TO AIR TOXIC MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses three advanced, laser-based monitoring techniques that the EPA is assisting in developing for real time measurement of toxic aerosol compounds. One of the three techniques is jet resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (Jet REMPI) coupled with a time-of-flig...

  6. Analytical description of the breakup of liquid jets in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1993-01-01

    A viscous or inviscid cylindrical jet with surface tension in a vacuum tends to pinch due to the mechanism of capillary instability. Similarity solutions are constructed which describe this phenomenon as a critical time is encountered, for two physically distinct cases: inviscid jets governed by the Euler equations and highly viscous jets governed by the Stokes equations. In both cases the only assumption imposed is that at the time of pinching the jet shape has a radial length scale which is smaller than the axial length scale. For the inviscid case, we show that our solution corresponds exactly to one member of the one-parameter family of solutions obtained from slender jet theories and the shape of the jet is locally concave at breakup. For highly viscous jets our theory predicts local shapes which are monotonic increasing or decreasing indicating the formation of a mother drop connected to the jet by a thin fluid tube. This qualitative behavior is in complete agreement with both direct numerical simulations and experimental observations.

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopic measurement of air entrainment in argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into an argon plasma jet has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition to turbulence occurs, air is rapidly entrained into the jet core. The location of the transition region is thought to be driven by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopic measurement of air entrainment in argon plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincke, J. R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C. G.

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into an argon plasma jet has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition to turbulence occurs, air is rapidly entrained into the jet core. The location of the transition region is thought to be driven by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number.

  9. Effects of long-term air jet noise and dietary sodium chloride in borderline hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tucker, D C; Hunt, R A

    1993-10-01

    The hypothesis that simultaneous exposure to a high (8%) sodium chloride diet and behavioral stress (air jet noise) would act synergistically to increase blood pressure was investigated in male borderline hypertensive rats. Rats were fed either a 1% or an 8% sodium chloride diet beginning at 6 weeks of age. Rats in the Air Noise condition were restrained and exposed to random blasts of air jet noise for 2 h/d, 5 d/wk, from 7 to 17 weeks of age. Controls either were placed in identical restrainers and test chambers but not exposed to air jet noise (Restrained Control) or were left undisturbed (Maturation Control). Biweekly indirect blood pressure measurements showed that by 17 weeks of age, the high-sodium chloride diet and air jet noise exposure produced additive increases in blood pressure. Direct blood pressure measurements at 18 weeks of age confirmed the higher systolic pressures in borderline hypertensive rats exposed to both an 8% sodium chloride diet and air jet noise. After ganglionic blockade, the blood pressure of rats in the Air Noise group remained higher than that of Restrained and Maturation Controls, suggesting that the increased blood pressure of air jet noise-exposed rats was not maintained by increased autonomic activity. Blood pressure after maximal vasodilation by hydralazine was increased in rats exposed to both an 8% sodium chloride diet and air jet noise compared with other groups. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (tested by graded doses of angiotensin II) did not differ among groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  11. A PIV Study of Slotted Air Injection for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Results from acoustic and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are presented for single and dual-stream jets with fluidic injection on the core stream. The fluidic injection nozzles delivered air to the jet through slots on the interior of the nozzle at the nozzle trailing edge. The investigations include subsonic and supersonic jet conditions. Reductions in broadband shock noise and low frequency mixing noise were obtained with the introduction of fluidic injection on single stream jets. Fluidic injection was found to eliminate shock cells, increase jet mixing, and reduce turbulent kinetic energy levels near the end of the potential core. For dual-stream subsonic jets, the introduction of fluidic injection reduced low frequency noise in the peak jet noise direction and enhanced jet mixing. For dual-stream jets with supersonic fan streams and subsonic core streams, the introduction of fluidic injection in the core stream impacted the jet shock cell structure but had little effect on mixing between the core and fan streams.

  12. Time and frequency domain investigation of the heat transfer to a synthetic air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylatt, D. I.; O'Donovan, T. S.

    2012-11-01

    Heat transfer to a synthetic air jets is investigated experimentally. The influence of peaks in heat transfer outwith the stagnation region of the jet are of particular interest. Heat transfer to the jets is reported for experimental parameters, jet exit to impingement surface spacings, H/D = 1, Reynolds number of 3000, non-dimensional Stroke length, L0/D of 14.and an excitation frequency of 70 Hz Peaks in heat transfer outwith the stagnation region of the jet are investigated in both the time and frequency domain and a connection between the driving frequency of the jet and changes in the rate of heat transfer is outlined. It is shown that two type's changes in the rate of heat transfer outwith the stagnation region are present in synthetic jet impingement heat transfer; those associated with the jet excitation frequency and therefore attributed to interactions between the two jet flow regimes and those associated with the breakdown of coherent structures in the jet flow.

  13. Rupture of thin liquid films induced by impinging air-jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Kruis, Geerit C F L; Riepen, Michel; Darhuber, Anton A

    2012-07-01

    Thin liquid films on partially wetting substrates are subjected to laminar axisymmetric air-jets impinging at normal incidence. We measured the time at which film rupture occurs and dewetting commences as a function of diameter and Reynolds number of the air-jet. We developed numerical models for the air flow as well as the height evolution of the thin liquid film. The experimental results were compared with numerical simulations based on the lubrication approximation and a phenomenological expression for the disjoining pressure. We achieved quantitative agreement for the rupture times. We found that the film thickness profiles were highly sensitive to the presence of minute quantities of surface-active contaminants.

  14. Spot cooling. Part 1: Human responses to cooling with air jets

    SciTech Connect

    Melikov, A.K.; Halkjaer, L.; Arakelian, R.S.; Fanger, P.O.

    1994-12-31

    Eight standing male subjects and a thermal manikin were studied for thermal, physiological, and subjective responses to cooling with an air jet at room temperatures of 28 C, 33 C, and 38 C and a constant relative humidity of 50%. The subjects wore a standard uniform and performed light work. A vertical jet and a horizontal jet were employed The target area of the jet, i.e., the cross section of the jet where it first met the subject, had a diameter of 0.4 m and was located 0.5 m from the outlet. Experiments were performed at average temperatures at the jet target area of 20 C, 24 C, and 28 C. Each experiment lasted 190 minutes and was performed with three average velocities at the target area: 1 and 2 m/s and the preferred velocity selected by the subjects. The impact of the relative humidity of the room air, the jet`s turbulence intensity, and the use of a helmet on the physiological and subjective responses of the eight subjects was also studied The responses of the eight subjects were compared with the responses of a group of 29 subjects. The spot cooling improved the thermal conditions of the occupants. The average general thermal sensation for the eight subjects was linearly correlated to the average mean skin temperature and the average sweat rate. An average mean skin temperature of 33 C and an average sweat rate of 33 g{center_dot}h{sup {minus}1} m{sup {minus}2} were found to correspond to a neutral thermal sensation. The local thermal sensation at the neck and at the arm exposed to the cooling jet was found to be a function of the room air temperature and the local air velocity and temperature of the jet. The turbulence intensity of the cooling jet and the humidity of the room air had no impact on the subjects` physiological and subjective responses. Large individual differences were observed in the evaluation of the environment and in the air velocity preferred by the subjects.

  15. On-loom, real-time, noncontact detection of fabric defects by ultrasonic imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, H. T.

    1998-09-08

    A noncontact, on-loom ultrasonic inspection technique was developed for real-time 100% defect inspection of fabrics. A prototype was built and tested successfully on loom. The system is compact, rugged, low cost, requires minimal maintenance, is not sensitive to fabric color and vibration, and can easily be adapted to current loom configurations. Moreover, it can detect defects in both the pick and warp directions. The system is capable of determining the size, location, and orientation of each defect. To further improve the system, air-coupled transducers with higher efficiency and sensitivity need to be developed. Advanced detection algorithms also need to be developed for better classification and categorization of defects in real-time.

  16. The Effect of Solid Admixtures on the Velocity of Motion of a Free Dusty Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. P.

    1957-01-01

    In dusty air flows occurring in industrial practice in transport by air pressure of friable materials, in the drying, annealing, and so forth, of a pulverized solid mass in suspension, and in other processes, the concentration of solid particles usually has a magnitude of the order of 1 kg per 1 kg of air. At such a concentration, the ratio of the volume of the particles to the volume of the air is small (less than one-thousandth part). However, regardless of this, the presence of a solid admixture manifests itself in the rules for the velocity distribution of the air in a dusty air flow. As a result, the rules of velocity change are different for clean and for dusty air flows. The estimation of the influence of the admixture on the velocity of the motion of the flow presents a definitive interest. One of the attempts to estimate that influence on the axial velocity of a free axially symmetrical jet with admixtures was made by Abramovich. Abramovich assumed beforehand that the fine particles of the admixture in the jet are subject to the motion of the air (that is, that the velocity of the admixture is approximately equal to the local velocity of the air); he then took as the basis of his considerations, in solving the problem, the condition that the amount of motion of the two-phase jet must be constant.

  17. The Looming Maladaptive Style in Social Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Michael A.; Stopa, Luisa

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the relationship between the looming maladaptive style (i.e., an enduring and traitlike cognitive pattern to appraise threat as rapidly rising in risk, progressively worsening, or actively speeding up and accelerating) and three different aspects of trait social anxiety (i.e., fear of negative evaluation, social…

  18. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Asma; Laroussi, Mounir; Pervez, Mohammad Rasel

    2013-06-01

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 1011 cm-3 and it reaches to the maximum of 1012 cm-3.

  19. An experimental investigation of the aeroacoustic properties of high-speed, helium/air mixture axisymmetric jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, Michael Justin

    The acoustic and aerodynamic properties of high-speed axisymmetric jets are investigated experimentally in a recently refurbished high-speed jet noise facility. Mach numbers from 0.5 to 1.5 are tested with an emphasis on Mach 0.9 and 1.5 jets. Reynolds numbers for the current study range from approximately 200,000 to 600,000. The properties of heated jets which are important in aeroacoustic studies, namely low density and high velocity, are simulated in the current study by adding helium to the jet flow. In addition, an optical deflectometry system is used to provide unique two-point space-time correlation measurements within the jet shear layer. A combination of acoustic, mean flow, and optical deflectometry measurements are made for both pure air and helium/air mixture jets at various helium concentrations. Far-field acoustic measurements indicate very reasonable agreement between previously measured heated jet directivity patterns and those at simulated temperature ratios using helium/air mixture jets. The addition of helium also shows strong similarities to the addition of heat in the mean velocity profile measurements. A shortening of the potential core and a slight decrease in jet spreading rate are observed with helium addition---the same trends observed for heated jets. Optical deflectometry measurements near the end of the potential core along the jet lip line exhibit distinct cross-correlation curves for the pure air jet cases. However, helium/air mixture jets display much lower levels of correlation and little evidence of large-scale structure in the measured spectra. It is believed the strong visual density gradients throughout the shear layer effectively mask the large-scale structure, thus reflecting a limitation of the optical deflectometer. Finally, a decrease in normalized convection velocity with simulated heating (helium addition) is observed.

  20. Mixing of Pure Air Jets with a Reacting Fuel-Rich Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    Jets in a crossflow play an integral role in practical combustion systems such as can and annular gas turbine combustors in conventional systems, and the Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor utilized in stationary applications and proposed for advanced subsonic and supersonic transports. The success of the RQL combustor rests with the performance of the quick-mixing section that bridges the rich and lean zones. The mixing of jet air with a rich crossflow to bring the reaction to completion in the lean zone must be performed rapidly and thoroughly in order to decrease the extent of near-stoichiometric fluid pocket formation. Fluid pockets at near-stoichiometric equivalence ratios are undesirable because the high temperatures attained accelerate pollutant formation kinetics associated with nitric oxide (NO). The present study develops a model experiment designed to reveal the processes that occur when jet air is introduced into hot effluent emanating from a fuel-rich reaction zone.

  1. Evaluation of the Ram-Jet device, a PCV air bleed. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency receives information about many systems which appear to offer potential for emission reduction or fuel economy improvement compared to conventional engines and vehicles. This report discusses EPA's evaluation of the Ram-Jet, a retrofit device marketed by Ed Almquist. It is designed to bleed in extra air to the engine by allowing ambient air to bypass the carburetor under high engine load conditions. The manufacturer claims the device reduces emission pollutants and improves fuel economy.

  2. Combustion Gas Properties I-ASTM Jet a Fuel and Dry Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. E.; Trout, A. M.; Wear, J. D.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    A series of computations was made to produce the equilibrium temperature and gas composition for ASTM jet A fuel and dry air. The computed tables and figures provide combustion gas property data for pressures from 0.5 to 50 atmospheres and equivalence ratios from 0 to 2.0.

  3. Linear-response reflection coefficient of the recorder air-jet amplifier.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Johnston, William A; McKinnon, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    In a duct-flute such as the recorder, steady-state oscillations are controlled by two parameters, the blowing pressure and the frequency of the acoustic resonator. As in most feedback oscillators, the oscillation amplitude is determined by gain-saturation of the amplifier, and thus it cannot be controlled independently of blowing pressure and frequency unless the feedback loop is opened. In this work, the loop is opened by replacing the recorder body with a waveguide reflectometer: a section of transmission line with microphones, a signal source, and an absorbing termination. When the mean flow from the air-jet into the transmission line is not blocked, the air-jet amplifier is unstable to edge-tone oscillations through a feedback path that does not involve the acoustic resonator. When it is blocked, the air-jet is deflected somewhat outward and the system becomes stable. It is then possible to measure the reflection coefficient of the air-jet amplifier versus blowing pressure and acoustic frequency under linear response conditions, avoiding the complication of gain-saturation. The results provide a revealing test of flute drive models under the simplest conditions and with few unknown parameters. The strengths and weaknesses of flute drive models are discussed.

  4. Linear-response reflection coefficient of the recorder air-jet amplifier.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Johnston, William A; McKinnon, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    In a duct-flute such as the recorder, steady-state oscillations are controlled by two parameters, the blowing pressure and the frequency of the acoustic resonator. As in most feedback oscillators, the oscillation amplitude is determined by gain-saturation of the amplifier, and thus it cannot be controlled independently of blowing pressure and frequency unless the feedback loop is opened. In this work, the loop is opened by replacing the recorder body with a waveguide reflectometer: a section of transmission line with microphones, a signal source, and an absorbing termination. When the mean flow from the air-jet into the transmission line is not blocked, the air-jet amplifier is unstable to edge-tone oscillations through a feedback path that does not involve the acoustic resonator. When it is blocked, the air-jet is deflected somewhat outward and the system becomes stable. It is then possible to measure the reflection coefficient of the air-jet amplifier versus blowing pressure and acoustic frequency under linear response conditions, avoiding the complication of gain-saturation. The results provide a revealing test of flute drive models under the simplest conditions and with few unknown parameters. The strengths and weaknesses of flute drive models are discussed. PMID:26627801

  5. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  6. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellett, G.L.; Northam, G.B.; Wilson, L.G.; Jarrett, O. Jr.; Antcliff, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF. 42 refs.

  7. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Antcliff, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF.

  8. A Supersonic Argon/Air Coaxial Jet Experiment for Computational Fluid Dynamics Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, Chandler W.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    A non-reacting experiment is described in which data has been acquired for the validation of CFD codes used to design high-speed air-breathing engines. A coaxial jet-nozzle has been designed to produce pressure-matched exit flows of Mach 1.8 at 1 atm in both a center jet of argon and a coflow jet of air, creating a supersonic, incompressible mixing layer. The flowfield was surveyed using total temperature, gas composition, and Pitot probes. The data set was compared to CFD code predictions made using Vulcan, a structured grid Navier-Stokes code, as well as to data from a previous experiment in which a He-O2 mixture was used instead of argon in the center jet of the same coaxial jet assembly. Comparison of experimental data from the argon flowfield and its computational prediction shows that the CFD produces an accurate solution for most of the measured flowfield. However, the CFD prediction deviates from the experimental data in the region downstream of x/D = 4, underpredicting the mixing-layer growth rate.

  9. Periodic steamwise variations of heat transfer coefficients for incline and staggered arrays of circular jets with crossflow of spent air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Berry, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Heat transfer characteristics were measured for inline and staggered arrays of circular jets impinging on a surface parallel to the jet orifice plate. The impinging flow was constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet plate and the heat transfer surface. In this configuration the air discharged from upstream transverse rows of jet holes imposes a crossflow of increasing magnitude on the succeeding downstream jet rows. Streamwise heat transfer coefficient profiles were determined for a streamwise resolution of one-third the streamwise hole spacing, utilizing a specially constructed test surface.

  10. Opposed jet burner studies of hydrogen combustion with pure and N2, NO-contaminated air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    A counterflow diffusion flame formed by an argon-bathed tubular-opposed jet burner (OJB) was used to determine the 'blowoff' and 'restore' combustion characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures and for jets of air contaminated by NO (which normally occurs in high-enthalpy airflows supplied to hypersonic test facilities for scramjet combustors). Substantial divergence of 'blowoff' and 'restore' limits occurred as H2 mass flux, M(H)2, increased, the H2 jet became richer, and the M(air)/M(H2 + N2) ratio increased from 1 to 3 (molar H2/O2 from 1 to 16). Both OJB limits were sensitive to reactant composition. One to six percent NO in air led to significant N2-corrected decreases in the M(H2) values for 'blowoff' (2-8 percent) and 'restore' (6-12 percent) for mole fractions of H2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.95. However, when H2/O2 was held constant, all N2-corrected changes in M(H2) were negligible.

  11. Role of water and discharge mode on modulating properties in an atmospheric air MHCD jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Chenying; Lei, Juzhang; Hu, Huimin; Zheng, Peichao; He, Wei

    2016-04-01

    A portable micro hollow cathode discharge (MHCD) device was designed in this paper to generate water-air plasma jet. The results showed that MHCD jet pattern was changed from self-pulsing discharge mode to DC mode with the increasing of voltage, and the critical voltage value of discharge mode increased with the rise of gas flow. In order to study the influences of discharge mode and water content on MHCD jet, the electrical characteristics and radicals were all measured in different conditions. We found that the length of jet decreased and temperature increased with raising water-air ratio, and during self-pulsing discharge mode, •OH content was extremely low because of the low energy of electron, but level of NO was raised with gradually increasing applied voltage. In DC mode, the results showed there was least NO content, on the other hand •OH content increased with rise of voltage and water-air ratio. O existed in both discharge modes and the effect of water content on the O production was complex. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  12. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Begum, Asma; Laroussi, Mounir; Pervez, Mohammad Rasel

    2013-06-15

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and it reaches to the maximum of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}.

  13. Development and Validation of a Supersonic Helium-Air Coannular Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, Atherton A.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1999-01-01

    Data are acquired in a simple coannular He/air supersonic jet suitable for validation of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes for high speed propulsion. Helium is employed as a non-reacting hydrogen fuel simulant, constituting the core of the coannular flow while the coflow is composed of air. The mixing layer interface between the two flows in the near field and the plume region which develops further downstream constitute the primary regions of interest, similar to those present in all hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems. A computational code has been implemented from the experiment's inception, serving as a tool for model design during the development phase.

  14. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  15. Spectroscopic Diagnostics and an Arc Jet Heated Air Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Larry Howard, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Spectral radiation measurements were made in the range of 200 to 900 nm across a section of the plenum of an arc jet wind tunnel using a series of optical fibers. The spectra contained line radiation from Oxygen and Nitrogen atoms and molecular radiation from N2(+), N2, and NO. Abel inversion technique is used to obtain radial distribution of the spectra. The analysis yielded radial profiles of the electronic excitation, vibrational and rotational temperatures of the flow field. Spectral fitting yielded branching ratios for different vibrational and rotational bands. Relatively mild flow conditions, i.e. enthalpy and mass flow rate, were used for prolonged measurements of up to and over two hours to establish the best experimental methods of temperature determinations. Signal to noise was improved by at least an order of magnitude enabling the molecular vibrational band heads of N2(+) (first negative system), N2 (second positive system), and NO (beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon systems) to be resolved in the lower ultraviolet wavelength regions. The increased signal to noise ratio also enabled partial resolution of the rotational lines of N2(+) and N2 in certain regions of minimal overlap. Comparison of the spectra with theoretical models such as the NEQAIR2 code are presented and show potential for fitting the spectra when reliable calibration is performed for the complete wavelength range.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Flow Evolution in a Helium Jet Injected into Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satti, Rajani P.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    A computational model to study the stability characteristics of an evolving buoyant helium gas jet in ambient air environment is presented. Numerical formulation incorporates a segregated approach to solve for the transport equations of helium mass fraction coupled with the conservation equations of mixture mass and momentum using a staggered grid method. The operating parameters correspond to the Reynolds number varying from 30 to 300 to demarcate the flow dynamics in oscillating and non-oscillating regimes. Computed velocity and concentration fields were used to analyze the flow structure in the evolving jet. For Re=300 case, results showed that an instability mode that sets in during the evolution process in Earth gravity is absent in zero gravity, signifying the importance of buoyancy. Though buoyancy initiates the instability, below a certain jet exit velocity, diffusion dominates the entrainment process to make the jet non-oscillatory as observed for the Re=30 case. Initiation of the instability was found to be dependent on the interaction of buoyancy and momentum forces along the jet shear layer.

  17. Degradation in the fatigue resistance of dentin by bur and abrasive air-jet preparations.

    PubMed

    Majd, H; Viray, J; Porter, J A; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to distinguish whether the instruments commonly used for cutting dentin cause degradation in strength or fatigue behavior. Beams of coronal dentin were obtained from unrestored 3(rd) molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. The surfaces of selected beams were treated with a conventional straight-sided bur or with an abrasive air jet laden with glass particles. Under monotonic loading, there was no difference in the strength or Weibull parameters obtained for the control or treated beams. However, the fatigue strength of dentin receiving bur and air-jet treatments was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.0001) than that of the control. The bur treatment resulted in the largest overall degree of degradation, with nearly 40% reduction in the endurance limit and even more substantial decrease in the fatigue life. The methods currently used for cavity preparations substantially degrade the durability of dentin.

  18. Average heat-transfer characteristics of a row of circular air jets impinging on a concave surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the average heat-transfer characteristics of air jets impinging on the concave side of a right-circular semicylinder is reported. Results from existing correlating are compared with each other and with experimental heat-transfer data for a row of circular jets. Two correlations available in the literature are recommended for use in designing cooled turbine vanes and blades.

  19. An Experimental Investigation of an Exhaust-gas-to-air Heat Exchanger for Use on Jet-stack-equipped Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Jackson R; Spies, Ray J , Jr

    1948-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the loss in exhaust-jet thrust and engine power resulting from the insertion of an exhaust-gas-to-air heat exchanger in a jet-type exhaust stack of an aircraft engine. The thermal performance of the heat exchanger was also determined.

  20. Conditioning the middle ear reflex at sensation levels below reflex threshold: air jet and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    McDaniel-Bacon, L; Fulton, R T; Laskowski, R P

    1980-01-01

    An ABAB functional analysis, conditioning and generalization, design was used in 3 experiments (2 were formal studies and 1 was empirical in nature) to investigate the conditionability of the middle ear reflex. The conditioned stimuli were subreflex threshold pure tones of various frequencies and intensities. The unconditioned stimulus (UCS) was an auricular air jet to the contralateral ear in the first experiment and cutaneous electrical stimulation to the ipsolateral, probe ear in the last 2 experiments. Reflexes were monitored by an otoadmittance meter, storage oscilloscope, and strip chart recorder. In the first experiment (air jet UCS), no subjects met the conditioning criterion within the maximum presentation of 400 paired trials, despite pilot evidence which indicated conditioning was feasible. In the second experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), 2 subjects met conditioning criterion; however, only one subject reconditioned and demonstrated partial generalization to other conditioned stimuli. In the third experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), one of 3 subjects who had previously been unconditionable with the air jet UCS met conditioning and reconditioning criterion and demonstrated partial generalization. Results indicate that the middle ear reflex can be conditioned to be elicited by subreflex threshold pure tones, however, results are limited.

  1. Air contaminant control investigation of a jet augmented local exhaust system

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, D.B.; Johnston, W.L.; Konzen, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of a jet augmented local exhaust system to control air contaminants was investigated in a scale model hood. Tracer gas concentrations were mapped on top of idealized airflow streamlines to illustrate the jet's interaction with air contaminants. A key findings was the possibility of contaminant loss from the hood if the jet flow was not recaptured completely. Airflow design parameters, which had been identified previously to affect the airflow pattern, were evaluation for their effect on air contaminant control. The results indicated that tracer gas recovery was affected by a single airflow design parameters. An inverse linear relationship between the design parameter and control levels indicated that the recovery rate was controllable in design and that 100% control was achievable at a low total airflow rate. Important potential design advantages include the ability to specify the contaminant control level prior to installation, system flexibility to change contaminant control levels by adjusting airflow design parameters, and lower installation and operation costs than a comparable local exhaust system. The next research step is to test a full-scale prototype system to evaluate its performance efficiency and economy under realistic operating conditions.

  2. Effects of water-contaminated air on blowoff limits of opposed jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Jentzen, Marilyn E.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Northam, G. Burton

    1988-01-01

    The effects of water-contaminated air on the extinction and flame restoration of the central portion of N2-diluted H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flames are investigated using a coaxial tubular opposed jet burner. The results show that the replacement of N2 contaminant in air by water on a mole for mole basis decreases the maximum sustainable H2 mass flow, just prior to extinction, of the flame. This result contrasts strongly with the analogous substitution of water for N2 in a relatively hot premixed H2-O2-N2 flame, which was shown by Koroll and Mulpuru (1986) to lead to a significant, kinetically controlled increase in laminar burning velocity.

  3. Electron properties and air mixing in radio frequency driven argon plasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gessel, Bram van; Bruggeman, Peter; Brandenburg, Ronny

    2013-08-05

    A time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet operated with an Ar mixture is investigated by measuring the electron density and electron temperature using Thomson scattering. The measurements have been performed spatially resolved for two different electrode configurations and as a function of the plasma dissipated power and air concentration admixed to the Ar. Time resolved measurements of electron densities and temperatures during the RF cycle and after plasma power switch-off are presented. Furthermore, the influence of the plasma on the air entrainment into the effluent is studied using Raman scattering.

  4. Aerodynamic effect of combustor inlet-air pressure on fuel jet atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Mean drop diameters were measured with a recently developed scanning radiometer in a study of the atomization of liquid jets injected cross stream in high velocity and high pressure airflows. At constant inlet air pressure, reciprocal mean drop diameter, was correlated with airflow mass velocity. Over a combustor inlet-air pressure range of 1 to 21 atmospheres, the ratio of orifice to mean drop diameter, D(O)/D(M), was correlated with the product of Weber and Reynolds number, WeRe, and with the molecular scale momentum transfer ratio of gravitational to inertial forces.

  5. Aerodynamic effect of combustor inlet-air pressure on fuel jet atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Mean drop diameters were measured with a recently developed scanning radiometer in a study of the atomization of liquid jets injected cross stream in high velocity and high pressure airflows. At constant inlet air pressure, reciprocal mean drop diameter was correlated with airflow mass velocity. Over a combustor inlet-air pressure range of 1 to 21 atmospheres, the ratio of orifice to mean drop diameter, D(O)/D(M), was correlated with the product of Weber and Reynolds number, WeRe, and with the molecular scale momentum transfer ratio of gravitational to inertial forces. Previously announced in STAR as N84-22910

  6. Dynamical encoding of looming, receding, and focussing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longtin, Andre; Clarke, Stephen Elisha; Maler, Leonard; CenterNeural Dynamics Collaboration

    This talk will discuss a non-conventional neural coding task that may apply more broadly to many senses in higher vertebrates. We ask whether and how a non-visual sensory system can focus on an object. We present recent experimental and modeling work that shows how the early sensory circuitry of electric sense can perform such neuronal focusing that is manifested behaviorally. This sense is the main one used by weakly electric fish to navigate, locate prey and communicate in the murky waters of their natural habitat. We show that there is a distance at which the Fisher information of a neuron's response to a looming and receding object is maximized, and that this distance corresponds to a behaviorally relevant one chosen by these animals. Strikingly, this maximum occurs at a bifurcation between tonic firing and bursting. We further discuss how the invariance of this distance to signal attributes can arise, a process that first involves power-law spike frequency adaptation. The talk will also highlight the importance of expanding the classic dual neural encoding of contrast using ON and OFF cells in the context of looming and receding stimuli. The authors acknowledge support from CIHR and NSERC.

  7. Plain-jet airblast atomization of alternative liquid petroleum fuels under high ambient air pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasuja, A. K.

    1982-04-01

    The effects that air and fuel properties have upon the spray mean drop size characteristics of a plain-jet airblast atomizer of the type employed in the gas turbine engine are investigated. The tests used kerosene, gas oil and a high-viscosity blend of gas oil in residual fuel oil, and covered a wide range of ambient air pressures. Laser light-scattering technique was employed for drop size measurements. It is concluded that the atomizer's measured mean drop size characteristics are only slightly different from those of the pre-filming type, especially when operating on low-viscosity kerosene under higher ambient air pressure. The beneficial effect of increased levels of ambient air pressure on mean drop size is shown to be much reduced in the case of high-viscosity fuels, thus making the attainment of good atomization performance on such fuels difficult. An expression is derived for correlating the obtained mean drop size data.

  8. High-Speed Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry Analysis of Helium Jets Flowing into Air for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptuch, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    The flow phenomena of buoyant jets have been analyzed by many researchers in recent years. Few, however have studied jets in microgravity conditions, and the exact nature of the flow under these conditions has until recently been unknown. This study seeks to extend the work done by researchers at the university of Oklahoma in examining and documenting the behavior of helium jets in micro-gravity conditions. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry data have been obtained for helium jets discharging vertically into quiescent ambient air from tubes of several diameters at various flow rates using a high-speed digital camera. These data have obtained before, during and after the onset of microgravity conditions. High-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry has been developed for this study with the installation and use of a high-speed digital camera and modifications to the optical setup. Higher temporal resolution of the transitional phase between terrestrial and micro-gravity conditions has been obtained which has reduced the averaging effect of longer exposure times used in all previous schlieren studies. Results include color schlieren images, color time-space images (temporal evolution images), frequency analyses, contour plots of hue and contour plots of helium mole fraction. The results, which focus primarily on the periods before and during the onset of microgravity conditions, show that the pulsation of the jets normally found in terrestrial gravity ("earth"-gravity) conditions cease, and the gradients in helium diminish to produce a widening of the jet in micro-gravity conditions. In addition, the results show that the disturbance propagate upstream from a downstream source.

  9. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanguo; Li, Ying; Cao, Peng; Zhao, Hongjie

    2013-07-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet.

  10. Experimental Study and CFD modeling of high speed water jets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Anirban; Barron, R. M.; Balachandar, R.

    2007-11-01

    High speed turbulent water jets are extensively used in industrial cleaning applications. They interact vigorously with the surrounding air and loose mass in the form of water droplets which moves along with the entrained air stream. The transfer of momentum to the surroundings reduces the jet velocity and thus the pressure at the impinging surface is significantly lower than the supply pressure. Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) measurements of velocity field and pressure measurements at different axial and radial locations were performed. The potential core of the jet was found to extend to around 100 nozzle diameters. The dynamic pressure along the centerline was found to decay linearly, which can be used to estimate the decay of water volume fraction along the centerline. An empirical formulation of mass transfer (in the form of droplets) from water phase to the surroundings has been developed and incorporated into the commercial CFD code FLUENT. The flow was simulated using the RNG k-ɛ turbulence model and Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase model. The predicted pressure distribution at the impinging surface was found to match closely with the experimental findings.

  11. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Laminar-Jet Diffusion Flames in Coflowing Air. Appendix F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round luminous hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame shapes were measured from photographs of flames burning at low pressures in order to minimize the effects of buoyancy. Test conditions involved acetylene-, propylene. and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 19-50 kPa, jet-exit Reynolds numbers of 18-121, and initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0.22-32.45 to yield luminous flame lengths of 21-198 mm. The present flames were close to the laminar smoke point but were not soot emitting. Simple expressions to estimate the shapes of nonbuoyant laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflow were found by extending an earlier analysis of Mahalingam et al. These formulas provided a good correlation of present measurements except near the burner exit where self-similar approximations used in the simplified analysis are no longer appropriate.

  12. Re: Penetration Behavior of Opposed Rows of Staggered Secondary Air Jets Depending on Jet Penetration Coefficient and Momentum Flux Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain why the extension of the previously published C = (S/Ho)sqrt(J) scaling for opposed rows of staggered jets wasn't directly successful in the study by Choi et al. (2016). It is not surprising that staggered jets from opposite sides do not pass each other at the expected C value, because Ho/D and sqrt(J) are much larger than the maximum in previous studies. These, and large x/D's, tend to suggest development of 2-dimensional flow. Although there are distinct optima for opposed rows of in-line jets, single-side injection, and opposed rows of staggered jets based on C, opposed rows of staggered jets provide as good or better mixing performance, at any C value, than opposed rows of in-line jets or jets from single-side injection.

  13. Prediction of the blowout of jet diffusion flames in a coflowing stream of air

    SciTech Connect

    Karbasi, M.; Wierzba, I.

    1995-12-31

    The blowout limits of a lifted diffusion flame in a coflowing stream of air are estimated using a simple model for extinction, for a range of fuels, jet diameters and co-flowing stream velocities. The proposed model uses a parameter which relates to the ratio of a time associated with the mixing processes in a turbulent jet to a characteristic chemical time. The Kolmogorov microscale of time is used as time scale in this model. It is shown that turbulent diffusion flames are quenched by excessive turbulence for a critical value of this parameter. The predicted blowout velocity of diffusion flames obtained using this model is in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  14. Characteristics of Low Power CH4/Air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZHANG, Jun; XIAO, Dezhi; FANG, Shidong; SHU, Xingsheng; ZUO, Xiao; CHENG, Cheng; MENG, Yuedong; WANG, Shouguo

    2015-03-01

    A low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet driven by a 24 kHz AC power source and operated with a CH4/air gas mixture has been investigated by optical emission spectrometer. The plasma parameters including the electron excitation temperature, vibrational temperature and rotational temperature of the plasma jet at different discharge powers are diagnosed based on the assumption that the kinetic energy of the species obeys the Boltzmann distribution. The electron density at different power is also investigated by Hβ Stark broadening. The results show that the plasma source works under non-equilibrium conditions. It is also found that the vibrational temperature and rotational temperature increase with discharge power, whereas the electron excitation temperature seems to have a downward trend. The electron density increases from 0.8 × 1021 m-3 to 1.1 × 1021 m-3 when the discharge power increases from 53 W to 94 W.

  15. Experimental study of near-field air entrainment by subsonic volcanic jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The flow structure in the developing region of a turbulent jet has been examined using particle image velocimetry methods, considering the flow at steady state conditions. The velocity fields were integrated to determine the ratio of the entrained air speed to the jet speed, which was approximately 0.03 for a range of Mach numbers up to 0.89 and. Reynolds numbers up to 217,000. This range of experimental Mach and Reynolds numbers is higher than previously considered for high-accuracy entrainment measures, particularly in the near-vent region. The entrainment values are below those commonly used for geophysical analyses of volcanic plumes, suggesting that existing 1-D models are likely to understate the tendency for column collapse. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Monitoring space shuttle air quality using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Margaret Amy; Zhou, Hanying; Buehler, Martin G; Manatt, Kenneth S; Mowrey, Victoria S; Jackson, Shannon P; Kisor, Adam K; Shevade, Abhijit V; Homer, Margie L

    2004-06-01

    A miniature electronic nose (ENose) has been designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, and was designed to detect, identify, and quantify ten common contaminants and relative humidity changes. The sensing array includes 32 sensing films made from polymer carbon-black composites. Event identification and quantification were done using the Levenberg-Marquart nonlinear least squares method. After successful ground training, this ENose was used in a demonstration experiment aboard STS-95 (October-November, 1998), in which the ENose was operated continuously for six days and recorded the sensors' response to the air in the mid-deck. Air samples were collected daily and analyzed independently after the flight. Changes in shuttle-cabin humidity were detected and quantified by the JPL ENose; neither the ENose nor the air samples detected any of the contaminants on the target list. The device is microgravity insensitive.

  17. Monitoring space shuttle air quality using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory electronic nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Margaret Amy; Zhou, Hanying; Buehler, Martin G.; Manatt, Kenneth S.; Mowrey, Victoria S.; Jackson, Shannon P.; Kisor, Adam K.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Homer, Margie L.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature electronic nose (ENose) has been designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, and was designed to detect, identify, and quantify ten common contaminants and relative humidity changes. The sensing array includes 32 sensing films made from polymer carbon-black composites. Event identification and quantification were done using the Levenberg-Marquart nonlinear least squares method. After successful ground training, this ENose was used in a demonstration experiment aboard STS-95 (October-November, 1998), in which the ENose was operated continuously for six days and recorded the sensors' response to the air in the mid-deck. Air samples were collected daily and analyzed independently after the flight. Changes in shuttle-cabin humidity were detected and quantified by the JPL ENose; neither the ENose nor the air samples detected any of the contaminants on the target list. The device is microgravity insensitive.

  18. An investigation of air solubility in Jet A fuel at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Problems concerned with the supercritical injection concept are discussed. Supercritical injection involves dissolving air into a fuel prior to injection. A similar effect is obtained by preheating the fuel so that a portion of the fuel flashes when its pressure is reduced. Flashing improves atomization properties and the presence of air in the primary zone of a spray flame reduces the formation of pollutants. The investigation is divided into three phases: (1) measure the solubility and density properties of fuel/gas mixtures, including Jet A/air, at pressures and correlate these results using theory; (2) investigate the atomization properties of flashing liquids, including fuel/dissolved gas systems. Determine and correlate the effect of inlet properties and injector geometry on mass flow rates, Sauter mean diameter and spray angles; (3) examine the combustion properties of flashing injection in an open burner flame, considering flame shape and soot production.

  19. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.

    1999-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of round luminous nonbuoyant soot-containing hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames at microgravity were found from color video images obtained on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Test conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, ambient pressures of 35-130 kPa, initial jet diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, and jet exit Reynolds numbers of 45-170. Present test times were 100-200 s and yielded steady axisymmetric flames that were close to the laminar smoke point (including flames both emitting and not emitting soot) with luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The present soot-containing flames had larger luminous flame lengths than earlier ground-based observations having similar burner configurations: 40% larger than the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing low gravity flames observed using an aircraft (KC-135) facility due to reduced effects of accelerative disturbances and unsteadiness; roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing normal gravity flames due to the absence of effects of buoyant mixing and roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-free low gravity flames observed using drop tower facilities due to the presence of soot luminosity and possible reduced effects of unsteadiness. Simplified expressions to estimate the luminous flame boundaries of round nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames were obtained from the classical analysis of Spalding (1979); this approach provided Successful Correlations of flame shapes for both soot-free and soot-containing flames, except when the soot-containing flames were in the opened-tip configuration that is reached at fuel flow rates near and greater than the laminar smoke point fuel flow rate.

  20. Personal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel vapors and exhaust at air force bases.

    PubMed

    Pleil, J D; Smith, L B; Zelnick, S D

    2000-03-01

    JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and ground crew personnel during preflight operations and for maintenance personnel performing routine tasks. Personal exposure at an Air Force base occurs through occupational exposure for personnel involved with fuel and aircraft handling and/or through incidental exposure, primarily through inhalation of ambient fuel vapors. Because JP-8 is less volatile than its predecessor fuel (JP-4), contact with liquid fuel on skin and clothing may result in prolonged exposure. The slowly evaporating JP-8 fuel tends to linger on exposed personnel during their interaction with their previously unexposed colleagues. To begin to assess the relative exposures, we made ambient air measurements and used recently developed methods for collecting exhaled breath in special containers. We then analyzed for certain volatile marker compounds for JP-8, as well as for some aromatic hydrocarbons (especially benzene) that are related to long-term health risks. Ambient samples were collected by using compact, battery-operated, personal whole-air samplers that have recently been developed as commercial products; breath samples were collected using our single-breath canister method that uses 1-L canisters fitted with valves and small disposable breathing tubes. We collected breath samples from various groups of Air Force personnel and found a demonstrable JP-8 exposure for all subjects, ranging from slight elevations as compared to a control cohort to > 100 [mutilpe] the control values. This work suggests that further studies should be performed on specific issues to obtain pertinent exposure data. The data can be applied to assessments of health outcomes and to recommendations for changes in the use of personal protective

  1. Numerical modeling and simulation of hot air jet anti-icing system employing channels for enhanced heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kamran Zaki

    Aircraft icing is a serious concern for the aviation community since it is one of the major causes of fatal aircraft accidents. Aircrafts use different anti-icing systems and one such system is the hot-air anti-icing system, which utilizes hot-air from the engine compressor bleed to heat critical aircraft surfaces and prevent ice formation. Numerous experimental and numerical studies have been performed to increase the efficiency of the hot-air jet based anti-icing systems. Most of the investigations have focused on either orifice design or the impingement region of target surface geometry. Since the impingement surface heat transfer drops off sharply past the stagnation region, investigators have studied the use of multiple jets to enhance surface heat transfer over a larger area. However, use of multiple jets is a further strain on engine resources. One way to conserve engine resources is to use single jet in conjunction with various geometric and physical mechanisms to enhance heat transfer. The current study focuses on enhancing heat transfer using a single jet and a channel. The study investigates the effect of channel's height, inlet location and Reynolds number on heat transfer characteristics in terms of average Nusselt number distribution along the impingement surface. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to simulate the different cases. Results indicate that the heat transfer depends strongly on height and width of channel, jet-to-target spacing, inlet angle and jet Reynolds number.

  2. The sound of oscillating air jets: Physics, modeling and simulation in flute-like instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Cuadra, Patricio

    Flute-like instruments share a common mechanism that consists of blowing across one open end of a resonator to produce an air jet that is directed towards a sharp edge. Analysis of its operation involves various research fields including fluid dynamics, aero-acoustics, and physics. An effort has been made in this study to extend this description from instruments with fixed geometry like recorders and organ pipes to flutes played by the lips. An analysis of the jet's response to a periodic excitation is the focus of this study, as are the parameters under the player's control in forming the jet. The jet is excited with a controlled excitation consisting of two loudspeakers in opposite phase. A Schlieren system is used to visualize the jet, and image detection algorithms are developed to extract quantitative information from the images. In order to study the behavior of jets observed in different flute-like instruments, several geometries of the excitation and jet shapes are studied. The obtained data is used to propose analytical models that correctly fit the observed measurements and can be used for simulations. The control exerted by the performer on the instrument is of crucial importance in the quality of the sound produced for a number of flute-like instruments. The case of the transverse flute is experimentally studied. An ensemble of control parameters are measured and visualized in order to describe some aspects of the subtle control attained by an experienced flautist. Contrasting data from a novice flautist are compared. As a result, typical values for several non-dimensional parameters that characterize the normal operation of the instrument have been measured, and data to feed simulations has been collected. The information obtained through experimentation is combined with research developed over the last decades to put together a time-domain simulation. The model proposed is one-dimensional and driven by a single physical input. All the variables in the

  3. The influence of intraocular pressure and air jet pressure on corneal contactless tonometry tests.

    PubMed

    Simonini, Irene; Pandolfi, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The air puff is a dynamic contactless tonometer test used in ophthalmology clinical practice to assess the biomechanical properties of the human cornea and the intraocular pressure due to the filling fluids of the eye. The test is controversial, since the dynamic response of the cornea is governed by the interaction of several factors which cannot be discerned within a single measurement. In this study we describe a numerical model of the air puff tests, and perform a parametric analysis on the major action parameters (jet pressure and intraocular pressure) to assess their relevance on the mechanical response of a patient-specific cornea. The particular cornea considered here has been treated with laser reprofiling to correct myopia, and the parametric study has been conducted on both the preoperative and postoperative geometries. The material properties of the cornea have been obtained by means of an identification procedure that compares the static biomechanical response of preoperative and postoperative corneas under the physiological IOP. The parametric study on the intraocular pressure suggests that the displacement of the cornea׳s apex can be a reliable indicator for tonometry, and the one on the air jet pressure predicts the outcomes of two or more distinct measurements on the same cornea, which can be used in inverse procedures to estimate the material properties of the tissue.

  4. Investigation of air solubility in jet A fuel at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupprecht, S. D.; Faeth, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    The solubility and density properties of saturated mixtures of fuels and gases were measured. The fuels consisted of Jet A and dodecane, the gases were air and nitrogen. The test range included pressures of 1.03 to 10.34 MPa and temperatures of 298 to 373 K. The results were correlated successfully, using the Soave equation of state. Over this test range, dissolved gas concentrations were roughly proportional to pressure and increased slightly with increasing temperature. Mixture density was relatively independent of dissolved gas concentration.

  5. The 90 deg Acoustic Spectrum of a High Speed Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.

    2004-01-01

    Tam and Auriault successfully predicted the acoustic spectrum at 90deg to the axis of a high speed air jet by using an acoustic equation derived from ad hoc kinetic theory-type arguments. The present paper shows that similar predictions can be obtained by using a rigorous acoustic analogy approach together with actual measurements of the relevant acoustic source correlations. This puts the result on a firmer basis and enables its extension to new situations and to the prediction of sound at other observation angles.

  6. Simulation of Synthetic Jets in Quiescent Air Using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli

    2006-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for the simulation of a synthetic jet created by a single diaphragm piezoelectric actuator in quiescent air. This configuration was designated as Case 1 for the CFDVAL2004 workshop held at Williamsburg, Virginia, in March 2004. Time-averaged and instantaneous data for this case were obtained at NASA Langley Research Center, using multiple measurement techniques. Computational results for this case using one-equation Spalart-Allmaras and two-equation Menter's turbulence models are presented along with the experimental data. The effect of grid refinement, preconditioning and time-step variation are also examined in this paper.

  7. Thermal performance analysis of optimized hexagonal finned heat sinks in impinging air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, Kenan; Yeşildal, Faruk; Karabey, Altuǧ; Yakut, Rıdvan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, thermal performance analysis of hexagonal finned heat sinks which optimized according to the experimental design and optimization method of Taguchi were investigated. Experiments of air jet impingement on heated hexagonal finned heat sinks were carried out adhering to the L18(21*36) orthogonal array test plan. Optimum geometries were determined and named OH-1, OH-2. Enhancement efficiency with the first law of thermodynamics was analyzed for optimized heat sinks with 100, 150, 200 mm heights of hexagonal fin. Nusselt correlations were found out and variations of enhancement efficiency with Reynolds number presented in η-Re graphics.

  8. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying; Bao, Wenting

    2013-09-01

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  9. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying

    2013-09-30

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  10. Two-dimensional numerical study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in air at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wen; Sang, Chaofeng; Wang, Dezhen; Liu, Fucheng

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, a computational study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in ambient air is presented. A two-dimensional fluid model is applied to investigate the physical processes of the two plasma jets interaction (PJI) driven by equal and unequal voltages, respectively. In all studied cases, the PJI results in a decrease of both plasma bullets propagation velocity. When the two plasma jets are driven by equal voltages, they never merge but rather approach each other around the middle of the gas gap at a minimum approach distance, and the minimal distance decreases with the increase of both the applied voltages and initial electron density, but increases with the increase of the relative permittivity. When the two plasma jets are driven by unequal voltages, we observe the two plasma jets will merge at the position away from the middle of the gas gap. The effect of applied voltage difference on the PJI is also studied.

  11. Low temperature, atmospheric pressure, direct current microplasma jet operated in air, nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Kolb, J. F.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Micro-plasma jets in atmospheric pressure molecular gases (nitrogen, oxygen, air) were generated by blowing these gases through direct current microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs). The tapered discharge channel, drilled through two 100 to 200 μm thick molybdenum electrodes separated by a 200 μm thick alumina layer, is 150 to 450 μm in diameter in the cathode and has an opening of 100 to 300 μm in diameter in the anode. Sustaining voltages are 400 to 600 V, the maximum current is 25 mA. The gas temperature of the microplasma inside the microhollow cathode varies between ~2000 K and ~1000 K depending on current, gas, and flow rate. Outside the discharge channel the temperature in the jet can be reduced by manipulating the discharge current and the gas flow to achieve values close to room temperature. This cold microplasma jet can be used for surface treatment of heat sensitive substances, and for sterilization of contaminated areas.

  12. Implementation of inherence calculus in the PowerLoom environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulski, Marcin F.; Mulawka, Jan J.; Nieznański, Edward

    The article describes an attempt to implement abstract and concrete inherence calculi in the PowerLoom technology. Issues in the field of artificial intelligence, ontology and philosophy have been addressed. The inherence calculus is a type of a formal logic system. The PowerLoom technology consists of a knowledge representation language and an inference engine. Six inherence calculi have been implemented and an appropriate testing environment has been developed. The inherence calculus has been also extended by categorical properties and a theoretical discussion of ontological Boolean algebra has been conducted. Carried out experiments showed properties of the inherence calculi and also verified capabilities of PowerLoom to construct such logic systems. It occurred that expert system operational mode of PowerLoom outperforms its abilities to work as a mathematical theorem prover.

  13. Seeing it coming: infants' brain responses to looming danger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Weel, F. R. (Ruud); van der Meer, Audrey L. H.

    2009-12-01

    A fundamental property of most animals is the ability to see whether an object is approaching on a direct collision course and, if so, when it will collide. Using high-density electroencephalography in 5- to 11-month-old infants and a looming stimulus approaching under three different accelerations, we investigated how the young human nervous system extracts and processes information for impending collision. Here, we show that infants’ looming related brain activity is characterised by theta oscillations. Source analyses reveal clear localised activity in the visual cortex. Analysing the temporal dynamics of the source waveform, we provide evidence that the temporal structure of different looming stimuli is sustained during processing in the more mature infant brain, providing infants with increasingly veridical time-to-collision information about looming danger as they grow older and become more mobile.

  14. Looming vulnerability to threat: a cognitive paradigm for anxiety.

    PubMed

    Riskind, J H

    1997-08-01

    The concept that perceived threat or danger is a cognitive antecedent of anxiety is central in clinical psychology, personality psychology, and social psychology. The aim in the current article is to review this concept and present a new conception called the looming vulnerability model. Looming vulnerability is conceptualized as an important cognitive component of threat or danger that elicits anxiety, sensitizes the individual to signs of movement and threat, biases cognitive processing, and makes the anxiety more persistent and less likely to habituate. In addition, it is postulated as a principal theme that discriminates anxiety and focal fears from depression. The looming vulnerability model integrates a disparate collection of findings and integrates the conceptualization of anxiety and fear with ethological and developmental observations. The social-cognitive and evolutionary basis of the sense of looming vulnerability are discussed, as well as its roots in cognitive schemata (fear scripts), its state elicitation by several potential classes of antecedent conditions, and possible treatment implications.

  15. The suppression of opposed-jet methane-air flames by methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.; McMillion, L.G. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports on an opposed-jet diffusion flame burner that was used in conjunction with an emission infrared spectrometer to study the effects of the addition of methyl bromide on the combustion of methane with air. An optical system permitted incremental scanning of a laminar diffusion flame formed between two horizontally opposed burner tubes. The image of the flat flame was focused on an auxiliary slit of the spectrometer by optical mirrors and scanned by moving the slit passed the image. For a methane-air flame with an overall stoichiometric ratio, {phi}, of 0.86, the spectra for the 3700-2400 cm{sup {minus}1} region (H{sub 2}O, OH, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}, and HCHO bands) and 2400 to 2000 cm{sup {minus}1} (CO and CO{sub 2} bands) were compared with the spectra obtained when methyl bromide was added to the air-side of the burner. Supplementary measurements were made on methane-air and methane-oxygen-nitrogen flames with {phi} values in the range of 0.74 - 2.0. In some cases, the methane was diluted with nitrogen, and the methyl bromide was added to either the fuel or the air side of the burner.

  16. Generation of Air Microplasma Jet and Its Application to Local Etching of Polyimide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiki, Hiroyuki

    2006-06-01

    An air microplasma jet (air μ-PJ) was generated at the tip of a stainless steel surgical needle with outer diameters of 0.4-0.7 mm at air flow rates of 0.3-1.0 l/min and RF (13.56 MHz) powers of 4-14 W, in which the air μ-PJ was operated without generating arc discharge at atmospheric pressure. The needle acts as both a powered electrode and a narrow gas nozzle. The peak-to-peak voltages Vpp were 1.5-1.7 kV and the temperatures of the plasma-irradiated spot (φ<1 mm) were 70-160 °C. The air μ-PJ was applied to the local etching of polyimide films with a thickness of 0.025 mm. A polyimide etch rate of approximately 5 μm/s was attained using a 0.4-mm-φ needle electrode at a RF power of 8 W. The etching mechanism was not based on a thermal effect but on a chemical reaction of oxygen atoms. Furthermore, the local removal of a polyamide-imide insulator film coated on a copper winding wire (φ<0.25 mm) was demonstrated and a good selectivity of the insulator film to a copper wire was achieved at a RF power of 7 W and plasma irradiation times of 5-20 s.

  17. Evaluation of Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort From High Sidewall Supply Air Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ridouane, El Hassan

    2011-09-01

    Uniform mixing of conditioned air with room air is an essential factor for providing comfort in homes. The objective of the study outlined in this report is to resolve the issue that the flow rates that are required to meet the small remaining thermal loads are not large enough to maintain uniform mixing in the space.and maintain uniform temperatures within future homes. The results provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to maintain proper room mixing for heating and cooling of high performance homes.

  18. Localized etching of polymer films using an atmospheric pressure air microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Honglei; Liu, Jingquan; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    A direct-write process device based on the atmospheric pressure air microplasma jet (AμPJ) has been developed for the localized etching of polymer films. The plasma was generated by the air discharge ejected out through a tip-nozzle (inner diameter of 100 μm), forming the microplasma jet. The AμPJ was capable of reacting with the polymer surface since it contains a high concentration of oxygen reactive species and thus resulted in the selective removal of polymer films. The experimental results demonstrated that the AμPJ could fabricate different microstructures on a parylene-C film without using any masks or causing any heat damage. The etch rate of parylene-C reached 5.1 μm min-1 and microstructures of different depth and width could also be realized by controlling two process parameters, namely, the etching time and the distance between the nozzle and the substrate. In addition, combining XPS analysis and oxygen-induced chemical etching principles, the potential etching mechanism of parylene-C by the AμPJ was investigated. Aside from the etching of parylene-C, micro-holes on the photoresist and polyimide film were successfully created by the AμPJ. In summary, maskless pattern etching of polymer films could be achieved using this AμPJ.

  19. Emission spectroscopy of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated with air at low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, L.; Gallego, J. L.; Minotti, F.; Kelly, H.; Grondona, D.

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature, high-pressure plasma jets have an extensive use in plasma biology and plasma medicine, such as pathogen deactivation, wound disinfection, stopping of bleeding without damage of healthy tissue, acceleration of wound healing, control of bio-film proliferation, etc. In this work, a spectroscopic characterization of a typical plasma jet, operated in air at atmospheric pressure, is reported. Within the spectrum of wavelengths from 200 to 450 nm all remarkable emissions of N2 were monitored. Spectra of the N2 2nd positive system (C3Πu-B3Πg) emitted in air are the most convenient for plasma diagnostics, since they enable to determine electronic Te, rotational Tr and vibrational Tv temperatures by fitting the experimental spectra with the simulated ones. We used SPECAIR software for spectral simulation and obtained the best fit with all these temperatures about 3500K. The conclusion that all temperatures are equal, and its relatively high value, is consistent with the results of a previous work, where it was found that the experimentally determined electrical characteristic was consistent with the model of a thermal arc discharge, together with a highly collisional cathode sheet.

  20. Autonomous obstacle avoidance using visual fixation and looming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joarder, Kunal; Raviv, Daniel

    1992-11-01

    This paper describes a vision-based method for avoiding obstacles using the concepts of visual looming and fixating motion. Visual looming refers to the expansion of images of objects in the retina. Usually, this is due to the decreasing distance between the observer and the object. An increasing looming value signifies an increasing threat of collision with the object. The visual task of avoiding collision can be further simplified by purposive control of visual fixation at the objects in front of the moving camera. Using these two basic concepts real time obstacle avoidance in a tight perception-action loop is implemented. Three-dimensional space in front of the camera is divided into zones with various degrees of looming-based threat of collision. For each obstacle seen by a fixating camera, looming and its time derivative are calculated directly from the 2-D image. Depending on the threat posed by an obstacle, a course change is dictated. This looming based approach is simple, independent of the size of the 3-D object and its range and involves simple quantitative measurements. Results pertinent to a camera on a robot arm navigating between obstacles are presented.

  1. Evaluation of Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort From High Sidewall Supply Air Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ridouane, E. H.

    2011-09-01

    Uniform mixing of conditioned air with room air is an essential factor for providing comfort in homes. The higher the supply flow rates the easier to reach good mixing in the space. In high performance homes, however, the flow rates required to meet the small remaining thermal loads are not large enough to maintain uniform mixing in the space. The objective of this study is to resolve this issue and maintain uniform temperatures within future homes. We used computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the performance of high sidewall air supply for residential applications in heating and cooling modes. Parameters of the study are the supply velocity, supply temperature, diffuser dimensions, and room dimensions. Laboratory experiments supported the study of thermal mixing in heating mode; we used the results to develop a correlation to predict high sidewall diffuser performance. For cooling mode, numerical analysis is presented. The results provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to maintain proper room mixing for heating and cooling of high performance homes. It is proven that these systems can achieve good mixing and provide acceptable comfort levels. Recommendations are given on the operating conditions to guarantee occupant comfort.

  2. Personal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel vapors and exhaust at air force bases.

    PubMed Central

    Pleil, J D; Smith, L B; Zelnick, S D

    2000-01-01

    JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and ground crew personnel during preflight operations and for maintenance personnel performing routine tasks. Personal exposure at an Air Force base occurs through occupational exposure for personnel involved with fuel and aircraft handling and/or through incidental exposure, primarily through inhalation of ambient fuel vapors. Because JP-8 is less volatile than its predecessor fuel (JP-4), contact with liquid fuel on skin and clothing may result in prolonged exposure. The slowly evaporating JP-8 fuel tends to linger on exposed personnel during their interaction with their previously unexposed colleagues. To begin to assess the relative exposures, we made ambient air measurements and used recently developed methods for collecting exhaled breath in special containers. We then analyzed for certain volatile marker compounds for JP-8, as well as for some aromatic hydrocarbons (especially benzene) that are related to long-term health risks. Ambient samples were collected by using compact, battery-operated, personal whole-air samplers that have recently been developed as commercial products; breath samples were collected using our single-breath canister method that uses 1-L canisters fitted with valves and small disposable breathing tubes. We collected breath samples from various groups of Air Force personnel and found a demonstrable JP-8 exposure for all subjects, ranging from slight elevations as compared to a control cohort to > 100 [mutilpe] the control values. This work suggests that further studies should be performed on specific issues to obtain pertinent exposure data. The data can be applied to assessments of health outcomes and to recommendations for changes in the use of personal protective

  3. Numerical simulation of flow in a circular duct fitted with air-jet vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küpper, Christoph; Henry, Frank S.

    2002-04-01

    Most of the fundamental studies of the use of air-jet vortex generators (AJVGs) have concentrated on their potential ability to inhibit boundary layer separation on aerofoils. However, AJVGs may be of use in controlling or enhancing certain features of internal duct flows. For example, they may be of use in controlling the boundary layer at the entrance to engine air intakes, or as a means of increasing mixing and heat transfer. The objective of this paper is to analyse the flow field in the proximity of an air-jet vortex generator array in a duct by using two local numerical models, i.e. a simple flat plate model and a more geometrically faithful sector model. The sector model mirrors the circular nature of the duct's cross-section and the centre line conditions on the upper boundary. The flow was assumed fully turbulent and was solved using the finite volume, Navier-Stokes Code CFX 4 (CFDS, AEA Technology, Harwell) on a non-orthogonal, body-fitted, grid using the k- turbulence model and standard wall functions. Streamwise, vertical and cross-stream velocity profiles, circulation and peak vorticity decay, peak vorticity paths in cross-stream and streamwise direction, cross-stream vorticity profiles and cross-stream wall shear stress distributions were predicted. Negligible difference in results was observed between the flat plate and the sector model, since the produced vortices were small relative to the duct diameter and close to the surface. The flow field was most enhanced, i.e. maximum thinning of the boundary layer, with a configuration of 30° pitch and 75° skew angle. No significant difference in results could be observed between co- and counter-rotating vortex arrays. Copyright

  4. Opposed Jet Burner Extinction Limits: Simple Mixed Hydrocarbon Scramjet Fuels vs Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2007-01-01

    Opposed Jet Burner tools have been used extensively by the authors to measure Flame Strength (FS) of laminar non-premixed H2 air and simple hydrocarbon (HC) air counterflow diffusion flames at 1-atm. FS represents a strain-induced extinction limit based on air jet velocity. This paper follows AIAA-2006-5223, and provides new HC air FSs for global testing of chemical kinetics, and for characterizing idealized flameholding potentials during early scramjet-like combustion. Previous FS data included six HCs, pure and N2-diluted; and three HC-diluted H2 fuels, where FS decayed very nonlinearly as HC was added to H2, due to H-atom scavenging. This study presents FSs on mixtures of (candidate surrogate) HCs, some with very high FS ethylene. Included are four binary gaseous systems at 300 K, and a hot ternary system at approx. 600 K. The binaries are methane + ethylene, ethane + ethylene, methane + ethane, and methane + propylene. The first three also form two ternary systems. The hot ternary includes both 10.8 and 21.3 mole % vaporized n-heptane and full ranges of methane + ethylene. Normalized FS data provide accurate means of (1) validating, globally, chemical kinetics for extinction of non-premixed flames, and (2) estimating (scaling by HC) the loss of incipient flameholding in scramjet combustors. The n-heptane is part of a proposed baseline simulant (10 mole % with 30% methane + 60% ethylene) that mimics the ignition of endothermically cracked JP-7 like kerosene fuel, as suggested by Colket and Spadaccini in 2001 in their shock tube Scramjet Fuels Autoignition Study. Presently, we use FS to gauge idealized flameholding, and define HC surrogates. First, FS was characterized for hot nheptane + methane + ethylene; then a hot 36 mole % methane + 64% ethylene surrogate was defined that mimics FS of the baseline simulant system. A similar hot ethane + ethylene surrogate can also be defined, but it has lower vapor pressure at 300 K, and thus exhibits reduced gaseous

  5. Opposed jet burner studies of effects of CO, CO2, and N2 air-contaminants on hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    The blowoff/restore characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures opposed to jets of air contaminated by N2, CO, and CO2 have been determined using a counterflow diffusion flame formed by a tubular opposed jet burner. Both blowoff and restore limits are found to be sensitive to fuel and air composition. Empirically derived variations in the limits of the average mass flux of incoming H2 with percent contaminant, at fixed incoming fuel and H2/O2 inputs, are used to quantify the effects of oxygen dilution, flame augmentation, and flame retardation by N2, CO, and CO2 contaminants. The implications of the results are discussed.

  6. Piloted methane/air jet flames: Transport effects and aspects of scalar structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.S.; Frank, J.H.; Karpetis, A.N.; Chen, J.-Y.

    2005-12-01

    Previously unpublished results from multiscalar point measurements in the series of piloted CH{sub 4}/air jet flames [R.S. Barlow, J.H. Frank, Proc. Combust. Inst. 27 (1998) 1087-1095] are presented and analyzed. The emphasis is on features of the data that reveal the relative importance of molecular diffusion and turbulent transport in these flames. The complete series A-F is considered. This includes laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames spanning a range in Reynolds number from 1100 to 44,800. Results on conditional means of species mass fractions, the differential diffusion parameter, and the state of the water-gas shift reaction all show that there is an evolution in these flames from a scalar structure dominated by molecular diffusion to one dominated by turbulent transport. Long records of 6000 single-point samples at each of several selected locations in flame D are used to quantify the cross-stream (radial) dependence of conditional statistics of measured scalars. The cross-stream dependence of the conditional scalar dissipation is determined from 6000-shot, line-imaging measurements at selected locations. The cross-stream dependence of reactive scalars, which is most significant in the near field of the jet flame, is attributed to radial differences in both convective and local time scales of the flow. Results illustrate some potential limitations of common modeling assumptions when applied to laboratory-scale flames and, thus, provide a more complete context for interpretation of comparisons between experiments and model calculations.

  7. Piloted methane/air jet flames : transport effects and aspects of scalar structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Karpetis, Adionos N.; Chen, J. Y.; Barlow, Robert S.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2005-02-01

    Previously unpublished results from multiscalar point measurements in the series of piloted CH{sub 4}/air jet flames [R.S. Barlow, J.H. Frank, Proc. Combust. Inst. 27 (1998) 1087-1095] are presented and analyzed. The emphasis is on features of the data that reveal the relative importance of molecular diffusion and turbulent transport in these flames. The complete series A-F is considered. This includes laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames spanning a range in Reynolds number from 1100 to 44,800. Results on conditional means of species mass fractions, the differential diffusion parameter, and the state of the water-gas shift reaction all show that there is an evolution in these flames from a scalar structure dominated by molecular diffusion to one dominated by turbulent transport. Long records of 6000 single-point samples at each of several selected locations in flame D are used to quantify the cross-stream (radial) dependence of conditional statistics of measured scalars. The cross-stream dependence of the conditional scalar dissipation is determined from 6000-shot, line-imaging measurements at selected locations. The cross-stream dependence of reactive scalars, which is most significant in the near field of the jet flame, is attributed to radial differences in both convective and local time scales of the flow. Results illustrate some potential limitations of common modeling assumptions when applied to laboratory-scale flames and, thus, provide a more complete context for interpretation of comparisons between experiments and model calculations.

  8. Open-air direct current plasma jet: Scaling up, uniformity, and cellular control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Lu, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets are commonly used in many fields from medicine to nanotechnology, yet the issue of scaling the discharges up to larger areas without compromising the plasma uniformity remains a major challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate a homogenous cold air plasma glow with a large cross-section generated by a direct current power supply. There is no risk of glow-to-arc transitions, and the plasma glow appears uniform regardless of the gap between the nozzle and the surface being processed. Detailed studies show that both the position of the quartz tube and the gas flow rate can be used to control the plasma properties. Further investigation indicates that the residual charges trapped on the inner surface of the quartz tube may be responsible for the generation of the air plasma plume with a large cross-section. The spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy reveals that the air plasma plume is uniform as it propagates out of the nozzle. The remarkable improvement of the plasma uniformity is used to improve the bio-compatibility of a glass coverslip over a reasonably large area. This improvement is demonstrated by a much more uniform and effective attachment and proliferation of human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells on the plasma-treated surface.

  9. Open-air direct current plasma jet: Scaling up, uniformity, and cellular control

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Lu, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2012-10-15

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets are commonly used in many fields from medicine to nanotechnology, yet the issue of scaling the discharges up to larger areas without compromising the plasma uniformity remains a major challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate a homogenous cold air plasma glow with a large cross-section generated by a direct current power supply. There is no risk of glow-to-arc transitions, and the plasma glow appears uniform regardless of the gap between the nozzle and the surface being processed. Detailed studies show that both the position of the quartz tube and the gas flow rate can be used to control the plasma properties. Further investigation indicates that the residual charges trapped on the inner surface of the quartz tube may be responsible for the generation of the air plasma plume with a large cross-section. The spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy reveals that the air plasma plume is uniform as it propagates out of the nozzle. The remarkable improvement of the plasma uniformity is used to improve the bio-compatibility of a glass coverslip over a reasonably large area. This improvement is demonstrated by a much more uniform and effective attachment and proliferation of human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells on the plasma-treated surface.

  10. Analysis of opposed-jet hydrogen-air counter flow diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. H.; Isaac, K. M.; Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    An opposed-jet counterflow diffusion-flame configuration is considered for the analysis of a nitrogen-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flame. A boundary-layer similarity solution is employed in order to reduce the governing equations to a set of equations in one independent variable. The equation set is written in the time-dependent form and solved by the finite-volume time-marching technique. This model uses detailed chemistry and accounts for the variations of Prandtl number and Lewis number as well as the effect of thermal diffusion on the flame. It is noted that a one-step model can predict several features of the flame, while the detailed-chemistry model can be used for fine-tuning the results. The present results indicate that thermal diffusion has negligible effect on the characteristics of the flame.

  11. Venturi air-jet vacuum ejectors for high-volume atmospheric sampling on aircraft platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gerald F.; Sachse, Glen W.; Young, Douglas C.; Wade, Larry O.; Burney, Lewis G.

    1992-01-01

    Documentation of the installation and use of venturi air-jet vacuum ejectors for high-volume atmospheric sampling on aircraft platforms is presented. Information on the types of venturis that are useful for meeting the pumping requirements of atmospheric-sampling experiments is also presented. A description of the configuration and installation of the venturi system vacuum line is included with details on the modifications that were made to adapt a venturi to the NASA Electra aircraft at GSFC, Wallops Flight Facility. Flight test results are given for several venturis with emphasis on applications to the Differential Absorption Carbon Monoxide Measurement (DACOM) system at LaRC. This is a source document for atmospheric scientists interested in using the venturi systems installed on the NASA Electra or adapting the technology to other aircraft.

  12. Simulation of Synthetic Jets in Quiescent Air Using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli L.

    2004-01-01

    We report research experience in applying an Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for the prediction of time-dependent flows in the presence of an active flow control device. The configuration under consideration is a synthetic jet created by a single diaphragm piezoelectric actuator in quiescent air. Time-averaged and instantaneous data for this case were obtained at Langley Research Center, using multiple measurement techniques. Computational results for this case using one-equation Spalart-Allmaras and two-equation Menter s turbulence models are presented here along with comparisons with the experimental data. The effect of grid refinement, preconditioning and time-step variation are also examined.

  13. A brush-shaped air plasma jet operated in glow discharge mode at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Jia, Pengying; Di, Cong

    2014-07-01

    Using ambient air as working gas, a direct-current plasma jet is developed to generate a brush-shaped plasma plume with fairly large volume. Although a direct-current power supply is used, the discharge shows a pulsed characteristic. Based on the voltage-current curve and fast photography, the brush-shaped plume, like the gliding arc plasma, is in fact a temporal superposition of a moving discharge filament in an arched shape. During it moves away from the nozzle, the discharge evolves from a low-current arc into a normal glow in one discharge cycle. The emission profile is explained qualitatively based on the dynamics of the plasma brush.

  14. Impact prediction by looming visual stimuli enhances tactile detection.

    PubMed

    Cléry, Justine; Guipponi, Olivier; Odouard, Soline; Wardak, Claire; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2015-03-11

    From an ecological point of view, approaching objects are potentially more harmful than receding objects. A predator, a dominant conspecific, or a mere branch coming up at high speed can all be dangerous if one does not detect them and produce the appropriate escape behavior fast enough. And indeed, looming stimuli trigger stereotyped defensive responses in both monkeys and human infants. However, while the heteromodal somatosensory consequences of visual looming stimuli can be fully predicted by their spatiotemporal dynamics, few studies if any have explored whether visual stimuli looming toward the face predictively enhance heteromodal tactile sensitivity around the expected time of impact and at its expected location on the body. In the present study, we report that, in addition to triggering a defensive motor repertoire, looming stimuli toward the face provide the nervous system with predictive cues that enhance tactile sensitivity on the face. Specifically, we describe an enhancement of tactile processes at the expected time and location of impact of the stimulus on the face. We additionally show that a looming stimulus that brushes past the face also enhances tactile sensitivity on the nearby cheek, suggesting that the space close to the face is incorporated into the subjects' body schema. We propose that this cross-modal predictive facilitation involves multisensory convergence areas subserving the representation of a peripersonal space and a safety boundary of self.

  15. Unsteady Extinction of Opposed Jet Ethylene/Methane HIFiRE Surrogate Fuel Mixtures vs Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaden, Sarah N.; Debes, Rachel L.; Lash, E. Lara; Burk, Rachel S.; Boyd, C. Merritt; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Pellett, Gerald L.

    2009-01-01

    A unique idealized study of the subject fuel vs. air systems was conducted using an Oscillatory-input Opposed Jet Burner (OOJB) system and a newly refined analysis. Extensive dynamic-extinction measurements were obtained on unanchored (free-floating) laminar Counter Flow Diffusion Flames (CFDFs) at 1-atm, stabilized by steady input velocities (e.g., U(sub air)) and perturbed by superimposed in-phase sinusoidal velocity inputs at fuel and air nozzle exits. Ethylene (C2H4) and methane (CH4), and intermediate 64/36 and 15/85 molar percent mixtures were studied. The latter gaseous surrogates were chosen earlier to mimic ignition and respective steady Flame Strengths (FS = U(sub air)) of vaporized and cracked, and un-cracked, JP-7 "like" kerosene for a Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) scramjet. For steady idealized flameholding, the 100% C2H4 flame is respectively approx. 1.3 and approx.2.7 times stronger than a 64/36 mix and CH4; but is still 12.0 times weaker than a 100% H2-air flame. Limited Hot-Wire (HW) measurements of velocity oscillations at convergent-nozzle exits, and more extensive Probe Microphone (PM) measurements of acoustic pressures, were used to normalize Dynamic FSs, which decayed linearly with pk/pk U(sub air) (velocity magnitude, HW), and also pk/pk P (pressure magnitude, PM). Thus Dynamic Flame Weakening (DFW) is defined as % decrease in FS per Pascal of pk/pk P oscillation, namely, DFW = -100 d(U(sub air)/U(sub air),0Hz)/d(pkpk P). Key findings are: (1) Ethylene flames are uniquely strong and resilient to extinction by oscillating inflows below 150 Hz; (2) Methane flames are uniquely weak; (3) Ethylene / methane surrogate flames are disproportionately strong with respect to ethylene content; and (4) Flame weakening is consistent with limited published results on forced unsteady CFDFs. Thus from 0 to approx. 10 Hz and slightly higher, lagging diffusive responses of key species led to progressive phase lags (relative

  16. Atomization and Dispersion of a Liquid Jet Injected Into a Crossflow of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seay, J. E.; Samuelson, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, environmental regulations have become more stringent, requiring lower emissions of mainly nitrogen oxides (NOx), as well as carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC). These regulations have forced the gas turbine industry to examine non-conventional combustion strategies, such as the lean burn approach. The reasoning behind operating under lean conditions is to maintain the temperature of combustion near and below temperatures required for the formation of thermal nitric oxide (NO). To be successful, however, the lean processes require careful preparation of the fuel/air mixture to preclude formation of either locally rich reaction zones, which may give rise to NO formation, or locally lean reaction zones, which may give rise to inefficient fuel processing. As a result fuel preparation is crucial to the development and success of new aeroengine combustor technologies. A key element of the fuel preparation process is the fuel nozzle. As nozzle technologies have developed, airblast atomization has been adopted for both industrial and aircraft gas turbine applications. However, the majority of the work to date has focused on prefilming nozzles, which despite their complexity and high cost have become an industry standard for conventional combustion strategies. It is likely that the new strategies required to meet future emissions goals will utilize novel fuel injector approaches, such as radial injection. This thesis proposes and demonstrates an experiment to examine, on a mechanistic level (i.e., the physics of the action), the processes associated with the atomization, evaporation, and dispersion of a liquid jet introduced, from a radial, plain-jet airblast injector, into a crossflow of air. This understanding requires the knowledge not only of what factors influence atomization, but also the underlying mechanism associated with liquid breakup and dispersion. The experimental data acquired identify conditions and geometries for improved

  17. Short-latency cortical potentials evoked by tactile air-jet stimulation of body and face in man.

    PubMed

    Schieppati, M; Ducati, A

    1984-11-01

    Natural cutaneous stimulation was performed in 10 healthy volunteers by means of a brief, localized air jet directed to the glabrous skin of the face, finger or toe. Neurograms (from finger stimulation) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were recorded and, in the case of finger and toe stimulation, compared with the SEPs obtained by low intensity electrical stimulation. Comparing the latencies at wrist and elbow of the respective neurograms, it appears that a 2 msec period accounts for skin indentation and build-up of the generator potential in the receptors activated by the air jet. A slightly lower conduction velocity was obtained on natural than on electrical stimulation, and the cortical SEPs accordingly had a longer latency. In spite of the much smaller amplitude of the air-jet evoked neurograms, the amplitudes of the SEPs from finger and toe were similar to the amplitudes of the SEPs on electrical stimulation of the same regions. Natural stimulation in the regions innervated by the 3 branches of the trigeminal nerve (tongue included) yielded consistent SEPs, comparable with those reported in the literature to electrical stimulation. These potentials were distinguishable from the electrical activity due to the blink reflex, which invariably takes place on air-jet stimulation of the first trigeminal branch.

  18. Measurements of soot, OH, and PAH concentrations in turbulent ethylene/air jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Young; Turns, Stephen R.; Santoro, Robert J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents results from an investigation of soot formation in turbulent, non-premixed, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/air jet flames. Tests were conducted using a H{sub 2}-piloted burner with fuel issuing from a 2.18 mm i.d. tube into quiescent ambient air. A range of test conditions was studied using the initial jet velocity (16.2-94.1 m/s) as a parameter. Fuel-jet Reynolds numbers ranged from 4000 to 23,200. Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) was employed to determine soot volume fractions, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to measure relative hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations. Extensive information on the structure of the soot and OH fields was obtained from two-dimensional imaging experiments. Quantitative measurements were obtained by employing the LII and LIF techniques independently. Imaging results for soot, OH, and PAH show the existence of three soot formation/oxidation regions: a rapid soot growth region, in which OH and soot particles lie in distinctly different radial locations; a mixing-dominated region controlled by large-scale motion; and a soot-oxidation region in which the OH and soot fields overlap spatially, resulting in the rapid oxidation of soot particles. Detailed quantitative analyzes of soot volume fractions and OH and soot zone thicknesses were performed along with the temperature measurement using the N{sub 2}-CARS system. Measurements of OH and soot zone thicknesses show that the soot zone thickness increases linearly with axial distance in the soot formation region, whereas the OH zone thickness is nearly constant in this region. The OH zone thickness then rapidly increases with downstream distance and approximately doubles in the soot-oxidation region. Probability density functions also were obtained for soot volume fractions and OH concentrations. These probability density functions clearly define the spatial relationships among the OH, PAH concentrations, the

  19. Influence of air diffusion on the OH radicals and atomic O distribution in an atmospheric Ar (bio)plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A.; Li, L.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Vanraes, P.; Leys, C.

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of samples with plasmas in biomedical applications often occurs in ambient air. Admixing air into the discharge region may severely affect the formation and destruction of the generated oxidative species. Little is known about the effects of air diffusion on the spatial distribution of OH radicals and O atoms in the afterglow of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets. In our work, these effects are investigated by performing and comparing measurements in ambient air with measurements in a controlled argon atmosphere without the admixture of air, for an argon plasma jet. The spatial distribution of OH is detected by means of laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics (LIF), whereas two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) is used for the detection of atomic O. The spatially resolved OH LIF and O TALIF show that, due to the air admixture effects, the reactive species are only concentrated in the vicinity of the central streamline of the afterglow of the jet, with a characteristic discharge diameter of ˜1.5 mm. It is shown that air diffusion has a key role in the recombination loss mechanisms of OH radicals and atomic O especially in the far afterglow region, starting up to ˜4 mm from the nozzle outlet at a low water/oxygen concentration. Furthermore, air diffusion enhances OH and O production in the core of the plasma. The higher density of active species in the discharge in ambient air is likely due to a higher electron density and a more effective electron impact dissociation of H2O and O2 caused by the increasing electrical field, when the discharge is operated in ambient air.

  20. Selective central alpha-2 adrenoceptor control of regional haemodynamic responses to air jet stress in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Knardahl, S; Koepke, J P; Johnson, A K; DiBona, G F

    1989-03-01

    The role of central nervous system alpha 2-adrenoceptors in the regulation of peripheral sympathetic outflow to regional vascular resistance beds during environmental stress was examined in conscious chronically instrumented spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). SHR were instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes on the renal and mesenteric arteries and the lower abdominal aorta. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate and regional vascular resistance responses to air jet stress were determined before and after cumulative administration of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, guanabenz, into the lateral cerebral ventricle in doses of 5 and 25 micrograms. Compared with intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of isotonic saline vehicle which did not affect baseline systemic and regional haemodynamic measurements, guanabenz produced significant decreases in baseline MAP and heart rate but did not affect regional vascular resistances. During air jet stress, the characteristic pattern of the classic defense reaction with an increase in MAP, heart rate, renal and mesenteric vascular resistances and a decrease in hindquarters vascular resistance was observed and was not affected by i.c.v. administration of isotonic saline vehicle. Guanabenz did not affect the MAP, heart rate or renal vascular resistance responses to air jet stress. The air jet stress-induced increase in mesenteric vascular resistance was reduced by 25 micrograms guanabenz. The air jet stress-induced decrease in hindquarters vascular resistance was converted to an increase by 25 micrograms guanabenz. These results demonstrate that the regulation of environmental stress-stimulated sympathetic neural outflow to different vascular beds may be independently controlled by central nervous system alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

  1. Science should warn people of looming disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Contemporary Science is responsible for not coping with challenging changes of Exposures and their Vulnerability inflicted by growing population, its concentration, etc., which result in a steady increase of Losses from Natural Hazards. Scientists owe to Society for lack of special knowledge, education, and communication. In fact, it appears that a few seismic hazard assessment programs and/or methodologies were tested appropriately against real observations before being endorsed for estimation of earthquake related risks. The fatal evidence and aftermath of the past decades prove that many of the existing internationally accepted methodologies are grossly misleading and are evidently unacceptable for any kind of responsible risk evaluation and knowledgeable disaster prevention. In contrast, the confirmed reliability of pattern recognition aimed at earthquake prone areas and times of increased probability, along with realistic earthquake scaling and scenario modeling, allow us to conclude that Contemporary Science can do a better job in disclosing Natural Hazards, assessing Risks, and delivering this state-of-the-art knowledge of looming disaster in advance catastrophic events. In a lieu of seismic observations long enough for a reliable probabilistic assessment or a comprehensive physical theory of earthquake recurrence, pattern recognition applied to available geophysical and/or geological data sets remains a broad avenue to follow in seismic hazard forecast/prediction. Moreover, better understanding seismic process in terms of non-linear dynamics of a hierarchical system of blocks-and-faults and deterministic chaos, progress to new approaches in assessing time-dependent seismic hazard based on multiscale analysis of seismic activity and reproducible intermediate-term earthquake prediction technique. The algorithms, which make use of multidisciplinary data available and account for fractal nature of earthquake distributions in space and time, have confirmed their

  2. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250–1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  3. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250-1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  4. 10. View of Draper darby chain loom from warp beam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of Draper darby chain loom from warp beam end, patent date 1913, made by Drpaer Corporation, Hopedale, Massachusetts. Acquired ca. 1941. Note Draper-Northrop name on automatic spindle changer. - Riverdale Cotton Mill, Corner of Middle & Lower Streets, Valley, Chambers County, AL

  5. Haptic Distal Spatial Perception Mediated by Strings: Haptic "Looming"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabe, Patrick A.

    2011-01-01

    Five experiments tested a haptic analog of optical looming, demonstrating string-mediated haptic distal spatial perception. Horizontally collinear hooks supported a weighted string held taut by a blindfolded participant's finger midway between the hooks. At the finger, the angle between string segments increased as the finger approached…

  6. 10. Photocopy of Photograph, c. 1980. VIEW LOOMING EAST ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of Photograph, c. 1980. VIEW LOOMING EAST ALONG THE WATER-FILLED SAN FRANCISCO CANAL. Photographer: Mark Durben, July 1986 Source: Salt River Project Archives - San Francisco Canal, Between Fortieth & Weir & Thirty-sixth Street & Roeser Road, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. Effect of Gravity on the Near Field Flow Structure of Helium Jet in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Parthasarathy, Ramkumar; Griffin, DeVon

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have shown that a low-density jet injected into a high-density surrounding medium undergoes periodic oscillations in the near field. Although the flow oscillations in these jets at Richardson numbers about unity are attributed to the buoyancy, the direct physical evidence has not been acquired in the experiments. If the instability were indeed caused by buoyancy, the near-field flow structure would undergo drastic changes upon removal of gravity in the microgravity environment. The present study was conducted to investigate this effect by simulating microgravity environment in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The non-intrusive, rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique was used for quantitative measurements of helium concentrations in buoyant and non-buoyant jets. Results in a steady jet show that the radial growth of the jet shear layer in Earth gravity is hindered by the buoyant acceleration. The jet in microgravity was 30 to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The microgravity jet showed typical growth of a constant density jet shear layer. In case of a self-excited helium jet in Earth gravity, the flow oscillations continued as the jet flow adjusted to microgravity conditions in the drop tower. The flow oscillations were however not present at the end of the drop when steady microgravity conditions were reached.

  8. Effects of air transient spark discharge and helium plasma jet on water, bacteria, cells, and biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Karol; Kučerová, Katarína; Tarabová, Barbora; Janda, Mário; Machala, Zdenko; Sano, Kaori; Mihai, Cosmin Teodor; Ciorpac, Mitică; Gorgan, Lucian Dragos; Jijie, Roxana; Pohoata, Valentin; Topala, Ionut

    2015-06-06

    Atmospheric pressure DC-driven self-pulsing transient spark (TS) discharge operated in air and pulse-driven dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet (PJ) operated in helium in contact with water solutions were used for inducing chemical effects in water solutions, and the treatment of bacteria (Escherichia coli), mammalian cells (Vero line normal cells, HeLa line cancerous cells), deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA), and protein (bovine serum albumin). Two different methods of water solution supply were used in the TS: water electrode system and water spray system. The effects of both TS systems and the PJ were compared, as well as a direct exposure of the solution to the discharge with an indirect exposure to the discharge activated gas flow. The chemical analysis of water solutions was performed by using colorimetric methods of UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometry. The bactericidal effects of the discharges on bacteria were evaluated by standard microbiological plate count method. Viability, apoptosis and cell cycle were assessed in normal and cancerous cells. Viability of cells was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion test, apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide assay, and cell cycle progression by propidium iodide/RNase test. The effect of the discharges on deoxyribonucleic acid and protein were evaluated by fluorescence and UV absorption spectroscopy. The results of bacterial and mammalian cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle clearly show that cold plasma can inactivate bacteria and selectively target cancerous cells, which is very important for possible future development of new plasma therapeutic strategies in biomedicine. The authors found that all investigated bio-effects were stronger with the air TS discharge than with the He PJ, even in indirect exposure.

  9. A Portable, Air-Jet-Actuator-Based Device for System Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, Wayne; Belden, Jesse; Mazumdar, Anirban; Hunter, Ian

    2010-11-01

    System identification (ID) of human and robotic limbs could help in diagnosis of ailments and aid in optimization of control parameters and future redesigns. We present a self-contained actuator, which uses the Coanda effect to rapidly switch the direction of a high speed air jet to create a binary stochastic force input to a limb for system ID. The design of the actuator is approached with the goal of creating a portable device, which could deployed on robot or human limbs for in situ identification. The viability of the device is demonstrated by performing stochastic system ID on an underdamped elastic beam system with fixed inertia and stiffness, and variable damping. The non-parametric impulse response yielded from the stochastic system ID is modeled as a second order system, and the resultant parameters are found to be in excellent agreement with those found using more traditional system ID techniques. The current design could be further miniaturized and developed as a portable, wireless, on-site multi-axis system identification system for less intrusive and more widespread use.

  10. Effects of surface roughness on the average heat transfer of an impinging air jet

    SciTech Connect

    Beitelmal, A.H.; Saad, M.A.; Patel, C.D.

    2000-01-01

    Localized cooling by impinging flow has been used in many industrial applications such as in cooling of gas turbine blades and drying processes. Here, effect of surface roughness of a uniformly heated plate on the average heat transfer characteristics of an impinging air jet was experimentally investigated. Two aluminum plates, one with a flat surface and the second with some roughness added to the surface were fabricated. The roughness took the shape of a circular array of protrusions of 0.5mm base and 0.5mm height. A circular Kapton heater of the same diameter as the plates (70mm) supplied the necessary power. The surfaces of the plates were polished to reduce radiation heat losses and the back and sides insulated to reduce conduction heat losses. temperatures were measured over a Reynolds number ranging from 9,600 to 38,500 based on flow rate through a 6.85mm diameter nozzle. The temperature measurements were repeated for nozzle exit-to-plate spacing, z/d, ranging from 1 to 10. The average Nusselt number for both cases was plotted versus the Reynolds number and their functional correlation was determined. The results indicate an increase of up to 6.0% of the average Nusselt number due to surface roughness. This modest increase provides evidence to encourage further investigation and characterization of the surface roughness as a parameter for enhancing heat transfer.

  11. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230/s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit In the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experiments] conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous Annie lengths of 49-64 mm. Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging, soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, not structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer. The present flames were larger, and emitted soot men readily, than comparable observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  12. Analysis of opposed jet hydrogen-air counter flow diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. H.; Isaac, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational simulation of the opposed-jet diffusion flame is performed to study its structure and extinction limits. The present analysis concentrates on the nitrogen-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flame, which provides the basic information for many vehicle designs such as the aerospace plane for which hydrogen is a candidate as the fuel. The computer program uses the time-marching technique to solve the energy and species equations coupled with the momentum equation solved by the collocation method. The procedure is implemented in two stages. In the first stage, a one-step forward overal chemical reaction is chosen with the gas phase chemical reaction rate determined by comparison with experimental data. In the second stage, a complete chemical reaction mechanism is introduced with detailed thermodynamic and transport property calculations. Comparison between experimental extinction data and theoretical predictions is discussed. The effects of thermal diffusion as well as Lewis number and Prandtl number variations on the diffusion flame are also presented.

  13. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  14. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  15. Functionalization of graphene by atmospheric pressure plasma jet in air or H2O2 environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weixin; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-03-01

    The functionalization of graphene, which deforms its band structure, can result in a metal-semiconductor transition. In this work, we report a facile strategy to oxidize single-layer graphene using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) that generates a variety of reactive plasma species at close to ambient temperature. We systematically characterized the oxygen content and chemical structure of the graphene films after plasma treatment under different oxidative conditions (ambient air atmosphere or hydrogen peroxide solution) by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Plasma-treated graphene films containing more than 40% oxygen were obtained in both oxidative environments. Interestingly, prolonged irradiation led to the reduction of graphene oxides. N-doping of graphene also occurred during the APPJ treatment in H2O2 solution; the nitrogen content of the doped graphene was dependent on the duration of irradiation and reached up to 8.1% within 40 min. Moreover, the H2O2 solution served as a buffer layer that prevented damage to the graphene during plasma irradiation. Four-point probe measurement revealed an increase in sheet resistance of the plasma-treated graphene, indicating the transition of the material property from semi-metallic to semiconducting.

  16. Air jet erosion test on plasma sprayed surface by varying erodent impingement pressure and impingement angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Ajit; Behera, Asit; Mishra, S. C.; Pani, S.; Parida, P.

    2015-02-01

    Fly-ash premixed with quartz and illmenite powder in different weight proportions are thermal sprayed on mild steel and copper substrates at various input power levels of the plasma torch ranging from 11 kW to 21 kW DC. The erosion test has done using Air Jet erosion test Reg (As per ASTM G76) with silica erodent typically 150-250 pm in size. Multiple tests were performed at increasing the time duration from 60 sec to 180 sec with increasing pressure (from 1 bar to 2.5 bar) and angle (60° & 90°). This study reveals that the impact velocity and impact angle are two most significant parameters among various factors influencing the wear rate of these coatings. The mechanisms and microstructural changes that arise during erosion wear are studied by using SEM. It is found that, when erodent are impacting the fresh un-eroded surface, material removal occurs by the continuous evolution of craters on the surface. Upper layer splats are removed out after 60 sec and second layer splat erosion starts. Based on these observations Physical models are developed. Some graphs plotted between mass loss-rate versus time period/impact Pressure/impact Angle gives good correlation with surface features observed.

  17. Optimal Micro-Jet Flow Control for Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Miller, Daniel N.; Addington, Gregory A.; Agrell, Johan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-jet secondary flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to optimally design micro-jet secondary flow control arrays, and to establish that the aeromechanical effects of engine face distortion can also be included in the design and optimization process. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the design characteristics of "low mass" micro-jet array designs. The term "low mass" micro-jet may refers to fluidic jets with total (integrated) mass flow ratios between 0.10 and 1.0 percent of the engine face mass flow. Therefore, this report examines optimal micro-jet array designs for compact inlets through a Response Surface Methodology.

  18. Naturalistic stimulus structure determines the integration of audiovisual looming signals in binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Verena; Kleiner, Mario; Bartels, Andreas; Hartcher O'Brien, Jessica; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Noppeney, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Rapid integration of biologically relevant information is crucial for the survival of an organism. Most prominently, humans should be biased to attend and respond to looming stimuli that signal approaching danger (e.g. predator) and hence require rapid action. This psychophysics study used binocular rivalry to investigate the perceptual advantage of looming (relative to receding) visual signals (i.e. looming bias) and how this bias can be influenced by concurrent auditory looming/receding stimuli and the statistical structure of the auditory and visual signals. Subjects were dichoptically presented with looming/receding visual stimuli that were paired with looming or receding sounds. The visual signals conformed to two different statistical structures: (1) a 'simple' random-dot kinematogram showing a starfield and (2) a "naturalistic" visual Shepard stimulus. Likewise, the looming/receding sound was (1) a simple amplitude- and frequency-modulated (AM-FM) tone or (2) a complex Shepard tone. Our results show that the perceptual looming bias (i.e. the increase in dominance times for looming versus receding percepts) is amplified by looming sounds, yet reduced and even converted into a receding bias by receding sounds. Moreover, the influence of looming/receding sounds on the visual looming bias depends on the statistical structure of both the visual and auditory signals. It is enhanced when audiovisual signals are Shepard stimuli. In conclusion, visual perception prioritizes processing of biologically significant looming stimuli especially when paired with looming auditory signals. Critically, these audiovisual interactions are amplified for statistically complex signals that are more naturalistic and known to engage neural processing at multiple levels of the cortical hierarchy.

  19. Equilibrium chemical reaction of supersonic hydrogen-air jets (the ALMA computer program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elghobashi, S.

    1977-01-01

    The ALMA (axi-symmetrical lateral momentum analyzer) program is concerned with the computation of two dimensional coaxial jets with large lateral pressure gradients. The jets may be free or confined, laminar or turbulent, reacting or non-reacting. Reaction chemistry is equilibrium.

  20. Effects of CO addition on the characteristics of laminar premixed CH{sub 4}/air opposed-jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-Y.; Chao, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-P.; Ho, C.-T.; Cheng, T.S.

    2009-02-15

    The effects of CO addition on the characteristics of premixed CH{sub 4}/air opposed-jet flames are investigated experimentally and numerically. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations of the flame front position, temperature, and velocity are performed in stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air opposed-jet flames with various CO contents in the fuel. Thermocouple is used for the determination of flame temperature, velocity measurement is made using particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the flame front position is measured by direct photograph as well as with laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) of OH imaging techniques. The laminar burning velocity is calculated using the PREMIX code of Chemkin collection 3.5. The flame structures of the premixed stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air opposed-jet flames are simulated using the OPPDIF package with GRI-Mech 3.0 chemical kinetic mechanisms and detailed transport properties. The measured flame front position, temperature, and velocity of the stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air flames are closely predicted by the numerical calculations. Detailed analysis of the calculated chemical kinetic structures reveals that as the CO content in the fuel is increased from 0% to 80%, CO oxidation (R99) increases significantly and contributes to a significant level of heat-release rate. It is also shown that the laminar burning velocity reaches a maximum value (57.5 cm/s) at the condition of 80% of CO in the fuel. Based on the results of sensitivity analysis, the chemistry of CO consumption shifts to the dry oxidation kinetics when CO content is further increased over 80%. Comparison between the results of computed laminar burning velocity, flame temperature, CO consumption rate, and sensitivity analysis reveals that the effect of CO addition on the laminar burning velocity of the stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air flames is due mostly to the transition of the dominant chemical kinetic steps. (author)

  1. High Pressure Air Jet in the Endoscopic Preparation Room: Risk of Noise Exposure on Occupational Health

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lung-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    After high-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes, they are hung to dry in order to prevent residual water droplets impact on patient health. To allow for quick drying and clinical reuse, some endoscopic units use a high pressure air jet (HPAJ) to remove the water droplets on the endoscopes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the excessive noise exposure with the use of HPAJ in endoscopic preparation room and to investigate the risk to occupational health. Noise assessment was taken during 7 automatic endoscopic reprocessors (AERs) and combined with/without HPAJ use over an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). Analytical procedures of the NIOSH and the ISO for noise-induced hearing loss were estimated to develop analytic models. The peak of the noise spectrum of combined HPAJ and 7 AERs was significantly higher than that of the 7 AERs alone (108.3 ± 1.36 versus 69.3 ± 3.93 dBA, P < 0.0001). The risk of hearing loss (HL > 2.5 dB) was 2.15% at 90 dBA, 11.6% at 95 dBA, and 51.3% at 100 dBA. The odds ratio was 49.1 (95% CI: 11.9 to 203.6). The noise generated by the HPAJ to work over TWA seriously affected the occupational health and safety of those working in an endoscopic preparation room. PMID:25710009

  2. Interactions between Oceanic Saharan Air Layer and African Easterly Jet- African Easterly Waves System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols have robust influences on multi-scale climatic systems and variability. Non-linear aerosol-cloud-climate interactions depend on many parameters such as aerosol features, regional atmospheric dynamics and variability. Although there are remarkable modeling studies indicating that aerosols induce robust modifications in cloud properties, circulations and the hydrological cycle, many of the physical and dynamical processes involving in these complex interactions between aerosols and Earth's system are still poorly understood. Better understanding the contribution of aerosols with atmospheric phenomena and their transient changes are crucial for efforts to evaluate climate predictions by next generation climate models. This study provides strong evidence of mechanistic relationships between perturbations of the oceanic Saharan air layer (OSAL) and anomalies of atmospheric circulations over the eastern tropical Atlantic/Africa. These relationships are characterized using an ensemble of daily datasets including the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS), and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWIFS) for the boreal summer season. The study is motivated by previous results suggesting that oceanic dust-induced large-scale to meso-scale climatic adjustments. Our hypothesis is that perturbations in OSAL significantly interact with regional climate variability through African Easterly Jet- African Easterly Waves (AEJ-AEW) system. Passive/ active phases of AEWs in the northern and southern-track wave packets are associated with dipole patterns of thermal/dynamical anomalies correlated with perturbations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in OSAL. Enhanced (suppressed) dust AOD in OSAL are significantly correlated with convective re-circulation within subsidence region of Hadley cell as well as robust mid-level dipole vorticity disturbances downstream of the AEJ core

  3. Bag breakup of low viscosity drops in the presence of a continuous air jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, V. Sojka, P. E.

    2014-07-15

    This work examines the breakup of a single drop of various low viscosity fluids as it deforms in the presence of continuous horizontal air jet. Such a fragmentation typically occurs after the bulk liquid has disintegrated upon exiting the atomizer and is in the form of an ensemble of drops which undergo further breakup. The drop deformation and its eventual disintegration is important in evaluating the efficacy of a particular industrial process, be it combustion in automobile engines or pesticide spraying in agricultural applications. The interplay between competing influences of surface tension and aerodynamic disruptive forces is represented by the Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, and used to describe the breakup morphology. The breakup pattern considered in our study corresponds to that of a bag attached to a toroidal ring which occurs from ∼12 < We < ∼16. We aim to address several issues connected with this breakup process and their dependence on We and Oh which have been hitherto unexplored. The We boundary at which breakup begins is theoretically determined and the expression obtained, We=12(1+2/3Oh{sup 2}), is found to match well with experimental data ([L.-P. Hsiang and G. M. Faeth, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21(4), 545–560 (1995)] and [R. S. Brodkey, “Formation of drops and bubbles,” in The Phenomena of Fluid Motions (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1967)]). An exponential growth in the radial extent of the deformed drop and the streamline dimension of the bag is predicted by a theoretical model and confirmed by experimental findings. These quantities are observed to strongly depend on We. However, their dependence on Oh is weak.

  4. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  5. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    DOE PAGES

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore » the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  6. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall on the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.

  7. Further Experiments on the Flow and Heat Transfer in a Heated Turbulent Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Uberoi, Mahinder S

    1950-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the mean-total-head and mean-temperature fields in a round turbulent jet with various initial temperatures. The results show that the jet spreads more rapidly as its density becomes lower than that of the receiving medium, even when the difference is not sufficiently great to cause dynamic-pressure function. Rough analytical considerations have given the same relative spread. The effective "turbulent Prandtl number" for a section of the fully developed jet was found to be equal to the true (laminar) Prandtl number within the accuracy measurement.

  8. The flow field of an underexpanded H2 jet coaxially injected into a hot free or ducted supersonic jet of air or nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data obtained in an investigation of the mixing of an underexpanded hydrogen jet in a supersonic flow both with and without combustion are presented. Tests were conducted in a Mach 2 test stream with both air and nitrogen as test media. Total temperature of the test stream was 2170 K, and static exit pressure was about one atmosphere. The static pressure at the exit of the hydrogen injector's Mach 2 nozzle was about two atmospheres. Primary measurements included shadowgraphs and pitot pressure surveys of the flow field. Pitot surveys and wall static pressures were measured for the case where the entire flow was shrouded. The results are compared to similar experimental data and theoretical predictions for the matched pressure case.

  9. Modeling the receptivity of an air jet to transverse acoustic disturbance with application to musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Blanc, F; François, V; Fabre, B; de la Cuadra, P; Lagrée, P-Y

    2014-06-01

    A simple analytical model for the interaction between a plane jet issued from a flue and a transverse acoustic disturbance is developed in this paper. The model is inspired by direct flow simulation results confronted to experimental data. The interaction is expected to take place in the vicinity of the separation points of the jet. The influence of the detailed geometry of the channel end on the jet receptivity is discussed, and more specifically the chamfer geometries found in flute-like musical instruments. The simplified model explains quite well the difference between the jet response of a flue with square edges compared to a chamfered flue exit. The effect of rounded, lip-like flue exit is not well captured by the model.

  10. An experimental and numerical study into turbulent condensing steam jets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerlemans, S.; Badie, R.; Van Dongen, M. E. H.

    Temperatures, velocities, and droplet sizes are measured in turbulent condensing steam jets produced by a facial sauna, for varying nozzle diameters and varying initial velocities (Re=3,600-9,200). The release of latent heat due to droplet condensation causes the temperature in the two-phase jet to be significantly higher than in a single-phase jet. At some distance from the nozzle, droplets reach a maximum size and start to evaporate again, which results in a change in sign of latent heat release. The distance of maximum size is determined from droplet size measurements. The experimental results are compared with semi-analytical expressions and with a fully coupled numerical model of the turbulent condensing steam jet. The increase in centreline temperature due to droplet condensation is successfully predicted.

  11. Modeling the receptivity of an air jet to transverse acoustic disturbance with application to musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Blanc, F; François, V; Fabre, B; de la Cuadra, P; Lagrée, P-Y

    2014-06-01

    A simple analytical model for the interaction between a plane jet issued from a flue and a transverse acoustic disturbance is developed in this paper. The model is inspired by direct flow simulation results confronted to experimental data. The interaction is expected to take place in the vicinity of the separation points of the jet. The influence of the detailed geometry of the channel end on the jet receptivity is discussed, and more specifically the chamfer geometries found in flute-like musical instruments. The simplified model explains quite well the difference between the jet response of a flue with square edges compared to a chamfered flue exit. The effect of rounded, lip-like flue exit is not well captured by the model. PMID:24907787

  12. Two identified looming detectors in the locust: ubiquitous lateral connections among their inputs contribute to selective responses to looming objects

    PubMed Central

    Rind, F. Claire; Wernitznig, Stefan; Pölt, Peter; Zankel, Armin; Gütl, Daniel; Sztarker, Julieta; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    In locusts, two lobula giant movement detector neurons (LGMDs) act as looming object detectors. Their reproducible responses to looming and their ethological significance makes them models for single neuron computation. But there is no comprehensive picture of the neurons that connect directly to each LGMD. We used high-through-put serial block-face scanning-electron-microscopy to reconstruct the network of input-synapses onto the LGMDs over spatial scales ranging from single synapses and small circuits, up to dendritic branches and total excitatory input. Reconstructions reveal that many trans-medullary-afferents (TmAs) connect the eye with each LGMD, one TmA per facet per LGMD. But when a TmA synapses with an LGMD it also connects laterally with another TmA. These inter-TmA synapses are always reciprocal. Total excitatory input to the LGMD 1 and 2 comes from 131,000 and 186,000 synapses reaching densities of 3.1 and 2.6 synapses per μm2 respectively. We explored the computational consequences of reciprocal synapses between each TmA and 6 others from neighbouring columns. Since any lateral interactions between LGMD inputs have always been inhibitory we may assume these reciprocal lateral connections are most likely inhibitory. Such reciprocal inhibitory synapses increased the LGMD’s selectivity for looming over passing objects, particularly at the beginning of object approach. PMID:27774991

  13. Combustion of hydrogen-air jets in local chemical equilibrium: A guide to the CHARNAL computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, D. B.; Launder, B. E.; Morse, A. P.; Maples, G.

    1974-01-01

    A guide to a computer program, written in FORTRAN 4, for predicting the flow properties of turbulent mixing with combustion of a circular jet of hydrogen into a co-flowing stream of air is presented. The program, which is based upon the Imperial College group's PASSA series, solves differential equations for diffusion and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy and also of the R.M.S. fluctuation of hydrogen concentration. The effective turbulent viscosity for use in the shear stress equation is computed. Chemical equilibrium is assumed throughout the flow.

  14. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J.; Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic oxygen number density [O] is measured in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Gas flow is fixed at 8 slpm, the RF power coupled into the plasma jet varied between 5 W and 20 W, and the resulting changes in atomic oxygen density measured. Photolysis of molecular oxygen is employed to allow in situ calibration of the TALIF system. During calibration, O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting oxygen atoms are achieved within the same laser pulse. The atomic oxygen density produced by photolysis is time varying and spatially non-uniform which needs to be corrected for to calibrate the TALIF system for measurement of atomic oxygen density in plasma. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I 0(t), wavelength, and focal spot size allows correction factors to be determined using a rate equation model. Atomic oxygen is used for calibration and measurement, so the laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power dependence region without affecting the calibration reliability as the laser power dependence will still be the same for both. The atomic O density results obtained are not directly benchmarked against other known density measurement techniques. The results show that the plasma jet atomic oxygen content increases as the RF power coupled into the plasma increases.

  15. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimurthy, M.; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2016-06-01

    Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a normal slot air jet is experimental investigated. Present study focuses on the influence of jet-to-plate spacing (Z/D h ) (0.5-10) and Reynolds number (2500-20,000) on the fluid flow and heat transfer distribution. A single slot jet with an aspect ratio (l/b) of about 22 is chosen for the current study. Infrared Thermal Imaging technique is used to capture the temperature data on the target surface. Local heat transfer coefficients are estimated from the thermal images using `SMART VIEW' software. Wall static pressure measurement is carried out for the specified range of Re and Z/D h . Wall static pressure coefficients are seen to be independent of Re in the range between 5000 and 15,000 for a given Z/D h . Nu values are higher at the stagnation point for all Z/D h and Re investigated. For lower Z/D h and higher Re, secondary peaks are observed in the heat transfer distributions. This may be attributed to fluid translating from laminar to turbulent flow on the target plate. Heat transfer characteristics are explained based on the simplified flow assumptions and the pressure data obtained using Differential pressure transducer and static pressure probe. Semi-empirical correlation for the Nusselt number in the stagnation region is proposed.

  16. A study of reacting free and ducted hydrogen/air jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The mixing and reaction of a supersonic jet of hydrogen in coaxial free and ducted high temperature test gases were investigated. The importance of chemical kinetics on computed results, and the utilization of free-jet theoretical approaches to compute enclosed flow fields were studied. Measured pitot pressure profiles were correlated by use of a parabolic mixing analysis employing an eddy viscosity model. All computations, including free, ducted, reacting, and nonreacting cases, use the same value of the empirical constant in the viscosity model. Equilibrium and finite rate chemistry models were utilized. The finite rate assumption allowed prediction of observed ignition delay, but the equilibrium model gave the best correlations downstream from the ignition location. Ducted calculations were made with finite rate chemistry; correlations were, in general, as good as the free-jet results until problems with the boundary conditions were encountered.

  17. Nitric oxide formation in a lean, premixed-prevaporized jet A/air flame tube: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Bianco, Jean; Deur, John M.; Ghorashi, Bahman

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was performed on a lean, premixed-prevaporized Jet A/air flame tube. The NO(x) emissions were measured in a flame tube apparatus at inlet temperatures ranging from 755 to 866 K (900 to 1100 F), pressures from 10 to 15 atm, and equivalence ratios from 0.37 to 0.62. The data were then used in regressing an equation to predict the NO(x) production levels in combustors of similar design. Through an evaluation of parameters it was found that NO(x) is dependent on adiabatic flame temperature and combustion residence time, yet independent of pressure and inlet air temperature for the range of conditions studied. This equation was then applied to experimental data that were obtained from the literature, and a good correlation was achieved.

  18. A look into the cockpit of the developing locust: looming detectors and predator avoidance.

    PubMed

    Sztarker, Julieta; Rind, F Claire

    2014-11-01

    For many animals, the visual detection of looming stimuli is crucial at any stage of their lives. For example, human babies of only 6 days old display evasive responses to looming stimuli (Bower et al. [1971]: Percept Psychophys 9: 193-196). This means the neuronal pathways involved in looming detection should mature early in life. Locusts have been used extensively to examine the neural circuits and mechanisms involved in sensing looming stimuli and triggering visually evoked evasive actions, making them ideal subjects in which to investigate the development of looming sensitivity. Two lobula giant movement detectors (LGMD) neurons have been identified in the lobula region of the locust visual system: the LGMD1 neuron responds selectively to looming stimuli and provides information that contributes to evasive responses such as jumping and emergency glides. The LGMD2 responds to looming stimuli and shares many response properties with the LGMD1. Both neurons have only been described in the adult. In this study, we describe a practical method combining classical staining techniques and 3D neuronal reconstructions that can be used, even in small insects, to reveal detailed anatomy of individual neurons. We have used it to analyze the anatomy of the fan-shaped dendritic tree of the LGMD1 and the LGMD2 neurons in all stages of the post-embryonic development of Locusta migratoria. We also analyze changes seen during the ontogeny of escape behaviors triggered by looming stimuli, specially the hiding response.

  19. Reduced Looming Sensitivity in Primary School Children with Developmental Co-Ordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Catherine; Wann, John P.; Wilmut, Kate; Poulter, Damian

    2012-01-01

    Almost all locomotor animals are sensitive to optical expansion (visual looming) and for most animals this sensitivity is evident very early in their development. In humans there is evidence that responses to looming stimuli begin in the first 6 weeks of life, but here we demonstrate that as children become independent their perceptual acuity…

  20. Haptic distal spatial perception mediated by strings: haptic "looming".

    PubMed

    Cabe, Patrick A

    2011-10-01

    Five experiments tested a haptic analog of optical looming, demonstrating string-mediated haptic distal spatial perception. Horizontally collinear hooks supported a weighted string held taut by a blindfolded participant's finger midway between the hooks. At the finger, the angle between string segments increased as the finger approached collinearity with the hooks, just as the optical angle subtended by an approaching object increases. The vertical force component at the finger is potentially informative for perception, approaching zero at finger-hook collinearity. In Experiment 1, participants judged hook height reasonably accurately. To retain force relationships but eliminate immediate skin contact, Experiment 2 employed a hand-held rod; results replicated those of Experiment 1. Experiment 3 replicated Experiment 2 using a ring instead of a rod. In all three experiments, estimated hook height closely paralleled actual height, r > .9. Experiments 4 and 5 showed that participants could project impending finger-hook collinearity when finger contact with the string was interrupted during its traverse. Perceivers' estimate errors were nearly perfectly predicted by height-force ratio relationships (Rs > .96). Outcomes are related to optical and acoustic looming, dynamic touch, tau theory, and Gibsonian perceptual theory.

  1. Haptic distal spatial perception mediated by strings: haptic "looming".

    PubMed

    Cabe, Patrick A

    2011-10-01

    Five experiments tested a haptic analog of optical looming, demonstrating string-mediated haptic distal spatial perception. Horizontally collinear hooks supported a weighted string held taut by a blindfolded participant's finger midway between the hooks. At the finger, the angle between string segments increased as the finger approached collinearity with the hooks, just as the optical angle subtended by an approaching object increases. The vertical force component at the finger is potentially informative for perception, approaching zero at finger-hook collinearity. In Experiment 1, participants judged hook height reasonably accurately. To retain force relationships but eliminate immediate skin contact, Experiment 2 employed a hand-held rod; results replicated those of Experiment 1. Experiment 3 replicated Experiment 2 using a ring instead of a rod. In all three experiments, estimated hook height closely paralleled actual height, r > .9. Experiments 4 and 5 showed that participants could project impending finger-hook collinearity when finger contact with the string was interrupted during its traverse. Perceivers' estimate errors were nearly perfectly predicted by height-force ratio relationships (Rs > .96). Outcomes are related to optical and acoustic looming, dynamic touch, tau theory, and Gibsonian perceptual theory. PMID:21688938

  2. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  3. Characterization of Wet Air Plasma Jet Powered by Sinusoidal High Voltage and Nanosecond Pulses for Plasma Agricultural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Shimada, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Not only for the plasma sterilization but also for many of plasma life-science applications, atmospheric pressure plasma devices that allowed us to control its state and reactive species production are deserved to resolve the roles of the chemical species. Influence of the hydroxyl radical and ozone on germination of conidia of a strawberry pathogen is presented. Water addition to air plasma jet significantly improves germination suppression performance, while measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) are reduced. Although the results show a negative correlation between ROS and the germination suppression, this infers the importance of chemical composition generated by plasma. For further control of the plasma product, a plasma jet powered by sinusoidal high voltage and nanosecond pulses is developed and characterized with the voltage-charge Lissajous. Control of breakdown phase and discharge power by pulse-imposed phase is presented. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) Grant Number 15K17480 and Exploratory Research Grant Number 23644199.

  4. A methodology for the evaluation of the turbine jet engine fragment threat to generic air transportable containers

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D.C.; Pierce, J.D.

    1993-06-01

    Uncontained, high-energy gas turbine engine fragments are a potential threat to air-transportable containers carried aboard jet aircraft. The threat to a generic example container is evaluated by probability analyses and penetration testing to demonstrate the methodology to be used in the evaluation of a specific container/aircraft/engine combination. Fragment/container impact probability is the product of the uncontained fragment release rate and the geometric probability that a container is in the path of this fragment. The probability of a high-energy rotor burst fragment from four generic aircraft engines striking one of the containment vessels aboard a transport aircraft is approximately 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} strikes/hour. Finite element penetration analyses and tests can be performed to identify specific fragments which have the potential to penetrate a generic or specific containment vessel. The relatively low probability of engine fragment/container impacts is primarily due to the low release rate of uncontained, hazardous jet engine fragments.

  5. Investigation of the Behavior of Parallel Two-Dimensional Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was made of the flow downstream from a "two-dimensional" grid formed of parallel rods. In both two and three dimensional jet fields there is a critical range of grid density below which the downstream flow is stable and above which it is unstable. The flow can be completely stabilized by means of an adequate lateral contraction beginning immediately after the grid or by use of a fine-mesh damping screen parallel to the grid plane and within a definite range of positions downstream from the grid.

  6. Fierce debate looms over funding of superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lepkowski, W.

    1988-02-01

    The coming session of Congress looks like a crucial one in the present era of Big Science. Legislators will have to decide on whether to go ahead and approve construction funding for the biggest atom smasher of all time, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The Administration will be asking for about $230 million (out of a scheduled $350 million) to begin work. But uncertainties loom, and the debate ahead looks bloody. The SSC is a project the Department of Energy says will cost $4.4 billion in fiscal 1988 dollars, rated according to a targeted completion date in 1996. The General Accounting Office pegs the cost at $4.9 billion in 1985 dollars. In inflationary and project stretchout dollars, the figure could easily double. But money for science is again tight in the government, and battles that lie ahead involve the competition between science and social programs, and, indeed, between the sciences themselves. This article discusses these battles.

  7. Background complexity affects response of a looming-sensitive neuron to object motion.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana C; McMillan, Glyn A; Santos, Cristina P; Gray, John R

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies show how stimulus complexity affects the responses of looming-sensitive neurons across multiple animal taxa. Locusts contain a well-described, descending motion-sensitive pathway that is preferentially looming sensitive. However, the lobula giant movement detector/descending contralateral movement detector (LGMD/DCMD) pathway responds to more than simple objects approaching at constant, predictable trajectories. In this study, we presented Locusta migratoria with a series of complex three-dimensional visual stimuli presented while simultaneously recording DCMD activity extracellularly. In addition to a frontal looming stimulus, we used a combination of compound trajectories (nonlooming transitioning to looming) presented at different velocities and onto a simple, scattered, or progressive flow field background. Regardless of stimulus background, DCMD responses to looming were characteristic and related to previously described effects of azimuthal approach angle and velocity of object expansion. However, increasing background complexity caused reduced firing rates, delayed peaks, shorter rise phases, and longer fall phases. DCMD responded to transitions to looming with a characteristic drop in a firing rate that was relatively invariant across most stimulus combinations and occurred regardless of stimulus background. Spike numbers were higher in the presence of the scattered background and reduced in the flow field background. We show that DCMD response time to a transition depends on unique expansion parameters of the moving stimulus irrespective of background complexity. Our results show how background complexity shapes DCMD responses to looming stimuli, which is explained within a behavioral context.

  8. Frequency response of a jet engine test facility air supply system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, M. E.; Ross, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The frequency response of a laboratory scale model of a portion of the air supply system of an engine test facility is obtained both experimentally and using one-dimensional, small-signal, distributed parameter theory. The effects of line terminations and mean flow are considered. Good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. Predictions are extended to a full scale test facility air supply system operating under several possible test conditions.

  9. The effects of stroke length and Reynolds number on heat transfer to a ducted confined and semi-confined synthetic air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylatt, D. I.; O'Donovan, T. S.

    2014-07-01

    Heat transfer to three configurations of ducted jet and un-ducted semiconfined jets is investigated experimentally. The influence of the jet operating parameters, stroke length (L0/D) and Reynolds (Re) number on the heat transferred to the jet is of particular interest. Heat transfer distributions to the jet are reported at H/D = 1 for a range of experimental parameters Re (1000 to 4000) and L0/D (5 to 20). Secondary and tertiary peaks are discernable in the heat transfer distributions across the range of parameters tested. It is shown that for a fixed Re varying the L0/D has little effect on the magnitude of the stagnation region heat transfer but does effect the position and magnitude of the secondary and tertiary peaks in the heat transfer distribution. It is also shown that for a fixed L0/D increasing the Re has a significant effect on the magnitude of the stagnation region heat transfer but has little impact on the position of the secondary and tertiary peaks in the heat transfer distributions. Ducting is added to the configuration to improve heat transfer by drawing cold air from a remote location into the jet flow. Ducting is shown to increase stagnation region and area averaged heat transfer across the range of jet parameters tested when compared with an un-ducted jets of equal confinement. Increasing the stroke length from L0/D = 5 to 20 for a Reynolds number of 2000 reduces the enhancement in stagnation region heat transfer provided by the ducting from 35% to 10%; the area averaged heat transfer provided by the ducting also changes from a 42% to a 21% enhancement. This is shown to be partly due to relative magnitude of the peaks in heat transfer outwith the stagnation region; at low stroke lengths, the difference in the magnitude of these peaks is large and reduces with increasing L0/D. It is also shown that as L0/D is increased the stagnation region heat transfer to the un-ducted jets increases while for the ducted jets stagnation region heat transfer

  10. Microwave plasma jet assisted combustion of premixed methane-air: Roles of OH(A) and OH(X) radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuji; Wu, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Plasma assisted combustion (PAC) technology can enhance combustion performance by pre-heating combustion fuels, shortening ignition delay time, enhancing flame holding, or increasing flame volume and flame speed. PAC can also increase fuel efficiency by extending fuel lean flammability limit (LFL) and help reduce combustion pollutant emissions. Experiment results have shown that microwave plasma could modify flame structure, increase flame volume, flame speed, flame temperature, and flame stability, and could also extend the fuel lean flammability limit. We report on a novel microwave PAC system that allows us to study PAC using complicated yet well-controlled combinations of operating parameters, such as fuel equivalence ratio (φ) , fuel mixture flow rate, plasma gas flow rate, plasma gases, plasma jet configurations, symmetric or asymmetric fuel-oxidant injection patterns, etc. We have investigated the roles of the stated-resolved OH(A, X) radicals in plasma assisted ignition and combustion of premixed methane-air fuel mixtures. Results suggest that that both the electronically excited state OH(A) and the electronic ground state OH(X) enhance the methane-air ignition process, i.e. extending the fuel LFL, but the flame stabilization and flame holding is primarily determined by the electronic ground state OH(X) as compared to the role of the OH(A). E-mail: cw175@msstate.edu. Supported by National Science Foundation through the grant of ``A quantitative survey of combustion intermediates toward understanding of plasma-assisted combustion mechanism'' (CBET-1066486).

  11. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Velocity in a H2-air Combustion-Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Baurle, Robert a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents simultaneous measurements at multiple points of two orthogonal components of flow velocity using a single-shot interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) technique. The measurements are performed on a large-scale Mach 1.6 (Mach 5.5 enthalpy) H2-air combustion jet during the 2007 test campaign in the Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The measurements are performed simultaneously with CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) using a combined CARS-IRS instrument with a common path 9-nanosecond pulsed, injection-seeded, 532-nm Nd:YAG laser probe pulse. The paper summarizes the measurements of velocities along the core of the vitiated air flow as well as two radial profiles. The average velocity measurement near the centerline at the closest point from the nozzle exit compares favorably with the CFD calculations using the VULCAN code. Further downstream, the measured axial velocity shows overall higher values than predicted with a trend of convergence at further distances. Larger discrepancies are shown in the radial profiles.

  12. Combustor exhaust-emissions and blowout-limits with diesel number 2 and jet A fuels utilizing air-atomizing and pressure atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental tests with diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels were conducted in a combustor segment to obtain comparative data on exhaust emissions and blowout limits. An air-atomizing nozzle was used to inject the fuels. Tests were also made with diesel number 2 fuel using a pressure-atomizing nozzle to determine the effectiveness of the air-atomizing nozzle in reducing exhaust emissions. Test conditions included fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.018, inlet-air total pressures and temperatures of 41 to 203 newtons per square centimeter and 477 to 811 K, respectively, and a reference velocity of 21.3 meters per second. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons were twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel. This was attributed to diesel number 2 having a higher concentration of aromatics and lower volatility than Jet A fuel. Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and blowout limits were approximately the same for the two fuels. The air-atomizing nozzle, as compared with the pressure-atomizing nozzle, reduced oxides-of-nitrogen by 20 percent, smoke number by 30 percent, carbon monoxide by 70 percent, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50 percent when used with diesel number 2 fuel.

  13. Air pollution from aircraft. [jet exhaust - aircraft fuels/combustion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Chigier, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    A model which predicts nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions from a swirl can modular combustor is discussed. A detailed analysis of the turbulent fuel-air mixing process in the swirl can module wake region is reviewed. Hot wire anemometry was employed, and gas sampling analysis of fuel combustion emissions were performed.

  14. Analytical evaluation of effect of equivalence ratio inlet-air temperature and combustion pressure on performance of several possible ram-jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, Leonard K; Gammon, Benson E

    1953-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation of the theoretical air specific impulse performance and adiabatic combustion temperatures of several possible ram-jet fuels over a range of equivalence ratios, inlet-air temperatures, and combustion pressures, is presented herein. The fuels include octane-1, 50-percent-magnesium slurry, boron, pentaborane, diborane, hydrogen, carbon, and aluminum. Thermal effects from high combustion temperatures were found to effect considerably the combustion performance of all the fuels. An increase in combustion pressure was beneficial to air specific impulse at high combustion temperatures. The use of these theoretical data in engine operation and in the evaluation of experimental data is described.

  15. The effects of suspension particle size on the performance of air-jet, ultrasonic and vibrating-mesh nebulisers.

    PubMed

    Najlah, Mohammad; Parveen, Ishrat; Alhnan, Mohamed Albed; Ahmed, Waqar; Faheem, Ahmed; Phoenix, David A; Taylor, Kevin M G; Elhissi, Abdelbary

    2014-01-30

    Using latex microspheres as model suspensions, the influence of suspension particle size (1, 4.5 and 10 μm) on the properties of aerosols produced using Pari LC Sprint (air-jet), Polygreen (ultrasonic), Aeroneb Pro (actively vibrating-mesh) and Omron MicroAir NE-U22 (passively vibrating-mesh) nebulisers was investigated. The performance of the Pari nebuliser was independent of latex spheres particle size. For both Polygreen and Aeroneb Pro nebulizers, total aerosol output increased when the size of latex spheres increased, with highest fine particle fraction (FPF) values being recorded. However, following nebulisation of 1 or 4.5 μm suspensions with the Polygreen device, no particles were detected in the aerosols deposited in a two-stage impinger, suggesting that the aerosols generated from this device consisted mainly of the continuous phase while the dispersed microspheres were excluded and remained in the nebuliser. The Omron nebuliser efficiently nebulised the 1 μm latex spheres, with high output rate and no particle aggregation. However, this device functioned inefficiently when delivering 4.5 or 10 μm suspensions, which was attributed to the mild vibrations of its mesh and/or the blockage of the mesh apertures by the microspheres. The Aeroneb Pro fragmented latex spheres into smaller particles, but uncontrolled aggregation occurred upon nebulisation. This study has shown that the design of the nebuliser influenced the aerosol properties using latex spheres as model suspensions. Moreover, for the recently marketed mesh nebulisers, the performance of the Aeroneb Pro device was less dependent on particle size of the suspension compared with the Omron MicroAir nebuliser. PMID:24275450

  16. Secondary eyes mediate the response to looming objects in jumping spiders (Phidippus audax, Salticidae).

    PubMed

    Spano, Lauren; Long, Skye M; Jakob, Elizabeth M

    2012-12-23

    Some species have sensory systems divided into subsystems with morphologically different sense organs that acquire different types of information within the same modality. Jumping spiders (family Salticidae) have eight eyes. Four eyes are directed anteriorly to view objects in front of the spider: a pair of principal eyes track targets with their movable retinae, while the immobile anterior lateral (AL) eyes have a larger field of view and lower resolution. To test whether the principal eyes, the AL eyes, or both together mediate the response to looming stimuli, we presented spiders with a video of a solid black circle that rapidly expanded (loomed) or contracted (receded). Control spiders and spiders with their principal eyes masked were significantly more likely to back away from the looming stimulus than were spiders with their AL eyes masked. Almost no individuals backed away from the receding stimulus. Our results show that the AL eyes alone mediate the loom response to objects anterior to the spider. PMID:23075526

  17. Simulation of a Synthetic Jet in Quiescent Air Using TLNS3D Flow Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Although the actuator geometry is highly three-dimensional, the outer flowfield is nominally two-dimensional because of the high aspect ratio of the rectangular slot. For the present study, this configuration is modeled as a two-dimensional problem. A multi-block structured grid available at the CFDVAL2004 website is used as a baseline grid. The periodic motion of the diaphragm is simulated by specifying a sinusoidal velocity at the diaphragm surface with a frequency of 450 Hz, corresponding to the experimental setup. The amplitude is chosen so that the maximum Mach number at the jet exit is approximately 0.1, to replicate the experimental conditions. At the solid walls zero slip, zero injection, adiabatic temperature and zero pressure gradient conditions are imposed. In the external region, symmetry conditions are imposed on the side (vertical) boundaries and far-field conditions are imposed on the top boundary. A nominal free-stream Mach number of 0.001 is imposed in the free stream to simulate incompressible flow conditions in the TLNS3D code, which solves compressible flow equations. The code was run in unsteady (URANS) mode until the periodicity was established. The time-mean quantities were obtained by running the code for at least another 15 periods and averaging the flow quantities over these periods. The phase-locked average of flow quantities were assumed to be coincident with their values during the last full time period.

  18. Hearing brighter: changing in-depth visual perception through looming sounds.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Clare A M; Thut, Gregor; Romei, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    Rapidly approaching (looming) sounds are ecologically salient stimuli that are perceived as nearer than they are due to overestimation of their loudness change and underestimation of their distance (Neuhoff, 1998; Seifritz et al., 2002). Despite evidence for crossmodal influence by looming sounds onto visual areas (Romei, Murray, Cappe, & Thut, 2009, 2013; Tyll et al., 2013), it is unknown whether such sounds bias visual percepts in similar ways. Nearer objects appear to be larger and brighter than distant objects. If looming sounds impact visual processing, then visual stimuli paired with looming sounds should be perceived as brighter and larger, even when the visual stimuli do not provide motion cues, i.e. are static. In Experiment 1 we found that static visual objects paired with looming tones (but not static or receding tones) were perceived as larger and brighter than their actual physical properties, as if they appear closer to the observer. In a second experiment, we replicate and extend the findings of Experiment 1. Crucially, we did not find evidence of such bias by looming sounds when visual processing was disrupted via masking or when catch trials were presented, ruling out simple response bias. Finally, in a third experiment we found that looming tones do not bias visual stimulus characteristics that do not carry visual depth information such as shape, providing further evidence that they specifically impact in-depth visual processing. We conclude that looming sounds impact visual perception through a mechanism transferring in-depth sound motion information onto the relevant in-depth visual dimensions (such as size and luminance but not shape) in a crossmodal remapping of information for a genuine, evolutionary advantage in stimulus detection.

  19. Free-flight Performance of a Rocket-boosted, Air-launched 16-inch-diameter Ram-jet Engine at Mach Numbers up to 2.20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, John H; Kohl, Robert C; Jones, Merle L

    1953-01-01

    The investigation of air-launched ram-jet engines has been extended to include a study of models with a nominal design free-stream Mach number of 2.40. These models require auxiliary thrust in order to attain a flight speed at which the ram jet becomes self-accelerating. A rocket-boosting technique for providing this auxiliary thrust is described and time histories of two rocket-boosted ram-jet flights are presented. In one flight, the model attained a maximum Mach number of 2.20 before a fuel system failure resulted in the destruction of the engine. Performance data for this model are presented in terms of thrust and drag coefficients, diffuser pressure recovery, mass-flow ratio, combustion efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and over-all engine efficiency.

  20. Mixing of Multiple Jets with a Confined Subsonic Crossflow: Part III--The Effects of Air Preheat and Number of Orifices on Flow and Emissions in an RQL Mixing Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdemann, James D.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2008-01-01

    This study was motivated by a goal to understand the mixing and emissions in the Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor scheme that has been proposed to minimize the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in gas turbine combustors. The study reported herein was a reacting jet-in-crossflow experiment at atmospheric pressure. The jets were injected from the perimeter of a cylindrical duct through round-hole orifices into a fuel-rich mainstream flow. The number of orifices investigated in this study gave over- to optimum to underpenetrating jets at a jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio of J = 57. The size of individual orifices was decreased as the number of orifices increased to maintain a constant total area; the jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio was constant at MR = 2.5. The experiments focused on the effects of the number of orifices and inlet air preheat and were conducted in a facility that provided the capability for independent variation of jet and main inlet air preheat temperature. The number of orifices was found to have a significant effect on mixing and the distributions of species, but very little effect on overall NOx emissions, suggesting that an aerodynamically optimum mixer might not minimize NOx emissions. Air preheat was found to have very little effect on mixing and the distributions of major species, but preheating both main and jet air did increase NOx emissions significantly. Although the air jets injected in the quick-mix section of an RQL combustor may comprise over 70 percent of the total air flow, the overall NOx emission levels were found to be more sensitive to main stream air preheat than to jet stream air preheat.

  1. The Effects of Projected Future Demand Including Very Light Jet Air-Taxi Operations on U.S. National Airspace System Delays as a Function of Next Generation Air Transportation System Airspace Capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jerry; Viken, Jeff; Dollyhigh, Samuel; Trani, Antonio; Baik, Hojong; Hinze, Nicholas; Ashiabor, Senanu

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a study which investigates the potential effects of the growth in air traffic demand including projected Very Light Jet (VLJ) air-taxi operations adding to delays experienced by commercial passenger air transportation in the year 2025. The geographic region studied is the contiguous United States (U.S.) of America, although international air traffic to and from the U.S. is included. The main focus of this paper is to determine how much air traffic growth, including VLJ air-taxi operations will add to enroute airspace congestion and determine what additional airspace capacity will be needed to accommodate the expected demand. Terminal airspace is not modeled and increased airport capacity is assumed.

  2. Highly efficient photocatalytic TiO2 coatings deposited by open air atmospheric pressure plasma jet with aerosolized TTIP precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhouri, H.; Ben Salem, D.; Carton, O.; Pulpytel, J.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2014-07-01

    A simple method to deposit photocatalytic TiO2 coatings, at a high rate (20-40 µm s-1), and with a high porosity, is reported in this paper. This method, which allows the treatment of membranes (with an 800 nm pore size), is based on the introduction of a liquid precursor sprayed into an open-air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 thin films prepared by APPJ have been compared with our best N-doped TiO2 thin films, deposited by reactive radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, previously reported in the literature. The morphology, chemical composition, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings have been studied in this paper. Significant control of the porosity and crystallinity was achieved by varying the deposition parameters and the annealing temperature. Under optimized conditions, the TiO2 coatings deposited by APPJ are characterized by a higher photocatalytic activity as compared to the optimized thin films deposited by RF sputtering. This difference can be explained by the higher specific surface of the APPJ coatings. Finally, the most interesting characteristic of this APPJ-liquid spray process is its capacity to treat membranes without blocking the pores, and to produce photocatalytic membranes which can efficiently combine filtration and photocatalysis for water treatment.

  3. Development of hydrophilic dental wax without surfactant using a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-06-01

    Dental wax (DW), a low-melting and high-molecular-weight organic mixture, is widely used in dentistry for forming moulds of teeth. Hydrophilicity is an important property for DW, as a wet dental investment is used to surround the wax before wax burnout is performed. However, recent attempts to improve the hydrophilicity of DW using a surfactant have resulted in the reduced mechanical properties of the dental investment, leading to the failure of the dental restoration. This study applied a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) for DW surface treatment and investigated its effect on both DW hydrophilicity and the dental investment's mechanical properties. The results showed that the application of the AAPPJ significantly improved the hydrophilicity of the DW, and that the results were similar to that of cleaner-treated DW using commercially available products with surfactant. A surface chemical analysis indicated that the improvement of hydrophilicity was related to an increase in the number of oxygen-related bonds on the DW surface following the removal of carbon hydrate in both AAPPJ and cleaner-treated DW. However, cleaner treatment compromised the mechanical property of the dental investment when the dental investment was in contact with the treated DW, while the AAPPJ treatment did not. Therefore, the use of AAPPJ to treat DW is a promising method for accurate dental restoration, as it induces an improvement in hydrophilicity without harming the dental investment.

  4. Test and evaluation of shale derived jet fuel by the United States Air Force

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    In June 1980, the United States Congress passed the Energy Security Act which provided for the formation of the United States Synthetic Fuels Corporation and amended the Defense Production Act of 1950 to provide for synthetic fuels for the Department of Defense (DOD). A subsequent law, P.L., 96-304, appropriated up to $20 billion for financial incentives to foster a national synthetic fuel industry. The initial synthetic fuel project funded under the Energy Security Act is the Unocal Parachute Creek Project in Colorado with an expected shale oil production of 10,000 bbls/day. The Defense Fuel Supply Center (DFSC) contracted with Gary Energy Refining Company, Fruita, Colorado to provide approximately 5,000 bbls/day of shale JP-4 for the United States Air Force (USAF) using crude from the Parachute Creek Project, with initial deliveries to begin in 1985.

  5. Inactivation of a 25.5 µm Enterococcus faecalis biofilm by a room-temperature, battery-operated, handheld air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, X.; Lu, X.; Liu, J.; Liu, D.; Yang, Y.; Ostrikov, K.; Chu, Paul K.; Pan, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Effective biofilm inactivation using a handheld, mobile plasma jet powered by a 12 V dc battery and operated in open air without any external gas supply is reported. This cold, room-temperature plasma is produced in self-repetitive nanosecond discharges with current pulses of ˜100 ns duration, current peak amplitude of ˜6 mA and repetition rate of ˜20 kHz. It is shown that the reactive plasma species penetrate to the bottom layer of a 25.5 µm-thick Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and produce a strong bactericidal effect. This is the thickest reported biofilm inactivated using room-temperature air plasmas.

  6. Inhibitory effect of silver nanoparticles mediated by atmospheric pressure air cold plasma jet against dermatophyte fungi.

    PubMed

    Ouf, Salama A; El-Adly, Amira A; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H

    2015-10-01

    In an in vitro study with five clinical isolates of dermatophytes, the MIC(50) and MIC(100) values of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) ranged from 5 to 16 and from 15 to 32 μg ml(- 1), respectively. The combined treatment of AgNPs with atmospheric pressure-air cold plasma (APACP) induced a drop in the MIC(50) and MIC100 values of AgNPs reaching 3-11 and 12-23 μg ml(- 1), respectively, according to the examined species. Epidermophyton floccosum was the most sensitive fungus to AgNPs, while Trichophyton rubrum was the most tolerant. AgNPs induced significant reduction in keratinase activity and an increase in the mycelium permeability that was greater when applied combined with plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy showed electroporation of the cell walls and the accumulation of AgNPs on the cell wall and inside the cells, particularly when AgNPs were combined with APACP treatment. An in vivo experiment with dermatophyte-inoculated guinea pigs indicated that the application of AgNPs combined with APACP was more efficacious in healing and suppressing disease symptoms of skin as compared with the application of AgNPs alone. The recovery from the infection reached 91.7 % in the case of Microsporum canis-inoculated guinea pigs treated with 13 μg ml(- 1) AgNPs combined with APACP treatment delivered for 2  min. The emission spectra indicated that the efficacy of APACP was mainly due to generation of NO radicals and excited nitrogen molecules. These reactive species interact and block the activity of the fungal spores in vitro and in the skin lesions of the guinea pigs. The results achieved are promising compared with fluconazole as reference antifungal drug. PMID:26296782

  7. Inhibitory effect of silver nanoparticles mediated by atmospheric pressure air cold plasma jet against dermatophyte fungi.

    PubMed

    Ouf, Salama A; El-Adly, Amira A; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H

    2015-10-01

    In an in vitro study with five clinical isolates of dermatophytes, the MIC(50) and MIC(100) values of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) ranged from 5 to 16 and from 15 to 32 μg ml(- 1), respectively. The combined treatment of AgNPs with atmospheric pressure-air cold plasma (APACP) induced a drop in the MIC(50) and MIC100 values of AgNPs reaching 3-11 and 12-23 μg ml(- 1), respectively, according to the examined species. Epidermophyton floccosum was the most sensitive fungus to AgNPs, while Trichophyton rubrum was the most tolerant. AgNPs induced significant reduction in keratinase activity and an increase in the mycelium permeability that was greater when applied combined with plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy showed electroporation of the cell walls and the accumulation of AgNPs on the cell wall and inside the cells, particularly when AgNPs were combined with APACP treatment. An in vivo experiment with dermatophyte-inoculated guinea pigs indicated that the application of AgNPs combined with APACP was more efficacious in healing and suppressing disease symptoms of skin as compared with the application of AgNPs alone. The recovery from the infection reached 91.7 % in the case of Microsporum canis-inoculated guinea pigs treated with 13 μg ml(- 1) AgNPs combined with APACP treatment delivered for 2  min. The emission spectra indicated that the efficacy of APACP was mainly due to generation of NO radicals and excited nitrogen molecules. These reactive species interact and block the activity of the fungal spores in vitro and in the skin lesions of the guinea pigs. The results achieved are promising compared with fluconazole as reference antifungal drug.

  8. THE APPLICATION OF JET REMPI-TOFMS TO REAL-TIME MONITORING OF AROMATIC AIR TOXIC POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jet REMPI-TOFMS is a measurement technique which combines laser induced photoionization with mass spectrometry to create a two-dimensional (wavelength / mass) detection method. In combination with a supersonic jet inlet, aromatic organics are detected in real time (one data poin...

  9. Longitudinal study of looming in infants with high-density EEG.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Audrey L H; Svantesson, Monica; van der Weel, F R Ruud

    2012-01-01

    A rapidly approaching object provides information about the object's approach and how imminent a collision is. Prospective control when responding to a looming virtual object approaching on a direct collision course was studied longitudinally in 10 infants aged 5/6 and 12/13 months. Different characteristics of the looming-related visual evoked potential (VEP) responses from infants' brain electrical recordings (EEG) were explored and compared between the infants at these different ages. The aim of this study was to find evidence for infant brain electrical responses coherent with a looming stimulus approaching the infant under three different accelerations. It was also investigated whether the use of different timing strategies to estimate the loom's time-to-collision would produce differences in the EEG recordings. The results showed that the timing and the duration of the VEP responses differed with age. At the age of 5/6 months, infants showed VEP peaks earlier in the looming sequence and VEP responses with longer duration than when they were 12/13 months old. Results from the timing-strategy analysis showed that with age, 4 infants shifted from a less efficient timing strategy involving the loom's velocity to the more efficient strategy involving the loom's time-to-collision. Further, it was found that peak VEP activation in the investigated areas propagated across the cortex, showing the highest observed activation in the occipital area at the age of 5/6 months, whereas the parietal area showed the highest activation when the infants were 12/13 months. The decrease in processing time together with a peak VEP response closer to the loom's time-to-collision indicate a developmental trend in infants' prediction of an object's time-to-collision. This developmental trend is further substantiated by the shift from a less efficient to a more efficient timing strategy and by evidence of propagated peak VEP activation towards higher information processing areas in the

  10. Escape behavior and neuronal responses to looming stimuli in the crab Chasmagnathus granulatus (Decapoda: Grapsidae).

    PubMed

    Oliva, Damián; Medan, Violeta; Tomsic, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Behavioral responses to looming stimuli have been studied in many vertebrate and invertebrate species, but neurons sensitive to looming have been investigated in very few animals. In this paper we introduce a new experimental model using the crab Chasmagnathus granulatus, which allows investigation of the processes of looming detection and escape decision at both the behavioral and neuronal levels. By analyzing the escape response of the crab in a walking simulator device we show that: (i) a robust and reliable escape response can be elicited by computer-generated looming stimuli in all tested animals; (ii) parameters such as distance, speed, timing and directionality of the escape run, are easy to record and quantify precisely in the walking device; (iii) although the magnitude of escape varies between animals and stimulus presentations, the timing of the response is remarkably consistent and does not habituate at 3 min stimulus intervals. We then study the response of neurons from the brain of the crab by means of intracellular recordings in the intact animal and show that: (iv) two subclasses of previously identified movement detector neurons from the lobula (third optic neuropil) exhibit robust and reliable responses to the same looming stimuli that trigger the behavioral response; (v) the neurons respond to the object approach by increasing their rate of firing in a way that closely matches the dynamics of the image expansion. Finally, we compare the neuronal with the behavioral response showing that: (vi) differences in the neuronal responses to looming, receding or laterally moving stimuli closely reflect the behavioral differences to such stimuli; (vii) during looming, the crab starts to run soon after the looming-sensitive neurons begin to increase their firing rate. The increase in the running speed during stimulus approach faithfully follows the increment in the firing rate, until the moment of maximum stimulus expansion. Thereafter, the neurons abruptly

  11. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of shear flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  12. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of sheer flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  13. Effects of northbound long-haul international air travel on sleep quantity and subjective jet lag and wellness in professional Australian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Peter; Duffield, Rob; Howle, Kieran; Waterson, Adam; Vaile, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the effects of 10-h northbound air travel across 1 time zone on sleep quantity, together with subjective jet lag and wellness ratings, in 16 male professional Australian football (soccer) players. Player wellness was measured throughout the week before (home training week) and the week of (away travel week) travel from Australia to Japan for a preseason tour. Sleep quantity and subjective jet lag were measured 2 d before (Pre 1 and 2), the day of, and for 5 d after travel (Post 1-5). Sleep duration was significantly reduced during the night before travel (Pre 1; 4.9 [4.2-5.6] h) and night of competition (Post 2; 4.2 [3.7-4.7] h) compared with every other night (P<.01, d>0.90). Moreover, compared with the day before travel, subjective jet lag was significantly greater for the 5 d after travel (P<.05, d>0.90), and player wellness was significantly lower 1 d post-match (Post 3) than at all other time points (P<.05, d>0.90). Results from the current study suggest that sleep disruption, as a result of an early travel departure time (8 PM) and evening match (7:30 PM), and fatigue induced by competition had a greater effect on wellness ratings than long-haul air travel with a minimal time-zone change. Furthermore, subjective jet lag may have been misinterpreted as fatigue from sleep disruption and competition, especially by the less experienced players. Therefore, northbound air travel across 1 time zone from Australia to Asia appears to have negligible effects on player preparedness for subsequent training and competition.

  14. Looming sensitive cortical regions without V1 input: evidence from a patient with bilateral cortical blindness

    PubMed Central

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Legrand, Lore B.; Zhan, Minye; Tamietto, Marco; de Gelder, Beatrice; Pegna, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Fast and automatic behavioral responses are required to avoid collision with an approaching stimulus. Accordingly, looming stimuli have been found to be highly salient and efficient attractors of attention due to the implication of potential collision and potential threat. Here, we address the question of whether looming motion is processed in the absence of any functional primary visual cortex and consequently without awareness. For this, we investigated a patient (TN) suffering from complete, bilateral damage to his primary visual cortex. Using an fMRI paradigm, we measured TN's brain activation during the presentation of looming, receding, rotating, and static point lights, of which he was unaware. When contrasted with other conditions, looming was found to produce bilateral activation of the middle temporal areas, as well as the superior temporal sulcus and inferior parietal lobe (IPL). The latter are generally thought to be involved in multisensory processing of motion in extrapersonal space, as well as attentional capture and saliency. No activity was found close to the lesioned V1 area. This demonstrates that looming motion is processed in the absence of awareness through direct subcortical projections to areas involved in multisensory processing of motion and saliency that bypass V1. PMID:26557059

  15. Air jet spinning of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid) hybrid nanocomposite membrane mats for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Sheikh, Faheem A; Lim, Jae Kyoo

    2013-02-01

    The technique for the production of multifunctional scaffolds from bioactive ceramics and biodegradable polymers for use in tissue scaffolds remains challenging. Here, the goal was to fabricate 3D nanocomposite nanofiber scaffolds of nanohydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid) (nHA/PLA) prepared by air jet spinning (AJS) as a novel and facile composite fabrication process. The characteristics of the fabricated 3D scaffolds were investigated using SEM, water contact angle, DSC, FTIR, XRD analyses and tensile tests. The surface morphology exhibited highly interconnected bonded fibers due to the high fabrication rates. It was also found that the nHA particles were effectively embedded in the fibers' surface due to the difference in the kinetic energies between the nHA particles and polymer molecules. The as-received PLA film showed a low crystallinity value of about 19%, which was expected with the casting process. The crystallinities of the plain PLA and nHA/PLA membrane scaffolds were about 31.78% and 32.21%, respectively. This reveals that HA nanoparticles could engage in a beneficial interaction with the PLA chain molecules during the AJS process. The tensile strength of the membrane PLA mats, particularly the hybrid nanocomposite samples with low nHA contents, was considerably improved compared to that of the PLA casted film. Biological in vitro cell cultures of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells on the fabricated scaffolds were studied for up to seven days. The nanocomposite membrane mats of nHA/PLA, fabricated by AJS, had highly interconnected fibers. This facile technique has a high production rate and is a new concept of potential interest for bone tissue engineering applications.

  16. Air jet spinning of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid) hybrid nanocomposite membrane mats for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Sheikh, Faheem A; Lim, Jae Kyoo

    2013-02-01

    The technique for the production of multifunctional scaffolds from bioactive ceramics and biodegradable polymers for use in tissue scaffolds remains challenging. Here, the goal was to fabricate 3D nanocomposite nanofiber scaffolds of nanohydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid) (nHA/PLA) prepared by air jet spinning (AJS) as a novel and facile composite fabrication process. The characteristics of the fabricated 3D scaffolds were investigated using SEM, water contact angle, DSC, FTIR, XRD analyses and tensile tests. The surface morphology exhibited highly interconnected bonded fibers due to the high fabrication rates. It was also found that the nHA particles were effectively embedded in the fibers' surface due to the difference in the kinetic energies between the nHA particles and polymer molecules. The as-received PLA film showed a low crystallinity value of about 19%, which was expected with the casting process. The crystallinities of the plain PLA and nHA/PLA membrane scaffolds were about 31.78% and 32.21%, respectively. This reveals that HA nanoparticles could engage in a beneficial interaction with the PLA chain molecules during the AJS process. The tensile strength of the membrane PLA mats, particularly the hybrid nanocomposite samples with low nHA contents, was considerably improved compared to that of the PLA casted film. Biological in vitro cell cultures of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells on the fabricated scaffolds were studied for up to seven days. The nanocomposite membrane mats of nHA/PLA, fabricated by AJS, had highly interconnected fibers. This facile technique has a high production rate and is a new concept of potential interest for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:23107942

  17. Ignition of ethane, propane, and butane in counterflow jets of cold fuel versus hot air under variable pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Fotache, C.G.; Wang, H.; Law, C.K.

    1999-06-01

    This study investigates experimentally the nonpremixed ignition of ethane, propane, n-butane, and isobutane in a configuration of opposed fuel versus heated air jets. For each of these fuels the authors explore the effects of inert dilution, system pressure, and flow strain rate, for fuel concentrations ranging between 3--100% by volume, pressures between 0.2 and 8 atm, and strain rates of 100--600 s{sup {minus}1}. Qualitatively, these fuels share a number of characteristics. First, flame ignition typically occurs after an interval of mild oxidation, characterized by minimal heat release, fuel conversion, and weak light emission. The temperature extent of this regime decreases with increasing the fuel concentration, the ambient pressure, or the flow residence time. Second, the response to strain rate, pressure, and fuel concentration is similar for all investigated fuels, in that the ignition temperatures monotonically decrease with increasing fuel content, decreasing flow strain, and increasing ambient pressure. The C{sub 4} alkanes, however, exhibit three distinct p-T ignition regimes, similar to the homogeneous explosion limits. Finally, at 1 atm, 100% fuel, and a fixed flow strain rate the ignition temperature increases in the order of ethane < propane < n-butane < i-butane. Numerical simulation was conducted for ethane ignition using detailed reaction kinetics and transport descriptions. The modeling results suggest that ignition for all fuels studied at pressures below 5 atm is initiated by fuel oxidation following the high-temperature mechanism of radical chain branching and with little contribution by low-to-intermediate temperature chemistry.

  18. Absolute OH density measurements in the effluent of a cold atmospheric-pressure Ar-H2O RF plasma jet in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreycken, Tiny; Mensink, Rob; van der Horst, Ruud; Sadeghi, Nader; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2013-10-01

    Absolute OH densities are obtained in a radio-frequency-driven Ar-H2O atmospheric-pressure plasma jet by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), calibrated by Rayleigh scattering and by UV broadband absorption. The measurements are carried out in ambient air and the effect of air entrainment into the Ar jet is measured by analyzing the time-resolved fluorescence signals. The OH densities are obtained for different water vapor concentrations admixed to the Ar and as a function of the axial distance from the nozzle. A sensitivity analysis to deduce the accuracy of the model-calculated OH density from the LIF measurement is reported. It is found that the UV absorption and the LIF results correspond within experimental accuracy close to the nozzle and deviate in the far effluent. The possible reasons are discussed. The OH densities found in the plasma jet are in the range (0.1-2.5) × 1021 m-3 depending on the water concentration and plasma conditions.

  19. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  20. Responses of descending neurons to looming stimuli in the praying mantis Tenodera aridifolia.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, Yoshifumi; Toh, Yoshihiro

    2009-03-01

    Responses to visual stimuli of some neurons that descend the nerve cord from the brain were recorded extracellularly in the mantis Tenodera aridifolia. Most of the recorded neurons showed their largest responses to looming stimuli that simulated a black circle approaching towards the mantis. The neurons showed a transient excitatory response to a gradually darkening or receding circle. The neurons showed sustained excitation to the linearly expanding stimuli, but the spike frequency decreased rapidly. The responses of the neurons were affected by both the diameter and the speed of looming stimuli. Faster or smaller looming stimuli elicited a higher peak frequency. These responses were observed in both recordings from the connective between suboesophageal and prothoracic ganglia and the connective between prothoracic and mesothoracic ganglia. There was a one-to-one correspondence of spike firing between these two recordings with a fixed delay. The neurons had the receptive field on ipsilateral side to its axon at the cervical connective. These results suggest that there is a looming-sensitive descending neuron, with an axon projecting over prothoracic ganglion, in the mantis nervous system. PMID:19093123

  1. Experimental investigation of supersonic low pressure air plasma flows obtained with different arc-jet operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Viviana; Ndiaye, Abdoul-Aziz

    2012-11-01

    A stationary arc-jet plasma flow at low pressure is used to simulate some properties of the gas flow surrounding a vehicle during its entry into celestial body's atmospheres. This paper presents an experimental study concerning plasmas simulating a re-entry into our planet. Optical measurements have been carried out for several operating plasma conditions in the free stream, and in the shock layer formed in front of a flat cylindrical plate, placed in the plasma jet. The analysis of the spectral radiation enabled the identification of the emitting species, the determination of the rotational and vibrational temperatures in the free-stream and in the shock layer and the determination of the distance of the shock to the flat plate face. Some plasma fluid parameters like, stagnation pressure, specific enthalpy and heat flux have been determined experimentally along the plasma-jet axis.

  2. Experimental investigation of supersonic low pressure air plasma flows obtained with different arc-jet operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lago, Viviana; Ndiaye, Abdoul-Aziz

    2012-11-27

    A stationary arc-jet plasma flow at low pressure is used to simulate some properties of the gas flow surrounding a vehicle during its entry into celestial body's atmospheres. This paper presents an experimental study concerning plasmas simulating a re-entry into our planet. Optical measurements have been carried out for several operating plasma conditions in the free stream, and in the shock layer formed in front of a flat cylindrical plate, placed in the plasma jet. The analysis of the spectral radiation enabled the identification of the emitting species, the determination of the rotational and vibrational temperatures in the free-stream and in the shock layer and the determination of the distance of the shock to the flat plate face. Some plasma fluid parameters like, stagnation pressure, specific enthalpy and heat flux have been determined experimentally along the plasma-jet axis.

  3. Wind-tunnel investigation at Mach numbers from 1.90 to 2.86 of a canard-controlled missile with ram-air-jet spoiler roll control. [in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The efficacy of using a ram-air-jet spoiler roll control device on a typical canard-controlled missile configuration was investigated. For roll control comparisons, conventional aileron controls on the tail fins were also tested. The results indicate that the roll control of the ram-air-jet spoiler tail fins at the highest free-stream Mach number compared favorably with that of the conventional 11-70 area-ratio tail fin ailerons, each deflected 10 deg. The roll control of the tail fin ailerons decreased while that of the ram-air-jet spoiler increased with free-stream Mach number. The addition of the ram-air-jet spoiler tail fins or flow-through tip chord nacelles on the tail fins resulted in only small changes in basic missile longitudinal stability. The axial force coefficient of the operating ram-air-jet spoiler is significantly larger than that of conventional ailerons and results primarily from the total pressure behind a normal shock in front of the nacelle inlets.

  4. Pulling Results Out of Thin Air: Four Years of Ozone and Greenhouse Gas Measurements by the Alpha Jet Atmospheric Experiment (AJAX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Emma

    2015-01-01

    The Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) has been measuring atmospheric ozone, carbon dioxide, methane and meteorological parameters from near the surface to 8000 m since January 2011. The main goals are to study photochemical ozone production and the impacts of extreme events on western US air quality, provide data to support satellite observations and aid in the quantification of emission sources e.g. wildfires, urban outflow, diary and oil and gas. The aircraft is based at Moffett Field and flies multiple times a month to sample vertical profiles at selected sites in California and Nevada, providing long-term data records at these sites. AJAX is also uniquely positioned to launch with short notice sampling flights in rapid response to extreme events e.g. the 2013 Yosemite Rim fire. This talk will focus on the impacts of vertical transport on surface air quality, and investigation of emission sources from diaries and wildfires.

  5. An Investigation of Applications for Thermodynamic Work Potential Methods: Working Tables and Charts for Estimation of Thermodynamic Work Potential in Equilibrium Mixtures of Jet-A and Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri; Roth, Bryce; McDonald, Rob

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a tool to facilitate the application of thermodynamic work potential methods to aircraft and engine analysis. This starts with a discussion of the theoretical background underlying these methods, which is then used to derive various equations useful for thermodynamic analysis of aircraft engines. The work potential analysis method is implemented in the form of a set of working charts and tables that can be used to graphically evaluate work potential stored in high-enthalpy gas. The range of validity for these tables is 300 to 36,000 R, pressures between between 0.01 atm and 100 atm, and fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric. The derivations and charts assume mixtures of Jet-A and air as the working fluid. The thermodynamic properties presented in these charts were calculated based upon standard thermodynamic curve fits.

  6. DBD Plasma Actuators for Flow Control in Air Vehicles and Jet Engines - Simulation of Flight Conditions in Test Chambers by Density Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma actuators for active flow control in aircraft and jet engines need to be tested in the laboratory to characterize their performance at flight operating conditions. DBD plasma actuators generate a wall-jet electronically by creating weakly ionized plasma, therefore their performance is affected by gas discharge properties, which, in turn, depend on the pressure and temperature at the actuator placement location. Characterization of actuators is initially performed in a laboratory chamber without external flow. The pressure and temperature at the actuator flight operation conditions need to be simultaneously set in the chamber. A simplified approach is desired. It is assumed that the plasma discharge depends only on the gas density, while other temperature effects are assumed to be negligible. Therefore, tests can be performed at room temperature with chamber pressure set to yield the same density as in operating flight conditions. The needed chamber pressures are shown for altitude flight of an air vehicle and for jet engines at sea-level takeoff and altitude cruise conditions. Atmospheric flight conditions are calculated from standard atmosphere with and without shock waves. The engine data was obtained from four generic engine models; 300-, 150-, and 50-passenger (PAX) aircraft engines, and a military jet-fighter engine. The static and total pressure, temperature, and density distributions along the engine were calculated for sea-level takeoff and for altitude cruise conditions. The corresponding chamber pressures needed to test the actuators were calculated. The results show that, to simulate engine component flows at in-flight conditions, plasma actuator should be tested over a wide range of pressures. For the four model engines the range is from 12.4 to 0.03 atm, depending on the placement of the actuator in the engine. For example, if a DBD plasma actuator is to be placed at the compressor exit of a 300 PAX engine, it

  7. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  8. Modified shielding jet model for twin-jet shielding analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.; Gilbride, J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model to estimate the shielding of noise emitted from a point noise source has been developed assuming the shielding jet to be a cylinder of constant radius with uniform flow across the cross section. Comparison to experiment indicated that the model overestimates diffraction of sound around the jet in the far downstream region. The shielding jet model is modified to include widening downstream of the nozzle exit. This not only represents a more realistic model of the jet, but is also expected to improve the shielding estimate downstream. The modified jet model incorporates a Mach number dependent widening rate, a corresponding decrease in flow velocity downstream and an equivalent slug flow evaluation to retain the locally parallel flow approximation of the model development. The shielding analysis with modified jet model is compared to measured data for a subsonic isothermal air jet and a simulated hot subsonic jet. Improvement of the shielding estimate is discussed.

  9. Predator versus Prey: Locust Looming-Detector Neuron and Behavioural Responses to Stimuli Representing Attacking Bird Predators

    PubMed Central

    Santer, Roger D.; Rind, F. Claire; Simmons, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Many arthropods possess escape-triggering neural mechanisms that help them evade predators. These mechanisms are important neuroethological models, but they are rarely investigated using predator-like stimuli because there is often insufficient information on real predator attacks. Locusts possess uniquely identifiable visual neurons (the descending contralateral movement detectors, DCMDs) that are well-studied looming motion detectors. The DCMDs trigger ‘glides’ in flying locusts, which are hypothesised to be appropriate last-ditch responses to the looms of avian predators. To date it has not been possible to study glides in response to stimuli simulating bird attacks because such attacks have not been characterised. We analyse video of wild black kites attacking flying locusts, and estimate kite attack speeds of 10.8±1.4 m/s. We estimate that the loom of a kite’s thorax towards a locust at these speeds should be characterised by a relatively low ratio of half size to speed (l/|v|) in the range 4–17 ms. Peak DCMD spike rate and gliding response occurrence are known to increase as l/|v| decreases for simple looming shapes. Using simulated looming discs, we investigate these trends and show that both DCMD and behavioural responses are strong to stimuli with kite-like l/|v| ratios. Adding wings to looming discs to produce a more realistic stimulus shape did not disrupt the overall relationships of DCMD and gliding occurrence to stimulus l/|v|. However, adding wings to looming discs did slightly reduce high frequency DCMD spike rates in the final stages of object approach, and slightly delay glide initiation. Looming discs with or without wings triggered glides closer to the time of collision as l/|v| declined, and relatively infrequently before collision at very low l/|v|. However, the performance of this system is in line with expectations for a last-ditch escape response. PMID:23209660

  10. Dispositional and comparative optimism interact to predict avoidance of a looming health threat.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Stephanie L; Geers, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that when confronted with a health threat, individuals high in both dispositional and comparative optimism employ a more avoidant style of coping than individuals high in dispositional but low in comparative optimism. We examined the hypothesis that threat distance moderates this interactive optimism association. In two studies, participants were randomly assigned to a looming or distant threat condition. Study 1 revealed that in the looming threat condition, participants high in both forms of optimism were more likely to minimise the threat and less inclined to seek additional health information relative to participants high in dispositional but low in comparative optimism. In Study 2, the same interaction pattern emerged on a measure of psychological abstraction suggesting these variables combine to alter broad information processing strategies. Implications for considering multiple forms of optimism when delivering health status information are discussed.

  11. Speed-invariant encoding of looming object distance requires power law spike rate adaptation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Stephen E; Naud, Richard; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2013-08-13

    Neural representations of a moving object's distance and approach speed are essential for determining appropriate orienting responses, such as those observed in the localization behaviors of the weakly electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus. We demonstrate that a power law form of spike rate adaptation transforms an electroreceptor afferent's response to "looming" object motion, effectively parsing information about distance and approach speed into distinct measures of the firing rate. Neurons with dynamics characterized by fixed time scales are shown to confound estimates of object distance and speed. Conversely, power law adaptation modifies an electroreceptor afferent's response according to the time scales present in the stimulus, generating a rate code for looming object distance that is invariant to speed and acceleration. Consequently, estimates of both object distance and approach speed can be uniquely determined from an electroreceptor afferent's firing rate, a multiplexed neural code operating over the extended time scales associated with behaviorally relevant stimuli.

  12. A looming-sensitive pathway responds to changes in the trajectory of object motion.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Glyn A; Gray, John R

    2012-08-01

    Two identified locust neurons, the lobula giant movement detector (LGMD) and its postsynaptic partner, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD), constitute one motion-sensitive pathway in the visual system that responds preferentially to objects that approach on a direct collision course and are implicated in collision-avoidance behavior. Previously described responses to the approach of paired objects and approaches at different time intervals (Guest BB, Gray JR. J Neurophysiol 95: 1428-1441, 2006) suggest that this pathway may also be affected by more complicated movements in the locust's visual environment. To test this possibility we presented stationary locusts with disks traveling along combinations of colliding (looming), noncolliding (translatory), and near-miss trajectories. Distinctly different responses to different trajectories and trajectory changes demonstrate that DCMD responds to complex aspects of local visual motion. DCMD peak firing rates associated with the time of collision remained relatively invariant after a trajectory change from translation to looming. Translatory motion initiated in the frontal visual field generated a larger peak firing rate relative to object motion initiated in the posterior visual field, and the peak varied with simulated distance from the eye. Transition from translation to looming produced a transient decrease in the firing rate, whereas transition away from looming produced a transient increase. The change in firing rate at the time of transition was strongly correlated with unique expansion parameters described by the instantaneous angular acceleration of the leading edge and subtense angle of the disk. However, response time remained invariant. While these results may reflect low spatial resolution of the compound eye, they also suggest that this motion-sensitive pathway may be capable of monitoring dynamic expansion properties of objects that change the trajectory of motion.

  13. Retinally-generated saccadic suppression of a locust looming-detector neuron: investigations using a robot locust.

    PubMed

    Santer, R D; Stafford, R; Rind, F C

    2004-11-22

    A fundamental task performed by many visual systems is to distinguish apparent motion caused by eye movements from real motion occurring within the environment. During saccadic eye movements, this task is achieved by inhibitory signals of central and retinal origin that suppress the output of motion-detecting neurons. To investigate the retinally-generated component of this suppression, we used a computational model of a locust looming-detecting pathway that experiences saccadic suppression. This model received input from the camera of a mobile robot that performed simple saccade-like movements, allowing the model's response to simplified real stimuli to be tested. Retinally-generated saccadic suppression resulted from two inhibitory mechanisms within the looming-detector's input architecture. One mechanism fed inhibition forward through the network, inhibiting the looming-detector's initial response to movement. The second spread inhibition laterally within the network, suppressing the looming-detector's maintained response to movement. These mechanisms prevent a looming-detector model response to whole-field visual stimuli. In the locust, this mechanism of saccadic suppression may operate in addition to centrally-generated suppression. Because lateral inhibition is a common feature of early visual processing in many organisms, we discuss whether the mechanism of retinally-generated saccadic suppression found in the locust looming-detector model may also operate in these species.

  14. Retinally-generated saccadic suppression of a locust looming-detector neuron: investigations using a robot locust.

    PubMed Central

    Santer, R. D.; Stafford, R.; Rind, F. C.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental task performed by many visual systems is to distinguish apparent motion caused by eye movements from real motion occurring within the environment. During saccadic eye movements, this task is achieved by inhibitory signals of central and retinal origin that suppress the output of motion-detecting neurons. To investigate the retinally-generated component of this suppression, we used a computational model of a locust looming-detecting pathway that experiences saccadic suppression. This model received input from the camera of a mobile robot that performed simple saccade-like movements, allowing the model's response to simplified real stimuli to be tested. Retinally-generated saccadic suppression resulted from two inhibitory mechanisms within the looming-detector's input architecture. One mechanism fed inhibition forward through the network, inhibiting the looming-detector's initial response to movement. The second spread inhibition laterally within the network, suppressing the looming-detector's maintained response to movement. These mechanisms prevent a looming-detector model response to whole-field visual stimuli. In the locust, this mechanism of saccadic suppression may operate in addition to centrally-generated suppression. Because lateral inhibition is a common feature of early visual processing in many organisms, we discuss whether the mechanism of retinally-generated saccadic suppression found in the locust looming-detector model may also operate in these species. PMID:16849153

  15. Nonhomogeneous surface properties of parylene-C film etched by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 micro-plasma jet in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Yang, Chunsheng; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-10-01

    Surface properties of parylene-C film etched by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 micro-plasma jet in ambient air were investigated. The morphologies and chemical compositions of the etched surface were analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS, XPS and ATR-FTIR. The microscopy and SEM images showed the etched surface was nonhomogeneous with six discernable ring patterns from the center to the outside domain, which were composed of (I) a central region; (II) an effective etching region, where almost all of the parylene-C film was removed by the plasma jet with only a little residual parylene-C being functionalized with carboxyl groups (Cdbnd O, Osbnd Cdbnd O-); (III) an inner etching boundary; (IV) a middle etching region, where the film surface was smooth and partially removed; (V) an outer etching boundary, where the surface was decorated with clusters of debris, and (VI) a pristine parylene-C film region. The analysis of the different morphologies and chemical compositions illustrated the different localized etching process in the distinct regions. Besides, the influence of O2 flow rate on the surface properties of the etched parylene-C film was also investigated. Higher volume of O2 tended to weaken the nonhomogeneous characteristics of the etched surface and improve the etched surface quality.

  16. Quantitative tests of the Perceived Relative Argument Model: comment on Loomes (2010).

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Regenwetter, Michel

    2014-10-01

    Loomes (2010, Psychological Review) proposed the Perceived Relative Argument Model (PRAM) as a novel descriptive theory for risky choice. PRAM differs from models like prospect theory in that decision makers do not compare 2 prospects by first assigning each prospect an overall utility and then choosing the prospect with the higher overall utility. Instead, the decision maker determines the relative argument for one or the other prospect separately for outcomes and probabilities, before reaching an overall pairwise preference. Loomes (2010) did not model variability in choice behavior. We consider 2 types of "stochastic specification" of PRAM. In one, a decision maker has a fixed preference, and choice variability is caused by occasional errors/trembles. In the other, the parameters of the perception functions for outcomes and for probabilities are random, with no constraints on their joint distribution. State-of-the-art frequentist and Bayesian "order-constrained" inference suggest that PRAM accounts poorly for individual subject laboratory data from 67 participants. This conclusion is robust across 7 different utility functions for money and remains largely unaltered also when considering a prior unpublished version of PRAM (Loomes, 2006) that featured an additional free parameter in the perception function for probabilities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25347316

  17. Graphene-stabilized copper nanoparticles as an air-stable substitute for silver and gold in low-cost ink-jet printable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luechinger, Norman A.; Athanassiou, Evagelos K.; Stark, Wendelin J.

    2008-11-01

    Metallic copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a bottom-up approach, and in situ coated with protective shells of graphene in order to get a metal nanopowder of high air stability and chemical inertness. Using an amphiphilic surfactant, a water-based copper nanocolloid could be prepared and successfully printed onto a polymer substrate by conventional ink-jet printing using household printers. The dried printed patterns exhibited strong metallic gloss and an electrical conductivity of >1 S cm-1 without the need for a sintering or densification step. This conductivity currently limits use in electronics to low current application or shielding and decorative effects. The high stability of graphene-coated copper nanoparticles makes them economically a most attractive alternative to silver or gold nanocolloids, and will strongly facilitate the industrial use of metal nanocolloids in consumer goods.

  18. Graphene-stabilized copper nanoparticles as an air-stable substitute for silver and gold in low-cost ink-jet printable electronics.

    PubMed

    Luechinger, Norman A; Athanassiou, Evagelos K; Stark, Wendelin J

    2008-11-01

    Metallic copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a bottom-up approach, and in situ coated with protective shells of graphene in order to get a metal nanopowder of high air stability and chemical inertness. Using an amphiphilic surfactant, a water-based copper nanocolloid could be prepared and successfully printed onto a polymer substrate by conventional ink-jet printing using household printers. The dried printed patterns exhibited strong metallic gloss and an electrical conductivity of >1 S cm(-1) without the need for a sintering or densification step. This conductivity currently limits use in electronics to low current application or shielding and decorative effects. The high stability of graphene-coated copper nanoparticles makes them economically a most attractive alternative to silver or gold nanocolloids, and will strongly facilitate the industrial use of metal nanocolloids in consumer goods. PMID:21832722

  19. Counter-gradient transport in the combustion of a premixed CH{sub 4}/air annular jet by combined PIV/OH-LIF

    SciTech Connect

    Troiani, G.; Marrocco, M.; Giammartini, S.; Casciola, C.M.

    2009-03-15

    A combination of PIV/OH laser induced fluorescence technique is used to measure the conditional - burned and unburned - gas velocity in a turbulent premixed CH{sub 4}/air annular bluff-body stabilized burner. By changing the equivalence ratio from lean to almost stoichiometric, the energy budget of the recirculating region anchoring the flame is altered in such a way to increasingly lift the flame away from the jet exit. The overall turbulence intensity interacting with each flame is thus systematically varied in a significant range, allowing for a parametric study of its effect on turbulent scalar transport under well controlled conditions, always well within the flamelet regime. The component of the flux normal to the average front is found to reverse its direction, confirming the Bray number as a good indicator of gradient/counter-gradient behavior, once the actual incoming turbulence level felt locally by the flame is assumed as the proper control parameter. (author)

  20. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  1. Ram jet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Crispin, B.; Pohl, W.D.; Thomaier, D.; Voss, N.

    1983-11-29

    In a ram jet engine, a tubular combustion chamber is divided into a flame chamber followed by a mixing chamber. The ram air is supplied through intake diffusers located on the exterior of the combustion chamber. The intake diffusers supply combustion air directly into the flame chamber and secondary air is conveyed along the exterior of the combustion chambers and then supplied directly into the mixing chamber.

  2. Velocity field near the jet orifice of a round jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Benson, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    Experimentally determined velocities at selected locations near the jet orifice are presented and analyzed for a round jet in crossflow. Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of four and eight were studied experimentally for a round subsonic jet of air exhausting perpendicularly through a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature. Velocity measurements were made in cross sections to the jet plume located from one to four jet diameters from the orifice. Jet centerline and vortex properties are presented and utilized to extend the results of a previous study into the region close to the jet orifice.

  3. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cyrus, J.D.; Kadlec, E.G.; Klimas, P.C.

    1983-09-15

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the end thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby including stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  4. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cyrus, Jack D.; Kadlec, Emil G.; Klimas, Paul C.

    1985-01-01

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the ends thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby inducing stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  5. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen, and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. The paper presents: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions; (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  6. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. Presented are: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions: (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  7. Durability of zirconia thermal-barrier ceramic coatings on air-cooled turbine blades in cyclic jet engine operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Jacobs, R. E.; Stecura, S.; Morse, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal barrier ceramic coatings of stabilized zirconia over a bond coat of Ni Cr Al Y were tested for durability on air cooled turbine rotor blades in a research turbojet engine. Zirconia stabilized with either yttria, magnesia, or calcia was investigated. On the basis of durability and processing cost, the yttria stabilized zirconia was considered the best of the three coatings investigated.

  8. Role of a looming-sensitive neuron in triggering the defense behavior of the praying mantis Tenodera aridifolia.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keiichiro; Yamawaki, Yoshifumi

    2014-08-01

    In responses to looming objects, the praying mantis shows a defense behavior, which consists of retracting forelegs under the prothorax. The role of a looming-sensitive neuron in triggering this behavior was investigated by simultaneously recording the activity and behavioral responses of the neuron. The mantis initiated the defense behavior earlier in response to larger and slower looming stimuli. The time remaining to collision at defense initiation was linearly correlated with the ratio of the half-size of an approaching object to its speed (l/|v|), suggesting that the defense behavior occurred a fixed delay after the stimuli had reached a fixed angular threshold. Furthermore, the results suggested that high-frequency spikes of the looming-sensitive neuron were involved in triggering the defense behavior: the distribution of maximum firing rate for trials with defense was shifted to larger rates compared with trials without defense; the firing rate of the neuron exceeded 150 Hz ∼100 ms before the defense initiation regardless of stimulus parameters; when a looming stimulus ceased approach prematurely, high-frequency spikes were removed, and the occurrence of defense was reduced. PMID:24848471

  9. Beyond abortion: the looming battle over death in the 'culture wars'.

    PubMed

    Evans, James

    2008-08-01

    By concentrating on abortion, the culture wars have avoided facing a crisis about the end of life. This paper explores four themes: (1) the technological transformation of birth and death into matters of decision, not matters of fact; (2) abortion as the nexus of Eros (sex) with Thanatos (death); (3) the real crisis, conveniently masked by our obsession with sex, looming at the end of life, not at its beginning; (4) the surplus-repression that protects us from assuming responsibility for choosing between life and death. PMID:18410462

  10. Beyond abortion: the looming battle over death in the 'culture wars'.

    PubMed

    Evans, James

    2008-08-01

    By concentrating on abortion, the culture wars have avoided facing a crisis about the end of life. This paper explores four themes: (1) the technological transformation of birth and death into matters of decision, not matters of fact; (2) abortion as the nexus of Eros (sex) with Thanatos (death); (3) the real crisis, conveniently masked by our obsession with sex, looming at the end of life, not at its beginning; (4) the surplus-repression that protects us from assuming responsibility for choosing between life and death.

  11. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  12. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  13. Using the tabulated diffusion flamelet model ADF-PCM to simulate a lifted methane-air jet flame

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Colin, Olivier; Angelberger, Christian; Veynante, Denis

    2009-07-15

    Two formulations of a turbulent combustion model based on the approximated diffusion flame presumed conditional moment (ADF-PCM) approach [J.-B. Michel, O. Colin, D. Veynante, Combust. Flame 152 (2008) 80-99] are presented. The aim is to describe autoignition and combustion in nonpremixed and partially premixed turbulent flames, while accounting for complex chemistry effects at a low computational cost. The starting point is the computation of approximate diffusion flames by solving the flamelet equation for the progress variable only, reading all chemical terms such as reaction rates or mass fractions from an FPI-type look-up table built from autoigniting PSR calculations using complex chemistry. These flamelets are then used to generate a turbulent look-up table where mean values are estimated by integration over presumed probability density functions. Two different versions of ADF-PCM are presented, differing by the probability density functions used to describe the evolution of the stoichiometric scalar dissipation rate: a Dirac function centered on the mean value for the basic ADF-PCM formulation, and a lognormal function for the improved formulation referenced ADF-PCM{chi}. The turbulent look-up table is read in the CFD code in the same manner as for PCM models. The developed models have been implemented into the compressible RANS CFD code IFP-C3D and applied to the simulation of the Cabra et al. experiment of a lifted methane jet flame [R. Cabra, J. Chen, R. Dibble, A. Karpetis, R. Barlow, Combust. Flame 143 (2005) 491-506]. The ADF-PCM{chi} model accurately reproduces the experimental lift-off height, while it is underpredicted by the basic ADF-PCM model. The ADF-PCM{chi} model shows a very satisfactory reproduction of the experimental mean and fluctuating values of major species mass fractions and temperature, while ADF-PCM yields noticeable deviations. Finally, a comparison of the experimental conditional probability densities of the progress variable for

  14. Collision avoidance and a looming sensitive neuron: size matters but biggest is not necessarily best.

    PubMed

    Rind, F Claire; Santer, Roger D

    2004-02-01

    Locusts possess visual neurons that can be uniquely identified in each locust and that respond selectively to looming stimuli, giving the animal a warning of impending collision. It has been suggested that one such neuron, the lobula giant movement detector (LGMD), issues this warning by generating a peak in its response that occurs ca. 25 ms after a looming object reaches a subtense of 17 degrees on the eye. This peak is proposed to be a trigger for escape behaviour. We use both modelling and electrophysiological techniques to show that this early peak in LGMD response is not the 'essential functional variable' used naturally by the locust to trigger escape, but rather results from the unnaturally large stimulus used in the previous experimental work. The natural predators of Locusta in Africa, where the locust evolved, are small birds such as the fiscal shrike Lanius collaris humeralis and the carmine bee-eater Merops nubicus, with pectoral diameters of 40-45 mm (measurements from museum specimens). Locusta in flight are less than 100 mm wing tip to wing tip. When a locust views small approaching objects, the response of the LGMD continues to increase throughout the object's approach and the locust is able to trigger escape behaviours without the LGMD response peaking prior to collision.

  15. Jet control carburetor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujikake, K.; Idota, Y.; Ohsawa, K.; Sugiyama, K.

    1982-06-29

    A jet control type carburetor according to the present invention includes an intake pipe having an intake passage formed in an inner wall thereof, the intake passage allowing an intake air to flow therethrough; a venturi provided in the intake pipe, for controlling flow velocity and pressure of the intake air in the intake passage; a fuel nozzle opened into the intake passage and connected to a fuel supply source through a fuel passage for sucking the fuel within the intake passage from the fuel nozzle in order to introduce the mixture of air and fuel within the intake passage; a throttle valve provided downstream of the venturi, for controlling the flow rate of the mixture of intake air and fuel; a control air nozzle opened into the intake passage and connected to an air supply source through a control air passage for jetting the flow of the control air to the fuel spurted from the fuel nozzle to afford the kinetic energy of the control air to the fuel; and a throttle means provided upstream of the control air nozzle in the control air passage, for controlling the flow rate of the control air. The control air nozzle has a predetermined inner diameter (da) and is provided at a portion apart from the fuel nozzle with a predetermined spacing (w), and a dimensional relationship of the spacing W between the fuel nozzle and the control air nozzle to the inner diameter (da) of the control air nozzle is set as follows: w/da < or = 20.

  16. Air atmospheric pressure plasma jet pretreatment for drop-wise loading of dexamethasone on hydroxyapatite scaffold for increase of osteoblast attachment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-10-01

    Periodontal disease affects alveolar bone resorption around the involved teeth. To gain bone height, bone graft materials have been widely used with drug carriers. Application of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) treatment is widely studied due to its ability to change surface characteristics without topographical change. The aim of this study is to identify whether the air APPJ (AAPPJ) treatment before drop-wise loading performance could change loaded amount of dexamethasone, and induce increase of cell attachment and proliferation. The results suggested that AAPPJ treatment decreased the contact angle down to about 13 degrees, which increased gradually but significantly lowered at least 4 days compared to no-treated group. After AAPPJ treatment, hydrocarbon was removed with change of zeta potential into positive charge. However, the AAPPJ treatment did not change the quantity or releasing profile of dexamethasone (p > 0.05). Confocal analysis combined with DNA proliferation analysis showed increase of osteoblast attachment and proliferation. Hence, AAPPJ could be a useful pretreatment method before drop-wise loading on HA scaffold with dexamethasone for increase of osteoblast attachment. PMID:25942843

  17. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix E; Repr. from AIAA Journal, v. 36 p 1346-1360

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230-s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous flame lengths of 49-64 mm Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, soot structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer.The present flames were larger, and emitted soot more readily, than comparable flames observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  18. Reconstruction of Rayleigh-Lamb dispersion spectrum based on noise obtained from an air-jet forcing.

    PubMed

    Larose, Eric; Roux, Philippe; Campillo, Michel

    2007-12-01

    The time-domain cross correlation of incoherent and random noise recorded by a series of passive sensors contains the impulse response of the medium between these sensors. By using noise generated by a can of compressed air sprayed on the surface of a plexiglass plate, we are able to reconstruct not only the time of flight but the whole wave forms between the sensors. From the reconstruction of the direct A(0) and S(0) waves, we derive the dispersion curves of the flexural waves, thus estimating the mechanical properties of the material without a conventional electromechanical source. The dense array of receivers employed here allow a precise frequency-wavenumber study of flexural waves, along with a thorough evaluation of the rate of convergence of the correlation with respect to the record length, the frequency, and the distance between the receivers. The reconstruction of the actual amplitude and attenuation of the impulse response is also addressed in this paper.

  19. Basic data of ions in He-air mixtures for fluid modeling of low temperature plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousfi, M.; Hennad, A.; Benhenni, M.; Eichwald, O.; Merbahi, N.

    2012-08-01

    The basic ion data such as interaction potential parameters, elastic and inelastic collision cross sections, transport coefficients (reduced mobility and diffusion coefficients) and reaction coefficients have been analysed and determined for the case of He+, N2+, and O2+ in He-dry air mixtures. The ion transport and reaction coefficients have been determined from an optimized Monte Carlo simulation using calculated elastic and experimentally fitted inelastic collision cross sections. The elastic momentum transfer cross sections have been calculated from a semi-classical JWKB (Jeffreys Wentzel Kramers Brillouin) approximation based on a (6-4) rigid core interaction potential model. The inelastic cross sections have been fitted using the measured reaction coefficients, such as, for instance, the non resonant charge transfer coefficients. The cross section sets involving elastic and inelastic processes were then validated using either the measured reduced mobility whenever available in the literature or the zero-field mobility calculated from Satoh's relation, and potential parameters available in the literature. From the sets of elastic and inelastic collision cross sections thus obtained for the first time for He+/N2, He+/O2, N2+/He, and O2+/He systems, the ion transport and reaction coefficients were calculated in the pure gases over a wide range of the density reduced electric field E/N. Then, from the present cross section and other literature sets, the ion mobility and the longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients were calculated for different concentrations of air in He in the case of He+, N2+, O2+, and also O- ions.

  20. A theoretical analysis of the extinction limits of a methane-air opposed-jet diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; T'Ien, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is described for a methane-air diffusion flame stabilized in the forward stagnation region of a porous metal cylinder in a forced convective flow. The analysis includes effects of radiative heat loss from the porous metal surface and finite rate kinetics but neglects the effects of gravity. The theoretically predicted extinction limits compare well with experimentally observed extinction limits from the literature. After the predicted limits compared well with the experimental limits, a parametric study of the effect of fuel surface emissivity and Lewis number was conducted with the numerical model. It was found that the computed blowoff limit is independent of radiative heat loss for high fuel blowing velocities but is a strong function of Lewis number. At low fuel blowing velocities, the extinction limit varies with both radiative heat loss and Lewis number. It is discovered, however, that even if thermal losses from the fuel surface are absent, the flame can extinguish at the fuel surface independently of Lewis number due to excessive reaction zone thinning.

  1. Investigation of two plane parallel jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, H.; Gahin, S.; Rashed, M. I. I.

    1983-07-01

    Flow measurements made downstream from two air jets are reported. The exit Re was 20,000 and turbulence was kept to 1 pct. X-wire constant temperature anemometers were employed to measure the mean velocities and the three component turbulent intensities. Data were gathered on the flowfield of both a single jet and from two jets. A velocity profile from two jets was found to be similar to that of a single jet, with the combined jets width spreading linearly downstream as a single jet, but with a slightly lower spread angle. The turbulent velocity fluctuations were, however, dissimilar up to 120 nozzle diameters downstream. Finally, the maximum shear stress was nearly the same with two jets as with one jet.

  2. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  3. Prioritization of factors impacting on performance of power looms using AHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulange, S. R.; Pundir, A. K.; Ganapathy, L.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the critical success factors influencing the performance of power loom textiles, to evaluate their impact on the organizational performance and to find out the effect of these factors on the organizational performance of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the Solapur (Maharashtra) industrial sector using AHP. In the methodology adopted, factors are identified through the literature survey and finalization of these factors is done by taking the opinion of experts in the Indian context. By cognitive map, the relation between these factors (direct and indirect effect) is determined and cause and effect diagram is prepared. Then these factors are arranged hierarchically and tree diagram is prepared. A questionnaire was designed and distributed among the experts; data is collected. Using expert choice software data is filled to quantify by pair-wise comparison of these factors and are prioritized. The weights demonstrate several key findings: local and global priority reveals that there is a substantial effect of the human resource, product style, and volume on the organizational performance. The skills and technology upgradation impact on organizational performance. Maintenance plays an important role in improving the organizational performances of the SMEs. Overall, the results showed the central role of the operational factors are important. The research is subject to the normal limitations of AHP. The study is using perceptual data provided by Experts which may not provide clear measures of impact factors. However, this can be overcome using more experts to collect data in future studies. Interestingly, the findings here may be generalisable outside Solapur like Ichalkarnji, Malegaon, and Bhiwadi (Maharashtra). Solapur power loom SMEs should consider AHP as an innovative tool for quantification of factors impacting on performance and improving operational and organizational performance in today's dynamic

  4. 75 FR 39046 - Russell Brands, LLC, Fabrics Division, a Subsidiary of Fruit of the Loom, Including Employees...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Loom, Including Employees Working Off-Site In New York, Alexander City, AL; Amended Certification... occurred involving employees under the control of the subject firm working off- site in New York. The... published in the Federal Register on January 25, 2010 (75 FR 3930). At the request of the State agency,...

  5. IN-SITU AIR INJECTION, SOIL VACUUM EXTRACTION AND ENHANCED BIODEGRADATION: A CASE STUDY IN A JP-4 JET FUEL CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) conducted a joint demonstration of in situ remediation of a JP-4 jet fuel spill at the USCG Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. The jet fuel was trapped beneath a clay layer that ext...

  6. Water Jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  7. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  8. Crossmodal enhancement of visual orientation discrimination by looming sounds requires functional activation of primary visual areas: a case study.

    PubMed

    Cecere, Roberto; Romei, Vincenzo; Bertini, Caterina; Làdavas, Elisabetta

    2014-04-01

    Approaching or looming sounds are salient, potentially threatening stimuli with particular impact on visual processing. The early crossmodal effects by looming sounds (Romei, Murray, Cappe, & Thut, 2009) and their selective impact on visual orientation discrimination (Leo, Romei, Freeman, Ladavas, & Driver, 2011) suggest that these multisensory interactions may take place already within low-level visual cortices. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested a patient (SDV) with bilateral occipital lesion and spared residual portions of V1/V2. Accordingly, SDV׳s visual perimetry revealed blindness of the central visual field with some residual peripheral vision. In two experiments we tested for the influence of looming vs. receding and stationary sounds on SDV׳s line orientation discrimination (orientation discrimination experiment) and visual detection abilities (detection experiment) in the preserved or blind portions of the visual field, corresponding to spared and lesioned areas of V1, respectively. In the visual orientation discrimination experiment we found that SDV visual orientation sensitivity significantly improved for visual targets paired with looming sounds but only for lines presented in the partially preserved visual field. In the visual detection experiment, where SDV was required to simply detect the same stimuli presented in the orientation discrimination experiment, a generalised sound-induced visual improvement both in the intact and in blind portion of the visual field was observed. These results provide direct evidence that early visual areas are critically involved in crossmodal modulation of visual orientation sensitivity by looming sounds. Thus, a lesion in V1 prevents the enhancement of visual orientation sensitivity. In contrast, the same lesion does not prevent the visual detection enhancement by a sound, probably due to alternative visual pathways (e.g. retino-colliculo-extrastriate) which are usually spared in these patients and able to

  9. Behavior of turbulent gas jets in an axisymmetric confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The understanding of the mixing of confined turbulent jets of different densities with air is of great importance to many industrial applications, such as gas turbine and Ramjet combustors. Although there have been numerous studies on the characteristics of free gas jets, little is known of the behavior of gas jets in a confinement. The jet, with a diameter of 8.73 mm, is aligned concentrically in a tube of 125 mm diameter, thus giving a confinement ratio of approximately 205. The arrangement forms part of the test section of an open-jet wind tunnel. Experiments are carried out with carbon dioxide, air and helium/air jets at different jet velocities. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are made with a one-color, one-component laser Doppler velocimeter operating in the forward scatter mode. Measurements show that the jets are highly dissipative. Consequently, equilibrium jet characteristics similar to those found in free air jets are observed in the first two diameters downstream of the jet. These results are independent of the fluid densities and velocities. Decay of the jet, on the other hand, is a function of both the jet fluid density and momentum. In all the cases studied, the jet is found to be completely dissipated in approximately 30 jet diameters, thus giving rise to a uniform flow with a very high but constant turbulence field across the confinement.

  10. Hypersonic jet control effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Stollery, J. L.; Smith, A. J.

    The present study aims to identify some of the parameters which determine the upstream extent and the lateral spreading of the separation front around an under-expanded transverse jet on a slender blunted cone. The tests were conducted in the Cranfield hypersonic facility at M∞ = 8.2, Re∞ /cm = 4.5 to 9.0 × 104 and at M∞ = 12.3, Re∞ /cm = 3.3 × 104. Air was used as the working gas for both the freestream and the jet. Schlieren pictures were used for the visualisation of the three-dimensional structures around the jet. Pressure, normal force and pitching moment measurements were conducted to quantitatively study the interaction region and its effects on the vehicle. An analytical algorithm has been developed to predict the shape of the separation front around the body.

  11. Measurements of Shaped Charge Jet Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2013-06-01

    Penetration depth is an important requirement in oil/gas well perforating jobs. The depth determines how far the wellbore can directly communicate with reservoir fluids. Deep perforation charges are widely used in oilfield industry and most of those are powder metal liner charge for no carrot-like slug left as solid liner does. Comprehensive measurements for the powder metal liner shaped charge jet characteristics, namely, the jet density and velocity, are needed to predict the shaped charge performance and to plan the perforating job. This paper focuses on an experimental work of jet velocity measurements. A medium size of powder metal liner charges (27 grams HMX) is used in the tests. The powder jet shoots through a stack of limestone blocks with shorting switch set in between. Half inch air-gap between two blocks is design to provide space for jet traveling in air to record free fly velocity, meanwhile the jet penetration velocity in the limestone is measured. Aluminum foil switches are used to record the jet Time of Arrival (TOA). The charged switch shorted by the metal jet when it arrives. The shorting signal is recorded. The two velocities can be used to estimate the jet penetration effectiveness. A series of TOA tests show that jet velocity along its length linearly decreases from jet tip to tail until the stagnation points referring to which jet material moves in opposite direction.

  12. Investigation of air stream from combustor-liner air entry holes, 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiba, T.; Nakano, T.

    1979-01-01

    Jets flowing from air entry holes of the combustor liner of a gas turbine were investigated. Cold air was supplied through the air entry holes into the primary hot gas flows. The mass flow of the primary hot gas and issuing jets was measured, and the behavior of the air jets was studied by the measurement of the temperature distribution of the gas mixture. The air jets flowing from three circular air entry holes, single streamwise long holes, and two opposing circular holes, parallel to the primary flow were studied along with the effects of jet and gas stream velocities, and of gas temperature. The discharge coefficient, the maximum penetration of the jets, the jet flow path, the mixing of the jets, and temperature distribution across the jets were investigated. Empirical expressions which describe the characteristics of the jets under the conditions of the experiments were formulated.

  13. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Axisymmetric Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.; Grigsby, Carl E.; Lee, Louise P.; Woodling, Mildred J.

    1959-01-01

    Some experimental and theoretical studies have been made of axisymmetric free jets exhausting from sonic and supersonic nozzles into still air and into supersonic streams with a view toward problems associated with propulsive jets and the investigation of these problems. For jets exhausting into still air, consideration is given to the effects of jet Mach number, nozzle divergence angle, and jet static pressure ratio upon jet structure, jet wavelength, and the shape and curvature of the jet boundary. Studies of the effects of the ratio of specific heats of the jets are included are observations pertaining to jet noise and jet simulation. For jets exhausting into supersonic streams, an attempt has been made to present primarily theoretical certain jet interference effects and in formulating experimental studies. The primary variables considered are jet Mach number, free stream Mach number, jet static pressure ratio, ratio of specific heats of the jet, nozzle exit angle, and boattail angle. The simulation problem and the case of a hypothetical hypersonic vehicle are examined, A few experimental observations are included.

  15. Sex, acceleration, brain imaging, and rhesus monkeys: Converging evidence for an evolutionary bias for looming auditory motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhoff, John G.

    2003-04-01

    Increasing acoustic intensity is a primary cue to looming auditory motion. Perceptual overestimation of increasing intensity could provide an evolutionary selective advantage by specifying that an approaching sound source is closer than actual, thus affording advanced warning and more time than expected to prepare for the arrival of the source. Here, multiple lines of converging evidence for this evolutionary hypothesis are presented. First, it is shown that intensity change specifying accelerating source approach changes in loudness more than equivalent intensity change specifying decelerating source approach. Second, consistent with evolutionary hunter-gatherer theories of sex-specific spatial abilities, it is shown that females have a significantly larger bias for rising intensity than males. Third, using functional magnetic resonance imaging in conjunction with approaching and receding auditory motion, it is shown that approaching sources preferentially activate a specific neural network responsible for attention allocation, motor planning, and translating perception into action. Finally, it is shown that rhesus monkeys also exhibit a rising intensity bias by orienting longer to looming tones than to receding tones. Together these results illustrate an adaptive perceptual bias that has evolved because it provides a selective advantage in processing looming acoustic sources. [Work supported by NSF and CDC.

  16. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  17. Spatiotemporal stimulus properties modulate responses to trajectory changes in a locust looming-sensitive pathway.

    PubMed

    Dick, Paul C; Gray, John R

    2014-05-01

    The lobula giant movement detector (LGMD) and descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD) constitute one motion-sensitive pathway in the locust visual system that is implicated in collision-avoidance behaviors. While this pathway is thought to respond preferentially to objects approaching on a direct collision course, emerging studies suggest the firing rate is able to monitor more complicated movements that would occur under natural conditions. While previous studies have compared the response of the DCMD to objects on collision courses that travel at different speeds, velocity has not been manipulated for other simple or compound trajectories. Here we test the possibility that the LGMD/DCMD pathway is capable of responding uniquely to complex aspects of object motion, including translation and trajectory changes at different velocities. We found that the response of the DCMD to translational motion initiated in the caudal visual field was a low-amplitude peak in firing rate that occurred before the object crossed 90° azimuth that was invariant to different object velocities. Direct looms at different velocities resulted in peak firing rates that occurred later in time and with greater amplitude for higher velocities. In response to transitions from translational motion to a collision course, the firing rate change depended on both the location within the visual field and the velocity. These results suggest that this pathway is capable of conveying information about multiple properties of a moving object's trajectory.

  18. Collision-avoidance behaviors of minimally restrained flying locusts to looming stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Chan, R. WM.; Gabbiani, F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Visually guided collision avoidance is of paramount importance in flight, for instance to allow escape from potential predators. Yet, little is known about the types of collision-avoidance behaviors that may be generated by flying animals in response to an impending visual threat. We studied the behavior of minimally restrained locusts flying in a wind tunnel as they were subjected to looming stimuli presented to the side of the animal, simulating the approach of an object on a collision course. Using high-speed movie recordings, we observed a wide variety of collision-avoidance behaviors including climbs and dives away from – but also towards – the stimulus. In a more restrained setting, we were able to relate kinematic parameters of the flapping wings with yaw changes in the trajectory of the animal. Asymmetric wing flapping was most strongly correlated with changes in yaw, but we also observed a substantial effect of wing deformations. Additionally, the effect of wing deformations on yaw was relatively independent of that of wing asymmetries. Thus, flying locusts exhibit a rich range of collision-avoidance behaviors that depend on several distinct aerodynamic characteristics of wing flapping flight. PMID:23364572

  19. Defence behaviours of the praying mantis Tenodera aridifolia in response to looming objects.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, Yoshifumi

    2011-11-01

    Defence responses to approaching objects were observed in the mantis Tenodera aridifolia. The mantis showed three kinds of behaviour, fixation, evasion and cryptic reaction. The cryptic reaction consisted of rapid retraction of the forelegs under the prothorax or rapid extending of the forelegs in the forward direction. Obstructing the mantis' sight decreased its response rates, suggesting that the visual stimuli generated by an approaching object elicited the cryptic reaction. The response rate of the cryptic reactions was highest for objects that approached on a direct collision course. Deviation in a horizontal direction from the direct collision course resulted in a reduced response. The response rate of the cryptic reaction increased as the approaching velocity of the object increased, and the rate decreased as the object ceased its approach at a greater distance from the mantis. These results suggest that the function of the observed cryptic reactions is defence against impending collisions. The possible role of the looming-sensitive neuron in the cryptic reaction is also discussed. PMID:21851823

  20. Spatiotemporal stimulus properties modulate responses to trajectory changes in a locust looming-sensitive pathway.

    PubMed

    Dick, Paul C; Gray, John R

    2014-05-01

    The lobula giant movement detector (LGMD) and descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD) constitute one motion-sensitive pathway in the locust visual system that is implicated in collision-avoidance behaviors. While this pathway is thought to respond preferentially to objects approaching on a direct collision course, emerging studies suggest the firing rate is able to monitor more complicated movements that would occur under natural conditions. While previous studies have compared the response of the DCMD to objects on collision courses that travel at different speeds, velocity has not been manipulated for other simple or compound trajectories. Here we test the possibility that the LGMD/DCMD pathway is capable of responding uniquely to complex aspects of object motion, including translation and trajectory changes at different velocities. We found that the response of the DCMD to translational motion initiated in the caudal visual field was a low-amplitude peak in firing rate that occurred before the object crossed 90° azimuth that was invariant to different object velocities. Direct looms at different velocities resulted in peak firing rates that occurred later in time and with greater amplitude for higher velocities. In response to transitions from translational motion to a collision course, the firing rate change depended on both the location within the visual field and the velocity. These results suggest that this pathway is capable of conveying information about multiple properties of a moving object's trajectory. PMID:24478154

  1. Escape response of the crab Neohelice to computer generated looming and translational visual danger stimuli.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Florencia; Tomsic, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Historically, arthropod behavior has been considered to be a collection of simple, automaton-like routines commanded by domain-specific brain modules working independently. Nowadays, it is evident that the extensive behavioral repertoire of these animals and its flexibility necessarily imply far more complex abilities than originally assumed. For example, even what was thought to be a straightforward behavior of crabs, the escape response to visual danger stimuli, proved to involve a number of sequential stages, each of which implying decisions made on the bases of stimulus and contextual information. Inspired in previous observations on how the stimulus trajectory can affect the escape response of crabs in the field, we investigated the escape response to images of objects approaching directly toward the crab (looming stimuli: LS) or moving parallel to it (translational stimuli: TS) in the laboratory. Computer simulations of moving objects were effective to elicit escapes. LS evoked escapes with higher probability and intensity (speed and distance of escape) than TS, but responses started later. In addition to the escape run, TS also evoked a defensive response of the animal with its claws. Repeated presentations of TS or LS were both capable of inducing habituation. Results are discussed in connection with the possibilities offered by crabs to investigate the neural bases of behaviors occurring in the natural environment.

  2. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  3. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  4. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  5. An Experimental and CFD Study of a Supersonic Coaxial Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; White, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    A supersonic coaxial jet facility is designed and experimental data are acquired suitable for the validation of CFD codes employed in the analysis of high-speed air-breathing engines. The center jet is of a light gas, the coflow jet is of air, and the mixing layer between them is compressible. The jet flow field is characterized using schlieren imaging, surveys with pitot, total temperature and gas sampling probes, and RELIEF velocimetry. VULCAN, a structured grid CFD code, is used to solve for the nozzle and jet flow, and the results are compared to the experiment for several variations of the kappa - omega turbulence model

  6. Application of the theory of free jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A; Petersohn, E

    1932-01-01

    Based upon Kirchoff's theory of free jets the flow through different screen arrangements of flat plates, as chiefly encountered with turbines in the cavitation zone is defined. It is shown by experiments that these theoretical results are very well representative in most cases of the conditions of discharge from water in air and consequently by cavitation. In addition, the experiments reveal a picture of the discrepancies between the actual flow and the theory of discharge of air in air (of water in water without cavitation). These discrepancies are explained qualitatively by the mingling processes between the jets and the dead air zones.

  7. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, Scott D.; Farrington, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  8. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  9. Idealised simulations of sting jet cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Laura; Gray, Suzanne; Clark, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Extratropical cyclones often produce strong surface winds, mostly associated with low-level jets along the warm and cold fronts. Some severe extratropical cyclones have been found to produce an additional area of localised strong, and potentially very damaging, surface winds during a certain part of their development. These strong winds are associated with air that originates within the cloud head, exiting at the tip of the cloud head and descending rapidly from there to the surface. This rapidly descending air associated with the strong surface winds is known as a sting jet. Previous published work on sting jets has been limited to analyses of only a small number of case studies of observed sting jet cyclones, so a study of idealised sting jet cyclones, rather than specific cases, will be useful in determining the important features and mechanisms that lead to sting jets. This work focuses on an idealised simulation of a cyclone with a sting jet using a periodic channel configuration of the idealised nonhydrostatic Met Office Unified Model. The idealised cyclone simulation is based on baroclinic lifecycle simulations run at sufficiently high resolution for a sting jet to be generated. An analysis of the idealised cyclone and a comparison of the idealised cyclone with case studies of observed sting jet cyclones will be presented.

  10. Burst Firing in a Motion-Sensitive Neural Pathway Correlates with Expansion Properties of Looming Objects that Evoke Avoidance Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Glyn A.; Gray, John R.

    2015-01-01

    The locust visual system contains a well-defined motion-sensitive pathway that transfers visual input to motor centers involved in predator evasion and collision avoidance. One interneuron in this pathway, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD), is typically described as using rate coding; edge expansion of approaching objects causes an increased rate of neuronal firing that peaks after a certain retinal threshold angle is exceeded. However, evidence of intrinsic DCMD bursting properties combined with observable oscillations in mean firing rates and tight clustering of spikes in raw traces, suggest that bursting may be important for motion detection. Sensory neuron bursting provides important timing information about dynamic stimuli in many model systems, yet no studies have rigorously investigated if bursting occurs in the locust DCMD during object approach. We presented repetitions of 30 looming stimuli known to generate behavioral responses to each of 20 locusts in order to identify and quantify putative bursting activity in the DCMD. Overall, we found a bimodal distribution of inter-spike intervals (ISI) with peaks of more frequent and shorter ISIs occurring from 1–8 ms and longer less frequent ISIs occurring from 40–50 ms. Subsequent analysis identified bursts and isolated single spikes from the responses. Bursting frequency increased in the latter phase of an approach and peaked at the time of collision, while isolated spiking was predominant during the beginning of stimulus approach. We also found that the majority of inter-burst intervals (IBIs) occurred at 40–50 ms (or 20–25 bursts/s). Bursting also occurred across varied stimulus parameters and suggests that burst timing may be a key component of looming detection. Our findings suggest that the DCMD uses two modes of coding to transmit information about looming stimuli and that these modes change dynamically with a changing stimulus at a behaviorally-relevant time. PMID:26696845

  11. Turbulent Jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, B. H.; Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Perry, T. S.; Steinkamp, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Gittings, M. L.; Coker, R. F.; Keiter, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Drake, R. P.; Remington, B. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Campbell, R. B.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2003-10-01

    Over the last few years we have fielded numerous supersonic jet experiments on the NOVA and OMEGA lasers and Sandia's pulsed-power Z-machine in a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Atomic Weapons Establishment, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. These experiments are being conducted to help validate our radiation-hydrodynamic codes, especially the newly developing ASC codes. One of the outstanding questions is whether these types of jets should turn turbulent given their high Reynolds number. Recently we have modified our experiments to have more Kelvin-Helmholtz shear, run much later in time and therefore have a better chance of going turbulent. In order to diagnose these large (several mm) jets at very late times ( 1000 ns) we are developing point-projection imaging on both the OMEGA laser, the Sandia Z-Machine, and ultimately at NIF. Since these jets have similar Euler numbers to jets theorized to be produced in supernovae explosions, we are also collaborating with the astrophysics community to help in the validation of their new codes. This poster will present a review of the laser and pulsed-power experiments and a comparison of the data to simulations by the codes from the various laboratories. We will show results of simulations wherein these jets turn highly 3-dimensional and show characteristics of turbulence. With the new data, we hope to be able to validate the sub-grid-scale turbulent mix models (e. g. BHR) that are being incorporated into our codes.*This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48, the Laboratory for Laser Energetics under Contract No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, Sandia National Laboratories under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Astrophysical Theory Grant.

  12. Dysfunctional Freezing Responses to Approaching Stimuli in Persons with a Looming Cognitive Style for Physical Threats

    PubMed Central

    Riskind, John H.; Sagliano, Laura; Trojano, Luigi; Conson, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Immobilizing freezing responses are associated with anxiety and may be etiologically related to several anxiety disorders. Although recent studies have sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms in freezing responses that are so problematic in many forms of anxiety, cognitive factors related to anxiety have not been investigated. This study was designed to investigate the potential moderating role of a well-documented cognitive vulnerability to anxiety, the Looming Cognitive Style (i.e., LCS; Riskind et al., 2000), which assesses the extent to which individuals tend to routinely interpret ambiguous threats (e.g., physical or social threats) in a biased manner as approaching. We assessed participants' Reaction Times (RTs) when they made judgments about images of animals that differed in threat valence (threat or neutral) and motion direction (approach or recede). As expected, LCS for concerns about the approach of physical dangers appeared to moderate freeze reactions. Individuals who were high on this LCS factor tended to generally exhibit a freeze-response (slower RTs) and this was independent of the threat valence or motion direction of the animals. These general freezing reactions were in stark contrast to those of individuals who were low on the LCS factor for concerns about the approach of physical dangers. These participants tended to exhibit more selective and functional freezing responses that occurred only to threatening animals with approach motion; they did not exhibit freezing to neutral stimuli or any stimuli with receding motion. These findings did not appear to be explicable by a general slowing of RTs for the participants with high LCS. Moreover, the LCS factor for concerns about social threats (such as rejection or embarrassment) was not related to differences in freezing; there was also no additional relationship of freezing to behavioral inhibition scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System and the Behavioral Activation System Scales (BIS

  13. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  14. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  15. Knowledge based jet engine diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jellison, Timothy G.; Dehoff, Ronald L.

    1987-01-01

    A fielded expert system automates equipment fault isolation and recommends corrective maintenance action for Air Force jet engines. The knowledge based diagnostics tool was developed as an expert system interface to the Comprehensive Engine Management System, Increment IV (CEMS IV), the standard Air Force base level maintenance decision support system. XMAM (trademark), the Expert Maintenance Tool, automates procedures for troubleshooting equipment faults, provides a facility for interactive user training, and fits within a diagnostics information feedback loop to improve the troubleshooting and equipment maintenance processes. The application of expert diagnostics to the Air Force A-10A aircraft TF-34 engine equipped with the Turbine Engine Monitoring System (TEMS) is presented.

  16. Jets and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-03-01

    This Letter applies the concept of “jets,” as constructed from calorimeter cell four-vectors, to jets composed (primarily) of photons (or leptons). Thus jets become a superset of both traditional objects such as QCD jets, photons, and electrons, and more unconventional objects such as photon jets and electron jets, defined as collinear photons and electrons, respectively. Since standard objects such as single photons become a subset of jets in this approach, standard jet substructure techniques are incorporated into the photon finder toolbox. Using a (reasonably) realistic calorimeter model we demonstrate that, for a single photon identification efficiency of 80% or above, the use of jet substructure techniques reduces the number of QCD jets faking photons by factors of 2.5 to 4. Depending on the topology of the photon jets, the substructure variables reduce the number of photon jets faking single photons by factors of 10 to 103 at a single photon identification efficiency of 80%.

  17. Full-scale testing and early production results from horizontal air sparging and soil vapor extraction wells remediating jet fuel in soil and groundwater at JFK International Airport, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.J.; Bianco, P.; Kirshner, M.; Pressly, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Jet fuel contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated at the International Arrivals Building (IAB) of the JFK International Airport in Jamaica, New York, are being remediated using soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). The areal extent of the contaminated soil is estimated to be 70 acres and the volume of contaminated groundwater is estimated to be 2.3 million gallons. The remediation uses approximately 13,000 feet of horizontal SVE (HSVE) wells and 7,000 feet of horizontal AS (HAS) wells. The design of the HSVE and HAS wells was based on a pilot study followed by a full-scale test. In addition to the horizontal wells, 28 vertical AS wells and 15 vertical SVE wells are used. Three areas are being remediated, thus, three separate treatment systems have been installed. The SVE and AS wells are operated continuously while groundwater will be intermittently extracted at each HAS well, treated by liquid phase activated carbon and discharged into stormwater collection sewerage. Vapors extracted by the SVE wells are treated by vapor phase activated carbon and discharged into ambient air. The duration of the remediation is anticipated to be between two and three years before soil and groundwater are remediated to New York State cleanup criteria for the site. Based on the monitoring data for the first two months of operation, approximately 14,600 lbs. of vapor phase VOCs have been extracted. Analyses show that the majority of the VOCs are branched alkanes, branched alkenes, cyclohexane and methylated cyclohexanes.

  18. Business Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Learjet Inc.'s Learjet 31 and Learjet 55C both feature NASA developed winglets, nearly vertical extensions of the wing designed to reduce fuel consumption and generally improve airplane's performance. Winglets are lifting surfaces designed to operate in the vortex or air whirlpool that occurs at an airplanes wingtip. This complex flow of air creates air drag; the winglets job is to reduce the strength of the vortex and thereby substantially reduce drag, additionally the winglet generates its own lift producing forward thrust in the manner of a sailboat's sail. Combination of reduced drag and additional thrust adds up to improvement in fuel efficiency.

  19. Single and multiple jet impingement heat transfer on rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, D. E.; Partipilo, V. A.

    1989-01-01

    In some gas turbine engine designs cooling air jets are directed at the rotating disk in an atempt to enhance the convection coefficients and reduce the amount of gas flow required for cooling. The jet-impingement scheme is particularly attractive for achieving intense cooling at a specific radial location, such as the blade attachment region. In earlier single-jet studies, the interaction between an impinging jet and rotating disk has been found to involve a flow regime transition. The present study extends the previously acquired data base with new results from both heat-transfer and flow-visualization testing, including effects of hub size, jet travel distance, and the number of jets. Results include a superposition scheme for predicting heat transfer for multiple jets and a criterion for the minimum amount of flow required through each jet nozzle to assure enhancement of the disk convection.

  20. THE APPLICATION OF JET REMPI/TOFMS TO REAL-TIME MONITORING OF DIOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An advanced rapid monitoring technology, Jet Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization, (Jet REMPI) is being applied to the measurement of air toxics, including chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (CDD/CDF), for mechanistic understanding, process monitoring, and regulat...

  1. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  2. Parabolic maneuvers of the Swiss Air Force fighter jet F-5E as a research platform for cell culture experiments in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Marc; Bradacs, Gesine; Hilliger, Andre; Hürlimann, Eva; Engeli, Stephanie; Thiel, Cora S.; Zeitner, Peter; Denier, Beat; Binggeli, Markus; Syburra, Thomas; Egli, Marcel; Engelmann, Frank; Ullrich, Oliver

    2011-06-01

    Long-term sensitivity of human cells to reduced gravity has been supposed since the first Apollo missions and was demonstrated during several space missions in the past. However, little information is available on primary and rapid gravi-responsive elements in mammalian cells. In search of rapid-responsive molecular alterations in mammalian cells, short-term microgravity provided by parabolic flight maneuvers is an ideal way to elucidate such initial and primary effects. Modern biomedical research at the cellular and molecular level requires frequent repetition of experiments that are usually performed in sequences of experiments and analyses. Therefore, a research platform on Earth providing frequent, easy and repeated access to real microgravity for cell culture experiments is strongly desired. For this reason, we developed a research platform onboard the military fighter jet aircraft Northrop F-5E "Tiger II". The experimental system consists of a programmable and automatically operated system composed of six individual experiment modules, placed in the front compartment, which work completely independent of the aircraft systems. Signal transduction pathways in cultured human cells can be investigated after the addition of an activator solution at the onset of microgravity and a fixative or lysis buffer after termination of microgravity. Before the beginning of a regular military training flight, a parabolic maneuver was executed. After a 1 g control phase, the parabolic maneuver starts at 13,000 ft and at Mach 0.99 airspeed, where a 22 s climb with an acceleration of 2.5 g is initiated, following a free-fall ballistic Keplerian trajectory lasting 45 s with an apogee of 27,000 ft at Mach 0.4 airspeed. Temperature, pressure and acceleration are monitored constantly during the entire flight. Cells and activator solutions are kept at 37 °C during the entire experiment until the fixative has been added. The parabolic flight profile provides up to 45 s of

  3. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  4. Singular Jets and Bubbles in Drop Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis; Josserand, Christophe; Bonn, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    We show that when water droplets gently impact on a hydrophobic surface, the droplet shoots out a violent jet, the velocity of which can be up to 40 times the drop impact speed. As a function of the impact velocity, two different hydrodynamic singularities are found that correspond to the collapse of the air cavity formed by the deformation of the drop at impact. It is the collapse that subsequently leads to the jet formation. We show that the divergence of the jet velocity can be understood using simple scaling arguments. In addition, we find that very large air bubbles can remain trapped in the drops. The surprising occurrence of the bubbles for low-speed impact is connected with the nature of the singularities, and can have important consequences for drop deposition, e.g., in ink-jet printing.

  5. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  6. Bilateral flight muscle activity predicts wing kinematics and 3-dimensional body orientation of locusts responding to looming objects.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Glyn A; Loessin, Vicky; Gray, John R

    2013-09-01

    We placed locusts in a wind tunnel using a loose tether design that allowed for motion in all three rotational degrees of freedom during presentation of a computer-generated looming disc. High-speed video allowed us to extract wing kinematics, abdomen position and 3-dimensional body orientation. Concurrent electromyographic (EMG) recordings monitored bilateral activity from the first basalar depressor muscles (m97) of the forewings, which are implicated in flight steering. Behavioural responses to a looming disc included cessation of flight (wings folded over the body), glides and active steering during sustained flight in addition to a decrease and increase in wingbeat frequency prior to and during, respectively, an evasive turn. Active steering involved shifts in bilateral m97 timing, wing asymmetries and whole-body rotations in the yaw (ψ), pitch (χ) and roll (η) planes. Changes in abdomen position and hindwing asymmetries occurred after turns were initiated. Forewing asymmetry and changes in η were most highly correlated with m97 spike latency. Correlations also increased as the disc approached, peaking prior to collision. On the inside of a turn, m97 spikes occurred earlier relative to forewing stroke reversal and bilateral timing corresponded to forewing asymmetry as well as changes in whole-body rotation. Double spikes in each m97 occurred most frequently at or immediately prior to the time the locusts turned, suggesting a behavioural significance. These data provide information on mechanisms underlying 3-dimensional flight manoeuvres and will be used to drive a closed loop flight simulator to study responses of motion-sensitive visual neurons during production of realistic behaviours.

  7. Bilateral flight muscle activity predicts wing kinematics and 3-dimensional body orientation of locusts responding to looming objects.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Glyn A; Loessin, Vicky; Gray, John R

    2013-09-01

    We placed locusts in a wind tunnel using a loose tether design that allowed for motion in all three rotational degrees of freedom during presentation of a computer-generated looming disc. High-speed video allowed us to extract wing kinematics, abdomen position and 3-dimensional body orientation. Concurrent electromyographic (EMG) recordings monitored bilateral activity from the first basalar depressor muscles (m97) of the forewings, which are implicated in flight steering. Behavioural responses to a looming disc included cessation of flight (wings folded over the body), glides and active steering during sustained flight in addition to a decrease and increase in wingbeat frequency prior to and during, respectively, an evasive turn. Active steering involved shifts in bilateral m97 timing, wing asymmetries and whole-body rotations in the yaw (ψ), pitch (χ) and roll (η) planes. Changes in abdomen position and hindwing asymmetries occurred after turns were initiated. Forewing asymmetry and changes in η were most highly correlated with m97 spike latency. Correlations also increased as the disc approached, peaking prior to collision. On the inside of a turn, m97 spikes occurred earlier relative to forewing stroke reversal and bilateral timing corresponded to forewing asymmetry as well as changes in whole-body rotation. Double spikes in each m97 occurred most frequently at or immediately prior to the time the locusts turned, suggesting a behavioural significance. These data provide information on mechanisms underlying 3-dimensional flight manoeuvres and will be used to drive a closed loop flight simulator to study responses of motion-sensitive visual neurons during production of realistic behaviours. PMID:23737560

  8. Noise suppressor for turbo fan jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A noise suppressor is disclosed for installation on the discharge or aft end of a turbo fan engine. Within the suppressor are fixed annular airfoils which are positioned to reduce the relative velocity between the high temperature fast moving jet exhaust and the low temperature slow moving air surrounding it. Within the suppressor nacelle is an exhaust jet nozzle which constrains the shape of the jet exhaust to a substantially uniform elongate shape irrespective of the power setting of the engine. Fixed ring airfoils within the suppressor nacelle therefore have the same salutary effects irrespective of the power setting at which the engine is operated.

  9. Silver Ink For Jet Printing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.; Singaram, Saraswathi

    1989-01-01

    Metallo-organic ink containing silver (with some bismuth as adhesion agent) applied to printed-circuit boards and pyrolized in air to form electrically conductive patterns. Ink contains no particles of silver, does not have to be mixed during use to maintain homogeneity, and applied to boards by ink-jet printing heads. Consists of silver neodecanoate and bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in xylene and/or toluene.

  10. Jet array impingement with crossflow-correlation of streamwise resolved flow and heat transfer distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Truman, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Correlations for heat transfer coefficients for jets of circular offices and impinging on a surface parallel to the jet orifice plate are presented. The air, following impingement, is constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and the heat transfer (impingement) surface. The downstream jets are subjected to a crossflow originating from the upstream jets. Impingement surface heat transfer coefficients resolved to one streamwise jet orifice spacing, averaged across the channel span, are correlated with the associated individual spanwise orifice row jet and crossflow velocities, and with the geometric parameters.

  11. The Giant Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.; Arnone, E.; Zanotti, F.; Cummer, S.; Li, J.; Füllekrug, M.; van der Velde, O.

    2012-04-01

    Thunderstorm clouds may discharge directly to the ionosphere in spectacular luminous jets - the longest electric discharges on our planet. The electric properties of jets, such as their polarity, conductivity, and currents, have been predicted by models, but are poorly characterized by measurements. Here we present an analysis of the first gigantic jet that with certainty has a positive polarity. The jet region in the mesosphere was illuminated by an unusual sprite discharge generated by a positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash shortly after the onset of the jet. The sprite appeared with elements in a ring at ~40 km distance around the jet, the elements pointing curving away from the jet. This suggests that the field close the jet partially cancels the field driving the sprite. From a simple model of the event we conclude that a substantial portion of the positive cloud potential must be carried to ~50 km altitude, which is also consistent with the observed channel expansion and the electromagnetic radiation associated with the jet. It is further shown that blue jets are likely to substantially modify the free electron content in the lower ionosphere because of increased electron attachment driven by the jet electric field. The model further makes clear the relationship between jets, gigantic jets, and sprites. This is the first time that sprites are used for sounding the properties of the mesosphere. The observations presented here will allow evaluation of theories for jet and gigantic jet generation and of their influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system.

  12. Lifted turbulent jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jay A.

    Experiments were conducted on lifted, turbulent jet diffusion flames. An automated technique using a linear photodiode array was implemented to measure the temporal history of the liftoff height h. The measurements enabled accurate determination of the mean liftoff height [...] under a wide range of flow conditions, including several fuels, nozzle diameters, and exit velocities [...]. The results showed an approximately linear relationship between [...] and [...], with a slight dependence on Reynolds number. A strain-rate model for liftoff, based on far-field scaling of turbulent jets, provides an explanation for the linear dependence of [...] on [...]. Measurements were also made in which the nozzle fluid contained varying amounts of air, where it was found that the slope of the [...] vs. [...] line increases faster than predicted by far-field scaling of turbulent jets. The discrepancy is attributed to near-field effects.The amplitudes of the fluctuations in h were found to be of the order of the local large scale of the jet. There is a slight increase in normalized fluctuation level [...] with [...], and there is some variation of [...] with fuel type. The time scales of the fluctuations of h were found to be considerably longer than the local large-scale time of the turbulence [...]. By using fuels of different chemical times to vary [...], the measured correlation time [...] normalized by [...] was found to collapse with Richardson number [...]. Experiments in which the nozzles were oriented horizontally showed no change in [...], however. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate alternative explanations for the variation of [...] with [...]. These experiments included measuring the flame length L simultaneously with h, and measuring the visible radiation I simultaneously with h. L(t) was found to be nearly uncorrelated with h(t), dismissing the possibility that a feedback mechanism from L to h controls the fluctuations of h. Although I(t) is highly

  13. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment.

  14. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment. PMID:15093276

  15. The near field behavior of turbulent gas jets in a long confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, Ronald M. C.; Ahmed, Saad A.; Yu, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    The near-field behavior of a turbulent gas jet (8.73 mm in diameter) in a long confinement was studied using a test rig with a confinement area ratio of about 205 and a length-to-jet diameter ratio of about 1700. Experiments were carried out with CO2, air, and He/air jets at different jet velocities, using a laser Doppler velocimeter for velocity and turbulence measurements and hot-wire anemometers for a detailed examination of the turbulent shear field of an air jet. The air column inside the tunnel was seen to be first compressed by the jet and then to be slowly pushed out of the tunnel, causing the jet to spread rapidly and to decay quickly. As a result, an equilibrium turbulence field is established in the first two diameters of the jet which bears a similarity to that found in self-preserving turbulent free jets and jets in short confinement. However, in contrast to the cases of the two latter jet types, the near field of jets in a long confinement is independent of jet fluid densities and velocities.

  16. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. Bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they rise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  17. Infrared imaging results of an excited planar jet

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    Planar jets are used for many applications including heating, cooling, and ventilation. Generally such a jet is designed to provide good mixing within an enclosure. In building applications, the jet provides both thermal comfort and adequate indoor air quality. Increased mixing rates may lead to lower short-circuiting of conditioned air, elimination of dead zones within the occupied zone, reduced energy costs, increased occupant comfort, and higher indoor air quality. This paper discusses using an infrared imaging system to show the effect of excitation of a jet on the spread angle and on the jet mixing efficiency. Infrared imaging captures a large number of data points in real time (over 50,000 data points per image) providing significant advantages over single-point measurements. We used a screen mesh with a time constant of approximately 0.3 seconds as a target for the infrared camera to detect temperature variations in the jet. The infrared images show increased jet spread due to excitation of the jet. Digital data reduction and analysis show change in jet isotherms and quantify the increased mixing caused by excitation. 17 refs., 20 figs.

  18. Metagenomics reveals diversity and abundance of meta-cleavage pathways in microbial communities from soil highly contaminated with jet fuel under air-sparging bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Brennerova, Maria V; Josefiova, Jirina; Brenner, Vladimir; Pieper, Dietmar H; Junca, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The extradiol dioxygenase diversity of a site highly contaminated with aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons under air-sparging treatment was assessed by functional screening of a fosmid library in Escherichia coli with catechol as substrate. The 235 positive clones from inserts of DNA extracted from contaminated soil were equivalent to one extradiol dioxygenase-encoding gene per 3.6 Mb of DNA screened, indicating a strong selection for genes encoding this function. Three subfamilies were identified as being predominant, with 72, 55 and 43 fosmid inserts carrying genes, related to those encoding TbuE of Ralstonia pickettii PK01 (EXDO-D), IpbC of Pseudomonas sp. JR1 (EXDO-K2) or DbtC of Burkholderia sp. DBT1 (EXDO-Dbt), respectively, whereas genes encoding enzymes related to XylE of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 were not observed. Genes encoding oxygenases related to isopropylbenzene dioxygenases were usually colocalized with genes encoding EXDO-K2 dioxygenases. Functional analysis of representative proteins indicated a subcluster of EXDO-D proteins to show exceptional high affinity towards different catecholic substrates. Based on Vmax/Km specificity constants, a task-sharing between different extradiol dioxygenases in the community of the contaminated site can be supposed, attaining a complementary and community-balanced catalytic power against diverse catecholic derivatives, as necessary for effective degradation of mixtures of aromatics. PMID:19575758

  19. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    To investigate the possibility of active control of jet noise, knowledge of the noise generation mechanisms in natural jets is essential. Once these mechanisms are determined, active control can be used to manipulate the noise production processes. We investigated the evolution of the flow fields and the acoustic fields of rectangular and circular jets. A predominant flapping mode was found in the supersonic rectangular jets. We hope to increase the spreading of supersonic jets by active control of the flapping mode found in rectangular supersonic jets.

  20. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  1. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  2. Properties of air and combustion products of fuel with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poferl, D. J.; Svehla, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Thermodynamic and transport properties have been calculated for air, the combustion products of natural gas and air, and combustion products of ASTM-A-1 jet fuel and air. Properties calculated include: ratio of specific heats, molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat, thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, and enthalpy.

  3. Visual Cortex Modulates the Magnitude but Not the Selectivity of Looming-Evoked Responses in the Superior Colliculus of Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Liu, Mingna; Cang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neural circuits in the brain often receive inputs from multiple sources, such as the bottom-up input from early processing stages and the top-down input from higher-order areas. Here, we study the function of top-down input in the mouse Superior Colliculus (SC), which receives convergent inputs from the retina and visual cortex. Neurons in the superficial SC display robust responses and speed tuning to looming stimuli that mimic approaching objects. The looming-evoked responses are reduced by almost half when the visual cortex is optogenetically silenced in awake, but not in anesthetized mice. Silencing the cortex does not change the looming speed tuning of SC neurons, or the response time course except at the lowest tested speed. Furthermore, the regulation of SC responses by the corticotectal input is organized retinotopically. This effect we revealed may thus provide a potential substrate for the cortex, an evolutionarily new structure, to modulate SC-mediated visual behaviors. PMID:25220812

  4. Flow Coupling Effects in Jet-in-Crossflow Flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, D. B.; Smith, C. E.; Liscinsky, D. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    The combustor designer is typically required to design liner orifices that effectively mix air jets with crossflow effluent. CFD combustor analysis is typically used in the design process; however the jets are usually assumed to enter the combustor with a uniform velocity and turbulence profile. The jet-mainstream flow coupling is usually neglected because of the computational expense. This CFD study was performed to understand the effect of jet-mainstream flow coupling, and to assess the accuracy of jet boundary conditions that are commonly used in combustor internal calculations. A case representative of a plenum-fed quick-mix section of a Rich Burn/Quick Mix/Lean Burn combustor (i.e. a jet-mainstream mass-flow ratio of about 3 and a jet-mainstream momentum-flux ratio of about 30) was investigated. This case showed that the jet velocity entering the combustor was very non-uniform, with a low normal velocity at the leading edge of the orifice and a high normal velocity at the trailing edge of the orifice. Three different combustor-only cases were analyzed with uniform inlet jet profile. None of the cases matched the plenum-fed calculations. To assess liner thickness effects, a thin-walled case was also analyzed. The CFD analysis showed the thin-walled jets had more penetration than the thick-walled jets.

  5. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  6. Editorial on Future Jet Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    Advanced jet engines do not operate in an application vacuum. Their optimal use in advanced military applications drives much of their basic innovative research and development, especially when new needs arise in the rapidly changing domains of stealth-agile, fighter aircraft and tailless-stealth, Jet-Steered, Unmanned Air Vehicles (JS-UAV). For these reasons we periodically update this Journal with new trends that affect, and sometimes control, research and development of future jet-engines. One relevant example is the recently unmasked RQ-180 stealth-tailless drone, which is an improved version of the smaller, RQ-170 captured by Iran. Most important, with the new X-47B/C tailless-stealth JS-UAV, it is to dominate future uses of fuel-efficient jet-engines, especially for operating in dusty environments. The RQ-180 has been secretly designed and funded since 2008. It is based on a classified, 1986, parent Israeli Patents 78402, which protect hundreds design and testing trade secrets taken from 1986 to 1997 by the United States Government (USG) via classified contracts with USG-Contractors Boeing, Lockheed, General Dynamics and General Electric, as revealed by a December 6, 2013 Aviation Week [1-3] and U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, Case 2014-5028, Docket 12 [4]. The new RQ-180 design explains the recent U.S. Air Force ISR shift away from "permissive" environments - such as Iraq and Afghanistan, where non-stealthy Global Hawk and General Atomics' Reaper operate - toward new missions in highly "contested" or strongly "denied" enemy airspaces.

  7. Living tissue under treatment of cold plasma atmospheric jet

    SciTech Connect

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.; Bronnikov, S.; Jurjus, R. A.; Stepp, M. A.

    2008-11-03

    The interaction of the cold atmospheric plasma jet with fibroblast cells was studied. Plasma jet was initiated in the helium flow blowing through the syringe by application of high ac voltage to the discharge electrodes. The plasma jet had a length of 5 cm and a diameter of 1.5-2 mm in ambient air. Treatment of cells with plasma jet resulted in decreasing of cell migration rate, cell detachment, and appearance of ''frozen'' cells, while treatment with helium flow (no plasma) resulted in appearance of frozen cells only. A variety of cellular responses was explained by different intensities of treatment.

  8. Living tissue under treatment of cold plasma atmospheric jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.; Bronnikov, S.; Jurjus, R. A.; Stepp, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The interaction of the cold atmospheric plasma jet with fibroblast cells was studied. Plasma jet was initiated in the helium flow blowing through the syringe by application of high ac voltage to the discharge electrodes. The plasma jet had a length of 5cm and a diameter of 1.5-2mm in ambient air. Treatment of cells with plasma jet resulted in decreasing of cell migration rate, cell detachment, and appearance of "frozen" cells, while treatment with helium flow (no plasma) resulted in appearance of frozen cells only. A variety of cellular responses was explained by different intensities of treatment.

  9. Supersonic Coaxial Jet Experiment for CFD Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Carty, A. A.; Doerner, S. E.; Diskin, G. S.; Drummond, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A supersonic coaxial jet facility has been designed to provide experimental data suitable for the validation of CFD codes used to analyze high-speed propulsion flows. The center jet is of a light gas and the coflow jet is of air, and the mixing layer between them is compressible. Various methods have been employed in characterizing the jet flow field, including schlieren visualization, pitot, total temperature and gas sampling probe surveying, and RELIEF velocimetry. A Navier-Stokes code has been used to calculate the nozzle flow field and the results compared to the experiment.

  10. Jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-08-01

    Recent jet results in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from the CDF experiment at the Tevatron are presented. The jet inclusive cross section is compared to next-to-leading order QCD prediction in different rapidity regions. The b-jet inclusive cross section is measured exploiting the long lifetime and large mass of B-hadrons. Jet shapes, W+jets and W/Z+photon cross sections are also measured and compared to expectations from QCD production.

  11. Protostellar Jets: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, B. F.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1998-11-01

    Numerical simulations of astrophysical jets have been made in order to study their collimation and internal structure. Recently Ouyed & Pudritz (1997) did numerical simulations of axi-simetric magnetocentrifugal jets from a keplerian acretion disk employing the eulerian finite difference code Zeus-2D. During their simulation, it was raised a steady state jet confirming a lot of results of the MHD winds steady state theory. Following this scenario we did tridimensional numerial simulations of this model allowing the jet, after a perturbation, evolve into a not steady state producing the helical features observed in some protostellar jets.

  12. Research on the mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Honghui; Wang, Boyi; Dai, Zhenqing

    2010-03-01

    An experimental research was carried out to study the fluid mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets. High pressure air was injected into a water tank through converging-diverging nozzles (Laval nozzles). The jets were operated at different conditions of over-, full- and under-expansions. The jet sequences were visualized using a CCD camera. It was found that the injection of supersonic air jets into water is always accompanied by strong flow oscillation, which is related to the phenomenon of shock waves feedback in the gas phase. The shock wave feedback is different from the acoustic feedback when a supersonic gas jet discharges into open air, which causes screech tone. It is a process that the shock waves enclosed in the gas pocket induce a periodic pressure with large amplitude variation in the gas jet. Consequently, the periodic pressure causes the jet oscillation including the large amplitude expansion. Detailed pressure measurements were also conducted to verify the shock wave feedback phenomenon. Three kinds of measuring methods were used, i.e., pressure probe submerged in water, pressure measurements from the side and front walls of the nozzle devices respectively. The results measured by these methods are in a good agreement. They show that every oscillation of the jets causes a sudden increase of pressure and the average frequency of the shock wave feedback is about 5-10 Hz.

  13. Aeroacoustics of volcanic jets: Acoustic power estimation and jet velocity dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Fee, David; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.; Ogden, Darcy E.

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano acoustics is to relate observed infrasonic signals to the eruptive processes generating them. A link between acoustic power Πjet noise theory at the time (acoustic analogy theory). We reexamine this approach in the context of the current understanding of jet noise, using data from a laboratory jet, a full-scale military jet aircraft, and a full-scale rocket motor. Accurate estimates of Πjet noise directionality; this is not usually possible in volcano acoustic field experiments. Typical volcano acoustic data better represent point measurements of acoustic intensity Ijet axis rather than Πair jet flows, velocity-scaling laws currently proposed for acoustic intensity differ from those for acoustic power and are of the form Ijet flows are more complex than the pure air laboratory case, which suggests that we do not currently know how the exponent nθ varies for a volcanic jet flow. This indicates that the formulation of Woulff and McGetchin (1976) can lead to large errors when inferring eruption parameters from acoustic data and thus requires modification. Quantitative integration of field, numerical, and laboratory studies within a modern aeroacoustics framework will lead to a more accurate relationship between volcanic infrasound and eruption parameters.

  14. High-Speed X-ray Investigation of Granular Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, John; Corwin, Eric; Flior, Andrew; Conyers, Bryan; Cordero, Maria-Luisa; Rivers, Mark; Eng, Peter; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2006-03-01

    When a heavy sphere is dropped onto a bed of loose, fine sand, a large, focused jet of sand shoots upward. Experiments at reduced air pressure reveal that the jet in fact consists of two components: a wispy, thin jet that varies little with pressure followed by a thick air-pressure-driven jet. To observe the initial stages of jet formation inside the granular bed, we employed x-ray radiography using the high-intensity beams available at the Advanced Photon Source. This technique allowed us to image the motion of the sphere and the evolution of the void left behind it at frame rates up to 6600 frames per second. The x-ray movies reveal that gravity-driven collapse produces the initial, thin jet, while the compression of an air pocket trapped below the surface drives up the thick jet. We also find that the interstitial air alters the compressibility of the sand bed. In vacuum a visible compaction front precedes the ball, while at atmospheric pressure the sand flows out of the way of the ball, behaving more like an incompressible fluid. Thoroddsen, S. T. and Shen, A. Q. Phys. Fluids 13, 4-6 (2001). Lohse, D. et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004). Royer, J. et al. Nature Physics, December 2005.

  15. Effect of Jet Injection Angle and Number of Jets on Mixing and Emissions From a Reacting Crossflow at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.John, D.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The mixing of air jets into hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone is an important step in staged combustion. Often referred to as "quick quench," the mixing occurs with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. An experiment has been designed to simulate and study this process, and the effect of varying the entry angle (0 deg, 22.5 deg and 45 deg from normal) and number of the air jets (7, 9, and 11) into the main flow, while holding the jet-to-crossflow mass-low ratio, MR, and momentum-flux ratio, J, constant (MR = 2.5;J = 25). The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from orifices equally spaced around the perimeter. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture to a module containing air jet injection tubes that can be changed to vary orifice geometry. Species concentrations of O2, CO, CO2, NO(x) and HC were obtained one duct diameter upstream (in the rich zone), and primarily one duct radius downstream. From this information, penetration of the jet, the spatial extent of chemical reaction, mixing, and the optimum jet injection angle and number of jets can be deduced.

  16. The entrainment rate for a row of turbulent jets. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Eliott B.; Greber, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    Entrainment rates for a row of isothermal circular air jets issuing into a quiescent environment are found by integrating velocity distributions measured by a linearized hot-wire anemometer. Jet spacing to jet diameter ratios of 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 are studied at jet Reynold's numbers ranging from 5110 to 12070. Velocity distributions are determined at regular downstream intervals at axial distances equal to 16.4 to 164 jet diameters from the jet source. The entrainment rates for the four spacing configurations vary monotonically with increasing spacing/diameter between the limiting case of the slot jet entrainment rate (where the jet spacing to diameter ratio is zero) and the circular jet entrainment rate (in which the spacing to diameter ratio is infinity).

  17. Jet mixing in a reacting cylindrical crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  18. On jet substructure methods for signal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Powling, Alexander; Siodmok, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    We carry out simple analytical calculations and Monte Carlo studies to better understand the impact of QCD radiation on some well-known jet substructure methods for jets arising from the decay of boosted Higgs bosons. Understanding differences between taggers for these signal jets assumes particular significance in situations where they perform similarly on QCD background jets. As an explicit example of this we compare the Y-splitter method to the more recently proposed Y-pruning technique. We demonstrate how the insight we gain can be used to significantly improve the performance of Y-splitter by combining it with trimming and show that this combination outperforms the other taggers studied here, at high p T . We also make analytical estimates for optimal parameter values, for a range of methods and compare to results from Monte Carlo studies.

  19. JetStar in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This 18-second movie clip shows the NASA Dryden Lockheed C-140 JetStar in flight with its pylon-mounted air-turbine-drive system used to gather information on the acoustic characteristics of subscale advanced design propellers. Data was gathered through 28 flush-mounted microphones on the skin of the aircraft. From 1976 to 1987 the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio -- today known as the Glenn Research Center -- engaged in research and development of an advanced turboprop concept in partnership with Hamilton Standard, Windsor Locks, Connecticut, the largest manufacturer of propellers in the United States. The Advanced Turboprop Project took its impetus from the energy crisis of the early 1970's and sought to produce swept propeller blades that would increase efficiency and reduce noise. As the project progressed, Pratt & Whitney, Allison Gas Turbine Division of General Motors, General Electric, Gulfstream, Rohr Industries, Boeing, Lockheed, and McDonnell Douglas, among others, also took part. NASA Lewis did the much of the ground research and marshaled the resources of these and other members of the aeronautical community. The team came to include the NASA Ames Research Center, Langley Research Center, and the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (before and after that time, the Dryden Flight Research Center). Together, they brought the propeller to the flight research stage, and the team that worked on the project won the coveted Collier Trophy for its efforts in 1987. To test the acoustics of the propeller the team developed, it mounted propeller models on a C-140 JetStar aircraft fuselage at NASA Dryden. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air-turbine-drive system. The drive motor, with a test propeller, was mounted on a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propeller. Microphones mounted on the wings and on an accompanying Learjet chase

  20. Propane-Fueled Jet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farwell, D. A.; Svenson, A. J.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2001-04-01

    We present our recent efforts to design, construct, and test a gas turbine, or jet, engine. Our design utilizes a turbocharger and ignition system from an automobile, and a flame tube/reaction chamber unit fabricated by hand from stainless steel. Once the engine is running, it is completely self-sustaining as long as there is a fuel supply, which in our case is propane. Air is forced into the intake where it is compressed and then injected into the combustion chamber where it is mixed with propane. The spark plugs ignite the air-propane mixture which burns to produce thrust at the exhaust. We have performed operational tests under different environmental conditions and with several turbochargers. We are currently working on adding a lubrication system to the engine, and will discuss our plan to experiment with the reaction chamber and flame tube design in an effort to improve performance and efficiency. *Corresponding author: rex@uakron.edu

  1. Conical shaped charge pressed powder, metal liner jet characterization and penetration in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1997-05-01

    This work was conducted as part of a Near-wellbore Mechanics program at Sandia National Laboratories. An understanding of the interaction of the perforator jet from an explosive shaped charge with the fluid filled porous sandstone media is of basic importance to the completion of oil wells. Tests were conducted using the five-head Flash X-ray Test Site to measure the jet tip velocities and jet geometry for the OMNI and CAPSULE Conical Shaped Charge (CSC) oil well perforator jets fired into air. These tests were conducted to generate jet velocity and geometry information to be used in validating the CTH hydrocode modeling/simulation development of pressed powder, metal liner jets in air. Ten tests were conducted to determine the CSC jet penetration into 6061-T6 aluminum targets. Five tests were conducted with the OMNI CSC at 0.25, 6.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. Five tests were conducted with the CAPSULE CSC at 0.60, 5.0, 10.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. These tests were conducted to generate jet penetration into homogeneous target information for use in validating the CTH code modeling/simulation of pressed powder, metal liner jets penetrating aluminum targets. The Flash X-ray radiographs, jet velocities, jet diameters, and jet lengths data for jets fired into air are presented in this report. The jet penetration into aluminum and penetration hole profile data are also presented for the OMNI and CAPSULE perforators. Least Squares fits are presented for the measured jet velocity and jet penetration data.

  2. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  3. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Air Entraining Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2001-11-01

    Air entraining flows are frequently encountered in Nature (e.g. breaking waves, waterfalls, rain over water bodies) and in technological applications (gas-liquid chemical reactors, water treatment, aquaculture, and others). Superficially, one may distinguish between transient events, such as a breaking wave, and steady situations, e.g. a falling jet. However, when viscosity is not important, the process of air entrainment turns out to be the consequence of local transient events even in steady flows. For example, surface disturbances convected by a nominally steady jet impact the receiving liquid, create a deep depression, which collapses entraining an air pocket. (In practice this basic mechanism is complicated by the presence of waves, vortical flows, and other factors.) This talk will describe several examples of air-entraining flows illustrating the fluid mechanic principles involved with high-speed movies and numerical computations.

  5. Effects of Jet Swirl on Mixing of a Light Gas Jet in a Supersonic Airstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerner, Steven E.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1999-01-01

    A non reacting experiment was performed to investigate the effects of jet swirl on mixing of a light gas jet in a supersonic airstream. The experiment consisted of two parts. The first part was an investigation of the effects of jet swirl and skew on the mixing and penetration of a 25 deg. supersonic jet injected from a flat surface (flush wall injection) into a supersonic ducted airflow. Specifically, the objective was to determine whether the jet would mix more rapidly if the jet were swirling, and whether swirl, with and without skew, causes the injectant-air plume to have a net circulation (i.e., a single or dominant vortex). The second part was a preliminary study of the mixing of swirling jets injected from the base of a skewed ramp. The hypothesis was that favorable interactions between vorticity generated by the swirling jet and vortices generated by the ramp could produce mixing enhancements. Both parts of the experiment were conducted at equal injectant mass flow rate and total pressure. The results for the flush wall injection cases indicate that, except relatively close to the injection point, swirl, with or without skew, does not enhance the mixing of the jet, and can in fact reduce penetration. In addition, a plume with significant net circulation is not generated, as had previously been believed. The results for the ramp cases indicated no improvements in mixing in comparison with the baseline (swept ramp injector) case. However, it was not possible to determine the vorticity mechanisms underlying the poor performance, since no measurements of vorticity were made. Thus, since many geometric parameters were chosen arbitrarily, the results are inconclusive for this class of injector.

  6. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  7. Transitional Gas Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Alammar, Khalid; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Drop tower experiments were performed to identify buoyancy effects in transitional hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry was utilized to optically visualize the flame and to measure oxygen concentration in the laminar portion of the flame. Test conditions consisted of atmospheric pressure flames burning in quiescent air. Fuel from a 0.3mm inside diameter tube injector was issued at jet exit Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1300 to 1700. Helium mole percentage in the fuel was varied from 0 to 40%. Significant effects of buoyancy were observed in near field of the flame even-though the fuel jets were momentum-dominated. Results show an increase of breakpoint length in microgravity. Data suggest that transitional flames in earth-gravity at Re<1300 might become laminar in microgravity.

  8. Air pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Fay, J. A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    A series of fundamental problems related to jet engine air pollution and combustion were examined. These include soot formation and oxidation, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions mechanisms, pollutant dispension, flow and combustion characteristics of the NASA swirl can combustor, fuel atomization and fuel-air mixing processes, fuel spray drop velocity and size measurement, ignition and blowout. A summary of this work, and a bibliography of 41 theses and publications which describe this work, with abstracts, is included.

  9. A computational study of highly viscous impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, M.W.

    1998-11-01

    Two commercially-available computational fluid dynamics codes, FIDAP (Fluent, Inc., Lebanon, NH) and FLOW-3D (Flow Science, Inc., Los Alamos, NM), were used to simulate the landing region of jets of highly viscous fluids impinging on flat surfaces. The volume-of-fluid method was combined with finite difference and finite element approaches to predict the jet behavior. Several computational models with varying degrees of physical realism were developed, and the results were compared with experimental observations. In experiments, the jet exhibited several complex behaviors. As soon as it exited the nozzle, the jet began to neck down and become narrower. When it impacted the solid surface, the jet developed an instability near the impact point and buckled to the side. This buckling became a spiraling motion, and the jet spiraled about the impact point. As the jet spiraled around, a cone-shaped pile was build up which eventually became unstable and slumped to the side. While all of these behaviors were occurring, air bubbles, or voids, were being entrapped in the fluid pool. The results obtained from the FLOW-3D models more closely matched the behavior of real jets than the results obtained from /the FIDAP models. Most of the FLOW-3D models predicted all of the significant jet behaviors observed in experiments: necking, buckling, spiraling, slumping, and void entrapment. All of the FIDAP models predicted that the jet would buckle relatively far from the point of impact, whereas the experimentally observed jet behavior indicates that the jets buckle much nearer the impact point. Furthermore, it was shown that FIDAP is incapable of incorporating heat transfer effects into the model, making it unsuitable for this work.

  10. Identification of sting jet extratropical cyclones in ERA-Interim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Alvarado, Oscar; Gray, Suzanne

    2010-05-01

    Sting jets are transient, highly localized low-level jets that descend from the tip of the cloud head towards the top of the boundary layer in some rapidly deepening Shapiro-Keyser type extratropical cyclones. Sting jets have recently been recognised as clearly different from other air streams, such as the warm and cold conveyor belts, that are also part of the structure of these cyclones. Understanding the dynamics and statistics of sting jets is important due to the potential loss of life and damage to property and infrastructure that can occur as a consequence of the strong winds that sting jets can generate if their momentum is transferred to the surface. However, with very few documented cases, their frequency of occurrence and intensity range are still open questions. One way of tackling this problem is to study available reanalysis datasets. However, these datasets are not expected to explicitly show the occurrence of sting jets due to their coarse resolution. Instead of a direct search for sting jets, a search for sting jet precursors such as regions of high conditional symmetric instability (CSI) at mid-tropospheric levels is proposed in this study. For this purpose, a method based on an appropriate set of diagnostics has been devised to identify regions of CSI potentially associated with sting jets in gridded atmospheric datasets at resolutions including the coarse resolution of currently available reanalyses. The method is tested on some of the well-documented case studies of sting jets. Once its reliability is proven, it is applied to the 50 most intense cyclones in the North Atlantic during the first 10 years (from 1989 to 1998) of the ECMWF reanalysis ERA-Interim. Around 10% of these cases are found to potentially have sting jets. These results represent a further step towards the construction of the first climatology of sting jets.

  11. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  12. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  13. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  14. Biosurface engineering through ink jet printing.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohidus Samad; Fon, Deniece; Li, Xu; Tian, Junfei; Forsythe, John; Garnier, Gil; Shen, Wei

    2010-02-01

    The feasibility of thermal ink jet printing as a robust process for biosurface engineering was demonstrated. The strategy investigated was to reconstruct a commercial printer and take advantage of its colour management interface. High printing resolution was achieved by formulating bio-inks of viscosity and surface tension similar to those of commercial inks. Protein and enzyme denaturation during thermal ink jet printing was shown to be insignificant. This is because the time spent by the biomolecules in the heating zone of the printer is negligible; in addition, the air and substrate of high heat capacity absorb any residual heat from the droplet. Gradients of trophic/tropic factors can serve as driving force for cell growth or migration for tissue regeneration. Concentration gradients of proteins were printed on scaffolds to show the capability of ink jet printing. The printed proteins did not desorb upon prolonged immersion in aqueous solutions, thus allowing printed scaffold to be used under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Our group portrait was ink jet printed with a protein on paper, illustrating that complex biopatterns can be printed on large area. Finally, patterns of enzymes were ink jet printed within the detection and reaction zones of a paper diagnostic.

  15. LIF Measurement of Interacting Gas Jet Flow with Plane Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, A.; Kurihara, S.; Yamazaki, S.; Ota, M.; Maeno, K.

    2011-05-01

    Discharging rarefied gas jets in low-pressure conditions are interesting and important phenomena from an engineering point of view. For example they relate to the attitude control of the space satellite, or the semiconductor technology. The jets, however, deform to the complicated shapes by interacting with solid walls. In this paper we have performed the experiments the flow visualization as a first step by applying the LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) method on the jet-wall interaction. Jet is spouting out from a φ1.0 mm circular hole into the low pressure air chamber, impinging on a flat plate. The LIF visualization of interacting rarefied gas jet is carried out by using the iodine (I2) tracer and argon ion laser.

  16. America's looming creativity crisis.

    PubMed

    Florida, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The strength of the American economy does not rest on its manufacturing prowess, its natural resources, or the size of its market. It turns on one factor--the country's openness to new ideas, which has allowed it to attract the brightest minds from around the world and harness their creative energies. But the United States is on the verge of losing that competitive edge. As the nation tightens its borders to students and scientists and subjects federal research funding to ideological and religious litmus tests, many other countries are stepping in to lure that creative capital away. Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, and others are spending more on research and development and shoring up their universities in an effort to attract the world's best--including Americans. If even a few of these nations draw away just a small percentage of the creative workers from the U.S., the effect on its economy will be enormous. In this article, the author introduces a quantitative measure of the migration of creative capital called the Global Creative-Class Index. It shows that, far from leading the world, the United States doesn't even rank in the top ten in the percentage of its workforce engaged in creative occupations. What's more, the baby boomers will soon retire. And data showing large drops in foreign student applications to U.S. universities and in the number of visas issued to knowledge workers, along with concomitant increases in immigration in other countries, suggest that the erosion of talent from the United States will only intensify. To defend the U.S. economy, the business community must take the lead in ensuring that global talent can move efficiently across borders, that education and research are funded at radically higher levels, and that we tap into the creative potential of more and more workers. Because wherever creativity goes, economic growth is sure to follow.

  17. America's looming creativity crisis.

    PubMed

    Florida, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The strength of the American economy does not rest on its manufacturing prowess, its natural resources, or the size of its market. It turns on one factor--the country's openness to new ideas, which has allowed it to attract the brightest minds from around the world and harness their creative energies. But the United States is on the verge of losing that competitive edge. As the nation tightens its borders to students and scientists and subjects federal research funding to ideological and religious litmus tests, many other countries are stepping in to lure that creative capital away. Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, and others are spending more on research and development and shoring up their universities in an effort to attract the world's best--including Americans. If even a few of these nations draw away just a small percentage of the creative workers from the U.S., the effect on its economy will be enormous. In this article, the author introduces a quantitative measure of the migration of creative capital called the Global Creative-Class Index. It shows that, far from leading the world, the United States doesn't even rank in the top ten in the percentage of its workforce engaged in creative occupations. What's more, the baby boomers will soon retire. And data showing large drops in foreign student applications to U.S. universities and in the number of visas issued to knowledge workers, along with concomitant increases in immigration in other countries, suggest that the erosion of talent from the United States will only intensify. To defend the U.S. economy, the business community must take the lead in ensuring that global talent can move efficiently across borders, that education and research are funded at radically higher levels, and that we tap into the creative potential of more and more workers. Because wherever creativity goes, economic growth is sure to follow. PMID:15559581

  18. The effect of working gas impurities on plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. Y.; He, M. B.; Liu, D. W.

    2015-04-15

    Air intrusion reduced the purity of working gas inside the tube for plasma jet, and thereby, affected the discharge dynamics. In this paper, the effect of using working gas with different purity level (helium purity 99.99999%, 99.99%, 99.9%, and 99%) on photoionization and the chemical reactivity of plasma jet were studied using a 2 dimensional plasma jet model. Photoionization of air species acted as a source of pre-ionization in front of the ionization region, which facilitated the transition from localized discharge to streamers inside the tube. The density of reactive species inside the tube was found to increase with the concentration of working gas impurities. For the highest purity helium (99.99999%), despite a low photoionization rate and the distance between the photoionization region and ionization region inside the tube, by increasing the applied voltage and decreasing the distance between the electrode and nozzle, plasma jets were formed.

  19. Polymer film deposition on agar using a dielectric barrier discharge jet and its bacterial growth inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T.-C.; Cho, J.; Mcintyre, K.; Jo, Y.-K.; Staack, D.

    2012-08-01

    Polymer film deposition on agar in ambient air was achieved using the helium dielectric barrier discharge jet (DBD jet) fed with polymer precursors, and the bacterial growth inhibition due to the deposited film was observed. The DBD jet with precursor addition was more efficient at sterilization than a helium-only DBD jet. On the areas where polymer films cover the agar the bacterial growth was significantly inhibited. The inhibition efficacy showed dependence on the film thickness. The DBD jet without precursor also created a modified agar layer, which may slow the growth of some bacterial strains.

  20. Three dimensional flow field measurements of a 4:1 aspect ratio subsonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Swan, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements for a subsonic rectangular cold air jet with an aspect ratio of 4:1 (12.7 x 50.8 mm) at a Mach number of 0.09 and Re of 100,000 have been carried out using a three-dimensional laser Doppler anemometer system. Mean velocity measurements show that the jet width spreads more rapidly along the minor axis than along the major axis. The outward velocities, however, are not significantly different for the two axes, indicating the presence of enhanced mixing along the minor axis. The jet slowly changes from a rectangular jet to a circular jet as the flow progresses downstream.

  1. Responses of Raptorial Birds to Low Level Military Jets and Sonic Booms: Results of the 1980-1981 Joint U.S. Air Force-U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Summary: For this study, we gathered several kinds of data to determine the likely effects of low level jets and sonic booms on nesting Peregrine Falcons and other raptors. We directly observed responses to worst case stimulus loads: responses to extremely frequent and extremely nearby jet aircraft were often minimal, seldom significant and never associated with reproductive failure. Likewise, responses to real and simulated sonic booms were often minimal and never productivity limiting. In addition to directly observing behavioral responses, in 1981 we invited jet passes at four Prairie Falcon eyries during courtship and incubation when the adults were most likely to abandon, on an ad libitum basis. All four eyries fledged young. Nesting success and site reoccupancy rates were high for all eyries. In tests of two relatively naive captive Peregrine Falcons, we failed to detect significantly negative responses. Typically the birds either quickly resumed feeding or other activities within a few seconds following a pass or boom. The female falcon repeatedly made hunting forays as jets swept overhead. From heart rate (HR) data taken via a telemetering egg during incubation at a wild Prairie Falcon eyrie, we determined that stimulus induced HR alterations were comparable to rate changes of the birds settling to incubate following flight. No significant long term responses were identified. The falcons successfully fledged two young even with the more disruptive activities associated with entering the eyrie three times to position and recover the telemetering eggs. Significantly, birds ofprey of several genera commonly nest in the supersonic military operations areas in southern Arizona. In addition, raptor eyries are frequently found at locations where low level jet traffic naturally concentrates. For example, Prairie Falcon Site 11 is directly on the approach path to strafing and bombing targets. Prairie Falcon Site 1 is in a narrow canyon through which A-10 aircraft

  2. Jet Exit Rig Six Component Force Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Wolter, John; Woike, Mark; Booth, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    A new six axis air balance was delivered to the NASA Glenn Research Center. This air balance has an axial force capability of 800 pounds, primary airflow of 10 pounds per second, and a secondary airflow of 3 pounds per second. Its primary use was for the NASA Glenn Jet Exit Rig, a wind tunnel model used to test both low-speed, and high-speed nozzle concepts in a wind tunnel. This report outlines the installation of the balance in the Jet Exit Rig, and the results from an ASME calibration nozzle with an exit area of 8 square-inches. The results demonstrated the stability of the force balance for axial measurements and the repeatability of measurements better than 0.20 percent.

  3. Variable-cut particle-size classification by opposing jets.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, R E; Willeke, K

    1978-12-01

    A new technique of aerodynamic particle-size classification has been developed utilizing axisymmetrically-opposed air jets. For a fixed geometry the cut size can be varied from 0.8 to 3.6 micrometer by changing the jet flow rates. Future designs are expected to extend the useful particle-size range. Particles remain airborne after size separation, permitting the use of continuous, automated methods for analyzing the particle concentration and chemical compositon.

  4. Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking north at Jet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking north at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Edwards Test Station complex in 1959, shortly after completion of 'D' stand construction and installation of underground tunnel system. Test stands 'A,' 'B,' 'C,' and 'D' are in view; the Control and Recording Center (Building 4221/E-22) is still under construction. (JPL negative no. 384-1917-A, 28 May 1959) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking south at Jet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking south at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Edwards Test Station complex in 1959, shortly after completion of Test Stand 'D' construction and installation of underground tunnel system. Test Stand 'D' is in the foreground, Test Stand 'A' complex in the background. Roads are as yet unpaved. (JPL negative no. 384-1917-B, 28 May 1959) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Visualization of synthetic jets at higher Stokes numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Šafařík, Pavel

    2012-04-01

    Visualization of synthetic jets at higher Stokes numbers (S = 90 and 127) by the phase-locked smoke-wire technique is presented and discussed. The working fluid is air. The Reynolds numbers are quantified using hot-wire anemometry. Although our method of visualization essentially provides only qualitative results, the present study also demonstrates some quantitative results, namely the behavior of the zero-net-mass-flux jet near its critical stage. Visualization of the sub-critical stage is also shown.

  7. Aeroacoustics of a porous plug supersonic jet noise suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosanjh, D. S.; Matambo, T. J.; Das, I. S.

    1983-01-01

    The aeroacoustics of a porous plug supersonic jet noise suppressor was investigated. The needed modifications of the existing multistream coaxial jet rig; the compressed air facility and pressure controls; the design, the fabrication, and the installation of the plenum chamber for the plug nozzle, and the design and the machining of the first contoured plug nozzle were completed. The optical and the aeroacoustic data of the contoured plug nozzles and of the conical convergent nozzle alone were discussed.

  8. The Very Light Jet Arrives: Stakeholders and Their Perceptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, Richard; Thomas, James L.; Cobb, Laura A.

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes the initial results of a systematic study that addressed issues related to the direct and indirect market impact of very light jet (VLJ) aircraft. Although reports in the popular press offer wide-ranging estimates of the impact that these new jets will have on existing air travel, no systematic data exists that may be of use to all potential stakeholders. This introductory study serves to describe potential VLJ users and their perceptions of this new type of aircraft.

  9. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  10. Pulsed jet combustion generator for premixed charge engines

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheim, A. K.; Stewart, H. E.; Hom, K.

    1990-01-01

    A method and device for generating pulsed jets which will form plumes comprising eddie structures, which will entrain a fuel/air mixture from the head space of an internal combustion engine, and mixing this fuel/air mixture with a pre-ignited fuel/air mixture of the plumes thereby causing combustion of the reactants to occur within the interior of the eddie structures.

  11. Editorial on Future Jet Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    The jet engine is the prime flight controller in post-stall flight domains where conventional flight control fails, or when the engine prevents catastrophes in training, combat, loss of all airframe hydraulics (the engine retains its own hydraulics), loss of one engine, pilot errors, icing on the wings, landing gear and runway issues in takeoff and landing and in bad-whether recoveries. The scientific term for this revolutionary technology is "jet-steering", and in engineering practice - "thrust vectoring", or "TV". Jet-Steering in advanced fighter aircraft designs is integrated with stealth technology. The resulting classified Thrust-Vectoring-Stealth ("TVS") technology has generated a second jet-revolution by which all Air-&-Sea-Propulsion Science and R&D are now being reassessed. Classified F-22, X-47B/C and RQ-180 TVS-vehicles stand at the front of this revolution. But recent transfers of such sensitive technologies to South Korea and Japan [1-5], have raised various fundamental issues that are evaluated by this editorial-review. One, and perhaps a key conclusion presented here, means that both South Korea and Japan may have missed one of their air-&-sea defenses: To develop and field low-cost unmanned fleets of jet-drones, some for use with expensive, TVS-fighter aircraft in highly congested areas. In turn, the U.S., EU, Russia and China, are currently developing such fleets at various TVS levels and sizes. China, for instance, operates at least 15,000 drones ("UAVs") by 2014 in the civilian sector alone. All Chinese drones have been developed by at least 230 developers/manufacturers [1-16]. Mobile telecommunication of safe links between flyers and combat drones ("UCAVs") at increasingly deep penetrations into remote, congested areas, can gradually be purchased-developed-deployed and then operated by extant cader of tens of thousands "National Champion Flyers" who have already mastered the operation of mini-drones in free-to-all sport clubs under national

  12. AEA Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-01

    AEA's Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer was developed to mix and maintain the suspension of solids and to blend process liquids. The mixer can be used to combine a tank's available supernate with the sludge into a slurry that is suitable for pumping. The system uses jet nozzles in the tank coupled to a charge vessel. Then, a jet pump creates a partial vacuum in the charge vessel allowing it to be filled with waste. Next, air pressure is applied to the charge vessel, forcing sludge back into the tank and mixing it with the liquid waste. When the liquid waste contains 10% solids, a batch is pumped out of the tank.

  13. Dynamics of bouncing-versus-merging response in jet collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minglei; Saha, Abhishek; Zhu, D. L.; Sun, Chao; Law, Chung K.

    2015-08-01

    A new regime of oblique jet collision, characterized by low impact inertia and jet merging through bridge formation, is observed and thereby completes the entire suite of possible jet collision outcomes of (soft) merging, bouncing, and (hard) merging with increasing inertia. These distinct regimes, together with the observed dependence of the collision outcome on the impact angle and liquid properties, are characterized through scaling analysis by considering the competing effects of impact inertia, surface tension, and viscous thinning of the interfacial air gap leading to merging.

  14. Breakup of a liquid jet in supersonic crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.-S.; Karagozian, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical study of the breakup of a circular liquid jet injected transversely into a supersonic air stream is conducted. Two different criteria for breakup are explored in the context of a previously developed model for the behavior of liquid jets in compressible crossflow (Heister et al., 1989). The local sonic point criterion first proposed by Schetz, et al. (1980) is explored, in addition to an auxiliary criterion put forth by Clark (1964) based on surface-tension stability. It is found that the local sonic point appears to provide a more reasonable approximation to the actual location of jet breakup, based on comparisons with limited experimental data.

  15. The role of conditional symmetric instability in Sting Jet storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. H.; Martinez-Alvarado, O.; Gray, S. L.; Clark, P. A.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this project is to determine the mechanisms that lead to sting jets in extreme windstorms and develop diagnostics for predicting their formation and development. Extratropical cyclones often produce strong surface winds, mostly associated with low-level jets along the warm and cold fronts. Some severe extratropical cyclones have been found to produce an additional area of localised strong, and potentially very damaging, surface winds during a certain part of their development. These strong winds are associated with air that originates within the cloud head, exiting at the tip of the cloud head and descending rapidly from there to the surface. This rapidly descending air associated with the strong surface winds is known as a sting jet. One significant feature of sting jet storms is mesoscale slantwise circulations in the cloud head, which have been speculated to be due to the release of conditional symmetric instability (CSI). Analyses of two very different proposed sting jet storms will be presented. In both cases, a sting jet feature has been identified and examined using two diagnostics for CSI: SCAPE (slantwise convective available potential energy) and moist potential vorticity (MPV). SCAPE and negative MPV exist near the tip of the cloud heads and SCAPE decreases during the time of the descent of the sting jets, indicating that CSI may be being released.

  16. Formation of granular jets observed by high-speed x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, J.R.; Corwin, E.I.; Flior, A.; Cordero, M.L.; Rivers, M.; Eng, P.; Jaeger, H.M.

    2010-07-20

    When a heavy sphere is dropped onto a bed of loose, fine sand, a remarkable phenomenon occurs: a large, focused jet of sand shoots upwards. Although similar looking jets are observed on impact in fluid systems, they are held together by surface tension. Surprisingly, the granular jet exists in the absence of both surface tension and cohesion, thus fluid jet models are of limited use. Previous work proposed that the jet is created solely by the gravity-driven collapse of a void left by the sphere's descent through the pack. Here we present experimental evidence that granular jets are instead driven by a more complex process involving the interaction between the sand and interstitial air. Using high-speed X-ray radiography, and high-speed digital video, we observe the formation of the jet both inside and above the bed. We find that what previously was thought of as a single jet in fact consists of two components: a wispy, thin jet that varies little with pressure followed by a thick air-pressure-driven jet. This is further evidence that qualitatively new phenomena in granular systems can emerge as a function of air pressure. Our results highlight the importance of the dynamic coupling between gas and granule motion.

  17. AngioJet thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S; Singh, Varinder; Wilentz, James R; Makkar, Raj R

    2004-10-01

    The AngioJet rheolytic thrombectomy system is designed to remove thrombus with the Venturi-Bernoulli effect, with multiple high-velocity, high-pressure saline jets which are introduced through orifices in the distal tip of the catheter to create a localized low-pressure zone, resulting in a vacuum effect with the entrainment and dissociation of bulky thrombus. Rheolytic thrombectomy with the AngioJet catheter can reduce the thrombus burden in the setting of AMI and degenerated SVGs. The long-term follow-up appears to be favorable in patients treated with rheolytic thrombectomy in the setting of acute myocardial infarction over conventional primary angioplasty. PMID:15505358

  18. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  19. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheim, Antoni K.; Maxson, James A.; Hensinger, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  20. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheim, A.K.; Maxson, J.A.; Hensinger, D.M.

    1993-12-21

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure. 24 figures.

  1. The effect of slot height and difference in gas densities for coaxial jets on jet mixing in constrained swirled flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, N. E.

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were conducted about the effect of height of annular slot on efficiency of film cooling in a tube flow. Nonisothermal nature of flows was modelled by mixing of jets with different densities: air with argon or with helium: the concentration of foreign gas on wall was measured. The influence of nearwall jet swirling and of proportions of densities of gas flows as key factors for laminarization of mixing was considered.

  2. Fluidic Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin; Henderson, Brenda; Whitmire, Julia

    2004-01-01

    Chevron mixing devices are used to reduce noise from commercial separate-flow turbofan engines. Mechanical chevron serrations at the nozzle trailing edge generate axial vorticity that enhances jet plume mixing and consequently reduces far-field noise. Fluidic chevrons generated with air injected near the nozzle trailing edge create a vorticity field similar to that of the mechanical chevrons and allow more flexibility in controlling acoustic and thrust performance than a passive mechanical design. In addition, the design of such a system has the future potential for actively controlling jet noise by pulsing or otherwise optimally distributing the injected air. Scale model jet noise experiments have been performed in the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel to investigate the fluidic chevron concept. Acoustic data from different fluidic chevron designs are shown. Varying degrees of noise reduction are achieved depending on the injection pattern and injection flow conditions. CFD results were used to select design concepts that displayed axial vorticity growth similar to that associated with mechanical chevrons and qualitatively describe the air injection flow and the impact on acoustic performance.

  3. Fifty Years of Fluidic Injection for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    The paper reviews 50 years of research investigating jet noise reduction through fluidic injection. Both aqueous and gaseous injection concepts for supersonic and subsonic jet exhausts are discussed. Aqueous injection reduces jet noise by reducing main jet temperature through evaporation and main jet velocity through momentum transfer between water droplets and the main jet. In the launch vehicle environment where large quantities of fluid do not have to be carried with the vehicle, water injection is very effective at reducing excess overpressures. For in-flight use, aqueous injection is problematic as most studies show that either large quantities of water or high injection pressures are required to achieve noise reduction. The most effective noise reduction injection systems require water pressures above 2000 kPa (290 psi) and water-to-mainjet mass flow rates above 10% to achieve overall sound pressure level reductions of roughly 6 dB in the peak jet noise direction. Injection at lower pressure (roughly 1034 kPa or 150 psi) has resulted in a 1.6 EPNdb reduction in effective perceived noise level. Gaseous injection reduces noise through jet plume modifications resulting from the introduction of streamwise vorticity in the main jet. In subsonic single-stream jets, air injection usually produces the largest overall sound pressure level reductions (roughly 2 dB) in the peak jet noise direction. In dual-stream jets, properly designed injection systems can reduce overall sound pressure levels and effective perceived noise levels but care must be taken to choose injector designs that limit sound pressure level increases at high frequencies. A reduction of 1.0 EPNdB has been achieved with injection into the fan and core streams. However, air injection into dual-stream subsonic jets has received little attention and the potential for noise reduction is uncertain at this time. For dual-stream supersonic jets, additional research needs to be conducted to determine if

  4. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  5. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  6. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  7. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  8. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  9. Modeling of pulverulent ceramic jets with CALE: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Winer, K.; Maxwell, D.

    1992-12-31

    The intent of this work is to provide an accurate, predictive description of the formation and evolution of pulverulent (consisting of finely divided grains) ceramic jets. The present phase of this effort is devoted to validation and optimization of the intact and powder ceramic material models by comparison of calculated model performance with experimental data. Physically reasonable parameters were chosen for the model which was optimized by comparison of the calculated results with experimental flash X-ray density data. Optimization parameters included jet tip velocity, jet density distributions, jet radius, and penetration depth. The optimized jets were tested in configurations similar to those of experiment and reproduced the data adequately. Jet formation from intact ceramic liners is a complicated physical process which is not yet completely understood. Models have been developed to describe this process at the level of current understanding. The models account for such processes as fracture of the solid ceramic by the high explosive detonation shock front, loss of yield strength as the resulting pulverized ceramic is decompressed and flows into the jet, dilatation and expansion of the pulverized ceramic as jet formation proceeds, and entrainment of air into the voids between the grains of the pulverized ceramic as the jet stretches and expands. The description of the behavior of ceramics under shock loading consists of four models (equation of state model, dilatancy model, air diffusion model, and strength model) which are incorporated into a special version of LLNL`s CALE, a C-language-based, two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode that is portable to Unix systems. Despite the interdependence of the model components, it is possible to determine reasonable values for the model parameters which allow quantitative agreement with the existing experimental data. These are briefly described and compared to the results of CALE simulations.

  10. An experimental study of the noise generating mechanisms in supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Flow fluctuation measurements with normal and X-wire hot-wire probes and acoustic measurements with a traversing condenser microphone were carried out in small air jets in the Mach number range from M = 0.9 to 2.5. One of the most successful studies involved a moderate Reynolds number M = 2.1 jet. The large scale turbulence properties in the jet, and the noise radiation were characterized. A parallel study involved similar measurements on a low Reynolds number M = 0.9 jet. These measurements show that there are important differences in the noise generation process of the M = 0.9 jet in comparison with low supersonic Mach number (M = 1.4) jets. Problems encounted while performing X-wire measurements in low Reynolds number jets of M = 2.1 and 2.5, and in installing a vacuum pump are discussed.

  11. Effect of Compressibility on Contrail Ice Particle Growth in an Engine Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, François; Maglaras, Ephi; Morency, François; Vancassel, Xavier

    2014-06-01

    In order to understand the formation process of condensation trails (contrails), the flow in the near field of an aircraft engine jet is studied by using the three-dimensional Large Eddy Simulation technique. The configuration consists of a hot round jet laden with soot particles. The particles are tracked using the Lagrangian approach, and their growth is calculated by a microphysics water vapour deposition model. A series of simulations are performed at a realistic Reynolds number (Re = 3.2 · 106) for two different jet Mach numbers: quasi-incompressible jet flow (M = 0.2) and compressible jet flow (M = 1). Whatever the Mach number used the ice crystals first appear at the edges of the jet where the hot and moist flow mixes with the cold and dry ambient air. Both the thermal transfers and the mass coupling, which are more significant for the quasi-incompressible jet flow, control the growth process.

  12. Role of metastable atoms in the propagation of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge jets

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qing; Zhu Ximing; Li Jiangtao; Pu Yikang

    2010-02-15

    In the experiment of plasma jets generated in a tube dielectric barrier discharge configuration, three distinguishable modes, namely, laminar, transition, and turbulent jet modes, have been identified. Flows of helium, neon, and argon gases shared the hydrodynamic law when their plasma jets spraying into ambient air of atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Aiming to reveal the basic processes, we propose that plasma jet length is mainly determined by reactions involving metastable atoms. These processes are responsible for the variation in plasma jet length versus gas flow rate and working gas species. To investigate this proposal in detail, we have obtained three significant experimental results, i.e., (1) the plasma jet lengths of helium, neon, and argon are different; (2) the plasma jet length of krypton slightly changes with gas flow rate, with three modes indistinguishable; and (3) there are large differences between optical emission spectra of helium, neon, argon, and krypton flow gases. These observations are in good agreement with our proposal.

  13. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  14. Étude numérique de la convection mixte dans une cavité en forme de « T » soumise à un flux de chaleur constant et ventilée par le bas à l'aide d'un jet d'air verticalNumerical study of mixed convection in a ``T'' form cavity submitted to constant heat flux and ventilated from below with a vertical jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najam, Mostafa; El Alami, Mustapha; Hasnaoui, Mohammed; Amahmid, Abdelkhalk

    A numerical study of the mixed convection is presented in a "T" form cavity, heated with constant heat flux and submitted to a vertical jet of fresh air from below. The heating blocks are identical and the system presents a symmetry with respect to a vertical axis passing by the middle of the openings. The governing equations are solved using the finite difference method. The parameters of control are the Rayleigh number (0⩽Ra⩽10 6), the Reynolds number (1⩽Re⩽1000), the Prandtl number (Pr=0.72), the relative height of the heating blocks ( B= h/ H=0.5), the dimension C of admission and evacuation openings ( C= l/ L=0.15) and the relative distance D between the blocks ( D= d/ L=0.50). The results obtained, with H/ L=1, show the existence of multiple solutions on which the resulting heat transfer depends significantly. To cite this article: M. Najam et al., C. R. Mecanique 330 (2002) 461-467.

  15. Thermal ink jet: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanka, Ivan

    1992-05-01

    The first public demonstration of thermal ink jet printing was done by Canon in 1981 and the first thermal ink jet product, ThinkJet, was introduced by the Hewlett-Packard Company in 1984. Since then, this powerful printing technology has assumed a strong presence in the market. In this discussion, we will first briefly review the printer market, the increasing role thermal ink jet is playing in this arena, as well as the reasons for its success. The technology discussion will follow, and will focus on several highlights in thermal ink jet physics, materials, and printing. We will conclude with our comments on future thermal ink jet developments.

  16. Control of shock-wave boundary layer interaction using steady micro-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, S. B.; Manisankar, C.; Akshara, P.

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to control the amplitude of shock unsteadiness associated with the interaction induced by a cylindrical protuberance on a flat plate in a Mach 2.18 flow. The control was applied in the form of an array of steady micro air-jets of different configurations with variation in pitch and skew angle of the jets. The effect of air-jet supply pressure on control was also studied. Each of the micro-jet configurations was placed 20 boundary layer thicknesses upstream of the leading edge of the cylinder. The overall interaction is seen to get modified for all control configurations and shows a reduction in both separation- and bow-shock strengths and in triple-point height. A significant reduction in the peak rms value is also observed in the intermittent region of separation for each case. For pitched jets placed in a zig-zag configuration, good control effectiveness is achieved at control pressures similar to the stagnation pressure of the freestream. At higher control pressures, however, their obstruction component increases and if these jets are not spaced sufficiently far apart, the effectiveness of their control begins to drop due to the beginning of spanwise jet-to-jet interaction. On the other hand, pitching or skewing the jets to reduces the obstruction component considerably which at lower control pressures shows lower effectiveness. But at higher control pressure, the effectiveness of these configurations continues to increase unlike the pitched jets.

  17. 14 CFR 71.15 - Designation of jet routes and VOR Federal airways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designation of jet routes and VOR Federal... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS § 71.15 Designation of jet routes and VOR Federal airways. Unless...

  18. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  19. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  20. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  1. Generation of elves by sprites and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, Y.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Yukhimuk, V.; Symbalisty, E.

    1997-04-01

    Recent years of observations of the upper atmosphere and the lower ionosphere brought a fascinating collection of new phenomena including optical, radio, and gamma-ray emissions originating in the 20 to 90 km altitude range. Up to now, the most diverse phenomenology has emerged from the optical observations which have led to the identification of red sprites, blue jets, blue starts, and elves. Most of the studies have concentrated on relating such phenomena in the upper atmosphere to regular lightning discharges in the troposphere. The sprite/jet discharge itself can be caused by the runaway air breakdown, or regular air breakdown. The standard theory for optical airglow transients in the lower ionosphere above the thunderstorms also known as elves suggests that they are produced during interaction of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) from lightning with the lower ionosphere. Heating of the ambient electrons by the EMP in the D region can result in excitation of optical emissions once the optical excitation thresholds are reached. In this paper the authors suggest that in addition to this mechanism elves can be caused by an EMP generated by sprites and jets.

  2. Unimpeded air velocity profiles of air-assisted five-port sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capability that relies on tree structure information to control liquid and air flow rates is the preferential design in the development of variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Unimpeded air jet velocities from an air assisted, five-port sprayer in an open field were measured at four height...

  3. Air velocity distributions from a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer for tree applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capability that implements tree structure to control liquid and air flow rates is the preferential design in the development of variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Air jet velocity distributions from an air assisted, five-port sprayer which was under the development to achieve variable-rat...

  4. Air velocity distributions from air-assisted five-port sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capability to control both liquid and air flow rates based on tree structures would be one of the advantages of future variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Air jet velocity distributions from an air assisted, five-port sprayer which was under the development to achieve variable-rate functions...

  5. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  6. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes.

  7. Focusing phenomenon and stability of spiral-flow jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Kiyoshi; Matsumae, Yuji; Cheng, Xiao M.; Takei, Masahiro; Yasukawa, Eiji

    1991-02-01

    A new nozzle assembly has been developed for an improved focusing of spiral air jet streams. To obtain a focused and highly stable spiral-flow jet, a nozzle is designed with an annular slit connected to a conical cylinder. Pressurized fluid is forced through the sides of the device into the buffer area and then through the annular slit into the pipe entrance. The fluid, passing through the conical cylinder, develops a spiral structure with a steeper axial velocity distribution, caused by Coanda effect and the instability of flow. The jet stream velocity as well as its focusing phenomenon was experimentally determined using a laser sheet method. The results clearly indicate the focusing characteristic and the high stability of spiral flow jet.

  8. Some features of tones generated by an underexpanded rectangular jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krothapalli, A.; Baganoff, D.; Karamcheti, K.; Hsia, Y.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out on an underexpanded jet of air issuing from a convergent rectangular nozzle. Schlieren pictures of the flow field along with microphone and hot wire measurements in the near field of the jet were obtained at different pressure ratios. At the pressure ratio for maximum screech sound radiation, the schlieren photographs show a very strong organized cylindrical wave pattern on either side of the jet with their source being located at the end of the third shock cell. Associated with this wave pattern is a large angle of spread of the jet of about 36 degrees. Experiments using a reflecting surface near the nozzle exit show that the flow can be either destabilized or stabilized by a small rigid plate located only on one side, and in almost all positions.

  9. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  10. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  11. Three component velocity measurements in an axisymmetric jet using LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John M.; Gross, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    A commercial three-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) has been used to acquire a detailed set of three-dimensional mean and fluctuating velocity measurements in a low-speed air jet entering a stagnant ambient, over the first 15 jet exit diameters along the jet trajectory. These data are consistent with previous measurements in axisymmetric, turbulent jets. Mean velocity and Reynolds stress data approach a self-preserving behavior by x/D equal to about 15. However, the RMS turbulence fluctuations were not self-preserving at this axial location, as expected based upon previous experimental studies. These data confirm the ability to obtain reliable three-dimensional velocity data using the present three-dimensional LDA system.

  12. Excavation of Regolith by Impinging Jets of Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.; Vu, Bruce T.; Donahue, Carly M.

    2006-01-01

    There are many situations in nature and technology where particulate matter is excavated by a fluid jet. Such a process is often used to excavate soil or to dig wells. Air jets are often used to transport particulate matter such as powders in various industrial processes. Similar situations occur in nature, as when waterfalls scour holes in sand. In other cases, the excavation is unwanted such as when a rocket lands on the sandy or dusty surface of a planet or moon. Recent research into regolith excavation by gas jets has obtained new insights into the physical processes of that excavation, and these may lead to new advances in technology for more efficient fluid-jet excavation processes and for better control of the unwanted excavation effects of landing rockets. This talk will explain the new insights and point to future work supporting lunar exploration.

  13. Image processing analysis of vortex dynamics of lobed jets from three-dimensional diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastase, Ilinca; Meslem, Amina; El Hassan, Mouhammad

    2011-12-01

    The passive control of jet flows with the aim to enhance mixing and entrainment is of wide practical interest. Our purpose here is to develop new air diffusers for heating ventilating air conditioning systems by using lobed geometry nozzles, in order to ameliorate the users' thermal comfort. Two turbulent six-lobed air jets, issued from a lobed tubular nozzle and an innovative hemispherical lobed nozzle, were studied experimentally. It was shown that the proposed innovative concept of a lobed jet, which can be easily integrated in air diffusion devices, is very efficient regarding induction capability. A vortical dynamics analysis for the two jets is performed using a new method of image processing, namely dynamic mode decomposition. A validation of this method is also proposed suggesting that the dynamical mode decomposition (DMD) image processing method succeeds in capturing the most dominant frequencies of the flow dynamics, which in our case are related to the quite special dynamics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  14. 3. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING JET ENGINE TEST STAND. WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING JET ENGINE TEST STAND. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71A, Propulsion Research Laboratory, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  15. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  16. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  17. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  18. The toxicity of commercial jet oils.

    PubMed

    Winder, Chris; Balouet, Jean-Christophe

    2002-06-01

    Jet oils are specialized synthetic oils used in high-performance jet engines. They have an appreciable hazard due to toxic ingredients, but are safe in use provided that maintenance personnel follow appropriate safety precautions and the oil stays in the engine. Aircraft engines that leak oil may expose others to the oils through uncontrolled exposure. Airplanes that use engines as a source of bleed air for cabin pressurization may have this source contaminated by the oil if an engine leaks. Examination of the ingredients of the oil indicates that at least two ingredients are hazardous: N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (a skin sensitizer) and tricresyl phosphate (a neurotoxicant, if ortho-cresyl isomers are present). Publicly available information such as labels and MSDS understates the hazards of such ingredients and in the case of ortho-cresyl phosphates by several orders of magnitude.

  19. The toxicity of commercial jet oils.

    PubMed

    Winder, Chris; Balouet, Jean-Christophe

    2002-06-01

    Jet oils are specialized synthetic oils used in high-performance jet engines. They have an appreciable hazard due to toxic ingredients, but are safe in use provided that maintenance personnel follow appropriate safety precautions and the oil stays in the engine. Aircraft engines that leak oil may expose others to the oils through uncontrolled exposure. Airplanes that use engines as a source of bleed air for cabin pressurization may have this source contaminated by the oil if an engine leaks. Examination of the ingredients of the oil indicates that at least two ingredients are hazardous: N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (a skin sensitizer) and tricresyl phosphate (a neurotoxicant, if ortho-cresyl isomers are present). Publicly available information such as labels and MSDS understates the hazards of such ingredients and in the case of ortho-cresyl phosphates by several orders of magnitude. PMID:12123648

  20. Circadian rhythms, athletic performance, and jet lag

    PubMed Central

    Manfredini, R.; Manfredini, F.; Fersini, C.; Conconi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid air travel across several time zones exposes the traveller to a shift in his/her internal biological clock. The result is a transient desynchronisation of the circadian rhythm, called jet lag, lasting until the rhythm is rephased to the new environmental conditions. The most commonly experienced symptoms are sleep disorders, difficulties with concentrating, irritability, depression, fatigue, disorientation, loss of appetite, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Apart from the decrements in mental and physical performance directly consequent on such symptoms, competitive athletes are also exposed to the additional negative consequences of a shift from the optimal circadian window of performance. A brief summary of the possible negative effects of jet lag on athletic performance and potentially alleviating strategies is given. 




 PMID:9631214

  1. Compatibility of elastomers in alternate jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.; Fedors, R. F.; Reilly, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    The compatibility of elastomeric compositions of known resistance to aircraft fuels was tested for potential use in Jet A type fuels obtainable from alternate sources, such as coal. Since such fuels were not available at the time, synthetic alternate fuels were prepared by adding tetralin to a petroleum based Jet A type fuel to simulate coal derived fuels which are expected to contain higher amounts of aromatic and hydroaromatic hydrocarbons. The elastomeric compounds tested were based on butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber, a castable Thiokol polysulfide rubber, and a castable fluorosilicone rubber. Batches of various cross-link densities of these rubbers were made and their chemical stress relaxation behavior in fuel, air, and nitrogen, their swelling properties, and response to mechanical testing were determined.

  2. Measurements of turbulent inclined plane dual jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. S.; Lin, Y. F.; Sheu, M. J.

    1993-11-01

    Measurements of mean velocities, flow direction, velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stress were made with a split film probe of hot wire anemometer to investigate the interactions created by two air jets issuing from two identical plane inclined nozzles. The reverse flow was detected by using the split film probe and observed by flow visualization. Experimental results with an inclined angle of 9° are presented in the paper. Some experimental results with an inclined angle of 27° are presented to investigate the effect of inclination on the flow field. Mean velocities approach self-preservation in both the converging region and the combining region. Velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stress approach self-preservation in the combining region only. The spreads of jet and the square of the decay of maximum mean velocity increase linearly as the distance from the nozzle exit increases.

  3. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Ciancone, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configutations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  4. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configurations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  5. Experimental Determination of Jet Boundary Corrections for Airfoil Tests in Four Open Wind Tunnel Jets of Different Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Harris, Thomas A

    1931-01-01

    This experimental investigation was conducted primarily for the purpose of obtaining a method of correcting to free air conditions the results of airfoil force tests in four open wind tunnel jets of different shapes. Tests were also made to determine whether the jet boundaries had any appreciable effect on the pitching moments of a complete airplane model. Satisfactory corrections for the effect of the boundaries of the various jets were obtained for all the airfoils tested, the span of the largest being 0.75 of the jet width. The corrections for angle of attack were, in general, larger than those for drag. The boundaries had no appreciable effect on the pitching moments of either the airfoils or the complete airplane model. Increasing turbulence appeared to increase the minimum drag and maximum lift and to decrease the pitching moment.

  6. In situ venting of jet fuel-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, M.G.; DePaoli, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Air Force Engineering and Services center is performing a field demonstration of in situ soil venting at a 27,000-gallon jet fuel spill site at Hill AFB UT. In situ soil venting is a soil cleanup technique which uses vacuum blowers to pull large volumes of air through contaminated soil. The air flow sweeps out the soil gas, disrupting the equilibrium existing between the contaminants on the soil and in the vapor. This causes volatilization of the contaminants and subsequent removal in the air stream. In situ soil venting has been used for removing volatile contaminants such as gasoline and trichloroethylene, but a full-scale demonstration for removing jet fuel from soil has not been reported. This paper describes our initial site characterization, the one-vent pilot test, and the design and preliminary results of our full-scale in situ soil venting system. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Impact of Fluidic Chevrons on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Kinzie, Kevin W.; Whitmire, Julia; Abeysinghe, Amal

    2005-01-01

    The impact of alternating fluidic core chevrons on the production of jet noise is investigated. Core nozzles for a representative 1/9th scale, bypass ratio 5 model system were manufactured with slots cut near the trailing edges to allow for air injection into the core and fan streams. The injectors followed an alternating pattern around the nozzle perimeter so that the injection alternated between injection into the core stream and injection into the fan stream. For the takeoff condition and a forward flight Mach number of 0.10, the overall sound pressure levels at the peak jet noise angle decrease with increasing injection pressure. Sound pressure levels increase for observation angles less than 110o at higher injection pressures due to increases in high frequency noise. Greater increases in high frequency noise are observed when the number of injectors increases from 8 to 12. When the forward flight Mach number is increased to 0.28, jet noise reduction (relative to the baseline) is observed at aft angles for increasing injection pressure while significant increases in jet noise are observed at forward observation angles due to substantial acoustic radiation at high frequencies. A comparison between inflow and alternating injectors shows that, for equal mass injection rates, the inflow nozzle produces greater low frequency noise reduction (relative to the baseline) than the alternating injectors at 90o and aft observation angles and a forward flight Mach number of 0.28. Preliminary computational fluid dynamic simulations indicate that the spatial decay rate of the hot potential core flow is less for the inflow nozzle than for the alternating nozzles which indicates that gentle mixing may be preferred over sever mixing when fluidic chevrons are used for jet noise reduction.

  8. Urinary biomarkers of exposure to jet fuel (JP-8).

    PubMed Central

    Serdar, Berrin; Egeghy, Peter P; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Gibson, Roger; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2003-01-01

    Benzene, naphthalene, and 1- and 2-naphthol were measured in urine samples obtained from 322 U.S. Air Force personnel categorized a priori as likely to have low, moderate, or high exposure to jet fuel [jet propulsion fuel-8 (JP-8)]. In postexposure samples, levels of these analytes in the high-exposure group were 3- to 29-fold greater than in the low-exposure group and 2- to 12-fold greater than in the moderate-exposure group. Heavy exposure to JP-8 contributed roughly the same amount of benzene and more than three times the amount of naphthalene compared with cigarette smoking. Strong correlations were observed among postexposure levels of naphthalene-based biomarkers in urine and naphthalene in air and breath. We conclude that urinary naphthalene and the naphthols can serve as biomarkers of exposure to jet fuel. Of these, the naphthols are probably more useful because of their greater abundance and slower elimination kinetics. PMID:14594628

  9. Investigations of transonic buffet control on civil aircraft wing with the use of tangential jet blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramova, K. A.; Petrov, A. V.; Potapchick, A. V.; Soudakov, V. G.

    2016-10-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of transonic buffet control by tangential jet blowing are presented. To suppress the shock-induced boundary layer separation and the buffet at transonic speeds, compressed air jet is blown through a small slot nozzle tangentially to the upper surface of the supercritical airfoil. Numerical simulations were carried out on the basis of the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. Experimental studies of the tangential jet blowing were performed in the transonic wind tunnel T-112 of TsAGI. Results show that the jet moves the shock downstream, increases lift, suppresses flow separation under shock foot and delays buffet onset.

  10. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  11. Stationary relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we describe a simple numerical approach which allows to study the structure of steady-state axisymmetric relativistic jets using one-dimensional time-dependent simulations. It is based on the fact that for narrow jets with vz≈ c the steady-state equations of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics can be accurately approximated by the one-dimensional time-dependent equations after the substitution z=ct. Since only the time-dependent codes are now publicly available this is a valuable and efficient alternative to the development of a high-specialised code for the time-independent equations. The approach is also much cheaper and more robust compared to the relaxation method. We tested this technique against numerical and analytical solutions found in literature as well as solutions we obtained using the relaxation method and found it sufficiently accurate. In the process, we discovered the reason for the failure of the self-similar analytical model of the jet reconfinement in relatively flat atmospheres and elucidated the nature of radial oscillations of steady-state jets.

  12. Jets and QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Soper, Davison E.

    2013-06-01

    An essential element of the development of the strong interaction component of the Standard Model of particle physics, QCD, has been the evolving understanding of the "jets" of particles that appear in the final states of high energy particle collisions. In this chapter we provide a historical outline of those developments...

  13. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  14. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  15. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  16. Improved Exhaust Diffuser for Jet-Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Sarohia, V. S.

    1985-01-01

    High-altitude simulator reduced power requirements. Test cell uses its exhaust-capture duct only to remove gases from engine; cooling air evacuated through separate path by auxiliary suction system. This way, capture duct cross-sectional area kept close to exhaust jet area, leading to greatly improved recovery performance.

  17. 13. DETAIL VIEW OF DELUGE JETS DIRECTED TOWARDS CAPTIVE TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL VIEW OF DELUGE JETS DIRECTED TOWARDS CAPTIVE TEST STAND BEHIND PROTECTIVE BLAST WALL. NOTE FLAME RETARDENT PUTTY (FONDUE FYRE) ON WALL; VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28402, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. Perforations in jet engine supersonic inlet increase shock stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppler, C. R.

    1966-01-01

    Modification of a conventional jet engine internal compression supersonic inlet results in increased shock stability and thus, engine instantaneous response to changes in inlet air properties. This technique provides a large amount of bleed near the maximum pressure recovery at the expense of minor bleed flow during critical operation.

  19. Dynamic characteristics of peripheral jet ACV. II - Pitching motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Maeda, H.

    The dynamic pitching characteristics of peripheral jet ACV (Air Cushion Vehicle) which have a stability curtain are investigated analytically and experimentally. The measured values of moment, lift and cushion pressure are compared with numerical results noting applicability to the pitching motion. The response of ACV to the sinusoidal pitching oscillation of the ground is also studied.

  20. Review of jet reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Ryan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate jet reconstruction is necessary for understanding the link between the unobserved partons and the jets of observed collimated colourless particles the partons hadronise into. Understanding this link sheds light on the properties of these partons. A review of various common jet algorithms is presented, namely the Kt, Anti-Kt, Cambridge/Aachen, Iterative cones and the SIScone, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. If one is interested in studying jets, the Anti-Kt algorithm is the best choice, however if ones interest is in the jet substructures then the Cambridge/Aachen algorithm would be the best option.

  1. Effect of a simulated engine jet blowing above an arrow wing at Mach 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, B. L.; Hayes, C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of a gas jet simulating a turbojet engine exhaust blowing above a cambered and twisted arrow wing were investigated. Tests were conducted in the Langley 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at a Mach number of 2.0. Nozzle pressure ratios from 1 to 64 were tested with both helium and air used as jet gases. The tests were conducted at angles of attack from -2 deg to 8 deg at a Reynolds number of 9,840,000 per meter. Only the forces and moments on the wing were measured. Results of the investigation indicated that the jet blowing over the wing caused reductions in maximum lift-drag ratio of about 4 percent for helium and 6 percent for air at their respective design nozzle pressure ratios, relative to jet-off data. Moderate changes in the longitudinal, vertical, or angular positions of the jet relative to the wing had little effect on the wing aerodynamic characteristics.

  2. Investigation of differential diffusion in turbulent jet flows using planar laser Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dibble, Robert W.; Long, Marshall B.

    2005-12-01

    A series of laser Rayleigh-scattering experiments has been performed to investigate the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent nonreacting jet flows. A turbulent jet of a mixture of Freon and H{sub 2} exiting into coflowing air was studied at various Reynolds numbers. In laminar flow, Rayleigh scattering clearly showed H{sub 2} diffusing ahead of Freon. In turbulent flow, the instantaneous Rayleigh images showed differential diffusion at the many interfaces between jet fluid and entrained air. Yet, ensemble averages of instantaneous images showed no average diffusion of H{sub 2} ahead of Freon.

  3. Interacting jets from binary protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, G. C.; Lery, T.; O'Sullivan, S.; Spicer, D.; Bacciotti, F.; Rosen, A.

    2008-02-01

    Aims: We investigate potential models that could explain why multiple proto-stellar systems predominantly show single jets. During their formation, stars most frequently produce energetic outflows and jets. However, binary jets have only been observed in a very small number of systems. Methods: We model numerically 3D binary jets for various outflow parameters. We also model the propagation of jets from a specific source, namely L1551 IRS 5, known to have two jets, using recent observations as constraints for simulations with a new MHD code. We examine their morphology and dynamics, and produce synthetic emission maps. Results: We find that the two jets interfere up to the stage where one of them is almost destroyed or engulfed into the second one. We are able to reproduce some of the observational features of L1551 such as the bending of the secondary jet. Conclusions: While the effects of orbital motion are negligible over the jets dynamical timeline, their interaction has significant impact on their morphology. If the jets are not strictly parallel, as in most observed cases, we show that the magnetic field can help the collimation and refocusing of both of the two jets.

  4. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  5. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  6. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    PubMed

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging.

  7. Study on Surface Modification of Polymer Films by Using Atmospheric Plasma Jet Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Hara, Tamio

    2008-07-01

    Reactive gas plasma treatments of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polyimide (Kapton) have been performed using an atmospheric plasmas jet source. Characteristics of surface modification have been examined by changing the distance between the plasma jet source and the treated sample, and by changing the working gas spaces. Simultaneously, each plasma jet source has been investigated by space-resolving spectroscopy in the UV/visible region. Polymer surfaces have been analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A marked improvement in the hydrophilicity of the polymer surfaces has been made by using N2 or O2 plasma jet source with a very short exposure time of about 0.01 s, whereas the less improvement has been obtained using on air plasma jet source because of NOx compound production. Changes in the chemical states of C of the polymer surfaces have been observed in XPS spectra after N2 plasma jet spraying.

  8. High-Speed Rainbow Schlieren Visualization of an Oscillating Helium Jet Undergoing Gravitational Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptuch, Peter A.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow schlieren deflectometry combined with high-speed digital imaging was used to study buoyancy effects on flow structure of a helium jet discharged vertically into air. The experimental data were taken using the 2.2-sec drop tower facility at the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The test conditions pertained to jet Reynolds number of 490 and jet Richardson number of 0.11, for which buoyancy is often considered unimportant. Experimental results show global oscillations at a frequency of 27 Hz in Earth gravity. In microgravity, the jet oscillations vanished and the jet width increased. Results provide a direct physical evidence of the importance of buoyancy on the flow structure of low-density gas jets at a Richardson number considered too small to account for gravity.

  9. Pressure dependence of jet noise and silencing of blow-offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maa, D.-Y.; Li, P.-Z.

    1981-12-01

    Improvements in methods of jet noise prediction and reduction are discussed. Measurements were performed on a cold-air jet exiting through convergent nozzles of varying diameters, and on superheated jet streams at an oil refinery. A critical value was determined for the stagnation pressure, beyond which the jet becomes choked and shock-cell noise occurs along with turbulent noise. The turbulent noise was isolated by making the lip of the jet irregular, then measuring the A-weighted sound level. Blow-down studies were also made of the shock-cell noise, which was found to happen above the frequency peak of the turbulent noise. The interaction of microjets grouped together is considered, noting that a form of the Coanda effect causes the formation of a single jet. A micropore muffler is presented, which consists of a pipe drilled with many holes, and a diffuse-muffler is mentioned, which contains randomly distributed holes internally to dampen the noise emission.

  10. Gravitational Effects on Near Field Flow Structure of Low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yep, Tze-Wing; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon; Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2-second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of site measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and helium mole percentage obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet flow was significantly influenced by the gravity. The jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low density jet was buoyancy induced. The paper provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiment undergoes a change in gravity in the drop tower.

  11. Jet engine soot emission measured at altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.; Greegor, R.

    1974-01-01

    The state of knowledge concerning engine design to minimize air pollution is believed to be such that emission products can be reliably predicted while the engine is still on the drawing board. More effort is now being made to measure emission products from engines operating under cruise conditions. The use of an instrumented aircraft to obtain the appropriate data is perhaps a more realistic and less expensive approach. The results of this study taken at face value indicate that the emission index of typical jet engines calculated from the ground level measurements is comparable to the actual in-flight emission index for altitudes up to 30,000 ft.

  12. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  13. Coanda effect jet around a cylinder with an interacting adjacent surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Randolph Allen

    The effects of placing a plane solid surface in close proximity to a Coanda effect jet turning over a cylindrical surface are investigated to help judge the possible application of this type of jet to manufacturing line processes. The Coanda jet is proposed as a coating control mechanism for fluidic coatings on sheets or a particulate removal device. A Coanda jet placed close to a surface will develop a strong tangential flow that will shear by viscous effects and pressure gradients. A turbulent k-epsilon finite element model, developed in FIDAP, is presented that studies the effects of cylinder-sheet separation distance and jet-to-gap angular placement of the jet. It is assumed that the operation is isothermal and that the sheet speed is negligible compared to the air jet speed. Unconstrained models and cases with a distant surface were run and compared to published experimental results for an unconstrained Coanda jet to validate the modeling method and optimize the empirical constants in the k-epsilon equations. Best agreement is found if the C(sub 2) parameter in the equations is increased from 1.92 to 3.0. Maximum shear stress and pressure gradient values increased exponentially for a decreasing gap size and physical geometric constraints will be the limiting factor to efficiency. For similar initial jets this study shows that the Coanda jet develops stripping forces about 1/2 as great as the regular air-knife, but has advantages such as directed flow. The Coanda jet is seen as a viable option to air-knives for certain operations.

  14. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  15. 76 FR 26607 - Safety Zone; Air Power Over Hampton Roads, Back River, Hampton, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ..., there have been unfortunate instances of jets and planes crashing during performances at air shows. Along with a jet or plane crash, there is typically a wide area of scattered debris that also damages... with a potential jet or plane crash, the Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone bound by...

  16. High speed jet noise research at NASA Lewis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Cooper, B. A.; Kim, C. M.; Khavaran, Abbas

    1992-01-01

    The source noise portion of the High Speed Research Program at NASA LeRC is focused on jet noise reduction. A number of jet noise reduction concepts are being investigated. These include two concepts, the Pratt & Whitney ejector suppressor nozzle and the General Electric (GE) 2D-CD mixer ejector nozzle, that rely on ejectors to entrain significant amounts of ambient air to mix with the engine exhaust to reduce the final exhaust velocity. Another concept, the GE 'Flade Nozzle' uses fan bypass air at takeoff to reduce the mixed exhaust velocity and to create a fluid shield around a mixer suppressor. Additional concepts are being investigated at Georgia Tech Research Institute and at NASA LeRC. These will be discussed in more detail in later figures. Analytical methods for jet noise prediction are also being developed. Efforts in this area include upgrades to the GE MGB jet mixing noise prediction procedure, evaluation of shock noise prediction procedures, and efforts to predict jet noise directly from the unsteady Navier-Stokes equation.

  17. Subtropical-polar jet interactions in Southern Plains dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Vellore, Ramesh K.; Lewis, John M.; Underwood, S. Jeffrey; Pauley, Patricia M.; Martin, Jonathan E.; Rabin, Robert M.; Krishnan, R.

    2013-12-01

    origin of two separate Southern High Plains dust storms, which occurred over a 2 day period in February 2007, is traced to an interaction between the subtropical jet (STJ) and the polar jet (PJ). A large-scale thermal wind imbalance resulting from the confluence of these two jets led to a series of mesoscale circulations that ultimately produced the dust storms. Understanding the connectivity between the dust storms with differing geometries is central to the present investigation. The study rests on the interpretation of analyses from upper air and surface observations complemented by imagery from satellites, the 32 km gridded data set from the North American Regional Reanalysis, and a fine-resolution (6 km grid) simulation from the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Principal assertions from the present study are (1) scale interaction is fundamental to the creation of an environment conducive to dust storm development, (2) low to middle tropospheric mass adjustment is the primary response to a large-scale imbalance, (3) the mesoscale mass adjustment is associated with circulations about a highly accelerative jet streak resulting from the merger of the PJ and STJ, (4) the structure of the jet streak resulting from this merger governs the evolution of the geometry of the dust plumes, with plumes that initially had a straight-line orientation developing a semicircular geometry, and (5) it is concluded that improvements in dust storm prediction will depend on an augmentation to the upper air network in concert with a flow-dependent data assimilation strategy.

  18. Performance of in situ soil venting system at jet fuel spill site

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli, D.W.; Herbes, S.E.; Elliott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Air Force Engineering and Services Center and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are performing a field demonstration of in situ venting at a 27,000-gal jet fuel spill site at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah. In situ soil venting is a soil cleanup techniques that uses vacuum blowers to pull large volumes of air through contaminated soil. The air flow sweeps out the soil gas, disrupting the equilibrium existing between the contaminants on the soil and in the vapor. This causes volatilization of the contaminant and subsequent removal in the air stream. In situ soil venting has been used for removing volatile contaminants such as gasoline and trichloroethylene, but a full-scale demonstration for removing jet fuel from soil has not been reported. This paper briefly describes the jet fuel spill site and the design and results to date of our full-scale in situ soil venting system. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Thermodynamics and historical relevance of a jetting thermometer made of Chinese zisha ceramic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vincent; Attinger, Daniel

    2016-07-19

    Following a recent trend of scientific studies on artwork, we study here the thermodynamics of a thermometer made of zisha ceramic, related to the Chinese tea culture. The thermometer represents a boy who "urinates" shortly after hot water is poured onto his head. Long jetting distance is said to indicate that the water temperature is hot enough to brew tea. Here, a thermodynamic model describes the jetting phenomenon of that pee-pee boy. The study demonstrates how thermal expansion of an interior air pocket causes jetting. A thermodynamic potential is shown to define maximum jetting velocity. Seven optimization criteria to maximize jetting distance are provided, including two dimensionless numbers. Predicted jetting distances, jet durations, and temperatures agree very well with infrared and optical measurements. Specifically, the study confirms that jetting distances are sensitive enough to measure water temperature in the context of tea brewing. Optimization results show that longer jets are produced by large individuals, with low body mass index, with a boyhood of medium size inclined at an angle π/4. The study ends by considering the possibility that ceramic jetting artifacts like the pee-pee boy might have been the first thermometers known to mankind, before Galileo Galilei's thermoscope.

  20. Thermodynamics and historical relevance of a jetting thermometer made of Chinese zisha ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vincent; Attinger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Following a recent trend of scientific studies on artwork, we study here the thermodynamics of a thermometer made of zisha ceramic, related to the Chinese tea culture. The thermometer represents a boy who “urinates” shortly after hot water is poured onto his head. Long jetting distance is said to indicate that the water temperature is hot enough to brew tea. Here, a thermodynamic model describes the jetting phenomenon of that pee-pee boy. The study demonstrates how thermal expansion of an interior air pocket causes jetting. A thermodynamic potential is shown to define maximum jetting velocity. Seven optimization criteria to maximize jetting distance are provided, including two dimensionless numbers. Predicted jetting distances, jet durations, and temperatures agree very well with infrared and optical measurements. Specifically, the study confirms that jetting distances are sensitive enough to measure water temperature in the context of tea brewing. Optimization results show that longer jets are produced by large individuals, with low body mass index, with a boyhood of medium size inclined at an angle π/4. The study ends by considering the possibility that ceramic jetting artifacts like the pee-pee boy might have been the first thermometers known to mankind, before Galileo Galilei’s thermoscope. PMID:27431925

  1. Thermodynamics and historical relevance of a jetting thermometer made of Chinese zisha ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Vincent; Attinger, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Following a recent trend of scientific studies on artwork, we study here the thermodynamics of a thermometer made of zisha ceramic, related to the Chinese tea culture. The thermometer represents a boy who “urinates” shortly after hot water is poured onto his head. Long jetting distance is said to indicate that the water temperature is hot enough to brew tea. Here, a thermodynamic model describes the jetting phenomenon of that pee-pee boy. The study demonstrates how thermal expansion of an interior air pocket causes jetting. A thermodynamic potential is shown to define maximum jetting velocity. Seven optimization criteria to maximize jetting distance are provided, including two dimensionless numbers. Predicted jetting distances, jet durations, and temperatures agree very well with infrared and optical measurements. Specifically, the study confirms that jetting distances are sensitive enough to measure water temperature in the context of tea brewing. Optimization results show that longer jets are produced by large individuals, with low body mass index, with a boyhood of medium size inclined at an angle π/4. The study ends by considering the possibility that ceramic jetting artifacts like the pee-pee boy might have been the first thermometers known to mankind, before Galileo Galilei’s thermoscope.

  2. Thermodynamics and historical relevance of a jetting thermometer made of Chinese zisha ceramic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vincent; Attinger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Following a recent trend of scientific studies on artwork, we study here the thermodynamics of a thermometer made of zisha ceramic, related to the Chinese tea culture. The thermometer represents a boy who "urinates" shortly after hot water is poured onto his head. Long jetting distance is said to indicate that the water temperature is hot enough to brew tea. Here, a thermodynamic model describes the jetting phenomenon of that pee-pee boy. The study demonstrates how thermal expansion of an interior air pocket causes jetting. A thermodynamic potential is shown to define maximum jetting velocity. Seven optimization criteria to maximize jetting distance are provided, including two dimensionless numbers. Predicted jetting distances, jet durations, and temperatures agree very well with infrared and optical measurements. Specifically, the study confirms that jetting distances are sensitive enough to measure water temperature in the context of tea brewing. Optimization results show that longer jets are produced by large individuals, with low body mass index, with a boyhood of medium size inclined at an angle π/4. The study ends by considering the possibility that ceramic jetting artifacts like the pee-pee boy might have been the first thermometers known to mankind, before Galileo Galilei's thermoscope. PMID:27431925

  3. Non-contact measurements of water jet spreading width with a laser instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funami, Yuki; Hasuya, Ryo; Tanabe, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Jet spreading width is one of the important characteristics of water jets discharging into the air. Many researchers have dealt with measuring this width, and contact measuring methods on the water jet surface were employed in a lot of the cases. In order to avoid undesirable effects caused by the contact on the jet surface, we introduce non-contact measuring methods with a laser instrument to the measurements of jet spreading width. In measurements, a transmitter emits sheet-like laser beam to a receiver. The water jet between the transmitter and the receiver interrupts the laser beam and makes a shadow. The minimum and maximum values of the shadow width are measured. In addition, pictures of the water jet are taken with a scale, and the shadow width is measured from the pictures. The experiments on various needle strokes were performed. Three kinds of width consistent with the jet structure were obtained. In the results, it can be concluded that our non-contact measuring methods are feasible. The data of jet spreading widths and jet taper were obtained and are useful for future applications.

  4. Control jets in interaction with hypersonic rarefied flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegre, J.; Raffin, M.

    1993-11-01

    Control jets are used on space vehicles in order to replace or complement mechanical aerodynamic controls at high altitudes. As a matter of fact, the efficiency of mechanical controls decreases drastically with higher rarefaction levels of external flow. Control jets were experimentally investigated in wind-tunnels. The jets interact with external hypersonic rarefied flows. Jet efficiency and associated interaction mechanisms were analyzed for two types of configurations. The first configuration is a delta wing with transverse control jets issuing from sonic nozzles located close to the trailing edge. Tests are performed with an external hypersonic air flow characterized by a Mach number of about 8, a Reynolds number of 11,000, and a rarefaction parameter V = 0.077. The second configuration is a corner flow interacting with a transverse jet issuing from one hypersonic nozzle. This nozzle is inserted in one of the two walls which make up the corner model. Tests are made under external hypersonic nitrogen flows characterized by a Mach number of about 20 and dynamic pressures ranging from 20 Pa to 620 Pa covering rarefaction levels associated with reentry conditions.

  5. SparkJet Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  6. Strain-induced extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames - Effects of steam, CO2, N2, and O2 additives to air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental study was performed using axisymmetric nozzle and tubular opposed jet burners to measure the effects of laminar plug flow and parabolic input velocity profiles on the extinction limits of H2-air counterflow diffusion flames. Extinction limits were quantified by 'flame strength', (average axial air jet velocity) at blowoff of the central flame. The effects of key air contaminants, on the extinction limits, are characterized and analyzed relative to utilization of combustion contaminated vitiated air in high enthalpy supersonic test facilities.

  7. Jet-Supercavity Interaction: Insights from Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeny, M. J.; Krane, M. H.; Kirschner, I. N.; Kinzel, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental study was performed to evaluate some of the claims of Paryshev (2006) regarding changes to ventilated cavity behavior caused by the interaction of a jet with the cavity closure region. The experiments, conducted in the 1.22m dia. Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel, were performed for EDD to tunnel diameter of 0.022, Fr = 14.5 and 26.2. The model consisted of a converging-section nozzle mounted to the base of a 27.9mm 37° cone cavitator placed on the tunnel centerline at the end of a 138.4mm long streamlined strut. A ventilated cavity was formed over the model, then an air jet, issuing from a converging nozzle, was initiated. Changes to cavity behavior were quantified in terms of cavitation number, thrust-to- drag ratio, and stagnation pressure ratio at the jet nozzle. The results show that, while the overall trends predicted by Paryshev were observed, the data did not fully collapse, suggesting that many of the effects neglected by Paryshev's model have measureable effect.

  8. Cleanup of a jet fuel spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesko, Steve

    1996-11-01

    Eaton operates a corporate aircraft hanger facility in Battle Creek, Michigan. Tests showed that two underground storage tanks leaked. Investigation confirmed this release discharged several hundred gallons of Jet A kerosene into the soil and groundwater. The oil moved downward approximately 30 feet and spread laterally onto the water table. Test results showed kerosene in the adsorbed, free and dissolved states. Eaton researched and investigated three clean-up options. They included pump and treat, dig and haul and bioremediation. Jet fuel is composed of readily biodegradable hydrocarbon chains. This fact coupled with the depth to groundwater and geologic setting made bioremediation the low cost and most effective alternative. A recovery well was installed at the leading edge of the dissolved contamination. A pump moved water from this well into a nutrient addition system. Nutrients added included nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Additionally, air was sparged into the water. The water was discharged into an infiltration gallery installed when the underground storage tanks were removed. Water circulated between the pump and the infiltration basin in a closed loop fashion. This oxygenated, nutrient rich water actively and aggressively treated the soils between the bottom of the gallery and the top of the groundwater and the groundwater. The system began operating in August of 1993 and reduced jet fuel to below detection levels. In August of 1995 The State of Michigan issued a clean closure declaration to the site.

  9. [Physical flow aspects of pressure jet ventilation].

    PubMed

    Iben, H; Christoph, B

    1989-01-01

    The decrease of the temperature of a gas at a process of throttling depends on the thermodynamic properties of the concerned gas, on the initial pressure, the initial temperature, and the final pressure. It is for oxygen nearly as big as for air, and it amounts to delta T = 2 degrees C at delta p = 10 bar pressure drop. With a gas temperature T1 = 290 K (17 degrees C) in the oxygen cylinder, the gas temperature in the tracheobronchial tree may fall to values of -3 degrees C to -20 degrees C. A gas jet impacting vertically on a wall produces the power F = m.v approximately to 0.5 N. This corresponds in average to a pressure at the stagnation point of P0 = 2 bar = 0.2 N/mm2 (respectively to the weight of a mass of 22 g/mm2). A good suction effect of the jet of injector can only be obtained with an injector tube adjusted in length and diameter. To obtain a good homogenization in mixtures by ultrasonic, a long mixing tube (L 20.D approximately 180 mm) is required. Gas injectors are to laid out according to the theory of a friction-loaded compressible flow. Test results are necessary for the control. In high frequency jet ventilation an acoustic resonant oscillation is used that, indeed, leads to a practically negligible gas exchange. PMID:2800603

  10. Phenomenology of photon-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of collider physics is to unambiguously associate detector-based objects with the corresponding elementary physics objects. A particular example is the association of calorimeter-based objects such as “jets,” identified with a standard (IR-safe) jet algorithm, with the underlying physics objects, which may be QCD-jets (arising from a scattered parton), electrons, photons or, as discussed here, photon-jets (a group of collinear photons). This separation is especially interesting in the context of Higgs search, where the signal includes events with two photons (in the Standard Model) as well as events with two photon-jets (in a variety of Beyond the Standard Model scenarios), while QCD provides ever-present background. Here we describe the implementation of techniques from the rapidly evolving area of jet substructure studies, not only to enhance the more familiar photon-QCD separation, but also to separately distinguish photon-jets, i.e., to separate usual jets into three categories: single photons, photon-jets and QCD-jets. The efficacy of these techniques for separation is illustrated through studies of simulated data.

  11. Jet-Environment Interactions as Diagnostics of Jet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the interaction of jets with their environments. Jets can transport a sizable fraction of accretion energy away from black holes and neutron stars. Because they are collimated, they can travel to distances far beyond the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole. Yet, their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic medium must eventually halt their advance and dissipate the energy they carry. The termination of the jet, and the inflation of large scale cavities of relativistic plasma offers one of the most powerful ways to constrain the physics of jets. In this chapter, we will review the inflation of radio lobes, the propagation of hot spots, the creation of shells and cavities, and the bending of jet by proper motion through their environment, both in the context of AGN jets and microquasars.

  12. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  13. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, S.; Ciarlo, D.

    1996-05-13

    Goal is to develop a multi-channel micromachined chemical fluid jet dispenser that is applicable to prototype tests with biological samples that demonstrate its utility for molecular biology experiments. Objective is to demonstrate a new device capable of ultrasonically ejecting droplets from 10-200 {mu}m diameter capillaries that are arranged in an array that is linear or focused. The device is based on several common fabrication procedures used in MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology: piezoelectric actuators, silicon, etc.

  14. Behavior of Electrospinning Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Han; Reneker, Darrell

    2002-03-01

    During the electrospinning of jets of polymer solutions such as polyethylene oxide in water, interference colors similar to those seen in the walls of soap bubbles are seen if the proper illumination is provided. The colors can be seen both in the straight part of the jet and in the loops formed by the electrically driven bending instability. The colors were correlated with measurements of the diameter of segments of a particular color. The path of a slowly moving jet of polyisobutylene in a mixture of acetone and paraffin oil was recorded. A well-developed expanding spiral that moved downward was observed. The downward velocity of a typical segment was .13 m/s, and the radial velocity of the same segment was .23m/s. The development of the second bending instability occurred 180 ms after the first, and a third bending instability occurred 280 ms after the first. The growth of the bending instability clearly demonstrated its self-similar, fractal nature. A network of electrospun polyisobutylene fibers was collected in an isopropyl alcohol precipitation bath.

  15. Industrial jet noise: Coanda nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Halliwell, N. A.

    1985-04-01

    Within the U.K. manufacturing industries noise from industrial jets ranks third as a major contributor to industrial deafness. Noise control is hindered because use is made of the air once it has exuded from the nozzle exit. Important tasks include swarf removal, paint spreading, cooling, etc. Nozzles which employ the Coanda effect appear to offer the possibility of significant noise reduction whilst maintaining high thrust efficiency when compared with the commonly used simple open pipe or ordinary convergent nozzle. In this paper the performance of Coanda-type nozzles is examined in detail and an index rating for nozzle performance is introduced. Results show that far field stagnation pressure distributions are Gaussian and similar in all cases with a dispersion coefficient σ = 0·64. Noise reduction and thrust efficiency are shown to be closely related to the design geometry of the central body of the nozzle. Performance is based on four fundamental characteristics, these being the noise level at 1 m from the exit and at a 90° station to the nozzle axis, and the thrust on a chosen profile, the noise reduction and the thrust efficiency. Physically, performance is attributed to flow near field effects where, although all nozzles are choked, shock cell associated noise is absent.

  16. Flow structure and mixing in obstructed and confined jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, S. G.; Fryer-Taylor, R. E. J.

    A comprehensive series of smoke flow visualization and laser induced fluorescence experiments was performed in a study of the dispersion processes of obstructed and confined incompressible gas jets. It was found that large-scale vortical structures dominated the entrainment of ambient air into a free jet. The presence of obstacles within the flowfield generated additional vorticity which locally enhanced the concentration decay within the release. However, the creation of recirculatory regions in the wake of certain obstacles reduced enntrainment into these areas. For hazardous releases, this could give rise to a steady flammable or toxic mixture within the wake.

  17. Film cooling: case of double rows of staggered jets.

    PubMed

    Dorignac, E; Vullierme, J J; Noirault, P; Foucault, E; Bousgarbiès, J L

    2001-05-01

    An experimental investigation of film cooling of a wall in a case of double rows of staggered hot jets (65 degrees C) in an ambient air flow. The wall is heated at a temperature value between the one of the jets and the one of the main flow. Experiments have been carried out for different injection rates, the main flow velocity is maintained at 32 m/s. Association of the measures of temperature profiles by cold wire and the measures of wall temperature by infrared thermography allows us to describe the behaviour of the flows and to propose the best injection which assures a good cooling of the plate. PMID:11460645

  18. Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking down at Jet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking down at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Edwards Test Station complex in 1961, with north toward the top of the view. Dd test station has been added to Test Stand 'D,' liquid nitrogen storage facility E-63 has been built, as well as several adjuncts to Test Stand 'C' behind earth barriers, such as oxidizer facility at 4263/E-64 and hydrogen tank at 4264/E-65. (JPL negative no. 384-3003-A, 12 December 1961) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Wall jets created by single and twin high pressure jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P.; Wilson, M.

    1993-03-01

    An extensive experimental investigation into the nature of the wall jets produced by single and twin normal jet impingement has been undertaken. Wall jet velocity profiles have been recorded up to 70 jet diameters from the impingement point, at pressures representative of current VStol technology. The tests used fixed convergent nozzles, with nozzle height and spacing and jet pressure being varied. Single jet impingement displays a consistent effect of nozzle height on wall jet development. For twin jet cases a powerful reinforcement exists along the wall jet interaction plane. Remote from the interaction plane the wall jets are weaker than those produced by a single jet impingement.

  20. W + jet production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, Andrea; /INFN, Rome

    2006-10-01

    A measurement of W {yields} e{nu} + n-jet cross sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II (CDF II) is presented. The measurement is based on an integrated luminosity of 320 pb{sup -1}, and includes events with up to 4 or more jets. In each jet multiplicity sample the differential and cumulative cross sections with respect to the transverse energy of the i{sup th} jet are measured. For W+ {ge} 2 jets the differential cross section with respect to the 2-leading jets invariant mass m{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} and angural separation {Delta} R{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} is also reported. The data are compared to predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

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  2. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  3. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  4. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  5. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  6. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  7. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  8. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  9. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  10. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  11. Design of air curtains used for area confinement in tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyonnaud, L.; Solliec, C.; Dufresne de Virel, M.; Rey, C.

    Air curtains' devices, i.e., plane air jets, are used as virtual screens to reduce the heat and mass transfer from one zone to another subjected to different environmental or climatic conditions. An air curtain is a plane air jet blown through an opening. It produces a pressure drop that forbids transversal flow through the opening. The principal advantage of such installations is to facilitate the transit of people, vehicles or material through doorways of buildings and other enclosures. The purpose of this research is twofold: (i) to characterize the efficiency of air curtains; (ii) to establish how scaled down models could be used to set up full-scale installations.

  12. Fluid dynamic aspects of jet noise generation. [noise measurement of jet blast effects from supersonic jet flow in convergent-divergent nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barra, V.; Panunzio, S.

    1976-01-01

    Jet engine noise generation and noise propagation was investigated by studying supersonic nozzle flow of various nozzle configurations in an experimental test facility. The experimental facility was constructed to provide a coaxial axisymmetric jet flow of unheated air. In the test setup, an inner primary flow exhausted from a 7 in. exit diameter convergent--divergent nozzle at Mach 2, while a secondary flow had a 10 in. outside diameter and was sonic at the exit. The large dimensions of the jets permitted probes to be placed inside the jet core without significantly disturbing the flow. Static pressure fluctuations were measured for the flows. The nozzles were designed for shock free (balanced) flow at Mach 2. Data processing techniques and experimental procedures were developed in order to study induced disturbances at the edge of the supersonic flows, and the propagation of those disturbances throughout the flows. Equipment used (specifications are given) to record acoustic levels (far field noise) is described. Results and conclusions are presented and discussed. Diagrams of the jet flow fields are included along with photographs of the test stand.

  13. Radiation-Driven Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-10-01

    Radiative winds and jets from luminous accretion disks/tori are reviewed. Among various models of astrophysical jets, plasma outflows emanating from accretion disks/tori and accelerated by the radiation pressure is the most promising one. Here explained are the roles of radiation pressure force and radiation drag force. Rise and fall of a torus model are also discussed, following its revenge. Finally, the millennium jet model, where the multistage acceleration takes place, is proposed.

  14. Electromagnetic Models of Extragalactic Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, M.; Blandford, R.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-22

    Relativistic jets may be confined by large-scale, anisotropic electromagnetic stresses that balance isotropic particle pressure and disordered magnetic field. A class of axisymmetric equilibrium jet models will be described and their radiative properties outlined under simple assumptions. The partition of the jet power between electromagnetic and mechanical forms and the comoving energy density between particles and magnetic field will be discussed. Current carrying jets may be recognized by their polarization patterns. Progress and prospects for measuring this using VLBI and GLAST observations will be summarized.

  15. Photon + jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  16. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-27

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet.

  17. The formation of interstellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  18. The effect of refraction on acoustic wave-angle emission from free jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S.-L.

    Good quality optical photographs of supersonic helium free jets show three principal types of acoustic waves: (1) nozzle centered radiation in the form of high-frequency, closely-spaced waves which steepen with distance away from the jet; (2) wider-spaced high-frequency waves emanating from the first six diameters from the exit and inclined at approximately the same angle as the initial nozzle-centered waves, but with little steepening; and (3) low-angled low-frequency waves which originate from the end of the potential jet core and are cut off at the end of the sonic core. A theoretical method developed for ideally-expanded air jets has been modified for refraction and convection effects due to significantly different density and sound-speed jets exhausting into the quiescent atmosphere. The predicted acoustic wave angles are within 3 deg of the measured angles for six correctly-expanded air and helium jets; the additional shock noise contribution for 13 helium and air jets operating in the 50-150% expansion range are underestimated by 4-8 deg. The predicted angle for the low-frequency radiation is within 3 deg of the cone-of-silence angle in the 15 cases where the acoustic cut-off is within the optical field of view.

  19. Field of Flow About a Jet and Effect of Jets on Stability of Jet-Propelled Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S.

    1946-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on jet-induced flow deviation. Analysis is given of flow inclination induced outside cold and hot jets and jet deflection caused by angle of attack. Applications to computation of effects of jet on longitudinal stability and trim are explained. Effect of jet temperature on flow inclination was found small when thrust coefficient is used as criterion for similitude. The average jet-induced downwash over tail plane was obtained geometrically.

  20. The Near Noise Field of Static Jets and Some Model Studies of Devices for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, Leslie W; Hubbard, Harvey H

    1956-01-01

    An experimental study is presented of the pressure fluctuations near jet exhaust streams made during unchoked operation of a turbojet engine and a 1-inch-diameter high-temperature model jet and during choked operation of various sizes of model jets with unheated air. The tests for unchoked operation indicate a random spectrum of rather narrow band width which varies in frequency content with axial position along the jet. Pressure surveys from the model tests along lines parallel to the 15 degree jet boundary indicate that the station of greatest pressure fluctuations is determined by the jet velocity and the radial distance, with a tendency of the maximum to shift downstream as either parameter is increased. From model tests the magnitude of the fluctuations appears to increase as about the second power of jet velocity at points just outside the jet boundary and as increasingly higher powers of jet velocity as distance from the boundary is increased. A laboratory method of noise reduction with model jets was found to produce large decreases in the magnitude of the lower-frequency components of the spectra and thereby also to reduce the total radiated energy. Choked operation of model jets with unheated air indicates the appearance of a discrete-frequency component of very large magnitude. Shadowgraph records of the flow show that this condition is associated with the appearance of flow formations suggestive of partly formed toroidal vortices in the vicinity of the shocks. Elimination of these formations is found to eliminate the discrete component and thereby to reduce the overall noise level.