Science.gov

Sample records for air jet stress

  1. Role of the sympathetic nervous system in cerebrovascular responses to air-jet stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Revel, Aurélia; Oréa, Valérie; Chapuis, Bruno; Barrès, Christian; Julien, Claude

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of sympathetic nerves in the control of cerebral hemodynamics during air-jet stress. In adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, blood flow velocity (pulsed Doppler) was measured in both internal carotid arteries 1 week after excision of one superior cervical ganglion. Blood pressure (BP) and carotid blood flows (CBFs) were simultaneously recorded during exposure to air-jet stress. In 5 out of 13 rats, stress was applied after β(2)-adrenoceptor blockade with ICI 118551 (0.4 mg/kg, then 0.2 mg/kg/h, i.v). Stress evoked an immediate rise in BP, CBFs, and vascular conductances. Vasodilatation was much larger on the denervated side than on the intact side (mean ± SEM: 78 ± 7 versus 19 ± 4%; P < 0.02) and lasted about 10 s. Thereafter, blood flows returned to or near normal and showed parallel variations while BP remained elevated. There was, therefore, a net vasoconstriction on both sides. In ICI 118551-treated rats, the initial vasodilatation was not significantly reduced on the denervated side (64 ± 4%), but the subsequent vasoconstriction was enhanced (P < 0.05) on both sides. In conclusion, air-jet stress evokes an immediate, short-lasting vasodilatation through a mechanism unrelated to β(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation. Sympathetic nerves powerfully limit this phenomenon, and thus contribute to protect the cerebral circulation from stress-induced BP surges.

  2. The flow feature of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of micro air jets in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Amini, Younes; Ganji, D. D.; Takam, ​M. Rahimi

    2017-03-01

    Scramjet is found to be the efficient method for the space shuttle. In this paper, numerical simulation is performed to investigate the fundamental flow physics of the interaction between an array of fuel jets and multi air jets in a supersonic transverse flow. Hydrogen as a fuel is released with a global equivalence ratio of 0.5 in presence of micro air jets on a flat plate into a Mach 4 crossflow. The fuel and air are injected through streamwise-aligned flush circular portholes. The hydrogen is injected through 4 holes with 7dj space when the air is injected in the interval of the hydrogen jets. The numerical simulation is performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Both the number of air jets and jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio are varied in a parametric study. The interaction of the fuel and air jet in the supersonic flow present extremely complex feature of fuel and air jet. The results present various flow features depending upon the number and mass flow rate of micro air jets. These flow features were found to have significant effects on the penetration of hydrogen jets. A variation of the number of air jets, along with the jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio, induced a variety of flow structure in the downstream of the fuel jets.

  3. Characteristics of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of multi air jets within scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Fallah, Keivan; Pourmirzaagha, H.

    2017-03-01

    In this article, three-dimensional simulation is performed to investigate the effects of micro air jets on mixing performances of cascaded hydrogen jets within a scramjet combustor. In order to compare the efficiency of this technique, constant total fuel rate is injected through one, four, eight and sixteen arrays of portholes in a Mach 4.0 crossflow with a fuel global equivalence ratio of 0.5. In this method, micro air jets are released within fuel portholes to augment the penetration in upward direction. Extensive studies were performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Numerical studies on various air and fuel arrangements are done and the mixing rate and penetration are comprehensively investigated. Also, the flow feature of the fuel and air jets for different configuration is revealed. According to the obtained results, the influence of the micro air jets is significant and the presence of micro air jets increases the mixing rate about 116%, 77%, 56% and 41% for single, 4, 8 and 16 multi fuel jets, respectively. The maximum mixing rate of the hydrogen jet is obtained when the air jets are injected within the sixteen multi fuel jets. According to the circulation analysis of the flow for different air and fuel arrangements, it was found that the effects of air jets on flow structure are varied in various conditions and the presence of the micro jet highly intensifies the circulation in the case of 8 and 16 multi fuel jets.

  4. Far Noise Field of Air Jets and Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E; Coles, Willard D

    1957-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study and compare the acoustic radiation of air jets and jet engines. A number of different nozzle-exit shapes were studied with air jets to determine the effect of exit shape on noise generation. Circular, square, rectangular, and elliptical convergent nozzles and convergent-divergent and plug nozzles were investigated. The spectral distributions of the sound power for the engine and the air jet were in good agreement for the case where the engine data were not greatly affected by reflection or jet interference effects. Such power spectra for a subsonic or slightly choked engine or air jet show that the peaks of the spectra occur at a Strouhal number of 0.3.

  5. Investigation of the Penetration on an Air Jet Directed Perpendicularly to an Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E; Ruggeri, Robert S

    1948-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the penetration of a circular air Jet directed perpendicularly to an air stream as a function of Jet density, Jet velocity, air-stream density, air-stream velocity, Jet diameter, and distance downstream from the Jet. The penetration was determined for nearly constant values of air-stream density at two tunnel velocities, four Jet diameters, four positions downstream of the Jet, and for a large range of Jet velocities and densities. An equation for the penetration was obtained in terms of the Jet diameter, the distance downstream from the jet, and the ratios of Jet and air-stream velocities and densities.

  6. Synthetic Jets in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, C. S.; Chen, F. J.; Neuhart, D.; Harris, J.

    2007-01-01

    An oscillatory jet with zero net mass flow is generated by a cavity-pumping actuator. Among the three test cases selected for the Langley CFD validation workshop to assess the current CFD capabilities to predict unsteady flow fields, this basic oscillating jet flow field is the least complex and is selected as the first test case. Increasing in complexity, two more cases studied include jet in cross flow boundary layer and unsteady flow induced by suction and oscillatory blowing with separation control geometries. In this experiment, velocity measurements from three different techniques, hot-wire anemometry, Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), documented the synthetic jet flow field. To provide boundary conditions for computations, the experiment also monitored the actuator operating parameters including diaphragm displacement, internal cavity pressure, and internal cavity temperature.

  7. Portable nanosecond pulsed air plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2011-08-22

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas are of great importance in many emerging biomedical and materials processing applications. The redundancy of a vacuum system opens the gateway for highly portable plasma systems, for which air ideally becomes the plasma-forming gas and remote plasma processing is preferred to ensure electrical safety. Typically, the gas temperature observed in air plasma greatly exceeds that suitable for the processing of thermally liable materials; a large plasma-sample distance offers a potential solution but suffers from a diluted downstream plasma chemistry. This Letter reports a highly portable air plasma jet system which delivers enhanced downstream chemistry without compromising the low temperature nature of the discharge, thus forming the basis of a powerful tool for emerging mobile plasma applications.

  8. Computational Study of Air Entrainment by Plunging Jets-Influence of Jet Inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj; Trujillo, Mario

    2012-11-01

    The process of air entrainment by a continuous liquid jet plunging into a quiescent liquid pool is studied computationally. Our earlier study [APS2011] focused on shallow impacts and the discernible periodicity of air cavity formation. Here, we consider the effect of jet angle. For steep impacts, we see a chaotic formation of small cavities, in agreement with the literature. To explain the difference, we track evolution of the flow from initial impact to quasi-stationary state, for different jet inclinations. The initial impact always yields a large air cavity, regardless of jet angle. Difference emerges in the quasi-stationary state where shallow jets demonstrate the periodicity but the steep jets do not. We show that this is a manifestation of the air entrainment being a function of flow disturbance. For shallow jets, the disturbance originates from strong wavelike motion of the cavity which results in a total disruption of the jet. Thus, the resulting cavities are large and occur periodically. For the steep jets, entrainment happens by collapse of a thin gas film uniformly enshrouding the submerged jet. Such a thin film is very sensitive to the local flow disturbances. Thus, its collapse occurs stochastically all around the jet causing chaotic entrainment of small air pocket.

  9. Venturi Air-Jet Vacuum Ejector For Sampling Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gerald F.; Sachse, Glen W.; Burney, L. Garland; Wade, Larry O.

    1990-01-01

    Venturi air-jet vacuum ejector pump light in weight, requires no electrical power, does not contribute heat to aircraft, and provides high pumping speeds at moderate suctions. High-pressure motive gas required for this type of pump bled from compressor of aircraft engine with negligible effect on performance of engine. Used as source of vacuum for differential-absorption CO-measurement (DACOM), modified to achieve in situ measurements of CO at frequency response of 10 Hz. Provides improvement in spatial resolution and potentially leads to capability to measure turbulent flux of CO by use of eddy-correlation technique.

  10. The ADPI of cold air jets in an enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.T.; Knappmiller, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    The subject of this paper is the computational determination of the air diffusion performance index (ADPI) of a cold air jet in an enclosure. The jet outlet size, temperature, momentum, and Archimedes number were varied to produce a range of attached and separated flow regimes. The cooling load was produced by heating one of the room walls. The effect of using conventional and cold supply jets was investigated for two heat source locations. The results indicate that, for the type of diffuser and room configuration studied, an optimum ADPI was obtained when the jet separation distance is approximately equal to the room characteristic length. Room airflow conditions produced by conventional and cold air supply temperature air are almost identical to each other when the same separation distance criteria, i.e., same momentum flux, are used.

  11. Time-Accurate Numerical Simulations of Synthetic Jet Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupesh, K-A. B.; Ravi, B. R.; Mittal, R.; Raju, R.; Gallas, Q.; Cattafesta, L.

    2007-01-01

    The unsteady evolution of three-dimensional synthetic jet into quiescent air is studied by time-accurate numerical simulations using a second-order accurate mixed explicit-implicit fractional step scheme on Cartesian grids. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations of synthetic jet are carried out at a Reynolds number (based on average velocity during the discharge phase of the cycle V(sub j), and jet width d) of 750 and Stokes number of 17.02. The results obtained are assessed against PIV and hotwire measurements provided for the NASA LaRC workshop on CFD validation of synthetic jets.

  12. Supersonic moist air jet impingements on flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Miah Md. Ashraful; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2010-02-01

    Pronounced aeroacoustic resonances are exhibited in the flowfield where a jet emerges from an orifice or a nozzle and impinges on a solid surface. One instance where such resonances are produced is in a high speed jet impingement, such as in the space launch vehicle systems, jet-engine exhaust impingement, and in the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, etc. A highly unsteady flowfield leading to a drastic increase of noise level with very high dynamic pressure and thermal loads are noticed on nearby surfaces results dramatic lift loss, severe ground erosion and hot gas ingestion to the inlet in the jet engines. This highly unsteady behavior of the impinging jets is due to a feedback loop between the fluid and acoustic fields. In actual jet flow, the working gas may contain condensable gas such as steam or moist air. In these cases, the non-equilibrium condensation may occur at the region between nozzle exit and an object. The jet flow with non-equilibrium condensation may be quite different from that without condensation. Therefore, in this study, the effect of the non-equilibrium condensation of moist air on the axisymmetric under-expanded supersonic impinging jet on a vertical flat plate was investigated numerically.

  13. Impact of Air Injection on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Norum, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this viewgraph presentation is to review the program to determine impact of core fluidic chevrons on noise produced by dual stream jets (i.e., broadband shock noise - supersonic, and mixing noise - subsonic and supersonic). The presentation reviews the sources of jet noise. It shows designs of Generation II Fluidic Chevrons. The injection impacts shock structure and stream disturbances through enhanced mixing. This may impact constructive interference between acoustic sources. The high fan pressures may inhibit mixing produced by core injectors. A fan stream injection may be required for better noise reduction. In future the modification of Gen II nozzles to allow for some azimuthal control: will allow for higher mass flow rates and will allow for shallower injection angles A Flow field study is scheduled for spring, 2008 The conclusions are that injection can reduce well-defined shock noise and injection reduces mixing noise near peak jet noise angle

  14. Air entrainment and the dynamics of volcanic jets and plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, L. G.; Solovitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    During a typical pyroclastic eruption, gas and pyroclasts exit a volcanic vent at speeds of tens to hundreds of meters per second. At the vent the mixture is negatively buoyant, and rises as a plinian column only if it ingests and heats sufficient air to attain positive buoyancy. As erosion increases vent radius r during an eruption, eruptive mass flux increases with r2, but the mass of air entrained increases only with r1. Hence the column ingests progressively less air relative to its mass and eventually, at some threshold mass flux m, collapses. The threshold mass flux m depends strongly on the air entrainment coefficient ɛ, i.e. the velocity of inrushing air normalized to the upward jet velocity. The value of ɛ is not well characterized in the near-vent region, and likely varies with vent geometry, overpressure, and jet density among other factors. Theoretical scaling relations suggest that a two-fold variation in ɛ (e.g. 0.05-0.10) results in a four-fold variation in m. Numerical models of overpressured jets show that near- vent entrainment may be inhibited by shock waves, promoting partial or oscillatory column collapse within an otherwise steady plinian column. Here we present the first results of laboratory experiments using particle image velocimetry to quantify near-vent air entrainment. In these experiments, we use a jet of compressed air seeded with 3 μm TiO2 tracer particles, exiting a vertically-directed pipe 1.27 cm in inside diameter and 18 cm long, with upstream pressures of 0 to 21 kPa, producing a pressure-balanced jet at the exit with velocities up to about 180 m s-1. The ambient air was seeded with tracer oil droplets a few micrometers in diameter from a fog machine. The seeded jet was illuminated by a 0.5 mm-thick Nd:YAG laser sheet that extended 5 cm above and horizontally from the vent. Particles illuminated by this sheet were photographed by pairs of images separated in time by 10 to 200 μs, from which we were able to extract flow

  15. Generating and controlling homogeneous air turbulence using random jet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Douglas; Petersen, Alec; Amili, Omid; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The use of random jet arrays, already employed in water tank facilities to generate zero-mean-flow homogeneous turbulence, is extended to air as a working fluid. A novel facility is introduced that uses two facing arrays of individually controlled jets (256 in total) to force steady homogeneous turbulence with negligible mean flow, shear, and strain. Quasi-synthetic jet pumps are created by expanding pressurized air through small straight nozzles and are actuated by fast-response low-voltage solenoid valves. Velocity fields, two-point correlations, energy spectra, and second-order structure functions are obtained from 2D PIV and are used to characterize the turbulence from the integral-to-the Kolmogorov scales. Several metrics are defined to quantify how well zero-mean-flow homogeneous turbulence is approximated for a wide range of forcing and geometric parameters. With increasing jet firing time duration, both the velocity fluctuations and the integral length scales are augmented and therefore the Reynolds number is increased. We reach a Taylor-microscale Reynolds number of 470, a large-scale Reynolds number of 74,000, and an integral-to-Kolmogorov length scale ratio of 680. The volume of the present homogeneous turbulence, the largest reported to date in a zero-mean-flow facility, is much larger than the integral length scale, allowing for the natural development of the energy cascade. The turbulence is found to be anisotropic irrespective of the distance between the jet arrays. Fine grids placed in front of the jets are effective at modulating the turbulence, reducing both velocity fluctuations and integral scales. Varying the jet-to-jet spacing within each array has no effect on the integral length scale, suggesting that this is dictated by the length scale of the jets.

  16. Multiscale turbulence effects in supersonic jets exhausting into still air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1987-01-01

    A modified version of the multiscale turbulence model of Hanjalic has been applied to the problem of supersonic jets exhausting into still air. In particular, the problem of shock-cell decay through turbulent interaction with the mixing layer has been studied for both mildly interacting and strongly resonant jet conditions. The modified Hanjalic model takes into account the nonequilibrium energy transfer between two different turbulent spectral scales. The turbulence model was incorporated into an existing shock-capturing, parabolized Navier-Stokes computational model in order to perform numerical experiments. The results show that the two-scale turbulence model provides significant improvement over one-scale models in the prediction of plume shock structure for underexpanded supersonic (Mach 2) and sonic (Mach 1) jets. For the supersonic jet, excellent agreement with experiment was obtained for the centerline shock-cell pressure decay up to 40 jet radii. For the sonic jet, the agreement with experiment was not so good, but the two-scale model still showed significant improvement over the one-scale model. It is shown that by relating some of the coefficients in the turbulent-transport equations to the relative time scale for transfer of energy between scales the two-scale model can provide predictions that bound the measured shock-cell decay rate for the sonic jet.

  17. Characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental program to study the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling flows to obtain detailed and accurate data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport modeling for combustor flows is discussed. The work was also motivated by the need to investigate and quantify the influence of confinement and swirl on the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets. The flow facility was constructed in a simple way which allows easy interchange of different swirlers and the freedom to vary the jet Reynolds number. The velocity measurements were taken with a one color, one component DISA Model 55L laser-Doppler anemometer employing the forward scatter mode. Standard statistical methods are used to evaluate the various moments of the signals to give the flow characteristics. The present work was directed at the understanding of the velocity field. Therefore, only velocity and turbulence data of the axial and circumferential components are reported for inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows.

  18. A wide-frequency-range air-jet shaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Robert W

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a description of a simple air-jet shaker. Its force can be calibrated statically and appears to be constant with frequency. It is relatively easy to use, and it has essentially massless characteristics. This shaker is applied to define the unstable branch of a frequency-response curve obtained for a nonlinear spring with a single degree of freedom.

  19. Forces Acting on a Ball in an Air Jet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Zendri, G.; Oss, S.

    2011-01-01

    The forces acting on a ball in an air jet have been measured using simple equipment. Such measurements allow quite a precise, non-ambiguous description and understanding of the physical mechanism which explains the famous levitating ball experiment. (Contains 7 figures.)

  20. AirJet paper mover: an example of mesoscale MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegelsen, David K.; Berlin, Andrew A.; Cheung, Patrick; Fromherz, Markus P.; Goldberg, David; Jackson, Warren B.; Preas, Bryan; Reich, James; Swartz, Lars E.

    2000-08-01

    The motion of human scale objects requires MEMS-like device arrays capable of providing reasonable forces ($GTR mN) over human scale distances (10-100 cm). In principle batch fabricated values controlling air jets can satisfy these actuation requirements. By extending printed circuit board technology to include electromechanical actuation, analogous to the extension of VLSI to MEMS, the requirement of low system cost can be achieved through batch fabrication and integration of the transduction elements with computational and communication elements. In this paper we show that modulated air jets arrayed with position sensors can support and accelerate flexible media without physical contact. Precise motion control with three degrees of freedom parallel to the array, using high flow, low pressure air jet arrays is enabled using electrostatic valves having opening and closing times of approximately equals 1 ms. We present results of an exemplary platform based on printed circuit board technologies, having an array of 576 electrostatic flap valvves (1152 for double-sided actuation) and associated oriented jets, and an integrated array of 32,000 optical sensors for high resolution detection of paper edge positions. Under closed loop control edge positioning has a standard deviation of approximately equals 25 microns. Fabrication and control of the system is described.

  1. Lifted methane-air jet flames in a vitiated coflow

    SciTech Connect

    Cabra, R.; Chen, J.-Y.; Dibble, R.W.; Karpetis, A.N.; Barlow, R.S.

    2005-12-01

    The present vitiated coflow flame consists of a lifted jet flame formed by a fuel jet issuing from a central nozzle into a large coaxial flow of hot combustion products from a lean premixed H{sub 2}/air flame. The fuel stream consists of CH{sub 4} mixed with air. Detailed multiscalar point measurements from combined Raman-Rayleigh-LIF experiments are obtained for a single base-case condition. The experimental data are presented and then compared to numerical results from probability density function (PDF) calculations incorporating various mixing models. The experimental results reveal broadened bimodal distributions of reactive scalars when the probe volume is in the flame stabilization region. The bimodal distribution is attributed to fluctuation of the instantaneous lifted flame position relative to the probe volume. The PDF calculation using the modified Curl mixing model predicts well several but not all features of the instantaneous temperature and composition distributions, time-averaged scalar profiles, and conditional statistics from the multiscalar experiments. A complementary series of parametric experiments is used to determine the sensitivity of flame liftoff height to jet velocity, coflow velocity, and coflow temperature. The liftoff height is found to be approximately linearly related to each parameter within the ranges tested, and it is most sensitive to coflow temperature. The PDF model predictions for the corresponding conditions show that the sensitivity of flame liftoff height to jet velocity and coflow temperature is reasonably captured, while the sensitivity to coflow velocity is underpredicted.

  2. Jets.

    PubMed

    Rhines, Peter B.

    1994-06-01

    This is a discussion of concentrated large-scale flows in planetary atmospheres and oceans, argued from the viewpoint of basic geophysical fluid dynamics. We give several elementary examples in which these flows form jets on rotating spheres. Jet formation occurs under a variety of circumstances: when flows driven by external stress have a rigid boundary which can balance the Coriolis force, and at which further concentration can be caused by the beta effect; when there are singular lines like the line of vanishing windstress or windstress-curl, or the Equator; when compact sources of momentum, heat or mass radiate jet-like beta plumes along latitude circles; when random external stirring of the fluid becomes organized by the beta effect into jets; when internal instability of the mass field generates zonal flow which then is concentrated into jets; when bottom topographic obstacles radiate jets, and when frontogenesis leads to shallow jet formation. Essential to the process of jet formation in stratified fluids is the baroclinic life cycle described in geostrophic turbulence studies; there, conversion from potential to kinetic energy generates eddy motions, and these convert to quasibarotropic motions which then radiate and induce jet-like large-scale circulation. Ideas of potential vorticity stirring by eddies generalize the notion of Rossby-wave radiation, showing how jets embedded in an ambient potential vorticity gradient (typically due to the spherical geometry of the rotating planet) gain eastward momentum while promoting broader, weaker westward circulation. Homogenization of potential vorticity is an important limit point, which many geophysical circulations achieve. This well-mixed state is found in subdomains of the terrestrial midlatitude oceans, the high-latitude circumpolar ocean, and episodically in the middle atmosphere. Homogenization expels potential vorticity gradients vertically to the top and bottom of the fluid, and sideways to the edges of

  3. Soot Formation in Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames are important because they affect the durability and performance of propulsion systems, the hazards of unwanted fires, the pollutant and particulate emissions from combustion processes, and the potential for developing computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, this investigation involved an experimental study of the structure and soot properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames, seeking an improved understanding of soot formation (growth and nucleation) within diffusion flames. The present study extends earlier work in this laboratory concerning laminar smoke points (l) and soot formation in acetylene/air laminar jet diffusion flames (2), emphasizing soot formation in hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames for fuels other than acetylene. In the flame system, acetylene is the dominant gas species in the soot formation region and both nucleation and growth were successfully attributed to first-order reactions of acetylene, with nucleation exhibiting an activation energy of 32 kcal/gmol while growth involved negligible activation energy and a collision efficiency of O.53%. In addition, soot growth in the acetylene diffusion flames was comparable to new soot in premixed flame (which also has been attributed to first-order acetylene reactions). In view of this status, a major issue is the nature of soot formation processes in diffusion flame involving hydrocarbon fuels other than acetylene. In particular, information is needed about th dominant gas species in the soot formation region and the impact of gas species other than acetylene on soot nucleation and growth.

  4. The Effect of Aerodynamic Heating on Air Penetration by Shaped Charge Jets and Their Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backofen, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present recent work modeling thermal coupling between shaped charge jets and their particles with air while it is being penetrated to form a crater that subsequently collapses back onto the jet. This work complements research published at International Symposia on Ballistics: 1) 1987 - Shaped Charge Jet Aerodynamics, Particulation and Blast Field Modeling; and 2) 2007 - Air Cratering by Eroding Shaped Charge Jets. The current work shows how and when a shaped charge jet's tip and jet particles are softened enough that they can erode in a hydrodynamic manner as modeled in these papers. This paper and its presentation includes models for heat transfer from shocked air as a function of jet velocity as well as heat flow within the jet or particle. The work is supported by an extensive bibliographic search including publications on meteors and ballistic missile re-entry vehicles. The modeling shows that a jet loses its strength to the depth required to justify hydrodynamic erosion when its velocity is above a specific velocity related to the shock properties of air and the jet material's properties. As a result, the portion of a jet's kinetic energy converted at the aerodynamic shock into heating transferred back onto the jet affects the energy deposited into the air through drag and ablation which in turn affect air crater expansion and subsequent collapse back onto the jet and its particles as shown in high-speed photography.

  5. An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-24

    jet . This jet impacted at 90* a pool of water and, when a threshold velocity was exceeded, it was observed that the plunging liquid jet caused air ... Entrainment by Plunging Laminar Liquid Jets ," AIChE Journal, Vol. 12, No. 3, 563, 1966. McKeogh, E.J. and Ervine, D.A., " Air Entrainment Rate and Diffusion...transmit the fourth quarterly report for ONR grant N00014-91-J-1271, "An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid

  6. Study of Air Entrainment by a Horizontal Plunging Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Mario; Deshpande, Suraj; Wu, Xiongjun; Chahine, Georges

    2009-11-01

    The process of air entrainment following the impact of an initially horizontal circular water jet on a pool of water has been studied computationally and experimentally. It has been found that the entrainment of air cavities in the near field region is periodic, not continuous as reported in earlier studies. The simulations are based on a Volume-of-Fluid methodology with interfacial compression using a modified version of the open source utilities, OpenFoam. Close agreement with experiments is reported on the creation of cavities in the near field, where air entrainment occurs. The period of entrainment is found to be proportional to g, and a simplified closed-form solution for this periodic event is presented. An overall physical picture of the mechanisms leading to bubble formation is given. The far field, which is characterized by the presence of small bubbles is only partially resolved computationally. Comparisons against velocity data are performed in this region leading to adequate qualitative agreement.

  7. 77 FR 59391 - Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways Corporation, United Air Lines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ...] Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways Corporation, United Air Lines, Inc...'s Procedural Rules Applicable to Oil Pipeline Proceedings, 18 CFR 343.1(a) and 343.2(c); Delta...

  8. The influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, J.; Jícha, M.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with instigation of influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation. CFD approach was used for investigation and model geometry was based on small aircraft cabin mock-up geometry. Model was also equipped by nine seats and five manikins that represent passengers. The air jet direction was observed for selected ambient environment parameters and several types of air duct geometry and influence of main air duct geometry on jets direction is discussed. The model was created in StarCCM+ ver. 6.04.014 software and polyhedral mesh was used.

  9. Influence of Control Jets on Flush Air-data Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Computations are performed to investigate the effect of rocket control motors on flush air-data sensor systems. Such sensors are critical for the control of space vehicles during launch and re-entry, but are prone to interference from rocket motors, hypersonic-flow effects, etc. Computational analyses provide a means for studying these interference effects and exploring opportunities for mitigating them, either through design techniques or through appropriate processing of the sensor outputs. In the present work, the influence of rocket control motors on the nosecone flush air-data sensors of a launch-abort vehicle is studied. Particular attention is paid to the differential effect of various control-jet combinations on surface pressures. The relative effectiveness of inviscid, viscous, turbulent and two-phase-flow approximations in addressing this problem is also investigated.

  10. An experimental investigation of gas jets in confined swirling air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongia, H.; Ahmed, S. A.; Mongia, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of jets in confined swirling flows which is of importance to designers of turbine combustors and solid fuel ramjets used to power missiles fired from cannons were examined. The fluid dynamics of gas jets of different densities in confined swirling flows were investigated. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are made with a one color, one component laser velocimeter operating in the forward scatter mode. It is shown that jets in confined flow with large area ratio are highly dissipative which results in both air and helium/air jet centerline velocity decays. For air jets, the jet like behavior in the tube center disappears at about 20 diameters downstream of the jet exit. This phenomenon is independent of the initial jet velocity. The turbulence field at this point also decays to that of the background swirling flow. A jet like behavior in the tube center is noticed even at 40 diameters for the helium/air jets. The subsequent flow and turbulence field depend highly on the initial jet velocity. The jets are fully turbulent, and the cause of this difference in behavior is attributed to the combined action swirl and density difference. This observation can have significant impact on the design of turbine combustors and solid fuel ramjets subject to spin.

  11. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  12. PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO JP-8 JET FUEL VAPORS AND EXHAUST AT AIR FORCE BASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and gro...

  13. Acoustic properties of supersonic helium/air jets at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, Dennis K.; Barron, W. D.; Vaddempudi, Appa R.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed with the objective of developing a greater understanding of the physics of hot supersonic jet noise. Cold helium/air jets are used to easily and inexpensively simulate the low densities of hot air jets. The experiments are conducted at low Reynolds numbers in order to facilitate study of the large-scale turbulent structures (instability waves) that cause most of the radiated noise. Experiments have been performed on Mach 1.5 and 2.1 jets of pure air, pure helium and 10 percent helium by mass. Helium/air jets are shown to radiate more noise than pure air jets due to the increased exit velocity. Microphone spectra are usually dominated by a single spectral component at a predictable frequency. Increasing the jet's helium concentration is shown to increase the dominant frequency. The helium concentration in the test chamber is determined by calculating the speed of sound from the measured phase difference between two microphone signals. Bleeding outside air into the test chamber controls the accumulation of helium so that the hot jet simulation remains valid. The measured variation in the peak radiated noise frequency is in good agreement with the predictions of the hot jet noise theory of Tam et al.

  14. Analysis of the Stress Wave Effect During Rock Breakage by Pulsating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Wei, Jianping; Ren, Ting

    2016-02-01

    Formation, propagation and attenuation of stress waves during rock breakage by pulsating jets are simulated by introducing the Johnson-Holmquist-Concrete nonlinear constitutive model, and using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics approach. The curve of stress over time at different locations of the rock surface under the action of high-velocity pulsating jets is obtained, as well as relationship curve between amplitude of stress wave and distance to jet action spot. Based on the computational results, breakage behavior of rocks under stress wave effect, and impacts of jet velocity and rock properties on stress wave effect are analyzed. The results show that the stress wave effect of pulsating jets is rather strongly localized, and the amplitude of stress wave decreases sharply with increasing distance to jet action spot. The intensity and effect range of stress wave are in direct proportion to jet velocity; besides, there is a threshold velocity regarding macroscopic failure of rocks. Rocks of different lithologies have somewhat different failure modes under stress wave action of pulsating jets; failure mode of low strength rocks like sandstone is mainly crack propagation under tensile stress during rock loading and unloading processes, whereas the failure mode of hard brittle rocks such as limestone and granite is mainly longitudinal failure caused by stress concentration.

  15. The Effects of Very Light Jet Air Taxi Operations on Commercial Air Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the potential effects of Very Light Jet (VLJ) air taxi operations adding to delays experienced by commercial passenger air transportation in the year 2025. The affordable cost relative to existing business jets and ability to use many of the existing small, minimally equipped, but conveniently located airports is projected to stimulate a large demand for the aircraft. The resulting increase in air traffic operations will mainly be at smaller airports, but this study indicates that VLJs have the potential to increase further the pressure of demand at some medium and large airports, some of which are already operating at or near capacity at peak times. The additional delays to commercial passenger air transportation due to VLJ air taxi operations are obtained from simulation results using the Airspace Concepts Evaluation System (ACES) simulator. The direct increase in operating cost due to additional delays is estimated. VLJs will also cause an increase in traffic density, and this study shows increased potential for conflicts due to VLJ operations.

  16. Free-Lagrange simulations of the expansion and jetting collapse of air bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turangan, C. K.; Jamaluddin, A. R.; Ball, G. J.; Leighton, T. G.

    A free-Lagrange numerical method is implemented to simulate the axisymmetric jetting collapse of air bubbles in water. This is performed for both lithotripter shock-induced collapses of initially stable bubbles, and for free-running cases where the bubble initially contains an overpressure. The code is validated using two test problems (shock-induced bubble collapse using a step shock, and shock10 MPa tensile waves, interacts with a bubble of initial radius 0.04 mm located in a free field (case 1) and near a rigid boundary (case 2). The interaction of the shock with the bubble causes it to involute and a liquid jet is formed that achieves a velocity exceeding 1.2 km s1 for case 2. The impact of the jet on the downstream wall of the bubble generates a blast wave with peak overpressure exceeding 1 GPa and 1.75 GPa for cases 1 and 2, respectively. The results show that the simulation technique retains sharply resolved gas/liquid interfaces regardless of the degree of geometric deformation, and reveal details of the dynamics of bubble collapse. The effects of compressibility are included for both liquid and gas phases, whereas stress distributions can be predicted within elastic-plastic solid surfaces (both planar and notched) in proximity to cavitation events. There is a movie with the online version of the paper.

  17. An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    Plunging Liquid Jet - The Air Entrainment Process". It is intended that this paper will be finalized and...the fifth quarterly report for ONR grant N00014-91-J-1271, "An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion" (Lahey...Drew - CoPI). rhis report period has been concerned with performing an analysis of the air entrainment process associated with a plunging liquid

  18. An experimental study of air entrainment and oxygen transfer at a water jet from a nozzle with air holes.

    PubMed

    Baylar, Ahmet; Emiroglu, M Emin

    2004-01-01

    An adequate supply of dissolved oxygen is important in natural rivers and in some water treatment processes. The dissolved oxygen concentration can be enhanced by entraining air bubbles in a receiving pool. When a water jet impinges a receiving pool at rest, air bubbles may be entrained and carried away below the pool free surface. This process is called plunging water jet entrainment and aeration. This paper describes an experimental study of the air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency of circular nozzles with and without air holes. In particular, the effect of varying the number, positions, and open/close status of the air holes is investigated. A negative pressure occurred depending on the air holes opened on the circular nozzles. This phenomenon affected the water jet expansion, water jet shape, air entrainment, and bubble penetration depth and, hence, the oxygen transfer efficiency. It was demonstrated that the air entrainment rate and the oxygen transfer efficiency of the circular nozzles with air holes were better than those of the circular nozzles without air holes. Therefore, adding air holes to a simple, circular nozzle could lead to a significantly increased air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flow Properties of Supersonic Helium-Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.; Veltin, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Heated high speed subsonic and supersonic jets operating on- or off-design are a source of noise that is not yet fully understood. Helium-air mixtures can be used in the correct ratio to simulate the total temperature ratio of heated air jets and hence have the potential to provide inexpensive and reliable flow and acoustic measurements. This study presents a combination of flow measurements of helium-air high speed jets and numerical simulations of similar helium-air mixture and heated air jets. Jets issuing from axisymmetric convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles are investigated, and the results show very strong similarity with heated air jet measurements found in the literature. This demonstrates the validity of simulating heated high speed jets with helium-air in the laboratory, together with the excellent agreement obtained in the presented data between the numerical predictions and the experiments. The very close match between the numerical and experimental data also validates the frozen chemistry model used in the numerical simulation.

  20. Influence of air pressure on the performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Min; Wu, Yun; Li, Ying-hong; Zong, Hao-hua; Song, Hui-min; Liang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) has a wide application prospect in the high-speed flow control field for its high jet velocity. In this paper, the influence of the air pressure on the performance of a two-electrode PSJA is investigated by the schlieren method in a large range from 7 kPa to 100 kPa. The energy consumed by the PSJA is roughly the same for all the pressure levels. Traces of the precursor shock wave velocity and the jet front velocity vary a lot for different pressures. The precursor shock wave velocity first decreases gradually and then remains at 345 m/s as the air pressure increases. The peak jet front velocity always appears at the first appearance of a jet, and it decreases gradually with the increase of the air pressure. A maximum precursor shock wave velocity of 520 m/s and a maximum jet front velocity of 440 m/s are observed at the pressure of 7 kPa. The averaged jet velocity in one period ranges from 44 m/s to 54 m/s for all air pressures, and it drops with the rising of the air pressure. High velocities of the precursor shock wave and the jet front indicate that this type of PSJA can still be used to influence the high-speed flow field at 7 kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51407197, 51522606, 51336011, 91541120, and 11472306).

  1. Optimum Injection Pressure of a Cavitating Jet for Introducing Compressive Residual Stress into Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyama, Hitoshi; Nagasaka, Kazuya; Takakuwa, Osamu; Naito, Akima

    Introducing compressive residual stress by a cavitating jet into the sub-surface of components used in nuclear power plants can mitigate stress corrosion cracking in these components. Although applying the jet is an effective method for this purpose, it should be used without causing damage to the surface from water jet droplets arising from high-pressure injection of the water jet. Thus, in introducing compressive residual stress, the injection pressure needs to be optimized. In this paper, in order to determine the optimum injection pressure, the residual stress of stainless steel treated by a jet at various injection pressures was measured using an X-ray diffraction method. The injection pressure of the jet was varied from 5 MPa to 300 MPa, and the diameter of the nozzle throat of the jet was varied from 0.35 mm to 2.0 mm. The variation of residual stress with depth was measured by alternating X-ray diffraction measurements with electropolishing. It was revealed that a cavitating jet at an injection pressure of 10 MPa with a nozzle diameter of 2.0 mm can introduce higher compressive residual stress to deeper into stainless steel compared with a jet at 300 MPa with a nozzle diameter of 0.35 mm when the downstream pressure of the nozzle was constant.

  2. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Si-ze; Liu, Dongping; Song, Ying; Sun, Yue

    2013-05-15

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  3. Development and Evaluation of the Air Travel Stress Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricker, Jonathan B.

    2005-01-01

    Despite anecdotal evidence suggesting that air travel is personally demanding, little research has examined air travel stress. To address these issues, the author developed and evaluated the 1st known measure of air travel stress-the Air Travel Stress Scale-in 3 studies. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis indicated 3 components: (a)…

  4. Estimation of turbulent shear stress in free jets: application to valvular regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Winoto, S H; Shah, D A; Liu, H

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to better assess the severity of valvular regurgitation, an in-vitro experiment has been conducted to estimate turbulent shear stress levels within free jets issuing from different orifice shapes and sizes by means of hot-wire anemometry. On the basis of the measured mean velocities and the jet profiles, the distributions of the normalized kinematic turbulent shear stress (uv/Um2) were estimated for different jets by using an equation available for self-preserving circular jet. The results indicate that the equation can estimate the distributions of uv/Um2 independent of the orifice shape and Reynolds number of the jet. For the range of Reynolds numbers considered, the estimation of maximum turbulent shear stress inferred from these distributions suggests that the critical shear stress level of approximately 200 N/m2, corresponding to destruction of blood cells, is exceeded for typical blood flow velocity of 5 m/s at the valvular lesion.

  5. Mixing characteristics of pulsed air-assist liquid jet into an internal subsonic cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inchul; Kang, Youngsu; Koo, Jaye

    2010-04-01

    Penetration depth, spray dispersion angle, droplet sizes in breakup processes and atomization processes are very important parameters in combustor of air-breathing engine. These processes will enhance air/fuel mixing inside the combustor. Experimental results from the pulsed air-assist liquid jet injected into a cross-flow are investigated. And experiments were conducted to a range of cross-flow velocities from 42˜136 m/s. Air is injected with 0˜300kPa, with air-assist pulsation frequency of 0˜20Hz. Pulsation frequency was modulated by solenoid valve. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer(PDPA) was utilized to quantitatively measuring droplet characteristics. High-speed CCD camera was used to obtain injected spray structure. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will offer rapid mixing and good liquid jet penetration. Air-assist makes a very fine droplet which generated mist-like spray. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will introduce additional supplementary turbulent mixing and control of penetration depth into a cross-flow field. The results show that pulsation frequency has an effect on penetration, transverse velocities and droplet sizes. The experimental data generated in these studies are used for a development of active control strategies to optimize the liquid jet penetration in subsonic cross-flow conditions and predict combustion low frequency instability.

  6. Propulsive jet simulation with air and helium in launcher wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    The influence on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher model due to the presence of an under-expanded jet is investigated experimentally. Wake flow phenomena represent a significant source of uncertainties in the design of a space launcher. Especially critical are dynamic loads on the structure. The wake flow is investigated at supersonic (M=2.9 ) and hypersonic (M=5.9 ) flow regimes. The jet flow is simulated using air and helium as working gas. Due to the lower molar mass of helium, higher jet velocities are realized, and therefore, velocity ratios similar to space launchers can be simulated. The degree of under-expansion of the jet is moderate for the supersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 5 ) and high for the hypersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 90 ). The flow topology is described by Schlieren visualization and mean-pressure measurements. Unsteady pressure measurements are performed to describe the dynamic wake flow. The influences of the under-expanded jet and different jet velocities are reported. On the base fluctuations at a Strouhal number, around St_D ≈ 0.25 dominate for supersonic free-stream flows. With air jet, a fluctuation-level increase on the base is observed for Strouhal numbers above St_D ≈ 0.75 in hypersonic flow regime. With helium jet, distinct peaks at higher frequencies are found. This is attributed to the interactions of wake flow and jet.

  7. Bouncing Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Navish; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2011-11-01

    Contrary to common intuition, free jets of fluid can ``bounce'' off each other on collision in mid-air, through the effect of a lubricating air film that separates the jets. We have developed a simple experimental setup to stably demonstrate and study the non-coalescence of jets on collision. We present the results of an experimental investigation of oblique collision between two silicone oil jets, supported by a simple analytical explanation. Our focus is on elucidating the role of various physical forces at play such as viscous stresses, capillary force and inertia. A parametric study conducted by varying the nozzle diameter, jet velocity, angle of inclination and fluid viscosity reveals the scaling laws for the quantities involved such as contact time. We observed a transition from bouncing to coalescence with an increase in jet velocity and inclination angle. We propose that a balance between the contact time of jets and the time required for drainage of the trapped air film can provide a criterion for transition from non-coalescence to coalescence.

  8. A Single Parameter to Characterize Wall Shear Stress Developed from an Underexpanded Axisymmetric Impinging Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingham, Patrick; Murali, Harikrishnan

    2016-11-01

    Wall shear stress is characterized for underexpanded axisymmetric impinging jets for the application of aerodynamic particle resuspension from a surface. Analysis of the flow field and the wall shear stress resulted from normally impinging axisymmetric jets is conducted using Computational Fluid Dynamics. A normally impinging jet is modeled with a constant area nozzle, while varying height to diameter ratio (H/D) and inlet pressures. Schlieren photography is used to visualize the density gradient of the flow field for validation of the CFD. The Dimensionless Jet Parameter (DJP) is developed to describe flow regimes and characterize the shear stress. The DJP is defined as being proportional to the jet pressure ratio divided by the H/D ratio squared. Maximum wall shear stress is examined as a function of DJP with three distinct regimes: (i) subsonic impingement (DJP<1), (ii) transitional (12). Due to the jet energy dissipation in shock structures, which become a dominant dissipation mechanism in the supersonic impingement regime, wall shear stress is limited to a finite value. Additionally, formation of shock structures in the wall flow were observed for DJP>2 resulting in difficulties with dimensionless analysis. In the subsonic impingement and transitional regimes equations as a function of the DJP are obtained for the maximum wall shear stress magnitude, maximum shear stress location, and shear stress decay. Using these relationships wall shear stress can be predicted at all locations along the impingement surface.

  9. Numerical simulations of transient air entrainment by rough and smooth plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiger, Ken; Kharoua, Nabil; Khezzar, Lyes

    2012-11-01

    Plunging jets are intimately linked to the process of air or gas entrainment into liquid pools, and can play either a beneficial or detrimental role in many environmental and industrial flows. The purpose of the present work is to assess the capability of combined LES/VOF algorithms to simulate water/air plunging jet flows, starting with the transient impact of the free jet, initial cavity formation, pinch off, and evolution towards a continuous entrainment phase. We focus on what happens in the transient impact phase for weakly and highly disturbed jets, operating with impact conditions of Re = UD / ν = 10 , 500 , We = ρU2 D / σ = 300 and Fr =U2 / gD = 83 . In particular, the study investigates the ability of the simulations to capture liquid surface instabilities and the influence of the exiting jet turbulence content on the entrainment behavior. The results indicate that the qualitative behavior of the entrainment process follows very closely what is observed in experiments, with the rough jet exhibiting surface instabilities at impact that are not present in the smooth jet. These have an effect on the development of the initial air cavity and interfacial area, leading to a doubling of the interfacial area for a nominally similar entrained volume of air.

  10. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  11. Analytical description of the breakup of liquid jets in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1993-01-01

    A viscous or inviscid cylindrical jet with surface tension in a vacuum tends to pinch due to the mechanism of capillary instability. Similarity solutions are constructed which describe this phenomenon as a critical time is encountered, for two physically distinct cases: inviscid jets governed by the Euler equations and highly viscous jets governed by the Stokes equations. In both cases the only assumption imposed is that at the time of pinching the jet shape has a radial length scale which is smaller than the axial length scale. For the inviscid case, we show that our solution corresponds exactly to one member of the one-parameter family of solutions obtained from slender jet theories and the shape of the jet is locally concave at breakup. For highly viscous jets our theory predicts local shapes which are monotonic increasing or decreasing indicating the formation of a mother drop connected to the jet by a thin fluid tube. This qualitative behavior is in complete agreement with both direct numerical simulations and experimental observations.

  12. APPLICATION OF JET REMPI AND LIBS TO AIR TOXIC MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses three advanced, laser-based monitoring techniques that the EPA is assisting in developing for real time measurement of toxic aerosol compounds. One of the three techniques is jet resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (Jet REMPI) coupled with a time-of-flig...

  13. A PIV Study of Slotted Air Injection for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Results from acoustic and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are presented for single and dual-stream jets with fluidic injection on the core stream. The fluidic injection nozzles delivered air to the jet through slots on the interior of the nozzle at the nozzle trailing edge. The investigations include subsonic and supersonic jet conditions. Reductions in broadband shock noise and low frequency mixing noise were obtained with the introduction of fluidic injection on single stream jets. Fluidic injection was found to eliminate shock cells, increase jet mixing, and reduce turbulent kinetic energy levels near the end of the potential core. For dual-stream subsonic jets, the introduction of fluidic injection reduced low frequency noise in the peak jet noise direction and enhanced jet mixing. For dual-stream jets with supersonic fan streams and subsonic core streams, the introduction of fluidic injection in the core stream impacted the jet shock cell structure but had little effect on mixing between the core and fan streams.

  14. Studies on Impingement Effects of Low Density Jets on Surfaces — Determination of Shear Stress and Normal Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathian, Sarith. P.; Kurian, Job

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the Laser Reflection Method (LRM) for the determination of shear stress due to impingement of low-density free jets on flat plate. For thin oil film moving under the action of aerodynamic boundary layer the shear stress at the air-oil interface is equal to the shear stress between the surface and air. A direct and dynamic measurement of the oil film slope is measured using a position sensing detector (PSD). The thinning rate of oil film is directly measured which is the major advantage of the LRM over LISF method. From the oil film slope history, direct calculation of the shear stress is done using a three-point formula. For the full range of experiment conditions Knudsen numbers varied till the continuum limit of the transition regime. The shear stress values for low-density flows in the transition regime are thus obtained using LRM and the measured values of shear show fair agreement with those obtained by other methods. Results of the normal pressure measurements on a flat plate in low-density jets by using thermistors as pressure sensors are also presented in the paper. The normal pressure profiles obtained show the characteristic features of Newtonian impact theory for hypersonic flows.

  15. Analytical Description of the Breakup of Liquid Jets in Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    Papageorgiou and Orellana (1993), referred to as PO, to describe breakup of jets of one fluid into another with different density, with or without...as a small parameter. As noted by Papageorgiou and Orellana , such an ansatz can be applied to flows which have initial conditions characterized by a...formation in capillary jet breakup. Phys. Fluids A, 2, 1141-1144. " Papageorgiou, D.T. and Orellana , 0. 1993 Pinching solutions of slender

  16. Reynolds stress closure in jet flows using wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.

    1990-01-01

    A collection of papers is presented. The outline of this report is as follows. Chapter three contains a description of a weakly nonlinear turbulence model that was developed. An essential part of the application of such a closure scheme to general geometry jets is the solution of the local hydrodynamic stability equation for a given jet cross-section. Chapter four describes the conformal mapping schemes used to map such geometries onto a simple computational domain. Chapter five describes a solution of a stability problem for circular, elliptic, and rectangular geometries. In chapter six linear models for the shock shell structure in non-circular jets is given. The appendices contain reprints of papers also published during this study including the following topics: (1) instability of elliptic jets; (2) a technique for predicting the shock cell structure in non-circular jets using a vortex sheet model; and (3) the resonant interaction between twin supersonic jets.

  17. Spot cooling. Part 1: Human responses to cooling with air jets

    SciTech Connect

    Melikov, A.K.; Halkjaer, L.; Arakelian, R.S.; Fanger, P.O.

    1994-12-31

    Eight standing male subjects and a thermal manikin were studied for thermal, physiological, and subjective responses to cooling with an air jet at room temperatures of 28 C, 33 C, and 38 C and a constant relative humidity of 50%. The subjects wore a standard uniform and performed light work. A vertical jet and a horizontal jet were employed The target area of the jet, i.e., the cross section of the jet where it first met the subject, had a diameter of 0.4 m and was located 0.5 m from the outlet. Experiments were performed at average temperatures at the jet target area of 20 C, 24 C, and 28 C. Each experiment lasted 190 minutes and was performed with three average velocities at the target area: 1 and 2 m/s and the preferred velocity selected by the subjects. The impact of the relative humidity of the room air, the jet`s turbulence intensity, and the use of a helmet on the physiological and subjective responses of the eight subjects was also studied The responses of the eight subjects were compared with the responses of a group of 29 subjects. The spot cooling improved the thermal conditions of the occupants. The average general thermal sensation for the eight subjects was linearly correlated to the average mean skin temperature and the average sweat rate. An average mean skin temperature of 33 C and an average sweat rate of 33 g{center_dot}h{sup {minus}1} m{sup {minus}2} were found to correspond to a neutral thermal sensation. The local thermal sensation at the neck and at the arm exposed to the cooling jet was found to be a function of the room air temperature and the local air velocity and temperature of the jet. The turbulence intensity of the cooling jet and the humidity of the room air had no impact on the subjects` physiological and subjective responses. Large individual differences were observed in the evaluation of the environment and in the air velocity preferred by the subjects.

  18. Combustion of hydrogen-air jets in local chemical equilibrium: A guide to the CHARNAL computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, D. B.; Launder, B. E.; Morse, A. P.; Maples, G.

    1974-01-01

    A guide to a computer program, written in FORTRAN 4, for predicting the flow properties of turbulent mixing with combustion of a circular jet of hydrogen into a co-flowing stream of air is presented. The program, which is based upon the Imperial College group's PASSA series, solves differential equations for diffusion and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy and also of the R.M.S. fluctuation of hydrogen concentration. The effective turbulent viscosity for use in the shear stress equation is computed. Chemical equilibrium is assumed throughout the flow.

  19. The Effect of Solid Admixtures on the Velocity of Motion of a Free Dusty Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. P.

    1957-01-01

    In dusty air flows occurring in industrial practice in transport by air pressure of friable materials, in the drying, annealing, and so forth, of a pulverized solid mass in suspension, and in other processes, the concentration of solid particles usually has a magnitude of the order of 1 kg per 1 kg of air. At such a concentration, the ratio of the volume of the particles to the volume of the air is small (less than one-thousandth part). However, regardless of this, the presence of a solid admixture manifests itself in the rules for the velocity distribution of the air in a dusty air flow. As a result, the rules of velocity change are different for clean and for dusty air flows. The estimation of the influence of the admixture on the velocity of the motion of the flow presents a definitive interest. One of the attempts to estimate that influence on the axial velocity of a free axially symmetrical jet with admixtures was made by Abramovich. Abramovich assumed beforehand that the fine particles of the admixture in the jet are subject to the motion of the air (that is, that the velocity of the admixture is approximately equal to the local velocity of the air); he then took as the basis of his considerations, in solving the problem, the condition that the amount of motion of the two-phase jet must be constant.

  20. Stress Measurements in Glass during Shaped-Charge Jet Penetrations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    LIGHT SOURCE / EXPLODING WIRE FRESNEL LENS :PRTH OF THE JET I -I RHR PMMR .4 GLASS GLRSS GAGE T I •T G GLASS CAMERA GLASS ,THICKNESS OF CMM= 6.35 MM...SOURCE /EXPLODING WIRE FRESNEL LENS i-PATH OF THE JET RHR 4, I -*> TO CAMERA -GCAGE * I 7. GLASS LENGTH WIDTH THICKNESS (MM) (MM) (MM) GLASS 150 12...targets were back-lit with an exploding tungsten wire placed near the focus of a pla.stic Fresnel lens . When the glass layers were parallel to the jet

  1. Study of the expansion characteristics of a pulsed plasma jet in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuewei, ZHAO; Yonggang, YU; Shanshan, MANG; Xiaochun, XUE

    2017-04-01

    In the background of electrothermal-chemical (ETC) emission, an investigation has been conducted on the characteristics of a freely expanding pulsed plasma jet in air. The evolutionary process of the plasma jet is experimentally investigated using a piezoelectric pressure sensor and a digital high-speed video system. The variation relation in the extended volume, axial displacement and radial displacement of the pulsed plasma jet in atmosphere with time under different discharge voltages and jet breaking pressures is obtained. Based on experiments, a two-dimensional axisymmetric unsteady model is established to analyze the characteristics of the two-phase interface and the variation of flow-field parameters resulting from a pulsed plasma jet into air at a pressure of 1.5–3.5 MPa under three nozzle diameters (3 mm, 4 mm and 5 mm, respectively). The images of the plasma jet reveal a changing shape process, from a quasi-ellipsoid to a conical head and an elongated cylindrical tail. The axial displacement of the jet is always larger than that along the radial direction. The extended volume reveals a single peak distribution with time. Compared to the experiment, the numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental data. The parameters of the jet field mutate at the nozzle exit with a decrease in the parameter pulse near the nozzle, and become more and more gradual and close to environmental parameters. Increasing the injection pressure and nozzle diameter can increase the parameters of the flow field such as the expansion volume of the pulsed plasma jet, the size of the Mach disk and the pressure. In addition, the turbulent mixing in the expansion process is also enhanced.

  2. Oxidative Stress and Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lodovici, Maura; Bigagli, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of air pollution-induced health effects involve oxidative stress and inflammation. As a matter of fact, particulate matter (PM), especially fine (PM2.5, PM < 2.5 μm) and ultrafine (PM0.1, PM < 0.1 μm) particles, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and transition metals, are potent oxidants or able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress can trigger redox-sensitive pathways that lead to different biological processes such as inflammation and cell death. However, it does appear that the susceptibility of target organ to oxidative injury also depends upon its ability to upregulate protective scavenging systems. As vehicular traffic is known to importantly contribute to PM exposure, its intensity and quality must be strongly relevant determinants of the qualitative characteristics of PM spread in the atmosphere. Change in the composition of this PM is likely to modify its health impact. PMID:21860622

  3. Pneumomediastinum and retroperitoneal air after removal of papillomas with the microdebrider and jet ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Sims, H. Steven; Lertsburapa, Keith

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the complication of pneumothorax from alveolar rupture after transtracheal high-frequency jet ventilation and to present a case of pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and pneumoperitoneum after jet ventilation coupled with use of the microdebrider. METHOD: Detailed case report. RESULTS: Unilateral pnuemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum and retroperitoneal air discovered after jet ventilation for removal of airway papillomas resolved with conservative management. DISCUSSION: We discuss the difference between the respective patterns of air seepage in a peripheral alveolar injury versus a probable microperforation in the trachea. We also review the epidemiology of this rare disorder and its incidence in the African-American community. CONCLUSION: The recurrent nature of this disorder mandates multiple surgical procedures. Great care must be taken to eradicate disease and avoid complications. Pneumomediastinum in this setting can be managed conservatively. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17913120

  4. Mixing of Pure Air Jets with a Reacting Fuel-Rich Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    Jets in a crossflow play an integral role in practical combustion systems such as can and annular gas turbine combustors in conventional systems, and the Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor utilized in stationary applications and proposed for advanced subsonic and supersonic transports. The success of the RQL combustor rests with the performance of the quick-mixing section that bridges the rich and lean zones. The mixing of jet air with a rich crossflow to bring the reaction to completion in the lean zone must be performed rapidly and thoroughly in order to decrease the extent of near-stoichiometric fluid pocket formation. Fluid pockets at near-stoichiometric equivalence ratios are undesirable because the high temperatures attained accelerate pollutant formation kinetics associated with nitric oxide (NO). The present study develops a model experiment designed to reveal the processes that occur when jet air is introduced into hot effluent emanating from a fuel-rich reaction zone.

  5. The Original Seven Astronauts in Front of an Air Force Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The original seven astronauts for the Mercury Project pose in front of an Air Force Jet. From left to right: Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper, John H. Glenn, Virgil I. Gus Grissom, Walter M. Wally Schirra, Alan B. Shepard, and Donald K. Deke Slayton.

  6. Linear-response reflection coefficient of the recorder air-jet amplifier.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Johnston, William A; McKinnon, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    In a duct-flute such as the recorder, steady-state oscillations are controlled by two parameters, the blowing pressure and the frequency of the acoustic resonator. As in most feedback oscillators, the oscillation amplitude is determined by gain-saturation of the amplifier, and thus it cannot be controlled independently of blowing pressure and frequency unless the feedback loop is opened. In this work, the loop is opened by replacing the recorder body with a waveguide reflectometer: a section of transmission line with microphones, a signal source, and an absorbing termination. When the mean flow from the air-jet into the transmission line is not blocked, the air-jet amplifier is unstable to edge-tone oscillations through a feedback path that does not involve the acoustic resonator. When it is blocked, the air-jet is deflected somewhat outward and the system becomes stable. It is then possible to measure the reflection coefficient of the air-jet amplifier versus blowing pressure and acoustic frequency under linear response conditions, avoiding the complication of gain-saturation. The results provide a revealing test of flute drive models under the simplest conditions and with few unknown parameters. The strengths and weaknesses of flute drive models are discussed.

  7. Combustion Gas Properties I-ASTM Jet a Fuel and Dry Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. E.; Trout, A. M.; Wear, J. D.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    A series of computations was made to produce the equilibrium temperature and gas composition for ASTM jet A fuel and dry air. The computed tables and figures provide combustion gas property data for pressures from 0.5 to 50 atmospheres and equivalence ratios from 0 to 2.0.

  8. Linear-response reflection coefficient of the recorder air-jet amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, John C.; Johnston, William A.; McKinnon, Daniel D.

    2015-11-01

    In a duct-flute such as the recorder, steady-state oscillations are controlled by two parameters, the blowing pressure and the frequency of the acoustic resonator. As in most feedback oscillators, the oscillation amplitude is determined by gain-saturation of the amplifier, and thus it cannot be controlled independently of blowing pressure and frequency unless the feedback loop is opened. In this work, the loop is opened by replacing the recorder body with a waveguide reflectometer: a section of transmission line with microphones, a signal source, and an absorbing termination. When the mean flow from the air-jet into the transmission line is not blocked, the air-jet amplifier is unstable to edge-tone oscillations through a feedback path that does not involve the acoustic resonator. When it is blocked, the air-jet is deflected somewhat outward and the system becomes stable. It is then possible to measure the reflection coefficient of the air-jet amplifier versus blowing pressure and acoustic frequency under linear response conditions, avoiding the complication of gain-saturation. The results provide a revealing test of flute drive models under the simplest conditions and with few unknown parameters. The strengths and weaknesses of flute drive models are discussed.

  9. Reynolds stress closure in jet flows using wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ways of implementing the turbulence closure scheme based on modeling the large scale coherent structures as instability waves were sought. The computational tools necessary to apply this scheme to jets of arbitrary geometry were developed. The model, developed earlier, was extended to the shock structure of supersonic jets of arbitrary geometry and multiple jets. It was found that though the qualititate features of the unsteady flow field could be predicted there were always difficulties with some of the quantitative features. This led to the new formation of the closure scheme. The schemes for computations tools which were developed are efficient and represent the application of the very powerful mathematical tools to the problems of practical significance.

  10. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  11. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellett, G.L.; Northam, G.B.; Wilson, L.G.; Jarrett, O. Jr.; Antcliff, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF. 42 refs.

  12. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Antcliff, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF.

  13. Surface Properties of Turbulent Liquid Jets in Still Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, Khaled; Faeth, Gerard

    2001-11-01

    The mechanisms of creating drops from ligaments along the free surface of turbulent round and plane liquid jets in gases during turbulent primary breakup were investigated experimentally using pulsed holography. Jet exit conditions were limited to non-cavitating water and ethanol flows and long length-to-diameter ratio constant area injector passages at conditions where direct effects of liquid viscosity were small. Measurements involved drop/ligament diameter ratio, ligament angle, ligament slenderness ratio at the time of breakup, ligament breakup time and ligament tip velocity. The results show that the main mode of ligament breakup is Rayleigh breakup with the initial disturbance amplitude comparable to the ligament size and with drops forming at the tip of the ligament. A less common mode of drop formation involved ligament separation at its base due to velocity fluctuations. Ligament velocities were enhanced compared to the expectations of velocity fluctuations in turbulent pipe flows due to the smaller inertial resistance of the gas compared to the liquid.

  14. Air pollution, oxidative stress, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Paula Valencia; Yang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting millions of people worldwide and will continue to affect millions more with population aging on the rise. AD causality is multifactorial. Known causal factors include genetic predisposition, age, and sex. Environmental toxins such as air pollution (AP) have also been implicated in AD causation. Exposure to AP can lead to chronic oxidative stress (OS), which is involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Whereas AP plays a role in AD pathology, the epidemiological evidence for this association is limited. Given the significant prevalence of AP exposure combined with increased population aging, epidemiological evidence for this link is important to consider. In this paper, we examine the existing evidence supporting the relationship between AP, OS, and AD and provide recommendations for future research on the population level, which will provide evidence in support of public health interventions.

  15. A Supersonic Argon/Air Coaxial Jet Experiment for Computational Fluid Dynamics Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, Chandler W.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    A non-reacting experiment is described in which data has been acquired for the validation of CFD codes used to design high-speed air-breathing engines. A coaxial jet-nozzle has been designed to produce pressure-matched exit flows of Mach 1.8 at 1 atm in both a center jet of argon and a coflow jet of air, creating a supersonic, incompressible mixing layer. The flowfield was surveyed using total temperature, gas composition, and Pitot probes. The data set was compared to CFD code predictions made using Vulcan, a structured grid Navier-Stokes code, as well as to data from a previous experiment in which a He-O2 mixture was used instead of argon in the center jet of the same coaxial jet assembly. Comparison of experimental data from the argon flowfield and its computational prediction shows that the CFD produces an accurate solution for most of the measured flowfield. However, the CFD prediction deviates from the experimental data in the region downstream of x/D = 4, underpredicting the mixing-layer growth rate.

  16. In-air microfluidics: Drop and jet coalescence enables rapid multi-phase 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Claas Willem; Kamperman, Tom; Lohse, Detlef; Karperien, Marcel; University of Twente Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, we connect and integrate the fields of microfluidics and additive manufacturing, by presenting a unifying technology that we call In-air microfluidics (IAMF). We impact two liquid jets or a jet and a droplet train while flying in-air, and control their coalescence and solidification. This approach enables producing monodisperse emulsions, particles, and fibers with controlled shape and size (10 to 300 µm) and production rates 100x higher than droplet microfluidics. A single device is sufficient to process a variety of materials, and to produce different particle or fiber shapes, in marked contrast to current microfluidic devices or printers. In-air microfluidics also enables rapid deposition onto substrates, for example to form 3D printed (bio)materials which are partly-liquid but still shape-stable.

  17. Opposed jet burner studies of hydrogen combustion with pure and N2, NO-contaminated air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    A counterflow diffusion flame formed by an argon-bathed tubular-opposed jet burner (OJB) was used to determine the 'blowoff' and 'restore' combustion characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures and for jets of air contaminated by NO (which normally occurs in high-enthalpy airflows supplied to hypersonic test facilities for scramjet combustors). Substantial divergence of 'blowoff' and 'restore' limits occurred as H2 mass flux, M(H)2, increased, the H2 jet became richer, and the M(air)/M(H2 + N2) ratio increased from 1 to 3 (molar H2/O2 from 1 to 16). Both OJB limits were sensitive to reactant composition. One to six percent NO in air led to significant N2-corrected decreases in the M(H2) values for 'blowoff' (2-8 percent) and 'restore' (6-12 percent) for mole fractions of H2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.95. However, when H2/O2 was held constant, all N2-corrected changes in M(H2) were negligible.

  18. Acoustic Source Modeling for High Speed Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2005-01-01

    The far field acoustic spectra at 90deg to the downstream axis of some typical high speed jets are calculated from two different forms of Lilley s equation combined with some recent measurements of the relevant turbulent source function. These measurements, which were limited to a single point in a low Mach number flow, were extended to other conditions with the aid of a highly developed RANS calculation. The results are compared with experimental data over a range of Mach numbers. Both forms of the analogy lead to predictions that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data at subsonic Mach numbers. The agreement is also fairly good at supersonic speeds, but the data appears to be slightly contaminated by shock-associated noise in this case.

  19. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Begum, Asma; Laroussi, Mounir; Pervez, Mohammad Rasel

    2013-06-15

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and it reaches to the maximum of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}.

  20. Development and Validation of a Supersonic Helium-Air Coannular Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, Atherton A.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1999-01-01

    Data are acquired in a simple coannular He/air supersonic jet suitable for validation of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes for high speed propulsion. Helium is employed as a non-reacting hydrogen fuel simulant, constituting the core of the coannular flow while the coflow is composed of air. The mixing layer interface between the two flows in the near field and the plume region which develops further downstream constitute the primary regions of interest, similar to those present in all hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems. A computational code has been implemented from the experiment's inception, serving as a tool for model design during the development phase.

  1. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  2. Air entrainment by a plunging liquid jet on a liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liñan, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    1999-11-01

    When a liquid jet impinges on liquid pool, with a velocity higher than a critical velocity, a thin air film is entrained by the jet. The thickness ha of the air film, and thus the air mass entrained by the jet, is a function of its radius a and velocity U. This function, for the realistic small values of the capillary number ɛ = μa U/σ << 1 (based on the air viscosity μa and surface tension σ) turns out to be of the form h_a/a = F(a/a_c, ɛ), where a_c=√ σ/ρl g is the capillary length (based on the acceleration of gravity and liquid density ρ_l). An analysis similar to the analysis of Levish and Landau, for the entrainment of liquid by a plate moving out of a liquid pool, shows that the dependence of h_a/a on ɛ is of the form h_a/a = ɛ^2/3f(a/a_c), where f is of order unity for a/ac << 1 and f ≈ a_c/a for large values of a_c/a

  3. Spectroscopic Diagnostics and an Arc Jet Heated Air Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Larry Howard, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Spectral radiation measurements were made in the range of 200 to 900 nm across a section of the plenum of an arc jet wind tunnel using a series of optical fibers. The spectra contained line radiation from Oxygen and Nitrogen atoms and molecular radiation from N2(+), N2, and NO. Abel inversion technique is used to obtain radial distribution of the spectra. The analysis yielded radial profiles of the electronic excitation, vibrational and rotational temperatures of the flow field. Spectral fitting yielded branching ratios for different vibrational and rotational bands. Relatively mild flow conditions, i.e. enthalpy and mass flow rate, were used for prolonged measurements of up to and over two hours to establish the best experimental methods of temperature determinations. Signal to noise was improved by at least an order of magnitude enabling the molecular vibrational band heads of N2(+) (first negative system), N2 (second positive system), and NO (beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon systems) to be resolved in the lower ultraviolet wavelength regions. The increased signal to noise ratio also enabled partial resolution of the rotational lines of N2(+) and N2 in certain regions of minimal overlap. Comparison of the spectra with theoretical models such as the NEQAIR2 code are presented and show potential for fitting the spectra when reliable calibration is performed for the complete wavelength range.

  4. Multicyclic jet-flap control for alleviation of helicopter blade stresses and fuselage vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccloud, J. L., III; Kretz, M.

    1974-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel tests of a 12-meter-diameter rotor utilizing multicyclic jet-flap control deflection are presented. Analyses of these results are shown, and experimental transfer functions are determined by which optimal control vectors are developed. These vectors are calculated to eliminate specific harmonic bending stresses, minimize rms levels (a measure of the peak-to-peak stresses), or minimize vertical vibratory loads that would be transmitted to the fuselage. Although the specific results and the ideal control vectors presented are for a specific jet-flap driven rotor, the method employed for the analyses is applicable to similar investigations. A discussion of possible alternative methods of multicyclic control by mechanical flaps or nonpropulsive jet-flaps is presented.

  5. Aviators, Air Combat, and Combat Stress: An Air Force Commander’s Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-22

    airmen, and reviews the risky nature of the air combat environment. It goes on the describe the impact of stress on airmen and covers the Air Force’s...characteristics of airmen, and reviews the risky nature of the air combat environment. It goes on to describe the impact of stress on airmen and covers...sections review Air Force policy regarding aircrew psychological casualties as it has developed since the years of the First World War. The final parts of

  6. Peripheral Jet Air Cushion Landing System Spanloader Aircraft. Volume I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    the Lockheed-Georgia Company attempted to solve the airport problem by use of a pressurized, trunk- type , air- cushi* landing system (ACLS) on its...which result from span distributed load type aircraft. To accomplish this objective the following study steps are performed: 1) A revised Spanloader...The fan performance characteristics, which are shown on Figure 25, were estimated by sealing an off-the-shelf Industrial type fan in accordance with

  7. Numerical Analysis of Flow Evolution in a Helium Jet Injected into Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satti, Rajani P.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    A computational model to study the stability characteristics of an evolving buoyant helium gas jet in ambient air environment is presented. Numerical formulation incorporates a segregated approach to solve for the transport equations of helium mass fraction coupled with the conservation equations of mixture mass and momentum using a staggered grid method. The operating parameters correspond to the Reynolds number varying from 30 to 300 to demarcate the flow dynamics in oscillating and non-oscillating regimes. Computed velocity and concentration fields were used to analyze the flow structure in the evolving jet. For Re=300 case, results showed that an instability mode that sets in during the evolution process in Earth gravity is absent in zero gravity, signifying the importance of buoyancy. Though buoyancy initiates the instability, below a certain jet exit velocity, diffusion dominates the entrainment process to make the jet non-oscillatory as observed for the Re=30 case. Initiation of the instability was found to be dependent on the interaction of buoyancy and momentum forces along the jet shear layer.

  8. Average heat-transfer characteristics of a row of circular air jets impinging on a concave surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the average heat-transfer characteristics of air jets impinging on the concave side of a right-circular semicylinder is reported. Results from existing correlating are compared with each other and with experimental heat-transfer data for a row of circular jets. Two correlations available in the literature are recommended for use in designing cooled turbine vanes and blades.

  9. Degradation in the Fatigue Resistance of Dentin by Bur and Abrasive Air-jet Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Majd, H.; Viray, J.; Porter, J.A.; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to distinguish whether the instruments commonly used for cutting dentin cause degradation in strength or fatigue behavior. Beams of coronal dentin were obtained from unrestored 3rd molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. The surfaces of selected beams were treated with a conventional straight-sided bur or with an abrasive air jet laden with glass particles. Under monotonic loading, there was no difference in the strength or Weibull parameters obtained for the control or treated beams. However, the fatigue strength of dentin receiving bur and air-jet treatments was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.0001) than that of the control. The bur treatment resulted in the largest overall degree of degradation, with nearly 40% reduction in the endurance limit and even more substantial decrease in the fatigue life. The methods currently used for cavity preparations substantially degrade the durability of dentin. PMID:22851284

  10. Heat transfer characteristics of a single circular air jet impinging on a concave hemispherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the local and average heat-transfer characteristics of a single turbulent air jet impinging on the concave surface of a hemisphere. Correlations were developed for expressing the effects of a number of dimensionless variables on the local and average Nusselt numbers. Results of the present study are compared with those from a similar study concerning a concave surface of a semicylindrical shell.

  11. Air jet levitation furnace system for observing glass microspheres during heating and melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Dunn, S. L.

    1982-01-01

    A collimated hole structure air jet levitation system has been developed which can be used to levitate hollow glass microspheres used in inertial confinement fusion studies. An ellipsoidal furnace has been added to the system to provide a heating source. A video camera and a 16 mm movie camera connected to a microsphere system provide real time observation as well as permanent documentation of the experiments. Microspheres have been levitated at temperatures over 1400 C for over 10 minutes at a time.

  12. Kinetic modelling for an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gaens, W.; Bogaerts, A.

    2013-07-01

    A zero-dimensional, semi-empirical model is used to describe the plasma chemistry in an argon plasma jet flowing into humid air, mimicking the experimental conditions of a setup from the Eindhoven University of Technology. The model provides species density profiles as a function of the position in the plasma jet device and effluent. A reaction chemistry set for an argon/humid air mixture is developed, which considers 84 different species and 1880 reactions. Additionally, we present a reduced chemistry set, useful for higher level computational models. Calculated species density profiles along the plasma jet are shown and the chemical pathways are explained in detail. It is demonstrated that chemically reactive H, N, O and OH radicals are formed in large quantities after the nozzle exit and H2, O2(1Δg), O3, H2O2, NO2, N2O, HNO2 and HNO3 are predominantly formed as ‘long living’ species. The simulations show that water clustering of positive ions is very important under these conditions. The influence of vibrational excitation on the calculated electron temperature is studied. Finally, the effect of varying gas temperature, flow speed, power density and air humidity on the chemistry is investigated.

  13. Foaming/antifoaming in WTP Tanks Equipped with Pulse Jet Mixer and Air Spargers

    SciTech Connect

    HASSAN, NEGUIB

    2004-06-29

    The River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct small-scale foaming and antifoam testing using actual Hanford waste and simulants subjected to air sparging. The foaminess of Hanford tank waste solutions was previously demonstrated in SRNL during WTP evaporator foaming and ultrafiltration studies and commercial antifoam DOW Q2-3183A was recommended to mitigate the foam in the evaporators. Currently, WTP is planning to use air spargers in the HLW Lag Storage Vessels, HLW Concentrate Receipt Vessel, and the Ultrafiltration Vessels to assist the performance of the Jet Pulse Mixers (JPM). Sparging of air into WTP tanks will induce a foam layer within the process vessels. The air dispersion in the waste slurries and generated foams could present problems during plant operation. Foam in the tanks could also adversely impact hydrogen removal and mitigation. Antifoam (DOW Q2-3183A) will be used to control foaming in Hanford sparged waste processing tanks. These tanks will be mixed by a combination of pulse-jet mixers and air spargers. The percent allowable foaminess or freeboard in WTP tanks are shown in tables.

  14. Plain-jet airblast atomization of alternative liquid petroleum fuels under high ambient air pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasuja, A. K.

    1982-04-01

    The effects that air and fuel properties have upon the spray mean drop size characteristics of a plain-jet airblast atomizer of the type employed in the gas turbine engine are investigated. The tests used kerosene, gas oil and a high-viscosity blend of gas oil in residual fuel oil, and covered a wide range of ambient air pressures. Laser light-scattering technique was employed for drop size measurements. It is concluded that the atomizer's measured mean drop size characteristics are only slightly different from those of the pre-filming type, especially when operating on low-viscosity kerosene under higher ambient air pressure. The beneficial effect of increased levels of ambient air pressure on mean drop size is shown to be much reduced in the case of high-viscosity fuels, thus making the attainment of good atomization performance on such fuels difficult. An expression is derived for correlating the obtained mean drop size data.

  15. High-Speed Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry Analysis of Helium Jets Flowing into Air for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptuch, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    The flow phenomena of buoyant jets have been analyzed by many researchers in recent years. Few, however have studied jets in microgravity conditions, and the exact nature of the flow under these conditions has until recently been unknown. This study seeks to extend the work done by researchers at the university of Oklahoma in examining and documenting the behavior of helium jets in micro-gravity conditions. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry data have been obtained for helium jets discharging vertically into quiescent ambient air from tubes of several diameters at various flow rates using a high-speed digital camera. These data have obtained before, during and after the onset of microgravity conditions. High-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry has been developed for this study with the installation and use of a high-speed digital camera and modifications to the optical setup. Higher temporal resolution of the transitional phase between terrestrial and micro-gravity conditions has been obtained which has reduced the averaging effect of longer exposure times used in all previous schlieren studies. Results include color schlieren images, color time-space images (temporal evolution images), frequency analyses, contour plots of hue and contour plots of helium mole fraction. The results, which focus primarily on the periods before and during the onset of microgravity conditions, show that the pulsation of the jets normally found in terrestrial gravity ("earth"-gravity) conditions cease, and the gradients in helium diminish to produce a widening of the jet in micro-gravity conditions. In addition, the results show that the disturbance propagate upstream from a downstream source.

  16. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanguo; Li, Ying; Cao, Peng; Zhao, Hongjie

    2013-07-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet.

  17. Reynolds stress closure in jet flows using wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical methods were developed that will form the computational part of the turbulence closure scheme. A wave model was developed for the two-dimensional shear layer. This configuration is being used as a test case for the closure schemes. Various numerical schemes were examined to give efficient solutions of the Rayleigh equation for this geometry. These include both spectral and finite difference methods. Secondly, numerical methods are under development to solve the non-separable Rayleigh equation. This solution is required for the closure scheme in more complex geometries. A model problem was used to assist in the algorithm development. Two-dimensional spectral methods and a hybrid spectral/finite difference technique were developed. An analytic solution of the Rayleigh equation for a basic elliptic flow was obtained. This will be used to verify the stability codes developed for arbitrary geometries. Other numerical methods for solving the Rayleigh equation based on the boundary element technique were also examined. These solutions are forming the basis of a model for the shock structure in jets of arbitrary geometry.

  18. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Laminar-Jet Diffusion Flames in Coflowing Air. Appendix F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round luminous hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame shapes were measured from photographs of flames burning at low pressures in order to minimize the effects of buoyancy. Test conditions involved acetylene-, propylene. and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 19-50 kPa, jet-exit Reynolds numbers of 18-121, and initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0.22-32.45 to yield luminous flame lengths of 21-198 mm. The present flames were close to the laminar smoke point but were not soot emitting. Simple expressions to estimate the shapes of nonbuoyant laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflow were found by extending an earlier analysis of Mahalingam et al. These formulas provided a good correlation of present measurements except near the burner exit where self-similar approximations used in the simplified analysis are no longer appropriate.

  19. Discharge modes of a DC operated atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen; Pei, Xuekai; Kredl, Jana; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    By flowing air or nitrogen through a microhollow cathode discharge geometry an afterglow plasma jet can be generated at atmospheric pressure in air. The plasma jet has been successfully used for the inactivation of bacteria and yeast. The responsible reaction chemistry is based on the production of high concentrations of nitric oxide. Production yields depend in particular on gas flow rate and energy dissipated in the plasma. The same parameters also determine different modes of operation for the jet. A true DC operation is achieved for low to moderate gas flow rate of about 1 slm and discharge currents on the order of 10 mA. When increasing the gas flow rate to 10 slm the operation is changing to a self-pulsing mode with characteristics similar to the ones observed for a transient spark. By increasing the current a DC operation can be achieved again also at higher gas flow rates. The parameter regimes for different modes of operation can be described by the reduced electric field E/N.

  20. Re: Penetration Behavior of Opposed Rows of Staggered Secondary Air Jets Depending on Jet Penetration Coefficient and Momentum Flux Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain why the extension of the previously published C = (S/Ho)sqrt(J) scaling for opposed rows of staggered jets wasn't directly successful in the study by Choi et al. (2016). It is not surprising that staggered jets from opposite sides do not pass each other at the expected C value, because Ho/D and sqrt(J) are much larger than the maximum in previous studies. These, and large x/D's, tend to suggest development of 2-dimensional flow. Although there are distinct optima for opposed rows of in-line jets, single-side injection, and opposed rows of staggered jets based on C, opposed rows of staggered jets provide as good or better mixing performance, at any C value, than opposed rows of in-line jets or jets from single-side injection.

  1. Periodic Stresses in Gyroscopic Bodies, with Applications to Air Screws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1918-01-01

    Report discusses periodic stresses in gyroscopic bodies with applications to air screws caused by particle mass. Report concludes that all modern air screws obey the laws found for plane groups of particles. In particular the two-bladers exert on the shaft a rhythmic gyroscopic torque; the multibladers a steady one; both easily calculable for any given conditions of motion and mass distribution.

  2. Hydraulic fluids and jet engine oil: pyrolysis and aircraft air quality.

    PubMed

    van Netten, C; Leung, V

    2001-01-01

    Incidents of smoke in aircraft cabins often result from jet engine oil and/or hydraulic fluid that leaks into ventilation air, which can be subjected to temperatures that exceed 500 degrees C. Exposed flight-crew members have reported symptoms, including dizziness, nausea, disorientation, blurred vision, and tingling in the legs and arms. In this study, the authors investigated pyrolysis products of one jet engine oil and two hydraulic fluids at 525 degrees C. Engine oil was an important source of carbon monoxide. Volatile agents and organophosphate constituents were released from all the agents tested; however, the neurotoxin trimethyl propane phosphate was not found. The authors hypothesized that localized condensation of pyrolysis products in ventilation ducts, followed by mobilization when cabin heat demand was high, accounted for mid-flight incidents. The authors recommended that carbon monoxide data be logged continuously to capture levels during future incidents.

  3. Experimental study of near-field air entrainment by subsonic volcanic jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The flow structure in the developing region of a turbulent jet has been examined using particle image velocimetry methods, considering the flow at steady state conditions. The velocity fields were integrated to determine the ratio of the entrained air speed to the jet speed, which was approximately 0.03 for a range of Mach numbers up to 0.89 and. Reynolds numbers up to 217,000. This range of experimental Mach and Reynolds numbers is higher than previously considered for high-accuracy entrainment measures, particularly in the near-vent region. The entrainment values are below those commonly used for geophysical analyses of volcanic plumes, suggesting that existing 1-D models are likely to understate the tendency for column collapse. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Monitoring space shuttle air quality using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Margaret Amy; Zhou, Hanying; Buehler, Martin G; Manatt, Kenneth S; Mowrey, Victoria S; Jackson, Shannon P; Kisor, Adam K; Shevade, Abhijit V; Homer, Margie L

    2004-06-01

    A miniature electronic nose (ENose) has been designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, and was designed to detect, identify, and quantify ten common contaminants and relative humidity changes. The sensing array includes 32 sensing films made from polymer carbon-black composites. Event identification and quantification were done using the Levenberg-Marquart nonlinear least squares method. After successful ground training, this ENose was used in a demonstration experiment aboard STS-95 (October-November, 1998), in which the ENose was operated continuously for six days and recorded the sensors' response to the air in the mid-deck. Air samples were collected daily and analyzed independently after the flight. Changes in shuttle-cabin humidity were detected and quantified by the JPL ENose; neither the ENose nor the air samples detected any of the contaminants on the target list. The device is microgravity insensitive.

  5. Monitoring space shuttle air quality using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory electronic nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Margaret Amy; Zhou, Hanying; Buehler, Martin G.; Manatt, Kenneth S.; Mowrey, Victoria S.; Jackson, Shannon P.; Kisor, Adam K.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Homer, Margie L.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature electronic nose (ENose) has been designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, and was designed to detect, identify, and quantify ten common contaminants and relative humidity changes. The sensing array includes 32 sensing films made from polymer carbon-black composites. Event identification and quantification were done using the Levenberg-Marquart nonlinear least squares method. After successful ground training, this ENose was used in a demonstration experiment aboard STS-95 (October-November, 1998), in which the ENose was operated continuously for six days and recorded the sensors' response to the air in the mid-deck. Air samples were collected daily and analyzed independently after the flight. Changes in shuttle-cabin humidity were detected and quantified by the JPL ENose; neither the ENose nor the air samples detected any of the contaminants on the target list. The device is microgravity insensitive.

  6. An investigation of air solubility in Jet A fuel at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Problems concerned with the supercritical injection concept are discussed. Supercritical injection involves dissolving air into a fuel prior to injection. A similar effect is obtained by preheating the fuel so that a portion of the fuel flashes when its pressure is reduced. Flashing improves atomization properties and the presence of air in the primary zone of a spray flame reduces the formation of pollutants. The investigation is divided into three phases: (1) measure the solubility and density properties of fuel/gas mixtures, including Jet A/air, at pressures and correlate these results using theory; (2) investigate the atomization properties of flashing liquids, including fuel/dissolved gas systems. Determine and correlate the effect of inlet properties and injector geometry on mass flow rates, Sauter mean diameter and spray angles; (3) examine the combustion properties of flashing injection in an open burner flame, considering flame shape and soot production.

  7. Air pollution and circulating biomarkers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Staimer, Norbert; Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical components of air pollutant exposures that induce oxidative stress and subsequent inflammation may be partly responsible for associations of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with airborne particulate matter and combustion-related pollutant gasses. However, epidemiologic evidence regarding this is limited. An exposure-assessment approach is to measure the oxidative potential of particle mixtures because it is likely that hundreds of correlated chemicals are involved in overall effects of air pollution on health. Oxidative potential likely depends on particle composition and size distribution, especially ultrafine particle concentration, and on transition metals and certain semivolatile and volatile organic chemicals. For health effects, measuring systemic oxidative stress in the blood is one feasible approach, but there is no universal biomarker of oxidative stress and there are many potential target molecules (lipids, proteins, DNA, nitric oxide, etc.), which may be more or less suitable for specific study goals. Concurrent with the measurement of oxidative stress, it is important to measure gene and/or protein expression of endogenous antioxidant enzymes because they can modify relations between oxidative stress biomarkers and air pollutants. Conversely, the expression and activities of these enzymes are modified by oxidative stress. This interplay will likely determine the observed effects of air pollutants on systemic inflammatory and thrombotic mediators and related clinical outcomes. Studies are needed to assess the reliability and validity of oxidative stress biomarkers, evaluate differences in associations between oxidative stress biomarkers and various pollutant measurements (mass, chemical components, and oxidative potential), and evaluate impacts of antioxidant responses on these relations. PMID:23626660

  8. Numerical modeling and simulation of hot air jet anti-icing system employing channels for enhanced heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kamran Zaki

    Aircraft icing is a serious concern for the aviation community since it is one of the major causes of fatal aircraft accidents. Aircrafts use different anti-icing systems and one such system is the hot-air anti-icing system, which utilizes hot-air from the engine compressor bleed to heat critical aircraft surfaces and prevent ice formation. Numerous experimental and numerical studies have been performed to increase the efficiency of the hot-air jet based anti-icing systems. Most of the investigations have focused on either orifice design or the impingement region of target surface geometry. Since the impingement surface heat transfer drops off sharply past the stagnation region, investigators have studied the use of multiple jets to enhance surface heat transfer over a larger area. However, use of multiple jets is a further strain on engine resources. One way to conserve engine resources is to use single jet in conjunction with various geometric and physical mechanisms to enhance heat transfer. The current study focuses on enhancing heat transfer using a single jet and a channel. The study investigates the effect of channel's height, inlet location and Reynolds number on heat transfer characteristics in terms of average Nusselt number distribution along the impingement surface. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to simulate the different cases. Results indicate that the heat transfer depends strongly on height and width of channel, jet-to-target spacing, inlet angle and jet Reynolds number.

  9. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Ross, Howard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of round luminous nonbuoyant soot-containing hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames at microgravity were found from color video images obtained on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Test conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K ambient pressures of 35-130 kPa, initial jet diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, and jet exit Reynolds numbers of 45-170. Present test times were 100-200 s and yielded steady axisymmetric flames that were close to the laminar smoke point (including flames both emitting and not emitting soot) with luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The present soot-containing flames had larger luminous flame lengths than earlier ground-based observations having similar burner configurations: 40% larger than the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing low gravity flames observed using an aircraft (KC-135) facility due to reduced effects of accelerative disturbances and unsteadiness; roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing normal gravity flames due to the absence of effects of buoyant mixing and roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-free low gravity flames observed using drop tower facilities due to the presence of soot luminosity and possible reduced effects of unsteadiness, Simplified expressions to estimate the luminous flame boundaries of round nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames were obtained from the classical analysis of Spalding; this approach provided successful correlations of flame shapes for both soot-free and soot-containing flames, except when the soot-containing flames were in the opened-tip configuration that is reached at fuel flow rates near and greater than the laminar smoke point fuel flow rate.

  10. Guard Flow-enhanced Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Molecular Materials in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Shaurjo

    Rapid advances in the research and development of organic electronics have re-sulted in many exciting discoveries and applications, including OLEDs, OPVs and OTFTs. Devices based on small molecular organic materials often call for sharp interfaces and highly pure materials for improved device performance. Solvent-free deposition and additive patterning of the active layers without the use of vacuum is preferred, calling for specialized processing approaches. Guard flow-enhanced organic vapor jet printing (GF-OVJP), enables addi-tive, rapid, mask-free, solvent-free printing of molecular organic semiconductors in ambient atmosphere by evaporating organic source material into an inert carrier gas jet and collimating and impinging it onto a substrate where the organic molecules condense. A surrounding annular "guard flow" hydrodynamically focuses the primary jet carrying the hot organic vapor and shields it from contact with the ambient oxygen and moisture, enabling device-quality deposits. Deposition in air entails non-trivial effects at the boundary between ambient surroundings and the gas jet carrying the semiconductor vapor that influence the morphology and properties of the resulting electronic devices. This thesis demonstrates the deposition of active layers of OLEDs, OPVs and OTFTs by GF-OVJP in air. Process-structure-property relationships are elucidated, using a combination of film deposition and structural characterization (e.g. AFM, XRD, SEM, spectroscopies), device fabrication and testing, as well as compressible fluid flow, heat and mass transport modeling, thus laying the groundwork for rigorous, quantitative design of film deposition apparatus and small molecular organic semiconductor processing.

  11. AIR POLLUTION, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased incidents of classic and variant forms of neurodegenerative diseases suggest that environmental chemicals and susceptibility factors (e.g., genetics, diseased states, obesity, etc.) may be contributory. Particulate matter (PM) is a type of air pollution that is associat...

  12. Benzene and naphthalene in air and breath as indicators of exposure to jet fuel

    PubMed Central

    Egeghy, P; Hauf-Cabalo, L; Gibson, R; Rappaport, S

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To estimate exposures to benzene and naphthalene among military personnel working with jet fuel (JP-8) and to determine whether naphthalene might serve as a surrogate for JP-8 in studies of health effects. Methods: Benzene and naphthalene were measured in air and breath of 326 personnel in the US Air Force, who had been assigned a priori into low, moderate, and high exposure categories for JP-8. Results: Median air concentrations for persons in the low, moderate, and high exposure categories were 3.1, 7.4, and 252 µg benzene/m3 air, 4.6, 9.0, and 11.4 µg benzene/m3 breath, 1.9, 10.3, and 485 µg naphthalene/m3 air, and 0.73, 0.93, and 1.83 µg naphthalene/m3 breath, respectively. In the moderate and high exposure categories, 5% and 15% of the benzene air concentrations, respectively, were above the 2002 threshold limit value (TLV) of 1.6 mg/m3. Multiple regression analyses of air and breath levels revealed prominent background sources of benzene exposure, including cigarette smoke. However, naphthalene exposure was not unduly influenced by sources other than JP-8. Among heavily exposed workers, dermal contact with JP-8 contributed to air and breath concentrations along with several physical and environmental factors. Conclusions: Personnel having regular contact with JP-8 are occasionally exposed to benzene at levels above the current TLV. Among heavily exposed workers, uptake of JP-8 components occurs via both inhalation and dermal contact. Naphthalene in air and breath can serve as useful measures of exposure to JP-8 and uptake of fuel components in the body. PMID:14634191

  13. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying

    2013-09-30

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  14. Simulation of Synthetic Jets in Quiescent Air Using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli

    2006-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for the simulation of a synthetic jet created by a single diaphragm piezoelectric actuator in quiescent air. This configuration was designated as Case 1 for the CFDVAL2004 workshop held at Williamsburg, Virginia, in March 2004. Time-averaged and instantaneous data for this case were obtained at NASA Langley Research Center, using multiple measurement techniques. Computational results for this case using one-equation Spalart-Allmaras and two-equation Menter's turbulence models are presented along with the experimental data. The effect of grid refinement, preconditioning and time-step variation are also examined in this paper.

  15. The 90 deg Acoustic Spectrum of a High Speed Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.

    2004-01-01

    Tam and Auriault successfully predicted the acoustic spectrum at 90deg to the axis of a high speed air jet by using an acoustic equation derived from ad hoc kinetic theory-type arguments. The present paper shows that similar predictions can be obtained by using a rigorous acoustic analogy approach together with actual measurements of the relevant acoustic source correlations. This puts the result on a firmer basis and enables its extension to new situations and to the prediction of sound at other observation angles.

  16. Investigation of air solubility in jet A fuel at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupprecht, S. D.; Faeth, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    The solubility and density properties of saturated mixtures of fuels and gases were measured. The fuels consisted of Jet A and dodecane, the gases were air and nitrogen. The test range included pressures of 1.03 to 10.34 MPa and temperatures of 298 to 373 K. The results were correlated successfully, using the Soave equation of state. Over this test range, dissolved gas concentrations were roughly proportional to pressure and increased slightly with increasing temperature. Mixture density was relatively independent of dissolved gas concentration.

  17. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying; Bao, Wenting

    2013-09-01

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  18. Two-dimensional numerical study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in air at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wen; Sang, Chaofeng; Wang, Dezhen; Liu, Fucheng

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, a computational study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in ambient air is presented. A two-dimensional fluid model is applied to investigate the physical processes of the two plasma jets interaction (PJI) driven by equal and unequal voltages, respectively. In all studied cases, the PJI results in a decrease of both plasma bullets propagation velocity. When the two plasma jets are driven by equal voltages, they never merge but rather approach each other around the middle of the gas gap at a minimum approach distance, and the minimal distance decreases with the increase of both the applied voltages and initial electron density, but increases with the increase of the relative permittivity. When the two plasma jets are driven by unequal voltages, we observe the two plasma jets will merge at the position away from the middle of the gas gap. The effect of applied voltage difference on the PJI is also studied.

  19. DNS of a turbulent, self-igniting n-dodecane / air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesi, Giulio; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation of a turbulent, self-igniting temporal jet between n-dodecane and diluted air at p =25 bar has been conducted to clarify certain aspects of diesel engine combustion. The thermodynamics conditions were selected to result in a two-stage ignition event, in which low- and high-temperature chemical reactions play an equally important role during the ignition process. Jet parameters were tuned to yield a target ignition Damkohler number of 0.4, a value representative of conditions found in diesel spray flames. Chemical reactions were described by a 35-species reduced mechanism, including both the low- and high-temperature reaction pathways of n-dodecane. The present work focuses on the influence of low-temperature chemistry on the overall ignition transient. We also study the structure of the flames formed at the end of the autoignition transient. Recent studies on diluted dimethyl ether / air flames at pressure and temperature conditions similar to those investigated in this work revealed the existence of tetra- and penta-brachial flames, and it is of interest to determine whether similar flame structures also exist when diesel-like fuels are used.

  20. Emission spectroscopy of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated with air at low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, L.; Gallego, J. L.; Minotti, F.; Kelly, H.; Grondona, D.

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature, high-pressure plasma jets have an extensive use in plasma biology and plasma medicine, such as pathogen deactivation, wound disinfection, stopping of bleeding without damage of healthy tissue, acceleration of wound healing, control of bio-film proliferation, etc. In this work, a spectroscopic characterization of a typical plasma jet, operated in air at atmospheric pressure, is reported. Within the spectrum of wavelengths from 200 to 450 nm all remarkable emissions of N2 were monitored. Spectra of the N2 2nd positive system (C3Πu-B3Πg) emitted in air are the most convenient for plasma diagnostics, since they enable to determine electronic Te, rotational Tr and vibrational Tv temperatures by fitting the experimental spectra with the simulated ones. We used SPECAIR software for spectral simulation and obtained the best fit with all these temperatures about 3500K. The conclusion that all temperatures are equal, and its relatively high value, is consistent with the results of a previous work, where it was found that the experimentally determined electrical characteristic was consistent with the model of a thermal arc discharge, together with a highly collisional cathode sheet.

  1. Evaluation of Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort From High Sidewall Supply Air Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ridouane, El Hassan

    2011-09-01

    Uniform mixing of conditioned air with room air is an essential factor for providing comfort in homes. The objective of the study outlined in this report is to resolve the issue that the flow rates that are required to meet the small remaining thermal loads are not large enough to maintain uniform mixing in the space.and maintain uniform temperatures within future homes. The results provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to maintain proper room mixing for heating and cooling of high performance homes.

  2. Air pollution stress in the Bavarian Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, H. ); Molenaar, J. )

    1992-11-01

    Two objections expressed by Kandler (1992) to our results in a recent article (Visser and Molenaar 1992) are discussed. We argue that, although we did not use all data available from the fir stands under consideration, inclusion of the other measurements would not have changed our conclusions. We also point out that, contrary to Kandler's remark, deposition of pollutants (wet rather than dry deposition) may not be ignored as a potential stress factor in the Bavarian Forest. 6 refs., 1 figs.

  3. Ideas and perspectives: Heat stress: more than hot air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Boeck, Hans J.; Van De Velde, Helena; De Groote, Toon; Nijs, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Climate models project an important increase in the frequency and intensity of heat waves. In gauging the impact on plant responses, much of the focus has been on air temperatures, while a critical analysis of leaf temperatures during heat extremes has not been conducted. Nevertheless, direct physiological consequences from heat depend primarily on leaf rather than on air temperatures. We discuss how the interplay between various environmental variables and the plants' stomatal response affects leaf temperatures and the potential for heat stress by making use of both an energy balance model and field data. The results demonstrate that this interplay between plants and environment can cause leaf temperature to vary substantially at the same air temperature. In general, leaves tended to heat up when radiation was high and when stomates were closed, as expected. But perhaps counterintuitively, high air humidity also raised leaf temperatures, while humid conditions are typically regarded as benign with respect to plant survival since they limit water loss. High wind speeds brought the leaf temperature closer to the air temperature, which can imply either cooling or warming (i.e. abating or reinforcing heat stress) depending on other prevailing conditions. The results thus indicate that heat waves characterized by similar extreme air temperatures may pose little danger under some atmospheric conditions but could be lethal in other cases. The trends illustrated here should give ecologists and agronomists a more informed indication about which circumstances are most conducive to the occurrence of heat stress.

  4. An experimental study on the airlift pump with air jet nozzle and booster pump.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju; Lee, Chae-Moon; Park, Jung-Won

    2009-01-01

    The experiments for high head airlifting performance with vertical tube were examined for wastewater treatment. Comparing with the centrifugal pump and other pumps, the airlift pump has some problems and limited applications. However, an advantage of an airlift pump is in its geometrical simplicity, not having any moving parts, so it is suitable in lifting fluids including tiny pieces of metal or grit. In this study, for the purpose of high lifting head, an air jet nozzle was used. We have performed experimentally according to various characteristics of the airlift pump system such as the change of submerged depth, lifting head of liquid-air mixture (total head) and air flow rate. This work has verified through experiments that airlift pump shows lifting ability for 3 m (Sr = 0.3) in comparison with conventional height, 2 m (Sr = 0.4). Also, we suggested that the new airlift pump system with the air booster pump be used to improve the higher lifting head performance.

  5. Personal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel vapors and exhaust at air force bases.

    PubMed Central

    Pleil, J D; Smith, L B; Zelnick, S D

    2000-01-01

    JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and ground crew personnel during preflight operations and for maintenance personnel performing routine tasks. Personal exposure at an Air Force base occurs through occupational exposure for personnel involved with fuel and aircraft handling and/or through incidental exposure, primarily through inhalation of ambient fuel vapors. Because JP-8 is less volatile than its predecessor fuel (JP-4), contact with liquid fuel on skin and clothing may result in prolonged exposure. The slowly evaporating JP-8 fuel tends to linger on exposed personnel during their interaction with their previously unexposed colleagues. To begin to assess the relative exposures, we made ambient air measurements and used recently developed methods for collecting exhaled breath in special containers. We then analyzed for certain volatile marker compounds for JP-8, as well as for some aromatic hydrocarbons (especially benzene) that are related to long-term health risks. Ambient samples were collected by using compact, battery-operated, personal whole-air samplers that have recently been developed as commercial products; breath samples were collected using our single-breath canister method that uses 1-L canisters fitted with valves and small disposable breathing tubes. We collected breath samples from various groups of Air Force personnel and found a demonstrable JP-8 exposure for all subjects, ranging from slight elevations as compared to a control cohort to > 100 [mutilpe] the control values. This work suggests that further studies should be performed on specific issues to obtain pertinent exposure data. The data can be applied to assessments of health outcomes and to recommendations for changes in the use of personal protective

  6. Quantification of stiffness change in degenerated articular cartilage using optical coherence tomography-based air-jet indentation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Ping; Wang, Shu-Zhe; Saarakkala, Simo; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2011-10-01

    Articular cartilage is a thin complex tissue that covers the bony ends of joints. Changes in the composition and structure of articular cartilage will cause degeneration, which may further lead to osteoarthritis. Decreased stiffness is one of the earliest symptoms of cartilage degeneration and also represents the imperfect quality of repaired cartilage. An optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based air-jet indentation system was recently developed in our group to measure the mechanical properties of soft tissues. In this study, this system was applied to quantify the change of mechanical properties of articular cartilage after degeneration induced by enzymatic digestions. Forty osteochondral disks (n = 20 × 2) were prepared from bovine patellae and treated with collagenase and trypsin digestions, respectively. The apparent stiffness of the cartilage was measured by the OCT-based air-jet indentation system before and after the degeneration. The results were also compared with those from a rigid contact mechanical indentation and an ultrasound water-jet indentation. Through the air-jet indentation, it was found that the articular cartilage stiffness dropped significantly by 84% (p < 0.001) and 63% (p < 0.001) on average after collagenase and trypsin digestions, respectively. The stiffness measured by the air-jet indentation system was highly correlated (R > 0.8, p < 0.001) with that from the other two indentation methods. This study demonstrated that the OCT-based air-jet indentation can be a useful tool to quantitatively assess the mechanical properties of articular cartilage, and this encourages us to further develop a miniaturized probe suitable for arthroscopic applications.

  7. Evaluation of Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort From High Sidewall Supply Air Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ridouane, E. H.

    2011-09-01

    Uniform mixing of conditioned air with room air is an essential factor for providing comfort in homes. The higher the supply flow rates the easier to reach good mixing in the space. In high performance homes, however, the flow rates required to meet the small remaining thermal loads are not large enough to maintain uniform mixing in the space. The objective of this study is to resolve this issue and maintain uniform temperatures within future homes. We used computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the performance of high sidewall air supply for residential applications in heating and cooling modes. Parameters of the study are the supply velocity, supply temperature, diffuser dimensions, and room dimensions. Laboratory experiments supported the study of thermal mixing in heating mode; we used the results to develop a correlation to predict high sidewall diffuser performance. For cooling mode, numerical analysis is presented. The results provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to maintain proper room mixing for heating and cooling of high performance homes. It is proven that these systems can achieve good mixing and provide acceptable comfort levels. Recommendations are given on the operating conditions to guarantee occupant comfort.

  8. Liquid phase products and solid deposit formation from thermally stressed model jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Bittker, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between solid deposit formation and liquid degradation product concentration was studied for the high temperature (400 C) stressing of three hydrocarbon model fuels. A Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester was used to simulate actual engine fuel system conditions. The effects of fuel type, dissolved oxygen concentration, and hot surface contact time (reaction time) were studied. Effects of reaction time and removal of dissolved oxygen on deposit formation were found to be different for n-dodecane and for 2-ethylnaphthalene. When ten percent tetralin is added to n-dodecane to give a simpler model of an actual jet fuel, the tetralin inhibits both the deposit formation and the degradation of n-dodecane. For 2-ethylnaphthalene primary product analyses indicate a possible self-inhibition at long reaction times of the secondary reactions which form the deposit precursors. The mechanism of the primary breakdown of these fuels is suggested and the primary products which participate in these precursor-forming reactions are identified. Some implications of the results to the thermal degradation of real jet fuels are given.

  9. Opposed Jet Burner Extinction Limits: Simple Mixed Hydrocarbon Scramjet Fuels vs Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2007-01-01

    Opposed Jet Burner tools have been used extensively by the authors to measure Flame Strength (FS) of laminar non-premixed H2 air and simple hydrocarbon (HC) air counterflow diffusion flames at 1-atm. FS represents a strain-induced extinction limit based on air jet velocity. This paper follows AIAA-2006-5223, and provides new HC air FSs for global testing of chemical kinetics, and for characterizing idealized flameholding potentials during early scramjet-like combustion. Previous FS data included six HCs, pure and N2-diluted; and three HC-diluted H2 fuels, where FS decayed very nonlinearly as HC was added to H2, due to H-atom scavenging. This study presents FSs on mixtures of (candidate surrogate) HCs, some with very high FS ethylene. Included are four binary gaseous systems at 300 K, and a hot ternary system at approx. 600 K. The binaries are methane + ethylene, ethane + ethylene, methane + ethane, and methane + propylene. The first three also form two ternary systems. The hot ternary includes both 10.8 and 21.3 mole % vaporized n-heptane and full ranges of methane + ethylene. Normalized FS data provide accurate means of (1) validating, globally, chemical kinetics for extinction of non-premixed flames, and (2) estimating (scaling by HC) the loss of incipient flameholding in scramjet combustors. The n-heptane is part of a proposed baseline simulant (10 mole % with 30% methane + 60% ethylene) that mimics the ignition of endothermically cracked JP-7 like kerosene fuel, as suggested by Colket and Spadaccini in 2001 in their shock tube Scramjet Fuels Autoignition Study. Presently, we use FS to gauge idealized flameholding, and define HC surrogates. First, FS was characterized for hot nheptane + methane + ethylene; then a hot 36 mole % methane + 64% ethylene surrogate was defined that mimics FS of the baseline simulant system. A similar hot ethane + ethylene surrogate can also be defined, but it has lower vapor pressure at 300 K, and thus exhibits reduced gaseous

  10. Opposed jet burner studies of effects of CO, CO2, and N2 air-contaminants on hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    The blowoff/restore characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures opposed to jets of air contaminated by N2, CO, and CO2 have been determined using a counterflow diffusion flame formed by a tubular opposed jet burner. Both blowoff and restore limits are found to be sensitive to fuel and air composition. Empirically derived variations in the limits of the average mass flux of incoming H2 with percent contaminant, at fixed incoming fuel and H2/O2 inputs, are used to quantify the effects of oxygen dilution, flame augmentation, and flame retardation by N2, CO, and CO2 contaminants. The implications of the results are discussed.

  11. Piloted methane/air jet flames : transport effects and aspects of scalar structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Karpetis, Adionos N.; Chen, J. Y.; Barlow, Robert S.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2005-02-01

    Previously unpublished results from multiscalar point measurements in the series of piloted CH{sub 4}/air jet flames [R.S. Barlow, J.H. Frank, Proc. Combust. Inst. 27 (1998) 1087-1095] are presented and analyzed. The emphasis is on features of the data that reveal the relative importance of molecular diffusion and turbulent transport in these flames. The complete series A-F is considered. This includes laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames spanning a range in Reynolds number from 1100 to 44,800. Results on conditional means of species mass fractions, the differential diffusion parameter, and the state of the water-gas shift reaction all show that there is an evolution in these flames from a scalar structure dominated by molecular diffusion to one dominated by turbulent transport. Long records of 6000 single-point samples at each of several selected locations in flame D are used to quantify the cross-stream (radial) dependence of conditional statistics of measured scalars. The cross-stream dependence of the conditional scalar dissipation is determined from 6000-shot, line-imaging measurements at selected locations. The cross-stream dependence of reactive scalars, which is most significant in the near field of the jet flame, is attributed to radial differences in both convective and local time scales of the flow. Results illustrate some potential limitations of common modeling assumptions when applied to laboratory-scale flames and, thus, provide a more complete context for interpretation of comparisons between experiments and model calculations.

  12. Piloted methane/air jet flames: Transport effects and aspects of scalar structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.S.; Frank, J.H.; Karpetis, A.N.; Chen, J.-Y.

    2005-12-01

    Previously unpublished results from multiscalar point measurements in the series of piloted CH{sub 4}/air jet flames [R.S. Barlow, J.H. Frank, Proc. Combust. Inst. 27 (1998) 1087-1095] are presented and analyzed. The emphasis is on features of the data that reveal the relative importance of molecular diffusion and turbulent transport in these flames. The complete series A-F is considered. This includes laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames spanning a range in Reynolds number from 1100 to 44,800. Results on conditional means of species mass fractions, the differential diffusion parameter, and the state of the water-gas shift reaction all show that there is an evolution in these flames from a scalar structure dominated by molecular diffusion to one dominated by turbulent transport. Long records of 6000 single-point samples at each of several selected locations in flame D are used to quantify the cross-stream (radial) dependence of conditional statistics of measured scalars. The cross-stream dependence of the conditional scalar dissipation is determined from 6000-shot, line-imaging measurements at selected locations. The cross-stream dependence of reactive scalars, which is most significant in the near field of the jet flame, is attributed to radial differences in both convective and local time scales of the flow. Results illustrate some potential limitations of common modeling assumptions when applied to laboratory-scale flames and, thus, provide a more complete context for interpretation of comparisons between experiments and model calculations.

  13. The impacts of air pollution on maternal stress during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanfen; Zhou, Leilei; Xu, Jian; Luo, Zhongcheng; Kan, Haidong; Zhang, Jinsong; Yan, Chonghuai; Zhang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association of air pollution with maternal stress during pregnancy, we enrolled 1,931 women during mid-to-late pregnancy in Shanghai in 2010. The “Life-Event Scale for Pregnant Women” and “Symptom-Checklist-90-Revised Scale” (SCL-90-R) were used to evaluate life event stress and emotional stress, respectively. Air pollution data were collected for each district where pregnant women lived during pregnancy. We associated ambient air pollution with stress scores using multivariable logistic regression models. After adjusting for relevant covariates, an interquartile-range (IQR) increase in sulphur-dioxide (SO2) (OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.11–1.52) and particulate-matter with an aerodynamic-diameter <10 μm (PM10) (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.02–1.34) concentrations on the recruitment day, and in the 5-day moving average concentrations of nitrogen-dioxide (NO2) (OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.05–1.70) were associated with high Global-Severity-Indices (P75-P100) of the SCL-90-R. These associations were stronger among women bearing high levels (P25-P100) of air pollutants than among women experiencing low levels (P1-P25) of pollutants. The stronger associations and higher levels of pollutants were observed in the cool season than in the warm season. SO2 increases on the recruitment day were also associated with an increased risk of high depression scores (P75-P100). Our findings supported a dose-dependent association between air pollution and emotional stress during pregnancy. PMID:28098225

  14. The impacts of air pollution on maternal stress during pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yanfen; Zhou, Leilei; Xu, Jian; Luo, Zhongcheng; Kan, Haidong; Zhang, Jinsong; Yan, Chonghuai; Zhang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association of air pollution with maternal stress during pregnancy, we enrolled 1,931 women during mid-to-late pregnancy in Shanghai in 2010. The “Life-Event Scale for Pregnant Women” and “Symptom-Checklist-90-Revised Scale” (SCL-90-R) were used to evaluate life event stress and emotional stress, respectively. Air pollution data were collected for each district where pregnant women lived during pregnancy. We associated ambient air pollution with stress scores using multivariable logistic regression models. After adjusting for relevant covariates, an interquartile-range (IQR) increase in sulphur-dioxide (SO2) (OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.11–1.52) and particulate-matter with an aerodynamic-diameter <10 μm (PM10) (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.02–1.34) concentrations on the recruitment day, and in the 5-day moving average concentrations of nitrogen-dioxide (NO2) (OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.05–1.70) were associated with high Global-Severity-Indices (P75-P100) of the SCL-90-R. These associations were stronger among women bearing high levels (P25-P100) of air pollutants than among women experiencing low levels (P1-P25) of pollutants. The stronger associations and higher levels of pollutants were observed in the cool season than in the warm season. SO2 increases on the recruitment day were also associated with an increased risk of high depression scores (P75-P100). Our findings supported a dose-dependent association between air pollution and emotional stress during pregnancy.

  15. The impacts of air pollution on maternal stress during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yanfen; Zhou, Leilei; Xu, Jian; Luo, Zhongcheng; Kan, Haidong; Zhang, Jinsong; Yan, Chonghuai; Zhang, Jun

    2017-01-18

    To investigate the association of air pollution with maternal stress during pregnancy, we enrolled 1,931 women during mid-to-late pregnancy in Shanghai in 2010. The "Life-Event Scale for Pregnant Women" and "Symptom-Checklist-90-Revised Scale" (SCL-90-R) were used to evaluate life event stress and emotional stress, respectively. Air pollution data were collected for each district where pregnant women lived during pregnancy. We associated ambient air pollution with stress scores using multivariable logistic regression models. After adjusting for relevant covariates, an interquartile-range (IQR) increase in sulphur-dioxide (SO2) (OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.11-1.52) and particulate-matter with an aerodynamic-diameter <10 μm (PM10) (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.02-1.34) concentrations on the recruitment day, and in the 5-day moving average concentrations of nitrogen-dioxide (NO2) (OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.05-1.70) were associated with high Global-Severity-Indices (P75-P100) of the SCL-90-R. These associations were stronger among women bearing high levels (P25-P100) of air pollutants than among women experiencing low levels (P1-P25) of pollutants. The stronger associations and higher levels of pollutants were observed in the cool season than in the warm season. SO2 increases on the recruitment day were also associated with an increased risk of high depression scores (P75-P100). Our findings supported a dose-dependent association between air pollution and emotional stress during pregnancy.

  16. Blazar Jets Perturbed by Magneto-gravitational Stresses in Supermassive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.

    2017-02-01

    We study particle acceleration and radiative processes in blazar jets under recurring conditions set by gravitational perturbations in supermassive binary systems. We consider the action from a companion orbiting a primary black hole of ∼ {10}8 {M}ȯ , and perturbing its relativistic jet. We discuss how such conditions induce repetitive magneto-hydrodynamic stresses along the jet, and affect its inner electron acceleration and radiative processes. Specifically, we study how macroscopic perturbations related to increased jet “magnetization” end up in higher radiative outputs in the optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. We first find an increase in magnetic field strength, as gauged in the optical band from the synchrotron emission of electrons accelerated in kinetic processes stimulated by reconnecting magnetic lines. The energetic electrons then proceed to up-scatter the synchrotron photons to GeV energies after the canonical synchrotron self-Compton radiation process. Our model implies a specific recurring pattern in the optical to gamma-ray emissions, made of high peaks and wide troughs. Progressing accelerations caused by spreading reconnections will produce an additional synchrotron keV component. Such outbursts provide a diagnostics for enhanced acceleration of electrons, which can up-scatter photons into the TeV range. We discuss how our model applies to the BL Lac object PG 1553+113, arguably the best candidate to now for high amplitude, recurring modulations in its gamma-ray emissions. We also consider other BL Lacs showing correlated keV–TeV radiations such as Mrk 421.

  17. Degradation Through Erosion: Mechanistic Studies on IN-718 Superalloy Under Hot Air Jet Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirugnanasambantham, K. G.; Natarajan, S.

    2015-07-01

    IN718 is a Nickel-based superalloy, widely used in high-temperature applications such as aircraft, and land-based and marine turbines. This technical paper deals with high-temperature erosion behavior and its mechanism of IN718. The erosion mechanism of the IN718 was studied using hot air jet erosion experiments at 800 °C with varying parameters such as angle of impingement and erodent velocity. Characterization of the eroded samples was done using SEM micrographs and high-resolution universal tribometer to determine the erosion mechanisms. SEM micrographs of eroded samples reveal that lip formation, cutting, and ploughing are the dominant erosion mechanisms for IN718 at 45° angle of impingement, while at 90°, it is lip extrusion followed by flattening of lip and detachment of platelet. These mechanisms eventually retard the particle impact velocity, thus enhancing erosion resistance.

  18. Simulation of Synthetic Jets in Quiescent Air Using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli L.

    2004-01-01

    We report research experience in applying an Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for the prediction of time-dependent flows in the presence of an active flow control device. The configuration under consideration is a synthetic jet created by a single diaphragm piezoelectric actuator in quiescent air. Time-averaged and instantaneous data for this case were obtained at Langley Research Center, using multiple measurement techniques. Computational results for this case using one-equation Spalart-Allmaras and two-equation Menter s turbulence models are presented here along with comparisons with the experimental data. The effect of grid refinement, preconditioning and time-step variation are also examined.

  19. Cell immobilization on polymer by air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Om, Ji-yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-08-01

    The study of cell immobilization on delicate polymer by an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) is required for its medical application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AAPPJ treatment induce cell immobilization effect on delicate polymers without significant change of surface roughness by AAPPJ treatment. After surface roughness, dynamic contact angle, and chemical characteristics were investigated, the immobilization effect was evaluated with the mouse fibroblast L929 cell line. Surface roughness change was not observed (P > 0.05) in either delicate dental wax or polystyrene plate (PSP) as advancing and receding contact angles significantly decreased (P < 0.05), thanks to decreased hydrocarbon and formation of oxygen-related functional groups in treated PSP. Adherent L929 cells with elongated morphology were found in treated PSP along with the formation of immobilization markers vinculin and actin cytoskeleton. Increased PTK2 gene expression upregulated these markers on treated PSP.

  20. Unsteady Extinction of Opposed Jet Ethylene/Methane HIFiRE Surrogate Fuel Mixtures vs Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaden, Sarah N.; Debes, Rachel L.; Lash, E. Lara; Burk, Rachel S.; Boyd, C. Merritt; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Pellett, Gerald L.

    2009-01-01

    A unique idealized study of the subject fuel vs. air systems was conducted using an Oscillatory-input Opposed Jet Burner (OOJB) system and a newly refined analysis. Extensive dynamic-extinction measurements were obtained on unanchored (free-floating) laminar Counter Flow Diffusion Flames (CFDFs) at 1-atm, stabilized by steady input velocities (e.g., U(sub air)) and perturbed by superimposed in-phase sinusoidal velocity inputs at fuel and air nozzle exits. Ethylene (C2H4) and methane (CH4), and intermediate 64/36 and 15/85 molar percent mixtures were studied. The latter gaseous surrogates were chosen earlier to mimic ignition and respective steady Flame Strengths (FS = U(sub air)) of vaporized and cracked, and un-cracked, JP-7 "like" kerosene for a Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) scramjet. For steady idealized flameholding, the 100% C2H4 flame is respectively approx. 1.3 and approx.2.7 times stronger than a 64/36 mix and CH4; but is still 12.0 times weaker than a 100% H2-air flame. Limited Hot-Wire (HW) measurements of velocity oscillations at convergent-nozzle exits, and more extensive Probe Microphone (PM) measurements of acoustic pressures, were used to normalize Dynamic FSs, which decayed linearly with pk/pk U(sub air) (velocity magnitude, HW), and also pk/pk P (pressure magnitude, PM). Thus Dynamic Flame Weakening (DFW) is defined as % decrease in FS per Pascal of pk/pk P oscillation, namely, DFW = -100 d(U(sub air)/U(sub air),0Hz)/d(pkpk P). Key findings are: (1) Ethylene flames are uniquely strong and resilient to extinction by oscillating inflows below 150 Hz; (2) Methane flames are uniquely weak; (3) Ethylene / methane surrogate flames are disproportionately strong with respect to ethylene content; and (4) Flame weakening is consistent with limited published results on forced unsteady CFDFs. Thus from 0 to approx. 10 Hz and slightly higher, lagging diffusive responses of key species led to progressive phase lags (relative

  1. A novel ram-air plasma synthetic jet actuator for near space high-speed flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Xia, Zhixun; Luo, Zhenbing; Wang, Lin; Deng, Xiong

    2017-04-01

    As a promising high-speed flow control technique, plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) has the superiorities of requiring no moving parts or flow supplies, extremely fast response, wide frequency band and high efflux speed. However, it has limitations for application: in near space, the air in the cavity which is used to generate the puled plasma jet becomes rare, and the low refill rate often leads to insufficient recovery which limits the working frequency. In order to overcome these limitations, a novel actuator called ram-air plasma synthetic jet actuator (RPSJA) is proposed. Inspired by the ramjet, the principle of this actuator is to take advantage of the tremendous dynamic pressure of the high-speed inflow using an added ram-air inlet. Numerical investigations were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of such an actuator. The results show that, compared with PSJA, the air in the chamber becomes denser and the refill rate is notably increased owing to the ;ram-air effect; of RPSJA. Based on the flow characteristic analysis, a revised actuator with a stepped ram-air inlet is proposed and investigated as well, and the results show that the performance is improved as the stepped height rises.

  2. Atomization and Dispersion of a Liquid Jet Injected Into a Crossflow of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seay, J. E.; Samuelson, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, environmental regulations have become more stringent, requiring lower emissions of mainly nitrogen oxides (NOx), as well as carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC). These regulations have forced the gas turbine industry to examine non-conventional combustion strategies, such as the lean burn approach. The reasoning behind operating under lean conditions is to maintain the temperature of combustion near and below temperatures required for the formation of thermal nitric oxide (NO). To be successful, however, the lean processes require careful preparation of the fuel/air mixture to preclude formation of either locally rich reaction zones, which may give rise to NO formation, or locally lean reaction zones, which may give rise to inefficient fuel processing. As a result fuel preparation is crucial to the development and success of new aeroengine combustor technologies. A key element of the fuel preparation process is the fuel nozzle. As nozzle technologies have developed, airblast atomization has been adopted for both industrial and aircraft gas turbine applications. However, the majority of the work to date has focused on prefilming nozzles, which despite their complexity and high cost have become an industry standard for conventional combustion strategies. It is likely that the new strategies required to meet future emissions goals will utilize novel fuel injector approaches, such as radial injection. This thesis proposes and demonstrates an experiment to examine, on a mechanistic level (i.e., the physics of the action), the processes associated with the atomization, evaporation, and dispersion of a liquid jet introduced, from a radial, plain-jet airblast injector, into a crossflow of air. This understanding requires the knowledge not only of what factors influence atomization, but also the underlying mechanism associated with liquid breakup and dispersion. The experimental data acquired identify conditions and geometries for improved

  3. Influence of air diffusion on the OH radicals and atomic O distribution in an atmospheric Ar (bio)plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A.; Li, L.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Vanraes, P.; Leys, C.

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of samples with plasmas in biomedical applications often occurs in ambient air. Admixing air into the discharge region may severely affect the formation and destruction of the generated oxidative species. Little is known about the effects of air diffusion on the spatial distribution of OH radicals and O atoms in the afterglow of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets. In our work, these effects are investigated by performing and comparing measurements in ambient air with measurements in a controlled argon atmosphere without the admixture of air, for an argon plasma jet. The spatial distribution of OH is detected by means of laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics (LIF), whereas two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) is used for the detection of atomic O. The spatially resolved OH LIF and O TALIF show that, due to the air admixture effects, the reactive species are only concentrated in the vicinity of the central streamline of the afterglow of the jet, with a characteristic discharge diameter of ˜1.5 mm. It is shown that air diffusion has a key role in the recombination loss mechanisms of OH radicals and atomic O especially in the far afterglow region, starting up to ˜4 mm from the nozzle outlet at a low water/oxygen concentration. Furthermore, air diffusion enhances OH and O production in the core of the plasma. The higher density of active species in the discharge in ambient air is likely due to a higher electron density and a more effective electron impact dissociation of H2O and O2 caused by the increasing electrical field, when the discharge is operated in ambient air.

  4. Measurements of soot, OH, and PAH concentrations in turbulent ethylene/air jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Young; Turns, Stephen R.; Santoro, Robert J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents results from an investigation of soot formation in turbulent, non-premixed, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/air jet flames. Tests were conducted using a H{sub 2}-piloted burner with fuel issuing from a 2.18 mm i.d. tube into quiescent ambient air. A range of test conditions was studied using the initial jet velocity (16.2-94.1 m/s) as a parameter. Fuel-jet Reynolds numbers ranged from 4000 to 23,200. Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) was employed to determine soot volume fractions, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to measure relative hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations. Extensive information on the structure of the soot and OH fields was obtained from two-dimensional imaging experiments. Quantitative measurements were obtained by employing the LII and LIF techniques independently. Imaging results for soot, OH, and PAH show the existence of three soot formation/oxidation regions: a rapid soot growth region, in which OH and soot particles lie in distinctly different radial locations; a mixing-dominated region controlled by large-scale motion; and a soot-oxidation region in which the OH and soot fields overlap spatially, resulting in the rapid oxidation of soot particles. Detailed quantitative analyzes of soot volume fractions and OH and soot zone thicknesses were performed along with the temperature measurement using the N{sub 2}-CARS system. Measurements of OH and soot zone thicknesses show that the soot zone thickness increases linearly with axial distance in the soot formation region, whereas the OH zone thickness is nearly constant in this region. The OH zone thickness then rapidly increases with downstream distance and approximately doubles in the soot-oxidation region. Probability density functions also were obtained for soot volume fractions and OH concentrations. These probability density functions clearly define the spatial relationships among the OH, PAH concentrations, the

  5. Thorough small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of the instability of liquid micro-jets in air.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Benedetta; Cacho-Nerin, Fernando; Sartori, Barbara; Pérez, Javier; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Liquid jets are of interest, both for their industrial relevance and for scientific applications (more important, in particular for X-rays, after the advent of free-electron lasers that require liquid jets as sample carrier). Instability mechanisms have been described theoretically and by numerical simulation, but confirmed by few experimental techniques. In fact, these are mainly based on cameras, which is limited by the imaging resolution, and on light scattering, which is hindered by absorption, reflection, Mie scattering and multiple scattering due to complex air/liquid interfaces during jet break-up. In this communication it is demonstrated that synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can give quantitative information on liquid jet dynamics at the nanoscale, by detecting time-dependent morphology and break-up length. Jets ejected from circular tubes of different diameters (100-450 µm) and speeds (0.7-21 m s(-1)) have been explored to cover the Rayleigh and first wind-induced regimes. Various solvents (water, ethanol, 2-propanol) and their mixtures have been examined. The determination of the liquid jet behaviour becomes essential, as it provides background data in subsequent studies of chemical and biological reactions using SAXS or X-ray diffraction based on synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers.

  6. Inhalation exposure to jet fuel (JP8) among U.S. Air Force personnel.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kristen W; Proctor, Susan P; Ozonoff, Al; McClean, Michael D

    2010-10-01

    As jet fuel is a common occupational exposure among military and civilian populations, this study was conducted to characterize jet fuel (JP8) exposure among active duty U.S. Air Force personnel. Personnel (n = 24) were divided a priori into high, moderate, and low exposure groups. Questionnaires and personal air samples (breathing zone) were collected from each worker over 3 consecutive days (72 worker-days) and analyzed for total hydrocarbons (THC), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and naphthalene. Air samples were collected from inside the fuel tank and analyzed for the same analytes. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the exposure data. Our results show that the correlation of THC (a measure of overall JP8 inhalation exposure) with all other analytes was moderate to strong in the a priori high and moderate exposure groups combined. Inhalation exposure to all analytes varied significantly by self-reported JP8 exposure (THC levels higher among workers reporting JP8 exposure), a priori exposure group (THC levels in high group > moderate group > low group), and more specific job task groupings (THC levels among workers in fuel systems hangar group > refueling maintenance group > fuel systems office group > fuel handling group > clinic group), with task groupings explaining the most between-worker variability. Among highly exposed workers, statistically significant job task-related predictors of inhalation exposure to THC indicated that increased time in the hangar, working close to the fuel tank (inside > less than 25 ft > greater than 25 ft), primary job (entrant > attendant/runner/fireguard > outside hangar), and performing various tasks near the fuel tank, such as searching for a leak, resulted in higher JP8 exposure. This study shows that while a priori exposure groups were useful in distinguishing JP8 exposure levels, job task-based categories should be considered in epidemiologic study designs to improve exposure classification. Finally

  7. EVALUATION OF FOAMING/ANTIFOAMING IN WTP TANKS EQUIPPED WITH PULSE JET MIXERS AND AIR SPARGERS

    SciTech Connect

    JONES, TIMOTHYM.

    2004-09-01

    has no significant effect on pH or chemical composition of the slurry. The rheology is also not impacted by air sparging. The primary effect of air sparging is the removal of water by the dry air passing through the column and exiting in a saturated condition. This effect can be mitigated by adding water back to the column or vessel during sparging. Therefore, an initial charge of 350 mg/L antifoam (Dow Q2-3183A) followed by small batch additions of 70 mg/LQ2-3183A every 24 hours is recommended for use in WTP tanks equipped with air spargers and pulse jets based upon the testing done in this study. However, this recommendation is based upon a limited set of antifoam degradation data developed for the WTP evaporator R and T program. Therefore, additional investigation into refining the kinetic behavior of Q2 antifoam under radiation dose is recommended.

  8. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250-1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  9. Stretching the stress boundary: Linking air pollution health effects to a neurohormonal stress response.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2016-12-01

    Inhaled pollutants produce effects in virtually all organ systems in our body and have been linked to chronic diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's and diabetes. A neurohormonal stress response (referred to here as a systemic response produced by activation of the sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis) has been implicated in a variety of psychological and physical stresses, which involves immune and metabolic homeostatic mechanisms affecting all organs in the body. In this review, we provide new evidence for the involvement of this well-characterized neurohormonal stress response in mediating systemic and pulmonary effects of a prototypic air pollutant - ozone. A plethora of systemic metabolic and immune effects are induced in animals exposed to inhaled pollutants, which could result from increased circulating stress hormones. The release of adrenal-derived stress hormones in response to ozone exposure not only mediates systemic immune and metabolic responses, but by doing so, also modulates pulmonary injury and inflammation. With recurring pollutant exposures, these effects can contribute to multi-organ chronic conditions associated with air pollution. This review will cover, 1) the potential mechanisms by which air pollutants can initiate the relay of signals from respiratory tract to brain through trigeminal and vagus nerves, and activate stress responsive regions including hypothalamus; and 2) the contribution of sympathetic and HPA-axis activation in mediating systemic homeostatic metabolic and immune effects of ozone in various organs. The potential contribution of chronic environmental stress in cardiovascular, neurological, reproductive and metabolic diseases, and the knowledge gaps are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Air Pollution, edited by Wenjun Ding, Andrew J. Ghio and Weidong Wu.

  10. Species and velocity visualization of unseeded heated air and combusting hydrogen jets using laser and flashlamp sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1990-01-01

    Three techniques for the visualization of species and/or velocity in unseeded H2/air flames and heated air jets are described and preliminary image data are presented. The techniques described are: (1) simultaneous ArF laser imaging of H2, O2, and Rayleigh cross-section weighted density in an H2, O2, and Rayleigh cross-section weighted density in an H2/air flame; (2) ultraviolet flashlamp imaging of O2, OH, and Rayleigh cross-section weighted density in an H2/air flame; and (3) Raman Excitation plus Laser Induced Electronic Fluorescence velocimetry in heater air flows, up to static temperatures of 700 K. Application of these techniques, individually or in combination, should provide useful insight into mixing and reacting flows containing H2, O2, N2 and reaction intermediates such as OH.

  11. A stratospheric intrusion at the subtropical jet over the Mediterranean Sea: air-borne remote sensing observations and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, K.; Hoffmann, L.; Günther, G.; Khosrawi, F.; Olschewski, F.; Preusse, P.; Spang, R.; Stroh, F.; Riese, M.

    2012-03-01

    Remote sensing measurements from the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescope for the Atmosphere - New Frontiers (CRISTA-NF) during a flight on 29 July 2006 are presented. This flight is part of the AMMA-SCOUT-O3 measurement campaign, where CRISTA-NF was deployed on the high-flying research aircraft M55-Geophysica. The flight path was located over Italy and the Mediterranean Sea and crossed over the subtropical jet twice. Measurements of temperature, and the volume mixing ratios of water vapor (H2O), ozone (O3), nitric acid (HNO3) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) are available with a vertical resolution of up to 500 m between about 6 to 21 km altitude. CRISTA-NF observes these trace gases simultaneously and provides a quasi-2D view of the transition region between the troposphere and the stratosphere. The observation of these different trace gases allows to determine the origin of air masses in the stratosphere or troposphere. As expected, higher abundances are found where the main source of the trace gases is located: in the stratosphere for O3 and in the troposphere for H2O and PAN. Tracer-tracer correlations between O3 and PAN are used to identify mixed tropospheric and lowermost stratospheric air at the subtropical jet and around the thermal tropopause north of the jet. An intrusion of stratospheric air into the troposphere associated with the subtropical jet is found in the CRISTA-NF observations. The observations indicate that the intrusion is connected to a tropopause fold which is not resolved in the ECMWF analysis data. The intrusion was reproduced in a simulation with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). This work discusses the nature of the observed processes at the subtropical jet based on the CRISTA-NF observations and the CLaMS simulation.

  12. Air Pollution Stress and the Aging Phenotype: The Telomere Connection.

    PubMed

    Martens, Dries S; Nawrot, Tim S

    2016-09-01

    Aging is a complex physiological phenomenon. The question why some subjects grow old while remaining free from disease whereas others prematurely die remains largely unanswered. We focus here on the role of air pollution in biological aging. Hallmarks of aging can be grouped into three main categories: genomic instability, telomere attrition, and epigenetic alterations leading to altered mitochondrial function and cellular senescence. At birth, the initial telomere length of a person is largely determined by environmental factors. Telomere length shortens with each cell division and exposure to air pollution as well as low residential greens space exposure is associated with shorter telomere length. Recent studies show that the estimated effects of particulate air pollution exposure on the telomere mitochondrial axis of aging may play an important role in chronic health effects of air pollution. The exposome encompasses all exposures over an entire life. As telomeres can be considered as the cellular memories of exposure to oxidative stress and inflammation, telomere maintenance may be a proxy for assessing the "exposome". If telomeres are causally related to the aging phenotype and environmental air pollution is an important determinant of telomere length, this might provide new avenues for future preventive strategies.

  13. Large-volume excitation of air, argon, nitrogen and combustible mixtures by thermal jets produced by nanosecond spark discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyan, Sergey; Hayashi, Jun; Salmon, Arthur; Stancu, Gabi D.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents experimental observations of strong expanding thermal jets following the application of nanosecond spark discharges. These jets propagate in a toroidal shape perpendicular to the interelectrode axis, with high velocities of up to 30 m s‑1 and over distances of the order of a cm. Their propagation length is much larger than the thermal expansion region produced by the conventional millisecond sparks used in car engine ignition, thus greatly improving the volumetric excitation of gas mixtures. The shape and velocity of the jets is found to be fairly insensitive to the shape of the electrodes. In addition, their spatial extent is found to increase with the number of nanosecond sparks and with the discharge voltage, and to decrease slightly with the pressure between 1 and 7 atm at constant applied voltage. Finally, this thermal jet phenomenon is observed in experiments conducted with many types of gas mixtures, including air, nitrogen, argon, and combustible CH4/air mixtures. This makes nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges particularly attractive for aerodynamic flow control or plasma-assisted combustion because of their ability to excite large volumes of gas, typically about 100 times the volume of the discharge.

  14. A stratospheric intrusion at the subtropical jet over the Mediterranean Sea: air-borne remote sensing observations and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, K.; Hoffmann, L.; Günther, G.; Khosrawi, F.; Olschewski, F.; Preusse, P.; Spang, R.; Stroh, F.; Riese, M.

    2012-09-01

    Remote sensing measurements from the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescope for the Atmosphere - New Frontiers (CRISTA-NF) during a flight on 29 July 2006 are presented. This flight is part of the AMMA-SCOUT-O3 measurement campaign, where CRISTA-NF was deployed on the high-flying research aircraft M55-Geophysica. The flight path was located over Italy and the Mediterranean Sea and crossed over the subtropical jet twice. Measurements of temperature, and the volume mixing ratios of water vapor (H2O), ozone (O3), nitric acid (HNO3) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) are available with a vertical resolution of up to 500 m between about 6 to 21 km altitude. CRISTA-NF observes these trace gases simultaneously and provides a quasi-2-D view of the transition region between the troposphere and the stratosphere. The observation of these different trace gases allows to determine tropospheric and stratospheric air masses. As expected, higher abundances are found where the main source of the trace gases is located: in the stratosphere for O3 and in the troposphere for H2O and PAN. Tracer-tracer correlations between O3 and PAN are used to identify the mixed tropospheric and lowermost stratospheric air at the subtropical jet and around the thermal tropopause north of the jet. An intrusion of stratospheric air into the troposphere associated with the subtropical jet is found in the CRISTA-NF observations. The observations indicate that the intrusion is connected to a tropopause fold which is not resolved in the ECMWF analysis data. The intrusion was reproduced in a simulation with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). The CLaMS simulation shows, that the lowermost stratospheric air masses in the intrusion where transported along the the subtropical jet. The tropospheric air masses around the intrusion originate from the vicinity of the Asian monsoon anticyclone. This work discusses the nature of the observed processes at the subtropical jet based on the

  15. Stress-free automatic sleep deprivation using air puffs

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Brooks A.; Vanderheyden, William M.; Urpa, Lea M.; Davis, Devon E.; Fitzpatrick, Christopher J.; Prabhu, Kaustubh; Poe, Gina R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep deprivation via gentle handling is time-consuming and personnel-intensive. New Method We present here an automated sleep deprivation system via air puffs. Implanted EMG and EEG electrodes were used to assess sleep/waking states in six male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood samples were collected from an implanted intravenous catheter every 4 hours during the 12-hour light cycle on baseline, 8 hours of sleep deprivation via air puffs, and 8 hours of sleep deprivation by gentle handling days. Results The automated system was capable of scoring sleep and waking states as accurately as our offline version (~90% for sleep) and with sufficient speed to trigger a feedback response within an acceptable amount of time (1.76 s). Manual state scoring confirmed normal sleep on the baseline day and sleep deprivation on the two manipulation days (68% decrease in non-REM, 63% decrease in REM, and 74% increase in waking). No significant differences in levels of ACTH and corticosterone (stress hormones indicative of HPA axis activity) were found at any time point between baseline sleep and sleep deprivation via air puffs. Comparison with Existing Method There were no significant differences in ACTH or corticosterone concentrations between sleep deprivation by air puffs and gentle handling over the 8-hour period. Conclusions Our system accurately detects sleep and delivers air puffs to acutely deprive rats of sleep with sufficient temporal resolution during the critical 4-5 h post learning sleep-dependent memory consolidation period. The system is stress-free and a viable alternative to existing sleep deprivation techniques. PMID:26014662

  16. Effect of Gravity on the Near Field Flow Structure of Helium Jet in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Parthasarathy, Ramkumar; Griffin, DeVon

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have shown that a low-density jet injected into a high-density surrounding medium undergoes periodic oscillations in the near field. Although the flow oscillations in these jets at Richardson numbers about unity are attributed to the buoyancy, the direct physical evidence has not been acquired in the experiments. If the instability were indeed caused by buoyancy, the near-field flow structure would undergo drastic changes upon removal of gravity in the microgravity environment. The present study was conducted to investigate this effect by simulating microgravity environment in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The non-intrusive, rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique was used for quantitative measurements of helium concentrations in buoyant and non-buoyant jets. Results in a steady jet show that the radial growth of the jet shear layer in Earth gravity is hindered by the buoyant acceleration. The jet in microgravity was 30 to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The microgravity jet showed typical growth of a constant density jet shear layer. In case of a self-excited helium jet in Earth gravity, the flow oscillations continued as the jet flow adjusted to microgravity conditions in the drop tower. The flow oscillations were however not present at the end of the drop when steady microgravity conditions were reached.

  17. Effects of air transient spark discharge and helium plasma jet on water, bacteria, cells, and biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Karol; Kučerová, Katarína; Tarabová, Barbora; Janda, Mário; Machala, Zdenko; Sano, Kaori; Mihai, Cosmin Teodor; Ciorpac, Mitică; Gorgan, Lucian Dragos; Jijie, Roxana; Pohoata, Valentin; Topala, Ionut

    2015-06-06

    Atmospheric pressure DC-driven self-pulsing transient spark (TS) discharge operated in air and pulse-driven dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet (PJ) operated in helium in contact with water solutions were used for inducing chemical effects in water solutions, and the treatment of bacteria (Escherichia coli), mammalian cells (Vero line normal cells, HeLa line cancerous cells), deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA), and protein (bovine serum albumin). Two different methods of water solution supply were used in the TS: water electrode system and water spray system. The effects of both TS systems and the PJ were compared, as well as a direct exposure of the solution to the discharge with an indirect exposure to the discharge activated gas flow. The chemical analysis of water solutions was performed by using colorimetric methods of UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometry. The bactericidal effects of the discharges on bacteria were evaluated by standard microbiological plate count method. Viability, apoptosis and cell cycle were assessed in normal and cancerous cells. Viability of cells was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion test, apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide assay, and cell cycle progression by propidium iodide/RNase test. The effect of the discharges on deoxyribonucleic acid and protein were evaluated by fluorescence and UV absorption spectroscopy. The results of bacterial and mammalian cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle clearly show that cold plasma can inactivate bacteria and selectively target cancerous cells, which is very important for possible future development of new plasma therapeutic strategies in biomedicine. The authors found that all investigated bio-effects were stronger with the air TS discharge than with the He PJ, even in indirect exposure.

  18. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  19. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  20. A Portable, Air-Jet-Actuator-Based Device for System Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, Wayne; Belden, Jesse; Mazumdar, Anirban; Hunter, Ian

    2010-11-01

    System identification (ID) of human and robotic limbs could help in diagnosis of ailments and aid in optimization of control parameters and future redesigns. We present a self-contained actuator, which uses the Coanda effect to rapidly switch the direction of a high speed air jet to create a binary stochastic force input to a limb for system ID. The design of the actuator is approached with the goal of creating a portable device, which could deployed on robot or human limbs for in situ identification. The viability of the device is demonstrated by performing stochastic system ID on an underdamped elastic beam system with fixed inertia and stiffness, and variable damping. The non-parametric impulse response yielded from the stochastic system ID is modeled as a second order system, and the resultant parameters are found to be in excellent agreement with those found using more traditional system ID techniques. The current design could be further miniaturized and developed as a portable, wireless, on-site multi-axis system identification system for less intrusive and more widespread use.

  1. Functionalization of graphene by atmospheric pressure plasma jet in air or H2O2 environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weixin; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-03-01

    The functionalization of graphene, which deforms its band structure, can result in a metal-semiconductor transition. In this work, we report a facile strategy to oxidize single-layer graphene using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) that generates a variety of reactive plasma species at close to ambient temperature. We systematically characterized the oxygen content and chemical structure of the graphene films after plasma treatment under different oxidative conditions (ambient air atmosphere or hydrogen peroxide solution) by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Plasma-treated graphene films containing more than 40% oxygen were obtained in both oxidative environments. Interestingly, prolonged irradiation led to the reduction of graphene oxides. N-doping of graphene also occurred during the APPJ treatment in H2O2 solution; the nitrogen content of the doped graphene was dependent on the duration of irradiation and reached up to 8.1% within 40 min. Moreover, the H2O2 solution served as a buffer layer that prevented damage to the graphene during plasma irradiation. Four-point probe measurement revealed an increase in sheet resistance of the plasma-treated graphene, indicating the transition of the material property from semi-metallic to semiconducting.

  2. Effects of surface roughness on the average heat transfer of an impinging air jet

    SciTech Connect

    Beitelmal, A.H.; Saad, M.A.; Patel, C.D.

    2000-01-01

    Localized cooling by impinging flow has been used in many industrial applications such as in cooling of gas turbine blades and drying processes. Here, effect of surface roughness of a uniformly heated plate on the average heat transfer characteristics of an impinging air jet was experimentally investigated. Two aluminum plates, one with a flat surface and the second with some roughness added to the surface were fabricated. The roughness took the shape of a circular array of protrusions of 0.5mm base and 0.5mm height. A circular Kapton heater of the same diameter as the plates (70mm) supplied the necessary power. The surfaces of the plates were polished to reduce radiation heat losses and the back and sides insulated to reduce conduction heat losses. temperatures were measured over a Reynolds number ranging from 9,600 to 38,500 based on flow rate through a 6.85mm diameter nozzle. The temperature measurements were repeated for nozzle exit-to-plate spacing, z/d, ranging from 1 to 10. The average Nusselt number for both cases was plotted versus the Reynolds number and their functional correlation was determined. The results indicate an increase of up to 6.0% of the average Nusselt number due to surface roughness. This modest increase provides evidence to encourage further investigation and characterization of the surface roughness as a parameter for enhancing heat transfer.

  3. Management of neck pain in Royal Australian Air Force fast jet aircrew.

    PubMed

    Netto, Kevin; Hampson, Gregory; Oppermann, Brett; Carstairs, Greg; Aisbett, Brad

    2011-01-01

    To examine the type and effectiveness of various strategies used by Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) fast jet (FJ) aircrew in self-referral and management of flight-related neck pain, a 6-section, 18-question survey tool was distributed to 86 eligible RAAF aircrew. Selective results from the sections evaluating aircrew demographics, incidence of flight-related neck pain, and the self-referral strategies of aircrew to manage these injuries are presented here. Eighty-two RAAF FJ aircrew responded to the survey. Ninety-five percent of the respondents experienced flight-related neck pain. The most commonly sought treatment modalities were on-base medical and physiotherapy services. Many respondents reported that currently provided on-base treatment and ancillary services such as chiropractic therapy are the most effective in alleviating symptoms. Further investigation into the effectiveness and safety of these ancillary therapies needs to be performed to allow appropriate consideration of their place in the management of neck pain in FJ aircrew.

  4. Analysis of opposed jet hydrogen-air counter flow diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. H.; Isaac, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational simulation of the opposed-jet diffusion flame is performed to study its structure and extinction limits. The present analysis concentrates on the nitrogen-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flame, which provides the basic information for many vehicle designs such as the aerospace plane for which hydrogen is a candidate as the fuel. The computer program uses the time-marching technique to solve the energy and species equations coupled with the momentum equation solved by the collocation method. The procedure is implemented in two stages. In the first stage, a one-step forward overal chemical reaction is chosen with the gas phase chemical reaction rate determined by comparison with experimental data. In the second stage, a complete chemical reaction mechanism is introduced with detailed thermodynamic and transport property calculations. Comparison between experimental extinction data and theoretical predictions is discussed. The effects of thermal diffusion as well as Lewis number and Prandtl number variations on the diffusion flame are also presented.

  5. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230/s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit In the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experiments] conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous Annie lengths of 49-64 mm. Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging, soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, not structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer. The present flames were larger, and emitted soot men readily, than comparable observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  6. Optimal Micro-Jet Flow Control for Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Miller, Daniel N.; Addington, Gregory A.; Agrell, Johan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-jet secondary flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to optimally design micro-jet secondary flow control arrays, and to establish that the aeromechanical effects of engine face distortion can also be included in the design and optimization process. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the design characteristics of "low mass" micro-jet array designs. The term "low mass" micro-jet may refers to fluidic jets with total (integrated) mass flow ratios between 0.10 and 1.0 percent of the engine face mass flow. Therefore, this report examines optimal micro-jet array designs for compact inlets through a Response Surface Methodology.

  7. Effects of CO addition on the characteristics of laminar premixed CH{sub 4}/air opposed-jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-Y.; Chao, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-P.; Ho, C.-T.; Cheng, T.S.

    2009-02-15

    The effects of CO addition on the characteristics of premixed CH{sub 4}/air opposed-jet flames are investigated experimentally and numerically. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations of the flame front position, temperature, and velocity are performed in stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air opposed-jet flames with various CO contents in the fuel. Thermocouple is used for the determination of flame temperature, velocity measurement is made using particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the flame front position is measured by direct photograph as well as with laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) of OH imaging techniques. The laminar burning velocity is calculated using the PREMIX code of Chemkin collection 3.5. The flame structures of the premixed stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air opposed-jet flames are simulated using the OPPDIF package with GRI-Mech 3.0 chemical kinetic mechanisms and detailed transport properties. The measured flame front position, temperature, and velocity of the stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air flames are closely predicted by the numerical calculations. Detailed analysis of the calculated chemical kinetic structures reveals that as the CO content in the fuel is increased from 0% to 80%, CO oxidation (R99) increases significantly and contributes to a significant level of heat-release rate. It is also shown that the laminar burning velocity reaches a maximum value (57.5 cm/s) at the condition of 80% of CO in the fuel. Based on the results of sensitivity analysis, the chemistry of CO consumption shifts to the dry oxidation kinetics when CO content is further increased over 80%. Comparison between the results of computed laminar burning velocity, flame temperature, CO consumption rate, and sensitivity analysis reveals that the effect of CO addition on the laminar burning velocity of the stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air flames is due mostly to the transition of the dominant chemical kinetic steps. (author)

  8. Equilibrium chemical reaction of supersonic hydrogen-air jets (the ALMA computer program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elghobashi, S.

    1977-01-01

    The ALMA (axi-symmetrical lateral momentum analyzer) program is concerned with the computation of two dimensional coaxial jets with large lateral pressure gradients. The jets may be free or confined, laminar or turbulent, reacting or non-reacting. Reaction chemistry is equilibrium.

  9. External stress-corrosion cracking of a 1.22-m-diameter type 316 stainless steel air valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Telesman, Jack; Moore, Allan S.; Johnson, Dereck F.; Kuivinen, David E.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the cause of the failure of a massive AISI Type 316 stainless steel valve which controlled combustion air to a jet engine test facility. Several through-the-wall cracks were present near welded joints in the valve skirt. The valve had been in outdoor service for 18 years. Samples were taken in the cracked regions for metallographic and chemical analyses. Insulating material and sources of water mist in the vicinity of the failed valve were analyzed for chlorides. A scanning electron microscope was used to determine whether foreign elements were present in a crack. On the basis of the information generated, the failure was characterized as external stress-corrosion cracking. The cracking resulted from a combination of residual tensile stress from welding and the presence of aqueous chlorides. Recommended countermeasures are included.

  10. Bag breakup of low viscosity drops in the presence of a continuous air jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, V. Sojka, P. E.

    2014-07-15

    This work examines the breakup of a single drop of various low viscosity fluids as it deforms in the presence of continuous horizontal air jet. Such a fragmentation typically occurs after the bulk liquid has disintegrated upon exiting the atomizer and is in the form of an ensemble of drops which undergo further breakup. The drop deformation and its eventual disintegration is important in evaluating the efficacy of a particular industrial process, be it combustion in automobile engines or pesticide spraying in agricultural applications. The interplay between competing influences of surface tension and aerodynamic disruptive forces is represented by the Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, and used to describe the breakup morphology. The breakup pattern considered in our study corresponds to that of a bag attached to a toroidal ring which occurs from ∼12 < We < ∼16. We aim to address several issues connected with this breakup process and their dependence on We and Oh which have been hitherto unexplored. The We boundary at which breakup begins is theoretically determined and the expression obtained, We=12(1+2/3Oh{sup 2}), is found to match well with experimental data ([L.-P. Hsiang and G. M. Faeth, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21(4), 545–560 (1995)] and [R. S. Brodkey, “Formation of drops and bubbles,” in The Phenomena of Fluid Motions (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1967)]). An exponential growth in the radial extent of the deformed drop and the streamline dimension of the bag is predicted by a theoretical model and confirmed by experimental findings. These quantities are observed to strongly depend on We. However, their dependence on Oh is weak.

  11. Bag breakup of low viscosity drops in the presence of a continuous air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, V.; Sojka, P. E.

    2014-07-01

    This work examines the breakup of a single drop of various low viscosity fluids as it deforms in the presence of continuous horizontal air jet. Such a fragmentation typically occurs after the bulk liquid has disintegrated upon exiting the atomizer and is in the form of an ensemble of drops which undergo further breakup. The drop deformation and its eventual disintegration is important in evaluating the efficacy of a particular industrial process, be it combustion in automobile engines or pesticide spraying in agricultural applications. The interplay between competing influences of surface tension and aerodynamic disruptive forces is represented by the Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, and used to describe the breakup morphology. The breakup pattern considered in our study corresponds to that of a bag attached to a toroidal ring which occurs from ˜12 < We < ˜16. We aim to address several issues connected with this breakup process and their dependence on We and Oh which have been hitherto unexplored. The We boundary at which breakup begins is theoretically determined and the expression obtained, We = 12( {1 + 2/3 Oh^2 } ), is found to match well with experimental data {[L.-P. Hsiang and G. M. Faeth, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21(4), 545-560 (1995)] and [R. S. Brodkey, "Formation of drops and bubbles," in The Phenomena of Fluid Motions (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1967)]}. An exponential growth in the radial extent of the deformed drop and the streamline dimension of the bag is predicted by a theoretical model and confirmed by experimental findings. These quantities are observed to strongly depend on We. However, their dependence on Oh is weak.

  12. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    DOE PAGES

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; ...

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore » the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  13. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall on the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.

  14. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  15. Further Experiments on the Flow and Heat Transfer in a Heated Turbulent Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Uberoi, Mahinder S

    1949-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the mean total-head and temperature fields in a round turbulent jet with various initial temperatures. The results show that the jet spreads more rapidly as its density becomes lower than that of the receiving medium, even when the difference is not sufficiently great to cause measurable deviations from the constant-density, dimensionless, dynamic-pressure profile function. Rough analytical considerations have given the same relative spread. The effective "turbulent Prandtl number" for a section of the fully developed jet was found to be equal to the true (laminar) Prandtl number within the accuracy of measurement. (author)

  16. Numerical Study of Unsteady Properties of Ethylene/Air Turbulent Jet Diffusion Flame with Detached Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sugang; Zhong, Fengquan; Zhang, Xinyu

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, unsteady process of ignition and combustion of turbulent plane-jet diffusion flame of ethylene/air is numerically simulated with detached eddy simulation (DES) and a reduced kinetic mechanism of ethylene. The kinetic mechanism consisting of 25 species and 131 steps is reduced from a 25 species/131 steps detailed mechanism via the method of error-propagation-based directed relation graph (DRGEP). The DES results of averaged temperature profiles at varied downstream locations are compared with the DNS results of Yoo et al. and satisfactory agreement between them is found. Ignition and combustion of ethylene plane-jet diffusion flame is simulated and dynamic changes of temperature field and OH radical are obtained. The present numerical study shows that DES method with a qualified reduced mechanism of hydrocarbon fuels can effectively simulate temporal and spatial evolution of ignition and combustion process.

  17. NO{sub x} emissions of a jet diffusion flame which is surrounded by a shroud of combustion air

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; White, F.P.; Mathur, M.P.; Ekmann, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    The present work reports an experimental study on the behavior of a jet flame surrounded by a shroud of combustion air. Measurements focussed on the flame length and the emissions of NO{sub x}, total unburned hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}. Four different fuel flow rates (40.0, 78.33, 138.33, and 166.6 cm/s), air flow rates up to 2500 cm{sup 3}/s and four different air injector diameters (0.079 cm, 0. 158 cm, 0.237 cm, and 0.316 cm) were used. The shroud of combustion air causes the flame length to decrease by a factor proportional to 1/[p{sub a}/p{sub f} + C{sub 2}({mu}{sub a}Re,a/{mu}{sub f}Re,f){sup 2}]{sup {1/2}}. A substantial shortening of the flame length occurred by increasing the air injection velocity keeping fuel rate fixed or conversely by lowering the fuel flow rate keeping air flow rate constant. NO{sub x} emissions ranging from 5 ppm to 64 ppm were observed and the emission of NO{sub x} decreased strongly with the increased air velocity. The decrease of NO{sub x} emissions was found to follow a similar scaling law as does the flame length. However, the emission of the total hydrocarbons increased with the increased air velocity or the decreased fuel flow rate. A crossover condition where both NO{sub x} and unburned- hydrocarbon emissions are low, was identified. At an air-to-fuel velocity ratio of about 1, the emissions of NO{sub x} and the total hydrocarbons were found to be under 20 ppm.

  18. Passive control of wall shear stress and mass transfer generated by submerged lobed impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodjavi, Kodjovi; Montagné, Brice; Meslem, Amina; Byrne, Paul; Serres, Laurent; Sobolik, Vaclav

    2016-05-01

    Particle image velocimetry was used to investigate the flow field in an impinging lobed daisy hemispherical nozzle jet in comparison to its counterpart round jet, at a Reynolds number of 5620 based on the exit velocity and the equivalent diameter D e of the nozzle. The limitations of the PIV technique in the vicinity of the target wall due to the laser scattering were addressed by using the electrodiffusion (ED) technique to determine the wall shear rate distribution. The distribution of the mass transfer coefficient is also obtained using the ED technique. The target wall is placed at a distance H = 2 D e from the plane tangent to the nozzle, at the center of the orifice. The entrainment of ambient fluid in the free jet region, which is larger in the lobed jet compared to the round jet, feeds in turn the wall jet region. The maximum wall shear rate was found significantly higher in the daisy jet, with an excess of 93 % compared to the reference round jet. The maximum mass transfer is 35 % higher in the former compared to the latter. Therefore, the hemispherical daisy nozzle is an excellent candidate in passive strategies to enhance local skin-friction and the subsequent local mass transfer at a constant exit Reynolds number.

  19. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Adimurthy; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2017-02-01

    Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a normal slot air jet is experimental investigated. Present study focuses on the influence of jet-to-plate spacing ( Z/D h ) (0.5-10) and Reynolds number (2500-20,000) on the fluid flow and heat transfer distribution. A single slot jet with an aspect ratio ( l/b) of about 22 is chosen for the current study. Infrared Thermal Imaging technique is used to capture the temperature data on the target surface. Local heat transfer coefficients are estimated from the thermal images using `SMART VIEW' software. Wall static pressure measurement is carried out for the specified range of Re and Z/D h . Wall static pressure coefficients are seen to be independent of Re in the range between 5000 and 15,000 for a given Z/D h . Nu values are higher at the stagnation point for all Z/D h and Re investigated. For lower Z/D h and higher Re, secondary peaks are observed in the heat transfer distributions. This may be attributed to fluid translating from laminar to turbulent flow on the target plate. Heat transfer characteristics are explained based on the simplified flow assumptions and the pressure data obtained using Differential pressure transducer and static pressure probe. Semi-empirical correlation for the Nusselt number in the stagnation region is proposed.

  20. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimurthy, M.; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2016-06-01

    Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a normal slot air jet is experimental investigated. Present study focuses on the influence of jet-to-plate spacing (Z/D h ) (0.5-10) and Reynolds number (2500-20,000) on the fluid flow and heat transfer distribution. A single slot jet with an aspect ratio (l/b) of about 22 is chosen for the current study. Infrared Thermal Imaging technique is used to capture the temperature data on the target surface. Local heat transfer coefficients are estimated from the thermal images using `SMART VIEW' software. Wall static pressure measurement is carried out for the specified range of Re and Z/D h . Wall static pressure coefficients are seen to be independent of Re in the range between 5000 and 15,000 for a given Z/D h . Nu values are higher at the stagnation point for all Z/D h and Re investigated. For lower Z/D h and higher Re, secondary peaks are observed in the heat transfer distributions. This may be attributed to fluid translating from laminar to turbulent flow on the target plate. Heat transfer characteristics are explained based on the simplified flow assumptions and the pressure data obtained using Differential pressure transducer and static pressure probe. Semi-empirical correlation for the Nusselt number in the stagnation region is proposed.

  1. A study of reacting free and ducted hydrogen/air jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The mixing and reaction of a supersonic jet of hydrogen in coaxial free and ducted high temperature test gases were investigated. The importance of chemical kinetics on computed results, and the utilization of free-jet theoretical approaches to compute enclosed flow fields were studied. Measured pitot pressure profiles were correlated by use of a parabolic mixing analysis employing an eddy viscosity model. All computations, including free, ducted, reacting, and nonreacting cases, use the same value of the empirical constant in the viscosity model. Equilibrium and finite rate chemistry models were utilized. The finite rate assumption allowed prediction of observed ignition delay, but the equilibrium model gave the best correlations downstream from the ignition location. Ducted calculations were made with finite rate chemistry; correlations were, in general, as good as the free-jet results until problems with the boundary conditions were encountered.

  2. Nitric oxide formation in a lean, premixed-prevaporized jet A/air flame tube: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Bianco, Jean; Deur, John M.; Ghorashi, Bahman

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was performed on a lean, premixed-prevaporized Jet A/air flame tube. The NO(x) emissions were measured in a flame tube apparatus at inlet temperatures ranging from 755 to 866 K (900 to 1100 F), pressures from 10 to 15 atm, and equivalence ratios from 0.37 to 0.62. The data were then used in regressing an equation to predict the NO(x) production levels in combustors of similar design. Through an evaluation of parameters it was found that NO(x) is dependent on adiabatic flame temperature and combustion residence time, yet independent of pressure and inlet air temperature for the range of conditions studied. This equation was then applied to experimental data that were obtained from the literature, and a good correlation was achieved.

  3. Investigation on streamers propagating into a helium jet in air at atmospheric pressure: Electrical and optical emission analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazeli, K.; Svarnas, P.; Vafeas, P.; Papadopoulos, P. K.; Gkelios, A.; Clément, F.

    2013-09-01

    The plasma produced due to streamers guided by a dielectric tube and a helium jet in atmospheric air is herein studied electrically and optically. Helium streamers are produced inside the dielectric tube of a coaxial dielectric-barrier discharge and, upon exiting the tube, they propagate into the helium jet in air. The axisymmetric velocity field of the neutral helium gas while it penetrates the air is approximated with the PISO algorithm. At the present working conditions, turbulence helium flow is avoided. The system is driven by sinusoidal high voltage of variable amplitude (0-11 kV peak-to-peak) and frequency (5-20 kHz). It is clearly shown that a prerequisite for streamer development is a continuous flow of helium, independently of the sustainment or not of the dielectric-barrier discharge. A parametric study is carried out by scanning the range of the operating parameters of the system and the optimal operational window for the longest propagation path of the streamers in air is determined. For this optimum, the streamer current impulses and the spatiotemporal progress of the streamer UV-visible emission are recorded. The streamer mean propagation velocity is as well measured. The formation of copious reactive emissive species is then considered (in terms of intensity and rotational temperatures), and their evolution along the streamer propagation path is mapped. The main claims of the present work contribute to the better understanding of the physicochemical features of similar systems that are currently applied to various interdisciplinary engineering fields, including biomedicine and material processing.

  4. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  5. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, Gurusharan; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure atomic oxygen number density [O] in an air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ). A novel technique based on photolysis of O2 is used to calibrate the TALIF system ensuring the same species (O) is probed during calibration and measurement. As a result, laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power region without affecting calibration reliability as any high intensity saturation effects will be identical for calibration and experiment. Higher laser intensity gives stronger TALIF signals helping overcome weak TALIF signals often experienced at atmospheric pressure due to collisional quenching. O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting [O] are both achieved within the same laser pulse. The photolysis [O] is spatially non-uniform and time varying. To allow valid comparison with [O] in a plasma, spatial and temporal correction factors are required. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I0(t), and wavelength allows correction factors to be found using a rate equation model. The air flow into the jet was fixed and the RF power coupled into the system varied. The resulting [O] was found to increase with RF power.

  6. PIV measurements of isothermal plane turbulent impinging jets at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayrullina, A.; van Hooff, T.; Blocken, B.; van Heijst, G. J. F.

    2017-04-01

    This paper contains a detailed experimental analysis of an isothermal plane turbulent impinging jet (PTIJ) for two jet widths at moderate Reynolds numbers (7200-13,500) issued on a horizontal plane at fixed relative distances equal to 22.5 and 45 jet widths. The available literature on such flows is scarce. Previous studies on plane turbulent jets mainly focused on free jets, while most studies on impinging jets focused on the heat transfer between the jet and an impingement plane, disregarding jet development. The present study focuses on isothermal PTIJs at moderate Reynolds numbers characteristic of air curtains. Flow visualisations with fluorescent dye and 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements have been performed. A comparison is made with previous studies of isothermal free turbulent jets at moderate Reynolds numbers. Mean and instantaneous velocity and vorticity, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds shear stress are analysed. The jet issued from the nozzle with higher aspect ratio shows more intensive entrainment and a faster decay of the centreline velocity compared to the jet of lower aspect ratio for the same value of jet Reynolds number. The profiles of centreline and cross-jet velocity and turbulence intensity show that the PTIJs behave as a free plane turbulent jet until 70-75% of the total jet height. Alongside the information obtained on the jet dynamics, the data will be useful for the validation of numerical simulations.

  7. Planar Rayleigh scattering and laser-induced fluorescence for visualization of a hot, Mach 2 annular air jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    Planar Rayleigh scattering (PRS) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) were used to investigate the vitiated air component of a coaxial hydrogen/vitiated air nonpremixed turbulent jet flame that is ejected at a Mach number of 2. All experiments were performed with a xenon chloride tunable excimer laser. Planar information for both techniques was obtained using laser sheets 6 cm high, 5 cm wide, and 300 micron thick. In this flow field, the effective Rayleigh cross section of the components in the vitiated air was assumed to be independent of composition. Therefore, the PRS technique produced signals which were proportional to total density. When the flow field was assumed to be at a known and uniform pressure, the PRS signal data for the vitiated air could be converted to temperature information. Also, PLIF images were generated by probing the OH molecule. These images contain striation patterns attributed to small localized instantaneous temperature nonuniformities. The results from the PLIF and PRS techniques were used to show that this flow field contains a nongaseous component, most likely liquid water that can be reduced by increasing the settling chamber wall temperature.

  8. Normal impingement loads due to small air jets issuing from a base plate and reflecting off a platform for various jet Mach numbers, separation distances, and ambient pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in a 12.5-meter-diameter vacuum sphere to determine the impingement loads due to air jets issuing from and perpendicular to a circular base and reflecting off a square platform, that is, a simulation of rendezvous maneuvering, docking, launch, impact dampers etc. The nozzles had exit Mach numbers of 1, 3, 5, and 7. The ambient pressures were 0.0006, 5, 225, and 760 torr. Under near-field separation distances and at 0.0006 torr, reflections were significant; and ratios of the impingement force to thrust on both plates in the biplane arrangement varied from about 750 for exit Mach number 1 to 120 for exit Mach number 7. The far-field force ratios were near unity for the platform and zero for the base and indicated few, if any, reflections. Some reversals and rapid changes in loads were obtained at transition distances between the near and far fields. In general, increasing the exit Mach number or ambient pressure reduced the impingement loads.

  9. The Measurements of Axisymmetric Air Turbulent Jet Flow with an Individual Realization Laser Velocimeter System,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    wire anemometer in order to compare with those made with a LV. Their results were in good coincidence in the core flow region. The velocity bias was...jet flow with the use of an IRLV system. The mean velocity distribution was also measured simultaneously with a hot wire anemometer for comparison...1 and Fig. 2 show the experimental systems which consist of the model, IRLV system and hot wire anemometer . 1. Flow system The flow system is

  10. Inhalation Exposure to Jet Fuel (JP8) Among U.S. Air Force Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    study personneL Personal air samples were collected from the breathing zonc of each worker during thc entire duration of cach work shift. The air...Personnel. Personnel (n=24) were divided a priori into high, moderate, and low exposurc groups. Questionnaires and personal air samples ( breathing zone...were collected from each worker ovcr 3 consecutive days (72 worker-days) and analYLed for total hydrocarbons ( THC ), benzene, toluence, elhylbcnzene

  11. Ambient air particle transport into the effluent of a cold atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet investigated by molecular beam mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünnbier, M.; Schmidt-Bleker, A.; Winter, J.; Wolfram, M.; Hippler, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Reuter, S.

    2013-10-01

    Ambient air species, which are transported into the active effluent of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet result in highly reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Especially for the envisaged application field of plasma medicine, these RONS are responsible for strong biological responses. In this work, the effect of ambient air transport into the effluent of an atmospheric-pressure plasma argon jet on the on-axis densities of nitrogen, oxygen and argon was investigated by means of absolutely calibrated molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). According to biomedical experiments a (bottomless) Petri dish was installed in front of the MBMS. In the following, the near flow field is referring to the region close to the nozzle exit and the far flow field is referring to the region beyond that. The absolute on-axis densities were obtained by three different methods, for the near flow field with VUV-absorption technique, for the far flow field with the MBMS and the total flow field was calculated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results of the ambient air particle densities of all independent methods were compared and showed an excellent agreement. Therefore the transport processes of ambient air species can be measured for the whole effluent of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. Additionally, with the validation of the simulation it is possible in future to calculate the ambient species transport for various gas fluxes in the same turbulent flow regime. Comparing the on-axis densities obtained with an ignited and with a non-ignited plasma jet shows that for the investigated parameters, the main influence on the ambient air species transport is due to the increased temperature in the case when the jet is switched on. Moreover, the presence of positive ions (e.g. ArN_{2}^{+} ) formed due to the interaction of plasma-produced particles and ambient air species, which are transported into the effluent, is shown.

  12. Application of Dielectric-Barrier Discharge to the Stabilization of Lifted Non-Premixed Methane/Air Jet Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Hao; Zhao, Xiang-Hong

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that the application of non-thermal plasma is a promising way to enhance the flame stabilization and combustion efficiency. The present study experimentally investigates the effect of a dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) on the stabilization of lifted non-premixed methane/air jet flames. The jet flame with co-annular DBD is produced by a co-flow burner and has a Reynolds number of Re = 2500, 5000, 7000, and 9000. The application of DBD is seen to have an impact on the flame lift-off height, and the degree of impact is subject to flow conditions (such as Reynolds number and co-flow velocity) and plasma power. In general, the enhancement of flame stabilization, indicated by the decrease in lift-off height, is most evident at low Reynolds number and co-flow velocity. For flames with a Reynolds number less than Re = 5000, flames are attached to the nozzle regardless of the co-flow velocity and plasma power; at Re = 5000, flames are often intermittently attached. The enhancement is not that significant at high Reynolds number and co-flow velocity at least for the plasma power employed in the current study. A slight increase in plasma power leads to enhanced flame stabilization.

  13. Characterization of Wet Air Plasma Jet Powered by Sinusoidal High Voltage and Nanosecond Pulses for Plasma Agricultural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Shimada, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Not only for the plasma sterilization but also for many of plasma life-science applications, atmospheric pressure plasma devices that allowed us to control its state and reactive species production are deserved to resolve the roles of the chemical species. Influence of the hydroxyl radical and ozone on germination of conidia of a strawberry pathogen is presented. Water addition to air plasma jet significantly improves germination suppression performance, while measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) are reduced. Although the results show a negative correlation between ROS and the germination suppression, this infers the importance of chemical composition generated by plasma. For further control of the plasma product, a plasma jet powered by sinusoidal high voltage and nanosecond pulses is developed and characterized with the voltage-charge Lissajous. Control of breakdown phase and discharge power by pulse-imposed phase is presented. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) Grant Number 15K17480 and Exploratory Research Grant Number 23644199.

  14. A methodology for the evaluation of the turbine jet engine fragment threat to generic air transportable containers

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D.C.; Pierce, J.D.

    1993-06-01

    Uncontained, high-energy gas turbine engine fragments are a potential threat to air-transportable containers carried aboard jet aircraft. The threat to a generic example container is evaluated by probability analyses and penetration testing to demonstrate the methodology to be used in the evaluation of a specific container/aircraft/engine combination. Fragment/container impact probability is the product of the uncontained fragment release rate and the geometric probability that a container is in the path of this fragment. The probability of a high-energy rotor burst fragment from four generic aircraft engines striking one of the containment vessels aboard a transport aircraft is approximately 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} strikes/hour. Finite element penetration analyses and tests can be performed to identify specific fragments which have the potential to penetrate a generic or specific containment vessel. The relatively low probability of engine fragment/container impacts is primarily due to the low release rate of uncontained, hazardous jet engine fragments.

  15. AIRE-induced apoptosis is associated with nuclear translocation of stress sensor protein GAPDH

    SciTech Connect

    Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Kisand, Kai; Maslovskaja, Julia; Laan, Martti; Peterson, Paert

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induces apoptosis in epithelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARD domain of AIRE is sufficient for apoptosis induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induced apoptosis involves GAPDH translocation to the nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deprenyl inhibits AIRE induced apoptosis. -- Abstract: AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator) has a central role in the transcriptional regulation of self-antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, which is necessary for negative selection of autoreactive T cells. Recent data have shown that AIRE can also induce apoptosis, which may be linked to cross-presentation of these self-antigens. Here we studied AIRE-induced apoptosis using AIRE over-expression in a thymic epithelial cell line as well as doxycycline-inducible HEK293 cells. We show that the HSR/CARD domain in AIRE together with a nuclear localization signal is sufficient to induce apoptosis. In the nuclei of AIRE-positive cells, we also found an increased accumulation of a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAPDH) reflecting cellular stress and apoptosis. Additionally, AIRE-induced apoptosis was inhibited with an anti-apoptotic agent deprenyl that blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and nuclear translocation. We propose that the AIRE-induced apoptosis pathway is associated with GAPDH nuclear translocation and induction of NO-induced cellular stress in AIRE-expressing cells.

  16. Stress Management: A Handbook for Air Force Managers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    substantiated by medical personnel. Absenteeism, as a coping mechanism , is normally available to military personnel on a limited basis depending on...adaptive reactions, its mechanisms of defense against stress" (75:3). The G.A.S. is manifested in three stages during the course of prolonged exposure...pattern), are the basic determinants of psychological and physiological reactions and mechanisms (stress) (Fig. 3). This stress can lead to disease and can

  17. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Velocity in a H2-air Combustion-Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Baurle, Robert a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents simultaneous measurements at multiple points of two orthogonal components of flow velocity using a single-shot interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) technique. The measurements are performed on a large-scale Mach 1.6 (Mach 5.5 enthalpy) H2-air combustion jet during the 2007 test campaign in the Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The measurements are performed simultaneously with CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) using a combined CARS-IRS instrument with a common path 9-nanosecond pulsed, injection-seeded, 532-nm Nd:YAG laser probe pulse. The paper summarizes the measurements of velocities along the core of the vitiated air flow as well as two radial profiles. The average velocity measurement near the centerline at the closest point from the nozzle exit compares favorably with the CFD calculations using the VULCAN code. Further downstream, the measured axial velocity shows overall higher values than predicted with a trend of convergence at further distances. Larger discrepancies are shown in the radial profiles.

  18. Analytical evaluation of effect of equivalence ratio inlet-air temperature and combustion pressure on performance of several possible ram-jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, Leonard K; Gammon, Benson E

    1953-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation of the theoretical air specific impulse performance and adiabatic combustion temperatures of several possible ram-jet fuels over a range of equivalence ratios, inlet-air temperatures, and combustion pressures, is presented herein. The fuels include octane-1, 50-percent-magnesium slurry, boron, pentaborane, diborane, hydrogen, carbon, and aluminum. Thermal effects from high combustion temperatures were found to effect considerably the combustion performance of all the fuels. An increase in combustion pressure was beneficial to air specific impulse at high combustion temperatures. The use of these theoretical data in engine operation and in the evaluation of experimental data is described.

  19. Studies on the mixing of liquid jets and pre-atomized sprays in confined swirling air flows for lean direct injection combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jun-Young

    A lean direct injection (LDI) combustion concept was introduced recently to obtain both low NOsbx emissions and high performance for advanced aircraft gas turbine engines. It was reported that pollutant emissions, especially NOsbx, in a lean combustion mode depend significantly on the degree of mixing (mixedness) of supplied air and liquid fuel droplets. From a viewpoint of environmental protection, therefore, uniform mixing of fuel and air in a very short period of time, i.e., well-stirred mixing, is crucially important in the LDI combustion mode. In the present study, as the first stage toward understanding the combustion phenomena in a lean direct injection (LDI) mode, the hydrodynamic behavior of liquid jets and pre-atomized sprays in confined swirling air flows is investigated. Laser-based flow visualization and image analysis techniques are applied to analyze the instantaneous motion of the mixing process of the jets and pre-atomized sprays. Statistical analysis system (SAS) software is utilized to analyze the experimental data, and correlate experimental parameters. Statistical parameters, such as centrality, degree of spread, and total area ratio of particles, are defined in this study, and used to quantify the mixedness (degree of mixing) of liquid particles in confined geometry. Two empirical equations are obtained to predict jet intact lengths and spray angles, respectively, in confined swirling air flows. It is found that initial jet characteristics, such as intact length and spray angle, determine the mixing of the liquid particles resulting from the jet. It is verified that image analysis is feasible in quantitative determination of the mixedness of liquid particles. Even though substantial improvements in liquid fuel injector systems are required before they can be considered adequate for LDI combustion at high pressure and high temperature, the results and ideas obtained from the present study will help engineers find better mixing methods for LDI

  20. Air pollution from aircraft. [jet exhaust - aircraft fuels/combustion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Chigier, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    A model which predicts nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions from a swirl can modular combustor is discussed. A detailed analysis of the turbulent fuel-air mixing process in the swirl can module wake region is reviewed. Hot wire anemometry was employed, and gas sampling analysis of fuel combustion emissions were performed.

  1. Numerical studies on the structure of two-dimensional H{sub 2}/air premixed jet flame

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, V.R.; Roquemore, W.M.

    1995-07-01

    The burning characteristics of a premixed, H{sub 2}/air Bunsen-type flame are investigated using a time-dependent, axisymmetric numerical model with variable transport properties and a detailed-chemical-kinetics mechanism. The temperature, species concentration, and velocity fields are investigated under fuel-lean, stoichiometric, and fuel-rich conditions. The calculations show that under fuel-lean conditions the flame exhibits the ``tip-opening`` phenomenon, while under fuel-rich condition the tip of the flame burns intensely. These results are in agreement with the experimental findings of Mizomoto et al. who have suggested that the tip-opening phenomenon results from the nonunity Lewis number. To further investigate the impact of local Lewis number on the premixed-flame structure, numerical experiments are performed by modifying the local Lewis numbers of the individual species. Results for the fuel-lean condition confirm that the local Lewis number is responsible for the tip-opening phenomenon. Indeed, when the local Lewis number is set equal to 2, the burning pattern of the fuel-lean premixed flame resembles that of a fuel-rich flame with a closed tip. The spatial distributions of NO in the fuel-lean, stoichiometric, and fuel-rich flames are also examined. Under the fuel-lean and stoichiometric conditions, the NO is formed along the high-temperature cone of the flame, as expected. In the fuel-rich case, a dual flame structure is observed. The NO production occurs primarily in the secondary ``diffusion`` flame which is established at the interface of the excess fuel and ambient oxygen. Buoyancy-induced toroidal vortices are found to form in the vertically mounted premixed flames. However, the dynamic characteristics of a premixed flame, in contrast to those of a jet diffusion flame, are observed to be dependent on the inlet velocity profile of the fuel jet.

  2. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meda, Adimurthy; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2017-02-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the local distribution of wall static pressure and the heat transfer coefficient on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet. The experimental parameters include, nozzle-to-plate spacing (Z/D h = 0.5-10.0), axial distance from stagnation point (x/D h ), size of detached rib (b = 4-12 mm) and Reynolds number (Re = 2500-20,000). The wall static pressure on the surface is recorded using a Pitot tube and a differential pressure transmitter. Infrared thermal imaging technique is used to capture the temperature distribution on the target surface. It is observed that, the maximum wall static pressure occurs at the stagnation point (x/D h = 0) for all nozzle-to-plate spacing (Z/D h ) and rib dimensions studied. Coefficient of wall static pressure (C p ) decreases monotonically with x/D h . Sub atmospheric pressure is evident in the detached rib configurations for jet to plate spacing up to 6.0 for all ribs studied. Sub atmospheric region is stronger at Z/D h = 0.5 due to the fluid accelerating under the rib. As nozzle to plate spacing (Z/D h ) increases, the sub-atmospheric region becomes weak and vanishes gradually. Reasonable enhancement in both C p as well as Nu is observed for the detached rib configuration. Enhancement is found to decrease with the increase in the rib width. The results of the study can be used in optimizing the cooling system design.

  3. The effects of suspension particle size on the performance of air-jet, ultrasonic and vibrating-mesh nebulisers.

    PubMed

    Najlah, Mohammad; Parveen, Ishrat; Alhnan, Mohamed Albed; Ahmed, Waqar; Faheem, Ahmed; Phoenix, David A; Taylor, Kevin M G; Elhissi, Abdelbary

    2014-01-30

    Using latex microspheres as model suspensions, the influence of suspension particle size (1, 4.5 and 10 μm) on the properties of aerosols produced using Pari LC Sprint (air-jet), Polygreen (ultrasonic), Aeroneb Pro (actively vibrating-mesh) and Omron MicroAir NE-U22 (passively vibrating-mesh) nebulisers was investigated. The performance of the Pari nebuliser was independent of latex spheres particle size. For both Polygreen and Aeroneb Pro nebulizers, total aerosol output increased when the size of latex spheres increased, with highest fine particle fraction (FPF) values being recorded. However, following nebulisation of 1 or 4.5 μm suspensions with the Polygreen device, no particles were detected in the aerosols deposited in a two-stage impinger, suggesting that the aerosols generated from this device consisted mainly of the continuous phase while the dispersed microspheres were excluded and remained in the nebuliser. The Omron nebuliser efficiently nebulised the 1 μm latex spheres, with high output rate and no particle aggregation. However, this device functioned inefficiently when delivering 4.5 or 10 μm suspensions, which was attributed to the mild vibrations of its mesh and/or the blockage of the mesh apertures by the microspheres. The Aeroneb Pro fragmented latex spheres into smaller particles, but uncontrolled aggregation occurred upon nebulisation. This study has shown that the design of the nebuliser influenced the aerosol properties using latex spheres as model suspensions. Moreover, for the recently marketed mesh nebulisers, the performance of the Aeroneb Pro device was less dependent on particle size of the suspension compared with the Omron MicroAir nebuliser.

  4. Free-flight Performance of a Rocket-boosted, Air-launched 16-inch-diameter Ram-jet Engine at Mach Numbers up to 2.20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, John H; Kohl, Robert C; Jones, Merle L

    1953-01-01

    The investigation of air-launched ram-jet engines has been extended to include a study of models with a nominal design free-stream Mach number of 2.40. These models require auxiliary thrust in order to attain a flight speed at which the ram jet becomes self-accelerating. A rocket-boosting technique for providing this auxiliary thrust is described and time histories of two rocket-boosted ram-jet flights are presented. In one flight, the model attained a maximum Mach number of 2.20 before a fuel system failure resulted in the destruction of the engine. Performance data for this model are presented in terms of thrust and drag coefficients, diffuser pressure recovery, mass-flow ratio, combustion efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and over-all engine efficiency.

  5. Mixing of Multiple Jets with a Confined Subsonic Crossflow: Part III--The Effects of Air Preheat and Number of Orifices on Flow and Emissions in an RQL Mixing Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdemann, James D.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2008-01-01

    This study was motivated by a goal to understand the mixing and emissions in the Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor scheme that has been proposed to minimize the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in gas turbine combustors. The study reported herein was a reacting jet-in-crossflow experiment at atmospheric pressure. The jets were injected from the perimeter of a cylindrical duct through round-hole orifices into a fuel-rich mainstream flow. The number of orifices investigated in this study gave over- to optimum to underpenetrating jets at a jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio of J = 57. The size of individual orifices was decreased as the number of orifices increased to maintain a constant total area; the jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio was constant at MR = 2.5. The experiments focused on the effects of the number of orifices and inlet air preheat and were conducted in a facility that provided the capability for independent variation of jet and main inlet air preheat temperature. The number of orifices was found to have a significant effect on mixing and the distributions of species, but very little effect on overall NOx emissions, suggesting that an aerodynamically optimum mixer might not minimize NOx emissions. Air preheat was found to have very little effect on mixing and the distributions of major species, but preheating both main and jet air did increase NOx emissions significantly. Although the air jets injected in the quick-mix section of an RQL combustor may comprise over 70 percent of the total air flow, the overall NOx emission levels were found to be more sensitive to main stream air preheat than to jet stream air preheat.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Room Temperature Plasma Jets Facilitate Oxidative and Nitrative Stress and Lead to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Dependent Apoptosis in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Dandan; Lei, Qian; Li, Yin; Deng, Pengyi; Chen, Mingjie; Tu, Min; Lu, Xinpei; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure room temperature plasma jets (APRTP-Js) that can emit a mixture of different active species have recently found entry in various medical applications. Apoptosis is a key event in APRTP-Js-induced cellular toxicity, but the exact biological mechanisms underlying remain elusive. Here, we explored the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in APRTP-Js-induced apoptosis using in vitro model of HepG2 cells. We found that APRTP-Js facilitated the accumulation of ROS and RNS in cells, which resulted in the compromised cellular antioxidant defense system, as evidenced by the inactivation of cellular antioxidants including glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Nitrotyrosine and protein carbonyl content analysis indicated that APRTP-Js treatment caused nitrative and oxidative injury of cells. Meanwhile, intracellular calcium homeostasis was disturbed along with the alteration in the expressions of GRP78, CHOP and pro-caspase12. These effects accumulated and eventually culminated into the cellular dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress)-mediated apoptosis. The apoptosis could be markedly attenuated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a free radical scavenger), which confirmed the involvement of oxidative and nitrative stress in the process leading to HepG2 cell apoptosis by APRTP-Js treatment. PMID:24013954

  7. The Effects of Projected Future Demand Including Very Light Jet Air-Taxi Operations on U.S. National Airspace System Delays as a Function of Next Generation Air Transportation System Airspace Capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jerry; Viken, Jeff; Dollyhigh, Samuel; Trani, Antonio; Baik, Hojong; Hinze, Nicholas; Ashiabor, Senanu

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a study which investigates the potential effects of the growth in air traffic demand including projected Very Light Jet (VLJ) air-taxi operations adding to delays experienced by commercial passenger air transportation in the year 2025. The geographic region studied is the contiguous United States (U.S.) of America, although international air traffic to and from the U.S. is included. The main focus of this paper is to determine how much air traffic growth, including VLJ air-taxi operations will add to enroute airspace congestion and determine what additional airspace capacity will be needed to accommodate the expected demand. Terminal airspace is not modeled and increased airport capacity is assumed.

  8. Glottal jet inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mphail, Michael; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of an inertive contribution of the glottal jet to glottal aerodynamic resistance is presented. Given that inertance of the flow in a constriction can be expressed in terms of the kinetic energy of the flow, and that a jet is a maximum kinetic energy flow pattern, it is argued that the glottal jet possesses its own inertance which is at least as large as that of the vocal tract. These arguments are supported by estimates of inertance obtained from simulations of an unsteady flow through an axisymmetric orifice, and of a compliant constriction with the approximate shape and mechanical properties of the vocal folds. It is further shown that the inertive effect of the glottal jet depends on the jet path and jet mixing, with a slowly diffusing, symmetric jet showing higher inertance than an asymmetric jet which rapidly mixes with supraglottal air. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  9. [Collecting end-expiratory air for capnography in high-frequency jet ventilation].

    PubMed

    Rockemann, M G; Doehn, M

    1985-04-01

    By means of an ejector attachment to the endotracheal tube a negative intratracheal pressure of approx. -1 mmHg is created during an interruption of HFJV. Within 4 to 10 sec. this suction supplies alveolar air to the distal end of the endotracheal tube where capnographic analysis is possible in the mainstream or bystream. The end-tidal pCO2 differs by 0.1 mmHg (mean) from the arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure with a highly positive correlation (R = 0.98).

  10. Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report. Jet Forward Air Controllers in SEAsia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-10-15

    a var’lation of the 3 earlier HUNTER-KILLER operation--the SNARE DRUM mission, Unl-4.e the war in STEEL TIGER, the conflict in northern Laos was a...the use of ARC LIGHT B-52 ~ 323 I raids. SNARE DRUM , or min-ARC LIGH T st ’jKe! were substituted On these missions, a Laredo FAC led a force of s...pteen ’or moe) F-4s t, toie t ’get and 31, directed them against t After one ?O-.h p SNARE DRUM m, on, the Air I Attache at Ventiane reported. "The pr

  11. Development of a low-cost atmospheric non-thermal plasma jet and its characteristics in air and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Tarek M.; Ahmed, Kamal M.; Abouelatta, Mohamed A.; Ward, Sayed A.; Lashin, Ahmed A.; Soliman, Hanaa M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the development of a low-cost atmospheric non-thermal plasma jet (ANPJ) which was designed and operated previously in our laboratory. The purpose of the developed design with a small size less than 4% of the previous volume is to obtain a more portable device which holds promise for various fields of applications. The discharge is operated separately with compressed air and nitrogen gas with flow rates varied within the range of 3-18 L/min. The plasma plume length and thickness are measured as a function of the gas flow rate and input voltage Vinput within the range of 3-18 L/min and 2-6 kV respectively. The results showed that for nitrogen gas, the maximum values of the plume length and thickness are 20 mm and 1.3 mm respectively at a flow rate of 12 L/min and Vinput = 6 kV. Results of electrical characterization at Vinput = 6 kV such as discharge voltage, discharge current, the mean consumed power and energy showed that the maximum values of these parameters are obtained at a flow rate of 12 L/min. The developed design is found to be saving up to 65.47% and 68.54% of the consumed power compared to the previous design in the case of air and N2 respectively. The new proposed configuration for the developed ANPJ offers more suitable characteristics than the earlier designs, especially for nitrogen gas.

  12. Stress and physiological, behavioral and performance patterns of children under varied air ion levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornof, K. T.; Gilbert, G. O.

    1988-12-01

    The possibility that individual differences in reactivity to stressors are a major factor underlying discordant results reported for air ion studies prompted an investigation of response patterns in school children under both normal indoor air ion levels and moderately increased negative air ion levels (4000±500/cm3). It was hypothesized that the impact of stressors is reduced with high negative air ionization, and that resultant changes in stress effects would be differentially exhibited according to the children's normal degree of stimulus reactivity. A counter-balanced, replicative, withinssubject design was selected, and the subjects were 12 environmentally sensitive, 1st 4th grade school children. In addition to monitoring stress effects on activity level, attention span, concentration to task and conceptual performance, measures were also made of urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid levels and skin resistance response (SRR) to determine if changes extended to the physiological state. The cold water test was used to add physical stress and enable calculations of Lacey's autonomic lability scores (ALS) as indicators of individual reactivity. The results show main effects for air ions on both physiological parameters, with 48% less change in %SRR ( P<0.01) and 46% less change in urinary 5-HIAA levels ( P<0.055) during negative air ions, indicating increased stress tolerance. Strong interactive effects for ALS x air ion condition appeared, with high and low ALS children reacting oppositely to negative air ions in measures of skin resistance level ( P<0.01), wrist activity ( P<0.01) and digit span backwards ( P<0.004). Thus individual differences in autonomic reactivity and the presence or absence of stressors appear as critical elements for internal validity, and in preventing consequent skewed results from obscuring progress in air ion research.

  13. Highly efficient photocatalytic TiO2 coatings deposited by open air atmospheric pressure plasma jet with aerosolized TTIP precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhouri, H.; Ben Salem, D.; Carton, O.; Pulpytel, J.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2014-07-01

    A simple method to deposit photocatalytic TiO2 coatings, at a high rate (20-40 µm s-1), and with a high porosity, is reported in this paper. This method, which allows the treatment of membranes (with an 800 nm pore size), is based on the introduction of a liquid precursor sprayed into an open-air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 thin films prepared by APPJ have been compared with our best N-doped TiO2 thin films, deposited by reactive radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, previously reported in the literature. The morphology, chemical composition, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings have been studied in this paper. Significant control of the porosity and crystallinity was achieved by varying the deposition parameters and the annealing temperature. Under optimized conditions, the TiO2 coatings deposited by APPJ are characterized by a higher photocatalytic activity as compared to the optimized thin films deposited by RF sputtering. This difference can be explained by the higher specific surface of the APPJ coatings. Finally, the most interesting characteristic of this APPJ-liquid spray process is its capacity to treat membranes without blocking the pores, and to produce photocatalytic membranes which can efficiently combine filtration and photocatalysis for water treatment.

  14. Autoignited laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane jets in coflow air with elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B.C.; Chung, S.H.

    2010-12-15

    The autoignition characteristics of laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane fuels have been investigated experimentally in coflow air with elevated temperature over 800 K. The lifted flames were categorized into three regimes depending on the initial temperature and fuel mole fraction: (1) non-autoignited lifted flame, (2) autoignited lifted flame with tribrachial (or triple) edge, and (3) autoignited lifted flame with mild combustion. For the non-autoignited lifted flames at relatively low temperature, the existence of lifted flame depended on the Schmidt number of fuel, such that only the fuels with Sc > 1 exhibited stationary lifted flames. The balance mechanism between the propagation speed of tribrachial flame and local flow velocity stabilized the lifted flames. At relatively high initial temperatures, either autoignited lifted flames having tribrachial edge or autoignited lifted flames with mild combustion existed regardless of the Schmidt number of fuel. The adiabatic ignition delay time played a crucial role for the stabilization of autoignited flames. Especially, heat loss during the ignition process should be accounted for, such that the characteristic convection time, defined by the autoignition height divided by jet velocity was correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the critical autoignition conditions. The liftoff height was also correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time. (author)

  15. Development of hydrophilic dental wax without surfactant using a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-06-01

    Dental wax (DW), a low-melting and high-molecular-weight organic mixture, is widely used in dentistry for forming moulds of teeth. Hydrophilicity is an important property for DW, as a wet dental investment is used to surround the wax before wax burnout is performed. However, recent attempts to improve the hydrophilicity of DW using a surfactant have resulted in the reduced mechanical properties of the dental investment, leading to the failure of the dental restoration. This study applied a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) for DW surface treatment and investigated its effect on both DW hydrophilicity and the dental investment's mechanical properties. The results showed that the application of the AAPPJ significantly improved the hydrophilicity of the DW, and that the results were similar to that of cleaner-treated DW using commercially available products with surfactant. A surface chemical analysis indicated that the improvement of hydrophilicity was related to an increase in the number of oxygen-related bonds on the DW surface following the removal of carbon hydrate in both AAPPJ and cleaner-treated DW. However, cleaner treatment compromised the mechanical property of the dental investment when the dental investment was in contact with the treated DW, while the AAPPJ treatment did not. Therefore, the use of AAPPJ to treat DW is a promising method for accurate dental restoration, as it induces an improvement in hydrophilicity without harming the dental investment.

  16. Splitting culture medium by air-jet and rewetting for the assessment of the wettability of cultured epithelial cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Makoto; Uchida, Ryohei; Kaneko, Makoto; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2013-12-01

    This study found that the phenomenon of rewetting after squeezing culture medium varied in different culture conditions for rat oral mucosal epithelial cells. When culture medium covering over cultured cells was squeezed by an air-jet application, the motion of squeezed culture medium was able to be observed by using a commercially available movie camera. Squeezed width on cells cultured in keratinocyte culture medium (KCM), which contained with fetal bovine serum, was one-sixth of that in FBS-free KCM. This result corresponded to the mucous layer staining statuses of cultured cells in both cases; positive in KCM and negative in FBS-free medium. Furthermore, the gene expression of mucous glycoprotein MUC4 in KCM was 100 times higher than that in FBS-free medium, and the expression of MUC4 protein only showed on the apical surface of cells cultured in KCM. The relative gene expression levels of MUC1, 13, 15, and 16 in both the normal and FBS-free medium were found to be no more than one-thirtieth of that of MUC4 in KCM. The main factor of the wettability difference between KCM and FBS-free medium was speculated to be the difference of MUC4 expression between both media. This method can be a simple technique for testing not only the surface wettability but also the mucous formation of cultured cells.

  17. Reduced heat stress in offices in the tropics using solar powered drying of the supply air.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsen, L; Santos, A M B

    2002-12-01

    Many solutions to indoor climate problems known from developed countries may have prohibitive installation and running costs in developing countries. The purpose was to develop a low-cost solution to heat stress in a hot and humid environment based on solar powered drying of supply air. Dry supply air may facilitate personal cooling by increased evaporation of sweat. Heat acclimatized people with efficient sweating may in particular benefit from this cooling. A prototype solar powered supply system for dried-only air was made. Air from the system was mixed with room air, heated to six different combinations of temperature and humidity and led to Personal Units for Ventilation and Cooling (PUVAC) in six cubicles simulating office workplaces. A total of 123 heat acclimatized subjects were exposed 45 min in each of the cubicles. A model for the combined effect of operative temperature of room, moisture content of room air, temperature of supply air and moisture content of supply air was developed based on the experiments. Reduction of moisture content in the supply air by 1.6 g/kg had the same effect as lowering the operative temperature by 1 degree C. The solar-powered system for supplying dry air is a low-cost alternative to traditional air conditioning in hot and humid regions.

  18. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION CREATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  19. Comparison of pulsating DC and DC power air-water plasma jet: A method to decrease plume temperature and increase ROS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Hu, H.; Lei, J.; Hu, Y.; Zheng, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Most air-water plasma jets are rich in hydroxyl radicals (•OH), but the plasma has higher temperatures, compared to that of pure gas, especially when using air as working gas. In this paper, pulsating direct current (PDC) power was used to excite the air-water plasma jet to reduce plume temperature. In addition to the temperature, other differences between PDC and DC plasma jets are not yet clear. Thus, comparative studies of those plasmas are performed to evaluate characteristics, such as breakdown voltage, temperature, and reactive oxygen species. The results show that the plume temperature of PDC plasma is roughly 5-10 °C lower than that of DC plasma in the same conditions. The •OH content of PDC is lower than that of DC plasma, whereas the O content of PDC plasma is higher. The addition of water leads in an increase in the plume temperature and in the production of •OH with two types of power supplies. The production of O inversely shows a declining tendency with higher water ratio. The most important finding is that the PDC plasma with 100% water ratio achieves lower temperature and more abundant production of •OH and O, compared with DC plasma with 0% water ratio.

  20. Test and evaluation of shale derived jet fuel by the United States Air Force

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    In June 1980, the United States Congress passed the Energy Security Act which provided for the formation of the United States Synthetic Fuels Corporation and amended the Defense Production Act of 1950 to provide for synthetic fuels for the Department of Defense (DOD). A subsequent law, P.L., 96-304, appropriated up to $20 billion for financial incentives to foster a national synthetic fuel industry. The initial synthetic fuel project funded under the Energy Security Act is the Unocal Parachute Creek Project in Colorado with an expected shale oil production of 10,000 bbls/day. The Defense Fuel Supply Center (DFSC) contracted with Gary Energy Refining Company, Fruita, Colorado to provide approximately 5,000 bbls/day of shale JP-4 for the United States Air Force (USAF) using crude from the Parachute Creek Project, with initial deliveries to begin in 1985.

  1. Inactivation of a 25.5 µm Enterococcus faecalis biofilm by a room-temperature, battery-operated, handheld air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, X.; Lu, X.; Liu, J.; Liu, D.; Yang, Y.; Ostrikov, K.; Chu, Paul K.; Pan, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Effective biofilm inactivation using a handheld, mobile plasma jet powered by a 12 V dc battery and operated in open air without any external gas supply is reported. This cold, room-temperature plasma is produced in self-repetitive nanosecond discharges with current pulses of ˜100 ns duration, current peak amplitude of ˜6 mA and repetition rate of ˜20 kHz. It is shown that the reactive plasma species penetrate to the bottom layer of a 25.5 µm-thick Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and produce a strong bactericidal effect. This is the thickest reported biofilm inactivated using room-temperature air plasmas.

  2. Air-sea exchange from bubble-induced jetting: How viscous forces suppress droplet production from small bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Elena; Walls, Peter; Bird, James

    2016-11-01

    When a bubble ruptures in the ocean, it frequently produces a jet that releases aerosols into the atmosphere. The number of jet drops ejected is important because droplets may contain sea salt and other cloud condensation nuclei. It is generally accepted that the smallest bubbles produce the largest number of jet drops. However, if the bubble is sufficiently small, viscosity prevents droplet production altogether. Here we investigate the number of jet drops produced by small bubbles. Using a combination of high-speed microscopy, similitude, and numerical simulations, we quantify the extent that viscous forces inhibit this droplet production. We acknowledge support from NSF under Grant No. 1351466.

  3. Physical stability and aerosol properties of liposomes delivered using an air-jet nebulizer and a novel micropump device with large mesh apertures.

    PubMed

    Elhissi, A M A; Faizi, M; Naji, W F; Gill, H S; Taylor, K M G

    2007-04-04

    The aerosol properties of liposomes and their physical stability to aerosolization were evaluated using an air-jet nebulizer (Pari LC Plus) and a customized large aperture vibrating-mesh nebulizer (Aeroneb Pro-8microm). Soya phosphatidylcholine: cholesterol (1:1 mole ratio) multilamellar liposomes (MLVs) entrapping salbutamol sulfate were nebulized directly, or after being reduced in size by extrusion through 1 or 0.4microm polycarbonate membrane filters. MLVs were very unstable to jet nebulization and stability was not markedly enhanced when vesicles were extruded before nebulization, such that drug losses from delivered liposomes using the Pari nebulizer were up to 88% (i.e. only 12% retained in liposomes). The Aeroneb Pro-8microm nebulizer was less disruptive to liposomes, completed nebulization in a much shorter time, and produced greater mass output rate than the Pari nebulizer. However, aerosol droplets were larger, total drug and mass outputs were lower and aerosolization performance was dependent on formulation. Vibrating-mesh nebulization was less disruptive to liposomes extruded through the 1microm membranes compared with the non-extruded MLVs, so that the retained entrapment of the drug in the nebulized vesicles was 56% and 37%, respectively. However, extrusion of liposomes to 0.4microm resulted in reduced stability of liposomes to vibrating-mesh nebulization (retained entrapment=41%) which was attributed to the reduced liposome lamellarity and subsequent reduced resistance to nebulization-induced shearing. This study has shown that vibrating-mesh nebulization using the customized large aperture mesh nebulizer (Aeroneb Pro-8microm) had a less disruptive effect on liposomes and produced a higher output rate compared with the Pari LC Plus air-jet nebulizer. On the other hand, the air-jet nebulizer produced higher total mass and drug outputs and smaller aerosol droplets.

  4. Effects of northbound long-haul international air travel on sleep quantity and subjective jet lag and wellness in professional Australian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Peter; Duffield, Rob; Howle, Kieran; Waterson, Adam; Vaile, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the effects of 10-h northbound air travel across 1 time zone on sleep quantity, together with subjective jet lag and wellness ratings, in 16 male professional Australian football (soccer) players. Player wellness was measured throughout the week before (home training week) and the week of (away travel week) travel from Australia to Japan for a preseason tour. Sleep quantity and subjective jet lag were measured 2 d before (Pre 1 and 2), the day of, and for 5 d after travel (Post 1-5). Sleep duration was significantly reduced during the night before travel (Pre 1; 4.9 [4.2-5.6] h) and night of competition (Post 2; 4.2 [3.7-4.7] h) compared with every other night (P<.01, d>0.90). Moreover, compared with the day before travel, subjective jet lag was significantly greater for the 5 d after travel (P<.05, d>0.90), and player wellness was significantly lower 1 d post-match (Post 3) than at all other time points (P<.05, d>0.90). Results from the current study suggest that sleep disruption, as a result of an early travel departure time (8 PM) and evening match (7:30 PM), and fatigue induced by competition had a greater effect on wellness ratings than long-haul air travel with a minimal time-zone change. Furthermore, subjective jet lag may have been misinterpreted as fatigue from sleep disruption and competition, especially by the less experienced players. Therefore, northbound air travel across 1 time zone from Australia to Asia appears to have negligible effects on player preparedness for subsequent training and competition.

  5. Inhibitory effect of silver nanoparticles mediated by atmospheric pressure air cold plasma jet against dermatophyte fungi.

    PubMed

    Ouf, Salama A; El-Adly, Amira A; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H

    2015-10-01

    In an in vitro study with five clinical isolates of dermatophytes, the MIC(50) and MIC(100) values of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) ranged from 5 to 16 and from 15 to 32 μg ml(- 1), respectively. The combined treatment of AgNPs with atmospheric pressure-air cold plasma (APACP) induced a drop in the MIC(50) and MIC100 values of AgNPs reaching 3-11 and 12-23 μg ml(- 1), respectively, according to the examined species. Epidermophyton floccosum was the most sensitive fungus to AgNPs, while Trichophyton rubrum was the most tolerant. AgNPs induced significant reduction in keratinase activity and an increase in the mycelium permeability that was greater when applied combined with plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy showed electroporation of the cell walls and the accumulation of AgNPs on the cell wall and inside the cells, particularly when AgNPs were combined with APACP treatment. An in vivo experiment with dermatophyte-inoculated guinea pigs indicated that the application of AgNPs combined with APACP was more efficacious in healing and suppressing disease symptoms of skin as compared with the application of AgNPs alone. The recovery from the infection reached 91.7 % in the case of Microsporum canis-inoculated guinea pigs treated with 13 μg ml(- 1) AgNPs combined with APACP treatment delivered for 2  min. The emission spectra indicated that the efficacy of APACP was mainly due to generation of NO radicals and excited nitrogen molecules. These reactive species interact and block the activity of the fungal spores in vitro and in the skin lesions of the guinea pigs. The results achieved are promising compared with fluconazole as reference antifungal drug.

  6. THE APPLICATION OF JET REMPI-TOFMS TO REAL-TIME MONITORING OF AROMATIC AIR TOXIC POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jet REMPI-TOFMS is a measurement technique which combines laser induced photoionization with mass spectrometry to create a two-dimensional (wavelength / mass) detection method. In combination with a supersonic jet inlet, aromatic organics are detected in real time (one data poin...

  7. Air bearing center cross gap of neutron stress spectrometer sample table support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Wu, Yunxin; Gong, Hai; Feng, Xiaolei

    2016-12-01

    A support system is the main load-bearing component of sample table for neutron stress spectrometer, and air bearing is an important element of a support system. The neutron stress spectrometer sample table was introduced, and the scheme for air bearing combination was selected. To study the performance of air bearing center cross gap, finite element models (FEMs) were established based on air motion and Reynolds equations, effects of air supply pressure, and gap parameters on the overturning moment and bearing capacity of air bearing center cross gap were analyzed. Results indicate that the width, depth, and height differences of the marble floor gap played important roles in the performance of the air bearing. When gap width is lesser than 1 mm and gap depth is lower than 0.4 mm, bearing capacity and overturning moment would vary rapidly with the variation of the width and depth. A gap height difference results in the bearing capacity dropping rapidly. The FEM results agree well with experimental results. Further, findings of the study could guide the design of the support system and marble floor.

  8. IN VITRO CARDIOTOXICITY OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: ROLE OF BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CARDIOTOXICITY OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: ROLE OF BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION.

    T. L. Knuckles1 R. Jaskot2, J. Richards2, and K.Dreher2.
    1Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicin...

  9. AIR PARTICULATE POLLUTION EXPOSURE INDUCES SYSTEMIC OXIDATIVE STRESS IN HEALTHY MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air particulate pollution exposure induces systemic oxidative stress in healthy mice

    Elizabeth S Roberts1 and Kevin L Dreher2. 1 College or Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC , 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC

    Epidemiological s...

  10. Two-Dimensional Microdischarge Jet Array in Air: Characterization and Inactivation of Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Gaurav

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas (CAPs) have proven to be quite effective for surface disinfection, wound healing and even cancer treatment in recent years. One of the major societal challenges faced today is related to illness caused by food-borne bacteria and viruses, particularly in minimally processed, fresh or ready-to-eat foods. Gastroenteritis outbreaks, caused, for example, by the human Norovirus (NV) is a growing concern. Current used technologies seem not to be fully effective. In this work we focus on a possible solution based on CAP technology for surface disinfection. Many discharge sources have been studied for disinfection and the two major challenges faced are the use of expensive noble gases (Ar/He) by many plasma sources and the difficulty to scale up the plasma devices. The efficacies of these devices also vary for different plasma sources, making it difficult to compare results from different research groups. Also, the interaction of plasma with the biological matter is not understood well, particularly for virus. In this work, a two-dimensional array of micro dielectric barrier discharge is used to treat Feline Calicivirus (FCV), which is a surrogate for human Norovirus. The plasma source can be operated with an air flow rate (up to 94 standard liters per minute or slm). The use of such discharge source also raises important scientific questions which are addressed in this work. These questions include the effect of gas flow rate on discharge properties and the production of reactive species responsible for virus inactivation and the underlying inactivation mechanism. The plasma source is characterized via several diagnostic techniques such as current voltage measurements for electrical characterization and power measurements, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) to determine the gas temperature, cross-correlation spectroscopy (CCS) for microdischarge evolution and timescales, UV absorption spectroscopy to measure the O3 density, absolute IR

  11. Stretching the Stress Boundary: Linking Air Pollution Health Effects to a Neurohormonal Stress Response

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled pollutants produce effects in virtually all organ systems in our body and have been linked to chronic diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s and diabetes. A neurohormonal stress response (referred here as a systemic response produced by activ...

  12. Impact of Air Pollutants on Oxidative Stress in Common Autophagy-Mediated Aging Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Numan, Mohamed Saber; Brown, Jacques P.; Michou, Laëtitia

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution-induced cellular oxidative stress is probably one of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in most of the common autophagy-mediated aging diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s, disease, as well as Paget’s disease of bone with or without frontotemporal dementia and inclusion body myopathy. Oxidative stress has serious damaging effects on the cellular contents: DNA, RNA, cellular proteins, and cellular organelles. Autophagy has a pivotal role in recycling these damaged non-functional organelles and misfolded or unfolded proteins. In this paper, we highlight, through a narrative review of the literature, that when autophagy processes are impaired during aging, in presence of cumulative air pollution-induced cellular oxidative stress and due to a direct effect on air pollutant, autophagy-mediated aging diseases may occur. PMID:25690002

  13. Effect of naturally occurring ozone air pollution episodes on pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Cheryl; Sturrock, Anne; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Greene, Tom; Scholand, Mary Beth; Kanner, Richard; Paine, Robert

    2015-05-12

    This study aimed to determine if naturally occurring episodes of ozone air pollution in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, USA, during the summer are associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, increased respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared to controls. We measured biomarkers (nitrite/nitrate (NOx), 8-isoprostane) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), spirometry, and respiratory symptoms in 11 former smokers with moderate-to-severe COPD and nine former smokers without airflow obstruction during periods of low and high ozone air pollution. High ozone levels were associated with increased NOx in EBC in both COPD (8.7 (±8.5) vs. 28.6 (±17.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p < 0.01) and control participants (7.6 (±16.5) vs. 28.5 (±15.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p = 0.02). There was no difference in pollution effect between COPD and control groups, and no difference in EBC 8-isoprostane, pulmonary function, or respiratory symptoms between clean air and pollution days in either group. Former smokers both with and without airflow obstruction developed airway oxidative stress and inflammation in association with ozone air pollution episodes.

  14. Effect of Naturally Occurring Ozone Air Pollution Episodes on Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pirozzi, Cheryl; Sturrock, Anne; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Greene, Tom; Scholand, Mary Beth; Kanner, Richard; Paine, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if naturally occurring episodes of ozone air pollution in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, USA, during the summer are associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, increased respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared to controls. We measured biomarkers (nitrite/nitrate (NOx), 8-isoprostane) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), spirometry, and respiratory symptoms in 11 former smokers with moderate-to-severe COPD and nine former smokers without airflow obstruction during periods of low and high ozone air pollution. High ozone levels were associated with increased NOx in EBC in both COPD (8.7 (±8.5) vs. 28.6 (±17.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p < 0.01) and control participants (7.6 (±16.5) vs. 28.5 (±15.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p = 0.02). There was no difference in pollution effect between COPD and control groups, and no difference in EBC 8-isoprostane, pulmonary function, or respiratory symptoms between clean air and pollution days in either group. Former smokers both with and without airflow obstruction developed airway oxidative stress and inflammation in association with ozone air pollution episodes. PMID:25985308

  15. Igniter jet dynamics in solid fuel ramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahsini, A. M.; Farshchi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a two dimensional plane jet injected at the base of a step, parallel to the wall, in backward facing step flow geometry is numerically studied. The objective of this work is to gain insight into the dynamics of the igniter flow field in solid fuel ramjet motors. Solid fuel ramjets operate by ingestion of air and subsequent combustion with a solid fuel grain such as polyethylene. The system of governing equations is solved with a finite volume approach using a structured grid in which the AUSM + scheme is used to calculate the convective fluxes. The Spalart and Allmaras turbulence model is used in these simulations. Experimental data have been used to validate the flow solver and turbulence model simulation results. The comparison of the numerical results and experimental data has validated the use of the adopted turbulence model for the study of this type of problem. A special attention is paid to the igniter jet exit location. It is shown that the wall jet igniter, issuing from the base of the step, drastically changes the structure of recirculating region of backward facing step flow and produces large and damaging shear stress on the fuel surface. Moving the igniter jet exit location to the top of the backward facing step changes the flow field favorably, by reducing the fuel surface shear stress by an order of magnitude and maintaining the recirculating region behind the step, which can provide proper residence time for the fuel-air mixture chemical reactions.

  16. Jet propulsion for airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckingham, Edgar

    1924-01-01

    This report is a description of a method of propelling airplanes by the reaction of jet propulsion. Air is compressed and mixed with fuel in a combustion chamber, where the mixture burns at constant pressure. The combustion products issue through a nozzle, and the reaction of that of the motor-driven air screw. The computations are outlined and the results given by tables and curves. The relative fuel consumption and weight of machinery for the jet, decrease as the flying speed increases; but at 250 miles per hour the jet would still take about four times as much fuel per thrust horsepower-hour as the air screw, and the power plant would be heavier and much more complicated. Propulsion by the reaction of a simple jet can not compete with air screw propulsion at such flying speeds as are now in prospect.

  17. Fear and Loathing in the Air: Combat Fear and Stress in the Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    into three parts, each focusing on a major conflict—World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Before beginning, it is important to explore what constitutes an...during the research process . 5. Did this change after the episode (new policy, changed policy)? How? This question helps understand how prepared...they not found in the post-Vietnam era? Has something else about air combat or the combatants changed since 1973? If so, what does this tell us

  18. Stress, Coping, Health Practices, and Health Status in Enlisted and Officer Air Force Women with Dependent Children

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    Stress Scale, the Jaloweic Coping Scale, the Personal Lifestyle Questionaire , the Perceived Health Status Index and an demographic sheet devised by...AD-A218 164 (j) Stress, Coping, Health Practices, and Health Status in Enlisted and Officer Air Force Women with Dependent Children DTIC BY FEB 22...NO. 11. TiTLE (Include Security Classification) (UNCLASSIFIED) Stress, Coping, Health Practices, and Health Status in Enlisted and Officer Air Force

  19. Hematological and immunological effects of stress of air traffic controllers in northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Valdenilson Ribeiro; Martins, Hugo André de Lima; Viana, Marcelo Tavares; Fraga, Simone do Nascimento; Carneiro, Severino Marcos de Oliveira; Galvão, Bruno Henrique Andrade; Bezerra, Alice Andrade; de Castro, Célia Maria Machado Barbosa; Sougey, Everton Botelho; de Castro, Raul Manhães

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that stress and emotional reactions can affect immune responses in animals and humans. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate hematological and immunological effects of stress on air traffic controllers. Methods Thirty air traffic controllers and 15 aeronautical information service operators were evaluated. The groups were divided as information service operators with 10 years or more of experience (AIS≥10) and with less than 10 years in the profession (AIS<10) and air traffic controllers with 10 years or more of experience (ATCo≥10) and with less than 10 years in the profession (ATCo<10). Blood samples were drawn at 8:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. The paired t-test was used to compare monocyte and nitric oxide concentrations and ANOVA was used for the other parameters. Results The ATCo≥10 group presented a significantly lower phagocytosis rate of monocytes at 2:00 p.m. compared to 8:00 a.m. Moreover, the ATCo≥10 group presented lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, platelet and leukocyte levels, and increased cortisol concentrations at 8:00 a.m. compared to the other groups. Additionally, this group had lower phagocytosis rate of monocytes, and hemoglobin, platelet, leukocyte, basophils and nitric oxide levels at 2:00 p.m. compared to the other groups. Conclusion Stress seems to greatly affect immune responses of air traffic controllers with more than ten years of experience. PMID:23049295

  20. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  1. An investigation of the loads on the vertical tail of a jet-bomber airplane resulting from flight through rough air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Jack; Rhyne, Richard H

    1956-01-01

    Vertical-tail loads were measured in turbulent air on a four-engine jet bomber. Results showed large load oscillations which were lightly damped. Comparison of experimental results with discrete-load calculations indicated that discrete-gust calculations underestimated the loads by 30 to 40 percent and gave no indication of the low damping. Power spectral analysis, on the other hand, indicated the general frequency characteristics and gave a somewhat better estimate of the peak-load distributions. The present results strongly suggest that discrete-gust calculation for gust loads on vertical tails may seriously underestimate the gust loads for airplanes having lightly damped lateral oscillations.

  2. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  3. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  4. Experimental investigation of supersonic low pressure air plasma flows obtained with different arc-jet operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lago, Viviana; Ndiaye, Abdoul-Aziz

    2012-11-27

    A stationary arc-jet plasma flow at low pressure is used to simulate some properties of the gas flow surrounding a vehicle during its entry into celestial body's atmospheres. This paper presents an experimental study concerning plasmas simulating a re-entry into our planet. Optical measurements have been carried out for several operating plasma conditions in the free stream, and in the shock layer formed in front of a flat cylindrical plate, placed in the plasma jet. The analysis of the spectral radiation enabled the identification of the emitting species, the determination of the rotational and vibrational temperatures in the free-stream and in the shock layer and the determination of the distance of the shock to the flat plate face. Some plasma fluid parameters like, stagnation pressure, specific enthalpy and heat flux have been determined experimentally along the plasma-jet axis.

  5. Pulling Results Out of Thin Air: Four Years of Ozone and Greenhouse Gas Measurements by the Alpha Jet Atmospheric Experiment (AJAX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Emma

    2015-01-01

    The Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) has been measuring atmospheric ozone, carbon dioxide, methane and meteorological parameters from near the surface to 8000 m since January 2011. The main goals are to study photochemical ozone production and the impacts of extreme events on western US air quality, provide data to support satellite observations and aid in the quantification of emission sources e.g. wildfires, urban outflow, diary and oil and gas. The aircraft is based at Moffett Field and flies multiple times a month to sample vertical profiles at selected sites in California and Nevada, providing long-term data records at these sites. AJAX is also uniquely positioned to launch with short notice sampling flights in rapid response to extreme events e.g. the 2013 Yosemite Rim fire. This talk will focus on the impacts of vertical transport on surface air quality, and investigation of emission sources from diaries and wildfires.

  6. An Investigation of Applications for Thermodynamic Work Potential Methods: Working Tables and Charts for Estimation of Thermodynamic Work Potential in Equilibrium Mixtures of Jet-A and Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri; Roth, Bryce; McDonald, Rob

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a tool to facilitate the application of thermodynamic work potential methods to aircraft and engine analysis. This starts with a discussion of the theoretical background underlying these methods, which is then used to derive various equations useful for thermodynamic analysis of aircraft engines. The work potential analysis method is implemented in the form of a set of working charts and tables that can be used to graphically evaluate work potential stored in high-enthalpy gas. The range of validity for these tables is 300 to 36,000 R, pressures between between 0.01 atm and 100 atm, and fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric. The derivations and charts assume mixtures of Jet-A and air as the working fluid. The thermodynamic properties presented in these charts were calculated based upon standard thermodynamic curve fits.

  7. Oxidative stress and air pollution exposure during pregnancy: A molecular assessment.

    PubMed

    Nagiah, S; Phulukdaree, A; Naidoo, D; Ramcharan, K; Naidoo, R N; Moodley, D; Chuturgoon, A

    2015-08-01

    Chronic air pollution exposure during pregnancy can cause oxidative stress leading to adverse birth outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess and compare oxidative stress response in peripheral lymphocytes isolated from pregnant women from a highly industrialized locale (south Durban (SD); n = 50) and a control with lower air pollutant levels (north Durban (ND); n = 50). Oxidative stress response was measured by quantifying malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and a SuperArray gene panel. Mitochondrial function (adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels and mitochondrial depolarization), DNA integrity (comet assay and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) viability) and DNA repair (OGG1) were assessed. Antioxidant response was assessed by quantification of glutathione (GSH) and SOD2, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Levels of MDA (p = 0.9), mitochondrial depolarization (p = 0.88), ATP (1.89-fold), SOD2 (1.23-fold) and UCP2 (1.58-fold) gene expression were elevated in the SD group with significantly higher UCP2 protein levels (p = 0.05) and longer comet tail length (p = 0.0004). The expression of Nrf2 protein (p = 0.03) and mRNA levels (-1.37-fold), GSH concentration (p < 0.0001), mtDNA amplification (-2.04-fold) and OGG1 mRNA (-2.78-fold) activity were decreased in the SD group. Of the 84 oxidative stress-related genes evaluated, 26 were differentially regulated. Pregnant women exposed to higher air pollutant levels showed increased markers for oxidative stress and compromised DNA integrity and repair.

  8. On the behaviour of a stressed cotton canopy in a direct air stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B.; Newcomb, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    Reflectance variations of a stressed cotton canopy were conducted in the presence of a fan-generated air stream to investigate the effects of air movement and the resulting temperature changes on remotely-sensed data. The initial drop in reflectance after application of the air stream was found to be greatest in the morning because leaf turgor was at a maximum, enabling leaves on the windward side of the canopy to assume surprisingly stable vertical positions. By afternoon, a reduction in leaf turgor was responsible for less stem displacement and consequently a reduction in light-trapping capability. However, reflectance oscillations were greater because the leaves had become sufficiently limp to flutter at the edges and about the petioles exposing both adaxial and abaxial surfaces to the incident light.

  9. Buoyancy and cross flow effects on heat transfer of multiple impinging slot air jets cooling a flat plate at different orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nada, S. A.

    2009-06-01

    The present article reports on heat transfer characteristics associated with multiple laminar impinging air jet cooling a hot flat plat at different orientations. The work aims to study the interactions of the effects of cross flow, buoyancy induced flow, orientation of the hot surface with respect to gravity, Reynolds numbers and Rayleigh numbers on heat transfer characteristics. Experiments have been carried out for different values of jet Reynolds number, Rayleigh number and cross flow strength and at different orientations of the air jet with respect to the target hot plate. In general, the effective cooling of the plate has been observed to be increased with increasing Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. The results concluded that the hot surface orientation is important for optimum performance in practical applications. It was found that for Re ≥ 400 and Ra ≥ 10,000 (these ranges give 0.0142 ≤ Ri ≤ 1.59 the Nusselt number is independent on the hot surface orientation. However, for Re ≤ 300 and Ra ≥ 100,000 (these ranges give 1.59 ≤ Ri ≤ 42.85): (i) the Nusselt number for horizontal orientation with hot surface facing down is less that that of vertical orientation and that of horizontal orientation with hot surface facing up, and (ii) the Nusselt number of vertical orientation is approximately the same as that of horizontal orientation with hot surface facing up. For all surfaces orientations and for the entire ranges of Re and Ra, it was found that increasing the cross flow strength decreases the effective cooling of the surface.

  10. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  11. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.

    1994-08-16

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

  12. The relationship between the microwave radar cross section and both wind speed and stress: Model function studies using Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, David E.; Davidson, Kenneth L.; Brown, Robert A.; Friehe, Carl A.; Li, Fuk

    1994-01-01

    The Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX) provided a unique data set with coincident airborne scatterometer measurements of the ocean surface radar cross section (RCS)(at Ku band) and near-surface wind and wind stress. These data have been analyzed to study new model functions which relate wind speed and surface friction velocity (square root of the kinematic wind stress) to the radar cross section and to better understand the processes in the boundary layer that have a strong influence on the radar backscatter. Studies of data from FASINEX indicate that the RCS has a different relation to the friction velocity than to the wind speed. The difference between the RCS models using these two variables depends on the polarization and the incidence angle. The radar data have been acquired from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne scatterometer. These data span 10 different flight days. Stress measurements were inferred from shipboard instruments and from aircraft flying at low altitudes, closely following the scatterometer. Wide ranges of radar incidence angles and environmental conditions needed to fully develop algorithms are available from this experiment.

  13. Webinar Presentation: Air Pollution, Social and Psychosocial Stress, and Respitory Health in the Southern California Children's Health Study

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Air Pollution, Social and Psychosocial Stress, and Respitory Health in the Southern California Children's Health Study, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2016 Webinar Series: Exposome held on May 11, 2016.

  14. DETECTION AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION INDUCED CARDIOPULMONARY OXIDATIVE STRESS USING A TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODEL AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Identification of particle characteristics and biological mechanism(s) responsible for the adverse pulmonary and cardiovascular responses associated with particulate air pollution exposure remains a critical research activity. We have employed an oxidative stress sensitive an...

  15. Hypoxia Stress Test Reveals Exaggerated Cardiovascular Effects in Hypertensive Rats after Exposure to the Air Pollutant Acrolein

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in susceptible populations with cardiovascular disease. Stress tests are useful in assessing cardiovascular risk and manifesting latent effects of exposure. The goal of this study w...

  16. Air-adapted Methanosarcina acetivorans shows high methane production and develops resistance against oxygen stress.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Belmont-Díaz, Javier; Encalada, Rusely; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans, considered a strict anaerobic archaeon, was cultured in the presence of 0.4-1% O2 (atmospheric) for at least 6 months to generate air-adapted cells; further, the biochemical mechanisms developed to deal with O2 were characterized. Methane production and protein content, as indicators of cell growth, did not change in air-adapted cells respect to cells cultured under anoxia (control cells). In contrast, growth and methane production significantly decreased in control cells exposed for the first time to O2. Production of reactive oxygen species was 50 times lower in air-adapted cells versus control cells, suggesting enhanced anti-oxidant mechanisms that attenuated the O2 toxicity. In this regard, (i) the transcripts and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase significantly increased; and (ii) the thiol-molecules (cysteine + coenzyme M-SH + sulfide) and polyphosphate contents were respectively 2 and 5 times higher in air-adapted cells versus anaerobic-control cells. Long-term cultures (18 days) of air-adapted cells exposed to 2% O2 exhibited the ability to form biofilms. These data indicate that M. acetivorans develops multiple mechanisms to contend with O2 and the associated oxidative stress, as also suggested by genome analyses for some methanogens.

  17. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  18. Stress induced by hooking, net towing, elevated sea water temperature and air in sablefish: Lack of concordance between mortality and physiological measures of stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, M.W.; Olla, B.L.; Schreck, C.B.

    2001-01-01

    In a series of laboratory studies designed to simulate bycatch processes, sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria were either hooked for up to 24 h or towed in a net for 4 h and then subjected to an abrupt transfer to elevated sea water temperature and air. Mortality did not result from hooking or net towing followed by exposure to air, but increased for both capture methods as fish were exposed to elevated temperatures, reflecting the magnifying effect of elevated temperature on mortality. Hooking and exposure to air resulted in increased plasma cortisol and lactate concentrations, while the combination of hooking and exposure to elevated temperature and air resulted in increased lactate and potassium concentrations. In fish that were towed in a net and exposed to air, cortisol, lactate, potassium and sodium concentrations increased, but when subjected to elevated temperature and air, no further increases occurred above the concentrations induced by net towing and air, suggesting a possible maximum of the physiological stress response. The results suggest that caution should be exercised when using physiological measures to quantify stress induced by capture and exposure to elevated temperature and air, that ultimately result in mortality, since the connections between physiological stress and mortality in bycatch processes remain to be fully understood.

  19. DBD Plasma Actuators for Flow Control in Air Vehicles and Jet Engines - Simulation of Flight Conditions in Test Chambers by Density Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma actuators for active flow control in aircraft and jet engines need to be tested in the laboratory to characterize their performance at flight operating conditions. DBD plasma actuators generate a wall-jet electronically by creating weakly ionized plasma, therefore their performance is affected by gas discharge properties, which, in turn, depend on the pressure and temperature at the actuator placement location. Characterization of actuators is initially performed in a laboratory chamber without external flow. The pressure and temperature at the actuator flight operation conditions need to be simultaneously set in the chamber. A simplified approach is desired. It is assumed that the plasma discharge depends only on the gas density, while other temperature effects are assumed to be negligible. Therefore, tests can be performed at room temperature with chamber pressure set to yield the same density as in operating flight conditions. The needed chamber pressures are shown for altitude flight of an air vehicle and for jet engines at sea-level takeoff and altitude cruise conditions. Atmospheric flight conditions are calculated from standard atmosphere with and without shock waves. The engine data was obtained from four generic engine models; 300-, 150-, and 50-passenger (PAX) aircraft engines, and a military jet-fighter engine. The static and total pressure, temperature, and density distributions along the engine were calculated for sea-level takeoff and for altitude cruise conditions. The corresponding chamber pressures needed to test the actuators were calculated. The results show that, to simulate engine component flows at in-flight conditions, plasma actuator should be tested over a wide range of pressures. For the four model engines the range is from 12.4 to 0.03 atm, depending on the placement of the actuator in the engine. For example, if a DBD plasma actuator is to be placed at the compressor exit of a 300 PAX engine, it

  20. Coanda effect jet around a cylinder with an interacting adjacent surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Randolph Allen

    The effects of placing a plane solid surface in close proximity to a Coanda effect jet turning over a cylindrical surface are investigated to help judge the possible application of this type of jet to manufacturing line processes. The Coanda jet is proposed as a coating control mechanism for fluidic coatings on sheets or a particulate removal device. A Coanda jet placed close to a surface will develop a strong tangential flow that will shear by viscous effects and pressure gradients. A turbulent k-epsilon finite element model, developed in FIDAP, is presented that studies the effects of cylinder-sheet separation distance and jet-to-gap angular placement of the jet. It is assumed that the operation is isothermal and that the sheet speed is negligible compared to the air jet speed. Unconstrained models and cases with a distant surface were run and compared to published experimental results for an unconstrained Coanda jet to validate the modeling method and optimize the empirical constants in the k-epsilon equations. Best agreement is found if the C(sub 2) parameter in the equations is increased from 1.92 to 3.0. Maximum shear stress and pressure gradient values increased exponentially for a decreasing gap size and physical geometric constraints will be the limiting factor to efficiency. For similar initial jets this study shows that the Coanda jet develops stripping forces about 1/2 as great as the regular air-knife, but has advantages such as directed flow. The Coanda jet is seen as a viable option to air-knives for certain operations.

  1. Spectral changes in conifers subjected to air pollution and water stress: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Price, Curtis V.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of leaf anatomy, moisture and pigment content, and number of leaf layers on spectral reflectance in healthy, pollution-stressed, and water-stressed conifer needles were examined experimentally. Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) and giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron gigantea) were exposed to ozone and acid mist treatments in fumigation chambers; red pine (Pinus resinosa) needles were artificially dried. Infrared reflectance from stacked needles rose with free water loss. In an air-drying experiment, cell volume reductions induced by loss of turgor caused near-infrared reflectance (TM band 4) to drop after most free water was lost. Under acid mist fumigation, stunting of tissue development similarly reduced band 4 reflectance. Both artificial drying and pollutant fumigation caused a blue shift of the red edge of spectral reflectance curves in conifers, attributable to chlorophyll denaturation. Thematic mapper band ratio 4/3 fell and 5/4 rose with increasing pollution stress on artificial drying. Loss of water by air-drying, freeze-drying, or oven-drying enhanced spectral features, due in part to greater scattering and reduced water absorption. Grinding of the leaf tissue further enhanced the spectral features by increasing reflecting surfaces and path length. In a leaf-stacking experiment, an asymptote in visible and infrared reflectance was reached at 7-8 needle layers of red pine.

  2. Visualization of stress wave propagation via air-coupled acoustic emission sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivey, Joshua C.; Lee, Gil-Yong; Yang, Jinkyu; Kim, Youngkey; Kim, Sungchan

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of visualizing stress waves propagating in plates using air-coupled acoustic emission sensors. Specifically, we employ a device that embeds arrays of microphones around an optical lens in a helical pattern. By implementing a beamforming technique, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot and full-field measurement. This is a significant improvement over the conventional wave propagation tracking approaches based on laser doppler vibrometry or digital image correlation techniques. In this paper, we focus on demonstrating the feasibility and efficacy of this air-coupled acoustic emission technique by using large metallic plates exposed to external impacts. The visualization results of stress wave propagation will be shown under various impact scenarios. The proposed technique can be used to characterize and localize damage by detecting the attenuation, reflection, and scattering of stress waves that occurs at damage locations. This can ultimately lead to the development of new structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation methods for identifying hidden cracks or delaminations in metallic or composite plate structures, simultaneously negating the need for mounted contact sensors.

  3. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  4. Velocity field near the jet orifice of a round jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Benson, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    Experimentally determined velocities at selected locations near the jet orifice are presented and analyzed for a round jet in crossflow. Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of four and eight were studied experimentally for a round subsonic jet of air exhausting perpendicularly through a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature. Velocity measurements were made in cross sections to the jet plume located from one to four jet diameters from the orifice. Jet centerline and vortex properties are presented and utilized to extend the results of a previous study into the region close to the jet orifice.

  5. Ram jet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Crispin, B.; Pohl, W.D.; Thomaier, D.; Voss, N.

    1983-11-29

    In a ram jet engine, a tubular combustion chamber is divided into a flame chamber followed by a mixing chamber. The ram air is supplied through intake diffusers located on the exterior of the combustion chamber. The intake diffusers supply combustion air directly into the flame chamber and secondary air is conveyed along the exterior of the combustion chambers and then supplied directly into the mixing chamber.

  6. Nonhomogeneous surface properties of parylene-C film etched by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 micro-plasma jet in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Yang, Chunsheng; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-10-01

    Surface properties of parylene-C film etched by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 micro-plasma jet in ambient air were investigated. The morphologies and chemical compositions of the etched surface were analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS, XPS and ATR-FTIR. The microscopy and SEM images showed the etched surface was nonhomogeneous with six discernable ring patterns from the center to the outside domain, which were composed of (I) a central region; (II) an effective etching region, where almost all of the parylene-C film was removed by the plasma jet with only a little residual parylene-C being functionalized with carboxyl groups (Cdbnd O, Osbnd Cdbnd O-); (III) an inner etching boundary; (IV) a middle etching region, where the film surface was smooth and partially removed; (V) an outer etching boundary, where the surface was decorated with clusters of debris, and (VI) a pristine parylene-C film region. The analysis of the different morphologies and chemical compositions illustrated the different localized etching process in the distinct regions. Besides, the influence of O2 flow rate on the surface properties of the etched parylene-C film was also investigated. Higher volume of O2 tended to weaken the nonhomogeneous characteristics of the etched surface and improve the etched surface quality.

  7. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cyrus, Jack D.; Kadlec, Emil G.; Klimas, Paul C.

    1985-01-01

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the ends thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby inducing stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  8. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cyrus, J.D.; Kadlec, E.G.; Klimas, P.C.

    1983-09-15

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the end thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby including stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  9. Resilience, Stress, Stigma, and Barriers to Mental Healthcare in U.S. Air Force Nursing Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Stephen H. A.; Morgan, Brenda J.; Parshall, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Stigma may deter military service members from seeking mental health (MH) services. Previously, substantial proportions of U.S. Air Force (USAF) registered nurses and medical technicians reported concerns about stigma with accessing MH services; in particular, that unit members might lose confidence in them or perceive them as weak, unit leadership might treat them differently, or accessing care might affect career advancement. Objective This study assessed the extent to which stigma and barriers to accessing MH services as perceived by USAF nursing personnel are associated with resilience, stress, previous deployment, or demographic characteristics. Methods An anonymous, online survey was administered to active-duty USAF registered nurses and medical technicians at three locations (N = 250). The survey included demographic items, the Stigma and Barriers to Care scales, Conner–Davidson Resilience Scale, and Perceived Stress Questionnaire. Results Mean resilience was high, and perceived stress was moderate. About half of participants agreed that unit members might have less confidence in me (54%) or unit leadership might treat me differently (58%). Many also had concerns that it would harm my career (47%), I would be seen as weak (47%), or there would be difficulty getting time off work for treatment (45%). Stigma was positively correlated with perceived stress (r = .40, p < .01) and negatively correlated with resilience (r = −.24, p < .01). Officers had significantly higher stigma and resilience scores and lower stress scores compared with enlisted personnel, but those differences were small. Discussion This study validated previous findings that substantial percentages of USAF nursing personnel have concerns that accessing MH services may adversely affect their careers and how they are viewed by unit leaders and peers. In addition, higher levels of concern about stigma were associated with higher levels of stress and lower levels of resilience

  10. Stress-temperature-lifetime response of nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC composites in air

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, P.F.

    1996-02-01

    Time-to-failure tests were conducted in four-point flexure and in air as a function of stress levels and temperatures to study the lifetime response of various Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC (designated as Nic/SiC) composites with a graphitic interfacial coating. The results indicated that all of the Nic/SiC composites exhibit a similar stress-dependent failure at applied stress greater than a threshold value. In this case, the lifetimes of the composites increased with decrease in both stress level and test temperature. The lifetime of the composites appeared to be relatively insensitive to the thickness of graphitic interface layer and was enhanced somewhat by the addition of oxidation inhibitors. Electron microscopy and oxidation studies indicated that the life of the Nic/SiC composites was governed by the oxidation of the graphitic interfaces and the on of glass(es) in composites due to the oxidation of the fiber and matrix, inhibitor phases.

  11. A novel simple one-step air jet spinning approach for deposition of poly(vinyl acetate)/hydroxyapatite composite nanofibers on Ti implants.

    PubMed

    Abdal-Hay, Abdalla; Hamdy, Abdel Salam; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek; Lim, Ju Hyun

    2015-04-01

    A biocompatible coating consists of a poly(vinyl acetate)/hydroxyapatite (PVAc/HA) composite nanofiber mat was applied to NaOH-treated titanium metal by means of a novel, facile and efficient air jet spinning (AJS) approach. Results showed that HA nanoparticles (NPs) strongly embedded onto the AJS single fiber surface resulting in a strong chemical interfacial bonding between the two phases due to the difference in kinetic energies. It was proven that AJS membrane coatings can provide significant improvement in the corrosion resistance of titanium substrate. Interestingly, the biocompatibility using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast to the PVAc/HA fiber composite layer coated on Ti was significantly higher than pure titanium-substrates.

  12. Graphene-stabilized copper nanoparticles as an air-stable substitute for silver and gold in low-cost ink-jet printable electronics.

    PubMed

    Luechinger, Norman A; Athanassiou, Evagelos K; Stark, Wendelin J

    2008-11-05

    Metallic copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a bottom-up approach, and in situ coated with protective shells of graphene in order to get a metal nanopowder of high air stability and chemical inertness. Using an amphiphilic surfactant, a water-based copper nanocolloid could be prepared and successfully printed onto a polymer substrate by conventional ink-jet printing using household printers. The dried printed patterns exhibited strong metallic gloss and an electrical conductivity of >1 S cm(-1) without the need for a sintering or densification step. This conductivity currently limits use in electronics to low current application or shielding and decorative effects. The high stability of graphene-coated copper nanoparticles makes them economically a most attractive alternative to silver or gold nanocolloids, and will strongly facilitate the industrial use of metal nanocolloids in consumer goods.

  13. Measurement of inflammation and oxidative stress following drastic changes in air pollution during the Beijing Olympics: a panel study approach.

    PubMed

    Kipen, Howard; Rich, David; Huang, Wei; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Guangfa; Hu, Min; Lu, Shou-en; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yuedan; Zhang, Jim Junfeng

    2010-08-01

    Ambient air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory morbidity and mortality in epidemiology studies. Frequently, oxidative and nitrosative stress are hypothesized to mediate these pollution effects, however precise mechanisms remain unclear. This paper describes the methodology for a major panel study to examine air pollution effects on these and other mechanistic pathways. The study took place during the drastic air pollution changes accompanying the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, China. After a general description of air pollution health effects, we provide a discussion of panel studies and describe the unique features of this study that make it likely to provide compelling results. This study should lead to a clearer and more precise definition of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress, as well as other mechanisms, in determining acute morbidity and mortality from air pollution exposure.

  14. Measurement of inflammation and oxidative stress following drastic changes in air pollution during the Beijing Olympics: a panel study approach

    PubMed Central

    Kipen, Howard; Rich, David; Huang, Wei; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Guangfa; Hu, Min; Lu, Shou-en; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yuedan; Zhang, Jim (Junfeng)

    2014-01-01

    Ambient air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory morbidity and mortality in epidemiology studies. Frequently, oxidative and nitrosative stress are hypothesized to mediate these pollution effects, however precise mechanisms remain unclear. This paper describes the methodology for a major panel study to examine air pollution effects on these and other mechanistic pathways. The study took place during the drastic air pollution changes accompanying the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, China. After a general description of air pollution health effects, we provide a discussion of panel studies and describe the unique features of this study that make it likely to provide compelling results. This study should lead to a clearer and more precise definition of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress, as well as other mechanisms, in determining acute morbidity and mortality from air pollution exposure. PMID:20716299

  15. Jetting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Szarka, D.D.; Schwegman, S.L.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes an apparatus for hydraulically jetting a well tool disposed in a well, the well tool having a sliding member. It comprises positioner means for operably engaging the sliding member of the well tool; and a jetting means, connected at a rotatable connection to the positioner means so that the jetting means is rotatable relative to the positioner means and the well tool, for hydraulically jetting the well tool as the jetting means is rotated relative thereto.

  16. Environmental Assessment: Installation of Thermally Stable Jet Fuel (JPTS) Above Ground Storage System Westover Air Reserve Base, Chicopee, Massachusetts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-30

    project design and construction in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute and the National Fire Protection Association Standards...operations in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute , National Fire Protection Agency, Air Force Fuels handling standards and compliance with

  17. Stress in junior enlisted air force women with and without children.

    PubMed

    Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy

    2009-04-01

    The objective was to determine if there are differences between young enlisted military women with and without preschool children on role strain, stress, health, and military career aspiration and to identify the best predictors of these variables. The study used a cross-sectional descriptive design of 50 junior Air Force women with preschool children and 50 women without children. There were no differences between women with and without children in role strain, stress, health, and military career aspiration. In all women, higher stress was moderately predictive of higher role strain (39.9% of variance explained) but a poor predictor of career aspiration (3.8% of variance explained). Lower mental health scores were predicted by high stress symptoms (27.9% of variance explained), low military career aspiration (4.1% of variance explained), high role strain (4.0% of variance explained), and being non-White (3.9% of variance explained). Aspiration for a military career was predicted by high perceived availability of military resources (16.8% of variance explained), low family of origin socioeconomic status (4.5% of variance explained), and better mental health status (3.3% of variance explained). Contrary to theoretical expectations, in this sample, motherhood was not a significant variable. Increased role strain, stress, and decreased health as well as decreased military career aspiration were evident in both groups and may have more to do with individual coping skills and other unmeasured resources. More research is needed to determine what nursing interventions are needed to best support both groups of women.

  18. Isolation and identification of plant phenolic compounds in birch leaves: Air pollution stress and leaf phenolics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loponen, Jyrki Mikael

    Chromatographic (analytical and preparative HPLC), chemical (hydrolysis) and spectroscopic (UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and MS) techniques proved to be suitable tools for the structure identification of plant phenolic compounds. More than 30 individual phenolic compounds were detected and quantified. Detailed information of the structures of individual compounds was determined after isolation from birch leaves. Ten flavonoid glycosides were identified. Two of them, myricetin-3-O-α-L-(acetyl)-rhamnopyranoside and quercetin-3-O-α-L-(4/prime'-O-acetyl)- rhamnopyranoside, have been rarely found in birch leaves. Further, some characterized major phenolics with non- flavonoid structures in our study were 1-O-galloyl- β-D-(2-O-acetyl)-glucopyranose, gallic, chlorogenic, neochlorogenic, cis- and trans-forms of 3- and 5-p-coumaroylquinic acids. The presence of gallotannin group was evidenced by strong positive correlations between concentrations of these gallotannins (preliminary identified by HPLC and UV spectra) and the protein precipitation capacity of extracts. Content of gallotannins decreased with leaf growth and maturation. It is known that concentrations of phenolic compounds regularly increase in slowly growing stressed plants and therefore, it is natural that they are also sensitive to different forms of air pollution. Total content and the contents of some individual phenolics correlated negatively with the distance from the pollution source in our study area. In addition to comparing absolute concentrations of compounds in question, the within-tree correlations or within-tree variations of the relevant compounds between polluted and control areas were an alternative approach. Differences in pairwise correlations between the investigated leaf phenolic compounds indicated the competition between some gallotannins and p-coumaroylquinic acids on the polluted but not on the control site. Air pollution seems to be a stress factor for birch trees associated with

  19. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  20. Compatibility of elastomers in alternate jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.; Fedors, R. F.; Reilly, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    The compatibility of elastomeric compositions of known resistance to aircraft fuels was tested for potential use in Jet A type fuels obtainable from alternate sources, such as coal. Since such fuels were not available at the time, synthetic alternate fuels were prepared by adding tetralin to a petroleum based Jet A type fuel to simulate coal derived fuels which are expected to contain higher amounts of aromatic and hydroaromatic hydrocarbons. The elastomeric compounds tested were based on butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber, a castable Thiokol polysulfide rubber, and a castable fluorosilicone rubber. Batches of various cross-link densities of these rubbers were made and their chemical stress relaxation behavior in fuel, air, and nitrogen, their swelling properties, and response to mechanical testing were determined.

  1. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. Presented are: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions: (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  2. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen, and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. The paper presents: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions; (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  3. Urinary Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (OH-PAH) Metabolite Concentrations and the Effect of GST Polymorphisms Among US Air Force Personnel Exposed to Jet Fuel

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ema G.; Smith, Kristen; Maule, Alexis L.; Sjodin, Andreas; Li, Zheng; Romanoff, Lovisa; Kelsey, Karl; Proctor, Susan; McClean, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between inhalation exposure to jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) and urinary metabolites among US Air Force (USAF) personnel, and investigate the role of glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms. Methods Personal air samples were collected from 37 full-time USAF personnel during 4 consecutive workdays and analyzed for JP-8 constituents and total hydrocarbons. Pre- and postshift urine samples were collected each day and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon urinary metabolites. Results Work shift exposure to total hydrocarbons was significantly associated with postshift urinary 1-naphthol (β = 0.17; P = <0.0001), 2-naphthol (β = 0.09; P = 0.005), and 2-hydroxyfluorene concentrations (β = 0.08; P = 0.006), and a significant gene-environment interaction was observed with glutathione S-transferase mu-1. Conclusions USAF personnel experience inhalation exposure to JP-8, which is associated with absorption of JP-8 constituents while performing typical job-related tasks, and in our data the glutathione S-transferase mu-1 polymorphism was associated with differential metabolism of naphthalene. PMID:24806557

  4. Exposure to Fine Particulate Air Pollution Causes Vascular Insulin Resistance by Inducing Pulmonary Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to ambient air fine particulate matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects of PM2.5 remain unclear. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that PM2.5 exposure decreases vascular insulin sensitivity by inducing pulmonary oxidative stress. Methods: Mice fed control (10–13% kcal fat) and high-fat (60% kcal fat, HFD) diets, treated with 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) or mice overexpressing lung-specific extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) were exposed to HEPA-filtered air or to concentrated PM2.5 (CAP) for 9 or 30 days, and changes in systemic and organ-specific insulin sensitivity and inflammation were measured. Results: In control diet–fed mice, exposure to CAP for 30 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in lung, heart, and aorta but not in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver and did not affect adiposity or systemic glucose tolerance. In HFD-fed mice, 30-day CAP exposure suppressed insulin-stimulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and increased adipose tissue inflammation and systemic glucose intolerance. In control diet–fed mice, a 9-day CAP exposure was sufficient to suppress insulin-stimulated Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and to decrease IκBα (inhibitor of the transcription factor NF-κB levels in the aorta. Treatment with the antioxidant TEMPOL or lung-specific overexpression of ecSOD prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and inflammation. Conclusions: Short-term exposure to PM2.5 induces vascular insulin resistance and inflammation triggered by a mechanism involving pulmonary oxidative stress. Suppression of vascular insulin signaling by PM2.5 may accelerate the progression to systemic insulin resistance, particularly in the context of diet-induced obesity. Citation: Haberzettl P, O

  5. Durability of zirconia thermal-barrier ceramic coatings on air-cooled turbine blades in cyclic jet engine operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Jacobs, R. E.; Stecura, S.; Morse, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal barrier ceramic coatings of stabilized zirconia over a bond coat of Ni Cr Al Y were tested for durability on air cooled turbine rotor blades in a research turbojet engine. Zirconia stabilized with either yttria, magnesia, or calcia was investigated. On the basis of durability and processing cost, the yttria stabilized zirconia was considered the best of the three coatings investigated.

  6. Variable-Density Co-Flowing Jet Simulations with BHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments by the Extreme Fluids team at Los Alamos National Laboratory have examined a jet of SF6 injected into co-flowing air. The experiment is designed to aquire detailed diagnostics for comparision to turbulence models. Simultaneous PIV/PLIF is used to measure the Reynolds stress and velicty-density correlations. In the current work, the BHR RANS model is being implemented in an incompressible variable-density code, and compared to the experimental results. Since the jet is not self-similar, both due to co-flow and variable density effects, careful attenstion is payed to the role of inflow conditions. Also, some multi-jet configurations are explored.

  7. Multi-elemental analysis of jet engine lubricating oils and hydraulic fluids and their implication in aircraft air quality incidents.

    PubMed

    van Netten, C

    1999-05-07

    The flight crews of aircraft often report symptoms including dizziness, nausea, disorientation, blurred vision and tingling in legs and arms. Many of these incidents have been traced to contamination of cabin air with lubricating oil, as well as hydraulic fluid, constituents. Considering that these air contaminants are often subjected to temperatures in excess of 500 degrees C, a large number of different exposures can be expected. Although the reported symptoms are most consistent with exposures to volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and the organophosphate constituents in these oils and fluids, the involvement of these agents has not been clearly demonstrated. Possible exposure to toxic elements, such as lead, mercury, thallium and others, have not been ruled out. In order to assess the potential of exposure to toxic elements a multi-elemental analysis was done on two hydraulic fluids and three lubricating oils which have been implicated in a number of air quality incidents. A secondary objective was to establish if the multi-elemental concentrations of the fluids tested are different enough to allow such an analysis to be used as a possible method of identifying the source of exposure that might have been present during aircraft air quality incidents. No significant concentrations of toxic elements were identified in any of the oils or hydraulic fluids. The elemental compositions of the samples were different enough to be used for identification purposes and the measurement of only three elements was able to achieve this. Whether these findings have an application, in aircraft air quality incident investigations, needs to be established with further studies.

  8. Fuzzy jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  9. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; ...

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variablesmore » in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  10. On the mixing of a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothapalli, A.; Baganoff, D.; Karamcheti, K.

    1981-01-01

    Hot-wire measurements in an incompressible rectangular jet, issuing into a quiet environment at ambient conditions, are presented. A blow-down-type air supply system was used to provide the airflow to a cylindrical settling chamber 1.75 m in length and 0.6 m in diameter. The measurements were made with constant-temperature anemometers in conjunction with linearizers. The two signals from the linearizers were sent through a sum and difference unit which was calibrated from dc to 100 kHz. The distributions of mean velocity and the turbulence shear stresses were measured in the two central planes of the jet stations up to 115 widths downstream of the nozzle exit. Three distinct regions characterized the jet flow field: a potential core origin, a two-dimensional-type region, and an axisymmetric type region. The onset of the second region appeared to be at a location where the shear layers separated by the short dimension of the nozzle meet; and the third region occurred at a downstream location where the two shear layers from the short edges of the nozzle meet. In the central plane, similarity was found both in the mean velocity and shear stress profiles beyond 30 widths downstream of the nozzle exit; profiles of rms velocity showed similarity in the second, but not the third region.

  11. Rapid Confined Mixing Using Transverse Jets Part 2: Multiple Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forliti, David; Salazar, David

    2012-11-01

    An experimental study has been conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base to investigate the properties of confined mixing devices that employ transverse jets. The experiment considers the mixing of water with a mixture of water and fluorescein, and planar laser induced fluorescence was used to measure instantaneous mixture fraction distributions in the cross section view. Part one of this study presents the scaling law development and results for a single confined transverse jet. Part two will describe the results of configurations including multiple transverse jets. The different regimes of mixing behavior, ranging from under to overpenetration of the transverse jets, are characterized in terms of a new scaling law parameter presented in part one. The level of unmixedness, a primary metric for mixing device performance, is quantified for different jet diameters, number of jets, and relative flow rates. It is apparent that the addition of a second transverse jet provides enhanced scalar uniformity in the main pipe flow cross section compared to a single jet. Three and six jet configurations also provide highly uniform scalar distributions. Turbulent scalar fluctuation intensities, spectral features, and spatial eigenfunctions using the proper orthogonal decomposition will be presented. Distribution A: Public Release, Public Affairs Clearance Number: 12656.

  12. Mathematical simulation of ignition of a coal-dust suspension in air by a low-temperature plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, A. D.; Zhukov, M. F.

    1998-05-01

    The process of aerosuspension ignition of a suspension in air in a pulverized-coal burner with a preswitched muffle by a central axisymmetric air stream heated in an electric-arc plasmatron to a temperature of about ≈5000 K is numerically simulated. This process is the basis of a new fuel-oil-free method of ignition of the boilers of thermal power stations. The method is rather promising from the viewpoint of both economy and ecology. The goal of numerical simulation is to study the process of ignition of coal particles in the flow and to identify the conditions necessary for the transition to self-sustained burning of a coal-dust mixture. The results obtained revealed the significant role of radiative heat transfer in initializing the burning process of solid fuel particles.

  13. Numerical Parametric Studies of Laminar Flame Structures in Opposed Jets of Partially Premixed Methane-Air Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, C. R.; Raghavan, Vasudevan

    2012-09-01

    Interactions of fuel-rich and fuel-lean mixtures and formation of interlinked multiple flame zones are observed in gas turbines and industrial furnaces. For fundamentally understanding such flames, numerical investigation of heat and mass transport, and chemical reaction processes, in laminar, counter flowing partially premixed rich and lean streams of methane and air mixtures, is presented. An axisymmetric numerical reactive flow model, with C2 detailed mechanism for describing methane oxidation in air and an optically thin radiation sub-model, is used in simulations. The numerical results are validated against the experimental results from literature. The equivalence ratios of counter flowing rich and lean reactant streams and the resulting strain rates have been varied. The effect of these parameters on the flame structure is presented. For a given rich and lean side equivalence ratios, by varying the strain rates, triple, double and single flame zones are obtained.

  14. Investigation of mean flow and turbulence for a variable-density jet near transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovitz, Stephen; Mastin, Larry; Viggiano, Bianca; Dib, Tamara; Ali, Nasim; Cal, Raul; Volcanic Plume Research Team Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Plumes can vary widely in size and speed in geophysical systems, with Reynolds numbers (Re) extending from thousands to billions. Concurrently, their densities also have significant deviations, resulting in Richardson numbers (Ri) from negligible levels to near one. To investigate a range of these flow conditions more closely, a laboratory-scale experiment considered helium jets exhausting into air. The tests considered Re from 1500 to 10000 and Ri magnitudes near 0.001, which encompasses a series of jet conditions near the exit, including laminar, transitioning, and turbulent flow. Using particle image velocimetry (PIV), instantaneous velocity fields were acquired, and these were used to determine the mean velocity, entrainment, and turbulent statistics. The laminar jet showed very little development or entrainment, with only minor fluctuations. Turbulent jets had rapid flow development, nearing fully-developed conditions earlier than similar non-buoyant jets. For the transitioning jet, the entrainment and turbulent stresses were significantly larger than even the fully turbulent jet, with axial normal stresses more than doubled. Examining the instantaneous flow fields, these increases coincided with large, non-axisymmetric eddies in the shear layer. Supported by NSF Grant #: EAR-1346580.

  15. Contribution of infralimbic cortex in the cardiovascular response to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ribeiro, Flávia Camargos de Figueirêdo; Zaretsky, Dmitry V; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Santos, Robson A S; DiMicco, Joseph A; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2012-09-15

    The infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (IL) modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine function via projections to subcortical structures involved in the response to stress. We evaluated the contribution of the IL to the cardiovascular response evoked by acute stress. Under anesthesia (80 mg/kg ketamine-11.5 mg/kg xylazine), rats were implanted with telemetry probes or arterial lines for recording heart rate and blood pressure. Guide cannulas were implanted to target the IL for microinjection of muscimol (100 pmol/100 nl), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) (6 pmol/100 nl), or vehicle (100 nl). Microinjection of muscimol, an agonist of GABA(A) receptors, into the IL had no effect on stress-evoked cardiovascular and thermogenic changes in any of the paradigms evaluated (cage switch, restraint plus air-jet noise, or air-jet stress). However, microinjection of the excitatory amino acid NMDA into the IL attenuated the pressor and tachycardic response to air-jet stress. Pretreatment with the selective NMDA antagonist dl-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5, 100 pmol/100 nl) blocked the effect of NMDA on the cardiovascular response to air-jet stress. We conclude that 1) the IL region is not tonically involved in cardiovascular or thermogenic control during stress or under baseline conditions, and 2) activation of NMDA receptors in the IL can suppress the cardiovascular response to acute stress exposure.

  16. Stress response of Escherichia coli induced by surface streamer discharge in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doležalová, Eva; Prukner, Václav; Lukeš, Petr; Šimek, Milan

    2016-02-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli by means of surface streamer discharge has been investigated to obtain new insights into the key mechanisms involved, with a particular emphasis placed on the microbial response to plasma-induced stress. The surface streamer discharge was produced in coplanar dielectric barrier discharge electrode geometry, and was driven by an amplitude-modulated ac high voltage in humid synthetic air at atmospheric pressure. The response to plasma-induced stress was evaluated by using conventional cultivation, sublethal injury and resazurin assay and the LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ Bacterial Viability kit. Compared to conventional cultivation, the LIVE/DEAD® test labels bacteria with damaged membranes, while resazurin assay tracks their metabolic activity. Our results clearly demonstrate that the treated bacteria partly lost their ability to grow properly, i.e. they became injured and culturable, or even viable but nonculturable (VBNC). The ability to develop colonies could have been lost due to damage of the bacterial membrane. Damage of the membranes was mainly caused by the lipid peroxidation, evidencing the key role of oxygen reactive species, in particular ozone. We conclude that the conventional cultivation method overestimates the decontamination efficiency of various plasma sources, and must therefore be complemented by alternative techniques capable of resolving viable but nonculturable bacteria.

  17. Health Effects of a Mixture of Indoor Air Volatile Organics, Their Ozone Oxidation Products, and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Nancy; Laumbach, Robert; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Lioy, Paul; Fan, Zhi-Hua; Zhang, Junfeng; Ottenweller, John; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kipen, Howard

    2005-01-01

    In our present study we tested the health effects among women of controlled exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with and without ozone (O3), and psychological stress. Each subject was exposed to the following three conditions at 1-week intervals (within-subject factor): VOCs (26 mg/m3), VOCs + O3 (26 mg/m3 + 40 ppb), and ambient air with a 1-min spike of VOCs (2.5 mg/m3). As a between-subjects factor, half the subjects were randomly assigned to perform a stressor. Subjects were 130 healthy women (mean age, 27.2 years; mean education, 15.2 years). Health effects measured before, during, and after each 140-min exposure included symptoms, neurobehavioral performance, salivary cortisol, and lung function. Mixing VOCs with O3 was shown to produce irritating compounds including aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, organic acids, secondary organic aerosols, and ultrafine particles (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 μm). Exposure to VOCs with and without O3 did not result in significant subjective or objective health effects. Psychological stress significantly increased salivary cortisol and symptoms of anxiety regardless of exposure condition. Neither lung function nor neurobehavioral performance was compromised by exposure to VOCs or VOCs + O3. Although numerous epidemiologic studies suggest that symptoms are significantly increased among workers in buildings with poor ventilation and mixtures of VOCs, our acute exposure study was not consistent with these epidemiologic findings. Stress appears to be a more significant factor than chemical exposures in affecting some of the health end points measured in our present study. PMID:16263509

  18. Modeling activities in air traffic control systems: antecedents and consequences of a mid-air collision.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Paulo Victor R; Ferreira, Bemildo

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present a model of some functions and activities of the Brazilian Air traffic Control System (ATS) in the period in which occurred a mid-air collision between flight GLO1907, a commercial aircraft Boeing 737-800, and flight N600XL, an executive jet EMBRAER E-145, to investigate key resilience characteristics of the ATM. Modeling in some detail activities during the collision and related them to overall behavior and antecedents that stress the organization uncover some drift into failure mechanisms that erode safety defenses provided by the Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), enabling a mid-air collision to be happen.

  19. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  20. Air atmospheric pressure plasma jet pretreatment for drop-wise loading of dexamethasone on hydroxyapatite scaffold for increase of osteoblast attachment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-10-01

    Periodontal disease affects alveolar bone resorption around the involved teeth. To gain bone height, bone graft materials have been widely used with drug carriers. Application of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) treatment is widely studied due to its ability to change surface characteristics without topographical change. The aim of this study is to identify whether the air APPJ (AAPPJ) treatment before drop-wise loading performance could change loaded amount of dexamethasone, and induce increase of cell attachment and proliferation. The results suggested that AAPPJ treatment decreased the contact angle down to about 13 degrees, which increased gradually but significantly lowered at least 4 days compared to no-treated group. After AAPPJ treatment, hydrocarbon was removed with change of zeta potential into positive charge. However, the AAPPJ treatment did not change the quantity or releasing profile of dexamethasone (p > 0.05). Confocal analysis combined with DNA proliferation analysis showed increase of osteoblast attachment and proliferation. Hence, AAPPJ could be a useful pretreatment method before drop-wise loading on HA scaffold with dexamethasone for increase of osteoblast attachment.

  1. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix E; Repr. from AIAA Journal, v. 36 p 1346-1360

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230-s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous flame lengths of 49-64 mm Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, soot structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer.The present flames were larger, and emitted soot more readily, than comparable flames observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  2. The Numerical Simulation of Jet Mixing With Steady and Antisymmetric Pulsed Jets in Different Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. B.; Hong, L.

    2017-03-01

    A parametric study of the effect of rectangular antisymmetric pulsed control jets on the jet mixing with different pulse frequency is conducted using RANS simulation. The mean centerline potential core length and the axial velocity contours of the main jet at different downstream positions (x/D) is investigated and discussed in detail. When the antisymmetric pulsed control jets are injected into the main flow, a starting vortex is observed in the axial velocity contours on x-z plane, which does not exist when the control jets are symmetric steady (St=0). The factors that have effect on the jet mixing are analyzed and described in detail, and the jet/ambient air interfacial area is found to play an important role in jet mixing. The best mixing effect can be reached at the same mass flow ratio of the main flow to the control jets if a proper pulse frequency of the control jets is used.

  3. Stress in Air Traffic Controllers: Comparison of Two Air Route Traffic Control Centers on Different Shift Rotation Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    stress in their 23 cohorts on the 2-2-1 schedule. Stress estimates were made from urinary levels of 17- ketogenic steroids (st), epinephrine (e...analyzed, as previously reported,1 for 17- ketogenic steroids ^st), epinephrine (e), and norepinephrine (ne). These urinary me- tabolites are reported

  4. Antioxidant and oxidative stress parameters in brain of Heteropneustes fossilis under air exposure condition; role of mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Many fishes are exposed to air in their natural habitat or during their commercial handling. In natural habitat or during commercial handling, the cat fish Heteropneustes fossilis is exposed to air for >24h. Data on its oxidative metabolism in the above condition are not available. Oxidative stress (OS) indices (lipid and protein oxidation), toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS: H2O2) generation, antioxidative status (levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reductase, ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl) and activities of electron transport chain (ETC) enzymes (complex I-IV) were investigated in brain tissue of H. fossilis under air exposure condition (0, 3, 6, 12 and 18 h at 25°C). Decreased activities of antioxidant (except catalase) and ETC enzymes (except complex II) with increased H2O2 and OS levels were observed in the tissue under water deprivation condition. Positive correlation was observed for complex II activity and non-protein thiol groups with time period of air exposure. The critical time period to induce OS and to reduce most of the studied antioxidant level in brain was found to be 3-6h air exposure. The data can be useful to minimize the stress generated during commercial handling of the live fishes those exposed to air in general and H. fossilis in particular.

  5. Jet Propulsion with Special Reference to Thrust Augmenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubauer, G B

    1933-01-01

    An investigation of the possibility of using thrust augmented jets as prime movers was carried out. The augmentation was to be effected by allowing the jet to mix with the surrounding air in the presence of bodies which deflect the air set in motion by the jet.

  6. Measurement of acoustic shielding by a turbulent jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J. C.; Fratello, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The acoustic shielding properties of a turbulent jet have been investigated experimentally. The experimental arrangement consisted of an acoustic point source and a turbulent shielding jet. The source and jet parameters investigated include the source frequency, source spectrum, jet velocity, jet heating by simulation and the lateral and longitudinal source positions with respect to the shielding jet. It is found that the maximum sound attenuation provided by the shielding jet depends on the balance between refraction and diffraction. Over the frequency range investigated, the redistribution of sound by the shielding air jet is power conserving. Comparison between measurement and prediction based on an idealized cylindrical uniform jet model indicates that the spreading and decay of the flow field in real jets are important. Comparisons between the present data trends and those reported for jet-by-jet shielding suggest that the major effects observed in the latter are acoustical rather than aerodynamical.

  7. Deformation and dewetting of thin liquid films induced by moving gas jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Darhuber, Anton A

    2013-10-01

    We study the deformation of thin liquid films subjected to impinging air-jets that are moving with respect to the substrate. The height profile and shape of the deformed liquid film is evaluated experimentally and numerically for different jet Reynolds numbers and translation speeds, for different liquids and substrate materials. Experiments and numerical results are in good agreement. On partially wetting substrates film rupture occurs. We imaged the appearance of dry spots and emergence of droplet patterns by high-speed, dual-wavelength interference microscopy. We systematically evaluated the resulting average droplet size and droplet density as a function of the experimental conditions. We show that within experimental accuracy the distribution of dry spots is dependent only on the residual film thickness and is not directly influenced by the shear stress and pressure gradients of the air-jet, nor by the speed of the substrate.

  8. LDV Measurement of Confined Parallel Jet Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    R.F. Kunz; S.W. D'Amico; P.F. Vassallo; M.A. Zaccaria

    2001-01-31

    Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements were taken in a confinement, bounded by two parallel walls, into which issues a row of parallel jets. Two-component measurements were taken of two mean velocity components and three Reynolds stress components. As observed in isolated three dimensional wall bounded jets, the transverse diffusion of the jets is quite large. The data indicate that this rapid mixing process is due to strong secondary flows, transport of large inlet intensities and Reynolds stress anisotropy effects.

  9. Behavior of turbulent gas jets in an axisymmetric confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The understanding of the mixing of confined turbulent jets of different densities with air is of great importance to many industrial applications, such as gas turbine and Ramjet combustors. Although there have been numerous studies on the characteristics of free gas jets, little is known of the behavior of gas jets in a confinement. The jet, with a diameter of 8.73 mm, is aligned concentrically in a tube of 125 mm diameter, thus giving a confinement ratio of approximately 205. The arrangement forms part of the test section of an open-jet wind tunnel. Experiments are carried out with carbon dioxide, air and helium/air jets at different jet velocities. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are made with a one-color, one-component laser Doppler velocimeter operating in the forward scatter mode. Measurements show that the jets are highly dissipative. Consequently, equilibrium jet characteristics similar to those found in free air jets are observed in the first two diameters downstream of the jet. These results are independent of the fluid densities and velocities. Decay of the jet, on the other hand, is a function of both the jet fluid density and momentum. In all the cases studied, the jet is found to be completely dissipated in approximately 30 jet diameters, thus giving rise to a uniform flow with a very high but constant turbulence field across the confinement.

  10. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  11. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  12. Effect of rilmenidine on the cadiovascular responses to stress in the conscious rabbit.

    PubMed

    Burke, S L; Malpas, S C; Head, G A

    1998-10-15

    Environmental stress can cause an increase in sympathetic nerve activity both in humans and animals. While centrally acting antihypertensive drugs such as rilmenidine are known to reduce sympathetic tone, it is not clear whether they also influence the cardiovascular responses to acute stress. In the present study we examined the effects of systemic treatment with rilmenidine on the sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to air jet or noise stress. Twelve conscious rabbits previously implanted with a renal nerve recording electrode were subjected to an 8 l/min stream of air directed at their face for 10 min or exposure to 10 min of white noise (approximately 85 dB). Both air jet and noise stress elicited increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) which were greatest in the first minute (+55+/-9% and +40+/-6%, respectively), but which quickly reached a stable level over the subsequent 9 min (+24+/-6% and +9+/-5%, respectively). This was accompanied by a small increase in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Intravenous rilmenidine (273 microg/kg) reduced MAP from 85+/-3 mm Hg to 68+/-2 mm Hg and HR from 203+/-10 b/min to 188+/-10 b/min and lowered basal RSNA by 54%. Rilmenidine reduced the increase in RSNA seen during the first minute of air jet stress by 35% and reduced the average increase over the next 9 min by 68%. However, rilmenidine had little effect on either the initial or stable RSNA responses to noise stress. Saline treatment did not alter the RSNA responses to either air jet or noise stress. The results show that centrally-acting antihypertensive agents not only lower basal RSNA, but can differentially influence environmentally induced sympathetic responses. In addition, the differential effect of rilmenidine on noise and air jet stress suggests that they may involve quite different central processing.

  13. IN-SITU AIR INJECTION, SOIL VACUUM EXTRACTION AND ENHANCED BIODEGRADATION: A CASE STUDY IN A JP-4 JET FUEL CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) conducted a joint demonstration of in situ remediation of a JP-4 jet fuel spill at the USCG Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. The jet fuel was trapped beneath a clay layer that ext...

  14. Experiments with large diameter gravity driven impacting liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storr, G. J.; Behnia, M.

    The phenomenon of a liquid jet released under gravity and falling through or impacting onto another liquid before colliding with an obstructing solid surface has been studied experimentally under isothermal conditions. Usually the jet diameter was sufficiently large to ensure jet coherency until collision. Direct flow visualization was used to study jets released into water pools with no air head space and jets impacting onto water pools after falling through an air head space. It is shown that distances predicting the onset of buoyancy and the entrainment of air using derivations from continuous plunging jets, are not applicable for impacting jets. The morphology of jet debris after collision with the solid surfaces correlates with the wetting properties of the jet liquid on the surface.

  15. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment evokes transient oxidative stress in HaCaT keratinocytes and influences cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Wende, Kristian; Straßenburg, Susanne; Haertel, Beate; Harms, Manuela; Holtz, Sarah; Barton, Annemarie; Masur, Kai; von Woedtke, Thomas; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-04-01

    Modern non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma sources enable controllable interaction with biological systems. Their future applications - e.g. wound management - are based on their unique mixture of reactive components sparking both stimulatory as well as inhibitory processes. To gain detailed understanding of plasma-cell interaction and with respect to risk awareness, key mechanisms need to be identified. This study focuses on the impact of an argon non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (kINPen 09) on human HaCaT keratinocytes. With increasing duration, cell viability decreased. In accordance, cells accumulated in G2/M phase within the following 24 h. DNA single-strand breaks were detected immediately after treatment and receded in the aftermath, returning to control levels after 24 h. No directly plasma-related DNA double-strand breaks were detected over the same time. Concurrently, DNA synthesis decreased. Coincident with treatment time, an increase in intracellular 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCFDA) conversion increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. The radical scavenging activity of culture medium crucially influenced these effects. Thus, ROS changed DNA integrity, and the effectiveness of cellular defence mechanisms characterises the interaction of non-thermal plasma and eukaryotic cells. Effects were time-dependent, indicating an active response of the eukaryotic cells. Hence, a stimulation of eukaryotic cells using short-term non-thermal plasma treatment seems possible, eg in the context of chronic wound care. Long-term plasma treatments stopped in cell proliferation and apoptosis, which might be relevant in controlling neoplastic conditions.

  16. Measuring soil erodibility using a laboratory "mini" JET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Typically the erosion rate of cohesive soils is quantified using an excess shear stress equation, dependent on two major soil parameters: the critical shear stress and the erodibility coefficient. A submerged jet test (JETJet Erosion Test) is one method that has been developed for measuring the...

  17. Experimental study of turbulence in isothermal jet impingement at intermediate plate spacings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landfried, D. Tyler; Valentino, Alex; Mazumdar, Sagnik; Jana, Anirban; Kimber, Mark

    2013-11-01

    One fundamental problem in fluid dynamics is that of the axisymmetric round flow impinging on a plate placed some distance downstream of the jet. Impinging jets have a rich history of applications including small plate spacings, H/D ~ 1, such as encountered in electronics cooling, or large plate spacings, H/D ~ 102, such as vertical takeoff aircrafts and rocket engines. However, intermediate plate spacings, such as the lower plenum of the next generation nuclear reactors, are not typically studied. In this paper, an experimental study is conducted investigating the effect of the impingement plate on the flow behavior compared to the near free jet behavior when the plate is removed. Using air as the working fluid, a single jet is considered at jet Reynolds numbers of 10000, 20000, and 30000. A three-wire anemometer probe is used to quantify the mean components of velocities as well as the Reynolds stress and the third-order moments in the flow field at various distances between the jet outlet and the impingement plate. When present, the impingement plate is placed a distance of 8, 11, 14, and 17 diameters downstream of the jet. Additionally trends in the kinetic energy and dissipation are investigated for validation with numerical models.

  18. Composition of air pollution particles modifies oxidative stress in cells, tissues, and living systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate an association between increased levels of ambient air pollution particles and human morbidity and mortality. Production of oxidants, either directly by the air pollution particles or by the host response to the particles, appears to be fundame...

  19. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  20. Isothermal and Reactive Turbulent Jets in Cross-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Bush, Scott; Ibrahim, Irene

    2004-11-01

    Jets in cross flow have numerous applications including vertical/short takeoff/landing (V/STOL) aircraft, cooling jets for gas turbine blades and combustion air supply inlets in gas turbine engine. The properties exhibited by these jets are dictated by complex three dimensional turbulence structures which form due to the interaction of the jet with the freestream. The isothermal tests are conducted in a wind tunnel measuring the characteristics of air jets injected perpendicular into an otherwise undisturbed air stream. Different nozzle exit geometries of the air jets were tested including circular, triangular and elongated configurations. Jets are injected in single and paired combinations with other jets to measure the effect of mutual interaction on the parameters mentioned. Quantitative velocity fields are obtained using PIV. The data obtained allows the extraction of flow parameters such as jet structure, penetration and mixing. The reacting tests include separate and combined jets of fuel/air mixture utilized to explore the stabilization of combustion at various operating conditions. Different geometrical configurations of transverse jets are tested to determine the shape and combination of jets that will optimize the jets ability to successfully stabilize a flame.

  1. Short-term effects of air quality and thermal stress on non-accidental morbidity-a multivariate meta-analysis comparing indices to single measures.

    PubMed

    Lokys, Hanna Leona; Junk, Jürgen; Krein, Andreas

    2017-02-28

    Air quality and thermal stress lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Studies on morbidity and the combined impact of air pollution and thermal stress are still rare. To analyse the correlations between air quality, thermal stress and morbidity, we used a two-stage meta-analysis approach, consisting of a Poisson regression model combined with distributed lag non-linear models (DLNMs) and a meta-analysis investigating whether latitude or the number of inhabitants significantly influence the correlations. We used air pollution, meteorological and hospital admission data from 28 administrative districts along a north-south gradient in western Germany from 2001 to 2011. We compared the performance of the single measure particulate matter (PM10) and air temperature to air quality indices (MPI and CAQI) and the biometeorological index UTCI. Based on the Akaike information criterion (AIC), it can be shown that using air quality indices instead of single measures increases the model strength. However, using the UTCI in the model does not give additional information compared to mean air temperature. Interaction between the 3-day average of air quality (max PM10, max CAQI and max MPI) and meteorology (mean air temperature and mean UTCI) did not improve the models. Using the mean air temperature, we found immediate effects of heat stress (RR 1.0013, 95% CI: 0.9983-1.0043) and by 3 days delayed effects of cold stress (RR: 1.0184, 95% CI: 1.0117-1.0252). The results for air quality differ between both air quality indices and PM10. CAQI and MPI show a delayed impact on morbidity with a maximum RR after 2 days (MPI 1.0058, 95% CI: 1.0013-1.0102; CAQI 1.0068, 95% CI: 1.0030-1.0107). Latitude was identified as a significant meta-variable, whereas the number of inhabitants was not significant in the model.

  2. Short-term effects of air quality and thermal stress on non-accidental morbidity—a multivariate meta-analysis comparing indices to single measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokys, Hanna Leona; Junk, Jürgen; Krein, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Air quality and thermal stress lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Studies on morbidity and the combined impact of air pollution and thermal stress are still rare. To analyse the correlations between air quality, thermal stress and morbidity, we used a two-stage meta-analysis approach, consisting of a Poisson regression model combined with distributed lag non-linear models (DLNMs) and a meta-analysis investigating whether latitude or the number of inhabitants significantly influence the correlations. We used air pollution, meteorological and hospital admission data from 28 administrative districts along a north-south gradient in western Germany from 2001 to 2011. We compared the performance of the single measure particulate matter (PM10) and air temperature to air quality indices (MPI and CAQI) and the biometeorological index UTCI. Based on the Akaike information criterion (AIC), it can be shown that using air quality indices instead of single measures increases the model strength. However, using the UTCI in the model does not give additional information compared to mean air temperature. Interaction between the 3-day average of air quality (max PM10, max CAQI and max MPI) and meteorology (mean air temperature and mean UTCI) did not improve the models. Using the mean air temperature, we found immediate effects of heat stress (RR 1.0013, 95% CI: 0.9983-1.0043) and by 3 days delayed effects of cold stress (RR: 1.0184, 95% CI: 1.0117-1.0252). The results for air quality differ between both air quality indices and PM10. CAQI and MPI show a delayed impact on morbidity with a maximum RR after 2 days (MPI 1.0058, 95% CI: 1.0013-1.0102; CAQI 1.0068, 95% CI: 1.0030-1.0107). Latitude was identified as a significant meta-variable, whereas the number of inhabitants was not significant in the model.

  3. The Structure and Dynamics of GRB Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-10-25

    There are several lines of evidence which suggest that the relativistic outflows in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated into narrow jets. The jet structure has important implications for the true energy release and the event rate of GRBs, and can constrain the mechanism responsible for the acceleration and collimation of the jet. Nevertheless, the jet structure and its dynamics as it sweeps up the external medium and decelerates, are not well understood. In this review I discuss our current understanding of GRB jets, stressing their structure and dynamics.

  4. Increased Air Velocity Reduces Thermal and Cardiovascular Strain in Young and Older Males during Humid Exertional Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Wright Beatty, Heather E; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Older adults have been reported to have a lower evaporative heat loss capacity than younger adults during exercise when full sweat evaporation is permitted. However, it is unclear how conditions of restricted evaporative and convective heat loss (i.e., high humidity, clothing insulation) alter heat stress. to the purpose of this study was to examine the heat stress responses of young and older males during and following exercise in a warm/humid environment under two different levels of air velocity. Ten young (YOUNG: 24±2 yr) and 10 older (OLDER: 59±3 yr) males, matched for body surface area performed 4×15-min cycling bouts (15-min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in warm/humid conditions (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (Low) and 3.0 (High) m·s(-1) air velocity while wearing work coveralls. Rectal (Tre) and mean skin (MTsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), local sweat rate, % max skin blood flow (SkBF) (recovery only), and blood pressure (recovery only) were measured. High air velocity reduced core and skin temperatures (p < 0.05) equally in YOUNG and OLDER males (p > 0.05) but was more effective in reducing cardiovascular strain (absolute and % max HR; p < 0.05) in YOUNG males (p < 0.05). Greater increases in local dry heat loss responses (% max SkBF and cutaneous vascular conductance) were detected across time in OLDER than YOUNG males in both conditions (p < 0.05). Local dry heat loss responses and cardiovascular strain were attenuated during the High condition in YOUNG compared to OLDER (p < 0.05). High air velocity reduced the number of males surpassing the 38.0°C Tre threshold from 90% (Low) to 50% (High). Despite age-related local heat loss differences, YOUNG and OLDER males had similar levels of heat stress during intermittent exercise in warm and humid conditions while wearing work coveralls. Increased air velocity was effective in reducing heat stress equally, and cardiovascular strain to a greater extent, in YOUNG and OLDER

  5. Antioxidant N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 of industrial baker's yeast enhances fermentation ability after air-drying stress in bread dough.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2010-03-31

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to multiple stresses. Air-drying stress is one of the most harmful stresses by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previously, we discovered that the novel N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 confers oxidative stress tolerance by reducing intracellular ROS level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sigma1278b strain. In this study, we revealed that Japanese industrial baker's yeast possesses one MPR gene. The nucleotide sequence of the MPR gene in industrial baker's yeast was identical to the MPR2 gene in Sigma1278b strain. Gene disruption analysis showed that the MPR2 gene in industrial baker's yeast is involved in air-drying stress tolerance by reducing the intracellular oxidation levels. We also found that expression of the Lys63Arg and Phe65Leu variants with enhanced enzymatic activity and stability, respectively, increased the fermentation ability of bread dough after exposure to air-drying stress compared with the wild-type Mpr1. In addition, our recent study showed that industrial baker's yeast cells accumulating proline exhibited enhanced freeze tolerance in bread dough. Proline accumulation also enhanced the fermentation ability after air-drying stress treatment in industrial baker's yeast. Hence, the antioxidant enzyme Mpr1/2 could be promising for breeding novel yeast strains that are tolerant to air-drying stress.

  6. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  7. Effect of de-correlating turbulence on the low frequency decay of jet-surface interaction noise in sub-sonic unheated air jets using a CFD-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Leib, S. J.; Bozak, R. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we extend the Rapid-distortion theory (RDT)-based model derived by Goldstein, Afsar & Leib (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 736, pp. 532-569, 2013) for the sound generated by the interaction of a large-aspect-ratio rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a flat plate to include a more realistic upstream turbulence spectrum that possess a de-correlation (i.e. negative dip) in its space-time structure and use results from three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions to determine the mean flow, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence length & time scales. Since the interaction noise dominates the low-frequency portion of the spectrum, we use an appropriate asymptotic approximation for the Rayleigh equation Green's function, which enters the analysis, based on a two-dimensional mean flow representation for the jet. We use the model to predict jet-surface interaction noise for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets, nozzle aspect ratios, streamwise and transverse trailing-edge locations and compare them with experimental data. The RANS meanflow computations are also compared with flow data for selected cases to assess their validity. We find that finite de-correlation in the turbulence spectrum increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low-frequency "roll-off") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency to give a model that has a pure dipole frequency scaling. This gives better agreement with noise data compared to Goldstein et al. (2013) for Strouhal numbers less than the peak jet-surface interaction noise. For example, through sensitivity analysis we find that there is a difference of 10 dB at the lowest frequency for which data exists (relative to a model without de-correlation effects included) for the highest acoustic Mach number case. Secondly, our results for the planar flow theory provide a first estimate of the low-frequency amplification due to the jet-surface interaction for moderate aspect ratio nozzles when RANS

  8. RING Type E3 Ligase CaAIR1 in Pepper Acts in the Regulation of ABA Signaling and Drought Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Baek, Woonhee; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-09-01

    Several E3 ubiquitin ligases have been associated with the response to abiotic and biotic stresses in higher plants. Here, we report that the hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) ABA-Insensitive RING protein 1 gene (CaAIR1) is essential for a hypersensitive response to drought stress. CaAIR1 contains a C3HC4-type RING finger motif, which plays a role for attachment of ubiquitins to the target protein, and a putative transmembrane domain. The expression levels of CaAIR1 are up-regulated in pepper leaves by ABA treatments, drought and NaCl, suggesting its role in the response to abiotic stress. Our analysis showed that CaAIR1 displays self-ubiquitination and is localized in the nucleus. We generated CaAIR1-silenced peppers via virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and CaAIR1-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to evaluate their responses to ABA and drought. VIGS of CaAIR1 in pepper plants conferred an enhanced tolerance to drought stress, which was accompanied by low levels of transpirational water loss in the drought-treated leaves. CaAIR1-OX plants displayed an impaired sensitivity to ABA during seed germination, seedling and adult stages. Moreover, these plants showed enhanced sensitivity to drought stress because of reduced stomatal closure and decreased expression of stress-responsive genes. Thus, our data indicate that CaAIR1 is a negative regulator of the ABA-mediated drought stress tolerance mechanism.

  9. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  10. Low-order Description and Conditional Averaging in a Transitional Variable-Density Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viggiano, Bianca; Dib, Tamara; Ali, Naseem; Mastin, Larry; Solovitz, Stephen; Cal, Raul Bayoan

    2016-11-01

    A vertically oriented jet is investigated using particle image velocimetry to identify characteristics of the flow that contribute to the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy and development of Reynolds shear stresses. Experiments with three different gases air, argon and helium as the jet and a range of exit velocities were performed to allow for variety of the Reynolds and Richardson numbers. Five cases are examined in total. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to assess the energy distribution of all cases with respect to the number of modes. Reconstruction of the Reynolds shear stresses using 50% of the total turbulent kinetic energy is performed. Quadrant analysis with respect to the Reynolds shear stress is also performed for insight into the entrainment of the jet. Reynolds shear stresses are dominant in Q1 - advancing ejections and Q3 - impeding entrainment and exhibit negligible contributions from the remaining two quadrants. POD is able to identify most dominant structures and transition effects within the basis. Via quadrant analysis, advancing ejection and impeding entrainment further describe the streamwise development of each jet. National Science Foundation.

  11. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  12. Biofluid metabotyping of occupationally exposed subjects to air pollution demonstrates high oxidative stress and deregulated amino acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Surya Narayan; Das, Aleena; Meena, Ramovatar; Nanda, Ranjan Kumar; Rajamani, Paulraj

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to air pollution induces oxidative stress and prolonged exposure increases susceptibility to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in several working groups. Biofluid of these subjects may reflect perturbed metabolic phenotypes. In this study we carried out a comparative molecular profiling study using parallel biofluids collected from subjects (n = 85) belonging to auto rickshaw drivers (ARD), traffic cops (TC) and office workers (OW). Higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation markers in serum of ARD subjects were observed as compared to OW and TC. Uni and multivariate analyses of metabolites identified in urine by 1H NMR revealed 11 deregulated molecules in ARD subjects and involved in phenylalanine, histidine, arginine and proline metabolism. Despite contribution of confounding factors like exposure period, dietary factors including smoking and alcohol status, our results demonstrate existence of exposure specific metabotypes in biofluids of ARD, OW and TC groups. Monitoring serum oxidative stress and inflammation markers and urine metabolites by NMR may be useful to characterize perturbed metabolic phenotypes in populations exposed to urban traffic air pollution. PMID:27767182

  13. Symptoms of psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder in United States Air Force "drone" operators.

    PubMed

    Chappelle, Wayne L; McDonald, Kent D; Prince, Lillian; Goodman, Tanya; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie N; Thompson, William

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study is to repeat a survey administered in 2010 to assess for changes in mental health among United States Air Force aircrew operating Predator/Reaper remotely piloted aircraft, also commonly referred to as "drones." Participants were assessed for self-reported sources of occupational stress, levels of clinical distress using the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using the PTSD Checklist-Military Version. A total of 1,094 aircrew responded to the web-based survey composed of the commercially available standardized instruments mentioned above. The survey also contained nonstandardized items asking participants to report the main sources of their occupational stress, as well as questions addressing demographics and work-related characteristics. The estimated response rate to the survey was 49%. Study results reveal the most problematic self-reported stressors are operational: low manning, extra duties/administrative tasks, rotating shift work, and long hours. The results also reveal 10.72% of operators self-reported experiencing high levels of distress and 1.57% reported high levels of PTSD symptomology. The results are lower than findings from the 2010 survey and from soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Implications of the study and recommendations for United States Air Force line leadership and mental health providers are discussed.

  14. Biofluid metabotyping of occupationally exposed subjects to air pollution demonstrates high oxidative stress and deregulated amino acid metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Surya Narayan; Das, Aleena; Meena, Ramovatar; Nanda, Ranjan Kumar; Rajamani, Paulraj

    2016-10-01

    Occupational exposure to air pollution induces oxidative stress and prolonged exposure increases susceptibility to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in several working groups. Biofluid of these subjects may reflect perturbed metabolic phenotypes. In this study we carried out a comparative molecular profiling study using parallel biofluids collected from subjects (n = 85) belonging to auto rickshaw drivers (ARD), traffic cops (TC) and office workers (OW). Higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation markers in serum of ARD subjects were observed as compared to OW and TC. Uni and multivariate analyses of metabolites identified in urine by 1H NMR revealed 11 deregulated molecules in ARD subjects and involved in phenylalanine, histidine, arginine and proline metabolism. Despite contribution of confounding factors like exposure period, dietary factors including smoking and alcohol status, our results demonstrate existence of exposure specific metabotypes in biofluids of ARD, OW and TC groups. Monitoring serum oxidative stress and inflammation markers and urine metabolites by NMR may be useful to characterize perturbed metabolic phenotypes in populations exposed to urban traffic air pollution.

  15. Biofluid metabotyping of occupationally exposed subjects to air pollution demonstrates high oxidative stress and deregulated amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Surya Narayan; Das, Aleena; Meena, Ramovatar; Nanda, Ranjan Kumar; Rajamani, Paulraj

    2016-10-21

    Occupational exposure to air pollution induces oxidative stress and prolonged exposure increases susceptibility to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in several working groups. Biofluid of these subjects may reflect perturbed metabolic phenotypes. In this study we carried out a comparative molecular profiling study using parallel biofluids collected from subjects (n = 85) belonging to auto rickshaw drivers (ARD), traffic cops (TC) and office workers (OW). Higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation markers in serum of ARD subjects were observed as compared to OW and TC. Uni and multivariate analyses of metabolites identified in urine by (1)H NMR revealed 11 deregulated molecules in ARD subjects and involved in phenylalanine, histidine, arginine and proline metabolism. Despite contribution of confounding factors like exposure period, dietary factors including smoking and alcohol status, our results demonstrate existence of exposure specific metabotypes in biofluids of ARD, OW and TC groups. Monitoring serum oxidative stress and inflammation markers and urine metabolites by NMR may be useful to characterize perturbed metabolic phenotypes in populations exposed to urban traffic air pollution.

  16. Turbulent wall jet in a coflowing stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was undertaken to develop a relatively simple model of a two-dimensional, turbulent wall jet in a coflowing stream. The incompressible jet flow was modeled by using an integral method which includes turbulent shear stress, entrainment, and heat transfer. The method solves the conservation equations for the average jet flow properties and uses the velocity profile suggested by Escudier and Nicoll to obtain detailed characteristics of the jet on a flat plate. The analytical results compare favorably with experimental data for a range of injection velocities, which demonstrates the usefulness of the theory for estimating jet growth, velocity decay, and wall skin friction. The theory, which was applied to a Coanda jet on a circular cylinder, provided estimates of suction pressures aft of the jet exit that were in close agreement with experimental values.

  17. The role of air pollution in the relationship between a heat stress index and human mortality in Toronto.

    PubMed

    Rainham, Daniel G C; Smoyer-Tomic, Karen E

    2003-09-01

    In this study we considered confounding from air pollutants and chronological variables in the relation between humidex, a summer temperature and humidity index, and nonaccidental mortality, from 1980-1996 in Toronto, Canada. Changes in the risk of death by age group, gender, and combined cardiac-respiratory cause of death were estimated for both 1 degree C and 50-95th percentile increases in humidex using a generalized additive linear model. With air pollution terms in the models, relative risk (RR) point estimates narrowly exceeded 1.0 for all groups. Humidex effects were most apparent for females (RR=1.006, 95% CI=1.004-1.008 per 1 degree C humidex and RR=1.089, 95% CI=1.058-1.121 for 50th to 95th percentile humidex). When air pollution was omitted from the model, RR in the 50-95th percentile analysis increased less than 1.71% for all groups except females, for which RR decreased 1.42%. Differences in RR per 1 degree C humidex were all less than 0.12%. Confidence intervals narrowed slightly for all groups investigated. Heat stress has a statistically significant, yet minimal impact on Toronto populations, and air pollution does appear to have a small, but consistent confounding effect on humidex effect estimates.

  18. A Preliminary Study of Exposure to Pyridostigmine Bromide, Diethyltoluamide, JP-4 Jet Fuel and Stress on Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    diethyltoluamide, and JP-4 jet fuel vapor. Blood and tissue samples were analyzed for gross pathology, histopathology, and clinical chemistry effects...Serum and brain regions were analyzed for neurotransmitter levels. Body weights, gross pathology, histopathology, and clinical chemistry results

  19. Synergistic and antagonistic effects of thermal shock, air exposure, and fishing capture on the physiological stress of Squilla mantis (Stomatopoda).

    PubMed

    Raicevich, Saša; Minute, Fabrizio; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Caranfa, Francesca; Di Muro, Paolo; Scapolan, Lucia; Beltramini, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing the effects of multiple stressors (thermal shock, fishing capture, and exposure to air) on the benthic stomatopod Squilla mantis, a burrowing crustacean quite widespread in the Mediterranean Sea. Laboratory analyses were carried out to explore the physiological impairment onset over time, based on emersion and thermal shocks, on farmed individuals. Parallel field-based studies were carried out to also investigate the role of fishing (i.e., otter trawling) in inducing physiological imbalance in different seasonal conditions. The dynamics of physiological recovery from physiological disruption were also studied. Physiological stress was assessed by analysing hemolymph metabolites (L-Lactate, D-glucose, ammonia, and H+), as well as glycogen concentration in muscle tissues. The experiments were carried out according to a factorial scheme considering the three factors (thermal shock, fishing capture, and exposure to air) at two fixed levels in order to explore possible synergistic, additive, or antagonistic effects among factors. Additive effects on physiological parameters were mainly detected when the three factors interacted together while synergistic effects were found as effect of the combination of two factors. This finding highlights that the physiological adaptive and maladaptive processes induced by the stressors result in a dynamic response that may encounter physiological limits when high stress levels are sustained. Thus, a further increase in the physiological parameters due to synergies cannot be reached. Moreover, when critical limits are encountered, mortality occurs and physiological parameters reflect the response of the last survivors. In the light of our mortality studies, thermal shock and exposure to air have the main effect on the survival of S. mantis only on trawled individuals, while lab-farmed individuals did not show any mortality during exposure to air until after 2 hours.

  20. Synergistic and Antagonistic Effects of Thermal Shock, Air Exposure, and Fishing Capture on the Physiological Stress of Squilla mantis (Stomatopoda)

    PubMed Central

    Raicevich, Saša; Minute, Fabrizio; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Caranfa, Francesca; Di Muro, Paolo; Scapolan, Lucia; Beltramini, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing the effects of multiple stressors (thermal shock, fishing capture, and exposure to air) on the benthic stomatopod Squilla mantis, a burrowing crustacean quite widespread in the Mediterranean Sea. Laboratory analyses were carried out to explore the physiological impairment onset over time, based on emersion and thermal shocks, on farmed individuals. Parallel field-based studies were carried out to also investigate the role of fishing (i.e., otter trawling) in inducing physiological imbalance in different seasonal conditions. The dynamics of physiological recovery from physiological disruption were also studied. Physiological stress was assessed by analysing hemolymph metabolites (L-Lactate, D-glucose, ammonia, and H+), as well as glycogen concentration in muscle tissues. The experiments were carried out according to a factorial scheme considering the three factors (thermal shock, fishing capture, and exposure to air) at two fixed levels in order to explore possible synergistic, additive, or antagonistic effects among factors. Additive effects on physiological parameters were mainly detected when the three factors interacted together while synergistic effects were found as effect of the combination of two factors. This finding highlights that the physiological adaptive and maladaptive processes induced by the stressors result in a dynamic response that may encounter physiological limits when high stress levels are sustained. Thus, a further increase in the physiological parameters due to synergies cannot be reached. Moreover, when critical limits are encountered, mortality occurs and physiological parameters reflect the response of the last survivors. In the light of our mortality studies, thermal shock and exposure to air have the main effect on the survival of S. mantis only on trawled individuals, while lab-farmed individuals did not show any mortality during exposure to air until after 2 hours. PMID:25133593

  1. Effect of air desiccation and salt stress factors on in vitro regeneration of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Abu Baker; Ara, Israt; Islam, S M Shahinul; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of callus induction and its regeneration efficiency through in vitro techniques has been optimized for 2 abiotic stresses (salt and air desiccation) using 3 rice genotypes viz. BR10, BRRI dhan32 and BRRI dhan47. The highest frequency of callus induction was obtained for BRRI dhan32 (64.44%) in MS medium supplemented with 2, 4-D (2.5 mgL−1) and Kin (1.0 mgL−1). Different concentrations of NaCl (2.9, 5.9, 8.8 and 11.7 gL−1) were used and its effect was recorded on the basis of viability of calli (VC), relative growth rate (RGR), tolerance index (TI) and relative water content (RWC). It was observed that in all cases BRRI dhan47 showed highest performance on tolerance to VC (45.33%), RGR (1.03%), TI (0.20%) and RWC (10.23%) with 11.7 gL−1 NaCl. Plant regeneration capability was recorded after partial air desiccation pretreatment to calli for 15, 30, 45 and 60 h. In this case BRRI dhan32 gave maximum number of regeneration (76.19%) when 4 weeks old calli were desiccated for 45 h. It was observed that air desiccation was 2-3 folds more effective for enhancing green plantlet regeneration compared to controls. Furthermore, desiccated calli also showed the better capability to survive in NaCl induced abiotic stress; and gave 1.9 fold (88.80%) increased regeneration in 11.7 gL−1 salt level for BRRI dhan47. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that the genotypes, air desiccation and NaCl had significant effect on plant regeneration at P < 0.01. PMID:25482754

  2. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  3. OXIDATIVE STRESS MEDIATES AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE-INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND MOLECULAR PATHOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Insight into the mechanism(s) by which ambient air particulate matter (PM) mediates adverse health effects is needed to provide biological plausibility to epidemiological studies demonstrating associations between PM exposure and increased morbidity and mortality. Alt...

  4. A Visual Study of Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Debora A.; Stadnicki, John

    1997-11-01

    A jet which issues from a small hole in a flow surface, pitched and skewed relative to the crossflow, creates a single streamwise vortex which resembles the flow downstream of a half-delta-wing vortex generator. The term ``vortex generator jet'' (VGJ) has been used to describe such a flow. Investigators of jet-generated vortices have recognized their applicability to active control and their flexibility in terms of being activated and deactivated. We have installed a spanwise array of VGJ's in a turbulent boundary layer in the zero-pressure-gradient test section of the 12" × 36" boundary layer wind tunnel at Boston University. The Reynolds number based on jet diameter is in the range 4000 < Re < 10000. Our experimental investigations include flow visualization of a single pitched and skewed jet in crossflow, as well as wall shear stress measurements downstream of the array of jets. To capture still images of a cross-section of the jet flow, a light sheet formed by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser is used to illuminate smoke-tagged jet fluid. The wall shear stress measurements are made using an oil-film interferometry technique. Parameters varied include jet velocity and angles of jet pitch and skew.

  5. Flow field and near and far sound field of a subsonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1986-01-01

    Flow and sound field data are presented for a 2.54 cm diameter air jet at a Mach number of 0.50 and a Reynolds number of 300,000. Distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensities, Reynolds stress, spectral components of turbulence as well as of the near field pressure, together with essential characteristics of the far field sound are reported. This detailed set of data for one particular flow, erstwhile unavailable in the literature, is expected to help promoote and calibrate subsonic jet noise theories. 'Source locations' in terms of the turbulence maxima, coupling between the entrainment dynamics and the near pressure field, the sound radiation paths, and the balance in mass, momentum and sound energy fluxes are discussed. The results suggest that the large scale coherent structures of the jet govern the 'source locations' by controlling the turbulence and also strongly influence the near field pressure fluctuations.

  6. Very viscous electrically forced jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera, F. J.

    2005-11-01

    The dynamics of an axisymmetric jet of a very viscous liquid issuing into a region of uniform electric field, which is of interest for electrospinning, is described numerically using the leaky dielectric model. The jet is continuously strained by surface electric stresses. The flow depends on a capillary number Ca based on the liquid flow rate; an electric Bond number that measures the ratio of electric to surface tension stresses; the dielectric constant of the liquid; and the ratio T of a mechanical (viscous-capillary) time to the electric relaxation time required for the charge that is brought to the surface by the electric field to screen the liquid from the field. The electric current and the radius of the jet increase with Ca and tend to well defined limits for large values of this parameter, whereas a stationary jet ceases to exist when Ca decreases below a certain minimum. The radius of the jet decreases when the electric Bond number increases, due to the increased straining, and also when the time ratio T increases, which suggests that charge relaxation effects are always important in the formation of the jet.

  7. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  8. An Experimental and CFD Study of a Supersonic Coaxial Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; White, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    A supersonic coaxial jet facility is designed and experimental data are acquired suitable for the validation of CFD codes employed in the analysis of high-speed air-breathing engines. The center jet is of a light gas, the coflow jet is of air, and the mixing layer between them is compressible. The jet flow field is characterized using schlieren imaging, surveys with pitot, total temperature and gas sampling probes, and RELIEF velocimetry. VULCAN, a structured grid CFD code, is used to solve for the nozzle and jet flow, and the results are compared to the experiment for several variations of the kappa - omega turbulence model

  9. Mixing characteristics of a ducted, elliptical jet with dump

    SciTech Connect

    Schadow, K.C.; Wilson, K.J.; Parr, D.M.; Gutmark, E.

    1986-01-01

    Mixing between elliptical ducted air-jets with dump and nitrogen radially injected through the duct walls was experimentally studied using hot-wire anemometry and gas-sampling techniques. Mixing was considerably increased when the air-jet was issued from elliptical relative to circular jet-exit cross-sections. Elliptical jets issued from orifices provided better mixing than issued from pipes. Additional mixing enhancement was achieved when the elliptical jets were acoustically forced by excited resonant pressure waves of the duct. The mean and turbulence velocity measurements provided insight into the mechanism of the observed mixing enhancement.

  10. Focusing of cylindrical liquid jets into droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Kristen; McCleney, Amy; Bardet, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Upward angled water jets discharging in quiescent air are studied experimentally with time varying forcing. The jets issue from a 2 mm diameter tube, while highly controllable forcing is accomplished with a magnetic linear motor coupled with an arbitrary waveform generator. In particular, regimes of jet focusing are generated at various injection rates. The jets result in large droplets that can be created at various elevations. This type of flow mimics the spray generated by an Archer fish. Actual forcing functions were monitored using LDT.

  11. Association of air pollution sources and aldehydes with biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary inflammation, and systemic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Altemose, Brent; Robson, Mark G; Kipen, Howard M; Ohman Strickland, Pamela; Meng, Qingyu; Gong, Jicheng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guangfa; Rich, David Q; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Junfeng

    2016-07-20

    Using data collected before, during, and after the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing, this study examines associations between biomarkers of blood coagulation (vWF, sCD62P and sCD40L), pulmonary inflammation (EBC pH, EBC nitrite, and eNO), and systemic oxidative stress (urinary 8-OHdG) with sources of air pollution identified utilizing principal component analysis and with concentrations of three aldehydes of health concern. Associations between the biomarkers and the air pollution source types and aldehydes were examined using a linear mixed effects model, regressing through seven lag days and controlling for ambient temperature, relative humidity, gender, and day of week for the biomarker measurements. The biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation, particularly EBC pH and eNO, were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The biomarkers for blood coagulation, particularly vWF and sCD62p, were most consistently associated with oil combustion. Systemic oxidative stress biomarker (8-OHdG) was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. The associations of the biomarkers were generally not significant or consistent with secondary formation of pollutants and with the aldehydes. The findings support policies to control anthropogenic pollution sources rather than natural soil or road dust from a cardio-respiratory health standpoint.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 20 July 2016; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.38.

  12. Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of Woven SiC Fiber, BN Interphase, SiC Matrix Composites in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tensile stress-rupture experiments were performed on woven Hi-Nicalon reinforced SiC matrix composites with BN interphases in air. Modal acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the damage accumulation in the composites during the tests and microstructural analysis was performed to determine the amount of matrix cracking that occurred for each sample. Fiber fractograph), was also performed for individual fiber failures at the specimen fracture surface to determine the strengths at which fibers failed. The rupture strengths were significantly worse than what would have been expected front the inherent degradation of the fibers themselves when subjected to similar rupture conditions. At higher applied stresses the rate of rupture "?as larger than at lower applied stresses. It was observed that the change in rupture rate corresponded to the onset of through-thickness cracking in the composites themselves. The primary cause of the sen,ere degradation was the ease with which fibers would bond to one another at their closest separation distances, less than 100 nanometers, when exposed to the environment. The near fiber-to-fiber contact in the woven tows enabled premature fiber failure over large areas of matrix cracks due to the stress-concentrations created b), fibers bonded to one another after one or a few fibers fail. i.e. the loss of global load sharing. An@, improvement in fiber-to-fiber separation of this composite system should result in improved stress- rupture properties. A model was den,eloped in order to predict the rupture life-time for these composites based on the probabilistic nature of indin,idual fiber failure at temperature. the matrix cracking state during the rupture test, and the rate of oxidation into a matrix crack. Also incorporated into the model were estimates of the stress-concentration that would occur between the outer rim of fibers in a load-bearing bundle and the unbridged region of a matrix crack after Xia et al. For the lower stresses

  13. Application of the theory of free jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A; Petersohn, E

    1932-01-01

    Based upon Kirchoff's theory of free jets the flow through different screen arrangements of flat plates, as chiefly encountered with turbines in the cavitation zone is defined. It is shown by experiments that these theoretical results are very well representative in most cases of the conditions of discharge from water in air and consequently by cavitation. In addition, the experiments reveal a picture of the discrepancies between the actual flow and the theory of discharge of air in air (of water in water without cavitation). These discrepancies are explained qualitatively by the mingling processes between the jets and the dead air zones.

  14. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  15. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, Scott D.; Farrington, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  16. Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of a Woven Hi-Nicalon, BN-Interphase, SiC Matric Composite in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet; Brewer, David

    1999-01-01

    Woven Hi-Nicalon (TM) reinforced melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites were tested under tensile stress-rupture conditions in air at intermediate temperatures. A comprehensive examination of the damage state and the fiber properties at failure was performed. Modal acoustic emission analysis was used to monitor damage during the experiment. Extensive microscopy of the composite fracture surfaces and the individual fiber fracture surfaces was used to determine the mechanisms leading to ultimate failure. The rupture properties of these composites were significantly worse than expected compared to the fiber properties under similar conditions. This was due to the oxidation of the BN interphase. Oxidation occurred through the matrix cracks that intersected the surface or edge of a tensile bar. These oxidation reactions resulted in minor degradation to fiber strength and strong bonding of the fibers to one another at regions of near fiber-to-fiber contact. It was found that two regimes for rupture exist for this material: a high stress regime where rupture occurs at a fast rate and a low stress regime where rupture occurs at a slower rate. For the high stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of through thickness cracks. The average fracture strength of fibers that were pulled-out (the final fibers to break before ultimate failure) was controlled by the slow-crack growth rupture criterion in the literature for individual Hi-Nicalon (TM) fibers. For the low stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of microcracks which grew during the rupture test. The average fracture strength of fibers that were pulled-out in this regime was the same as the average fracture strength of individual fibers pulled out in as-produced composites tested at room temperature.

  17. Idealised simulations of sting jet cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Laura; Gray, Suzanne; Clark, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Extratropical cyclones often produce strong surface winds, mostly associated with low-level jets along the warm and cold fronts. Some severe extratropical cyclones have been found to produce an additional area of localised strong, and potentially very damaging, surface winds during a certain part of their development. These strong winds are associated with air that originates within the cloud head, exiting at the tip of the cloud head and descending rapidly from there to the surface. This rapidly descending air associated with the strong surface winds is known as a sting jet. Previous published work on sting jets has been limited to analyses of only a small number of case studies of observed sting jet cyclones, so a study of idealised sting jet cyclones, rather than specific cases, will be useful in determining the important features and mechanisms that lead to sting jets. This work focuses on an idealised simulation of a cyclone with a sting jet using a periodic channel configuration of the idealised nonhydrostatic Met Office Unified Model. The idealised cyclone simulation is based on baroclinic lifecycle simulations run at sufficiently high resolution for a sting jet to be generated. An analysis of the idealised cyclone and a comparison of the idealised cyclone with case studies of observed sting jet cyclones will be presented.

  18. Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaplygin, S.

    1944-01-01

    A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of the same independent variables as Molenbroek used, but it is found to be more suitable to consider other functions. The stream function and velocity potential corresponding to the problem are given in the form of series. The investigation on the convergence of these series in connection with certain properties of the functions entering them forms the subject of part II. In part III the problem of the outflow of a gas from an infinite vessel with plane walls is solved. In part IV the impact of a gas jet on a plate is considered and the limiting case where the jet expands to infinity changing into a gas flow is taken up in more detail. This also solved the equivalent problem of the resistance of a gaseous medium to the motion of a plate. Finally, in part V, an approximate method is presented that permits a simpler solution of the problem of jet flows in the case where the velocities of the gas (velocities of the particles in the gas) are not very large.

  19. Remote detection of air pollution stress to vegetation - Laboratory-level studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Price, Curtis V.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the role of leaf chemistry, anatomy, moisture content, and canopy density on spectral reflectance in healthy and pollution stressed western conifer needles and broad-leafed species of California coastal sage scrub is presented. Acid mist at a level of pH 2.0 is found to more severely effect chlorophyll loss and leaf death than ozone at a level of 0.2 ppm for a four-week period. Both pollutants cause water loss, affecting Bands 4 and 5 in nonlinear ways. The infrared bands initially rise as free water is lost, and subsequently, scattering and reflectance decline. The net effect is shown to be a reduction in TM 4/3 and a rise in TM 5/4 with pollution stress. Under more severe pollution stresses, the decline of leaf area indices due to accelerated leaf drop accentuates the expected TM 4/3 and TM 5/4 changes.

  20. Preservation of Cognitive Performance with Age during Exertional Heat Stress under Low and High Air Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wright Beatty, Heather E.; Keillor, Jocelyn M.; Hardcastle, Stephen G.; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P.

    2015-01-01

    Older adults may be at greater risk for occupational injuries given their reduced capacity to dissipate heat, leading to greater thermal strain and potentially cognitive decrements. Purpose. To examine the effects of age and increased air velocity, during exercise in humid heat, on information processing and attention. Methods. Nine young (24 ± 1 years) and 9 older (59 ± 1 years) males cycled 4 × 15 min (separated by 15 min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in humid heat (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (low) and 3.0 (high) m·s−1 air velocity wearing coveralls. At rest, immediately following exercise (end exercise), and after the final recovery, participants performed an abbreviated paced auditory serial addition task (PASAT, 2 sec pace). Results. PASAT numbers of correct responses at end exercise were similar for young (low = 49 ± 3; high = 51 ± 3) and older (low = 46 ± 5; high = 47 ± 4) males and across air velocity conditions, and when scored relative to age norms. Psychological sweating, or an increased sweat rate with the administration of the PASAT, was observed in both age groups in the high condition. Conclusion. No significant decrements in attention and speeded information processing were observed, with age or altered air velocity, following intermittent exercise in humid heat. PMID:25874223

  1. Tests on Thrust Augmenters for Jet Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Shoemaker, James M

    1932-01-01

    This series of tests was undertaken to determine how much the reaction thrust of a jet could be increased by the use of thrust augmenters and thus to give some indication as to the feasibility of jet propulsion for airplanes. The tests were made during the first part of 1927 at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. A compressed air jet was used in connection with a series of annular guides surrounding the jet to act as thrust augmenters. The results show that, although it is possible to increase the thrust of a jet, the increase is not large enough to affect greatly the status of the problem of the application of jet propulsion to airplanes.

  2. Supersonic jet mixing enhancement by vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, M.; Reeder, M. F.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to explore the effects of vortex generators, in the form of tabs projecting normally into the jet, on the mixing and the far-field noise characteristics of a jet. A converging-diverging nozzle with a design Mach number of 1.36 was used in the experiments. The flow regimes from subsonic to highly underexpanded supersonic conditions were studied. One, two, and four tabs were used and some of the findings of previous investigators were examined and confirmed. The tabs eliminated screech noise from moderately overexpanded cases to highly underexpanded cases. Detailed flow visualizations and measurements showed that two tabs bifurcated the jet at all Mach numbers. While the effect of two tabs was persistent and the jet remained bifurcated, the distortions produced by one and four tabs disappeared by a streamwise distance of approximately 16 jet diameters. Two and four tabs significantly increased the entrainment of ambient air into the jet.

  3. Leaping shampoo glides on a 500-nm-thick lubricating air layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Erqiang; Lee, Sanghyun; Marston, Jeremy; Bonito, Andrea; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2013-11-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer [Lee et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 061001 (2013)]. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine micro-bubbles. The resulting micro-bubble sizes suggest that the thickness of this air layer is around 500 nm. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding, with the shear stress within the thin air layer sufficient for the observed deceleration. Particle tracking within the jet shows uniform velocity, with no pronounced shear, which would be required for shear-thinning effects. The role of the surfactant may primarily be to stabilize the air film.

  4. Calibration of Raman spectroscopy in the stress measurement of air-plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Lord, Oliver; Flewitt, Peter E J

    2012-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used widely on a range of components that operate at high temperatures. We report measurement of the factor that is required to convert the Raman shift to stress for air plasma sprayed yttria (7 wt %) stabilized tetragonal zirconia (ZrO(2)) (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings. The factor is evaluated for the as-coated condition and also following a heat treatment at 1000 °C for 1050 h. Two Raman bands at 608 cm(-1) and 640 cm(-1) have been investigated in a diamond anvil cell under hydrostatic pressure up to ~24 GPa. In the range of zero to ~1.6 GPa, a linear behavior was observed in terms of the shifts of these two Raman bands with a gradient similar to dense bulk tetragonal ZrO(2). From these measurements the factors to convert wavenumber shift to stress have been derived. The application of these conversion factors to stress measurement in TBC coated test specimens and components is discussed.

  5. Investigations of Pulmonary Epithelial Cell Damage due to Air-Liquid Interfacial Stresses in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaver, Donald P., III; Bilek, A. M.; Kay, S.; Dee, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary airway closure is a potentially dangerous event that can occur in microgravity environments and may result in limited gas exchange for flight crew during long-term space flight. Repetitive airway collapse and reopening subjects the pulmonary epithelium to large, dynamic, and potentially injurious mechanical stresses. During ventilation at low lung volumes and pressures, airway instability leads to repetitive collapse and reopening. During reopening, air must progress through a collapsed airway, generating stresses on the airway walls, potentially damaging airway tissues. The normal lung can tolerate repetitive collapse and reopening. However, combined with insufficient or dysfunctional pulmonary surfactant, repetitive airway collapse and reopening produces severe lung injury. Particularly at risk is the pulmonary epithelium. As an important regulator of lung function and physiology, the degree of pulmonary epithelial damage influences the course and outcome of lung injury. In this paper we present experimental and computational studies to explore the hypothesis that the mechanical stresses associated with airway reopening inflict injury to the pulmonary epithelium.

  6. Reassessment of psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder in United States Air Force Distributed Common Ground System operators.

    PubMed

    Prince, Lillian; Chappelle, Wayne L; McDonald, Kent D; Goodman, Tanya; Cowper, Sara; Thompson, William

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study was to assess for the main sources of occupational stress, as well as self-reported symptoms of distress and post-traumatic stress disorder among U.S. Air Force (USAF) Distributed Common Ground System (DCGS) intelligence exploitation and support personnel. DCGS intelligence operators (n=1091) and nonintelligence personnel (n = 447) assigned to a USAF Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Wing responded to the web-based survey. The overall survey response rate was 31%. Study results revealed the most problematic stressors among DCGS intelligence personnel included high workload, low manning, as well as organizational leadership and shift work issues. Results also revealed 14.35% of DCGS intelligence operators' self-reported high levels of psychological distress (twice the rate of DCGS nonintelligence support personnel). Furthermore, 2.0% to 2.5% self-reported high levels of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, with no significant difference between groups. The implications of these findings are discussed along with recommendations for USAF medical and mental health providers, as well as operational leadership.

  7. Turbulence measurements in curved wall jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodman, L. C.; Wood, N. J.; Roberts, L.

    1987-01-01

    Accurate turbulence measurements taken in wall jet flows are difficult to obtain, due to high intensity turbulence and problems in achieving two-dimensionality. The problem is compounded when streamwise curvature of the flow is introduced, since the jet entrainment and turbulence levels are greatly increased over the equivalent planar values. In this experiment, two-dimensional plane and curved wall jet flows are simulated by having a jet blow axially over a cylinder. In the plane case the cylinder has constant transverse radius, and in the curved cases the cylinder has a varying transverse radius. Although the wall jet in these cases is axisymmetric, adequate 'two-dimensional' flow can be obtained as long as the ratio of the jet width to the cylinder radius is small. The annular wall jet has several advantages over wall jets issuing from finite rectangular slots. Since the slot has no ends, three-dimensional effects caused by the finite length of the slot and side wall interference are eliminated. Also, the transverse curvature of the wall allows close optical access to the surface using a Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system. Hot wire measurements and some LDV measurements are presented for plane and curved wall jet flows. An integral analysis is used to assess the effects of transverse curvature on the turbulent shear stress. The analysis and the data show that the effects of transverse curvature on both the mean flow and the shear stress are small enough for two-dimensional flow to be approximately satisfactorily.

  8. The Air-Sea Interface and Surface Stress under Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark; Ginis, Isaac

    2013-04-01

    Air-sea interaction dramatically changes from moderate to very high wind speed conditions (Donelan et al. 2004). Unresolved physics of the air-sea interface are one of the weakest components in tropical cyclone prediction models. Rapid disruption of the air-water interface under very high wind speed conditions was reported in laboratory experiments (Koga 1981) and numerical simulations (Soloviev et al. 2012), which resembled the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at an interface with very large density difference. Kelly (1965) demonstrated that the KH instability at the air-sea interface can develop through parametric amplification of waves. Farrell and Ioannou (2008) showed that gustiness results in the parametric KH instability of the air-sea interface, while the gusts are due to interacting waves and turbulence. The stochastic forcing enters multiplicatively in this theory and produces an exponential wave growth, augmenting the growth from the Miles (1959) theory as the turbulence level increases. Here we complement this concept by adding the effect of the two-phase environment near the mean interface, which introduces additional viscosity in the system (turning it into a rheological system). The two-phase environment includes air-bubbles and re-entering spray (spume), which eliminates a portion of the wind-wave wavenumber spectrum that is responsible for a substantial part of the air sea drag coefficient. The previously developed KH-type interfacial parameterization (Soloviev and Lukas 2010) is unified with two versions of the wave growth model. The unified parameterization in both cases exhibits the increase of the drag coefficient with wind speed until approximately 30 m/s. Above this wind speed threshold, the drag coefficient either nearly levels off or even slightly drops (for the wave growth model that accounts for the shear) and then starts again increasing above approximately 65 m/s wind speed. Remarkably, the unified parameterization reveals a local minimum

  9. Prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Remotely Piloted Aircraft Operators in the United States Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-24

    proliferation of this unique form of warfare, concerns have been raised regarding the psychological impact such operations have on RPA operators directly...and clinical interviews utilizing the Clinician Administered Psychological Survey to determine the nature of the respondents’ stressful military...identified. Of those reporting higher levels of psychological distress, none identified their engagement in remote warfare as a significant

  10. JET ROTATION DRIVEN BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian

    2011-08-10

    In this paper, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the hypothesis that a rotation of astrophysical jets can be caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in a helical magnetic field. Shock compression of the helical magnetic field results in a toroidal Lorentz force component that will accelerate the jet material in the toroidal direction. This process transforms magnetic angular momentum (magnetic stress) carried along the jet into kinetic angular momentum (rotation). The mechanism proposed here only works in a helical magnetic field configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of this mechanism by axisymmetric MHD simulations in 1.5 and 2.5 dimensions using the PLUTO code. In our setup, the jet is injected into the ambient gas with zero kinetic angular momentum (no rotation). We apply different dynamical parameters for jet propagation such as the jet internal Alfven Mach number and fast magnetosonic Mach number, the density contrast of the jet to the ambient medium, and the external sonic Mach number of the jet. The mechanism we suggest should work for a variety of jet applications, e.g., protostellar or extragalactic jets, and internal jet shocks (jet knots) or external shocks between the jet and the ambient gas (entrainment). For typical parameter values for protostellar jets, the numerically derived rotation feature looks consistent with the observations, i.e., rotational velocities of 0.1%-1% of the jet bulk velocity.

  11. Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... flu shot, are less effective for them. Some people cope with stress more effectively than others. It's important to know your limits when it comes to stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  12. JET Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise prediction has been an important and challenging research area since James Lighthill first introduced his Acoustic Analogy Approach over fifty years ago. This talk attempts to provide a unified framework for the subsequent theoretical developments in this field. It assumes that there is no single approach that is optimal in all situations and uses the framework as a basis for discussing the strengths weaknesses of the various approaches to this topic. But the emphasis here will be on the important problem of predicting the noise from high speed air jets. Specific results will presented for round jets in the 0.5 to 1.4 Mach number range and compared with experimental data taken on the Glenn SHAR rig. It is demonstrated that non-parallel mean flow effects play an important role in predicting the noise at the supersonic Mach numbers. The results explain the failure of previous attempts based on the parallel flow Lilley model (which has served as the foundation for most jet noise analyses during past two decades).

  13. A Descriptive Study of Stress Levels of Air Force Academy Cadets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    F., & McCoy, G. F. (1970). Bahavior Disorders in School-Aged Children. Scranton: Chandler. Crain, WU. C. (1980). Theories of Development: Concepts...also indebted to Ms Carol A. Schochenmaier RN, BSN, Disoharge Planning Coordinator with the Penrose Hospital in Colorado Springs for the assistance she...adolescents towards recovery from stress related issues. Additional theoretical support came from the social learning theory of Erikson (1968) and Piaget

  14. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop Hα macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Å snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T ~ 104 - 105 K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  15. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  16. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  17. Knowledge based jet engine diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jellison, Timothy G.; Dehoff, Ronald L.

    1987-01-01

    A fielded expert system automates equipment fault isolation and recommends corrective maintenance action for Air Force jet engines. The knowledge based diagnostics tool was developed as an expert system interface to the Comprehensive Engine Management System, Increment IV (CEMS IV), the standard Air Force base level maintenance decision support system. XMAM (trademark), the Expert Maintenance Tool, automates procedures for troubleshooting equipment faults, provides a facility for interactive user training, and fits within a diagnostics information feedback loop to improve the troubleshooting and equipment maintenance processes. The application of expert diagnostics to the Air Force A-10A aircraft TF-34 engine equipped with the Turbine Engine Monitoring System (TEMS) is presented.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of the air and fuel specific-impulse characteristics of several potential ram-jet fuels IV : hydrogen, a-methylnaphthalene, and carbon / Benson E. Gammon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, Benson E

    1951-01-01

    A preliminary analytical evaluation of the air and fuel specific-impulse characteristics of hydrogen, a-methylnapthalene, and graphite carbon has been made. Adiabatic constant-pressure combustion flame temperatures for each fuel at several equivalence ratios were calculated for an initial air temperature of 560 degrees R and a pressure of 2 atmospheres.

  19. Flight test results of an automatic support system on board a YF-12A airplane. [for jet engine inlet air control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    An automatic support system concept that isolated faults in an existing nonavionics subsystem was flight tested up to a Mach number of 3. The adaptation of the automated support concept to an existing system (the jet engine automatic inlet control system) caused most of the problems one would expect to encounter in other applications. These problems and their solutions are discussed. Criteria for integrating automatic support into the initial design of new subsystems are included in the paper. Cost effectiveness resulted from both the low maintenance of the automated system and the man-hour saving resulting from the real time diagnosis of the monitored subsystem.

  20. Instability arisen on liquid jet penetrated in flowing liquid bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Naoto; Ueno, Ichiro

    2009-11-01

    We carry out an experimental study with a special interest on a penetration process and an instability on a liquid jet impinged to a flowing liquid pool. The impinged jet penetrates into the flowing bath accompanying with an entrainment of the ambient immiscible gas without coalescing with the liquid in the pool until the air wrap around the jet collapses. The wrapping air controls instabilities arisen on the jet. We observe the dynamic behaviors of the penetrated jet and the departure of the bubble of the wrapping gas at the tip of the collapsing jet by use of a high-speed camera in order to categorize the behaviors as functions of the velocities of the jet and flow in the pool. We also evaluate an averaged thickness of the wrapping gas through the observation.

  1. The air-sea interface and surface stress under tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Alexander V; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark A; Haus, Brian K; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-06-16

    Tropical cyclone track prediction is steadily improving, while storm intensity prediction has seen little progress in the last quarter century. Important physics are not yet well understood and implemented in tropical cyclone forecast models. Missing and unresolved physics, especially at the air-sea interface, are among the factors limiting storm predictions. In a laboratory experiment and coordinated numerical simulation, conducted in this work, the microstructure of the air-water interface under hurricane force wind resembled Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability between fluids with a large density difference. Supported by these observations, we bring forth the concept that the resulting two-phase environment suppresses short gravity-capillary waves and alters the aerodynamic properties of the sea surface. The unified wave-form and two-phase parameterization model shows the well-known increase of the drag coefficient (Cd) with wind speed, up to ~30 ms(-1). Around 60 ms(-1), the new parameterization predicts a local peak of Ck/Cd, under constant enthalpy exchange coefficient Ck. This peak may explain rapid intensification of some storms to major tropical cyclones and the previously reported local peak of lifetime maximum intensity (bimodal distribution) in the best-track records. The bimodal distribution of maximum lifetime intensity, however, can also be explained by environmental parameters of tropical cyclones alone.

  2. Characterizing glottal jet turbulence.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C

    2006-02-01

    Air pressure associated with airflow from the lungs drives the vocal folds into oscillation and allows the air to exit the glottis as a turbulent jet, even though laminar flow may enter the glottis from the trachea. The separation of the turbulence from the deterministic portion of the glottal jet was investigated in the excised canine larynx model. The present study is methodological in that the main goal was to examine three methods of obtaining reasonable representations of both the deterministic signal and the residual turbulence portion: (a) smoothing, (b) wavelet denoising, and (c) ensemble averaging. Ensemble averaging resulted in a deterministic signal that disregarded gross cyclic alterations while exaggerating the turbulence intensity. Wavelet denoising can perform an excellent analysis and synthesis of the glottal velocity, but was problematic in determining which levels of analysis to choose to represent both the deterministic and turbulence appropriately. Smoothing appeared to be the most appropriate for phonation velocities because it preserved gross cyclic variations important to perturbations and modulations, while extracting turbulence at what appears to be reasonable levels.

  3. Assessment of air pollution stress on some commonly grown tree species in industrial zone of Durgapur, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Nayek, S; Satpati, S; Gupta, S; Saha, R N; Datta, J K

    2011-01-01

    The present study deals with the biochemical responses of some selected tree species with respect to increased air pollution in Durgapur industrial city in India. Areas in vicinity to industries possess very high concentrations of suspended particulate matter (571 microg/m3), SOx (132 microg/m3) and NOx (97 microg/m3) which shows significant correlations (p < 0.05) with the biochemical constituents of stressed plants. Plants growing in industrial zone exhibit a considerable decline in total chlorophyll (34.97-59.81%), soluble sugars (23.85-33.16%) and protein content (21.59-47.13%) and increase in ascorbic acid (81.87-238.53%) and proline content (123.47-284.91%). Of the studied tree species, Shorea robusta (9.78 +/- 0.095), Alstonia scholaris (8.76 +/- 0.084), Peltophorum pterocarpum (8.99 +/- 0.13) and Albizia lebbeck (7.71 +/- 0.012) were found to be more tolerant with higher Air Pollution Toblerance Index (APTI) and Tectona grandis (6.13 +/- 0.276), Lagerstroemia speciosa (7.075 +/- 0.18) and Delonix regia (6.87 +/- 0.079) were sensitive with lower APTI values. Therefore, plant species with higher APTI value, being more resistant, can be used as pollutant absorbent to reduce the pollution level and are suitable for plantations in industrial areas.

  4. Stress effect of different temperatures and air exposure during transport on physiological profiles in the American lobster Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, S; Giulianini, P G; Martinis, M; Ferrero, E A

    2007-05-01

    Homarus americanus is an important commercial species that can survive 2-3 days out of water if kept cool and humid. Once caught for commercial purpose and shipped around the world, a lobster is likely to be subjected to a number of stressors, including emersion and air exposure, hypoxia, temperature changes and handling. This study focused on the effect of transport stress and specifically at different animal body temperature (6 and 15 degrees C) and air exposure during commercial transport and recovery process in water. Animals were monitored, by hemolymph bleeding, at different times: 0 h (arrival time at plant) 3 h, 12 h, 24 h and 96 h after immersion in the stocking tank with a water temperature of 6.5+/-1.5 degrees C. We analysed the effects by testing some physiological variables of the hemolymph: glucose, cHH, lactate, total protein, cholesterol, triglycerides, chloride and calcium concentration, pH and density. All these variables appeared to be influenced negatively by high temperature both in average of alteration from the physiological value and in recovering time. Blood glucose, lactate, total protein, cholesterol were significantly higher in the group with high body temperature compared to those with low temperature until 96 h after immersion in the recovery tank.

  5. Modeling Variable-Density Jets with Co-Flow Using BHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The two-fluid jet in a co-flow has two similarity breaking features which make it more interesting, and challenging, than the simple self-similar jet. First, it transitions from strong jet to weak jet, and second, from shear driven to buoyancy driven. These two simultaneous mechanisms make it a strong test for a turbulence model. The Extreme Fluids team at Los Alamos National Laboratory has an on-going experimental campaign examining an SF6 jet injected downwards into a co-flowing air stream. Using simultaneous PIV/PLIF they have obtained measurements of important turbulence quantities, including the Reynolds stresses, and the velocity-density correlations. In the current work, these measurements are used to validate the BHR turbulence model. The BHR model (Besnard et al., 1992) is a variable-density turbulence model similar to the LRR model for shear flows, but with additional transport equations for ρai = ρ'ui' ' ̲ and b = ρ'v' ̲ . Here we examine both the conventional model form, as well as a new version (Schwarzkopf et al., 2016) which include two length-scale equations: one for the dissipation scale, and one for the turbulent transport scale.

  6. An analysis of post-traumatic stress symptoms in United States Air Force drone operators.

    PubMed

    Chappelle, Wayne; Goodman, Tanya; Reardon, Laura; Thompson, William

    2014-06-01

    Remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), commonly referred to as "drones," have emerged over the past decade as an innovative warfighting tool. Given there is a paucity of empirical research assessing drone operators, the purpose of this study was to assess for the prevalence of PTSD symptoms among this cohort. Of the 1084 United States Air Force (USAF) drone operators that participated, a total of 4.3% endorsed a pattern of symptoms of moderate to extreme level of severity meeting criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition. The incidence of PTSD among USAF drone operators in this study was lower than rates of PTSD (10-18%) among military personnel returning from deployment but higher than incidence rates (less than 1%) of USAF drone operators reported in electronic medical records. Although low PTSD rates may be promising, limitations to this study are discussed.

  7. Deriving parameters of a fundamental detachment model for cohesive soils from flume and jet erosion tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The erosion rate of cohesive soils is commonly quantified using the excess shear stress equation, dependent on two major soil parameters: the critical shear stress and the erodibility coefficient. A submerged jet test (JETJet Erosion Test) is one method that has been developed for measuring thes...

  8. THE APPLICATION OF JET REMPI/TOFMS TO REAL-TIME MONITORING OF DIOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An advanced rapid monitoring technology, Jet Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization, (Jet REMPI) is being applied to the measurement of air toxics, including chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (CDD/CDF), for mechanistic understanding, process monitoring, and regulat...

  9. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM). E S Roberts1, R Jaskot2, J Richards2, and K L Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC a...

  10. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  11. Business Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Learjet Inc.'s Learjet 31 and Learjet 55C both feature NASA developed winglets, nearly vertical extensions of the wing designed to reduce fuel consumption and generally improve airplane's performance. Winglets are lifting surfaces designed to operate in the vortex or air whirlpool that occurs at an airplanes wingtip. This complex flow of air creates air drag; the winglets job is to reduce the strength of the vortex and thereby substantially reduce drag, additionally the winglet generates its own lift producing forward thrust in the manner of a sailboat's sail. Combination of reduced drag and additional thrust adds up to improvement in fuel efficiency.

  12. Fluidic Injection for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Investigations into fluidic injection for jet noise reduction began over 50 years ago. Studies have included water and air injection for the reduction of noise in scale model jets and jet engines and water injection for the reduction of excess overpressures on the Space Shuttle at lift-off. Injection systems have included high pressure microjets as well as larger scale injectors operating at pressures that can be achieved in real jet engines. An historical perspective highlighting noise reduction potential is presented for injection concepts investigated over the last 50 years. Results from recent investigations conducted at NASA are presented for supersonic and subsonic dual-stream jets. The noise reduction benefits achieved through fluidic contouring using an azimuthally controlled nozzle will be discussed.

  13. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  14. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  15. Full-scale testing and early production results from horizontal air sparging and soil vapor extraction wells remediating jet fuel in soil and groundwater at JFK International Airport, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.J.; Bianco, P.; Kirshner, M.; Pressly, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Jet fuel contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated at the International Arrivals Building (IAB) of the JFK International Airport in Jamaica, New York, are being remediated using soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). The areal extent of the contaminated soil is estimated to be 70 acres and the volume of contaminated groundwater is estimated to be 2.3 million gallons. The remediation uses approximately 13,000 feet of horizontal SVE (HSVE) wells and 7,000 feet of horizontal AS (HAS) wells. The design of the HSVE and HAS wells was based on a pilot study followed by a full-scale test. In addition to the horizontal wells, 28 vertical AS wells and 15 vertical SVE wells are used. Three areas are being remediated, thus, three separate treatment systems have been installed. The SVE and AS wells are operated continuously while groundwater will be intermittently extracted at each HAS well, treated by liquid phase activated carbon and discharged into stormwater collection sewerage. Vapors extracted by the SVE wells are treated by vapor phase activated carbon and discharged into ambient air. The duration of the remediation is anticipated to be between two and three years before soil and groundwater are remediated to New York State cleanup criteria for the site. Based on the monitoring data for the first two months of operation, approximately 14,600 lbs. of vapor phase VOCs have been extracted. Analyses show that the majority of the VOCs are branched alkanes, branched alkenes, cyclohexane and methylated cyclohexanes.

  16. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  17. Response of stress indicators and growth parameters of Tibouchina pulchra Cogn. exposed to air and soil pollution near the industrial complex of Cubatão, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, G; Furlan, C M; Domingos, M; Klumpp, A

    2000-01-31

    The present study was performed in the vicinity of the industrial complex of Cubatão, São Paulo, Brazil, in order to evaluate the response of 'manaca da serra' Tibouchina pulchra Cogn. (Melastomataceae), a common species of secondary Atlantic Rain Forest vegetation, to the impact of complex air pollution. Emphasis was given to changes of biochemical parameters such as ascorbic acid concentration, peroxidase activity, contents of water-soluble thiols, pH of leaf extract and buffering capacity. These plant factors are often used as early indicators of air pollution stress. Field experiments included sampling of leaves from mature trees in areas with different air pollution load (passive monitoring), exposure of saplings cultivated in uniform soil at these areas (active monitoring) and a study on the combined effects of contaminated soil and air pollution. In general, metabolic response of saplings was more accentuated than that of mature trees. Leaf extract pH and buffering capacity showed no or only small alterations in plants exposed to industrial emissions. In contrast, air pollution resulted in a distinct decrease in ascorbic acid contents and an increase in peroxidase activity and thiol concentrations in leaves. Cultivation of saplings in soil types from contaminated regions frequently caused the same modifications or enhanced the effects produced by air pollution. Growth analysis of exposed saplings demonstrated that a change of the relationship between above-ground and below-ground plant parts was the most obvious effect of air pollution and soil contamination. The experiments showed that even T. pulchra, a species considered resistant to air pollution, suffers metabolic disturbances by the present ambient air and soil quality. Although biochemical and physiological alterations were not related to a certain air pollution type, they could be used to estimate the overall pollution load and to map zones with different air quality.

  18. Noise suppressor for turbo fan jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A noise suppressor is disclosed for installation on the discharge or aft end of a turbo fan engine. Within the suppressor are fixed annular airfoils which are positioned to reduce the relative velocity between the high temperature fast moving jet exhaust and the low temperature slow moving air surrounding it. Within the suppressor nacelle is an exhaust jet nozzle which constrains the shape of the jet exhaust to a substantially uniform elongate shape irrespective of the power setting of the engine. Fixed ring airfoils within the suppressor nacelle therefore have the same salutary effects irrespective of the power setting at which the engine is operated.

  19. Silver Ink For Jet Printing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.; Singaram, Saraswathi

    1989-01-01

    Metallo-organic ink containing silver (with some bismuth as adhesion agent) applied to printed-circuit boards and pyrolized in air to form electrically conductive patterns. Ink contains no particles of silver, does not have to be mixed during use to maintain homogeneity, and applied to boards by ink-jet printing heads. Consists of silver neodecanoate and bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in xylene and/or toluene.

  20. Jet array impingement with crossflow-correlation of streamwise resolved flow and heat transfer distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Truman, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Correlations for heat transfer coefficients for jets of circular offices and impinging on a surface parallel to the jet orifice plate are presented. The air, following impingement, is constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and the heat transfer (impingement) surface. The downstream jets are subjected to a crossflow originating from the upstream jets. Impingement surface heat transfer coefficients resolved to one streamwise jet orifice spacing, averaged across the channel span, are correlated with the associated individual spanwise orifice row jet and crossflow velocities, and with the geometric parameters.

  1. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  2. Neutrophilic inflammatory response and oxidative stress in premenopausal women chronically exposed to indoor air pollution from biomass burning.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anirban; Mondal, Nandan Kumar; Das, Debangshu; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2012-04-01

    The possibility of inflammation and neutrophil activation in response to indoor air pollution (IAP) from biomass fuel use has been investigated. For this, 142 premenopausal, never-smoking women (median age, 34 years) who cook exclusively with biomass (wood, dung, crop wastes) and 126 age-matched control women who cook with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) were enrolled. The neutrophil count in blood and sputum was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in biomass users than the control group. Flow cytometric analysis revealed marked increase in the surface expression of CD35 (complement receptor-1), CD16 (F(C)γ receptor III), and β(2) Mac-1 integrin (CD11b/CD18) on circulating neutrophils of biomass users. Besides, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that they had 72%, 67%, and 54% higher plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-12, respectively, and doubled neutrophil chemoattractant interleukin-8. Immunocytochemical study revealed significantly higher percentage of airway neutrophils expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase, while the serum level of nitric oxide was doubled in women who cooked with biomass. Spectrophotometric analysis documented higher myeloperoxidase activity in circulating neutrophils of biomass users, suggesting neutrophil activation. Flow cytometry showed excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by leukocytes of biomass-using women, whereas their erythrocytes contained a depleted level of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Indoor air of biomass-using households had two to four times more particulate matter with diameters of <10 μm (PM(10)) and <2.5 μm (PM(2.5)) as measured by real-time laser photometer. After controlling potential confounders, rise in proinflammatory mediators among biomass users were positively associated with PM(10) and PM(2.5) in indoor air, suggesting a close relationship between IAP and neutrophil activation. Besides

  3. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  4. Parabolic maneuvers of the Swiss Air Force fighter jet F-5E as a research platform for cell culture experiments in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Marc; Bradacs, Gesine; Hilliger, Andre; Hürlimann, Eva; Engeli, Stephanie; Thiel, Cora S.; Zeitner, Peter; Denier, Beat; Binggeli, Markus; Syburra, Thomas; Egli, Marcel; Engelmann, Frank; Ullrich, Oliver

    2011-06-01

    Long-term sensitivity of human cells to reduced gravity has been supposed since the first Apollo missions and was demonstrated during several space missions in the past. However, little information is available on primary and rapid gravi-responsive elements in mammalian cells. In search of rapid-responsive molecular alterations in mammalian cells, short-term microgravity provided by parabolic flight maneuvers is an ideal way to elucidate such initial and primary effects. Modern biomedical research at the cellular and molecular level requires frequent repetition of experiments that are usually performed in sequences of experiments and analyses. Therefore, a research platform on Earth providing frequent, easy and repeated access to real microgravity for cell culture experiments is strongly desired. For this reason, we developed a research platform onboard the military fighter jet aircraft Northrop F-5E "Tiger II". The experimental system consists of a programmable and automatically operated system composed of six individual experiment modules, placed in the front compartment, which work completely independent of the aircraft systems. Signal transduction pathways in cultured human cells can be investigated after the addition of an activator solution at the onset of microgravity and a fixative or lysis buffer after termination of microgravity. Before the beginning of a regular military training flight, a parabolic maneuver was executed. After a 1 g control phase, the parabolic maneuver starts at 13,000 ft and at Mach 0.99 airspeed, where a 22 s climb with an acceleration of 2.5 g is initiated, following a free-fall ballistic Keplerian trajectory lasting 45 s with an apogee of 27,000 ft at Mach 0.4 airspeed. Temperature, pressure and acceleration are monitored constantly during the entire flight. Cells and activator solutions are kept at 37 °C during the entire experiment until the fixative has been added. The parabolic flight profile provides up to 45 s of

  5. Turbulent jet mixing in a supersonic stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Schetz, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental study of turbulent, subsonic, coaxial jet mixing of air in a supersonic air stream is presented. Data taken at five axial stations downstream of the exit of the jet supply tube, which was suspended through the nozzle throat of a supersonic wind tunnel, are given in the form of total pressure, Mach number, and velocity distributions. An investigation of the effect of swirl as a mixing aid was conducted. Swirl, produced by tangential injection of 50% of the total air mass flow leaving the jet supply tube, was examined through Schlieren photographs and total pressure surveys. From a comparison of nonswirl and swirl data, it is concluded that the swirl has no discernible effect on the mixing.

  6. Advanced Thermally Stable Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    A. Boehman; C. Song; H. H. Schobert; M. M. Coleman; P. G. Hatcher; S. Eser

    1998-01-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components: 1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; 2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles during thermal stressing; 3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; 4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and 5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics from coal.

  7. Low frequency variability of Southern Ocean jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. F.; Richards, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Both observations and high resolution numerical models show that the Southern Ocean circumpolar flow is concentrated in a large number (approximately 8 to 12) of narrow filamentary jets. It is shown here that coherent jets exhibit a range of low frequency variability, on time scales of months to years, that can lead to displacement and to intermittent formation and dissipation of jets. Using output from an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model in local regions near topographic features, the impact of energy exchange between eddy and mean flow components on jet persistence and variability is examined. A novel approach that uses a time-dependent definition of the mean flow provides a clearer picture of eddy-mean flow interactions in regions with spatially and temporally varying flow structure. The dynamics are largely consistent with those in idealized quasi-geostrophic models, including topographically-organized and surface-enhanced Reynolds stress forcing of the mean flow. Jets form during periods of enhanced eddy activity, but may persist long after the eddy activity has decayed. Similarly, jets may evolve in a downstream sense, with jet formation localized near topography and undergoing modification in response to changing bathymetry. The evolution of both temperature and potential vorticity is used to show that the low-frequency variability of the jets impacts water mass structure and tracer transport. This study highlights various examples of Southern Ocean dynamics that will prove difficult to capture through existing parameterizations in coarser climate models.

  8. Low frequency variability of Southern Ocean jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Andrew F.; Richards, Kelvin J.

    2011-09-01

    Both observations and high resolution numerical models show that the Southern Ocean circumpolar flow is concentrated in a large number (approximately 8 to 12) of narrow filamentary jets. It is shown here that coherent jets exhibit a range of low frequency variability, on timescales of months to years, that can lead to displacement and to intermittent formation and dissipation of jets. Using output from an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model in local regions near topographic features, the impact of energy exchange between eddy and mean flow components on jet persistence and variability is examined. A novel approach that uses a time-dependent definition of the mean flow provides a clearer picture of eddy-mean flow interactions in regions with spatially and temporally varying flow structure. The dynamics are largely consistent with those in idealized quasi-geostrophic models, including topographically-organized and surface-enhanced Reynolds stress forcing of the mean flow. Jets form during periods of enhanced eddy activity, but may persist long after the eddy activity has decayed. Similarly, jets may evolve in a downstream sense, with jet formation localized near topography and undergoing modification in response to changing bathymetry. The evolution of both temperature and potential vorticity is used to show that the low-frequency variability of the jets impacts water mass structure and tracer transport. This study highlights various examples of Southern Ocean dynamics that will prove difficult to capture through parameterizations in coarser climate models.

  9. Measurement of the Velocity Field and Void Fraction in a Planar Plunging Jet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    plunging liquid jet entrains small bubbles from the air in the Taylor bubble. These bubbles follow the Taylor bubble in the liquid slug and...effect of any changes due to surface tension variation were too small to be detected. When the liquid jet impacts the pool surface, air entrainment ... Plunging Laminar Liquid Jets ," AIChE Journal, Vol. 12, No. 3, 563, 1966. McKeogh, E.J. and Elsaway, E., " Air Retained in

  10. Survey of Turbulence Models for the Computation of Turbulent Jet Flow and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, N.

    1999-01-01

    The report presents an overview of jet noise computation utilizing the computational fluid dynamic solution of the turbulent jet flow field. The jet flow solution obtained with an appropriate turbulence model provides the turbulence characteristics needed for the computation of jet mixing noise. A brief account of turbulence models that are relevant for the jet noise computation is presented. The jet flow solutions that have been directly used to calculate jet noise are first reviewed. Then, the turbulent jet flow studies that compute the turbulence characteristics that may be used for noise calculations are summarized. In particular, flow solutions obtained with the k-e model, algebraic Reynolds stress model, and Reynolds stress transport equation model are reviewed. Since, the small scale jet mixing noise predictions can be improved by utilizing anisotropic turbulence characteristics, turbulence models that can provide the Reynolds stress components must now be considered for jet flow computations. In this regard, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are good candidates. Reynolds stress transport models involve more modeling and computational effort and time compared to algebraic stress models. Hence, it is recommended that an algebraic Reynolds stress model (ASM) be implemented in flow solvers to compute the Reynolds stress components.

  11. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment.

  12. Operating experience with a high-throughput jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, William E.; Stephens, John C.; Vetrovec, John; Dickerson, Robert A.

    1997-04-01

    Over the last several years, Rocketdyne has conducted a number of experiments on advanced jet generators. Both cross flow jet generator and counter flow jet generators have been tested. We have made laser power measurements at our Continuous Wave Chemical Laser Facility (CWLL) and at the Air Force Phillips Laboratory RADICL test facility. A test there resulted in a measured chemical efficiency of 29.6%. This is the highest efficiency reported for a supersonic oxygen-iodine chemical laser.

  13. Hypersonic Induced Interactions of Plasma and Non-Plasma Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-12

    optimised . A preliminary assessment of the effects of plasma actuators on jet and jet in crossflow was conducted. NOMENCLATURE C Chapman-Rubesin...highly adaptable so as to allow for efficient changeover between the use of different geometries . The model was a zero incidence flat plate with a...Final Report: FA8655-07-1-3032 / Kontis, K Figure 7: Schematic of flat plate geometry Table 1 Pressure tappings. The non-plasma air jet was

  14. Size of the top jet drop produced by bubble bursting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Séon, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    As a bubble bursts at a liquid-air interface, a tiny liquid jet rises and can release the so-called jet drops. In this paper the size of the top jet drop produced by a bubble bursting is investigated experimentally. We determine and discuss the first scaling law enabling the determination of the top jet drop size as a function of the corresponding mother bubble radius and the liquid properties (viscosity, surface tension, and density), along with its regime of existence. Furthermore, with the aim of decoupling experimentally the effects of bubble collapse and jet dynamics on the drop detachment, we propose a scaling providing the top drop size only as a function of the jet velocity and liquid parameters. In particular, this allows us to untangle the intricate roles of viscosity, gravity, and surface tension in the end pinching of the bubble bursting jet.

  15. Jet noise control using the dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Bityurin, V. A.; Belyaev, I. V.; Godin, S. M.; Zaitsev, M. Yu.; Klimov, A. I.; Kopiev, V. A.; Moralev, I. A.; Ostrikov, N. N.

    2012-07-01

    We study experimentally how plasma actuators operating on the basis of surface barrier high-frequency discharge affect jet noise characteristics. The results of investigations of air jets (100-200 m/s) have demonstrated that the studied plasma actuators have control authority over the noise characteristics of these jets. An actuator's effect on the jet in the applied configuration is related to acoustic discharge excitation and to a large extent is similar to the well-known Vlasov-Ginevsky effect. It has been shown that jet excitation in the case of St ˜ 0.5 using the barrier-discharge plasma actuator leads to broadband amplification of jet sound radiation. The jet excitation in the case of St > 2 leads to broadband noise reduction if the action is sufficiently intensive.

  16. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. Bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they rise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  17. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  18. Infrared imaging results of an excited planar jet

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    Planar jets are used for many applications including heating, cooling, and ventilation. Generally such a jet is designed to provide good mixing within an enclosure. In building applications, the jet provides both thermal comfort and adequate indoor air quality. Increased mixing rates may lead to lower short-circuiting of conditioned air, elimination of dead zones within the occupied zone, reduced energy costs, increased occupant comfort, and higher indoor air quality. This paper discusses using an infrared imaging system to show the effect of excitation of a jet on the spread angle and on the jet mixing efficiency. Infrared imaging captures a large number of data points in real time (over 50,000 data points per image) providing significant advantages over single-point measurements. We used a screen mesh with a time constant of approximately 0.3 seconds as a target for the infrared camera to detect temperature variations in the jet. The infrared images show increased jet spread due to excitation of the jet. Digital data reduction and analysis show change in jet isotherms and quantify the increased mixing caused by excitation. 17 refs., 20 figs.

  19. Highly Inclined Jets in Cross Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, I. M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of flow field generated by pitched and yawed jets discharging from a flat plate into a cross-flow are presented. The circular jet was pitched at alpha = 20deg and 45deg and yawed between Beta = 0deg and 90deg in increments of 15deg. The measurements were performed with two ×-wires providing all three components of velocity and turbulent stresses. These data were obtained at downstream locations of x = 3, 5, 10 and 20, where the distance x, normalized by the jet diameter, is measured from the center of the orifice. Data for all configurations were acquired at a momentum-flux ratio J = 8. Additionally, for selected angles and locations, surveys were conducted for J = 1.5, 4, and 20. As expected, the jet penetration is found to be higher at larger alpha. With increasing beta the jet spreads more. The rate of reduction of peak streamwise vorticity, ? max, with the downstream distance is significantly less at higher Beta but is found to be practically independent of alpha. Thus, at the farthest measurement station x = 20, ?xmax is about five times larger for Beta = 75deg compared to the levels at Beta = 0deg. Streamwise velocity within the jet-vortex structure is found to depend on the parameter J. At J = 1.5 and 4, 'wake-like' velocity profiles are observed. In comparison, a 'jet-like' overshoot is present at higher J. Distributions of turbulent stresses for various cases are documented. Peak normal stresses are found to occur within the core of the streamwise vortices. With yaw, at lower values of J, high turbulence is also observed in the boundary layer underneath the jet-vortex structure

  20. The role of coherent structures in the generation of noise for subsonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Whitaker, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were made in the 'near' (r/D 60, x/D 60) field for high Reynolds number (184,000 to 262,000) axisymmetric cold air jets exhausting at atmospheric pressure. These measurements were in conjunction with an investigation which characterized the large scale coherent structure in the flow field of Mach number 0.6 to 0.8 jets. Natural jets as well as artificially excited jets were studied. Directivity plots were made for both natural jets and jets excited at various frequencies. Overall noise radiated by the jets reached a maximum value around 30 deg from the jet axis. However, individual frequencies emitted maximum sound pressure level at different angles from the jet axis. As the angle from the jet axis increased, the spectra of the noise shifted to higher frequencies.

  1. Alpha B-crystallin prevents the arrhythmogenic effects of particulate matter isolated from ambient air by attenuating oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyelim; Park, Sanghoon; Jeon, Hyunju; Song, Byeong-Wook; Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Chang-Soo; Pak, Hui-Nam; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Chung, Ji Hyung; Joung, Boyoung

    2013-01-15

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is activated by particulate matter (PM) isolated from ambient air and linked to prolonged repolarization and cardiac arrhythmia. We evaluated whether alpha B-crystallin (CryAB), a heat shock protein, could prevent the arrhythmogenic effects of PM by preventing CaMKII activation. CryAB was delivered into cardiac cells using a TAT-protein transduction domain (TAT-CryAB). ECGs were measured before and after tracheal exposure of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and each intervention in adult Sprague–Dawley rats. After endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/mL for 30 minutes, n = 11), QT intervals were prolonged from 115 ± 14 ms to 144 ± 20 ms (p = 0.03), and premature ventricular contractions were observed more frequently (0% vs. 44%) than control (n = 5) and TAT-Cry (n = 5). However, DEP-induced arrhythmia was not observed in TAT-CryAB (1 mg/kg) pretreated rats (n = 5). In optical mapping of Langendorff-perfused rat heats, compared with baseline, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/mL (n = 12) increased apicobasal action potential duration (APD) differences from 2 ± 6 ms to 36 ± 15 ms (p < 0.001), APD restitution slope from 0.26 ± 0.07 to 1.19 ± 0.11 (p < 0.001) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) from 0% to 75% (p < 0.001). DEP infusion easily induced spatially discordant alternans. However, the effects of DEP were prevented by TAT-CryAB (1 mg/kg, n = 9). In rat myocytes, while DEP increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and phosphated CaMKII, TAT-CryAB prevented these effects. In conclusion, CryAB, a small heat shock protein, might prevent the arrhythmogenic effects of PM by attenuating ROS generation and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► Particulate matter (PM) increases arrhythmia. ► PM induced arrhythmias are related with oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. ► Alpha B-crystallin (CryAB) could attenuate the arrhythmogenic effect of PM. ► CryAB decreases oxidative stress and CaMKII activation

  2. Studies of wall shear and mass transfer in a large scale model of neonatal high-frequency jet ventilation.

    PubMed

    Muller, W J; Gerjarusek, S; Scherer, P W

    1990-01-01

    The problem of endotracheal erosion associated with neonatal high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) is investigated through measurement of air velocity profiles in a scaled up model of the system. Fluid mechanical scaling principles are applied in order to construct a model within which velocity profiles are measured by hot-wire anemometry. The effects of two different jet geometries are investigated. Velocity gradients measured near the tracheal wall are used to measure the shear stresses caused by the jet flow on the wall. The Chilton-Colburn analogy between the transport of momentum and mass is applied to investigate tracheal drying caused by the high shear flow. Shear forces are seen to be more than two times higher for jets located near the endotracheal tube wall than for those located axisymmetrically in the center of the tube. Since water vapor fluxes are dependent on these shears, they are also higher for the asymmetric case. Fluxes are shown to be greatly dependent on the temperature and relative humidity of the inspired gas. Water from the tracheal surface may be depleted within one second if inspired gases are inadequately heated and humidified. It is recommended that the design of neonatal HFJV devices include delivery of heated (near body temperature), humidified (as close to 100% humidity as possible) gases through an axisymmetric jet to best avoid the problem of endotracheal erosion.

  3. Numerical simulation of liquid-layer breakup on a moving wall due to an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Taejong; Moon, Hojoon; You, Donghyun; Kim, Dokyun; Ovsyannikov, Andrey

    2014-11-01

    Jet wiping, which is a hydrodynamic method for controlling the liquid film thickness in coating processes, is constrained by a rather violent film instability called splashing. The instability is characterized by the ejection of droplets from the runback flow and results in an explosion of the film. The splashing phenomenon degrades the final coating quality. In the present research, a volume-of-fluid (VOF)-based method, which is developed at Cascade Technologies, is employed to simulate the air-liquid multiphase flow dynamics. The present numerical method is based on an unstructured-grid unsplit geometric VOF scheme and guarantees strict conservation of mass of two-phase flow, The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements such as the liquid-film thickness before and after the jet wiping, wall pressure and shear stress distributions. The trajectories of liquid droplets due to the fluid motion entrained by the gas-jet operation, are also qualitatively compared with experimental visualization. Physical phenomena observed during the liquid-layer breakup due to an impinging jet is characterized in order to develop ideas for controlling the liquid-layer instability and resulting splash generation and propagation. Supported by the Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699, the Brain Korea 21+ program, POSCO, and 2014 CTR Summer Program.

  4. Stress rupture and creep behavior of a low pressure plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, M. G.; Miner, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The creep behavior of a NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum at 660 and 850 C is studied. The microstructure of the coating alloy is described. Analysis of the creep curves reveal that the secondary creep rates, the transition from secondary to tertiary creep, and the strain-to-failure are affected by the environment, preexposure, stress, and temperature. It is observed that the rupture lives of the NiCoCrAlY alloy at 660 and 850 C are greater in air than in vacuum. Several mechanisms that may explain the lack of crack growth from surface-connected pores during tests in air are proposed.

  5. Understanding jet noise.

    PubMed

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  6. Some Measurements of Noise Transmission and Stress Response of a 0.020-Inch Duralumin Panel in the Presence of Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantarges, George T.

    1960-01-01

    Noise transmission measurements were made for a 0.020-inch panel with and without air flow on its surface. Tests were conducted with both an absorbent and reverberant chamber behind the panel. Panel stresses for some of these tests were also determined. Noise spectra obtained inside the absorbent chamber with flow attached and flow not attached to the panel appeared to contain several peaks corresponding in frequency to panel vibration modes. These peaks were notably absent when the chamber was reverberant. The noise reduction through the test panel measured with the aid of an absorbent chamber for the flow-not-attached case is in general agreement with values predicted by the theoretical weight law, which assumes negligible panel stiffness. Corresponding data for the flow-attached case do not follow the weight law but rather indicate less noise reduction at the high frequencies. The main stress responses of the panel without air flow occurred at its fundamental vibration mode. In the presence of air flow the main response occurs in a vibration mode having a node line perpendicular to the direction of air flow.

  7. Bouncing and Merging of Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Li, Minglei; Law, Chung K.

    2014-11-01

    Collision of two fluid jets is a technique that is utilized in many industrial applications, such as in rocket engines, to achieve controlled mixing, atomization and sometimes liquid phase reactions. Thus, the dynamics of colliding jets have direct impact on the performance, efficiency and reliability of such applications. In analogy with the dynamics of droplet-droplet collision, in this work we have experimentally demonstrated, for n-alkane hydrocarbons as well as water, that with increasing impact inertia obliquely colliding jets also exhibit the same nonmonotonic responses of merging, bouncing, merging again, and merging followed by disintegration; and that the continuous entrainment of the boundary layer air over the jet surface into the colliding interfacial region leads to two distinguishing features of jet collision, namely: there exists a maximum impact angle beyond which merging is always possible, and that merging is inhibited and then promoted with increasing pressure. These distinct response regimes were mapped and explained on the bases of impact inertia, deformation of the jet surface, viscous loss within the jet interior, and the thickness and pressure build-up within the interfacial region in order to activate the attractive surface van der Waals force to effect merging.

  8. Interim prediction method for jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is provided for predicting jet noise for a wide range of nozzle geometries and operating conditions of interest for aircraft engines. Jet noise theory, data and existing prediction methods was reviewed, and based on this information a interim method of jet noise prediction is proposed. Problem areas are idenified where further research is needed to improve the prediction method. This method predicts only the noise generated by the exhaust jets mixing with the surrounding air and does not include other noises emanating from the engine exhaust, such as combustion and machinery noise generated inside the engine (i.e., core noise). It does, however, include thrust reverser noise. Prediction relations are provided for conical nozzles, plug nozzles, coaxial nozzles and slot nozzles.

  9. Optical properties of a planar turbulent jet.

    PubMed

    Joia, I A; Perkins, R J; Uscinski, B J; Balmer, G; Jordan, D; Jakeman, E

    1995-10-20

    A planar heated air jet was constructed. Its flow properties were characterized and shown to be both reproducible and in good agreement with the results of turbulence theory. The optical properties of the jet were studied with the help of a 632.8-nm He-Ne laser beam. The random phase modulations imposed on the wave front of the beam traversing the jet were measured by interferometric means, and their spectra and variance were determined. The one-dimensional phase fluctuation spectrum obeyed a -8/3 power law as predicted by theory, whereas the phase variance (?(2)) depended on the jet temperature and was studied for values to as high as 0.4 (rad)(2)).

  10. Characterization of needle-assisted jet injections.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Ruddy, Bryan; Taberner, Andrew

    2016-12-10

    than those used in NFJI, yet still maintain the high-speed nature of jet injection by achieving a delivery rate of 2.25mL/s. The lower pressures required in needle-assisted drug delivery can lead to reduced device size and cost, as well as reduced shear stresses during jet injection and can therefore minimise the potentially adverse effect of shear on the structural integrity of proteins, vaccines and DNA.

  11. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  12. Drought and air warming affect the species-specific levels of stress-related foliar metabolites of three oak species on acidic and calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2013-05-01

    Climate change as projected for Central Europe will lead to prolonged periods of summer drought and enhanced air temperature. Thus, forest management practices are required to take into account how species performance is adapted to cope with these climate changes. Oak trees may play a major role in future forests because of their relative drought-tolerance compared with other species like beech. Therefore, this study investigated the stress responses (i.e., anti-oxidants, free amino acids) in the leaves of three widely distributed oak species in Central Europe (i.e., Quercus robur L., Q. petraea [Matt.] Libel., Q. pubescens Willd.) to drought, air warming and the combination of drought plus air warming under controlled conditions after periods of spring drought, a short rewetting and summer drought. We quantified foliar levels of thiols, ascorbate, and free amino compounds in Q robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens. Our study showed that oak saplings had increased levels of γ-glutamylcysteine and total glutathione and proline with drought and air warming. Foliar ascorbate, glutathione disulfide and dehydroascorbic acid levels were not affected. The comparison of stress responses to drought and/or air warming between the three species showed higher foliar thiol levels in Q. robur and Q. pubescens compared with Q. petraea. For total and reduced ascorbic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid, the highest levels were found in Q. robur. In conclusion, our study showed that foliar anti-oxidant and free amino acid levels were significantly affected by drought plus air warming; however, this effect was species-dependent with the drought-tolerant species of Q. pubescens having the highest reactive oxygen species scavenging capacity among three tested oak species. Furthermore, stress responses as shown by increased levels of foliar anti-oxidants and free amino acids differ between calcareous and acidic soil indicating that the capacities of anti-oxidative defense and osmotic stress

  13. Supersonic Coaxial Jet Experiment for CFD Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Carty, A. A.; Doerner, S. E.; Diskin, G. S.; Drummond, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A supersonic coaxial jet facility has been designed to provide experimental data suitable for the validation of CFD codes used to analyze high-speed propulsion flows. The center jet is of a light gas and the coflow jet is of air, and the mixing layer between them is compressible. Various methods have been employed in characterizing the jet flow field, including schlieren visualization, pitot, total temperature and gas sampling probe surveying, and RELIEF velocimetry. A Navier-Stokes code has been used to calculate the nozzle flow field and the results compared to the experiment.

  14. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  15. Fountain-Jet Turbulence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    and 3 times higher than expected from free- jet results. Hill et al., (Reference 6) in work with foun- tain jets impacting fuselage models, detected ...delineate the origins of the turbulent anomalies associated with fountain jets by extending the previous studies. The results are presented herein...jet velocities were detected with a Thermal Systems Inc. Model 1050 dual-channel constant-temperature anemometer equipped with a Thermal Systems Inc

  16. Metagenomics reveals diversity and abundance of meta-cleavage pathways in microbial communities from soil highly contaminated with jet fuel under air-sparging bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Brennerova, Maria V; Josefiova, Jirina; Brenner, Vladimir; Pieper, Dietmar H; Junca, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The extradiol dioxygenase diversity of a site highly contaminated with aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons under air-sparging treatment was assessed by functional screening of a fosmid library in Escherichia coli with catechol as substrate. The 235 positive clones from inserts of DNA extracted from contaminated soil were equivalent to one extradiol dioxygenase-encoding gene per 3.6 Mb of DNA screened, indicating a strong selection for genes encoding this function. Three subfamilies were identified as being predominant, with 72, 55 and 43 fosmid inserts carrying genes, related to those encoding TbuE of Ralstonia pickettii PK01 (EXDO-D), IpbC of Pseudomonas sp. JR1 (EXDO-K2) or DbtC of Burkholderia sp. DBT1 (EXDO-Dbt), respectively, whereas genes encoding enzymes related to XylE of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 were not observed. Genes encoding oxygenases related to isopropylbenzene dioxygenases were usually colocalized with genes encoding EXDO-K2 dioxygenases. Functional analysis of representative proteins indicated a subcluster of EXDO-D proteins to show exceptional high affinity towards different catecholic substrates. Based on Vmax/Km specificity constants, a task-sharing between different extradiol dioxygenases in the community of the contaminated site can be supposed, attaining a complementary and community-balanced catalytic power against diverse catecholic derivatives, as necessary for effective degradation of mixtures of aromatics. PMID:19575758

  17. Editorial on Future Jet Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    Advanced jet engines do not operate in an application vacuum. Their optimal use in advanced military applications drives much of their basic innovative research and development, especially when new needs arise in the rapidly changing domains of stealth-agile, fighter aircraft and tailless-stealth, Jet-Steered, Unmanned Air Vehicles (JS-UAV). For these reasons we periodically update this Journal with new trends that affect, and sometimes control, research and development of future jet-engines. One relevant example is the recently unmasked RQ-180 stealth-tailless drone, which is an improved version of the smaller, RQ-170 captured by Iran. Most important, with the new X-47B/C tailless-stealth JS-UAV, it is to dominate future uses of fuel-efficient jet-engines, especially for operating in dusty environments. The RQ-180 has been secretly designed and funded since 2008. It is based on a classified, 1986, parent Israeli Patents 78402, which protect hundreds design and testing trade secrets taken from 1986 to 1997 by the United States Government (USG) via classified contracts with USG-Contractors Boeing, Lockheed, General Dynamics and General Electric, as revealed by a December 6, 2013 Aviation Week [1-3] and U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, Case 2014-5028, Docket 12 [4]. The new RQ-180 design explains the recent U.S. Air Force ISR shift away from "permissive" environments - such as Iraq and Afghanistan, where non-stealthy Global Hawk and General Atomics' Reaper operate - toward new missions in highly "contested" or strongly "denied" enemy airspaces.

  18. Properties of air and combustion products of fuel with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poferl, D. J.; Svehla, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Thermodynamic and transport properties have been calculated for air, the combustion products of natural gas and air, and combustion products of ASTM-A-1 jet fuel and air. Properties calculated include: ratio of specific heats, molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat, thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, and enthalpy.

  19. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet induces apoptosis involving mitochondria via generation of free radicals.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Kim, Geunyoung; Moon, Eunpyo; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2011-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, its biological effects and mechanism of action remain elusive. Here, we investigated its cell death effects and underlying molecular mechanisms, using air and N₂ plasma jets from a micro nozzle array. Treatment with air or N₂ plasma jets caused apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells, simultaneously with depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, the plasma jets were able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), which function as surrogate apoptotic signals by targeting the mitochondrial membrane potential. Antioxidants or caspase inhibitors ameliorated the apoptotic cell death induced by the air and N₂ plasma jets, suggesting that the plasma jet may generate ROS as a proapoptotic cue, thus initiating mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest the potential employment of plasma jets as a novel therapy for cancer.

  20. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Jet Induces Apoptosis Involving Mitochondria via Generation of Free Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geunyoung; Moon, Eunpyo; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2011-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, its biological effects and mechanism of action remain elusive. Here, we investigated its cell death effects and underlying molecular mechanisms, using air and N2 plasma jets from a micro nozzle array. Treatment with air or N2 plasma jets caused apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells, simultaneously with depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, the plasma jets were able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), which function as surrogate apoptotic signals by targeting the mitochondrial membrane potential. Antioxidants or caspase inhibitors ameliorated the apoptotic cell death induced by the air and N2 plasma jets, suggesting that the plasma jet may generate ROS as a proapoptotic cue, thus initiating mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest the potential employment of plasma jets as a novel therapy for cancer. PMID:22140530

  1. The Effect of Break Edge Configuration on the Aerodynamics of Anti-Ice Jet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, V.; Yildizay, H.; Aras, H.

    2015-05-01

    One of the components of a turboprop gas turbine engine is the Front Bearing Structure (FBS) which leads air into the compressor. FBS directly encounters with ambient air, as a consequence ice accretion may occur on its static vanes. There are several aerodynamic parameters which should be considered in the design of anti-icing system of FBS, such as diameter, position, exit angle of discharge holes, etc. This research focuses on the effects of break edge configuration over anti-ice jet flow. Break edge operation is a process which is applied to the hole in order to avoid sharp edges which cause high stress concentration. Numerical analyses and flow visualization test have been conducted. Four different break edge configurations were used for this investigation; without break edge, 0.35xD, 74xD, 0.87xD. Three mainstream flow conditions at the inlet of the channel are defined; 10m/s, 20 m/s and 40 m/s. Shear stresses are extracted from numerical analyses near the trailing edge of pressure surface where ice may occur under icing conditions. A specific flow visualization method was used for the experimental study. Vane surface near the trailing edge was dyed and thinner was injected into anti-ice jet flow in order to remove dye from the vane surface. Hence, film effect on the surface could be computed for each testing condition. Thickness of the dye removal area of each case was examined. The results show noticeable effects of break edge operation on jet flow, and the air film effectiveness decreases when mainstream inlet velocity decreases.

  2. Mixing in plasma and low density jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, S.; Strykowski, P. J.; Pfender, E.

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the mechanisms which produce the large entrainment measured near the exit of thermal plasma torches. A research facility was constructed to examine low density jet behavior under similar dimensionless conditions as those produced by thermal plasma spray torches; the Reynolds number based on jet diameter and average properties was 1000, and the ratio of jet to ambient density was 0.07. This very low density jet produced organized vortex structures which were partially responsible for the rapid entrainment of external air. The formation of these organized structures could be disrupted by introducing turbulence, but the rapid entrainment process was not significantly affected. The structure of the jet produced by a commercial plasma torch was examined and compared to the low density research jet. At low gas flow rates the plasma jet also displayed the formation of coherent vortex structures, the passage frequency of which compared favorably with that measured in the low density research jet. At higher gas flow rates the shear layer of the plasma jet rapidly broke down producing relatively small scale turbulence. Visualizations of the hot plasma core were compared against measurements of the torch voltage fluctuations caused by arc instabilities. At low flow rates the arc voltage fluctuations were quite low and the plume was very steady. At higher flow rates the arc voltage fluctuations increased and produced “surging” and “whipping” in the hot potential core. It is believed that this low frequency unsteadiness is partially responsible for the rapid entrainment measured in plasma torches.

  3. COANDA Control of a Thick Wall-Jet in the Static Case

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    conforming to its shape ( Coanda effect ) and induces upstream air on the upper c surface to follow the jet flow. This phenomenon effectively increases the...downward (and in some cases more than 90 degrees downward, producing thrust reversal) when the CC Coanda jet is activated. Experimental research was...ro.r.d~d trailing edge. r Thikcxtes5 of the Coanda jet, It Entrainnment length--the distance between the exit plane of the thick " wall-jet nozzle and

  4. Entrainment by turbulent jets issuing from sharp-edged inlet round nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabold, T. A.; Essen, E. B.; Obot, N. T.

    Experiments were carried out to determine entrainment rates by turbulent air jets generated with square-edged inlet round nozzles. A parametric study was made which included the effects of Reynolds number, nozzle length, partial confinement and geometry of the jet plenum chamber. Measurements were made for the region extending from the nozzle exit to 24 jet hole diameters downstream. There is a large difference in entrainment rate between jets generated with relatively short nozzles and those discharged through long tubes.

  5. Characteristics of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow at low to medium jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios are computed with a finite volume numerical procedure which utilizes a second-moment closure model to approximate the Reynolds stresses. A multigrid method is used to accelerate the convergence rate of the procedure. Comparison of the computations to measured data show good qualitative agreement. All trends are correctly predicted, though there is some uncertainty on the height of penetration of the jet. The evolution of the vorticity field is used to explore the jet-crossflow interaction.

  6. Dynamics and control of coherent structure in turbulent jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1992-01-01

    Current understanding of coherent structure dynamics in incompressible turbulent jets as explained by the nonlinear stability theory is reviewed, focusing on nonswirling turbulent jets. Topics addressed include hydrodynamic stability theory and coherent structures; dynamics of energy transfers among different scales of motion; nonlinear development of amplitude; development of single-frequency coherent mode; fundamental-subharmonic interaction and vortex pairing; and reversal of Reynolds stresses. Attention is also given to the effect of initial phase-difference angle between fundamental and subharmonic, conditions for resonance interaction, modulation of spreading rate by controlling coherent structure, turbulence enhancement or suppression due to excitation, 3D effects, jet noise, and swirling jets.

  7. Evolution of arched roofs in salt caves: Role of gravity-induced stress and relative air humidity and temperature changes (Zagros Mts., Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruthans, Jiri; Filippi, Michal; Zare, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    In salt caves in the halite karst in SE Iran the disintegration of rock salt into individual grains can be observed. Highly disintegrated blocks and individual grains form a major volume of debris in many caves on islands in the Persian Gulf. Larger cave rooms have often perfectly arched roof. The perfect geometry of rooms and interlocking of salt grains indicate that evolution of room cross-sections in these caves is controlled by feedback between gravity-induced stress and rock salt disintegration in similar way as in evolution of sandstone landforms (Bruthans et al. 2014). Those portions of rock salt, which are under compressional stress, disintegrate much slower than portions under tensile stress. Important question is the kind of weathering mechanism responsible for intergranular disintegration of rock salt. The relationship between disintegration, its rate and cave climate was studied. Clearly the fastest disintegration rate was found in caves with strong air circulation (i.e, short caves with large cross-sections, open on both ends). Temperature and air humidity changes are considerable in these caves. On the other hand the disintegration is very slow in the inner parts of long caves with slow air circulation or caves with one entrance. The best example of such caves is the inner part of 3N Cave on Namakdan salt diapir with nearly no air circulation and stable temperature and humidity, where disintegration of rock salt into grains is missing. Strong effect of cave climate on disintegration rate can be explained by deliquescence properties of halite. Halite is absorbing air moisture forming NaCl solution if relative humidity (RH) exceeds 75 % (at 20-30 oC). In the Persian Gulf region the RH of the air is passing the 75 % threshold in case of 91% days (Qeshm Island, years 2002-2005), while in mountainous areas in mainland this threshold is less commonly reached. In most of nights (91 %) in Persian Gulf the air with RH >75 % is entering the salt caves and air

  8. Stress Analysis of B-52B and B-52H Air-Launching Systems Failure-Critical Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2005-01-01

    The operational life analysis of any airborne failure-critical structural component requires the stress-load equation, which relates the applied load to the maximum tangential tensile stress at the critical stress point. The failure-critical structural components identified are the B-52B Pegasus pylon adapter shackles, B-52B Pegasus pylon hooks, B-52H airplane pylon hooks, B-52H airplane front fittings, B-52H airplane rear pylon fitting, and the B-52H airplane pylon lower sway brace. Finite-element stress analysis was performed on the said structural components, and the critical stress point was located and the stress-load equation was established for each failure-critical structural component. The ultimate load, yield load, and proof load needed for operational life analysis were established for each failure-critical structural component.

  9. Effects of genetic strain on stress-induced weight and body fat loss in rats: Application to air pollution research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to some air pollutants is suspected of contributing to obesity. Hazelton chambers are commonly used in air pollution studies but we found unexpected reductions in body weight and body fat of rats housed in Hazelton chambers under control conditions. We suspect that stres...

  10. Effect of Jet Injection Angle and Number of Jets on Mixing and Emissions From a Reacting Crossflow at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.John, D.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The mixing of air jets into hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone is an important step in staged combustion. Often referred to as "quick quench," the mixing occurs with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. An experiment has been designed to simulate and study this process, and the effect of varying the entry angle (0 deg, 22.5 deg and 45 deg from normal) and number of the air jets (7, 9, and 11) into the main flow, while holding the jet-to-crossflow mass-low ratio, MR, and momentum-flux ratio, J, constant (MR = 2.5;J = 25). The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from orifices equally spaced around the perimeter. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture to a module containing air jet injection tubes that can be changed to vary orifice geometry. Species concentrations of O2, CO, CO2, NO(x) and HC were obtained one duct diameter upstream (in the rich zone), and primarily one duct radius downstream. From this information, penetration of the jet, the spatial extent of chemical reaction, mixing, and the optimum jet injection angle and number of jets can be deduced.

  11. High-Speed Jet Formation after Solid Object Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekle, Stephan; Gordillo, José Manuel; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    A circular disc hitting a water surface creates an impact crater which after collapse leads to a vigorous jet. Upon impact an axisymmetric air cavity forms and eventually pinches off in a single point halfway down the cavity. Two fast sharp-pointed jets are observed shooting up- and downwards from the closure location, which by then has turned into a stagnation point surrounded by a locally hyperbolic flow pattern. This flow, however, is not the mechanism feeding the jets. Using high-speed imaging and numerical simulations we show that jetting is fed by the local flow around the base of the jet, which is forced by the colliding cavity walls. We show how the well-known theory of a collapsing void (using a line of sinks on the symmetry axis) can be continued beyond pinch-off to obtain a new and quantitative model for jet formation which agrees well with numerical and experimental data.

  12. Heat shock transcription factors expression during fruit development and under hot air stress in Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Ponkan) fruit.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiong; Jiang, Qing; Lin, Juanying; Wang, Dengliang; Li, Shaojia; Liu, Chunrong; Sun, Chongde; Chen, Kunsong

    2015-04-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs) play a role in plant responses to stress. Citrus is an economically important fruit whose genome has been fully sequenced. So far, no detailed characterization of the Hsf gene family is available for citrus. A genome-wide analysis was carried out in Citrus clementina to identify Hsf genes, named CcHsfs. Eighteen CcHsfs were identified and classified into three main clades (clades A, B and C) according to the structural characteristics and the phylogenetic comparison with Arabidopsis and tomato. MEME motif analysis highlighted the conserved DBD and HR-A/B domains, which were similar to Hsf protein structures in other species. Gene expression analysis in Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Ponkan) fruit identified 14 Hsf genes, named CrHsf, as important candidates for a role in fruit development and ripening, and showed seven genes to be expressed in response to hot air stress. CrHsfB2a and CrHsfB5 were considered to be important regulators of citrate content and showed variation in both developmentally-related and hot air-triggered citrate degradation processes. In summary, the data obtained from this investigation provides the basis for further study to dissect Hsf function during fruit development as well as in response to heat stress and also emphasizes the potential importance of CrHsfs in regulation of citrate metabolism in citrus fruit.

  13. The entrainment rate for a row of turbulent jets. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Eliott B.; Greber, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    Entrainment rates for a row of isothermal circular air jets issuing into a quiescent environment are found by integrating velocity distributions measured by a linearized hot-wire anemometer. Jet spacing to jet diameter ratios of 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 are studied at jet Reynold's numbers ranging from 5110 to 12070. Velocity distributions are determined at regular downstream intervals at axial distances equal to 16.4 to 164 jet diameters from the jet source. The entrainment rates for the four spacing configurations vary monotonically with increasing spacing/diameter between the limiting case of the slot jet entrainment rate (where the jet spacing to diameter ratio is zero) and the circular jet entrainment rate (in which the spacing to diameter ratio is infinity).

  14. Drag reduction - Jet breakup correlation with kerosene-based additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, J. W.; Altman, R. L.; Taylor, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    The drag-reduction effectiveness of a number of high-polymer additives dissolved in aircraft fuel has been measured in a turbulent-flow rheometer. These solutions were further subjected to high elongational stress and breakup forces in a jet discharging in air. The jet was photographed using a high-resolution camera with special lighting. The object of the work was to study the possible spray-suppression ability of high-polymer additives to aircraft fuel and to correlate this with the drag-reducing properties of the additives. It was found, in fact, that the rheometer results indicate the most effective spray-suppressing additives. Using as a measure the minimum polymer concentration to give a maximum friction-reducing effect, the order of effectiveness of eight different polymer additives as spray-suppressing agents was predicted. These results may find application in the development of antimisting additives for aircraft fuel which may increase fire safety in case of crash or accident.

  15. Large bouncing jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, Karl; Weislogel, Mark

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the phenomena of large jet rebound (bounce), a mode of fluid transfer following oblique jet impacts on hydrophobic surfaces. We initially seek to describe the regimes of such jet bounce in tests conducted in the weightless environment of a drop tower. A parametric study reveals the dependence of the rebound mode on the relevant dimensionless groups such as Weber number We⊥ defined on the velocity component perpendicular to the surface. We show that significantly larger diameter jets behave similarly as much smaller jets demonstrated during previous terrestrial investigations when We⊥ 1 . For We⊥ > 1 , large jet impacts create fishbone-like structures. We also explore rebounds from nonplanar substrates. Improving our understanding of such jet rebound opens avenues for unique transport capabilities. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12A047A.

  16. Hydroacoustic pulsating jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unrau, A.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1987-04-01

    A high pressure turbulent jet generator connected to a low pressure hydraulic tube is studied to investigate water hammer in tubes with fast flow variations, generating high pressure pulsating water jets. The pulsating jet generator consists of a tube, a hydraulic valve, a spring, and a water container. The jet is the effect of the combination of turbulent pipe flow with a valve for flow nozzle. The jet pressure depends on specific oscillation impedance and flow velocity variations. For inlet pressure of 0.5 to 2 bar the pressure rises to 40 bar. The described pulsating jet generator is more effective than the earlier model. A piezoelectric pressure controller is used to register pressure signals and high speed photos are made of the jet. Test results are consistent with theoretical calculation.

  17. Supersonic Injection of Aerated Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhari, Abhijit; Sallam, Khaled

    2016-11-01

    A computational study of the exit flow of an aerated two-dimensional jet from an under-expanded supersonic nozzle is presented. The liquid sheet is operating within the annular flow regime and the study is motivated by the application of supersonic nozzles in air-breathing propulsion systems, e.g. scramjet engines, ramjet engines and afterburners. The simulation was conducted using VOF model and SST k- ω turbulence model. The test conditions included: jet exit of 1 mm and mass flow rate of 1.8 kg/s. The results show that air reaches transonic condition at the injector exit due to the Fanno flow effects in the injector passage. The aerated liquid jet is alternately expanded by Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan and compressed by oblique shock waves due to the difference between the back (chamber) pressure and the flow pressure. The process then repeats itself and shock (Mach) diamonds are formed at downstream of injector exit similar to those typical of exhaust plumes of propulsion system. The present results, however, indicate that the flow field of supersonic aerated liquid jet is different from supersonic gas jets due to the effects of water evaporation from the liquid sheet. The contours of the Mach number, static pressure of both cases are compared to the theory of gas dynamics.

  18. An Analysis of Pool Surface Deformation Due to a Plunging Liquid Jet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-31

    pool surface depression by the plunging liquid jet (which leads to the entrainment of air ) was completed...technique. INTRODUCTION The entrainment of non-condensible gases by a plunging liquid jet impacting a liquid pool is important for some practical...the surface is such that the surface tension is not large enough to keep the pool surface from getting near the plunging liquid jet and thus air

  19. Spatio-Temporal Characteristics of Scalar Mixing and Dissipation Processes in Turbulent Jets and Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-20

    Xi and i are the mole fraction and differential cross- section of species i, respectively. For a flow that is isothermal and isobaric , changes in...exit nozzle and d* is the “momentum diameter” which accounts for differences in density between the jet fluid and the ambient air, i.e., d*=(jet/air

  20. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  1. Ozone, jet streaks and severe weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sechrist, Frank S.; Petersen, Ralph A.; Brill, Keith F.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Uccellini, Louis W.

    1987-01-01

    Data from three independent observing platforms are synthesized to study the role of jet streaks in severe weather. The three data types are: conventional radiosondes; 6.7 micron water vapor imagery from the GOES satellite; and total ozone imagery from Nimbus 7. Diagnoses are then made of potential vorticity, mid-tropospheric moisture, and total ozone at and below the level of jet streaks. Potential vorticity and total ozone distributions are both tracers of stratospheric air. Theoretically, both should respond to the transverse, vertical circulations expected in the vicinity of jet streaks. Both should increase due to the sinking above the left front quadrant of the streaks. Moisture, on the other hand, increases in the ascent under the left front quadrant. This study shows striking agreement between the three parameters independently observed from three different observing platforms. Moreover, the three severe weather case studies suggest a unique distribution of ozone, potential vorticity, and mid-tropospheric moisture relative to a jet streak. This, in turn, led to the creation of a new ozone/jet streak model which shows that the total ozone distribution provides a signature in the vicinity of jet streaks and permits identification of areas most likely to experience severe weather at a later time. The value of such observations to operational forecasting is discussed.

  2. Jet Mixing in a Reacting Cylindrical Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors associated with nonspecific building-related symptoms in office employees in Japan: relationships between work environment, Indoor Air Quality, and occupational stress.

    PubMed

    Azuma, K; Ikeda, K; Kagi, N; Yanagi, U; Osawa, H

    2015-10-01

    A nationwide cross-sectional study of 3335 employees was conducted in 320 offices in Japan to estimate the prevalence of building-related symptoms (BRSs) and determine the risk factors related to work environment, Indoor Air Quality, and occupational stress. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. The prevalences of general symptoms, eye irritation, and upper respiratory symptoms were 14.4%, 12.1%, and 8.9%, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that eye irritation was significantly associated with carpeting [odds ratio (OR), 1.73; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-2.41], coldness perception (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13-1.45), and air dryness perception (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.42-1.82). General symptoms were significantly associated with unpleasant odors (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.13-1.65), amount of work (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06-1.45), and interpersonal conflicts (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.23-1.69). Upper respiratory symptoms were significantly associated with crowded workspaces (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63), air dryness perception (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.79-2.38), and reported dustiness on the floor (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.16-1.67). Although psychosocial support is important to reduce and control BRSs, maintaining appropriate air-conditioning and a clean and uncrowded workspace is of equal importance.

  4. Hot-salt stress-corrosion of titanium alloys as related to turbine operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    In an effort to simulate typical compressor operating conditions of current turbine engines, special test facilities were designed. Air velocity, air pressure, air dewpoint, salt deposition temperature, salt concentration, and specimen surface condition were systematically controlled and their influence on hot-salt stress-corrosion evaluated. The influence of both continuous and cyclic stress-temperature exposures was determined. The relative susceptibility of a variety of titanium alloys in commonly used heat-treated conditions was determined. The effects of both environmental and material variables were used to interpret the behavior of titanium alloys under hot-salt stress-corrosion conditions found in jet engines and to appraise their future potential under such conditions.

  5. Seasonality Influence on Biochemical and Hematological Indicators of Stress and Growth of Pirarucu (Arapaima gigas), an Amazonian Air-Breathing Fish

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Rosiely Felix; Soares, Maria do Carmo Figueiredo; Santos, Athiê Jorge Guerra; Maciel Carvalho, Elba Verônica Matoso; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors such as seasonal cycles are the main chronic stress cause in fish increasing incidence of disease and mortality and affecting productive performance. Arapaima gigas (pirarucu) is an Amazonian air-breathing and largest freshwater fish with scales in the world. The captivity development of pirarucu is expanding since it can fatten up over 1 kg per month reaching 10 kg body mass in the first year of fattening. This work was conducted in three periods (April to July 2010, August to November 2010, and December 2010 to March 2011) defined according to rainfall and medium temperatures. Seasonality effect analysis was performed on biochemical (lectin activity, lactate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase activities) and hematological (total count of red blood cells, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and hematimetric Wintrobe indexes) stress indicators, as well as on growth and wellbeing degree expressed by pirarucu condition factor developed in captivity. All biochemical and hematological stress indicators showed seasonal variations. However, the fish growth was allometrically positive; condition factor high values indicated good state of healthiness in cultivation. These results reinforce the robust feature of pirarucu and represent a starting point for understanding stress physiology and environmental changes during cultivation enabling identification and prevention of fish adverse health conditions. PMID:24578643

  6. JetStar in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This 18-second movie clip shows the NASA Dryden Lockheed C-140 JetStar in flight with its pylon-mounted air-turbine-drive system used to gather information on the acoustic characteristics of subscale advanced design propellers. Data was gathered through 28 flush-mounted microphones on the skin of the aircraft. From 1976 to 1987 the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio -- today known as the Glenn Research Center -- engaged in research and development of an advanced turboprop concept in partnership with Hamilton Standard, Windsor Locks, Connecticut, the largest manufacturer of propellers in the United States. The Advanced Turboprop Project took its impetus from the energy crisis of the early 1970's and sought to produce swept propeller blades that would increase efficiency and reduce noise. As the project progressed, Pratt & Whitney, Allison Gas Turbine Division of General Motors, General Electric, Gulfstream, Rohr Industries, Boeing, Lockheed, and McDonnell Douglas, among others, also took part. NASA Lewis did the much of the ground research and marshaled the resources of these and other members of the aeronautical community. The team came to include the NASA Ames Research Center, Langley Research Center, and the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (before and after that time, the Dryden Flight Research Center). Together, they brought the propeller to the flight research stage, and the team that worked on the project won the coveted Collier Trophy for its efforts in 1987. To test the acoustics of the propeller the team developed, it mounted propeller models on a C-140 JetStar aircraft fuselage at NASA Dryden. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air-turbine-drive system. The drive motor, with a test propeller, was mounted on a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propeller. Microphones mounted on the wings and on an accompanying Learjet chase

  7. Conical shaped charge pressed powder, metal liner jet characterization and penetration in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1997-05-01

    This work was conducted as part of a Near-wellbore Mechanics program at Sandia National Laboratories. An understanding of the interaction of the perforator jet from an explosive shaped charge with the fluid filled porous sandstone media is of basic importance to the completion of oil wells. Tests were conducted using the five-head Flash X-ray Test Site to measure the jet tip velocities and jet geometry for the OMNI and CAPSULE Conical Shaped Charge (CSC) oil well perforator jets fired into air. These tests were conducted to generate jet velocity and geometry information to be used in validating the CTH hydrocode modeling/simulation development of pressed powder, metal liner jets in air. Ten tests were conducted to determine the CSC jet penetration into 6061-T6 aluminum targets. Five tests were conducted with the OMNI CSC at 0.25, 6.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. Five tests were conducted with the CAPSULE CSC at 0.60, 5.0, 10.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. These tests were conducted to generate jet penetration into homogeneous target information for use in validating the CTH code modeling/simulation of pressed powder, metal liner jets penetrating aluminum targets. The Flash X-ray radiographs, jet velocities, jet diameters, and jet lengths data for jets fired into air are presented in this report. The jet penetration into aluminum and penetration hole profile data are also presented for the OMNI and CAPSULE perforators. Least Squares fits are presented for the measured jet velocity and jet penetration data.

  8. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Mahua G.; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2016-01-01

    The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) is frequently being challenged by bacterial contaminants, and different environmental insults like osmotic, hyper-ammonia, dehydration and oxidative stresses in its natural habitats throughout the year. The main objectives of the present investigation were to determine (a) the possible induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (a bacterial endotoxin), and (b) to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from the iNOS-induced perfused liver of singhi catfish. Intra-peritoneal injection of LPS led to induction of iNOS gene and localized tissue specific expression of iNOS enzyme with more production and accumulation of NO in different tissues of singhi catfish. Further, changes of hydration status/cell volume, caused either by anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites such as glutamine plus glycine and adenosine, affected the NO production from the perfused liver of iNOS-induced singhi catfish. In general, increase of hydration status/cell swelling due to hypotonicity caused decrease, and decrease of hydration status/cell shrinkage due to hypertonicity caused increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver, thus suggesting that changes in hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells serve as a potent modulator for regulating the NO production. Significant increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver was also observed while infusing the liver with stress hormones like epinephrine and norepinephrine, accompanied with decrease of hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells. Further, oxidative stress, caused due to infusion of t-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide separately, in the perfused liver of singhi catfish, resulted in

  9. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Mahua G; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2016-01-01

    The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) is frequently being challenged by bacterial contaminants, and different environmental insults like osmotic, hyper-ammonia, dehydration and oxidative stresses in its natural habitats throughout the year. The main objectives of the present investigation were to determine (a) the possible induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (a bacterial endotoxin), and (b) to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from the iNOS-induced perfused liver of singhi catfish. Intra-peritoneal injection of LPS led to induction of iNOS gene and localized tissue specific expression of iNOS enzyme with more production and accumulation of NO in different tissues of singhi catfish. Further, changes of hydration status/cell volume, caused either by anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites such as glutamine plus glycine and adenosine, affected the NO production from the perfused liver of iNOS-induced singhi catfish. In general, increase of hydration status/cell swelling due to hypotonicity caused decrease, and decrease of hydration status/cell shrinkage due to hypertonicity caused increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver, thus suggesting that changes in hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells serve as a potent modulator for regulating the NO production. Significant increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver was also observed while infusing the liver with stress hormones like epinephrine and norepinephrine, accompanied with decrease of hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells. Further, oxidative stress, caused due to infusion of t-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide separately, in the perfused liver of singhi catfish, resulted in

  10. Analysis of stratified and closely spaced jets exhausting into a crossflow. [aerodynamic characteristics of lift-jet, vectored thrust, and lift fan V/STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, H.; Woller, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Procedures have been developed for determining the flow field about jets with velocity stratification exhausting into a crossflow. Jets with three different types of exit velocity stratification have been considered: (1) jets with a relatively high velocity core; (2) jets with a relatively low velocity core; and (3) jets originating from a vaned nozzle. The procedure developed for a jet originating from a high velocity core nozzle is to construct an equivalent nozzle having the same mass flow and thrust but having a uniform exit velocity profile. Calculations of the jet centerline and induced surface static pressures have been shown to be in good agreement with test data for a high velocity core nozzle. The equivalent ideal nozzle has also been shown to be a good representation for jets with a relatively low velocity core and for jets originating from a vaned nozzle in evaluating jet-induced flow fields. For the singular case of a low velocity core nozzle, namely a nozzle with a dead air core, and for the vaned nozzle, an alternative procedure has been developed. The internal mixing which takes place in the jet core has been properly accounted for in the equations of motion governing the jet development. Calculations of jet centerlines and induced surface static pressures show good agreement with test data these nozzles.

  11. Site-scale variability of streambank fluvial erodibility parameters as measured with a jet erosion test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The erosion rate of cohesive streambanks is typically modeled using the excess shear stress equation, dependent on two erodibility parameters: critical shear stress and erodibility coefficient. The Jet Erosion Test (JET) has become the most common method for estimating these erodibility parameters ...

  12. Numerical modeling of lightning, blue jets, and gigantic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riousset, Jeremy A.

    boundaries. The results demonstrate the important role of the screening charges in local enhancement of the electric field and/or reduction of net charge in the upper levels of the thundercloud. This model shows that the accumulation of screening charges near the thundercloud top produces a charge configuration leading to the initiation of blue jets, and the effective mixing of these charges with the upper thundercloud charge may lead to the formation of gigantic jets. We develop a model of the streamer-to-spark transition to study this transition from cold, weakly ionized plasma to thermalized spark at various altitudes (or equivalently, ambient air densities) in the Earth atmosphere. The model is a fully one-dimensional (1-D) axisymmetric, axially invariant thermodynamics model coupled to a zero-dimensional (0-D) chemical kinetics scheme. In this dissertation, the model is applied to study the scaling properties of air heating in streamer channels under conditions of constant electric field. The model results on characteristic heating times taubr appear to be in excellent agreement with the available laboratory measurements conducted in short discharge gaps at ground and near-ground pressures. The results demonstrate a significant acceleration of the heating at lower air densities, with effective heating times appearing to scale closer to 1/ N than to 1/N2 predicted on the basis of simple similarity laws for Joule heating, where N is the ambient air density. This acceleration is attributed to strong reduction in electron losses owing to three-body attachment and electron--ion recombination with reduction of air pressure. The results also indicate that at low ambient air densities, the channel conductivity and the air temperature increase very rapidly in comparison with the gas dynamic expansion time (i.e., tau br≤rs/cs, where rs is the streamer channel radius and cs is speed of sound). Thus both constant-density and constant-pressure approximations to channel dynamics

  13. Aviator Psychological and Physiological Responses to Replacement Air Group Training.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Pro.rm The [RAG syllabus for F-4 jet aircraft at the Niar ar aval Air StAtion, San Diego, California, is divided into several phases. A co-,trol day...sunming the various responses to the adjectives in the scale. Perceived Stress Measure Following completion of the RAG syllabus , each trainee... the Naval Medical Research and Development Comn;and, Department of the Navy, under research work unit ZF5!..524.002,5OO. The views presented in this

  14. Experimental and numerical study of pulsating transversal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfeld, M. A.; Fedorova, N. N.; Fedorchenko, I. A.; Pozdnyakov, G. A.; Timofeev, K. Yu.; Zhakharova, Yu. V.

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents results of joint experimental and numerical investigation of pulsating jet penetration into still air and supersonic flow. Goal of the study is to investigate two-dimensional (2D) Hartmann generator (HG) properties and clear up its possibilities in providing better mixing between air and secondary (injected) gases.

  15. The jet in crossflowa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagozian, Ann R.

    2014-10-01

    The jet in crossflow, or transverse jet, is a flowfield that has relevance to a wide range of energy and propulsion systems. Over the years, our group's studies on this canonical flowfield have focused on the dynamics of the vorticity associated with equidensity and variable density jets in crossflow, including the stability characteristics of the jet's upstream shear layer, as a means of explaining jet response to altered types of excitation. The jet's upstream shear layer is demonstrated to exhibit convectively unstable behavior at high jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios, transitioning to absolutely unstable behavior at low momentum flux and/or density ratios, with attendant differences in shear layer vorticity evolution and rollup. These differences in stability characteristics are shown to have a significant effect on how one optimally employs external excitation to control jet penetration and spread, depending on the flow regime and specific engineering application. Yet recent unexpected observations on altered transverse jet structure under different flow conditions introduce a host of unanswered questions, primarily but not exclusively associated with the nature of molecular mixing, that make this canonical flowfield one that is of great interest for more extensive exploration.

  16. Advances of air pollution science: from forest decline to multiple-stress effects on forest ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, E; Schaub, M; Matyssek, R; Wieser, G; Augustaitis, A; Bastrup-Birk, A M; Bytnerowicz, A; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Müller-Starck, G; Serengil, Y

    2010-06-01

    Over the past 20 years, the focus of forest science on air pollution has moved from forest decline to a holistic framework of forest health, and from the effects on forest production to the ecosystem services provided by forest ecosystems. Hence, future research should focus on the interacting factorial impacts and resulting antagonistic and synergistic responses of forest trees and ecosystems. The synergistic effects of air pollution and climatic changes, in particular elevated ozone, altered nitrogen, carbon and water availability, must be key issues for research. Present evidence suggests air pollution will become increasingly harmful to forests under climate change, which requires integration amongst various stressors (abiotic and biotic factors, including competition, parasites and fire), effects on forest services (production, biodiversity protection, soil protection, sustained water balance, socio-economical relevance) and assessment approaches (research, monitoring, modeling) to be fostered.

  17. Effects of Jet Swirl on Mixing of a Light Gas Jet in a Supersonic Airstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerner, Steven E.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1999-01-01

    A non reacting experiment was performed to investigate the effects of jet swirl on mixing of a light gas jet in a supersonic airstream. The experiment consisted of two parts. The first part was an investigation of the effects of jet swirl and skew on the mixing and penetration of a 25 deg. supersonic jet injected from a flat surface (flush wall injection) into a supersonic ducted airflow. Specifically, the objective was to determine whether the jet would mix more rapidly if the jet were swirling, and whether swirl, with and without skew, causes the injectant-air plume to have a net circulation (i.e., a single or dominant vortex). The second part was a preliminary study of the mixing of swirling jets injected from the base of a skewed ramp. The hypothesis was that favorable interactions between vorticity generated by the swirling jet and vortices generated by the ramp could produce mixing enhancements. Both parts of the experiment were conducted at equal injectant mass flow rate and total pressure. The results for the flush wall injection cases indicate that, except relatively close to the injection point, swirl, with or without skew, does not enhance the mixing of the jet, and can in fact reduce penetration. In addition, a plume with significant net circulation is not generated, as had previously been believed. The results for the ramp cases indicated no improvements in mixing in comparison with the baseline (swept ramp injector) case. However, it was not possible to determine the vorticity mechanisms underlying the poor performance, since no measurements of vorticity were made. Thus, since many geometric parameters were chosen arbitrarily, the results are inconclusive for this class of injector.

  18. Transitional Gas Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Alammar, Khalid; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Drop tower experiments were performed to identify buoyancy effects in transitional hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry was utilized to optically visualize the flame and to measure oxygen concentration in the laminar portion of the flame. Test conditions consisted of atmospheric pressure flames burning in quiescent air. Fuel from a 0.3mm inside diameter tube injector was issued at jet exit Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1300 to 1700. Helium mole percentage in the fuel was varied from 0 to 40%. Significant effects of buoyancy were observed in near field of the flame even-though the fuel jets were momentum-dominated. Results show an increase of breakpoint length in microgravity. Data suggest that transitional flames in earth-gravity at Re<1300 might become laminar in microgravity.

  19. An analysis of interfacial waves and air ingestion mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, Azat

    This research was focused on developing analytical methods with which to derive the functional forms of the various interfacial forces in two-fluid models [Galimov et al., 2004], and on the Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of traveling breaking waves and plunging liquid jets. Analytical results are presented for a stable stratified wavy two-phase flow and the associated interfacial force densities of a two-fluid model. In particular, the non-drag interfacial force density [Drew & Passman, 1998], the Reynolds stress tensor, and the term ( p˜cli -pcl)∇alphacl, which drives surface waves, were derived, where p˜cli is interfacial average pressure, pcl is the average pressure, and alphacl is the volume fraction of the continuous liquid phase. These functional forms are potentially useful for developing two-fluid model closure relations for computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) numerical solvers. Moreover, it appears that this approach can be generalized to other flow regimes (e.g., annular flows). A comparison of the analytical and ensemble-averaged DNS results show good agreement, and it appears that this approach can be used to develop phenomenological flow-regime-specific closure laws for two-fluid models [Lahey & Drew, 2004], [Lahey, 2005]. A successful 2-D DNS of breaking traveling waves was performed. These calculations had periodic boundary conditions and the physical parameters for air/water flow at atmospheric pressure, including a liquid/gas density ratio of 1,000 and representative surface tension and viscosities. Detailed 3-D DNS was also made for a plunging liquid jet. The processes of forming the liquid jet, the associated air cavity, capturing an initial large donut-shaped air bubble, and developing and breaking-up this bubble into smaller bubbles due to liquid shear, were shown. These simulations showed that the inertia of the liquid jet initially depressed the pool's surface and the toroidal liquid eddy formed subsequently resulted in air

  20. Oxidative stress and DNA damage caused by the urban air pollutant 3-NBA and its isomer 2-NBA in human lung cells analyzed with three independent methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Eszter; Johansson, Clara; Zeisig, Magnus; Möller, Lennart

    2005-11-15

    The air pollutant 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), emitted in diesel exhaust, is a potent mutagen and genotoxin. 3-NBA can isomerise to 2-nitrobenzanthrone (2-NBA), which can become more than 70-fold higher in concentration in ambient air. In this study, three independent methods have been employed to evaluate the oxidative stress and genotoxicity of 2-NBA compared to 3-NBA in the human A549 lung cell line. HPLC-EC/UV was applied for measurements of oxidative damage in the form of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), (32)P-HPLC for measurements of lipophilic DNA-adducts, and the Comet assay to measure a variety of DNA lesions, including oxidative stress. No significant oxidative damage from either isomer was found regarding formation of 8-oxodG analysed using HPLC-EC/UV. However, the Comet assay (with FPG-treatment), which is more sensitive and detects more types of damages compared to HPLC-EC/UV, showed a significant effect from both 3-NBA and 2-NBA. (32)P-HPLC revealed a strong DNA-adduct formation from both 3-NBA and 2-NBA, and also a significant difference between both isomers compared to negative control. These results clearly show that 2-NBA has a genotoxic potential. Even if the DNA-adduct forming capacity and the amount of DNA lesions measured with the (32)P-HPLC and Comet assay is about one third of 3-NBA, the high abundance of 2-NBA in ambient air calls for further investigation and evaluation of its health hazard.

  1. Added value of stress related gene inductions in HepG2 cells as effect measurement in monitoring of air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobels, Ingrid; Vanparys, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Rosette; Vercauteren, Jordy; Blust, Ronny

    2012-08-01

    In this study we studied the effects of particulate matter samples (PM) through gene expression analysis in a routine air quality monitoring campaign by the Flemish Environment Agency (VMM, Belgium). We selected a human hepatoma (HepG2) multiple endpoint reporter assay for targeted stress related endpoint screening. Organic extracts of air samples (total suspended particles, TSP) were collected during one year in an industrial, urban and background location in Flanders, Belgium. Simultaneously, meteorological conditions (temperature, wind speed and precipitation) and particulate matter size ≤ 10 μM (PM10), organic (OC), elemental (EC) and total (TC) carbon were monitored and air samples were collected for chemical analysis (11 PAHs). Correlations between the induction of the different stress genes and the chemical pollutants were analysed. Exposure of HepG2 cells to daily air equivalents (20 m3) of organic TSP extracts revealed the dominant induction of the xenobiotic response element (Xre) and phase I (Cyp1A1) and phase II (GstYa) biotransformation enzymes. Additional effects were the induction of c-Fos, a proto-oncogen and Gadd45, a marker for cell cycle disturbance and responsive to genotoxic compounds. Inductions of other relevant pathways, such as sequestration of heavy metals, retinoids response, protein misfolding and increased cAMP levels were measured occasionally. A significant correlation was found between the genes Cyp1A1 (a typical marker for presence of PAHs and dioxin like compounds), c-Fos, Gadd45, (responsive to DNA damaging compounds) and the amount of PM10 and elemental carbon (EC) whereas no correlation was found between these genes and total PAHs content. This may suggest that the observed induction of Cyp1A1 and DNA damage related genes was provoked (partially) by other particle bound compounds (e.g. pesticides, PCBs, brominated flame retardants, dioxins, …), than PAHs. The contribution of particle bound compounds, other than PAHs might

  2. Microstructure and Residual Stress of Alumina Scale Formed on Ti2AlC at High Temperature in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Byeon, J; Liu, j; Hopkins, m; Fischer, W; Park, K; Brady, Michael P; Radovic, Miladin; Sohn, Yong Ho

    2007-01-01

    Ti2AlC ternary carbide is being explored for various high temperature applications owing to its high strength at high temperatures, excellent thermal-shock resistance, and high electrical conductivity. In this study, isothermal oxidation at 1000 XC, 1200 XC, and 1400 XC for up to 25 hours, as well as 1,000 1-hour cyclic oxidation at 1200 XC were performed in air to examine the oxidation behavior of Ti2AlC. Characteristics of the oxide scale developed in air, including mass change, residual stress in the -Al2O3 scale, phase constituents and microstructure, were examined as functions of time and temperature by thermogravimetry, photostimulated luminescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy via focused ion beam in-situ lift-out. A continuous and adherent -Al2O3 scale underneath a discontinuous-transient rutile-TiO2 scale was identified in the oxide scale developed at 1000 XC and 1200 XC. At 1400 XC, Al2TiO5 was identified as the discontinuous-transient scale above the continuous and adherent -Al2O3 scale. The -Al2O3 scale thickened to more than 15 m after 25 hours of isothermal oxidation at 1400 XC, and after 1,000 1-hour cyclic oxidation at 1200 XC, yet remained adherent and protective. The compressive residual stress determined by photoluminescence for the -Al2O3 scale remained under 0.65 GPa for the specimens oxidized up to 1400 XC for 25 hours. The small magnitude of the compressive residual stress may impart the high spallation-resistance of the protective -Al2O3 scale developed on Ti2AlC.

  3. Large Scale Turbulent Structures in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    , turbulent stresses, etc. which will aid in turbulence modeling. This report will be presented in two chapters. The first chapter describes some work on the linear stability of a supersonic round jet and the implications of this for the jet noise problem. The second chapter is an extensive discussion of numerical work using the spectral method which we use to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations to study turbulent jet flows. The method uses Fourier expansions in the azimuthal and streamwise direction and a 1-D B-spline basis representation in the radial direction. The B-spline basis is locally supported and this ensures block diagonal matrix equations which can be solved in O(N) steps. This is a modification of a boundary layer code developed by Robert Moser. A very accurate highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a turbulent jet flow is produced.

  4. Large Scale Turbulent Structures in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    velocities, turbulent stresses, etc. which will aid in turbulence modeling. This report will be presented in two chapters. The first chapter describes some work on the linear stability of a supersonic round jet and the implications of this for the jet noise problem. The second chapter is an extensive discussion of numerical work using the spectral method which we use to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations to study turbulent jet flows. The method uses Fourier expansions in the azimuthal and streamwise direction and a 1-D B-spline basis representation in the radial direction. The B-spline basis is locally supported and this ensures block diagonal matrix equations which can be solved in O(N) steps. This is a modification of a boundary layer code developed by Robert Moser. A very accurate highly resolved DNS of a turbulent jet flow is produced.

  5. Identification of sting jet extratropical cyclones in ERA-Interim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Alvarado, Oscar; Gray, Suzanne

    2010-05-01

    Sting jets are transient, highly localized low-level jets that descend from the tip of the cloud head towards the top of the boundary layer in some rapidly deepening Shapiro-Keyser type extratropical cyclones. Sting jets have recently been recognised as clearly different from other air streams, such as the warm and cold conveyor belts, that are also part of the structure of these cyclones. Understanding the dynamics and statistics of sting jets is important due to the potential loss of life and damage to property and infrastructure that can occur as a consequence of the strong winds that sting jets can generate if their momentum is transferred to the surface. However, with very few documented cases, their frequency of occurrence and intensity range are still open questions. One way of tackling this problem is to study available reanalysis datasets. However, these datasets are not expected to explicitly show the occurrence of sting jets due to their coarse resolution. Instead of a direct search for sting jets, a search for sting jet precursors such as regions of high conditional symmetric instability (CSI) at mid-tropospheric levels is proposed in this study. For this purpose, a method based on an appropriate set of diagnostics has been devised to identify regions of CSI potentially associated with sting jets in gridded atmospheric datasets at resolutions including the coarse resolution of currently available reanalyses. The method is tested on some of the well-documented case studies of sting jets. Once its reliability is proven, it is applied to the 50 most intense cyclones in the North Atlantic during the first 10 years (from 1989 to 1998) of the ECMWF reanalysis ERA-Interim. Around 10% of these cases are found to potentially have sting jets. These results represent a further step towards the construction of the first climatology of sting jets.

  6. Relation between Spinning Conditions and Jet Profile in Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadomae, Yosuke; Sugimoto, Masataka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Koyama, Kiyohito

    Relationship between electrospun fibers and spinning conditions are investigated from the view point of jet profiles such as diameter distribution, jet velocity, and the evaporation rate of solvent from the surface of jet in solution electrospinning process by changing (i) the applied voltage and (ii) the relative humidity of ambient air. Profiles of jets near the droplet at the tip of needle are measured as functions of the position along the spinning line by using photographs. The measured profiles of jet can be fitted nicely by the analytic expression of spinning profile for a non-evaporating Newtonian fluid, which enables us to calculate the velocity profile of jets and the evaporation rate of solvent from the jet as a function of the position along the spinning line. Changing the applied voltage, it is found that the jet velocity and the evaporation rate in our measured region are decreased and beaded fibers are increased when increasing the applied voltage, on the other hand the total amount of evaporated solvent from a jet in our measured region is too small to affect the profile of jet and to change the viscosity of solution in the jet. Changing the relative humidity, it is found that profiles of jets are almost the same except for the evaporation rate. The evaporation rate in our measured region is increased by decreasing the relative humidity. In the lower humidity region, less than 60% of humidity, beaded fibers are hardly formed, but in the higher humidity region, more than 60%, beaded fibers are increased with increasing humidity. From the results in two conditions (i) and (ii), it is found that the beaded fibers are easily formed as the evaporation rate of solvent becomes smaller.

  7. A computational study of highly viscous impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, M.W.

    1998-11-01

    Two commercially-available computational fluid dynamics codes, FIDAP (Fluent, Inc., Lebanon, NH) and FLOW-3D (Flow Science, Inc., Los Alamos, NM), were used to simulate the landing region of jets of highly viscous fluids impinging on flat surfaces. The volume-of-fluid method was combined with finite difference and finite element approaches to predict the jet behavior. Several computational models with varying degrees of physical realism were developed, and the results were compared with experimental observations. In experiments, the jet exhibited several complex behaviors. As soon as it exited the nozzle, the jet began to neck down and become narrower. When it impacted the solid surface, the jet developed an instability near the impact point and buckled to the side. This buckling became a spiraling motion, and the jet spiraled about the impact point. As the jet spiraled around, a cone-shaped pile was build up which eventually became unstable and slumped to the side. While all of these behaviors were occurring, air bubbles, or voids, were being entrapped in the fluid pool. The results obtained from the FLOW-3D models more closely matched the behavior of real jets than the results obtained from /the FIDAP models. Most of the FLOW-3D models predicted all of the significant jet behaviors observed in experiments: necking, buckling, spiraling, slumping, and void entrapment. All of the FIDAP models predicted that the jet would buckle relatively far from the point of impact, whereas the experimentally observed jet behavior indicates that the jets buckle much nearer the impact point. Furthermore, it was shown that FIDAP is incapable of incorporating heat transfer effects into the model, making it unsuitable for this work.

  8. Liver resection using a water jet.

    PubMed

    Une, Y; Uchino, J; Horie, T; Sato, Y; Ogasawara, K; Kakita, A; Sano, F

    1989-01-01

    The water-jet method has been used during hepatic resection. The instrument cuts the hepatic tissue with the high pressure of the fine water flow, while the exposed elastic intrahepatic vessels are spared injury. A comparative study on the water-jet method with the previously employed conventional methods was undertaken. Hepatic resections were performed on 35 patients using the water-jet method. Cirrhosis of the liver was associated with 10 of the 24 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. An ordinary saline solution was used as the jet, which was projected at a pressure of between 12 kg/cm2 and 20 kg/cm2 through a 0.15/mm-diameter nozzle. A higher jet pressure was needed to cut the fibrotic hepatic parenchyma. In the case of normal liver, the intrahepatic vessels of more than 0.2 mm were well preserved. In most of the cases, the loss of blood when cutting the hepatic parenchyma can be easily reduced with a jet pressure of 15-16 kg/cm2, thus preserving the fine vessels more than 0.2 mm in diameter without injury. When the same pressure was applied in the cutting of a cirrhotic liver, it took much longer time compared to that of a non-cirrhotic normal liver parenchyma. The cut surface was smooth compared to that after using CUSA, although its disadvantages lie in the formation of air bubbles, which obscure the operative field. The controlled projection of a jet of water under optimal pressure may ensure a safe hepatic resection of both normal and cirrhotic livers. Furthermore, because of its uncomplicated form, a wide range of applications can be expected, while the lower cost will also expedite its large-scale use for economic reasons.

  9. Jet lag modification.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Emily; McGrane, Owen; Wedmore, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Athletes often are required to travel for sports participation, both for practice and competition. A number of those crossing multiple time zones will develop jet lag disorder with possible negative consequences on their performance. This review will discuss the etiology of jet lag disorder and the techniques that are available to shorten or minimize its effects. This includes both pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches.

  10. Jet measurements in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Peter; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    The reconstruction of jets generated in the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of TeV with the ATLAS detector is discussed. Beginning with a brief review of the calorimeter signal definitions relevant for jet finding, and the use of reconstructed charged particle tracks, the jet reconstruction strategy is described in some detail. Emphasis is put on the jet energy scale (JES) calibration strategy applied for first data, which is based on a short sequence of data driven and simulation based calibrations and corrections to restore the measured jet energy to particle level. The level of understanding of the signal patterns entering the JES corrections is shown for selected variables in comparisons to simulations. The present systematic uncertainties on the JES, which can be as low as 2% for central jets, are presented and analyzed with respect to the individual fractional contributions entering their determination. Some characteristic jet reconstruction performance and selected results from the first year of jet physics with ATLAS in a newly accessible kinematic domain are shown in conclusion.

  11. Stress, Strain, and Coping Resources among Faculty at a Research University during Financial Decline. AIR 1996 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcy, Tom

    A study at the University of Missouri-Columbia investigated the stress factors and coping mechanisms among 196 faculty members in 16 departments. The study was undertaken during a period of low faculty salaries in comparison with similar institutions, characterized as moderate to severe financial decline. During the middle of the fall semester of…

  12. Three dimensional flow field measurements of a 4:1 aspect ratio subsonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Swan, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements for a subsonic rectangular cold air jet with an aspect ratio of 4:1 (12.7 x 50.8 mm) at a Mach number of 0.09 and Re of 100,000 have been carried out using a three-dimensional laser Doppler anemometer system. Mean velocity measurements show that the jet width spreads more rapidly along the minor axis than along the major axis. The outward velocities, however, are not significantly different for the two axes, indicating the presence of enhanced mixing along the minor axis. The jet slowly changes from a rectangular jet to a circular jet as the flow progresses downstream.

  13. LIF Measurement of Interacting Gas Jet Flow with Plane Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, A.; Kurihara, S.; Yamazaki, S.; Ota, M.; Maeno, K.

    2011-05-01

    Discharging rarefied gas jets in low-pressure conditions are interesting and important phenomena from an engineering point of view. For example they relate to the attitude control of the space satellite, or the semiconductor technology. The jets, however, deform to the complicated shapes by interacting with solid walls. In this paper we have performed the experiments the flow visualization as a first step by applying the LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) method on the jet-wall interaction. Jet is spouting out from a φ1.0 mm circular hole into the low pressure air chamber, impinging on a flat plate. The LIF visualization of interacting rarefied gas jet is carried out by using the iodine (I2) tracer and argon ion laser.

  14. Bacterial Inactivation by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Sanxi; Cheng, Cheng; Ni, Guohua; Meng, Yuedong; Chen, Hua

    2008-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli seeded in two media (agar and filter papers) were exposed to after-glow plasma emitted from a atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator in open air with a temperature of about 30-80 °C. In order to estimate the inactivation of microorganism using DBD plasma jet, various plasma conditions (such as treatment time and feed-gas composition of plasma jet) were changed. The results shown that the effective area of inactivation increased with the plasma treatment time as the bacteria seeded in Agar medium. The effective area of inactivation was much bigger than plasma jet treatment area after 5 min treatment. With the use of filter papers as the supporting media, the addition of reactive gases (oxygen, hydrogen peroxide vapor) into the plasma jet system, compared with only pure noble gas, led to a significant improvement in the bacterial Inactivation efficacy.

  15. Biosurface engineering through ink jet printing.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohidus Samad; Fon, Deniece; Li, Xu; Tian, Junfei; Forsythe, John; Garnier, Gil; Shen, Wei

    2010-02-01

    The feasibility of thermal ink jet printing as a robust process for biosurface engineering was demonstrated. The strategy investigated was to reconstruct a commercial printer and take advantage of its colour management interface. High printing resolution was achieved by formulating bio-inks of viscosity and surface tension similar to those of commercial inks. Protein and enzyme denaturation during thermal ink jet printing was shown to be insignificant. This is because the time spent by the biomolecules in the heating zone of the printer is negligible; in addition, the air and substrate of high heat capacity absorb any residual heat from the droplet. Gradients of trophic/tropic factors can serve as driving force for cell growth or migration for tissue regeneration. Concentration gradients of proteins were printed on scaffolds to show the capability of ink jet printing. The printed proteins did not desorb upon prolonged immersion in aqueous solutions, thus allowing printed scaffold to be used under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Our group portrait was ink jet printed with a protein on paper, illustrating that complex biopatterns can be printed on large area. Finally, patterns of enzymes were ink jet printed within the detection and reaction zones of a paper diagnostic.

  16. Thermal Management Using Pulsating Jet Cooling Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimohammadi, S.; Dinneen, P.; Persoons, T.; Murray, D. B.

    2014-07-01

    The existing methods of heat removal from compact electronic devises are known to be deficient as the evolving technology demands more power density and accordingly better cooling techniques. Impinging jets can be used as a satisfactory method for thermal management of electronic devices with limited space and volume. Pulsating flows can produce an additional enhancement in heat transfer rate compared to steady flows. This article is part of a comprehensive experimental and numerical study performed on pulsating jet cooling technology. The experimental approach explores heat transfer performance of a pulsating air jet impinging onto a flat surface for nozzle-to-surface distances 1 <= H/D <= 6, Reynolds numbers 1,300 <= Re <= 2,800 pulsation frequency 2Hz <= f <= 65Hz, and Strouhal number 0.0012 <= Sr = fD/Um <= 0.084. The time-resolved velocity at the nozzle exit is measured to quantify the turbulence intensity profile. The numerical methodology is firstly validated using the experimental local Nusselt number distribution for the steady jet with the same geometry and boundary conditions. For a time-averaged Reynolds number of 6,000, the heat transfer enhancement using the pulsating jet for 9Hz <= f <= 55Hz and 0.017 <= Sr <= 0.102 and 1 <= H/D <= 6 are calculated. For the same range of Sr number, the numerical and experimental methods show consistent results.

  17. Observations of solar X-ray and EUV jets and their related phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.; Bučík, R.; Guo, L.-J.; Nitta, N.

    2016-11-01

    Solar jets are fast-moving, elongated brightenings related to ejections seen in both images and spectra on all scales from barely visible chromospheric jets to coronal jets extending up to a few solar radii. The largest, most powerful jets are the source of type III radio bursts, energetic electrons and ions with greatly enhanced 3He and heavy element abundances. The frequent coronal jets from polar and equatorial coronal holes may contribute to the solar wind. The primary acceleration mechanism for all jets is believed to be release of magnetic stress via reconnection; however the energy buildup depends on the jets' source environment. In this review, we discuss how certain features of X-ray and EUV jets, such as their repetition rate and association with radio emission, depends on their underlying photospheric field configurations (active regions, polar and equatorial coronal holes, and quiet Sun).

  18. The effect of working gas impurities on plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. Y.; He, M. B.; Liu, D. W.

    2015-04-15

    Air intrusion reduced the purity of working gas inside the tube for plasma jet, and thereby, affected the discharge dynamics. In this paper, the effect of using working gas with different purity level (helium purity 99.99999%, 99.99%, 99.9%, and 99%) on photoionization and the chemical reactivity of plasma jet were studied using a 2 dimensional plasma jet model. Photoionization of air species acted as a source of pre-ionization in front of the ionization region, which facilitated the transition from localized discharge to streamers inside the tube. The density of reactive species inside the tube was found to increase with the concentration of working gas impurities. For the highest purity helium (99.99999%), despite a low photoionization rate and the distance between the photoionization region and ionization region inside the tube, by increasing the applied voltage and decreasing the distance between the electrode and nozzle, plasma jets were formed.

  19. Variable density effects on the mixing of turbulent rectangular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarh, B.; Goekalp, I.

    Variable density turbulent rectangular jets are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical description capitalizes on Rodi (1978), but introduces a new definition for the effective channel width. The experimental results are obtained by LDA and fine-wires in strongly heated air jets issuing vertically from a long rectangular channel into still air. Both approaches indicate that axial decay rates of the mean velocity and temperature increase when the density ratio between the ambient medium and the jet is increased. The use of the effective channel width defined here allows the global density effect to be taken into account. The effect of keeping constant jet exit parameters when the density ratio is varied is also discussed.

  20. Relativistic Jets and Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Woosley, S. E.

    2001-05-01

    In order to study the relativistic jets from collapsars, we have developed a special relativistic multiple-dimensional hydrodynamics code similar to the GENESIS code (Aloy et al., ApJS, 122, 151). The code is based on the PPM interpolation algorithm and Marquina's Riemann solver. Using this code, we have simulated the propagation of axisymmetric jets along the rotational axis of collapsed rotating stars (collapsars). Using the progenitors of MacFadyen, Woosley, and Heger, a relativistic jet is injected at a given inner boundary radius. This radius, the opening angle of the jet, its Lorentz factor, and its total energy are parameters of the problem. A highly collimated, relativistic outflow is observed at the surface of the star several seconds later. We will discuss the hydrodynamical focusing of the jet, it's break out properties, time evolution, and sensitivity to the adopted parameters.