Science.gov

Sample records for air kerma calibration

  1. Calibration and features of air-kerma length product meters.

    PubMed

    Merimaa, K; Tapiovaara, M; Kosunen, A; Toroi, P

    2012-12-01

    Pencil-type air-kerma length product meters are generally used for quality control and radiation exposure measurements in computed tomography. To ensure reliable results, these meters should be calibrated so that measurements are traceable to international standards. Suitable calibration procedures, together with the properties of these meters, were examined and compared with the international standards and recommendations. The calibration procedure and setup used in this study were slightly modified compared with international recommendations. The special collimator system was found to cause less scatter than similar setups in earlier studies. The energy dependence of the meter response was investigated for several types of meters with standard radiation qualities. With most tested meter types, the total variation due to energy dependence was <4 %, but some had strong energy dependence and the variation was up to 15 % or higher. This highlights the importance of a proper calibration. The response of one semiconductor meter type varied up to 8 % when rotating the meter around its axis; this should be taken into account when making calibrations with a static setup.

  2. Air kerma based dosimetry calibration for the Leksell Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Meltsner, Sheridan Griffin; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2009-02-15

    No accepted official protocol exists for the dosimetry of the Leksell Gamma Knife registered (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery device. Establishment of a dosimetry protocol has been complicated by the unique partial-hemisphere arrangement of 201 individual {sup 60}Co beams simultaneously focused on the treatment volume and by the rigid geometry of the GK unit itself. This article proposes an air kerma based dosimetry protocol using either an in-air or in-acrylic phantom measurement to determine the absorbed dose rate of fields of the 18 mm helmet of a GK unit. A small-volume air ionization chamber was used to make measurements at the physical isocenter of three GK units. The absorbed dose rate to water was determined using a modified version of the AAPM Task Group 21 protocol designed for use with {sup 60}Co-based teletherapy machines. This experimentally determined absorbed dose rate was compared to the treatment planning system (TPS) absorbed dose rate. The TPS used with the GK unit is Leksell GammaPlan. The TPS absorbed dose rate at the time of treatment is the absorbed dose rate determined by the physicist at the time of machine commissioning decay corrected to the treatment date. The TPS absorbed dose rate is defined as absorbed dose rate to water at the isocenter of a water phantom with a radius of 8 cm. Measurements were performed on model B and C Gamma Knife units. The absorbed dose rate to water for the 18 mm helmet determined using air-kerma based calculations is consistently between 1.5% and 2.9% higher than the absorbed dose rate provided by the TPS. These air kerma based measurements allow GK dosimetry to be performed with an established dosimetry protocol and without complications arising from the use of and possible variations in solid phantom material. Measurements were also made with the same ionization chamber in a spherical acrylic phantom for comparison. This methodology will allow further development of calibration methods appropriate for the

  3. Simulation evaluation of NIST air-kerma rate calibration standard for electronic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, Jessica R; Rivard, Mark J; Hughes, H Grady

    2016-03-01

    Dosimetry for the model S700 50 kV electronic brachytherapy (eBT) source (Xoft, Inc., a subsidiary of iCAD, San Jose, CA) was simulated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods by Rivard et al. ["Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent x-ray source: An electronic brachytherapy source," Med. Phys. 33, 4020-4032 (2006)] and recently by Hiatt et al. ["A revised dosimetric characterization of the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source containing an anode-centering plastic insert and other components not included in the 2006 model," Med. Phys. 42, 2764-2776 (2015)] with improved geometric characterization. While these studies examined the dose distribution in water, there have not previously been reports of the eBT source calibration methods beyond that recently reported by Seltzer et al. ["New national air-kerma standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources," J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. 119, 554-574 (2014)]. Therefore, the motivation for the current study was to provide an independent determination of air-kerma rate at 50 cm in airair(d=50 cm) using MC methods for the model S700 eBT source. Using CAD information provided by the vendor and disassembled sources, an MC model was created for the S700 eBT source. Simulations were run using the mcnp6 radiation transport code for the NIST Lamperti air ionization chamber according to specifications by Boutillon et al. ["Comparison of exposure standards in the 10-50 kV x-ray region," Metrologia 5, 1-11 (1969)], in air without the Lamperti chamber, and in vacuum without the Lamperti chamber. K̇air(d=50 cm) was determined using the *F4 tally with NIST values for the mass energy-absorption coefficients for air. Photon spectra were evaluated over 2 π azimuthal sampling for polar angles of 0° ≤ θ ≤ 180° every 1°. Volume averaging was averted through tight radial binning. Photon energy spectra were determined over all polar angles in both air and vacuum using

  4. MO-D-BRD-04: NIST Air-Kerma Standard for Electronic Brachytherapy Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mitch, M.

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  5. Dosimetric characteristics, air-kerma strength calibration and verification of Monte Carlo simulation for a new ytterbium-169 brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, H.; Williamson, J.F.; Li, Zuofeng; Mishra, V.; Meigooni, A.S. )

    1994-03-01

    Ytterbium-169 ([sup 169]Yb) is a promising new isotope for brachytherapy with a half life of 32 days and an average photon energy of 93 KeV. It has an Ir-192-equivalent dose distribution in water but a much smaller half-value layer in lead (0.2 mm), affording improved radiation protection and customized shielding of dose-limiting anatomic structures. The goals of this study are to: (a) experimentally validate Monte Carlo photon transport dose-rate calculations for this energy range, (b) to develop a secondary air-kerma strength standard for [sup 169]Yb, and (c) to present essential treatment planning data including the transverse-axis dose-rate distribution and dose correction factors for a number of local shielding materials. Several interstitial [sup 169]Yb sources (type 6) and an experimental high dose-rate source were made available for this study. Monte Carlo photon-transport (MCPT) simulations, based upon validated geometric models of source structure, were used to calculate dose rates in water. To verify MCPT predictions, the transverse-axis dose distribution in homogeneous water medium was measured using a silicon-diode detector. For use in designing shielded applicators, heterogeneity correction factors (HCF) arising from small cylindrical heterogeneities of lead, aluminum, titanium, steel and air were measured in a water medium. Finally, to provide a sound experimental basis for comparing experimental and theoretical dose-rate distributions, the air-kerma strength of the sources was measured using a calibrated ion chamber. To eliminate the influence of measurement artifacts on the comparison of theory and measurement, simulated detector readings were compared directly to measured diode readings. The final data are presented in the format endorsed by the Interstitial Collaborative Working Group. 33 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Comparison Between the NIST and the KEBS for the Determination of Air Kerma Calibration Coefficients for Narrow X-Ray Spectra and 137Cs Gamma-Ray Beams

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Michelle; Minniti, Ronaldo; Masinza, Stanslaus Alwyn

    2010-01-01

    Air kerma calibration coefficients for a reference class ionization chamber from narrow x-ray spectra and cesium 137 gamma-ray beams were compared between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS). A NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber was calibrated by each laboratory in terms of the quantity air kerma in four x-ray reference radiation beams of energies between 80 kV and 150 kV and in a cesium 137 gamma-ray beam. The reference radiation qualities used for this comparison are described in detail in the ISO 4037 publication.[1] The comparison began in September 2008 and was completed in March 2009. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The comparison of the calibration coefficients is based on the average ratios of calibration coefficients. PMID:27134777

  7. Comparison Between the NIST and the KEBS for the Determination of Air Kerma Calibration Coefficients for Narrow X-Ray Spectra and (137)Cs Gamma-Ray Beams.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michelle; Minniti, Ronaldo; Masinza, Stanslaus Alwyn

    2010-01-01

    Air kerma calibration coefficients for a reference class ionization chamber from narrow x-ray spectra and cesium 137 gamma-ray beams were compared between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS). A NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber was calibrated by each laboratory in terms of the quantity air kerma in four x-ray reference radiation beams of energies between 80 kV and 150 kV and in a cesium 137 gamma-ray beam. The reference radiation qualities used for this comparison are described in detail in the ISO 4037 publication.[1] The comparison began in September 2008 and was completed in March 2009. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The comparison of the calibration coefficients is based on the average ratios of calibration coefficients.

  8. Air kerma standard for calibration of well-type chambers in Brazil using {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and its traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prinzio, Renato; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de

    2009-03-15

    In Brazil there are over 100 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy facilities using well-type chambers for the determination of the air kerma rate of {sup 192}Ir sources. This paper presents the methodology developed and extensively tested by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas (LCR) and presently in use to calibrate those types of chambers. The system was initially used to calibrate six well-type chambers of brachytherapy services, and the maximum deviation of only 1.0% was observed between the calibration coefficients obtained and the ones in the calibration certificate provided by the UWADCL. In addition to its traceability to the Brazilian National Standards, the whole system was taken to University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) for a direct comparison and the same formalism to calculate the air kerma was used. The comparison results between the two laboratories show an agreement of 0.9% for the calibration coefficients. Three Brazilian well-type chambers were calibrated at the UWADCL, and by LCR, in Brazil, using the developed system and a clinical HDR machine. The results of the calibration of three well chambers have shown an agreement better than 1.0%. Uncertainty analyses involving the measurements made both at the UWADCL and LCR laboratories are discussed.

  9. Direct reference air-kerma rate calibration of 192Ir for a thimble-type ionization chamber in a cylindrical solid phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaulich, Theodor W.; Quast, Ulrich; Bamberg, Michael; Selbach, Hans-Joachim

    2012-10-01

    International and national reports strongly recommend experimental verification of the calibration of new HDR 192Ir sources prior to their clinical application for afterloading brachytherapy. To guarantee traceability, calibrated transfer standards are used, e.g. the recommended well-type ionization chambers (WIC) or certain detector-phantom arrangements (DPA) consisting of a thimble-type ionization chamber with a solid phantom. In Germany, direct calibrations for 192Ir were only provided for WICs. In June 2010, the PTB directly calibrated a DPA-transfer standard in the quantity reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) for 192Ir photons for the University Hospital Tübingen. This direct calibration provides the advantage that the comprehensive RAKR 192Ir calibration coefficient already takes all influence quantities into account—their correction factors are thus unified—except for the air-density correction kρ. The DPA-transfer standard described above and a WIC used as a reference were compared for acceptance tests of three GammaMedplus HDR 192Ir afterloading sources. The measurement uncertainty of the WIC and of the DPA-transfer standard were ±2.6%(k = 2) and ±2.8%(k = 2) respectively. A strong correlation was found between these measurement results with a coefficient of determination of r2 = 0.9998. Determining the RAKR of an HDR 192Ir afterloading source is as simple with the DPA as it is with WIC. The direct 192Ir calibrated DPA-transfer standard can therefore be used alternatively in future with the same measurement uncertainty if no WIC is available.

  10. The air-kerma rate constant: application to air-kerma measurements for homeland security.

    PubMed

    Pibida, L; Minniti, R; Lucas, L; Seltzer, S M

    2008-02-01

    Air-kerma rate measurements from 57Co, 60Co, and 137Cs radioactive sources were performed. These measurements were motivated by the development of new sources at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for radiological testing of equipment for homeland security applications. The testing of radiation detection equipment relies on knowing the values of the air-kerma rate for the radioactive sources at a fixed distance from the source. The air-kerma rate can be measured or alternatively estimated by using published values of the air-kerma rate constant. Although there are a large number of published values of the air-kerma rate constant for radionuclide sources based on theoretical calculations, strong disagreement is observed throughout the literature. Furthermore, most of the published values have no uncertainties assigned, and therefore their use for testing radiological equipment is limited. In this work we report experimentally-measured values of the air-kerma rate for three radionuclides with well defined source geometries and activities. The results are compared to estimates based on published values of the air-kerma rate constant. Such values are easily found in the literature from the last three decades and are used commonly by the scientific community.

  11. Comparing Hp(3) evaluated from the conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent for eye lens dosimetry calibrated on a new cylindrical PMMA phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esor, J.; Sudchai, W.; Monthonwattana, S.; Pungkun, V.; Intang, A.

    2017-06-01

    Based on a new occupational dose limit recommended by ICRP (2011), the annual dose limit for the lens of the eye for workers should be reduced from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y averaged over 5 consecutive years in which no single year exceeding 50 mSv. This new dose limit directly affects radiologists and cardiologists whose work involves high radiation exposure over 20 mSv/y. Eye lens dosimetry (Hp(3)) has become increasingly important and should be evaluated directly based on dosimeters that are worn closely to the eye. Normally, Hp(3) dose algorithm was carried out by the combination of Hp(0.07) and Hp(10) values while dosimeters were calibrated on slab PMMA phantom. Recently, there were three reports from European Union that have shown the conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(3). These conversion coefficients carried out by ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay projects were performed by using a new cylindrical head phantom. In this study, various delivered doses were calculated using those three conversion coefficients while nanoDot, small OSL dosimeters, were used for Hp(3) measurement. These calibrations were performed with a standard X-ray generator at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). Delivered doses (Hp(3)) using those three conversion coefficients were compared with Hp(3) from nanoDot measurements. The results showed that percentage differences between delivered doses evaluated from the conversion coefficient of each project and Hp(3) doses evaluated from the nanoDots were found to be not exceeding -11.48 %, -8.85 % and -8.85 % for ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay project, respectively.

  12. Air kerma and absorbed dose standards for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in primary standards for the calibration of brachytherapy sources, with an emphasis on the currently most common photon-emitting radionuclides. The introduction discusses the need for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy in general. The following section focuses on the three main quantities, i.e. reference air kerma rate, air kerma strength and absorbed dose rate to water, which are currently used for the specification of brachytherapy photon sources and which can be realized with primary standards from first principles. An overview of different air kerma and absorbed dose standards, which have been independently developed by various national metrology institutes over the past two decades, is given in the next two sections. Other dosimetry techniques for brachytherapy will also be discussed. The review closes with an outlook on a possible transition from air kerma to absorbed dose to water-based calibrations for brachytherapy sources in the future. PMID:24814696

  13. Photon extremity absorbed dose and kerma conversion coefficients for calibration geometries.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2007-02-01

    Absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients are routinely used in personnel dosimetry programs. These conversion coefficients can be applied to particle fluences or to measured air kerma values to determine appropriate operational monitoring quantities such as the ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent for a specific geometry. For personnel directly handling materials, the absorbed dose to the extremities is of concern. This work presents photon conversion coefficients for two extremity calibration geometries using finger and wrist/arm phantoms described in HPS N13.32. These conversion coefficients have been calculated as a function of photon energy in terms of the kerma and the absorbed dose using Monte Carlo techniques and the calibration geometries specified in HPS N13.32. Additionally, kerma and absorbed dose conversion coefficients for commonly used x-ray spectra and calibration source fields are presented. The kerma values calculated in this work for the x-ray spectra and calibration sources compare well to those listed in HPS N13.32. The absorbed dose values, however, differ significantly for higher energy photons because charged particle equilibrium conditions have not been satisfied for the shallow depth. Thus, the air-kerma-to-dose and exposure-to-dose conversion coefficients for Cs and Co listed in HPS N13.32 overestimate the absorbed dose to the extremities. Applying the conversion coefficients listed in HPS N13.32 for Cs, for example, would result in an overestimate of absorbed dose of 62% for the finger phantom and 55% for the wrist phantom.

  14. The IPEM code of practice for determination of the reference air kerma rate for HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources based on the NPL air kerma standard.

    PubMed

    Bidmead, A M; Sander, T; Locks, S M; Lee, C D; Aird, E G A; Nutbrown, R F; Flynn, A

    2010-06-07

    This paper contains the recommendations of the high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy working party of the UK Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The recommendations consist of a Code of Practice (COP) for the UK for measuring the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. In 2004, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) commissioned a primary standard for the realization of RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. This has meant that it is now possible to calibrate ionization chambers directly traceable to an air kerma standard using an (192)Ir source (Sander and Nutbrown 2006 NPL Report DQL-RD 004 (Teddington: NPL) http://publications.npl.co.uk). In order to use the source specification in terms of either RAKR, Κ(R) (ICRU 1985 ICRU Report No 38 (Washington, DC: ICRU); ICRU 1997 ICRU Report No 58 (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)), or air kerma strength, S(K) (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34), it has been necessary to develop algorithms that can calculate the dose at any point around brachytherapy sources within the patient tissues. The AAPM TG-43 protocol (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34) and the 2004 update TG-43U1 (Rivard et al 2004 Med. Phys. 31 633-74) have been developed more fully than any other protocol and are widely used in commercial treatment planning systems. Since the TG-43 formalism uses the quantity air kerma strength, whereas this COP uses RAKR, a unit conversion from RAKR to air kerma strength was included in the appendix to this COP. It is recommended that the measured RAKR determined with a calibrated well chamber traceable to the NPL (192)Ir primary standard is used in the treatment planning system. The measurement uncertainty in the source calibration based on the system described in this COP has been reduced considerably compared to other methods based on interpolation techniques.

  15. Comparison of the NIST and ENEA air kerma standards

    SciTech Connect

    Laitano, R.F.; Toni, M.P.; Lamperti, P.J.

    1998-07-01

    A comparison was made between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Ente per le Nuov Tecnologie l`Energia e l`Ambiente (ENEA) air kerma standards for medium energy x rays and {sup 60}Co gamma rays. The comparison took place at ENEA in June 1994. Two different transfer chambers from NIST were used for the comparison. The measurements were made at radiation qualities similar to those used at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) (generating voltages of 100 kV, 135 kV, 180 kV and 250 kV, respectively) and with {sup 60}Co gamma radiation. The transfer chamber calibration factors obtained at the NIST and at the ENEA agreed with one another to 0.03% for {sup 60}Co gamma radiation and between 0.1% to 0.8% for the medium energy x-ray beam codes.

  16. Comparison of the NIST and ENEA Air Kerma Standards

    PubMed Central

    Laitano, R. F.; Lamperti, P. J.; Toni, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie l’Energia e l’Ambiente (ENEA) air kerma standards for medium energy x rays and 60Co gamma rays. The comparison took place at ENEA in June 1994. Two different transfer chambers from NIST were used for the comparison. The measurements were made at radiation qualities similar to those used at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) (generating voltages of 100 kV, 135 kV, 180 kV and 250 kV, respectively) and with 60Co gamma radiation. The transfer chamber calibration factors obtained at the NIST and at the ENEA agreed with one another to 0.03 % for 60Co gamma radiation and between 0.1 % to 0.8 % for the medium energy x-ray beam codes. PMID:28009356

  17. SU-D-209-01: Can Fluoroscopic Air-Kerma Rates Be Reliably Measured with Solid-State Meters?

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, C; Thai, L; Wagner, L; Ozus, B

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Ionization chambers remain the standard for calibration of air-kerma rate measuring devices. Despite their strong energy-dependent response, solid state radiation detectors are increasingly used, primarily due to their efficiency in making standardized measurements. To test the reliability of these devices in measuring air-kerma rates, we compared ion chambers measurements with solid-state measurements for various mobile fluoroscopes operated at different beam qualities and air-kerma rates. Methods: Six mobile fluoroscopes (GE OEC models 9800 and 9900) were used to generate test beams. Using various field sizes and dose rate controls, copper attenuators and a lead attenuator were placed at the image receptor in varying combinations to generate a range of air-kerma rates. Air-kerma rates at 30 centimeters from the image receptors were measured using two 6-cm{sup 3} ion chambers with electrometers (Radcal, models 1015 and 9015) and two with solid state detectors (Unfors Xi and Raysafe X2). No error messages occurred during measurements. However, about two months later, one solid-state device stopped working and was replaced by the manufacturer. Two out of six mobile fluoroscopic units were retested with the replacement unit. Results: Generally, solid state and ionization chambers agreed favorably well, with two exceptions. Before replacement of the detector, the Xi meter when set in the “RF High” mode deviated from ion chamber readings by factors of 2 and 10 with no message indicating error in measurement. When set in the “RF Low” mode, readings were within −4% to +3%. The replacement Xi detector displayed messages alerting the user when settings were not compatible with air-kerma rates. Conclusion: Air-kerma rates can be measured favorably well using solid-state devices, but users must be aware of the possibility that readings can be grossly in error with no discernible indication for the deviation.

  18. Comparison of air-kerma strength determinations for HDR {sup 192}Ir sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Brian E.; Davis, Stephen D.; Schmidt, Cal R.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of the interim air-kerma strength standard for high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources maintained by University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) with measurements of the various source models using modified techniques from the literature. The current interim standard was established by Goetsch et al. in 1991 and has remained unchanged to date. Methods: The improved, laser-aligned seven-distance apparatus of University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC) was used to perform air-kerma strength measurements of five different HDR {sup 192}Ir source models. The results of these measurements were compared with those from well chambers traceable to the original standard. Alternative methodologies for interpolating the {sup 192}Ir air-kerma calibration coefficient from the NIST air-kerma standards at {sup 137}Cs and 250 kVp x rays (M250) were investigated and intercompared. As part of the interpolation method comparison, the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc was used to calculate updated values of A{sub wall} for the Exradin A3 chamber used for air-kerma strength measurements. The effects of air attenuation and scatter, room scatter, as well as the solution method were investigated in detail. Results: The average measurements when using the inverse N{sub K} interpolation method for the Classic Nucletron, Nucletron microSelectron, VariSource VS2000, GammaMed Plus, and Flexisource were found to be 0.47%, -0.10%, -1.13%, -0.20%, and 0.89% different than the existing standard, respectively. A further investigation of the differences observed between the sources was performed using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations of each source model inside a full model of an HDR 1000 Plus well chamber. Conclusions: Although the differences between the source models were found to be statistically significant, the equally weighted average difference between the seven-distance measurements and the well

  19. Integration of kerma-area product and cumulative air kerma determination into a skin dose tracking system for fluoroscopic imaging procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin dose tracking system (DTS) that we developed provides a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose distribution on a 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic procedures in real time. The DTS has now been modified to also calculate the kerma area product (KAP) and cumulative air kerma (CAK) for fluoroscopic interventions using data obtained in real-time from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix system. KAP is the integral of air kerma over the beam area and is typically measured with a large-area transmission ionization chamber incorporated into the collimator assembly. In this software, KAP is automatically determined for each x-ray pulse as the product of the air kerma/ mAs from a calibration file for the given kVp and beam filtration times the mAs per pulse times the length and width of the beam times a field nonuniformity correction factor. Field nonuniformity is primarily the result of the heel effect and the correction factor was determined from the beam profile measured using radio-chromic film. Dividing the KAP by the beam area at the interventional reference point provides the area averaged CAK. The KAP and CAK per x-ray pulse are summed after each pulse to obtain the total procedure values in real-time. The calculated KAP and CAK were compared to the values displayed by the fluoroscopy machine with excellent agreement. The DTS now is able to automatically calculate both KAP and CAK without the need for measurement by an add-on transmission ionization chamber.

  20. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  1. Seasonal variation of air kerma rate in Sicily.

    PubMed

    Basile, S; Brai, M; Marrale, M; Rizzo, S

    2008-07-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry has been used to measure air kerma in 29 sites in Sicily. Four three month measurement campaigns have been carried out in order to assess seasonal variations. Average annual values between 20 and 90 nGy h(-1), after cosmic background subtraction, are reported. Average annual values are strongly dependent on site lithology, and we find that winter data are generally the highest, while spring and autumn rates are generally the lowest with very similar trends in any site. Summer values generally lay in between. Largest seasonal variations are found in sites along the southern coast of the island, probably because of stronger action of winds affecting radon, along with its progeny, concentrations at ground level.

  2. Air-kerma strength determination of a miniature x-ray source for brachytherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Stephen D.

    A miniature x-ray source has been developed by Xoft Inc. for high dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. The source is contained in a 5.4 mm diameter water-cooling catheter. The source voltage can be adjusted from 40 kV to 50 kV and the beam current is adjustable up to 300 muA. Electrons are accelerated toward a tungsten-coated anode to produce a lightly-filtered bremsstrahlung photon spectrum. The sources were initially used for early-stage breast cancer treatment using a balloon applicator. More recently, Xoft Inc. has developed vaginal and surface applicators. The miniature x-ray sources have been characterized using a modification of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 formalism normally used for radioactive brachytherapy sources. Primary measurements of air kerma were performed using free-air ionization chambers at the University of Wisconsin (UW) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The measurements at UW were used to calibrate a well-type ionization chamber for clinical verification of source strength. Accurate knowledge of the emitted photon spectrum was necessary to calculate the corrections required to determine air-kerma strength, defined in vacuo. Theoretical predictions of the photon spectrum were calculated using three separate Monte Carlo codes: MCNP5, EGSnrc, and PENELOPE. Each code used different implementations of the underlying radiological physics. Benchmark studies were performed to investigate these differences in detail. The most important variation among the codes was found to be the calculation of fluorescence photon production following electron-induced vacancies in the L shell of tungsten atoms. The low-energy tungsten L-shell fluorescence photons have little clinical significance at the treatment distance, but could have a large impact on air-kerma measurements. Calculated photon spectra were compared to spectra measured with high-purity germanium spectroscopy systems at both UW and

  3. Reference air kerma and kerma-area product as estimators of peak skin dose for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Deukwoo; Little, Mark P.; Miller, Donald L.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine more accurate regression formulas for estimating peak skin dose (PSD) from reference air kerma (RAK) or kerma-area product (KAP). Methods: After grouping of the data from 21 procedures into 13 clinically similar groups, assessments were made of optimal clustering using the Bayesian information criterion to obtain the optimal linear regressions of (log-transformed) PSD vs RAK, PSD vs KAP, and PSD vs RAK and KAP. Results: Three clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs RAK, seven clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs KAP, and six clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs RAK and KAP. Prediction of PSD using both RAK and KAP is significantly better than prediction of PSD with either RAK or KAP alone. The regression of PSD vs RAK provided better predictions of PSD than the regression of PSD vs KAP. The partial-pooling (clustered) method yields smaller mean squared errors compared with the complete-pooling method.Conclusion: PSD distributions for interventional radiology procedures are log-normal. Estimates of PSD derived from RAK and KAP jointly are most accurate, followed closely by estimates derived from RAK alone. Estimates of PSD derived from KAP alone are the least accurate. Using a stochastic search approach, it is possible to cluster together certain dissimilar types of procedures to minimize the total error sum of squares.

  4. Procedures for establishing and maintaining consistent air-kerma strength standards for low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources: recommendations of the Calibration Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

    PubMed

    DeWerd, Larry A; Huq, M Saiful; Das, Indra J; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Hanson, William F; Slowey, Thomas W; Williamson, Jeffrey F; Coursey, Bert M

    2004-03-01

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is being used extensively for the treatment of prostate cancer. As of September 2003, there are a total of thirteen 125I and seven 103Pd sources that have calibrations from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratories (ADCLs) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The dosimetry standards for these sources are traceable to the NIST wide-angle free-air chamber. Procedures have been developed by the AAPM Calibration Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee to standardize quality assurance and calibration, and to maintain the dosimetric traceability of these sources to ensure accurate clinical dosimetry. A description of these procedures is provided to the clinical users for traceability purposes as well as to provide guidance to the manufacturers of brachytherapy sources and ADCLs with regard to these procedures.

  5. Measurement of air kerma rates for 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field by ionisation chamber and build-up plate.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Tsutsumi, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    The 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration field by the (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O reaction is to be served at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. For the determination of air kerma rates using an ionisation chamber in the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, the establishment of the charged particle equilibrium must be achieved during measurement. In addition to measurement of air kerma rates by the ionisation chamber with a thick build-up cap, measurement using the ionisation chamber and a build-up plate (BUP) was attempted, in order to directly determine air kerma rates under the condition of regular calibration for ordinary survey meters and personal dosemeters. Before measurements, Monte Carlo calculations were made to find the optimum arrangement of BUP in front of the ionisation chamber so that the charged particle equilibrium could be well established. Measured results imply that air kerma rates for the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field could be directly determined under the appropriate condition using an ionisation chamber coupled with build-up materials. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. APMP key comparison for the measurement of air kerma for 60Co (APMP.RI(I)-K1.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, D. V.; Lee, J.-H.; Budiantari, C. T.; Laban, J.; Saito, N.; Srimanoroth, S.; Khaled, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    The results are reported for an APMP.R(I)-K1.1 comparison that extends the regional comparison of standards for air kerma APMP.R(I)-K1 to several laboratories unable to participate earlier. The comparison was conducted with the goal of supporting the relevant calibration and measurement capabilities (CMCs) planned for publication by the participant laboratories. The comparison was conducted by the pilot laboratory, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (ARPANSA), Australia, supported by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Taiwan, in a modified ring-shaped arrangement from September 2009 to November 2010, in parallel with an APMP.R(I)-K4 comparison being piloted by the INER. The laboratories that took part in the comparison were the ARPANSA, the Centre of Technology of Radiation Safety and Metrology (PTKMR-BATAN), Indonesia, the Division of Radiation and Medical Devices (DMSC), Thailand, the INER, the National Centre for Radiation Science (NCRS), New Zealand, the National Institute for Standards (NIS), Egypt and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ/AIST), Japan. The two primary laboratories, ARPANSA and NMIJ, were chosen as the linking laboratories. Three ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments to be calibrated in terms of air kerma in 60Co radiotherapy beams. The comparison result is based on the ratio between the air kerma calibration coefficients (NK) determined by the participants and the mean of the results of the linking laboratories. The mean comparison ratio was found to be within 0.5 % of the key comparison reference value KCRV. The largest deviation between any two comparison ratios for the three chambers in terms of air kerma was 2.0 %. An analysis of the participant uncertainty budgets enabled the calculation of degrees of equivalence (DoE) in terms of the deviations of the results and their associated uncertainties. As a result of this APMP comparison, the BIPM key comparison database (KCDB) should

  7. New National Air-Kerma Standard for Low-Energy Electronic Brachytherapy Sources.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Stephen M; O'Brien, Michelle; Mitch, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The new primary standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources for the United States is described. These miniature x-ray tubes are inserted in catheters for interstitial radiation therapy and operate at tube potentials of up to about 50 kV. The standard is based on the realization of the air kerma produced by the x-ray beam at a reference distance in air of 50 cm.

  8. New National Air-Kerma Standard for Low-Energy Electronic Brachytherapy Sources

    PubMed Central

    Seltzer, Stephen M; O’Brien, Michelle; Mitch, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The new primary standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources for the United States is described. These miniature x-ray tubes are inserted in catheters for interstitial radiation therapy and operate at tube potentials of up to about 50 kV. The standard is based on the realization of the air kerma produced by the x-ray beam at a reference distance in air of 50 cm. PMID:26601044

  9. Absorbed dose to water based dosimetry versus air kerma based dosimetry for high-energy photon beams: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Palmans, Hugo; Nafaa, Laila; De, Jans Jo; Gillis, Sofie; Hoornaert, Marie-Thérèse; Martens, Chantal; Piessens, Marleen; Thierens, Hubert; Van der Plaetsen, Ann; Vynckier, Stefaan

    2002-02-07

    In recent years, a change has been proposed from air kerma based reference dosimetry to absorbed dose based reference dosimetry for all radiotherapy beams of ionizing radiation. In this paper, a dosimetry study is presented in which absorbed dose based dosimetry using recently developed formalisms was compared with air kerma based dosimetry using older formalisms. Three ionization chambers of each of three different types were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water and air kerma and sent to five hospitals. There, reference dosimetry with all the chambers was performed in a total of eight high-energy clinical photon beams. The selected chamber types were the NE2571, the PTW-30004 and the Wellhöfer-FC65G (previously Wellhöfer-IC70). Having a graphite wall, they exhibit a stable volume and the presence of an aluminium electrode ensures the robustness of these chambers. The data were analysed with the most important recommendations for clinical dosimetry: IAEA TRS-398, AAPM TG-51, IAEA TRS-277, NCS report-2 (presently recommended in Belgium) and AAPM TG-21. The necessary conversion factors were taken from those protocols, or calculated using the data in the different protocols if data for a chamber type are lacking. Polarity corrections were within 0.1% for all chambers in all beams. Recombination corrections were consistent with theoretical predictions, did not vary within a chamber type and only slightly between different chamber types. The maximum chamber-to-chamber variations of the dose obtained with the different formalisms within the same chamber type were between 0.2% and 0.6% for the NE2571, between 0.2% and 0.6% for the PTW-30004 and 0.1% and 0.3% for the Wellhöfer-FC65G for the different beams. The absorbed dose results for the NE2571 and Wellhöfer-FC65G chambers were in good agreement for all beams and all formalisms. The PTW-30004 chambers gave a small but systematically higher result compared to the result for the NE2571 chambers (on the

  10. New National Air-Kerma-Strength Standards for (125)I and (103)Pd Brachytherapy Seeds.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Stephen M; Lamperti, Paul J; Loevinger, Robert; Mitch, Michael G; Weaver, James T; Coursey, Bert M

    2003-01-01

    The new U.S. measurement standard for the air-kerma strength from low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy seed sources is formally described in detail. This instrument-based standard was implemented on 1 January 1999, with its salient features and the implications of differences with the previous standard given only through a series of informal communications. The Wide-Angle Free-Air Chamber (WAFAC) is specially designed to realize air kerma from a single-seed source emitting photons with energies up to about 40 keV, and is now used to measure the wide variety of seeds used in prostate-cancer therapy that has appeared in the last few years. For the two (125)I seed models that have been subject to both the old and new standards, the new standard reduces the air-kerma strength by 10.3 %. This change is mainly due to the removal of the influence on the measurement of the Ti K x rays produced in the source encapsulation, a component with no clinical significance.

  11. Effects of aluminum-copper alloy filtration on photon spectra, air kerma rate and image contrast.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Andréa; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Gonçalves, Marcelo; Haiter Neto, Francisco; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, without the original aluminum filter, for dental radiography in terms of x-ray energy spectrum, air kerma rate and image quality. Comparisons of various thicknesses of aluminum-copper alloy in three different percentages were made with aluminum filtration. Tests were conducted on an intra-oral dental x-ray machine and were made on mandible phantom and on step-wedge. Depending on the thickness of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, the beam could be hardened and filtrated. The use of the aluminum-copper alloy filter resulted in reductions in air kerma rate from 8.40% to 47.33%, and indicated the same image contrast when compared to aluminum filtration. Aluminum-copper alloy filtration may be considered a good alternative to aluminum filtration.

  12. Air kerma calculation in Monte Carlo simulations for deriving normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo

    2017-07-01

    The estimation of the mean glandular dose in mammography using Monte Carlo simulations requires the calculation of the incident air kerma evaluated on the breast surface. In such a calculation, caution should be applied in considering explicitly the presence of the top compression paddle, since Compton scattering in this slab may produce a large spread of the incidence angles of x-ray photons on the scoring surface. Then, the calculation of the incident air kerma should contain the ‘effective’ area of the scoring surface, which takes into account the angle of incidence of photons on such a surface. Using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations with a code previously validated according to the Task Group 195 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, we show that for typical x-ray spectra and energy range adopted in mammography, the resulting discrepancy in the calculation of the incident air kerma may lead to an overestimation from a minimum of 10% up to 12% of normalized dose coefficients and, hence, of the corresponding mean glandular dose if this contribution is not considered.

  13. Determination of air-kerma strength for the {sup 192}Ir GammaMedplus iX pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, A. D.; Pike, T. L.; Micka, J. A.; Fulkerson, R. K.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy was originally proposed to combine the therapeutic advantages of high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Though uncommon in the United States, several facilities employ pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy in Europe and Canada. Currently, there is no air-kerma strength standard for PDR brachytherapy {sup 192}Ir sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Discrepancies in clinical measurements of the air-kerma strength of the PDR brachytherapy sources using HDR source-calibrated well chambers warrant further investigation.Methods: In this research, the air-kerma strength for an {sup 192}Ir PDR brachytherapy source was compared with the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory transfer standard well chambers, the seven-distance technique [B. E. Rasmussen et al., 'The air-kerma strength standard for 192Ir HDR sources,' Med. Phys. 38, 6721-6729 (2011)], and the manufacturer's stated value. Radiochromic film and Monte Carlo techniques were also employed for comparison to the results of the measurements.Results: While the measurements using the seven-distance technique were within + 0.44% from the manufacturer's determination, there was a + 3.10% difference between the transfer standard well chamber measurements and the manufacturer's stated value. Results showed that the PDR brachytherapy source has geometric and thus radiological qualities that exhibit behaviors similar to a point source model in contrast to a conventional line source model.Conclusions: The resulting effect of the pointlike characteristics of the PDR brachytherapy source likely account for the differences observed between well chamber and in-air measurements.

  14. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the NMIJ and the BIPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Kurosawa, T.; Mikamoto, T.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources of the National Metrology Institute of Japan (AIST-NMIJ), Japan, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) in April 2015. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer standard and expressed as a ratio of the NMIJ and the BIPM standards for reference air kerma rate, is 1.0036 with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0054. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the NPL and the BIPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J. T.; Sander, T.; de Pooter, J. A.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Kessler, C.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources of the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), United Kingdom, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the NPL in June 2010. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer standard and expressed as a ratio of the NPL and the BIPM standards for reference air kerma rate, is 0.9989 with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0057. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Diaphragm correction factors for free-air chamber standards for air kerma in x-rays.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; Kessler, C

    2009-05-07

    At present, only a correction factor for photon transmission, k(l), is systematically applied for the entrance diaphragm of free-air chamber standards for air kerma. In the present work, the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE is used to re-evaluate k(l) for the BIPM standards and new correction factors are calculated for photon scatter and for fluorescence production in the diaphragm. An additional effect arising from electrons emitted from the diaphragm is shown to be significant at the highest photon energies. The results for the radiation qualities used for international comparisons give a combined diaphragm correction factor k(dia) = 0.9980(3) for the BIPM medium-energy standard at 250 kV. This is significantly different from the factor k(l) = 0.9996(1) in use at present and it might be concluded that differences are likely to exist for all free-air chamber standards. The effect of using a conical taper at the downstream edge of the diaphragm is shown to be negligible for these radiation qualities.

  17. Air-over-ground calculations of the neutron, prompt, and secondary-gamma free-in-air tissue kerma from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V. III; Knight, J.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of the two-dimensional discrete-ordinate, calculations for the air-over-ground transport of radiation from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki weapon devices. It was found that the gamma-ray kerma dominated the total kerma for both environments.

  18. Air-kerma strength determination of a new directional {sup 103}Pd source

    SciTech Connect

    Aima, Manik Reed, Joshua L.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Culberson, Wesley S.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: A new directional {sup 103}Pd planar source array called a CivaSheet™ has been developed by CivaTech Oncology, Inc., for potential use in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatments. The array consists of multiple individual polymer capsules called CivaDots, containing {sup 103}Pd and a gold shield that attenuates the radiation on one side, thus defining a hot and cold side. This novel source requires new methods to establish a source strength metric. The presence of gold material in such close proximity to the active {sup 103}Pd region causes the source spectrum to be significantly different than the energy spectra of seeds normally used in LDR brachytherapy treatments. In this investigation, the authors perform air-kerma strength (S{sub K}) measurements, develop new correction factors for these measurements based on an experimentally verified energy spectrum, and test the robustness of transferring S{sub K} to a well-type ionization chamber. Methods: S{sub K} measurements were performed with the variable-aperture free-air chamber (VAFAC) at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center. Subsequent measurements were then performed in a well-type ionization chamber. To realize the quantity S{sub K} from a directional source with gold material present, new methods and correction factors were considered. Updated correction factors were calculated using the MCNP 6 Monte Carlo code in order to determine S{sub K} with the presence of gold fluorescent energy lines. In addition to S{sub K} measurements, a low-energy high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to experimentally verify the calculated spectrum, a sodium iodide (NaI) scintillating counter was used to verify the azimuthal and polar anisotropy, and a well-type ionization chamber was used to test the feasibility of disseminating S{sub K} values for a directional source within a cylindrically symmetric measurement volume. Results: The UW VAFAC was successfully used to measure the S

  19. Air-kerma evaluation at the maze entrance of HDR brachytherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Pujades, M C; Granero, D; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Papagiannis, P; Siebert, F A

    2014-12-01

    In the absence of procedures for evaluating the design of brachytherapy (BT) facilities for radiation protection purposes, the methodology used for external beam radiotherapy facilities is often adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the NCRP 151 methodology for estimating the air-kerma rate at the door in BT facilities. Such methodology was checked against Monte Carlo (MC) techniques using the code Geant4. Five different facility designs were studied for (192)Ir and (60)Co HDR applications to account for several different bunker layouts.For the estimation of the lead thickness needed at the door, the use of transmission data for the real spectra at the door instead of the ones emitted by (192)Ir and (60)Co will reduce the lead thickness by a factor of five for (192)Ir and ten for (60)Co. This will significantly lighten the door and hence simplify construction and operating requirements for all bunkers.The adaptation proposed in this study to estimate the air-kerma rate at the door depends on the complexity of the maze: it provides good results for bunkers with a maze (i.e. similar to those used for linacs for which the NCRP 151 methodology was developed) but fails for less conventional designs. For those facilities, a specific Monte Carlo study is in order for reasons of safety and cost-effectiveness.

  20. MO-D-213-07: RadShield: Semi- Automated Calculation of Air Kerma Rate and Barrier Thickness

    SciTech Connect

    DeLorenzo, M; Wu, D; Rutel, I; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop the first Java-based semi-automated calculation program intended to aid professional radiation shielding design. Air-kerma rate and barrier thickness calculations are performed by implementing NCRP Report 147 formalism into a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The ultimate aim of this newly created software package is to reduce errors and improve radiographic and fluoroscopic room designs over manual approaches. Methods: Floor plans are first imported as images into the RadShield software program. These plans serve as templates for drawing barriers, occupied regions and x-ray tube locations. We have implemented sub-GUIs that allow the specification in regions and equipment for occupancy factors, design goals, number of patients, primary beam directions, source-to-patient distances and workload distributions. Once the user enters the above parameters, the program automatically calculates air-kerma rate at sampled points beyond all barriers. For each sample point, a corresponding minimum barrier thickness is calculated to meet the design goal. RadShield allows control over preshielding, sample point location and material types. Results: A functional GUI package was developed and tested. Examination of sample walls and source distributions yields a maximum percent difference of less than 0.1% between hand-calculated air-kerma rates and RadShield. Conclusion: The initial results demonstrated that RadShield calculates air-kerma rates and required barrier thicknesses with reliable accuracy and can be used to make radiation shielding design more efficient and accurate. This newly developed approach differs from conventional calculation methods in that it finds air-kerma rates and thickness requirements for many points outside the barriers, stores the information and selects the largest value needed to comply with NCRP Report 147 design goals. Floor plans, parameters, designs and reports can be saved and accessed later for modification and recalculation

  1. [Air kerma transmission factors of Scattered X-rays in the maze of a Linac room for lead shield].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki

    2005-01-20

    Spectra of scattered X-rays in the maze of a Linac (X-ray energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV) room were estimated by means of the Monte Carlo simulation, and air kerma transmission factors of the X-rays scattered through a lead shield were evaluated based on those spectra. Spectra of scattered X-rays showed a maximum in the energy area below 200 keV. The higher the accelerated electron energy, also, the smaller the scattering angle that tended to spread to the higher energy area of the distribution of spectra. The air kerma transmission factor of 120 degrees scattered X-rays of 4 MV X-rays obtained in this study was larger than the transmission factors of 124 degrees scattered photons of (60)Co gamma rays through a lead shield given in ICRP. The air kerma transmission factors of 120 degrees scattered X-rays of 6 MV X-rays were smaller than the transmission factors of 90 degrees scattered photons of (60)Co gamma rays. The air kerma transmission factors of 120 degrees scattered X-rays of 10 MV X-rays was slightly larger than transmission factors of 90 degrees scattered photons of (60)Co gamma rays. Therefore, in the case of a 4 MV X-ray Linac room, the calculation method given in the "Manual of Practical Shield Calculation of Radiation Facilities (2000)" causes underestimation of leakage doses.

  2. Primary Beam Air Kerma Dependence on Distance from Cargo and People Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.; Cerra, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The distance dependence of air kerma or dose rate of the primary radiation beam is not obvious for security scanners of cargo and people in which there is relative motion between a collimated source and the person or object being imaged. To study this problem, one fixed line source and three moving-source scan-geometry cases are considered, each characterized by radiation emanating perpendicular to an axis. The cases are 1) a stationary line source of radioactive material, e.g., contaminated solution in a pipe; 2) a moving, uncollimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; 3) a moving, collimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; and 4) a translating, narrow “pencil” beam emanating in a flying-spot, raster pattern. Each case is considered for short and long distances compared to the line source length or path traversed by a moving source. The short distance model pertains mostly to dose to objects being scanned and personnel associated with the screening operation. The long distance model pertains mostly to potential dose to bystanders. For radionuclide sources, the number of nuclear transitions that occur a) per unit length of a line source, or b) during the traversal of a point source, is a unifying concept. The “universal source strength” of air kerma rate at a meter from the source can be used to describe x-ray machine or radionuclide sources. For many cargo and people scanners with highly collimated fan or pencil beams, dose varies as the inverse of the distance from the source in the near field and with the inverse square of the distance beyond a critical radius. Ignoring the inverse square dependence and using inverse distance dependence is conservative in the sense of tending to overestimate dose.

  3. Comparison of air kerma between C-arm CT and 64-multidetector-row CT using a phantom.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Seiki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Murotani, Kazuhiro; Nishioku, Tadayoshi; Shirai, Shintaro; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2014-05-01

    To compare air kerma after scanning a phantom with C-arm CT and with 64-multidetector row CT (64MDCT). A phantom was scanned using parameters based on data of ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who had C-arm CT during hepatic arteriography and 64MDCT during arterial portography. Radiation monitors were used to measure air kerma ten times at each of five points: the center (A), top (B), left side (C), bottom (D), and right side (E). For C-arm CT vs. 64MDCT, air kerma after scanning was 10.5 ± 0.2 vs. 6.4 ± 0.0 for A, 1.5 ± 0.0 vs. 11.6 ± 0.2 for B, 37.1 ± 0.2 vs. 11.1 ± 0.1 for C, 55.6 ± 1.0 vs. 10.6 ± 0.1 for D, and 40.5 ± 0.5 vs. 11.7 ± 0.1 for E, respectively. Air kerma for A, B, C, D, and E was 1.64, 0.13, 3.34, 5.24, and 3.46 times greater for C-arm CT than for 64MDCT, respectively. Using the same scanning parameters as for clinical cases, air kerma values were greater with C-arm CT than with 64MDCT; at the dorsal side of the phantom, they were 5.24 times greater with C-arm CT compared with 64MDCT.

  4. Pin-photodiode array for the measurement of fan-beam energy and air kerma distributions of X-ray CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Aoyama, Takahiko; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao; Kameyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Patient dose estimation in X-ray computed tomography (CT) is generally performed by Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions within anthropomorphic or cylindrical phantoms. An accurate Monte Carlo simulation requires an understanding of the effects of the bow-tie filter equipped in a CT scanner, i.e. the change of X-ray energy and air kerma along the fan-beam arc of the CT scanner. To measure the effective energy and air kerma distributions, we devised a pin-photodiode array utilizing eight channels of X-ray sensors arranged at regular intervals along the fan-beam arc of the CT scanner. Each X-ray sensor consisted of two plate type of pin silicon photodiodes in tandem - front and rear photodiodes - and of a lead collimator, which only allowed X-rays to impinge vertically to the silicon surface of the photodiodes. The effective energy of the X-rays was calculated from the ratio of the output voltages of the photodiodes and the dose was calculated from the output voltage of the front photodiode using the energy and dose calibration curves respectively. The pin-photodiode array allowed the calculation of X-ray effective energies and relative doses, at eight points simultaneously along the fan-beam arc of a CT scanner during a single rotation of the scanner. The fan-beam energy and air kerma distributions of CT scanners can be effectively measured using this pin-photodiode array. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A conversion method of air kerma from the primary, scatter, and leakage radiations to effective dose for calculating x-ray shielding barriers in mammography.

    PubMed

    Kharrati, Hedi

    2005-05-01

    In this study, a new approach has been introduced for derivation of the effective dose from air kerma to calculate shielding requirements in mammography facilities. This new approach has been used to compute the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to the effective dose for the mammography reference beam series of the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and International Atomic Energy Agency laboratories. The results show that, in all cases, the effective dose in mammography energy range is less than 25% of the incident air kerma for the primary and the scatter radiations and does not exceed 75% for the leakage radiation.

  6. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the SCK.CEN, Belgium and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Chiriotti, S.

    2017-01-01

    A first key comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Laboratory for Nuclear Calibrations (LNK) from the Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie—Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucleaire (SCK.CEN), Belgium and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in September 2016. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the SCK.CEN and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0021 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.6 × 10-3. The results for an indirect comparison made at the same time are consistent with the direct results at the level of 7 parts in 104. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Comparison of the NIST and BIPM Standards for Air Kerma in Medium-Energy X-Rays.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; O'Brien, M

    2006-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the air-kerma standards for medium-energy x-rays of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The comparison involved a series of measurements at the BIPM and the NIST using the air-kerma standards and three NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber standards. Reference beam qualities in the range from 100 kV to 250 kV were used. The results show the standards to be in reasonable agreement within the combined standard uncertainty of the comparison of 0.37 %, although a significant trend with radiation quality is observed and the possible sources discussed.

  8. Verification of air-kerma strength of 125I seed for permanent prostate implants in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Iori; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Akino, Yuichi; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2009-12-01

    To assure the physical quality of brachytherapy, we investigated the difference between measured and manufacturer's stated source strengths in a single model SourceTech Medical (STM)1251 (125)I seed. A well-type ionization chamber with a single-seed holder was used to measure the source strength of 2412 (125)I seeds before implant in 34 patients. The air-kerma strength was 0.450 U for all cases. The mean source strength for each patient was measured and compared with the manufacturer's stated value. The deviation from the measured value was compared with the tolerance range of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) TG-56 report's recommendation. The measured source strength was higher than the manufacturer's stated value, with a median difference of 1% (range, 2% to 5%). Sixteen of the total of 2412 seeds (0.7%) were more than 5% different from the manufacturer's stated value. The median SD from the mean value was 2.2% (range, 1.1% to 2.5%) for all patients. This is the first report of a single-seed assay performed for the model STM1251 (125)I seed. In this study the manufacturer's stated strength agreed well with the measured value. Nevertheless, the advisability of performing a single-seed assay at every institution should be considered, by referring to the appropriate regulations; for example, those used in the United States.

  9. Entrance surface air kerma in X-ray systems for paediatric interventional cardiology: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, C; Vano, E; Miranda, P; Valenzuela, E; Vergara, F; Guarda, E

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this work were to report the results of a national survey on entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values for different phantom thicknesses and operation modes in paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) systems and to compare them with previous values. The national survey also offers suggested investigation levels (ILs) for ESAK in paediatric cardiac procedures. ESAK was measured on phantoms of 4-16 cm thickness of polymethyl methacrylate slabs. For low fluoroscopy mode (FM), ESAK rates ranged from 0.11 to 33.1 mGy min(-1) and for high FM from 0.34 to 61.0 mGy min(-1). For cine mode, values of ESAK per frame were from 1.9 to 78.2 µGy fr(-1). The ILs were suggested as the third quartile of the values measured. This research showed lower ESAK values than in previous research, particularly for ESAK values in cine modes. This work represents a first step towards launching a national programme in paediatric dosimetry for IC procedures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Determination of conversion factors from air kerma to operational dose equivalent quantities for low-energy X-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Hakanen, Arvi; Kosunen, Antti; Pöyry, Paula; Tapiovaara, Markku

    2007-01-01

    The conversion coefficients from air kerma to ICRU operational dose equivalent quantities for STUK's realisation of the X-radiation qualities N-15 to N-60 of the ISO narrow (N) spectrum series were determined by utilising X-ray spectrum measurements. The pulse-height spectra were measured using a planar high-purity germanium spectrometer and unfolded to fluence spectra using Monte Carlo generated data of the spectrometer response. To verify the measuring and unfolding method, the first and second half-value layers and the air kerma rate were calculated from the fluence spectra and compared with the values measured using an ionisation chamber. For each radiation quality, the spectrum was characterised by the parameters given in ISO 4037-1. The conversion coefficients from the air kerma to the ICRU operational quantities Hp(10), Hp(0.07), H'(0.07) and H*(10) were calculated using monoenergetic conversion coefficients at zero angle of incidence. The results are discussed with respect to ISO 4037-4, and compared with published results for low-energy X-ray spectra.

  11. Comparison between absorbed dose to water standards established by water calorimetry at the LNE-LNHB and by application of international air-kerma based protocols for kilovoltage medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Perichon, N; Rapp, B; Denoziere, M; Daures, J; Ostrowsky, A; Bordy, J-M

    2013-05-07

    Nowadays, the absorbed dose to water for kilovoltage x-ray beams is determined from standards in terms of air-kerma by application of international dosimetry protocols. New standards in terms of absorbed dose to water has just been established for these beams at the LNE-LNHB, using water calorimetry, at a depth of 2 cm in water in accordance with protocols. The aim of this study is to compare these new standards in terms of absorbed dose to water, to the dose values calculated from the application of four international protocols based on air-kerma standards (IAEA TRS-277, AAPM TG-61, IPEMB and NCS-10). The acceleration potentials of the six beams studied are between 80 and 300 kV with half-value layers between 3.01 mm of aluminum and 3.40 mm of copper. A difference between the two methods smaller than 2.1% was reported. The standard uncertainty of water calorimetry being below 0.8%, and the one associated with the values from protocols being around 2.5%, the results are in good agreement. The calibration coefficients of some ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, established by application of calorimetry and air-kerma based dosimetry protocols, were also compared. The best agreement with the calibration coefficients established by water calorimetry was found for those established with the AAPM TG-61 protocol.

  12. Comparison of air kerma measurements for tungsten anode based mammography x-ray beam qualities (EURAMET.RI(I)-S4.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, I.; Büermann, L.; Gomola, I.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the air kerma standards for x-radiation qualities used in mammography was performed between the PTB and the IAEA. Two reference-class ionization chamber types Radcal RC6M and Magna A650 of the IAEA and tungsten anode based beam qualities with Mo and Al external filtrations (W+Mo, W+Al) established at both laboratories were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients, NK_air, were determined for the transfer chambers at the PTB in May 2015 and before and after this at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The results show good agreement, to be well within the 0.55 % standard uncertainty of the comparison. Correction factors to determine NK_air for these beam qualities based on calibration in RQR-M mammography beam qualities, established according to the IEC 61267 standard, were also calculated for the Radcal RC6M, 10X5-6M, and Magna A650 types of chambers. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  13. A radiation quality correction factor k for well-type ionization chambers for the measurement of the reference air kerma rate of (60)Co HDR brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Andreas; Meier, Markus; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ can be determined in order to measure the reference air kerma rate of (60)Co high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources with acceptable uncertainty by means of a well-type ionization chamber calibrated for (192)Ir HDR sources. The calibration coefficients of 35 well-type ionization chambers of two different chamber types for radiation fields of (60)Co and (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy sources were determined experimentally. A radiation quality correction factor kQ was determined as the ratio of the calibration coefficients for (60)Co and (192)Ir. The dependence on chamber-to-chamber variations, source-to-source variations, and source strength was investigated. For the PTW Tx33004 (Nucletron source dosimetry system (SDS)) well-type chamber, the type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ is 1.19. Note that this value is valid for chambers with the serial number, SN ≥ 315 (Nucletron SDS SN ≥ 548) onward only. For the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well-type chambers, the type-specific correction factor kQ is 1.05. Both kQ values are independent of the source strengths in the complete clinically relevant range. The relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of kQ is UkQ = 2.1% for both chamber types. The calibration coefficient of a well-type chamber for radiation fields of (60)Co HDR brachytherapy sources can be calculated from a given calibration coefficient for (192)Ir radiation by using a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ. However, the uncertainty of a (60)Co calibration coefficient calculated via kQ is at least twice as large as that for a direct calibration with a (60)Co source.

  14. SU-E-I-36: A Study to Compare Operator Dosimeter Exposure versus Fluoroscopic Time and Air Kerma in Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures.

    PubMed

    McKetty, M

    2012-06-01

    The total effective dose equivalent limit for occupationally radiation exposed persons has remained at 50 millisieverts per year since the 1960s. There is ongoing discussion whether this limit should be lowered. Whether or not it is lowered, all facilities have to adhere to the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). In a hospital environment, the workers who typically have exposures which Result in ALARA investigations having to be performed include interventional radiologists, cardiologists, and mobile C-arm operators. At our institution there are a limited number of interventional radiologists with one person being responsible for performing the majority of the procedures and sometimes exceeding the ALARA investigational levels. A limited study was performed to compare the number, type of studies, cumulative air kerma, and fluoroscopic time versus the exposure measured by the personnel dosimeters worn by the radiologists. This was also related to the type of angiographic equipment in use. The length of fluoroscopic time and cumulative air kerma and cumulative DAP appeared to be related to the higher exposures received by the operator. The number of procedures performed did not correlate with the personnel dosimeter exposure; rather it was the type and complexity of a study and the length of fluoroscopic time that was related. The number of ALARA investigations required has decreased gradually. This could be attributed to several factors. These include increased use of available safety items. With an increase in the number of interventionalists the work load is distributed more equitably. The purchase of new angiographic equipment has resulted in better image quality and more shielding options for the operators. The operators are periodically reminded to keep fluoroscopic time to a minimum and use appropriate settings on the equipment. The equipment is calibrated to provide adequate image quality at mid-dose settings. © 2012 American Association of

  15. Comparison of the NIST and PTB Air-Kerma Standards for Low-Energy X-Rays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michelle; Bueermann, Ludwig

    2009-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the air-kerma standards for low-energy x rays at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The comparison involved a series of measurements at the PTB and the NIST using the air-kerma standards and two NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber standards. Results are presented for the reference radiation beam qualities in the range from 25 kV to 50 kV for low energy x rays, including the techniques used for mammography dose traceability. The tungsten generated reference radiation qualities, between 25 kV and 50 kV used for this comparison, are new to NIST; therefore this comparison will serve as the preliminary comparison for NIST and a verification of the primary standard correction factors. The mammography comparison will repeat two previously unpublished comparisons between PTB and NIST. The results show the standards to be in reasonable agreement within the standard uncertainty of the comparison of about 0.4 %.

  16. SU-E-T-552: Monte Carlo Calculation of Correction Factors for a Free-Air Ionization Chamber in Support of a National Air-Kerma Standard for Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mille, M; Bergstrom, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To use Monte Carlo radiation transport methods to calculate correction factors for a free-air ionization chamber in support of a national air-kerma standard for low-energy, miniature x-ray sources used for electronic brachytherapy (eBx). Methods: The NIST is establishing a calibration service for well-type ionization chambers used to characterize the strength of eBx sources prior to clinical use. The calibration approach involves establishing the well-chamber’s response to an eBx source whose air-kerma rate at a 50 cm distance is determined through a primary measurement performed using the Lamperti free-air ionization chamber. However, the free-air chamber measurements of charge or current can only be related to the reference air-kerma standard after applying several corrections, some of which are best determined via Monte Carlo simulation. To this end, a detailed geometric model of the Lamperti chamber was developed in the EGSnrc code based on the engineering drawings of the instrument. The egs-fac user code in EGSnrc was then used to calculate energy-dependent correction factors which account for missing or undesired ionization arising from effects such as: (1) attenuation and scatter of the x-rays in air; (2) primary electrons escaping the charge collection region; (3) lack of charged particle equilibrium; (4) atomic fluorescence and bremsstrahlung radiation. Results: Energy-dependent correction factors were calculated assuming a monoenergetic point source with the photon energy ranging from 2 keV to 60 keV in 2 keV increments. Sufficient photon histories were simulated so that the Monte Carlo statistical uncertainty of the correction factors was less than 0.01%. The correction factors for a specific eBx source will be determined by integrating these tabulated results over its measured x-ray spectrum. Conclusion: The correction factors calculated in this work are important for establishing a national standard for eBx which will help ensure that dose

  17. Comparison of the NIST and NPL Air Kerma Standards Used for X-Ray Measurements Between 10 kV and 80 kV.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M; Lamperti, P; Williams, T; Sander, T

    2000-01-01

    A direct comparison was made between the air kerma primary standards used for the measurements of low-energy x rays at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). The comparison was conducted at the NPL using NPL reference radiation qualities between 10 kV and 80 kV. The results show the primary air-kerma standards to agree within 0.6 % of their values for beam qualities up to 80 kV.

  18. Influence of photon energy spectra from brachytherapy sources on Monte Carlo simulations of kerma and dose rates in water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: For a given radionuclide, there are several photon spectrum choices available to dosimetry investigators for simulating the radiation emissions from brachytherapy sources. This study examines the dosimetric influence of selecting the spectra for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd on the final estimations of kerma and dose. Methods: For {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, the authors considered from two to five published spectra. Spherical sources approximating common brachytherapy sources were assessed. Kerma and dose results from GEANT4, MCNP5, and PENELOPE-2008 were compared for water and air. The dosimetric influence of {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd spectral choice was determined. Results: For the spectra considered, there were no statistically significant differences between kerma or dose results based on Monte Carlo code choice when using the same spectrum. Water-kerma differences of about 2%, 2%, and 0.7% were observed due to spectrum choice for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively (independent of radial distance), when accounting for photon yield per Bq. Similar differences were observed for air-kerma rate. However, their ratio (as used in the dose-rate constant) did not significantly change when the various photon spectra were selected because the differences compensated each other when dividing dose rate by air-kerma strength. Conclusions: Given the standardization of radionuclide data available from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and the rigorous infrastructure for performing and maintaining the data set evaluations, NNDC spectra are suggested for brachytherapy simulations in medical physics applications.

  19. SU-E-P-15: Technique Factor Modulation and Reference Plane Air Kerma Rates in Response to Simulated Patient Thickness Variations for a Sample of Current Generation Fluoroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, K; Rakowski, J; Dong, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. Methods: A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and spectral filtration over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within a default abdomen or body imaging protocol. Results: The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. Some vendors have made hardware advances increasing the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes; this was evident in the acquisition air kerma rates. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ copper filtration in the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Conclusion: Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and provides opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. The enhanced radiation output capabilities of some of the fluoroscopes may, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these higher output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Therefore, all parties involved in imaging, including the clinical team, medical physicists, and imaging vendors, must work

  20. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Hall, Christopher J.; Lye, Jessica E.; Nordstroem, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation

  1. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Rogers, Peter A W; Stevenson, Andrew W; Hall, Christopher J; Lye, Jessica E; Nordström, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M; Lewis, Robert A

    2013-06-01

    Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 ± 0.015 and 0.412 ± 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 ± 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation curve on the IMBL using a simple experimental

  2. KEY COMPARISON: APMP/TCRI key comparison report of measurement of air kerma for medium-energy x-rays (APMP.RI(I)-K3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, W. S.; Kotler, L. H.; Webb, D. V.; Büermann, L.; Burns, D. T.; Takeyeddin, M.; Shaha, V. V.; Srimanoroth, S.; Meghzifene, A.; Hah, S. H.; Chun, K. J.; Kadni, T. B.; Takata, N.; Msimang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The APMP/TCRI Dosimetry Working Group performed the APMP.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of measurement of air kerma for medium-energy x-rays (100 kV to 250 kV) between 2000 and 2003. In total, 11 institutes took part in the comparison, among which 8 were APMP member laboratories. Two commercial cavity ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments and circulated among the participants. All the participants established the 100 kV, 135 kV, 180 kV and 250 kV x-ray beam qualities equivalent to those of the BIPM. The results showed that the maximum difference between the participants and the BIPM in the medium-energy x ray range, evaluated using the comparison data of the linking laboratories ARPANSA and PTB, is less than 1.4%. The degrees of equivalence between the participants are presented and this comparison confirms the calibration capabilities of the participating laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section I, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  3. Comparison of air kerma standards of LNE-LNHB and NPL for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy sources: EUROMET project no 814.

    PubMed

    Douysset, Guilhem; Sander, Thorsten; Gouriou, Jean; Nutbrown, Rebecca

    2008-03-21

    An indirect comparison has been made in the air kerma standards for high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). The measurements were carried out at both laboratories between November and December 2004. The comparison was based on measurements using well-type transfer ionization chambers and two different source types, Nucletron microSelectron HDR Classic and version 2. The results show the reported calibration coefficients to agree within 0.47% to 0.63%, which is within the overall standard uncertainty of 0.65% reported by both laboratories at the time of this comparison. Following this comparison, some of the NPL primary standard correction factors were re-evaluated resulting in a change of +0.17% in the overall correction factor. The new factor was implemented in May 2006. Applying the revised chamber factor to the measurements reported in this comparison report will reduce the difference between the two standards by 0.17%.

  4. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the NIM, China and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D.; Wang, K.; Fan, Y.; Jin, S.; Yang, X.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for air kerma of the National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in November 2015. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the NIM and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 0.9997 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.7 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K5 of the air kerma standards of the ININ, Mexico and the BIPM in 137Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Alvarez Romero, J. T.; De la Cruz Hernández, D.; Cabrera Vertti, M. R.; Tovar-Muñoz, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 137Cs radiation beam of the BIPM in February 2015. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the ININ and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0048 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.0 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the ININ, Mexico and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Alvarez Romero, J. T.; Tovar-Muñoz, V. M.

    2013-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in 2012. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the ININ and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0035 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.1 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Accuracy of Spencer-Attix cavity theory and calculations of fluence correction factors for the air kerma formalism.

    PubMed

    La Russa, D J; Rogers, D W O

    2009-09-01

    EGSnrc calculations of ion chamber response and Spencer-Attix (SA) restricted stopping-power ratios are used to test the assumptions of the SA cavity theory and to assess the accuracy of this theory as it applies to the air kerma formalism for 60Co beams. Consistent with previous reports, the EGSnrc calculations show that the SA cavity theory, as it is normally applied, requires a correction for the perturbation of the charged particle fluence (K(fl)) by the presence of the cavity. The need for K(fl) corrections arises from the fact that the standard prescription for choosing the low-energy threshold delta in the SA restricted stopping-power ratio consistently underestimates the values of delta needed if no perturbation to the fluence is assumed. The use of fluence corrections can be avoided by appropriately choosing delta, but it is not clear how delta can be calculated from first principles. Values of delta required to avoid K(fl) corrections were found to be consistently higher than delta values obtained using the conventional approach and are also observed to be dependent on the composition of the wall in addition to the cavity size. Values of K(fl) have been calculated for many of the graphite-walled ion chambers used by the national metrology institutes around the world and found to be within 0.04% of unity in all cases, with an uncertainty of about 0.02%.

  8. Summary of the BIPM.RI(I)-K5 comparison for air kerma in 137Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.

    2013-01-01

    International comparisons of air kerma in 137Cs gamma radiation beams have been made at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) since 1994. Twelve national metrology institutes have taken part, seven of which have repeated the comparison over the intervening years. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) is taken as the BIPM evaluation, each comparison result being the ratio of the national metrology institute (NMI) evaluation to that of the BIPM standard under the same reference conditions. The degrees of equivalence between each NMI and the KCRV and a graphical presentation are given using the most recent published result for eleven NMIs. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. COOMET regional comparison of national measurement standards of air kerma for 137Cs γ radiation at protection level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, L.; Oborin, A. V.; Milevsky, V. S.; Walwyn Salas, G.; Sukhishvili, S.; Ginga, I.; Ivanov, R.; Gudelis, A.; Gomola, I.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented of the COOMET supplementary comparison of the national measurement standards for air kerma in 137Cs γ radiation at protection level (~10 mGy/h). Ten National Metrology Institutes from the COOMET organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency participated in this COOMET project no. 445. The PTB acted as pilot laboratory. Two of the participants, the SMU (Slovakia) and the NSC-'IM' (Ukraine) participated in the measurements but did not submit a valid report of results. The comparison reference value (CRV) was obtained as the mean result of the PTB and the VNIIM, both of which had previously taken part in the key comparison BIPM-RI(I)-K5. The degree of equivalence with the CRV was evaluated. The results were consistent within the relative standard uncertainties of the comparison ranging from 0.28% to 1.3% and deviated from the CRV by less than 1%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Final report on APMP.RI(I)-K1: APMP/TCRI key comparison report of measurement of air kerma for 60Co gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, K. J.; Butler, D. J.; Webb, D.; Mahant, A. K.; Meghzifene, A.; Lee, J. H.; Hah, S. H.; Kadni, T. B.; Zhang, Y.; Kurosawa, T.; Msimang, Z. L. M.; Caseria, E. S.

    2013-01-01

    The APMP.RI(I)-K1 key comparison of the measurement standards of air kerma for 60Co gamma-rays was undertaken by the APMP/TCRI Dosimetry Working Group between 2004 and 2006, coordinated by the Korean Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). In total, 10 institutes took part in the comparison, among which 7 were APMP member laboratories. Three Farmer-type commercial cavity chambers were used as transfer chambers and circulated among the participants. All the participants carried out their measurements according to the guidelines for the comparison established by the KRISS with the cooperation of the ARPANSA. For each transfer chamber, an NMI calibration coefficient was obtained and a ratio derived by dividing by the average result from the linking laboratories, ARPANSA and NMIJ. The APMP comparison reference value for each chamber was calculated as the mean of the NMI-determined calibration coefficients divided by the average result from the linking laboratories. The results showed that the maximum difference between the APMP linked ratio of a participating NMI and the APMP reference value was 1.76%. The measured ratios of the calibration coefficient RNMI, BIPM between the participating NMI and the BIPM via the link laboratories for the transfer chambers were obtained. The maximum expanded uncertainty of RNMI, BIPM for any participating laboratory was 2.0%. The degree of equivalence of each participating laboratory with respect to the key comparison reference value was also evaluated. The expanded uncertainty of the difference between the results ranged from 0.5% to 1.2%. The pair-wise degree of equivalence between each pair of laboratories was also obtained and the largest difference of the expanded uncertainty of the difference for any pair-wise degree of equivalence was within the expanded uncertainty of the measurement for the pair of laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that

  11. Experimental derivation of the fluence non-uniformity correction for air kerma near brachytherapy linear sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vianello, E. A.; Almeida, C. E. de

    2008-07-15

    In brachytherapy, one of the elements to take into account for measurements free in air is the non-uniformity of the photon fluence due to the beam divergence that causes a steep dose gradient near the source. The correction factors for this phenomenon have been usually evaluated by two available theories by Kondo and Randolph [Radiat. Res. 13, 37-60 (1960)] and Bielajew [Phys. Med. Biol. 35, 517-538 (1990)], both conceived for point sources. This work presents the experimental validation of the Monte Carlo calculations made by Rodriguez and deAlmeida [Phys. Med. Biol. 49, 1705-1709 (2004)] for the non-uniformity correction specifically for a Cs-137 linear source measured using a Farmer type ionization chamber. The experimental values agree very well with the Monte Carlo calculations and differ from the results predicted by both theoretical models widely used. This result confirms that for linear sources there are some important differences at short distances from the source and emphasizes that those theories should not be used for linear sources. The data provided in this study confirm the limitations of the mentioned theories when linear sources are used. Considering the difficulties and uncertainties associated with the experimental measurements, it is recommended to use the Monte Carlo data to assess the non-uniformity factors for linear sources in situations that require this knowledge.

  12. Calculation of conversion coefficients for air kerma to ambient dose equivalent using transmitted spectra of megavoltage X-rays through concrete.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, T P V; Silva, A X

    2012-12-01

    With the fast advancement of technology, (60)Co teletherapy units are largely being replaced with medical linear accelerators. In most cases, the linear accelerator tends to be installed in the same room in which the (60)Co teletherapy unit was previously placed. If in-depth structural remodelling is out of the question, high-density concrete is usually used to improve shielding against primary, scatter and leakage radiation originating in the new equipment. This work presents a study based on Monte Carlo simulations of the transmission of some clinical photon spectra (from 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV accelerators) through concrete, considering two different densities. Concrete walls with thickness ranging from 0.70 to 2.0 m were irradiated with 30 cm×30 cm primary beam spectra. The results show that the thickness of the barrier decreases up to ∼65 % when barite (high-density concrete) is used instead of ordinary concrete. The average energies of primary and transmitted beam spectra were also calculated. In addition, conversion coefficients from air kerma to ambient dose equivalent, H*(d)/K(air), and air kerma to effective dose, E/K(air), for photon spectra from the transmitted spectra were calculated and compared. The results suggest that the 10-mm depth is not the best choice to represent the effective dose.

  13. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K3 of the air-kerma standards of the NIST, USA and the BIPM in medium-energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; Kessler, C; O'Brien, M; Minniti, R

    2012-01-01

    A key comparison has been made between the air-kerma standards of the NIST, USA and the BIPM in the medium-energy x-ray range. The results show the standards to be in agreement at the level of the standard uncertainty of the comparison of 3.8 parts in 10(3), except at 250 kV where the difference is 1.5 times the standard uncertainty. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database.

  14. Evaluation of wall correction factor of INER's air-kerma primary standard chamber and dose variation by source displacement for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Wang, J N; Huang, T T; Su, S H; Chang, B J; Su, C H; Hsu, S M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR) ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the ¹⁹²Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK) for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR ¹⁹²Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity.

  15. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K5 of the air kerma standards of the VSL and the BIPM in 137Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Jansen, B. J.; de Pooter, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the VSL, Netherlands, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 137Cs radiation beam of the BIPM in April 2016. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the VSL and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 0.9952 with a combined standard uncertainty of 3.8 × 10-3. The results for an indirect comparison made at the same time are consistent with the direct results at the level of 1 part in 104. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Evaluation of Wall Correction Factor of INER's Air-Kerma Primary Standard Chamber and Dose Variation by Source Displacement for HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. H.; Wang, J. N.; Huang, T. T.; Su, S. H.; Chang, B. J.; Su, C. H.; Hsu, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the 192Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK) for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR 192Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity. PMID:24222907

  17. Comparison of air kerma-length product measurements between the PTB and the IAEA for x-radiation qualities used in computed tomography (EURAMET.RI(I)-S12, EURAMET project #1327)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, István; Büermann, Ludwig; Alikhani, Babak; Gomola, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of air kerma-length product determinations for standard radiation qualities defined for use in computed tomography was performed between the PTB and the IAEA as EURAMET project #1327, registered in the KCDB as the EURAMET.RI(I)-S12 comparison. A pencil type reference-class ionization chamber of the IAEA and the three RQT beam qualities established according to the IEC standard 61627:2005 were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients for the transfer chamber in terms of Gycm/C at the PTB and the IAEA using the partial irradiation method recommended in the IAEA TRS 457 were determined. The results show the calibration coefficients of both laboratories were in a very good agreement of about 0.2 % well within the estimated relative standard uncertainty of the comparison of about 0.8 %. Residual correction due to the additional aperture required for partial irradiation of pencil chambers and feasibility of the full irradiation method were also studied. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K3 of the air-kerma standards of the NIST, USA and the BIPM in medium-energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. T.; Kessler, C.; O'Brien, M.; Minniti, R.

    2017-01-01

    A key comparison has been made between the air-kerma standards of the NIST, USA and the BIPM in the medium-energy x-ray range. The results show the standards to be in agreement at the level of the standard uncertainty of the comparison of 3.8 parts in 103, except at 250 kV where the difference is 1.5 times the standard uncertainty. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  19. Kerma rate effects on thermoluminescent response of CVD diamond.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, F; Benabdesselam, M; Iacconi, P; Mady, F

    2006-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) response of chemical vapour deposition diamond is studied after X-irradiation (45 kV) at room temperature for various air kerma rates ranging from 0.7 to 100 Gy.min(-1). For a given air kerma, the TL signal as a function of air kerma rate exhibits large variations and is higher for low air kerma rates than for higher ones. In order to explain these results, the simplest energy-level scheme has been considered, that is, with only one electron trap and one recombination centre. Kinetic equations are numerically solved. Calculations are made for various electron-hole generation rates and show that the trap filling as a function of electron-hole generation rate follows, actually, the same evolution as the one of experimental TL response. The kerma rate effect on TL response is explained by the competitivity between the recombination and the trapping processes during irradiation.

  20. A radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} for well-type ionization chambers for the measurement of the reference air kerma rate of {sup 60}Co HDR brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schüller, Andreas Meier, Markus; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} can be determined in order to measure the reference air kerma rate of {sup 60}Co high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources with acceptable uncertainty by means of a well-type ionization chamber calibrated for {sup 192}Ir HDR sources. Methods: The calibration coefficients of 35 well-type ionization chambers of two different chamber types for radiation fields of {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources were determined experimentally. A radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} was determined as the ratio of the calibration coefficients for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. The dependence on chamber-to-chamber variations, source-to-source variations, and source strength was investigated. Results: For the PTW Tx33004 (Nucletron source dosimetry system (SDS)) well-type chamber, the type-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} is 1.19. Note that this value is valid for chambers with the serial number, SN ≥ 315 (Nucletron SDS SN ≥ 548) onward only. For the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well-type chambers, the type-specific correction factor k{sub Q} is 1.05. Both k{sub Q} values are independent of the source strengths in the complete clinically relevant range. The relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of k{sub Q} is U{sub k{sub Q}} = 2.1% for both chamber types. Conclusions: The calibration coefficient of a well-type chamber for radiation fields of {sup 60}Co HDR brachytherapy sources can be calculated from a given calibration coefficient for {sup 192}Ir radiation by using a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q}. However, the uncertainty of a {sup 60}Co calibration coefficient calculated via k{sub Q} is at least twice as large as that for a direct calibration with a {sup 60}Co source.

  1. Assessment of protocols in cone-beam CT with symmetric and asymmetric beams usingeffective dose and air kerma-area product.

    PubMed

    Batista, Wilson Otto; Soares, Maria Rosangela; de Oliveira, Marcus V L; Maia, Ana F; Caldas, Linda V E

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate and compare protocols with similar purposes in a cone beam CT scanner using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and the air kerma-area product (PKA) as the kerma index. The measurements were performed on two protocols used to obtain an image of the maxilla-mandible using the equipment GENDEX GXCB 500: Protocol [GX1] extended diameter and asymmetric beam (14cm×8.5cm-maxilla/mandible) and protocol [GX2] symmetrical beam (8.5cm×8.5cm-maxillary/mandible). LiF dosimeters inserted into a female anthropomorphic phantom were used. For both protocols, the value of PKA was evaluated using a PTW Diamentor E2 meter and the multimeter Radcal Rapidose system. The results obtained for the effective dose/PKA were separated by protocol image. [GX1]: 44.5µSv/478mGycm(2); [GX2]: 54.8µSv/507mGycm(2). Although the ratio of the diameters (14cm/8.5cm)=1.65, the ratio of effective dose values (44.5µSv/54.8µSv)=0.81, that is, the effective dose of the protocol with extended diameter is 19% smaller. The PKA values reveal very similar results between the two protocols. For the cases where the scanner uses an asymmetric beam to obtain images with large diameters that cover the entire face, there are advantages from the point of view of reducing the exposure of patients when compared to the use of symmetrical beam and/or to FOV images with a smaller diameter.

  2. AIRS radiometric calibration validation for climate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Elliott, Denis; Gaiser, Steve; Gregorich, Dave; Broberg, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Climate research using data from satellite based radiometers makes extreme demands on the traceability and stability of the radiometric calibration. The selection of a cooled grating array spectrometer for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, AIRS, is key, but does not ensured that AIRS data will be of climate quality. Additional design features, plus additional pre-launch testing, and extensive on-orbit calibration subsystem monitoring beyond what would suffice for application of the data to weather forecasting were required to ensure the radiometric data quality required for climate research. Validation that climate data quality are being generated makes use of the sea surface skin temperatures (SST and (obs-calc).

  3. Poster — Thur Eve — 24: Commissioning and preliminary measurements using an Attix-style free air ionization chamber for air kerma measurements on the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D; McEwen, M; Shen, H; Siegbahn, EA; Fallone, BG; Warkentin, B

    2014-08-15

    Synchrotron facilities, including the Canadian Light Source (CLS), provide opportunities for the development of novel imaging and therapy applications. A vital step progressing these applications toward clinical trials is the availability of accurate dosimetry. In this study, a refurbished Attix-style (cylindrical) free air chamber (FAC) is tested and used for preliminary air kerma measurements on the two BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamlines at the CLS. The FAC consists of a telescoping chamber that relies on a difference measurement of collected charge in expanded and collapsed configurations. At the National Research Council's X-ray facility, a Victoreen Model 480 FAC was benchmarked against two primary standard FACs. The results indicated an absolute accuracy at the 0.5% level for energies between 60 and 150 kVp. A series of measurements were conducted on the small, non-uniform X-ray beams of the 05B1-1 (∼8 – 100 keV) and 05ID-2 (∼20 – 200 keV) beamlines for a variety of energies, filtrations and beam sizes. For the 05B1-1 beam with 1.1 mm of Cu filtration, recombination corrections of less than 5 % could only be achieved for field sizes no greater than 0.5 mm × 0.6 mm (corresponding to an air kerma rate of ∼ 57 Gy/min). Ionic recombination thus presents a significant challenge to obtaining accurate air kerma rate measurements using this FAC in these high intensity beams. Future work includes measurements using a smaller aperture to sample a smaller and thus more uniform beam area, as well as experimental and Monte Carlo-based investigation of correction factors.

  4. Practical method for determination of air kerma by use of an ionization chamber toward construction of a secondary X-ray field to be used in clinical examination rooms.

    PubMed

    Maehata, Itsumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Takegami, Kazuki; Okino, Hiroki; Kanazawa, Yuki; Tominaga, Masahide

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new practical method for the construction of an accurate secondary X-ray field using medical diagnostic X-ray equipment. For accurate measurement of the air kerma of an X-ray field, it is important to reduce and evaluate the contamination rate of scattered X-rays. To determine the rate quantitatively, we performed the following studies. First, we developed a shield box in which an ionization chamber could be set at an inner of the box to prevent detection of the X-rays scattered from the air. In addition, we made collimator plates which were placed near the X-ray source for estimation of the contamination rate by scattered X-rays from the movable diaphragm which is a component of the X-ray equipment. Then, we measured the exposure dose while changing the collimator plates, which had diameters of 25-90 mm(ϕ). The ideal value of the exposure dose was derived mathematically by extrapolation to 0 mm(ϕ). Tube voltages ranged from 40 to 130 kV. Under these irradiation conditions, we analyzed the contamination rate by the scattered X-rays. We found that the contamination rates were less than 1.7 and 2.3 %, caused by air and the movable diaphragm, respectively. The extrapolated value of the exposure dose has been determined to have an uncertainty of 0.7 %. The ionization chamber used in this study was calibrated with an accuracy of 5 %. Using this kind of ionization chamber, we can construct a secondary X-ray field with an uncertainty of 5 %.

  5. Radiological investigations at the "Taiga" nuclear explosion site, part II: man-made γ-ray emitting radionuclides in the ground and the resultant kerma rate in air.

    PubMed

    Ramzaev, V; Repin, V; Medvedev, A; Khramtsov, E; Timofeeva, M; Yakovlev, V

    2012-07-01

    Samples of soil and epigeic lichens were collected from the "Taiga" peaceful nuclear explosion site (61.30°N 56.60°E, the Perm region, Russia) in 2009 and analyzed using high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. For soil samples obtained at six different plots, two products of fission ((137)Cs and (155)Eu), five products of neutron activation ((60)Co, (94)Nb, (152)Eu, (154)Eu, (207)Bi) and (241)Am have been identified and quantified. The maximal activity concentrations of (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am for the soils samples were measured as 1650, 7100, and 6800 Bq kg(-1) (d.w.), respectively. The deposit of (137)Cs for the top 20 cm of soil on the tested plots at the "Taiga" site ranged from 30 to 1020 kBq m(-2); the maximal value greatly (by almost 3 orders of magnitude) exceeded the regional background (from global fallout) level of 1.4 kBq m(-2). (137)Cs contributes approximately 57% of the total ground inventory of the man-made γ-ray emitters for the six plots tested at the "Taiga" site. The other major radionuclides -(241)Am and (60)Co, constitute around 40%. Such radionuclides as (60)Co, (137)Cs, (241)Am, and (207)Bi have also been determined for the epigeic lichens (genera Cladonia) that colonized certain areas at the ground lip produced by the "Taiga" explosion. Maximal activity concentrations (up to 80 Bq kg(-1) for (60)Co, 580 Bq kg(-1) for (137)Cs, 200 Bq kg(-1) for (241)Am, and 5 Bq kg(-1) for (207)Bi; all are given in terms of d.w.) have been detected for the lower dead section of the organisms. The air kerma rates associated with the anthropogenic sources of gamma radiation have been calculated using the data obtained from the laboratory analysis. For the six plots tested, the kerma rates ranged from 50 to 1200 nGy h(-1); on average, 51% of the dose can be attributed to (137)Cs and 45% to (60)Co. These estimates agree reasonably well with the results of the in situ measurements made during our field survey of the "Taiga" site in August

  6. Modelling the contribution of individual radionuclides to the total gamma air kerma rate for the sediments of the Ribble Estuary, NW England.

    PubMed

    Brown, J E; McDonald, P; Williams, M; Parker, A; Rae, J E

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to test the performance of a published dose-rate model, investigate the contribution of individual radionuclides to the total gamma air kerma rate (GAKR) and derive external doses to man in the Ribble Estuary, NW England. GAKRs were measured and sediment cores were collected in order to determine radionuclide specific activities with depth. The latter values were used as input data for the external dose-rate model. The model has a slight tendency to over-predict the GAKR, but, on average, the model predictions fall within +/-26% of the measured value. Improvements, in the present case, might be made by accounting for core shortening and variations in soil density in the input data. The model predicted that, for exposed intertidal mud sites, a range of GAKRs between 0.011 and 0.022 microGy h(-1) was attributable to Springfields discharges alone. The contribution due to 234mPa and 234Th ranged between 20 and 60%. An excess GAKR (GAKR arising from anthropogenic emissions alone) of 0.139-0.150 microGy h(-1), used in conjunction with relevant habit-survey data (for a potential critical group) and conversion factors, yielded a dose to man of 0.029-0.031 mSv year(-1).

  7. Calibrated infrared ground/air radiometric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, J. K.; Schildkraut, Elliot Robert; Bauldree, Russell S.; Goodrich, Shawn M.

    1996-06-01

    The calibrated infrared ground/air radiometric spectrometer (CIGARS) is a new high performance, multi-purpose, multi- platform Fourier transform spectrometer (FPS) sensor. It covers the waveband from 0.2 to 12 micrometer, has spectral resolution as fine as 0.3 cm-1, and records over 100 spectra per second. Two CIGARS units are being used for observations of target signatures in the air or on the ground from fixed or moving platforms, including high performance jet aircraft. In this paper we describe the characteristics and capabilities of the CIGARS sensor, which uses four interchangeable detector modules (Si, InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe) and two optics modules, with internal calibration. The data recording electronics support observations of transient events, even without precise information on the timing of the event. We present test and calibration data on the sensitivity, spectral resolution, stability, and spectral rate of CIGARS, and examples of in- flight observations of real targets. We also discuss plans for adapting CIGARS for imaging spectroscopy observations, with simultaneous spectral and spatial data, by replacing the existing detectors with a focal plane array (FPA).

  8. Mammography calibration qualities establishment in a Mo- Mo clinical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, E. L.; dos Santos, L. R.; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M. P. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study the mammography calibration qualities were established in a clinical mammography system. The objective is to provide the IPEN instruments calibration laboratory with both mammography calibration methods (using a clinical and an industrial system). The results showed a good behavior of mammography equipment, in terms of kVp, PPV and exposure time. The additional filtration of molybdenum is adequate, air-kerma rates were determined and spectra were obtained.

  9. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M; Lavallee, Robert L; Roskopf, Marsha L; Scalzetti, Ernest M

    2011-10-01

    To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom. A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K(CT) at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R(K)) as K∕ K(CT), which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R(K) values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. At 120 kV, median R(K) values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R(K) values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R(K) values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R(K) for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 ± 0.08. Average R(K) values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R(K) values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R(K) values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R(K) values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R(K) value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R(K) value by 9%. In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the isocenter (free in air). Conversion from in-patient air KERMA values to tissue dose would

  10. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K3 of the air-kerma standards of the VSL, The Netherlands and the BIPM in medium-energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. T.; Kessler, C.; de Pooter, J. A.; Jansen, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    A key comparison has been made between the air-kerma standards of the VSL, The Netherlands and the BIPM in the medium-energy x-ray range. The results show the standards to be in agreement at the level of the standard uncertainty of the comparison of 3.2 parts in 103. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. Air data position-error calibration using state reconstruction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, S. A.; Larson, T. J.; Ehernberger, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    During the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) flight test program recently completed at NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility, numerous problems were experienced in airspeed calibration. This necessitated the use of state reconstruction techniques to arrive at a position-error calibration. For the HiMAT aircraft, most of the calibration effort was expended on flights in which the air data pressure transducers were not performing accurately. Following discovery of this problem, the air data transducers of both aircraft were wrapped in heater blankets to correct the problem. Additional calibration flights were performed, and from the resulting data a satisfactory position-error calibration was obtained. This calibration and data obtained before installation of the heater blankets were used to develop an alternate calibration method. The alternate approach took advantage of high-quality inertial data that was readily available. A linearized Kalman filter (LKF) was used to reconstruct the aircraft's wind-relative trajectory; the trajectory was then used to separate transducer measurement errors from the aircraft position error. This calibration method is accurate and inexpensive. The LKF technique has an inherent advantage of requiring that no flight maneuvers be specially designed for airspeed calibrations. It is of particular use when the measurements of the wind-relative quantities are suspected to have transducer-related errors.

  12. A practical implementation of the 2010 IPEM high dose rate brachytherapy code of practice for the calibration of 192Ir sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awunor, O. A.; Lecomber, A. R.; Richmond, N.; Walker, C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper details a practical method for deriving the reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient for Farmer NE2571 chambers using the UK Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) code of practice for the determination of the reference air kerma rate for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources based on the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) air kerma standard. The reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient was derived using pressure, temperature and source decay corrected ionization chamber response measurements over three successive 192Ir source clinical cycles. A secondary standard instrument (a Standard Imaging 1000 Plus well chamber) and four tertiary standard instruments (one additional Standard Imaging 1000 Plus well chamber and three Farmer NE2571 chambers housed in a perspex phantom) were used to provide traceability to the NPL primary standard and enable comparison of performance between the chambers. Conservative and optimized estimates on the expanded uncertainties (k = 2) associated with chamber response, ion recombination and reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient were determined. This was seen to be 2.3% and 0.4% respectively for chamber response, 0.2% and 0.08% respectively for ion recombination and 2.6% and 1.2% respectively for the calibration coefficient. No significant change in ion recombination with source decay was observed over the duration of clinical use of the respective 192Ir sources.

  13. A practical implementation of the 2010 IPEM high dose rate brachytherapy code of practice for the calibration of 192Ir sources.

    PubMed

    Awunor, O A; Lecomber, A R; Richmond, N; Walker, C

    2011-08-21

    This paper details a practical method for deriving the reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient for Farmer NE2571 chambers using the U.K. Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) code of practice for the determination of the reference air kerma rate for HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources based on the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) air kerma standard. The reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient was derived using pressure, temperature and source decay corrected ionization chamber response measurements over three successive (192)Ir source clinical cycles. A secondary standard instrument (a Standard Imaging 1000 Plus well chamber) and four tertiary standard instruments (one additional Standard Imaging 1000 Plus well chamber and three Farmer NE2571 chambers housed in a perspex phantom) were used to provide traceability to the NPL primary standard and enable comparison of performance between the chambers. Conservative and optimized estimates on the expanded uncertainties (k = 2) associated with chamber response, ion recombination and reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient were determined. This was seen to be 2.3% and 0.4% respectively for chamber response, 0.2% and 0.08% respectively for ion recombination and 2.6% and 1.2% respectively for the calibration coefficient. No significant change in ion recombination with source decay was observed over the duration of clinical use of the respective 192Ir sources.

  14. Comparison of pencil-type ionization chamber calibration results and methods between dosimetry laboratories.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, Costas J; Büermann, Ludwig; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Csete, Istvan; Delis, Harry; Gomola, Igor; Persson, Linda; Novak, Leos; Petkov, Ivailo; Toroi, Paula

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of calibration results and procedures in terms of air kerma length product, PKL, and air kerma, K, was conducted between eight dosimetry laboratories. A pencil-type ionization chamber (IC), generally used for computed tomography dose measurements, was calibrated according to three calibration methods, while its residual signal and other characteristics (sensitivity profile, active length) were assessed. The results showed that the "partial irradiation method" is the preferred method for the pencil-type IC calibration in terms of PKL and it could be applied by the calibration laboratories successfully. Most of the participating laboratories achieved high level of agreement (>99%) for both dosimetry quantities (PKL and K). Estimated relative standard uncertainties of comparison results vary among laboratories from 0.34% to 2.32% depending on the quantity, beam quality and calibration method applied. Detailed analysis of the assigned uncertainties have been presented and discussed.

  15. Calibration of NASA Turbulent Air Motion Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrick, John D. W.; Ritter, John A.; Watson, Catherine E.; Wynkoop, Mark W.; Quinn, John K.; Norfolk, Daniel R.

    1996-01-01

    A turbulent air motion measurement system (TAMMS) was integrated onboard the Lockheed 188 Electra airplane (designated NASA 429) based at the Wallops Flight Facility in support of the NASA role in global tropospheric research. The system provides air motion and turbulence measurements from an airborne platform which is capable of sampling tropospheric and planetary boundary-layer conditions. TAMMS consists of a gust probe with free-rotating vanes mounted on a 3.7-m epoxy-graphite composite nose boom, a high-resolution inertial navigation system (INS), and data acquisition system. A variation of the tower flyby method augmented with radar tracking was implemented for the calibration of static pressure position error and air temperature probe. Additional flight calibration maneuvers were performed remote from the tower in homogeneous atmospheric conditions. System hardware and instrumentation are described and the calibration procedures discussed. Calibration and flight results are presented to illustrate the overall ability of the system to determine the three-component ambient wind fields during straight and level flight conditions.

  16. Key Comparison APMP.RI(I)-K2 of air kerma standards for the CCRI reference radiation qualities for low-energy x-rays, including a supplementary comparison for the ISO 4037 narrow spectrum series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Saito, N.; Bero, M.; Butler, D.; Mahant, A. K.; Meghzifene, A.; Chu, C. H.; Kadni, T. B.; Jinjie, WU; Soodprasert, T.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison was performed between nine national standards for air kerma for the CCRI radiation qualities from 10 kV to 50 kV (APMP.RI(I)-K2) and for the ISO 4037 narrow spectrum series (15 kV and 40 kV). Among the nine institutes that participated in the comparison, seven institutes were APMP member laboratories. Three commercially available thin window parallel plate ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments and circulated among the participants. The pilot laboratory, the NMIJ/AIST, served also as the link to the corresponding BIPM.RI(I)-K2 comparison. The results show general agreement within the combined uncertainties, although certain results for Nuclear Malaysia, the BARC and the OAP show larger differences. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. AIR KERMA TO Hp(3) CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS FOR IEC 61267 RQR X-RAY RADIATION QUALITIES: APPLICATION TO DOSE MONITORING OF THE LENS OF THE EYE IN MEDICAL DIAGNOSTICS.

    PubMed

    Principi, S; Guardiola, C; Duch, M A; Ginjaume, M

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies highlight the fact that the new eye lens dose limit can be exceeded in interventional radiology procedures and that eye lens monitoring could be required for these workers. The recommended operational quantity for monitoring of eye lens exposure is the personal dose equivalent at 3 mm depth Hp(3) (ICRU 51). However, there are no available conversion coefficients in international standards, while in the literature coefficients have only been calculated for monoenergetic beams and for ISO 4037-1 X-ray qualities. The aim of this article is to provide air kerma to Hp(3) conversion coefficients for a cylindrical phantom made of ICRU-4 elements tissue-equivalent material for RQR radiation qualities (IEC-61267) from 40 to 120 kV and for angles of incidence from 0 to 180°, which are characteristic of medical workplace. Analytic calculations using interpolation techniques and Monte Carlo modelling have been compared. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Calibration of GafChromic XR-RV3 radiochromic film for skin dose measurement using standardized x-ray spectra and a commercial flatbed scanner

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Bradley P.; Speidel, Michael A.; Pike, Tina L.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: In this study, newly formulated XR-RV3 GafChromic film was calibrated with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceability for measurement of patient skin dose during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. Methods: The film was calibrated free-in-air to air kerma levels between 15 and 1100 cGy using four moderately filtered x-ray beam qualities (60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp). The calibration films were scanned with a commercial flatbed document scanner. Film reflective density-to-air kerma calibration curves were constructed for each beam quality, with both the orange and white sides facing the x-ray source. A method to correct for nonuniformity in scanner response (up to 25% depending on position) was developed to enable dose measurement with large films. The response of XR-RV3 film under patient backscattering conditions was examined using on-phantom film exposures and Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The response of XR-RV3 film to a given air kerma depended on kVp and film orientation. For a 200 cGy air kerma exposure with the orange side of the film facing the source, the film response increased by 20% from 60 to 120 kVp. At 500 cGy, the increase was 12%. When 500 cGy exposures were performed with the white side facing the x-ray source, the film response increased by 4.0% (60 kVp) to 9.9% (120 kVp) compared to the orange-facing orientation. On-phantom film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations show that using a NIST-traceable free-in-air calibration curve to determine air kerma in the presence of backscatter results in an error from 2% up to 8% depending on beam quality. The combined uncertainty in the air kerma measurement from the calibration curves and scanner nonuniformity correction was {+-}7.1% (95% C.I.). The film showed notable stability. Calibrations of film and scanner separated by 1 yr differed by 1.0%. Conclusions: XR-RV3 radiochromic film response to a given air kerma shows dependence on beam quality and film

  19. Calibration of GafChromic XR-RV3 radiochromic film for skin dose measurement using standardized x-ray spectra and a commercial flatbed scanner

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Bradley P.; Speidel, Michael A.; Pike, Tina L.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, newly formulated XR-RV3 GafChromic® film was calibrated with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceability for measurement of patient skin dose during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. Methods: The film was calibrated free-in-air to air kerma levels between 15 and 1100 cGy using four moderately filtered x-ray beam qualities (60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp). The calibration films were scanned with a commercial flatbed document scanner. Film reflective density-to-air kerma calibration curves were constructed for each beam quality, with both the orange and white sides facing the x-ray source. A method to correct for nonuniformity in scanner response (up to 25% depending on position) was developed to enable dose measurement with large films. The response of XR-RV3 film under patient backscattering conditions was examined using on-phantom film exposures and Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The response of XR-RV3 film to a given air kerma depended on kVp and film orientation. For a 200 cGy air kerma exposure with the orange side of the film facing the source, the film response increased by 20% from 60 to 120 kVp. At 500 cGy, the increase was 12%. When 500 cGy exposures were performed with the white side facing the x-ray source, the film response increased by 4.0% (60 kVp) to 9.9% (120 kVp) compared to the orange-facing orientation. On-phantom film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations show that using a NIST-traceable free-in-air calibration curve to determine air kerma in the presence of backscatter results in an error from 2% up to 8% depending on beam quality. The combined uncertainty in the air kerma measurement from the calibration curves and scanner nonuniformity correction was ±7.1% (95% C.I.). The film showed notable stability. Calibrations of film and scanner separated by 1 yr differed by 1.0%. Conclusions: XR-RV3 radiochromic film response to a given air kerma shows dependence on beam quality and film

  20. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom.Method: A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K{sub CT} at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R{sub K}) as K/ K{sub CT}, which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R{sub K} values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. Results: At 120 kV, median R{sub K} values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R{sub K} for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 {+-} 0.08. Average R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R{sub K} values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R{sub K} values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R{sub K} value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R{sub K} value by 9%. Conclusions: In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the

  1. Calibration and Data Analysis of the MC-130 Air Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Dennis; Ulbrich, N.

    2012-01-01

    Design, calibration, calibration analysis, and intended use of the MC-130 air balance are discussed. The MC-130 balance is an 8.0 inch diameter force balance that has two separate internal air flow systems and one external bellows system. The manual calibration of the balance consisted of a total of 1854 data points with both unpressurized and pressurized air flowing through the balance. A subset of 1160 data points was chosen for the calibration data analysis. The regression analysis of the subset was performed using two fundamentally different analysis approaches. First, the data analysis was performed using a recently developed extension of the Iterative Method. This approach fits gage outputs as a function of both applied balance loads and bellows pressures while still allowing the application of the iteration scheme that is used with the Iterative Method. Then, for comparison, the axial force was also analyzed using the Non-Iterative Method. This alternate approach directly fits loads as a function of measured gage outputs and bellows pressures and does not require a load iteration. The regression models used by both the extended Iterative and Non-Iterative Method were constructed such that they met a set of widely accepted statistical quality requirements. These requirements lead to reliable regression models and prevent overfitting of data because they ensure that no hidden near-linear dependencies between regression model terms exist and that only statistically significant terms are included. Finally, a comparison of the axial force residuals was performed. Overall, axial force estimates obtained from both methods show excellent agreement as the differences of the standard deviation of the axial force residuals are on the order of 0.001 % of the axial force capacity.

  2. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma for photons using a male adult voxel simulator in sitting and standing posture with geometry of irradiation antero-posterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Cavalcante, F. R.; Carvalho, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    The dose conversion coefficient (DCC) is important to quantify and assess effective doses associated with medical, professional and public exposures. The calculation of DCCs using anthropomorphic simulators and radiation transport codes is justified since in-vivo measurement of effective dose is extremely difficult and not practical for occupational dosimetry. DCCs have been published by the ICRP using simulators in a standing posture, which is not always applicable to all exposure scenarios, providing an inaccurate dose estimation. The aim of this work was to calculate DCCs for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H/Kair) using the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code and the VOXTISS8 adult male voxel simulator in sitting and standing postures. In both postures, the simulator was irradiated by a plane source of monoenergetic photons in antero-posterior (AP) geometry. The photon energy ranged from 15 keV to 2 MeV. The DCCs for both postures were compared and the DCCs for the standing simulator were higher. For certain organs, the difference of DCCs were more significant, as in gonads (48% higher), bladder (16% higher) and colon (11% higher). As these organs are positioned in the abdominal region, the posture of the anthropomorphic simulator modifies the form in which the radiation is transported and how the energy is deposited. It was also noted that the average percentage difference of conversion coefficients was 33% for the bone marrow, 11% for the skin, 13% for the bone surface and 31% for the muscle. For other organs, the percentage difference of the DCCs for both postures was not relevant (less than 5%) due to no anatomical changes in the organs of the head, chest and upper abdomen. We can conclude that is important to obtain DCCs using different postures from those present in the scientific literature.

  3. Comparison of pediatric radiation dose and vessel visibility on angiographic systems using piglets as a surrogate: anti-scatter grid removal vs lower detector air kerma settings with a grid - a preclinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Keith J; Racadio, John M; Abruzzo, Todd A; Johnson, Neil D; Patel, Manish N; Kukreja, Kamlesh U; den Hartog, Mark J H; Hoonaert, Bart P A; Nachabe, Rami A

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to reduce pediatric doses while maintaining or improv-ing image quality scores without removing the grid from X-ray beam. This study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Three piglets (5, 14, and 20 kg) were imaged using six different selectable detector air kerma (Kair) per frame values (100%, 70%, 50%, 35%, 25%, 17.5%) with and without the grid. Number of distal branches visualized with diagnostic confidence relative to the injected vessel defined image quality score. Five pediatric interventional radiologists evaluated all images. Image quality score and piglet Kair were statistically compared using analysis of variance and receiver operating curve analysis to define the preferred dose setting and use of grid for a visibility of 2nd and 3rd order vessel branches. Grid removal reduced both dose to subject and imaging quality by 26%. Third order branches could only be visualized with the grid present; 100% detector Kair was required for smallest pig, while 70% detector Kair was adequate for the two larger pigs. Second order branches could be visualized with grid at 17.5% detector Kair for all three pig sizes. Without the grid, 50%, 35%, and 35% detector Kair were required for smallest to largest pig, respectively. Grid removal reduces both dose and image quality score. Image quality scores can be maintained with less dose to subject with the grid in the beam as opposed to removed. Smaller anatomy requires more dose to the detector to achieve the same image quality score.

  4. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma using a sitting and standing female adult voxel simulators exposure to photons in antero-posterior irradiation geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. R.; Galeano, D. C.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Due to the difficulty in implementing invasive techniques for calculations of dose for some exposure scenarios, computational simulators have been created to represent as realistically as possible the structures of the human body and through radiation transport simulations to obtain conversion coefficients (CCs) to estimate dose. In most published papers simulators are implemented in the standing posture and this may not describe a real scenario of exposure. In this work we developed exposure scenarios in the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code using a female simulator in standing and sitting postures. The simulator was irradiated in the antero-posterior (AP) geometry by a plane source of monoenergetic photons with energy from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (HT/Kair) were calculated for both scenarios and compared. The results show that the percentage difference of CCs for the organs of the head and thorax was not significant (less than 5%) since the anatomic position of the organs is the same in both postures. The percentage difference is more significant to the ovaries (71% for photon energy of 20 keV), to the bladder (39% at 60 keV) and to the uterus (37% at 100 keV) due to different processes of radiation interactions in the legs of the simulator when its posture is changed. For organs and tissues that are distributed throughout the entire body, such as bone (21% at 100 keV) and muscle (30% at 80 keV) the percentage difference of CCs reflects a reduction of interaction of photons with the legs of the simulator. Therefore, the calculation of conversion coefficients using simulators in the sitting posture is relevant for a more accurate dose estimation in real exposures to radiation.

  5. High-Altitude Air Mass Zero Calibration of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Snyder, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Air mass zero calibration of solar cells has been carried out for several years by NASA Glenn Research Center using a Lear-25 aircraft and Langley plots. The calibration flights are carried out during early fall and late winter when the tropopause is at the lowest altitude. Measurements are made starting at about 50,000 feet and continue down to the tropopause. A joint NASA/Wayne State University program called Suntracker is underway to explore the use of weather balloon and communication technologies to characterize solar cells at elevations up to about 100 kft. The balloon flights are low-cost and can be carried out any time of the year. AMO solar cell characterization employing the mountaintop, aircraft and balloon methods are reviewed. Results of cell characterization with the Suntracker are reported and compared with the NASA Glenn Research Center aircraft method.

  6. The US radiation dosimetry standards for 60Co therapy level beams, and the transfer to the AAPM accredited dosimetry calibration laboratories.

    PubMed

    Minniti, R; Chen-Mayer, H; Seltzer, S M; Huq, M Saiful; Bryson, L; Slowey, T; Micka, J A; DeWerd, L A; Wells, N; Hanson, W F; Ibbott, G S

    2006-04-01

    This work reports the transfer of the primary standard for air kerma from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to the secondary laboratories accredited by the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM). This transfer, performed in August of 2003, was motivated by the recent revision of the NIST air-kerma standards for 60Co gamma-ray beams implemented on July 1, 2003. The revision involved a complete recharacterization of the two NIST therapy-level 60Co gamma-ray beam facilities, resulting in new values for the air-kerma rates disseminated by the NIST. Some of the experimental aspects of the determination of the new air-kerma rates are briefly summarized here; the theoretical aspects have been described in detail by Seltzer and Bergstrom ["Changes in the U.S. primary standards for the air-kerma from gamma-ray beams," J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. 108, 359-381 (2003)]. The standard was transferred to reference-class chambers submitted by each of the AAPM Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratories (ADCLs). These secondary-standard instruments were then used to characterize the 60Co gamma-ray beams at the ADCLs. The values of the response (calibration coefficient) of the ADCL secondary-standard ionization chambers are reported and compared to values obtained prior to the change in the NIST air-kerma standards announced on July 1, 2003. The relative change is about 1.1% for all of these chambers, and this value agrees well with the expected change in chambers calibrated at the NIST or at any secondary-standard laboratory traceable to the new NIST standard.

  7. 49 CFR 229.29 - Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... system and for locomotives not equipped with an air compressor and that are semi-permanently coupled and... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and... Inspections and Tests § 229.29 Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing. (a) A locomotive's...

  8. 49 CFR 229.29 - Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... system and for locomotives not equipped with an air compressor and that are semi-permanently coupled and... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and... Inspections and Tests § 229.29 Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing. (a) A locomotive's...

  9. 49 CFR 229.29 - Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... system and for locomotives not equipped with an air compressor and that are semi-permanently coupled and... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and... Inspections and Tests § 229.29 Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing. (a) A locomotive's...

  10. Experimental derivation of wall correction factors for ionization chambers used in high dose rate 192Ir source calibration.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, M H; de Almeida, C E; Ferreira, I H; Sibata, C H

    2002-01-01

    At present there are no specific primary standards for 192Ir high dose rate sources used in brachytherapy. Traceability to primary standards is guaranteed through the method recommended by the AAPM that derives the air kerma calibration factor for the 192Ir gamma rays as the average of the air kerma calibration factors for x-rays and 137Cs gamma-rays or the Maréchal et al. method that uses the energy-weighted air kerma calibration factors for 250 kV x rays and 60Co gamma rays as the air kerma calibration factor for the 192Ir gamma rays. In order to use these methods, it is necessary to use the same buildup cap for all energies and the appropriate wall correction factor for each chamber. This work describes experimental work used to derive the A(W) for four different ionization chambers and different buildup cap materials for the three energies involved in the Maréchal et al. method. The A(W) for the two most common ionization chambers used in hospitals, the Farmer NE 2571 and PTW N30001 is 0.995 and 0.997, respectively, for 250 kV x rays, 0.982 and 0.985 for 192Ir gamma rays, and 0.979 and 0.991 for 60Co gamma rays, all for a PMMA build-up cap of 0.550 gm cm(-2). A comparison between the experimental values and Monte Carlo calculations shows an agreement better than 0.9%. Availability of the A(W) correction factors for all commercial chambers allows users of the in-air calibration jig, provided by the manufacturer, to alternatively use the Maréchal et al. method. Calibration laboratories may also used this method for calibration of a well-type ionization chamber with a comparable accuracy to the AAPM method.

  11. Node-to-node field calibration of wireless distributed air pollution sensor network.

    PubMed

    Kizel, Fadi; Etzion, Yael; Shafran-Nathan, Rakefet; Levy, Ilan; Fishbain, Barak; Bartonova, Alena; Broday, David M

    2017-09-23

    Low-cost air quality sensors offer high-resolution spatiotemporal measurements that can be used for air resources management and exposure estimation. Yet, such sensors require frequent calibration to provide reliable data, since even after a laboratory calibration they might not report correct values when they are deployed in the field, due to interference with other pollutants, as a result of sensitivity to environmental conditions and due to sensor aging and drift. Field calibration has been suggested as a means for overcoming these limitations, with the common strategy involving periodical collocations of the sensors at an air quality monitoring station. However, the cost and complexity involved in relocating numerous sensor nodes back and forth, and the loss of data during the repeated calibration periods make this strategy inefficient. This work examines an alternative approach, a node-to-node (N2N) calibration, where only one sensor in each chain is directly calibrated against the reference measurements and the rest of the sensors are calibrated sequentially one against the other while they are deployed and collocated in pairs. The calibration can be performed multiple times as a routine procedure. This procedure minimizes the total number of sensor relocations, and enables calibration while simultaneously collecting data at the deployment sites. We studied N2N chain calibration and the propagation of the calibration error analytically, computationally and experimentally. The in-situ N2N calibration is shown to be generic and applicable for different pollutants, sensing technologies, sensor platforms, chain lengths, and sensor order within the chain. In particular, we show that chain calibration of three nodes, each calibrated for a week, propagate calibration errors that are similar to those found in direct field calibration. Hence, N2N calibration is shown to be suitable for calibration of distributed sensor networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. A calibration facility to provide traceable calibration to upper air humidity measuring sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccaro, Rugiada; Rosso, Lucia; Smorgon, Denis; Beltramino, Giulio; Fernicola, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Accurate knowledge and high quality measurement of the upper air humidity and of its profile in atmosphere is essential in many areas of the atmospheric research, for example in weather forecasting, environmental pollution studies and research in meteorology and climatology. Moving from the troposphere to the stratosphere, the water vapour amount varies between some percent to few part per million. For this reason, through the years, several methods and instruments have been developed for the measurement of the humidity in atmosphere. Among the instruments used for atmospheric sounding, radiosondes, airborne and balloon-borne chilled mirror hygrometer (CMH) and tunable diode laser absorption spectrometers (TDLAS) play a key role. To avoid the presence of unknown biases and systematic errors and to obtain accurate and reliable humidity measurements, these instruments need a SI-traceable calibration, preferably carried out in conditions similar to those expected in the field. To satisfy such a need, a new calibration facility has been developed at INRIM. The facility is based on a thermodynamic-based frost-point generator designed to achieve a complete saturation of the carrier gas with a single passage through an isothermal saturator. The humidity generator covers the frost point temperature range between -98 °C and -20 °C and is able to work at any controlled pressure between 200 hPa and 1000 hPa (corresponding to a barometric altitude between ground level and approximately 12000 m). The paper reports the work carried out to test the generator performances, discusses the results and presents the evaluation of the measurement uncertainty. The present work was carried out within the European Joint Research Project "MeteoMet 2 - Metrology for Essential Climate Variables" co-funded by the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP). The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union.

  13. Calibration Methods for Air Coupled Antennas - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marecos, Vânia; Solla, Mercedes; Fontul, Simona; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the comparison of different methods for calibrating air coupled antennas: Coring, Surface Reflection Method (SRM) and Common Mid-Point (CMP) through the analysis of GPR data collected in a test site with different pavement solutions. Research activities have been carried out during a Short Term Scientific Mission (STSM) funded by the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" in December 2015. The use of GPR in transport infrastructures represents one of the most significant advances for obtaining continuous data along the road, with the advantage of operation at traffic speed and being a non-destructive technique. Its main application has been the evaluation of layer thickness. For the determination of layer thickness, it is necessary to know the velocity of the signal, which depends on the dielectric constant of the material, and the two-way travel time of the reflected signal that is recorded by the GPR system. The calculation of the dielectric value of the materials can be done using different approaches such as: using fixed values based on experience, laboratory determination of dielectric values, applying the SRM, performing back calculation from ground truth references such as cores and test pits, or using the CMP method. The problem with using ground truth is that it is time consuming, labour intensive and intrusive to traffic, in addition, a drill core is not necessarily representative of the whole surveyed area. Regarding the surface reflection technique, one of the problems is that it only measures the dielectric value from the layer surface and not from the whole layer. Recent works already started to address some of these challenges proposing new approaches for GPR layer thickness measurements using multiple antennas to calculate the average dielectric value of the asphalt layer, taking advantage of significant hardware improvements in GPR

  14. Calibration of Air Thermometers in a Climatic Chamber and Liquid Baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žužek, Vincencij; Pušnik, Igor

    2017-07-01

    The paper deals with calibration of digital indication thermometers designed for air temperature measurements. These were calibrated by comparison with a reference thermometer in two different calibration media: in the air when a climatic chamber was used and in a liquid when a calibration bath was used. The main difference between the media was thermal conductivity, which was more than ten times lower in the air. To compare both methods, we calibrated two sets of air thermometers twice. The first set comprised of small temperature loggers with an internal sensor, whereas the second set was a group of temperature probes connected to the measurement unit. The temperature ranges for the loggers were from 0°C to 40°C and for the probes from -20°C to 60°C. The results showed that the measured temperature errors were smaller in the bath as well as less scattered. Furthermore, the assigned measurement uncertainty was lower, if calibration was performed in a calibration bath, mostly due to better thermal homogeneity of a liquid compared to the air in a climatic chamber. Calibration shall assure traceability of a measurement equipment in such a way that a calibration procedure simulates an actual use of equipment; otherwise, the corrections and associated measurement uncertainty could be misleading. Therefore, when air thermometers, which are designed to measure a gaseous medium, are calibrated, they should be calibrated under similar conditions as they are used. The paper presents the differences in results of calibration of air thermometers under different calibration conditions.

  15. Measurement of the ambient gamma dose equivalent and kerma from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter and the small 60Co source at 2 meters

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W. F.

    2015-07-30

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 100 cm from the 252Cf source and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 200 cm from the 60Co source for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). An Exradin A6 ion chamber with Shonka air-equivalent plastic walls in combination with a Supermax electrometer were used to measure the exposure rate and free-in-air kerma rate of the two sources at the requested distances. The measured gamma exposure, kerma, and dose equivalent rates are tabulated.

  16. Source geometry factors for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations.

    PubMed

    Shipley, D R; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F

    2015-03-21

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated (192)Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR (192)Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, k(sg), is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR (192)Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR (192)Ir Flexisource k(sg) was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  17. Rapid Analysis, Self-Calibrating Array for Air Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Lara, Liana; Huerta, Ramon; Vergara, Alexander; Muezzinoglua, Mehmet K.

    2012-01-01

    Human space missions have critical needs for monitoring and control for life support systems. These systems have monitoring needs that include feedback for closed loop processes and quality control for environmental factors. Sensors and monitoring technologies assure that the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew habitat fall within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the more distant the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. The lifetime of the calibration, for some analytes, was as long as 24 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will include sensor response time in the analysis. The preliminary array analysis for two analytes shows that the analysis time, of an event, can be dropped from 45 minutes to less than10 minutes and array training time can be cut substantially. We will describe the lifetime testing of an array and show lifetime data on individual sensors. This progress will lead to more rapid identification of analytes, and faster training time of the array.

  18. Rapid Analysis, Self-Calibrating Array for Air Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Lara, Liana; Huerta, Ramon; Vergara, Alexander; Muezzinoglua, Mehmet K.

    2012-01-01

    Human space missions have critical needs for monitoring and control for life support systems. These systems have monitoring needs that include feedback for closed loop processes and quality control for environmental factors. Sensors and monitoring technologies assure that the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew habitat fall within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the more distant the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. The lifetime of the calibration, for some analytes, was as long as 24 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will include sensor response time in the analysis. The preliminary array analysis for two analytes shows that the analysis time, of an event, can be dropped from 45 minutes to less than10 minutes and array training time can be cut substantially. We will describe the lifetime testing of an array and show lifetime data on individual sensors. This progress will lead to more rapid identification of analytes, and faster training time of the array.

  19. Development and calibration of an air-floating six-axis force measurement platform using self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin; Wang, Xiaomeng; Li, Chengwei; Yi, Jiajing; Lu, Rongsheng; Tao, Jiayue

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design, working principle, as well as calibration of an air-floating six-axis force measurement platform, where the floating plate and nozzles were connected without contact, preventing inter-dimensional coupling and increasing precision significantly. The measurement repeatability error of the force size in the platform is less than 0.2% full scale (FS), which is significantly better than the precision of 1% FS in the six-axis force sensors on the current market. We overcame the difficulties of weight loading device in high-precision calibration by proposing a self-calibration method based on the floating plate gravity and met the calibration precision requirement of 0.02% FS. This study has general implications for the development and calibration of high-precision multi-axis force sensors. In particular, the air-floating six-axis force measurement platform could be applied to the calibration of some special sensors such as flexible tactile sensors and may be used as a micro-nano mechanical assembly platform for real-time assembly force testing.

  20. Development and calibration of an air-floating six-axis force measurement platform using self-calibration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Wang, Xiaomeng; Li, Chengwei; Yi, Jiajing; Lu, Rongsheng; Tao, Jiayue

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design, working principle, as well as calibration of an air-floating six-axis force measurement platform, where the floating plate and nozzles were connected without contact, preventing inter-dimensional coupling and increasing precision significantly. The measurement repeatability error of the force size in the platform is less than 0.2% full scale (FS), which is significantly better than the precision of 1% FS in the six-axis force sensors on the current market. We overcame the difficulties of weight loading device in high-precision calibration by proposing a self-calibration method based on the floating plate gravity and met the calibration precision requirement of 0.02% FS. This study has general implications for the development and calibration of high-precision multi-axis force sensors. In particular, the air-floating six-axis force measurement platform could be applied to the calibration of some special sensors such as flexible tactile sensors and may be used as a micro-nano mechanical assembly platform for real-time assembly force testing.

  1. Calibration of the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, B. W., Jr.; Runckel, J. F.; Igoe, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal (plenum suction) was calibrated to a Mach number of 1.3. The results of the calibration, including the effects of slot shape modifications, test section wall divergence, and water vapor condensation, are presented. A complete description of the wind tunnel and its auxiliary equipment is included.

  2. Energy dependent calibration of XR-QA2 radiochromic film with monochromatic and polychromatic x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lillo, F.; Mettivier, G. Sarno, A.; Russo, P.; Tromba, G.; Tomic, N.; Devic, S.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: This work investigates the energy response and dose-response curve determinations for XR-QA2 radiochromic film dosimetry system used for synchrotron radiation work and for quality assurance in diagnostic radiology, in the range of effective energies 18–46.5 keV. Methods: Pieces of XR-QA2 films were irradiated, in a plane transverse to the beam axis, with a monochromatic beam of energy in the range 18–40 keV at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy) and with a polychromatic beam from a laboratory x-ray tube operated at 80, 100, and 120 kV. The film calibration curve was expressed as air kerma (measured free-in-air with an ionization chamber) versus the net optical reflectance change (netΔR) derived from the red channel of the RGB scanned film image. Four functional relationships (rational, linear exponential, power, and logarithm) were tested to evaluate the best curve for fitting the calibration data. The adequacy of the various fitting functions was tested by using the uncertainty analysis and by assessing the average of the absolute air kerma error calculated as the difference between calculated and delivered air kerma. The sensitivity of the film was evaluated as the ratio of the change in net reflectance to the corresponding air kerma. Results: The sensitivity of XR-QA2 films increased in the energy range 18–39 keV, with a maximum variation of about 170%, and decreased in the energy range 38–46.5 keV. The present results confirmed and extended previous findings by this and other groups, as regards the dose response of the radiochromic film XR-QA2 to monochromatic and polychromatic x-ray beams, respectively. Conclusions: The XR-QA2 radiochromic film response showed a strong dependence on beam energy for both monochromatic and polychromatic beams in the range of half value layer values from 0.55 to 6.1 mm Al and corresponding effective energies from 18 to 46.5 keV. In this range, the film response varied by 170%, from a

  3. Energy dependent calibration of XR-QA2 radiochromic film with monochromatic and polychromatic x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Di Lillo, F; Mettivier, G; Sarno, A; Tromba, G; Tomic, N; Devic, S; Russo, P

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the energy response and dose-response curve determinations for XR-QA2 radiochromic film dosimetry system used for synchrotron radiation work and for quality assurance in diagnostic radiology, in the range of effective energies 18-46.5 keV. Pieces of XR-QA2 films were irradiated, in a plane transverse to the beam axis, with a monochromatic beam of energy in the range 18-40 keV at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy) and with a polychromatic beam from a laboratory x-ray tube operated at 80, 100, and 120 kV. The film calibration curve was expressed as air kerma (measured free-in-air with an ionization chamber) versus the net optical reflectance change (netΔR) derived from the red channel of the RGB scanned film image. Four functional relationships (rational, linear exponential, power, and logarithm) were tested to evaluate the best curve for fitting the calibration data. The adequacy of the various fitting functions was tested by using the uncertainty analysis and by assessing the average of the absolute air kerma error calculated as the difference between calculated and delivered air kerma. The sensitivity of the film was evaluated as the ratio of the change in net reflectance to the corresponding air kerma. The sensitivity of XR-QA2 films increased in the energy range 18-39 keV, with a maximum variation of about 170%, and decreased in the energy range 38-46.5 keV. The present results confirmed and extended previous findings by this and other groups, as regards the dose response of the radiochromic film XR-QA2 to monochromatic and polychromatic x-ray beams, respectively. The XR-QA2 radiochromic film response showed a strong dependence on beam energy for both monochromatic and polychromatic beams in the range of half value layer values from 0.55 to 6.1 mm Al and corresponding effective energies from 18 to 46.5 keV. In this range, the film response varied by 170%, from a minimum sensitivity of 0.0127 to a maximum

  4. Field calibration of two types of microphones in hyperbaric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul F.; Carpenter, Susan; Green, John

    1990-01-01

    The response of two microphones, one a condenser microphone and the other a diaphragm-activated piezoelectric ceramic microphone, were measured in compressed air at pressures as great as 810 kilopascals (8 atmospheres). The response of each microphone was compared to that of a hydrophone operated in air as a microphone. The results show that the two types of microphone respond similarly to high ambient pressure. Both types are less sensitive to sound pressure in compressed air than in air at normal pressures, and the frequency responses of both microphones are altered. The results are useful in the analyses of ambient noise measurements done during experiments in compressed air.

  5. Kerma factors for use in 37-group neutron spectrum calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, G. H.; Bice, W. S., Jr.

    1983-12-01

    Neutron kerma factors have been regrouped from the format of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 26 (ICRU-26) to supplement those available in the 37-group format of the Oak Ridge Data Library Collection 31 (DLC-31). Lists of regrouped neutron kerma factors are presented for eight elements and for seven compounds and mixtures. For several elements, disagreements in excess of 15% were observed between those neutron kerma factors available in DLC-31 and the regrouped neutron kerma factors of ICRU-26.

  6. Calibration of nozzle for air mass flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Jan; Kanta, Lukáš

    2017-09-01

    The effort to make calibration measurement of mass flow through a nozzle was not satisfying. Traversing across the pipe radius with Pitot probe was done. The presence of overshoot behind the bend in the pipe was found. The overshoot led to an asymmetric velocity profile.

  7. Practical calibration curve of small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter for evaluation of entrance skin dose in the diagnostic X-ray region.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Maehata, Itsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Tohru; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2015-07-01

    For X-ray diagnosis, the proper management of the entrance skin dose (ESD) is important. Recently, a small-type optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (nanoDot OSL dosimeter) was made commercially available by Landauer, and it is hoped that it will be used for ESD measurements in clinical settings. Our objectives in the present study were to propose a method for calibrating the ESD measured with the nanoDot OSL dosimeter and to evaluate its accuracy. The reference ESD is assumed to be based on an air kerma with consideration of a well-known back scatter factor. We examined the characteristics of the nanoDot OSL dosimeter using two experimental conditions: a free air irradiation to derive the air kerma, and a phantom experiment to determine the ESD. For evaluation of the ability to measure the ESD, a calibration curve for the nanoDot OSL dosimeter was determined in which the air kerma and/or the ESD measured with an ionization chamber were used as references. As a result, we found that the calibration curve for the air kerma was determined with an accuracy of 5 %. Furthermore, the calibration curve was applied to the ESD estimation. The accuracy of the ESD obtained was estimated to be 15 %. The origin of these uncertainties was examined based on published papers and Monte-Carlo simulation. Most of the uncertainties were caused by the systematic uncertainty of the reading system and the differences in efficiency corresponding to different X-ray energies.

  8. Four Years of Absolutely Calibrated Hyperspectral Data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the Eos Aqua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Broberg, Steve; Elliott, Denis; Gregorich, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews four years of absolute calibration of hyperspectral data from the AIRS instrument located on the EOS AQUA spacecraft. The following topics are discussed: 1) A quick overview of AIRS; 2) What absolute calibration accuracy and stability are required for climate applications?; 3) Validating of radiance accuracy and stability: Results from four years of AIRS data; and 4) Conclusions.

  9. The calibration and flight test performance of the space shuttle orbiter air data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, A. S.; Mena, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle air data system (ADS) is used by the guidance, navigation and control system (GN&C) to guide the vehicle to a safe landing. In addition, postflight aerodynamic analysis requires a precise knowledge of flight conditions. Since the orbiter is essentially an unpowered vehicle, the conventional methods of obtaining the ADS calibration were not available; therefore, the calibration was derived using a unique and extensive wind tunnel test program. This test program included subsonic tests with a 0.36-scale orbiter model, transonic and supersonic tests with a smaller 0.2-scale model, and numerous ADS probe-alone tests. The wind tunnel calibration was further refined with subsonic results from the approach and landing test (ALT) program, thus producing the ADS calibration for the orbital flight test (OFT) program. The calibration of the Space Shuttle ADS and its performance during flight are discussed in this paper. A brief description of the system is followed by a discussion of the calibration methodology, and then by a review of the wind tunnel and flight test programs. Finally, the flight results are presented, including an evaluation of the system performance for on-board systems use and a description of the calibration refinements developed to provide the best possible air data for postflight analysis work.

  10. Calibration of a system for measuring low air flow velocity in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krach, Andrzej; Kruczkowski, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the calibration of a system for measuring air flow velocity in a wind tunnel with a multiple-hole orifice. The comparative method was applied for the calibration. The method consists in equalising the air flow velocity in a test section of the tunnel with that of the hot-wire anemometer probe which should then read zero value. The hot-wire anemometer probe moves reciprocally in the tunnel test section with a constant velocity, aligned and opposite to the air velocity. Air velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that the minimum values of a periodic hot-wire anemometer signal displayed on an oscilloscope screen reach the lowest position (the minimum method). A sinusoidal component can be superimposed to the probe constant velocity. Then, the air flow velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that, when the probe moves in the direction of air flow, only the second harmonic of the periodically variable velocity superimposed on the constant velocity (second harmonic method) remains at the output of the low-pass filter to which the hot-wire anemometer signal, displayed on the oscilloscope screen, is supplied. The velocity of the uniform motion of the hot-wire anemometer probe is measured with a magnetic linear encoder. The calibration of the system for the measurement of low air velocities in the wind tunnel was performed in the following steps: 1. Calibration of the linear encoder for the measurement of the uniform motion velocity of the hot-wire anemometer probe in the test section of the tunnel. 2. Calibration of the system for measurement of low air velocities with a multiple-hole orifice for the velocities of 0.1 and 0.25 m s-1: - (a) measurement of the probe movement velocity setting; - (b) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel test section with comparison according to the second harmonic method; - (c) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel with comparison according to the minimum method. The calibration

  11. A likelihood method to cross-calibrate air-shower detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembinski, Hans Peter; Kégl, Balázs; Mariş, Ioana C.; Roth, Markus; Veberič, Darko

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed statistical treatment of the energy calibration of hybrid air-shower detectors, which combine a surface detector array and a fluorescence detector, to obtain an unbiased estimate of the calibration curve. The special features of calibration data from air showers prevent unbiased results, if a standard least-squares fit is applied to the problem. We develop a general maximum-likelihood approach, based on the detailed statistical model, to solve the problem. Our approach was developed for the Pierre Auger Observatory, but the applied principles are general and can be transferred to other air-shower experiments, even to the cross-calibration of other observables. Since our general likelihood function is expensive to compute, we derive two approximations with significantly smaller computational cost. In the recent years both have been used to calibrate data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We demonstrate that these approximations introduce negligible bias when they are applied to simulated toy experiments, which mimic realistic experimental conditions.

  12. Understanding Air Transportation Market Dynamics Using a Search Algorithm for Calibrating Travel Demand and Price

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vivek; Horio, Brant M.; DeCicco, Anthony H.; Hasan, Shahab; Stouffer, Virginia L.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a search algorithm based framework to calibrate origin-destination (O-D) market specific airline ticket demands and prices for the Air Transportation System (ATS). This framework is used for calibrating an agent based model of the air ticket buy-sell process - Airline Evolutionary Simulation (Airline EVOS) -that has fidelity of detail that accounts for airline and consumer behaviors and the interdependencies they share between themselves and the NAS. More specificially, this algorithm simultaneous calibrates demand and airfares for each O-D market, to within specified threshold of a pre-specified target value. The proposed algorithm is illustrated with market data targets provided by the Transportation System Analysis Model (TSAM) and Airline Origin and Destination Survey (DB1B). Although we specify these models and datasources for this calibration exercise, the methods described in this paper are applicable to calibrating any low-level model of the ATS to some other demand forecast model-based data. We argue that using a calibration algorithm such as the one we present here to synchronize ATS models with specialized forecast demand models, is a powerful tool for establishing credible baseline conditions in experiments analyzing the effects of proposed policy changes to the ATS.

  13. Calibrating Personal Air Monitoring. Module 7. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on calibrating personal air monitoring devices. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming each part of the…

  14. Long-term calibration monitoring of Spectralon diffusers BRDF in the air-ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Georgi T; Butler, James J

    2007-11-10

    Long-term calibration monitoring of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of Spectralon diffusers in the air-ultraviolet is presented. Four Spectralon diffusers were monitored in this study. Three of the diffusers, designated as H1, H2, and H3, were used in the prelaunch radiance calibration of the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet/2 (SBUV/2) satellite instruments on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 14 and 16. A fourth diffuser, designated as the 400 diffuser, was used in the prelaunch calibration of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument scheduled for initial flight in 2009 on the National Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project. The BRDF data of this study were obtained between 1994 and 2005 using the scatterometer located in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Diffuser Calibration Laboratory. The diffusers were measured at 13 wavelengths between 230 and 425 nm at the incident and scatter angles used in the prelaunch calibrations of SBUV/2 and OMPS. Spectral features in the BRDF of Spectralon are also discussed. The comparison shows how the air-ultraviolet BRDF of these Spectralon samples changed over time under clean room deployment conditions.

  15. Long-term calibration monitoring of Spectralon diffusers BRDF in the air-ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.

    2007-11-01

    Long-term calibration monitoring of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of Spectralon diffusers in the air-ultraviolet is presented. Four Spectralon diffusers were monitored in this study. Three of the diffusers, designated as H1, H2, and H3, were used in the prelaunch radiance calibration of the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet/2 (SBUV/2) satellite instruments on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 14 and 16. A fourth diffuser, designated as the 400 diffuser, was used in the prelaunch calibration of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument scheduled for initial flight in 2009 on the National Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project. The BRDF data of this study were obtained between 1994 and 2005 using the scatterometer located in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Diffuser Calibration Laboratory. The diffusers were measured at 13 wavelengths between 230 and 425 nm at the incident and scatter angles used in the prelaunch calibrations of SBUV/2 and OMPS. Spectral features in the BRDF of Spectralon are also discussed. The comparison shows how the air-ultraviolet BRDF of these Spectralon samples changed over time under clean room deployment conditions.

  16. Matrix Factorisation-based Calibration For Air Quality Crowd-sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorffer, Clement; Puigt, Matthieu; Delmaire, Gilles; Roussel, Gilles; Rouvoy, Romain; Sagnier, Isabelle

    2017-04-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) is extending internet to physical objects and places. The internet-enabled objects are thus able to communicate with each other and with their users. One main interest of IoT is the ease of production of huge masses of data (Big Data) using distributed networks of connected objects, thus making possible a fine-grained yet accurate analysis of physical phenomena. Mobile crowdsensing is a way to collect data using IoT. It basically consists of acquiring geolocalized data from the sensors (from or connected to the mobile devices, e.g., smartphones) of a crowd of volunteers. The sensed data are then collectively shared using wireless connection—such as GSM or WiFi—and stored on a dedicated server to be processed. One major application of mobile crowdsensing is environment monitoring. Indeed, with the proliferation of miniaturized yet sensitive sensors on one hand and, on the other hand, of low-cost microcontrollers/single-card PCs, it is easy to extend the sensing abilities of smartphones. Alongside the conventional, regulated, bulky and expensive instruments used in authoritative air quality stations, it is then possible to create a large-scale mobile sensor network providing insightful information about air quality. In particular, the finer spatial sampling rate due to such a dense network should allow air quality models to take into account local effects such as street canyons. However, one key issue with low-cost air quality sensors is the lack of trust in the sensed data. In most crowdsensing scenarios, the sensors (i) cannot be calibrated in a laboratory before or during their deployment and (ii) might be sparsely or continuously faulty (thus providing outliers in the data). Such issues should be automatically handled from the sensor readings. Indeed, due to the masses of generated data, solving the above issues cannot be performed by experts but requires specific data processing techniques. In this work, we assume that some mobile

  17. Buildup factors and kerma for Al2O3 and SiO2 in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Alım, Bünyamin; Akkuş, Tuba; Güzeldir, Betül

    2017-04-01

    The energy absorption buildup factors (EABF) have been calculated for some thermoluminescent dosimetric materials (Al2O3 and SiO2) in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to the penetration depth of 40 mean free paths (mfp). Also, kerma relative to air has been determined for these materials. It is observed that the energy absorption buildup factors and kerma relative to air depend on the photon energy and chemical content. Also, the energy absorption build up factors are found the highest in intermediate energy whereas the lowest in low- as well as high energies.

  18. Automatic exposure control calibration and optimisation for abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine imaging with an Agfa computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Avery, G.; Balcam, S.; Needler, L.; Joshi, H.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2016-11-01

    The use of three physical image quality metrics, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean effective noise equivalent quanta (eNEQm) have recently been examined by our group for their appropriateness in the calibration of an automatic exposure control (AEC) device for chest radiography with an Agfa computed radiography (CR) imaging system. This study uses the same methodology but investigates AEC calibration for abdomen, pelvis and spine CR imaging. AEC calibration curves were derived using a simple uniform phantom (equivalent to 20 cm water) to ensure each metric was held constant across the tube voltage range. Each curve was assessed for its clinical appropriateness by generating computer simulated abdomen, pelvis and spine images (created from real patient CT datasets) with appropriate detector air kermas for each tube voltage, and grading these against reference images which were reconstructed at detector air kermas correct for the constant detector dose indicator (DDI) curve currently programmed into the AEC device. All simulated images contained clinically realistic projected anatomy and were scored by experienced image evaluators. Constant DDI and CNR curves did not provide optimized performance but constant eNEQm and SNR did, with the latter being the preferred calibration metric given that it is easier to measure in practice. This result was consistent with the previous investigation for chest imaging with AEC devices. Medical physicists may therefore use a simple and easily accessible uniform water equivalent phantom to measure the SNR image quality metric described here when calibrating AEC devices for abdomen, pelvis and spine imaging with Agfa CR systems, in the confidence that clinical image quality will be sufficient for the required clinical task. However, to ensure appropriate levels of detector air kerma the advice of expert image evaluators must be sought.

  19. Automatic exposure control calibration and optimisation for abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine imaging with an Agfa computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Joshi, H; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2016-11-07

    The use of three physical image quality metrics, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean effective noise equivalent quanta (eNEQm) have recently been examined by our group for their appropriateness in the calibration of an automatic exposure control (AEC) device for chest radiography with an Agfa computed radiography (CR) imaging system. This study uses the same methodology but investigates AEC calibration for abdomen, pelvis and spine CR imaging. AEC calibration curves were derived using a simple uniform phantom (equivalent to 20 cm water) to ensure each metric was held constant across the tube voltage range. Each curve was assessed for its clinical appropriateness by generating computer simulated abdomen, pelvis and spine images (created from real patient CT datasets) with appropriate detector air kermas for each tube voltage, and grading these against reference images which were reconstructed at detector air kermas correct for the constant detector dose indicator (DDI) curve currently programmed into the AEC device. All simulated images contained clinically realistic projected anatomy and were scored by experienced image evaluators. Constant DDI and CNR curves did not provide optimized performance but constant eNEQm and SNR did, with the latter being the preferred calibration metric given that it is easier to measure in practice. This result was consistent with the previous investigation for chest imaging with AEC devices. Medical physicists may therefore use a simple and easily accessible uniform water equivalent phantom to measure the SNR image quality metric described here when calibrating AEC devices for abdomen, pelvis and spine imaging with Agfa CR systems, in the confidence that clinical image quality will be sufficient for the required clinical task. However, to ensure appropriate levels of detector air kerma the advice of expert image evaluators must be sought.

  20. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  1. Calibration and operation of continuous air monitors for alpha-emitting radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.J.

    1993-12-31

    Spectrometer-based continuous air monitors have improved our capabilities for detecting aerosols of alpha-emitting radionuclides. This paper describes basic requirements and statistical limitations in the sensitivity of alpha continuous air monitors, and presents a technical basis for selecting the energy window for detection of uranium and plutonium aerosols, correcting for interference from airborne dust, selecting filters with low pressure drop and good front surface collection characteristics, and properly using electroplated calibration sources. Sensitivity limits are described for detecting uranium or plutonium aerosols in the presence of increased concentrations of naturally occurring, alpha-emitting radon progeny radionuclides. Decreasing the lower energy boundary of the detection window from 4.3 MeV to 2.7 MeV improves by a factor of three the detection of plutonium in the presence of dust, while causing minimal additional interference from ambient radon progeny. Selection of the Millipore Fluoropore teflon membrane filter reduces both pressure drop and interference from ambient radon progeny by up to a factor of two. Field collection of ambient radon progeny can be used to verify the proper energy of alpha emissions from electroplated calibration sources. In the absence of energy verification, errors in instrument calibration may result from solid state diffusion of the electroplated calibration radionuclide into the substrate plate.

  2. Tropical SNO comparisons of AIRS and CrIS calibration for windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Evan M.; Aumann, Hartmut H.

    2016-09-01

    AIRS on EOS-Aqua and CrIS on Suomi NPP are two hyperspectral infrared sounders with similar capabilities and orbits, so there is a great opportunity to compare their absolute calibration while they are both in orbit. This insures that long-term climate record can be created by concatenating the two instrument records. There are significant differences in instrument architecture which may lead to subtle differences and complicate attempts to combine the records. We use Tropical Simultaneous Nadir Observations (TSNOs), cases where both instruments are looking nearly at the same place at the same time, to explore the differences. Due to the presence of cold clouds and clear hot desert surface, the data cover a brightness temperature range from 190 K to 340 K. We concentrate on the differences between the mean of the two instruments using atmospheric window channels as function of brightness temperature in 20-K wide bins. With the currently available AIRS and CrIS official calibrated data, radiometric differences as large as 0.3 K are seen at the extreme temperatures. These differences may be reduced in future releases of the AIRS and CrIS calibration.

  3. An Improved Calibration Method for Hydrazine Monitors for the United States Air Force

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, K

    2003-07-07

    This report documents the results of Phase 1 of the ''Air Force Hydrazine Detector Characterization and Calibration Project''. A method for calibrating model MDA 7100 hydrazine detectors in the United States Air Force (AF) inventory has been developed. The calibration system consists of a Kintek 491 reference gas generation system, a humidifier/mixer system which combines the dry reference hydrazine gas with humidified diluent or carrier gas to generate the required humidified reference for calibrations, and a gas sampling interface. The Kintek reference gas generation system itself is periodically calibrated using an ORNL-constructed coulometric titration system to verify the hydrazine concentration of the sample atmosphere in the interface module. The Kintek reference gas is then used to calibrate the hydrazine monitors. Thus, coulometric titration is only used to periodically assess the performance of the Kintek reference gas generation system, and is not required for hydrazine monitor calibrations. One advantage of using coulometric titration for verifying the concentration of the reference gas is that it is a primary standard (if used for simple solutions), thereby guaranteeing, in principle, that measurements will be traceable to SI units (i.e., to the mole). The effect of humidity of the reference gas was characterized by using the results of concentrations determined by coulometric titration to develop a humidity correction graph for the Kintek 491 reference gas generation system. Using this calibration method, calibration uncertainty has been reduced by 50% compared to the current method used to calibrate hydrazine monitors in the Air Force inventory and calibration time has also been reduced by more than 20%. Significant findings from studies documented in this report are the following: (1) The Kintek 491 reference gas generation system (generator, humidifier and interface module) can be used to calibrate hydrazine detectors. (2) The Kintek system output

  4. A flexible tactile sensor calibration method based on an air-bearing six-dimensional force measurement platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin

    2015-07-01

    A number of common issues related to the process of flexible tactile sensor calibration are discussed in this paper, and an estimate of the accuracy of classical calibration methods, as represented by a weight-pulley device, is presented. A flexible tactile sensor calibration method that is based on a six-dimensional force measurement is proposed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A high-accuracy flexible tactile sensor calibration bench based on the air-bearing six-dimensional force measurement principle was developed to achieve a technically challenging measurement accuracy of 2% full scale (FS) for three-dimensional (3D) flexible tactile sensor calibration. The experimental results demonstrate that the accuracy of the air-bearing six-dimensional force measurement platform can reach 0.2% FS. Thus, the system satisfies the 3D flexible tactile sensor calibration requirement of 2% FS.

  5. A flexible tactile sensor calibration method based on an air-bearing six-dimensional force measurement platform.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin

    2015-07-01

    A number of common issues related to the process of flexible tactile sensor calibration are discussed in this paper, and an estimate of the accuracy of classical calibration methods, as represented by a weight-pulley device, is presented. A flexible tactile sensor calibration method that is based on a six-dimensional force measurement is proposed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A high-accuracy flexible tactile sensor calibration bench based on the air-bearing six-dimensional force measurement principle was developed to achieve a technically challenging measurement accuracy of 2% full scale (FS) for three-dimensional (3D) flexible tactile sensor calibration. The experimental results demonstrate that the accuracy of the air-bearing six-dimensional force measurement platform can reach 0.2% FS. Thus, the system satisfies the 3D flexible tactile sensor calibration requirement of 2% FS.

  6. A Calibration Facility for Dew Point in Air up to 1 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, P. A.; Bell, S. A.; Stevens, M.

    2015-12-01

    The provision of primary dew-point standards for humidified air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is well established, and measurement traceability to these standards provides confidence in a vast number of air humidity measurements. However, hygrometers are used industrially at a wide range of pressures. Both the performance of hygrometers and the properties of humid gases are known to vary with gas pressure. The pressure-dependence of gas non-ideality for air-water mixtures (water-vapor enhancement factor) is well enough known at moderate pressures, but there remains a need to characterize hygrometers at the pressure of use. To address this, a humidity calibration capability of wider scope is under development at the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). As an initial stage in the development of this capability, a humidity standard generating air or nitrogen in the dew-point range from -60° C to +10° C, at pressures up to 1 MPa (10 bar) has been validated for the calibration of hygrometers. The expanded uncertainty of the dew-point generator in this range with a coverage factor k= 2 is ± 0.07° C.

  7. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (<0.05 °C) through the use of a heat exchanger. The temperature and total dissolved gas of the water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  8. Software System for the Calibration of X-Ray Measuring Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaytán-Gallardo, E.; Tovar-Muñoz, V. M.; Cruz-Estrada, P.; Vergara-Martínez, F. J.; Rivero-Gutiérrez, T.

    2006-09-01

    A software system that facilities the calibration of X-ray measuring instruments used in medical applications is presented. The Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) of the Nuclear Research National Institute in México (ININ in Spanish), supports activities concerning with ionizing radiations in medical area. One of these activities is the calibration of X-ray measuring instruments, in terms of air kerma or exposure by substitution method in an X-ray beam at a point where the rate has been determined by means of a standard ionization chamber. To automatize this process, a software system has been developed, the calibration system is composed by an X-ray unit, a Dynalizer IIIU X-ray meter by RADCAL, a commercial data acquisition card, the software system and the units to be tested and calibrated. A quality control plan has been applied in the development of the software system, ensuring that quality assurance procedures and standards are being followed.

  9. Software System for the Calibration of X-Ray Measuring Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Gaytan-Gallardo, E.; Tovar-Munoz, V. M.; Cruz-Estrada, P.; Vergara-Martinez, F. J.; Rivero-Gutierrez, T.

    2006-09-08

    A software system that facilities the calibration of X-ray measuring instruments used in medical applications is presented. The Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) of the Nuclear Research National Institute in Mexico (ININ in Spanish), supports activities concerning with ionizing radiations in medical area. One of these activities is the calibration of X-ray measuring instruments, in terms of air kerma or exposure by substitution method in an X-ray beam at a point where the rate has been determined by means of a standard ionization chamber. To automatize this process, a software system has been developed, the calibration system is composed by an X-ray unit, a Dynalizer IIIU X-ray meter by RADCAL, a commercial data acquisition card, the software system and the units to be tested and calibrated. A quality control plan has been applied in the development of the software system, ensuring that quality assurance procedures and standards are being followed.

  10. Development of a PVDF membrane hydrophone for use in air-coupled ultrasonic transducer calibration.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, W; Hayward, G

    1998-01-01

    This work describes the use of a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane hydrophone for application in air-coupled transducer calibration. A one-dimensional theoretical analysis is used to demonstrate the potential and performance of PVDF as a hydrophone material over the frequency range 100 kHz to 5 MHz included in the evaluation is the influence of deposited metallic electrode layers on the sensitivity of the material. Experimental validation over the restricted range 400 kHz to 1 MHz is provided by a coplanar 0.028 mm thick membrane hydrophone in conjunction with a custom built 1-3 piezocomposite transmitter. Calibration of the membrane hydrophone is performed by employing a standard hydrophone that has been calibrated to a primary standard in a water medium. Justification for such an approach is presented within the theoretical analysis which provides a close correlation with experimental data. The generation of Lamb waves at critical angles in the PVDF and their subsequent influence on the directional response of membrane hydrophones operating in air is also addressed. A method for partial suppression of the Lamb waves, based around perforation of the membrane (either in whole or in part), is evaluated experimentally with reasonable results.

  11. Calibration of Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnders, Alex

    Source calibration has to be considered an essential part of the quality assurance program in a brachytherapy department. Not only it will ensure that the source strength value used for dose calculation agrees within some predetermined limits to the value stated on the source certificate, but also it will ensure traceability to international standards. At present calibration is most often still given in terms of reference air kerma rate, although calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water would be closer to the users interest. It can be expected that in a near future several standard laboratories will be able to offer this latter service, and dosimetry protocols will have to be adapted in this way. In-air measurement using ionization chambers (e.g. a Baldwin—Farmer ionization chamber for 192Ir high dose rate HDR or pulsed dose rate PDR sources) is still considered the method of choice for high energy source calibration, but because of their ease of use and reliability well type chambers are becoming more popular and are nowadays often recommended as the standard equipment. For low energy sources well type chambers are in practice the only equipment available for calibration. Care should be taken that the chamber is calibrated at the standard laboratory for the same source type and model as used in the clinic, and using the same measurement conditions and setup. Several standard laboratories have difficulties to provide these calibration facilities, especially for the low energy seed sources (125I and 103Pd). Should a user not be able to obtain properly calibrated equipment to verify the brachytherapy sources used in his department, then at least for sources that are replaced on a regular basis, a consistency check program should be set up to ensure a minimal level of quality control before these sources are used for patient treatment.

  12. Calibration and application of a passive air sampler (XAD-PAS) for volatile methyl siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Krogseth, Ingjerd S; Zhang, Xianming; Lei, Ying D; Wania, Frank; Breivik, Knut

    2013-05-07

    Because the atmosphere is key to understanding the environmental behavior of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS), a variety of reliable air sampling methods are needed. The purpose of this study was to calibrate and evaluate an existing, polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymeric resin-based passive air sampler (XAD-PAS) for VMS. Sixteen XAD-PAS were deployed for 7-98 days at a suburban site in Toronto, Canada, while the VMS concentration in air was monitored by an active sampling method. This calibration and a subsequent field test further allowed for investigation of the temporal and spatial variability of VMS in the region. Uptake in the XAD-PAS of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and three linear VMS was linear throughout the whole deployment period. Sampling rates were between 0.4 and 0.5 m(3)/day. The XAD-PAS measured ∑VMS concentrations ranged from nondetects in rural areas (n = 3), to 169 ± 49 ng/m(3) in the urban region (n = 21), to levels above 600 ng/m(3) at sewage treatment plants (n = 2). Levels and composition of VMS within the urban area were remarkably uniform in space. Levels, but not composition, were highly variable in time and weakly correlated with temperature, wind speed, and wind direction.

  13. In-place HEPA (high efficiency, particulate air) filter testing at Hanford: Operating experiences, calibrations, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, D.S.; Decelis, D.G.

    1989-10-01

    High Efficiency, Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters provide a minimum of 99.97% removal efficiency for particles greater than or equal to .3 microns in diameter. Each HEPA filter installation at Hanford is, at specified intervals, functionally tested for leaks. The test procedure involves a dioctylphthalate (DOP) smoke generator and a calibrated airborne particle detector. The DOP generator produces smoke of a known quantitative particle size distribution upstream of the filter. The airborne particle detector is first placed upstream, and then downstream of the filter to determine percent penetration. The smoke generator is characterized using a calibrated laser spectrometer, and the particle detector is calibrated using a calibrated picoammeter. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Evaluation of an automated seed loader for seed calibration in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shuying; Joshi, Chandra P; Carnes, Greg; Schreiner, L John

    2006-01-01

    Automated seed loaders for permanent prostate implants are now commercially available. Besides improved radiation safety, these systems offer seed assay capability and ease of needle loading, making preplanned as well as intra-operative implant procedures more time-efficient. The Isoloader (Mentor Corp., CA) uses individual I125 seeds (SL-125 ProstaSeed) loaded in up to 199 chambers inside a shielded cartridge. The unit performs seed counting and calibration using a builtin solid-state detector. In order to evaluate the reproducibility and accuracy of the calibration process, two test cartridges were measured with the Isoloader itself and compared with a well-type ionization chamber (HDR-1000Plus, Standard Imaging). The air kerma strength measurements for all seeds using the Isoloader had a standard deviation of about 2.7%. For the eight seeds assayed more intensively using both the Isoloader and well chamber, the standard deviations of the measurements for each seed were in the range of 0.8% to 2.8% and 0.6% to 1.3%, respectively. The variation in the Isoloader calibration is attributed to small detector solid angle and bead geometry within seed capsules (verified by radiographs). The reproducibility of the air kerma strength measured by the Isoloader was comparable to that from the well chamber and was clinically acceptable. Seed strength measured with the Isoloader was on average 1% 2% larger than that measured with the well chamber, indicating that the accuracy of the Isoloader was clinically acceptable.

  15. Establishment of 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration fields produced using the 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the Facility of Radiation Standards, Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko

    2016-03-01

    A 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, produced by the nuclear reaction of (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O, has been established at the Facility of Radiation Standards (FRS) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency for calibration purposes. Basic dosimetric quantities (i.e. averaged gamma-ray energy, air-kerma-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients and air kerma rates at the point of test) have been precisely determined through a series of measurements using the NaI(Tl) spectrometer and an ionisation chamber coupled with an appropriate build-up material. The measurements obtained comply with values recommended by the International Organization for Standardization for an 'R-F field'. The neutron contamination component for the field has also been measured by means of a conventional neutron dose equivalent meter (the so-called neutron rem-counter) and determined to be ∼ 0.5 % of the total dose equivalent.

  16. Acoustical model of small calibre ballistic shock waves in air for automatic sniper localization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Juan R.; Salinas, Renato A.; Abidi, Mongi A.

    2007-04-01

    The phenomenon of ballistic shock wave emission by a small calibre projectile at supersonic speed is quite relevant in automatic sniper localization applications. When available, ballistic shock wave analysis makes possible the estimation of the main ballistic features of a gunfire event. The propagation of ballistic shock waves in air is a process which mainly involves nonlinear distortion, or steepening, and atmospheric absorption. Current ballistic shock waves propagation models used in automatic sniper localization systems only consider nonlinear distortion effects. This means that only the rates of change of shock peak pressure and the N-wave duration with distance are considered in the determination of the miss distance. In the present paper we present an improved acoustical model of small calibre ballistic shock wave propagation in air, intended to be used in acoustics-based automatic sniper localization applications. In our approach, we have considered nonlinear distortion, but additionally we have also introduced the effects of atmospheric sound absorption. Atmospheric absorption is implemented in the time domain in order to get faster calculation times than those computed in frequency domain. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that atmospheric absorption plays a fundamental role in the rise times of the shocks, and introduce the rate of change of the rise time with distance as a third parameter to be used in the determination of the miss distance. This lead us to a more accurate and robust estimation of the miss distance, and consequently of the projectile trajectory, and the spatial coordinates of the gunshot origin.

  17. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-03-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with an uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 (standard error) and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard-error uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the Global Positioning System, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that the new laser air-motion sensor, combined with parametrized fits to correction factors for the measured dynamic and ambient pressure, provides a measurement of temperature that is independent of any other temperature sensor.

  18. Results of the first air ion spectrometer calibration and intercomparison workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Sipilä, M.; Manninen, H. E.; Vanhanen, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Gagné, S.; Neitola, K.; Mirme, A.; Mirme, S.; Tamm, E.; Uin, J.; Komsaare, K.; Attoui, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2008-09-01

    The air ion spectrometer (AIS) measures mobility and size distributions of atmospheric ions. The neutral air ion spectrometer (NAIS) can additionally measure neutral particles. The number of the (N)AIS instruments in the world is only 11. Nevertheless, they are already widely used in atmospheric ion studies, particularly related to the initial steps of new particle formation. There is no standard method applicable for calibrating the ion spectrometers in the sub-3 nm ion range. However, recent development of high resolution DMAs has enabled the size separation of small ions with good mobility resolution. For the first time, the ion spectrometers were intercompared and calibrated in a workshop, held in January February 2008 in Helsinki, Finland. The overall goal was to experimentally determine the (N)AIS transfer functions. Monomobile mobility standards, 241-Am charger ions and silver particles were generated and used as calibration aerosols. High resolution DMAs were used to size-separate the smaller (1 10 nm) ions, while at bigger diameters (4 40 nm) the size was selected with a HAUKE-type DMA. Differences between the (N)AISs were small. Positive ion mobilities were detected by (N)AISs with better accuracy than negative, nonetheless, both were somewhat overestimated. The completely monomobile mobility standards were measured with the best accuracy. The (N)AIS concentrations were compared with an aerosol electrometer (AE) and a condensation particle counter (CPC). At sizes below 1.5 nm (positive) and 3 nm (negative) the ion spectrometers detected higher concentrations while at bigger sizes they showed similar concentrations as the reference instruments. The total particle concentrations measured by NAISs were ±50% of the reference CPC concentration at 4 40 nm sizes. The lowest cut-off size of the NAIS in neutral particle measurements was determined to be between 1.5 and 3 nm, depending on the measurement conditions and the polarity.

  19. Evaluation of passive air sampler calibrations: Selection of sampling rates and implications for the measurement of persistent organic pollutants in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melymuk, Lisa; Robson, Matthew; Helm, Paul A.; Diamond, Miriam L.

    2011-04-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers (PAS) are a common and highly useful method of sampling persistent organic pollutants (POP) concentrations in air. PAS calibration is necessary to obtain reasonable and comparable semi-quantitative measures of air concentrations. Various methods are found in the literature concerning PAS calibration. 35 studies on PAS use and calibration are examined here, in conjunction with a study involving 10 PAS deployed concurrently in outdoor air with a low-volume air sampler in order to measure the sampling rates of PUF-PAS for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic musks (PCMs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Based on this analysis it is recommended that (1) PAS should be assumed to represent bulk rather than gas-phase compound concentrations due to the sampling of particle-bound compounds, (2) calibration of PAS sampling rates is more accurately achieved using an active low-volume air sampler rather than depuration compounds since the former measures gas- and particle-phase compounds and does so continuously over the deployment period of the PAS, and (3) homolog-specific sampling rates based on KOA groupings be used in preference to compound/congener-specific or single sampling rates.

  20. Kerma Factors for Use in 37-Group Neutron Spectrum Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    PFPPI TECHNICAL REPORT Kerma factors for use in 37-group neutron spectrum calculations en en CO G. H. Zeman W. S. Bice, Jr. DEFENSE NUCLEAR...AGENCY ARMED FORCES RADIOBIOLOGY RESEARCH INSTITUTE BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20814 APPRCVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED REVIEWED AND...FACTORS FOR USE IN 37-GROUP NEUTRON SPECTRUM CALCULATIONS 7. AUTHORfs; G. H. Zeman and W. S. Bice, Jr. 9. PERFORMING

  1. SU-E-I-27: Estimating KERMA Area Product for CT Localizer Images

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, K; Greene-Donnelly, K; Bennett, R; Thorpe, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the free-in-air KERMA-Area Product (KAP) incident on patients due to CT localizer scans for common CT exams. Methods: In-plane beam intensity profiles were measured in localizer acquisition mode using OSLs for a 64 slice MDCT scanner (Lightspeed VCT, GE Medical Systems, Waukesha WI). The z-axis beam width was measured as a function of distance from isocenter. The beam profile and width were used to calculate a weighted average air KERMA per unit mAs as a function of intercepted x-axis beam width for objects symmetric about the localizer centerline.Patient areas were measured using manually drawn regions and divided by localizer length to determine average width. Data were collected for 50 head exams (lateral localizer only), 15 head/neck exams, 50 chest exams, and 50 abdomen/pelvis exams. Mean patient widths and acquisition techniques were used to calculate the weighted average free-in-air KERMA, which was multiplied by the patient area to estimate KAP. Results: Scan technique was 120 kV tube voltage, 10 mA current, and table speed of 10 cm/s. The mean ± standard deviation values of KAP were 120 ± 11.6, 469 ± 62.6, 518 ± 45, and 763 ± 93 mGycm{sup 2} for head, head/neck, chest, and abdomen/pelvis exams, respectively. For studies with AP and lateral localizers, the AP/lateral area ratio was 1.20, 1.33, and 1.24 for the head/neck, chest, and abdomen/pelvis exams, respectively. However, the AP/lateral KAP ratios were 1.12, 1.08, and 1.07, respectively. Conclusion: Calculation of KAP in CT localizers is complicated by the non-uniform intensity profile and z-axis beam width. KAP values are similar to those for simple radiographic exams such as a chest radiograph and represent a small fraction of the x-ray exposure at CT. However, as CT doses are reduced the localizer contribution will be a more significant fraction of the total exposure.

  2. On-board Polarimetric Calibration of Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harten, G.; Diner, D. J.; Bull, M. A.; Tkatcheva, I. N.; Jovanovic, V. M.; Seidel, F. C.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Davis, A. B.; Rheingans, B. E.; Chipman, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) aims at characterizing atmospheric aerosols and clouds using highly accurate imaging polarimetry. The instrument is deployed regularly onboard the NASA ER2 high-altitude aircraft, which is an ideal testbed for satellite remote sensing. Flying at 20 km altitude, AirMSPI's pushbroom camera typically provides 11×11 km images at 10 m resolution. The target is observed from multiple along-track angles within ±67° using a gimbal mount. Eight spectral bands within 355-935 nm are recorded simultaneously in different detector rows, 3 of which also measure linear polarization: 470, 660 and 865 nm. Photoelastic modulators (PEMs) encode the polarized and total intensities in each polarimetric pixel as the amplitude and offset of a wavelike intensity pattern, such that the ratio of the two is insensitive to pixel-to-pixel differences. This enables an accuracy in the degree of linear polarization of ~0.001, as measured in the lab. To maintain this accuracy in-flight, an optical probe continuously monitors the PEMs' retardances and controls their driving signals. Before and after observing a target, the instrument also observes a validator, which is an extended, polarized light source, located inside the instrument housing. These data are now incorporated in the data processing pipeline to further improve the calibration of the modulation functions. Highly polarized pixels in Earth data are utilized to transfer the validator results to meet the illumination in Earth scenes, as well as to make fine adjustments at higher temporal resolution. The reprocessed polarization products for the PODEX campaign show significant improvements when intercompared with the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP, Goddard Institute for Space Studies). We currently evaluate the impact of the on-board polarimetric calibration on aerosol retrievals, and compare against AERONET reference measurements.

  3. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in air using passive sampling calibrated with active measurements.

    PubMed

    Ellickson, K M; McMahon, C M; Herbrandson, C; Krause, M J; Schmitt, C M; Lippert, C J; Pratt, G C

    2017-08-22

    There are limited ambient air measurements of extended (beyond EPA Priority 16) lists of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We measured air concentrations of 45 PAHs using passive and active air sampling at 15 sites in a central urban community and one rural site for two years. Passive sampling was conducted with cylindrical XAD-based samplers deployed to capture spatial variability. High volume active samplers with quartz fiber filters for particles and XAD-4 absorbent for gases were deployed at two urban sites and the rural site to calibrate the passive measurements directly. Estimated passive sampling rates (PSRs) were evaluated as functions of meteorological data, seasons, locations, study year, and compared with other studies. Possible particle collection by the passive samplers was evaluated using a variety of particle measurements (TSP, PM10, PM2.5 and ultrafines <100 nm). Total PAHs were statistically associated with ultrafine particle concentrations and to a lesser extent PM2.5 and PM10, but not TSP. PSRs were more variable when PAH mass loadings were lower and near method detection limits; this occurred more often at the rural site. The PSRs were not statistically associated with meteorological conditions in this study, but wind speed had the highest potential to impact PSR results. The resulting passive PAH measurements are reported with respect to proximity to major roadways and other known air emissions types. PSRs were quantifiable for some PAHs that were found predominantly in the particulate phase in active sampling. This information, together with particle fraction calculations from active sampling, were used to estimate the particulate PAH capture of the passive sampler. Summed PAH (∑PAH) passive concentrations were measured within the range of 10-265 ng/m3, with the highest concentrations from naphthalene and the lowest detected concentrations from anthracene. These results indicated a stronger seasonal signal within 200 m of a major

  4. Results of the first air ion spectrometer calibration and intercomparison workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Sipilä, M.; Manninen, H. E.; Vanhanen, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Gagné, S.; Neitola, K.; Mirme, A.; Mirme, S.; Tamm, E.; Uin, J.; Komsaare, K.; Attoui, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Air Ion Spectrometer (AIS) measures mobility and size distributions of atmospheric ions. The Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) can additionally measure neutral particles. The number of the (N)AIS instruments in the world is only 11. Nevertheless, they are already widely used in atmospheric ion studies, particularly related to the initial steps of new particle formation. There is no standard method applicable for calibrating the ion spectrometers in the sub-3 nm ion range. However, recent development of high resolution DMAs has enabled the size separation of small ions with good mobility resolution. For the first time, the ion spectrometers were intercompared and calibrated in a workshop, held in January-February 2008 in Helsinki, Finland. The overall goal was to experimentally determine the (N)AIS transfer functions. Monomobile mobility standards, 241-Am charger ions and silver particles were generated and used as calibration aerosols. High resolution DMAs were used to size-separate the smaller (1-10 nm) ions, while at bigger diameters (4-40 nm) the size was selected with a HAUKE-type DMA. Negative ion mobilities were detected by (N)AISs with slightly better accuracy than positive, nonetheless, both were somewhat overestimated. A linear fit of slope of one to the whole dataset of mobilities suggested that (N)AISs measured the negative mobilities 1.36±0.16 times larger compared with the reference instruments. Similarly, positive mobilities were measured 1.39±0.15 times larger compared with the reference instruments. The completely monomobile mobility standards were measured with the best accuracy. The (N)AIS concentrations were compared with an aerosol electrometer (AE) and a condensation particle counter (CPC). At sizes below 1.5 nm (positive) and 3 nm (negative) the ion spectrometers detected higher concentrations while at bigger sizes they showed similar concentrations as the reference instruments. The total particle concentrations measured by

  5. Field calibration of polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers for PCBs and OC pesticides.

    PubMed

    Chaemfa, Chakra; Barber, Jonathan L; Gocht, Tilman; Harner, Tom; Holoubek, Ivan; Klanova, Jana; Jones, Kevin C

    2008-12-01

    Different passive air sampler (PAS) strategies have been developed for sampling in remote areas and for cost-effective simultaneous spatial mapping of POPs (persistent organic pollutants) over differing geographical scales. The polyurethane foam (PUF) disk-based PAS is probably the most widely used. In a PUF-based PAS, the PUF disk is generally mounted inside two stainless steel bowls to buffer the air flow to the disk and to shield it from precipitation and light. The field study described in this manuscript was conducted to: compare performance of 3 different designs of sampler; to further calibrate the sampler against the conventional active sampler; to derive more information on field-based uptake rates and equilibrium times of the samplers. Samplers were also deployed at different locations across the field site, and at different heights up a meteorological tower, to investigate the possible influence of sampler location. Samplers deployed <5m above ground, and not directly sheltered from the wind gave similar uptake rates. Small differences in dimensions between the 3 designs of passive sampler chamber had no discernable effect on accumulation rates, allowing comparison with previously published data.

  6. New evaluated kerma factor library from ENDF/B-V data

    SciTech Connect

    Farawila, Y.M.; Maynard, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    The problem addressed in this paper is the accurate evaluation of neutron fluence-to-kerma (kinetic energy released in materials) factors from microscopic nuclear data. Accurate kerma factors are necessary for calculating the local heat generation in materials subject to neutron irradiation, such as shields and fusion reactor blankets. The new algorithms developed for this purpose combine in a consistent manner the two basic methods for computing kerma factors, namely, reaction kinematics and direct energy balance. These algorithms are implemented in the code KAOS-V (kerma and other stuff), which was used as the main evaluating tool to construct the nuclear response function library KAOS/LIB-V.

  7. The needs for brachytherapy source calibrations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coursey, B. M.; Goodman, L. J.; Hoppes, D. D.; Loevinger, R.; McLaughlin, W. L.; Soares, C. G.; Weaver, J. T.

    1992-02-01

    Brachytherapy sources of beta and gamma radiation ("brachy" is from the Greek, meaning "near") have a long history of use in interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and ocular radiation therapy. In the past the US national standards for these sources were often specified in activity or milligram radium equivalent. With the introduction of new radionuclide sources to replace radium, source strength calibrations are now expressed as air kerma rate at a meter. In this paper, we review the NIST standards for brachytherapy sources, list some of the common radionuclides and source encapsulations in use in the US radiology community, and describe the latest NIST work, in collaboration with several US medical institutions, on a method of two- and three-dimensional dose mapping of brachytherapy sources using radiochromic films.

  8. A useful formula for the radiological calibration laboratory.

    PubMed

    Cummings, F M

    2005-03-01

    A useful technique for determining the relationships between irradiation position and air kerma or neutron dose equivalent rate is presented. The standard geometric model (1/r2) is expanded allowing the user to include curvature in the model caused by scattered radiation. This technique applies to clean irradiation geometries that are well modeled by the standard geometric model, high-scatter geometries encountered in well irradiators, and neutron irradiation fields used to calibrate health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. The technique, with slight modification, is also useful for determining the quality of x-ray beams. The basic equations and the implementing Excel functions are listed. In addition, several examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the technique.

  9. SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison of calibration coefficients at radiotherapy level for orthovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, M.; McCaffrey, J.; Shen, H.; Saraví, M.; Stefanic, A.; Montaño Ortiz, G.; Carlos, M.; da Silva, C.; Álvarez, J.; Tovar, V.

    2015-01-01

    Air-kerma calibration coefficients were compared at the radiotherapy level for orthovoltage x ray beams in the SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison for members of the Sistema Interamericano de Metrología (SIM). Five SIM laboratories participated in the comparison: NIST, NRC, ININ, CNEA and LNMRI, the NIST being the pilot laboratory. Results from the comparison are linked to the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison reference value through the NIST-BIPM comparison made in 2003 and will meet requirements of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) to support several CMCs (calibration and measurement capability claims) of the participants. The comparison began in October of 2007 and the measurements were completed in September 2008. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air-kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The evaluation of the degrees of equivalence was performed as described in the comparison protocol. The comparison of the calibration coefficients for the four chambers is based on the average ratios of the calibration coefficients measured at the NIST and at each participating laboratory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Errors in measurements of 222Rn in methane and carbon dioxide using scintillation cells calibrated for 222Rn in air.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Phillip H; Burkhart, James F; Camley, Robert E

    2014-03-01

    Scintillation cells are used typically for measuring the concentration of (222)Rn in air and are calibrated for that purpose. However, scintillation cells are sometimes used for measuring (222)Rn in natural gas or carbon dioxide. The counting efficiencies of scintillation cells for measurements of (222)Rn in these gases should be different from those for measuring (222)Rn in air because the ranges of alpha particles emitted by (222)Rn and its progeny are greater in methane and smaller in carbon dioxide than in air. If these effects are not taken into consideration, measurements of (222)Rn in natural gas will be biased high and in carbon dioxide will be biased low. The authors previously investigated the effects of barometric pressure on measurements of (222)Rn in air using scintillation cells. A modeling technique was used in a previous study to calculate theoretical errors that would result if atmospheric pressure were not considered. In the current study, the same modeling technique was used to calculate theoretical errors that would be made for measurements of (222)Rn in methane and carbon dioxide if the calibration for (222)Rn in air were used. Results are presented for four types of scintillation cells of varying geometries and for barometric pressures representative of four elevations ranging from sea level to 1,963 m (6,440 feet). These results indicate that the errors introduced by the ranges of the alpha particles in gases different from air can be significant. Depending on the type of cell and the local pressure, a measurement of (222)Rn in methane may be biased high by 2-7%, while a measurement of (222)Rn in CO2 may be biased low by 15-20% if the calibration for (222)Rn in air is used.

  11. SU-E-I-49: Influence of Scanner Output Measurement Technique on KERMA Ratios in CT.

    PubMed

    Ogden, K; Roskopf, M; Scalzetti, E

    2012-06-01

    KERMA ratios (RK) are defined as the ratio of KERMA measured at a specific phantom location (K) to in-air isocenter CT scanner output (KCT). In this work we investigate the impact of measurement methodology on KCT values. OSL dosimeter chips were used to measure KCT for a GE VCT scanner (GE Medical Systems, Waukesha WI), using the 40 mm nominal beam width. Methods included a single point measurement at the center of the beam (1 tube rotation), and extended z-axis measurements using multiple adjacent OSL's (7.5 cm extent), with single tube rotation, multiple contiguous axial scans, and helical scans (pitch of 1.375). Measurements were made in air and on the scan table at 80 and 120 kV. Averaged single point measurements were consistent, with a mean coefficient of variation of 2.5%. For extended measurements with a single tube rotation, the mean value was equivalent to the single point measurements. For multiple contiguous axial scans, the in-air KCT values were higher than the single rotation mean value and single point measurements by 13% and 10.3% at 120 and 80 kV, respectively, and for the on-table measurements the values were 14.9% and 8.1% higher at 120 and 80 kV, respectively. The increase is due to beam overlap caused by z- axis over-beaming. Extended measurements using helical scanning were equivalent to the multiple rotation axial measurements when corrected for the helical pitch. For all methodologies, the in-air values exceeded the on- table measurements by an average of 23% and 19.4% at 80 and 120 kV, respectively. Scanner KCT values must be measured to allow organ dose estimation using published RK values. It is imperative that the KCT measurement methodology is the same as for the published values, or large errors may be introduced into the resulting organ dose estimates. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Using CLARREO for spectral calibration of NOAA operational satellite sensors: Lessons learned from studies with AIRS and IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Cao, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) Mission will provide the spectrally resolved thermal IR and reflected solar measurements with high absolute accuracy. These SI traceable measurements will provide the basis for absolute calibration for a wide range of visible and infrared (IR) Earth observing sensors. In particular, CLARREO can potentially reduce the spectral uncertainties of NOAA’s operational satellite sensors. This study explores the potential of using CLARREO measurements for on-orbit spectral calibration for future NOAA operational sensors on both polar-orbiting and geostationary platforms. Lessons learned from the on-orbit spectral calibration of current systems will be reviewed based on our studies using Atmospheric Infrared Sounders (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) as quasi on-orbit standards in assessing Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), GOES Imagers and Sounders, and High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS). The on-going effort of spectral cross-check between AIRS and IASI with simultaneous nadir observations (SNOs) will be discussed. This method will also be used to verify the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) using CLARREO measurements. Similar work is planned to verify GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) using CLARREO based on studies between IASI/AIRS and GOES Imager as proxy.

  13. Calibrating automatic exposure control devices for digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Doyle, P; Martin, C J

    2006-11-07

    The energy responses of digital radiography detectors differ from those of screen-film systems. To provide a consistent level of image quality at different tube potentials automatic exposure control (AEC) devices must be calibrated to suit the energy response of the image receptor with which they are intended for use. AEC calibration for digital radiography systems requires an alternative parameter to optical density, ideally one related to the quality of a digital image. Energy responses of computed radiography (CR) and indirect digital radiography (IDR) image receptors have been calculated, and compared with those for screen-film systems. Practical assessments of the relative sensitivities of a CR detector made using the detector dose indicator (DDI), pixel value and signal-to-noise ratio showed similar variations with tube potential. The DDI has been used to determine the correct kV compensation curve required to calibrate the AECs for the loss in detector sensitivity with tube potential. AECs are set up relative to a predetermined air kerma incident on the detector at 80 kV for CR and IDR systems using this curve and the method used is described. Factors influencing the calibration of AECs for digital radiography including techniques, types of phantom and contributions from scatter are reviewed, and practical methods recommended for use.

  14. Field Calibration of XAD-Based Passive Air Sampler on the Tibetan Plateau: Wind Influence and Configuration Improvement.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Xiande; Wania, Frank

    2017-05-16

    The passive air sampler based on XAD-2 resin (XAD-PAS) has proven useful for collecting atmospheric persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in remote regions. Whereas laboratory studies have shown that, due to the open bottom of its housing, the passive sampling rate (PSR) of the XAD-PAS is susceptible to wind and other processes causing air turbulence, the sampler has not been calibrated in the field at sites experiencing high winds. In this study, the PSRs of the XAD-PAS were calibrated at three sites on the Tibetan Plateau, covering a wide range in temperature (T), pressure (P) and wind speed (v). At sites with low wind speeds (i.e., in a forest and an urban site), the PSRs are proportional to the ratio T(1.75)/ P; at windy sites with an average wind speed above 3 m/s, the influence of v on PSRs cannot be ignored. Moreover, the open bottom of the XAD-PAS housing causes the PSRs to be influenced by wind angle and air turbulence caused by sloped terrain. Field calibration, wind speed measurements, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations indicate that a modified design incorporating an air spoiler consisting of 4 metal sheets dampens the turbulence caused by wind angle and sloped terrain and caps the PSR at ∼5 m(3)/day, irrespective of ambient wind. Therefore, the original XAD-PAS with an open bottom is suitable for deployment in urban areas and other less windy places, the modified design is preferable in mountain regions and other places where air circulation is complicated and strong.

  15. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Tornero-López, Ana M; Guirado, Damián; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Simancas, Fernando; Gazdic-Santic, Maja; Lallena, Antonio M

    2013-12-01

    Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of (125)I seeds. Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for (125)I selectSeed(TM) brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level. Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber. Variations of the altitude and changes in the weather conditions may produce

  16. A Full-Envelope Air Data Calibration and Three-Dimensional Wind Estimation Method Using Global Output-Error Optimization and Flight-Test Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    A novel, efficient air data calibration method is proposed for aircraft with limited envelopes. This method uses output-error optimization on three-dimensional inertial velocities to estimate calibration and wind parameters. Calibration parameters are based on assumed calibration models for static pressure, angle of attack, and flank angle. Estimated wind parameters are the north, east, and down components. The only assumptions needed for this method are that the inertial velocities and Euler angles are accurate, the calibration models are correct, and that the steady-state component of wind is constant throughout the maneuver. A two-minute maneuver was designed to excite the aircraft over the range of air data calibration parameters and de-correlate the angle-of-attack bias from the vertical component of wind. Simulation of the X-48B (The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) aircraft was used to validate the method, ultimately using data derived from wind-tunnel testing to simulate the un-calibrated air data measurements. Results from the simulation were accurate and robust to turbulence levels comparable to those observed in flight. Future experiments are planned to evaluate the proposed air data calibration in a flight environment.

  17. An experimental approach to efficiency calibration for gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of large air particulate filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarchio, Elio

    2013-04-01

    A full-energy-peak efficiency (FEPE) calibration procedure for gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of air particulate samples collected on large filters is described herein. The experimental results are obtained for an unconventional measurement geometry, termed a "packet-sample". The sample is obtained from a large cellulose filter (45 cm×45 cm) used to collect air particulate samples that is resized to dimensions suitable for spectrometric measurements (6 cm×6 cm×0.7 cm). To determine the FEPEs, many standards were created, i.e., some filters containing a small amount of ThO2 and others containing a known amount of KCl. Efficiency curves obtained through best fits to experimental data for three high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, one of them for X-ray measurement, cover the energy range from 40 keV to 2600 keV. To validate the efficiency calibration procedure two experimental tests with the use of calibrated sources were conducted and, as application example, airborne concentrations of 131I (particulate matter), 134Cs and 137Cs at Palermo (Italy) in the days following the Fukushima accident in Japan were evaluated.

  18. Secondary bremsstrahlung and the energy-conservation aspects of kerma in photon-irradiated media.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E

    2016-02-07

    Kerma, collision kerma and absorbed dose in media irradiated by megavoltage photons are analysed with respect to energy conservation. The user-code DOSRZnrc was employed to compute absorbed dose D, kerma K and a special form of kerma, K ncpt, obtained by setting the charged-particle transport energy cut-off very high, thereby preventing the generation of 'secondary bremsstrahlung' along the charged-particle paths. The user-code FLURZnrc was employed to compute photon fluence, differential in energy, from which collision kerma, K col and K were derived. The ratios K/D, K ncpt/D and K col/D have thereby been determined over a very large volumes of water, aluminium and copper irradiated by broad, parallel beams of 0.1 to 25 MeV monoenergetic photons, and 6, 10 and 15 MV 'clinical' radiotherapy qualities. Concerning depth-dependence, the 'area under the kerma, K, curve' exceeded that under the dose curve, demonstrating that kerma does not conserve energy when computed over a large volume. This is due to the 'double counting' of the energy of the secondary bremsstrahlung photons, this energy being (implicitly) included in the kerma 'liberated' in the irradiated medium, at the same time as this secondary bremsstrahlung is included in the photon fluence which gives rise to kerma elsewhere in the medium. For 25 MeV photons this 'violation' amounts to 8.6%, 14.2% and 25.5% in large volumes of water, aluminium and copper respectively but only 0.6% for a 'clinical' 6 MV beam in water. By contrast, K col/D and K ncpt/D, also computed over very large phantoms of the same three media, for the same beam qualities, are equal to unity within (very low) statistical uncertainties, demonstrating that collision kerma and the special type of kerma, K ncpt, do conserve energy over a large volume. A comparison of photon fluence spectra for the 25 MeV beam at a depth of  ≈51 g cm−2 for both very high and very low charged-particle transport cut-offs reveals the considerable

  19. Secondary bremsstrahlung and the energy-conservation aspects of kerma in photon-irradiated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E.

    2016-02-01

    Kerma, collision kerma and absorbed dose in media irradiated by megavoltage photons are analysed with respect to energy conservation. The user-code DOSRZnrc was employed to compute absorbed dose D, kerma K and a special form of kerma, K ncpt, obtained by setting the charged-particle transport energy cut-off very high, thereby preventing the generation of ‘secondary bremsstrahlung’ along the charged-particle paths. The user-code FLURZnrc was employed to compute photon fluence, differential in energy, from which collision kerma, K col and K were derived. The ratios K/D, K ncpt/D and K col/D have thereby been determined over a very large volumes of water, aluminium and copper irradiated by broad, parallel beams of 0.1 to 25 MeV monoenergetic photons, and 6, 10 and 15 MV ‘clinical’ radiotherapy qualities. Concerning depth-dependence, the ‘area under the kerma, K, curve’ exceeded that under the dose curve, demonstrating that kerma does not conserve energy when computed over a large volume. This is due to the ‘double counting’ of the energy of the secondary bremsstrahlung photons, this energy being (implicitly) included in the kerma ‘liberated’ in the irradiated medium, at the same time as this secondary bremsstrahlung is included in the photon fluence which gives rise to kerma elsewhere in the medium. For 25 MeV photons this ‘violation’ amounts to 8.6%, 14.2% and 25.5% in large volumes of water, aluminium and copper respectively but only 0.6% for a ‘clinical’ 6 MV beam in water. By contrast, K col/D and K ncpt/D, also computed over very large phantoms of the same three media, for the same beam qualities, are equal to unity within (very low) statistical uncertainties, demonstrating that collision kerma and the special type of kerma, K ncpt, do conserve energy over a large volume. A comparison of photon fluence spectra for the 25 MeV beam at a depth of  ≈51 g cm-2 for both very high and very low charged-particle transport cut

  20. [Comparison of four multivariate calibration methods in simultaneous determination of air toxic organic compounds with FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Jun-de; Chen, Zuo-ru; Zhou, Xue-tie; Huang, Zhong-hua

    2002-10-01

    The concentration determination abilities of four multivariate calibration methods--classical least squares (CLS), partial least squares (PLS), kalman filter method (KFM) and artificial neural network (ANN) were compared in this paper. Five air toxic organic compounds--1,3-butadiene, benzene, o-xylen, chlorobenzene, and acrolein--whose FTIR spectra seriously overlap each other were selected to compose the analytical objects. The evaluation criterion was according to the mean prediction error (MPE) and mean relative error (MRE). Results showed that PLS was superior to other methods when treating multicomponent analysis problem, while there was no comparable difference between CLS, KFM and ANN.

  1. TU-AB-201-09: Calibration of An Element of a New Directional Pd-103 Planar Source Array

    SciTech Connect

    Aima, M; Culberson, W; Reed, J; DeWerd, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The CivaSheet™ is a new directional Pd-103 planar source array, with a variable number of discrete source elements referred to as “dots”. Each dot consists of a polymer capsule containing {sup 103}Pd and a gold shield that attenuates radiation on one side of the device to define hot and cold dose regions. Fluorescence from the gold shield is observed in the dot spectrum. Since CivaSheet™ is a planar directional source, conventional methods used for calibration of azimuthally symmetric sources are not applicable. The purpose of this work is to establish an air-kerma-strength standard and a transfer to a well chamber for clinical calibration. Methods: Primary air-kerma strength measurement of the dots was performed using a variable-aperture free-air chamber (VAFAC). Charge measurements were recorded using a well chamber with a custom insert. Anisotropy measurements were performed using a Sodium-Iodide detector. Spectral measurements were performed using a low-energy germanium detector and compared to a source without gold. The dot geometry was modeled using the MCNP6 radiation transport code. Results: Air-kerma strength measurements of a batch of four dots performed with the VAFAC were within ±1.5% of the average measured value and the measurement precision was within ±0.5%. Anisotropy measurements indicated uniform emission within the measurement uncertainty for the solid angle defining the VAFAC aperture used. Charge measurements of each dot using the well chamber in four cardinal angle source orientations were within ±1.5% of the average measured values. The spectral study of a dot resulted in identification of fluorescence from the gold shield and primary spectral energies that were compared to MCNP6 simulations. Conclusion: Calibration procedures for the new directional Pd-103 source dot were established for future clinical use, based on the results of experimental and Monte Carlo investigations. This work was partially supported by NCI

  2. Polydimethylsiloxane-based permeation passive air sampler. Part II: Effect of temperature and humidity on the calibration constants.

    PubMed

    Seethapathy, Suresh; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2010-12-10

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has low permeability towards water vapour and low energy of activation of permeation towards volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when compared to many other polymers. Suitability of the material for use in permeation-type passive air samplers was tested as it theoretically should reduce uptake rate variations due to temperature changes and eliminate or reduce complications arising from sorbent saturation by water vapour. The calibration constants of a simple autosampler vial-based permeation passive sampler equipped with a PDMS membrane (Waterloo Membrane Sampler(®)) were determined for various analytes at different temperatures. From the data, the activation energy of permeation for PDMS towards the analytes was determined. The analytes studied belonged to various classes of compounds with wide ranging polarities, including n-alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons, esters and alcohols. The results confirmed Arrhenius-type relationship between temperature and calibration constant and the energy of activation of permeation for PDMS ranged from -5kJ/mole for butylbenzene to -17kJ/mole for sec-butylacetate. Calibration constants of the samplers towards n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons determined at humidities between 30% and 91% indicated no statistically significant variations in the uptake rate with changes in humidity for 9 of the 11 analytes studied. The results confirmed the suitability of the sampler for deployment in high humidity areas and under varying temperature conditions.

  3. ACCURATE KAP METER CALIBRATION AS A PREREQUISITE FOR OPTIMISATION IN PROJECTION RADIOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Malusek, A; Sandborg, M; Carlsson, G Alm

    2016-06-01

    Modern X-ray units register the air kerma-area product, PKA, with a built-in KAP meter. Some KAP meters show an energy-dependent bias comparable with the maximum uncertainty articulated by the IEC (25 %), adversely affecting dose-optimisation processes. To correct for the bias, a reference KAP meter calibrated at a standards laboratory and two calibration methods described here can be used to achieve an uncertainty of <7 % as recommended by IAEA. A computational model of the reference KAP meter is used to calculate beam quality correction factors for transfer of the calibration coefficient at the standards laboratory, Q0, to any beam quality, Q, in the clinic. Alternatively, beam quality corrections are measured with an energy-independent dosemeter via a reference beam quality in the clinic, Q1, to beam quality, Q Biases up to 35 % of built-in KAP meter readings were noted. Energy-dependent calibration factors are needed for unbiased PKA Accurate KAP meter calibration as a prerequisite for optimisation in projection radiography.

  4. Improving the Air Force Infrared Stellar Calibration Network with High Spectral Resolution Data from the Infrared Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, K. E.; Engelke, C. W.; Price, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    We present preliminary results of a project to improve the spectral resolution of the Air Force Infrared Stellar Calibration Network by incorporating data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). This network and its deriviatives were created by Cohen and colleagues to support infrared calibration for government and civilian ground- and space-based observatories, such as the Infrared Telescope Facility, Gemini, and the Maui Optical Site. The reduced 2.4 to 45 μ m spectra from the ISO Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) are up to 100 times higher spectral resolution than the current network data. Appropriately substituting these spectra for the standard stars will improve the accuracy of the calibration network, particularly in spectral regions where the atmosphere limits ground-based data, and permit more accurate calibration of very narrow spectral bandpasses. The initial effort has photometrically calibrated the SWS spectra for the 9 stellar or secondary standards with composites. The model atmosphere spectrum for α Cen has been replaced by SWS data; the model spectra for α CMa and α Lyr have been retained in order to preserve the common calibration pedigree with the original Cohen et al. network (although see Price et al. 2004, AJ, 128, 889). Where available, high quality photometry from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) are used, supplemented by photometry from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experment (DIRBE) and the photometry used by Cohen et al. used to create the original composite. The next steps are to 1) replace the 10-15 tertiary standard stars with template spectra with measured spectra for the cases in which the SWS observations have sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratios (this will double the number of secondary standards); 2) develop a set of high spectral resolution infrared templates based on the SWS observations for each MK spectral class of the secondary standards with which to upgrade the entire network; 3) create new templates for

  5. Measurement of Pressure Dependent Fluorescence Yield of Air: Calibration Factor for UHECR Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.W.; Burt, G.W.; Cao, Z.; Chang, F.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Chen, C.W.; Chen, P.; Field, C.; Findlay, J.; Huntemeyer, Petra; Huang, M.A.; Hwang, W.-Y.P.; Iverson, R.; Jones, B.F.; Jui, C.C.H.; Kirn, M.; Lin, G.-L.; Loh, E.C.; Maestas, M.M.; Manago, N.; Martens, K.; /Montana U. /Utah U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2005-07-06

    In a test experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the fluorescence yield of 28.5 GeV electrons in air and nitrogen was measured. The measured photon yields between 300 and 400 nm at 1 atm and 29 C are Y(760 Torr){sup air} = 4.42 {+-} 0.73 and Y(760 Torr){sup N{sub 2}} = 29.2 {+-} 4.8 photons per electron per meter. Assuming that the fluorescence yield is proportional to the energy deposition of a charged particle traveling through air, good agreement with measurements at lower particle energies is observed.

  6. The Calibration of the Guane Array: Extensive Air Showers reconstruction and Space Weather studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, H.; Jaimes-Motta, A.; Núñez, L. A.; Peña-Rodríguez, J.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Suárez-Durán, M.

    2017-07-01

    We discuss the calibration scheme and the resulting acceptance of the Guane Array (GA) of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD). This array is part of the Latin American Giant Observatory (LAGO) project, having singles and small arrays particle detectors, covering a huge range of geomagnetic rigidity cutoffs and atmospheric absorption/reaction levels. GA is compose of three WCDs placed at the vertices of an equilateral triangle (˜ 105 meters), at Bucaramanga, Colombia, (N 7° 8' 40.1959'', W 73° 7' 30'', 956 m a.s.l.). It is designed to study the flux of Cosmic Rays between ˜ 10 GeV to ˜ 106 GeV and their modulation by Space Weather phenomena. GA is thought to operate in two modes simultaneously: Single Particle Mode and Cascade Mode. The calibration of GA is based on two steps: The first step is based on Geant4 simulations, to estimate the response of each WCD to the background radiation and the second step is related to the response in coincidence as an array, through simulations of secondary particle flux and their modulation using CORSIKA and MAGNETOCOSMICS codes. As a result of these calibration steps we have characterized the response of each WCD in terms of the Vertical Equivalent Muon -Energy deposited by a Muon entering at the top and exiting from the bottom of the detector- and estimate the response of the GA for different background fluctuations.

  7. Calibration of polydimethylsiloxane and XAD-Pocket passive air samplers (PAS) for measuring gas- and particle-phase SVOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeme, Joseph O.; Saini, Amandeep; Yang, Congqiao; Zhu, Jiping; Smedes, Foppe; Klánová, Jana; Diamond, Miriam L.

    2016-10-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has seen wide use as the stationary phase of gas chromatographic columns, a passive sampler in water, and recently as a personal exposure sampler, while styrene divinyl-benzene copolymer (XAD) has been used extensively as a passive air sampler outdoors and indoors. We have introduced PDMS and XAD-Pocket as new indoor passive air samplers (PASs). The XAD-Pocket was designed to maximize the surface area-to-volume ratio of XAD and to minimize obstruction of air flow by the sampler housing. Methods were developed to expedite the use of these PASs for measuring phthalates, novel brominated flame-retardants (NFRs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) indoors. Sampling rates, Rs, (m3 day-1), were measured during a 7-week calibration study. Variability within and between analyte groups was not statistically significant. As a result, generic values of 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.5 ± 0.3 m3 day-1 dm-2 are recommended for PDMS and XAD-Pocket for a 50-day deployment time, respectively. PDMS has a higher uptake rate and is easier to use than XAD-Pocket.

  8. SU-E-I-53: Comparison of Kerma-Area-Product Between the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD) as Used in Neuro-Endovascular Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Nagesh, S Setlur; Xiong, Z; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of integral dose to the patient when using the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) compared to when using the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) for the techniques used during neurointerventional procedures. Methods: The MAF is a small field-of-view, high resolution x-ray detector which captures 1024 x 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35μm and is capable of real-time imaging up to 30 frames per second. The MAF was used in neuro-interventions during those parts of the procedure when high resolution was needed and the FPD was used otherwise. The technique parameters were recorded when each detector was used and the kerma-area-product (KAP) per image frame was determined. KAP values were calculated for seven neuro interventions using premeasured calibration files of output as a function of kVp and beam filtration and included the attenuation of the patient table for the frontal projections to be more representative of integral patient dose. The air kerma at the patient entrance was multiplied by the beam area at that point to obtain the KAP values. The ranges of KAP values per frame were determined for the range of technique parameters used during the clinical procedures. To appreciate the benefit of the higher MAF resolution in the region of interventional activity, DA technique parameters were generally used with the MAF. Results: The lowest and highest values of KAP per frame for the MAF in DA mode were 4 and 50 times lower, respectively, compared to those of the FPD in pulsed fluoroscopy mode. Conclusion: The MAF was used in those parts of the clinical procedures when high resolution and image quality was essential. The integral patient dose as represented by the KAP value was substantially lower when using the MAF than when using the FPD due to the much smaller volume of tissue irradiated. This research was supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grant R01EB002873.

  9. Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimeteric Imager (AirMSPI): Calibration and Comparison with Collocated Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F. C.; Diner, D. J.; Bruegge, C. J.; Rheingans, B. E.; Garay, M. J.; Daugherty, B. J.; Chipman, R. A.; Davis, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) is a pushbroom multiangle spectropolarimetric camera with spectral bands near 355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, 865, and 935 nm. Flying on NASAs's high-altitude ER-2 aircraft since 2010, AirMSPI uses dual photoelastic modulator (PEM)-based technology to provide accurate measurements of the Stokes linear polarization parameters Q and U in the 470, 660, and 865 nm bands, providing unique observing capabilities for aerosol, cloud, and surface studies. We describe the methodologies used for radiometric and polarimetric calibration and characterization of the AirMSPI instrument, which make use of a combination of laboratory and vicarious techniques. A 1.65 m integrating sphere and overflights of Ivanpah Playa, NV are used for radiometric calibration. Radiometric cross-comparisons with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), also flying on the ER-2, are used to validate the radiometric scale. For polarimetric calibration, a well-calibrated Polarization State Generator is used to provide known polarimetric inputs. A high-extinction rotating wiregrid polarizer is used to derive polarimetric calibration coefficients for each pixel, and the results are then validated using partially polarized light generated using tilted glass plates. Examples of collocated multiangular, polarimetric imagery from AirMSPI and hyperspectral imagery from AVIRIS will be shown, presenting new opportunities for atmosphere and surface remote sensing.

  10. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1.

  11. Using Wind Setdown and Storm Surge on Lake Erie to Calibrate the Air-Sea Drag Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1. PMID:23977309

  12. Regression calibration with instrumental variables for longitudinal models with interaction terms, and application to air pollution studies

    PubMed Central

    Strand, M; Sillau, S; Grunwald, G K; Rabinovitch, N

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we derive forms of estimators and associated variances for regression calibration with instrumental variables in longitudinal models that include interaction terms between two unobservable predictors and interactions between these predictors and covariates not measured with error; the inclusion of the latter interactions generalize results we previously reported. The methods are applied to air pollution and health data collected on children with asthma. The new methods allow for the examination of how the relationship between health outcome leukotriene E4 (LTE4, a biomarker of inflammation) and two unobservable pollutant exposures and their interaction are modified by the presence or absence of upper respiratory infections. The pollutant variables include secondhand smoke and ambient (outdoor) fine particulate matter. Simulations verify the accuracy of the proposed methods under various conditions. PMID:26640396

  13. Quantitative sampling and analysis of trace elements in ambient air: impactor characterization and Synchrotron-XRF mass calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, A.; Bukowiecki, N.; Lienemann, P.; Furger, M.; Weideli, B.; Fierz, M.; Minguillón, M. C.; Figi, R.; Flechsig, U.; Appel, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-06-01

    Identification of trace elements in ambient air can add substantial information to pollution source apportionment studies, although they do not contribute significantly to emissions in terms of mass. A method for quantitative size and time-resolved trace element evaluation in ambient aerosols with a rotating drum impactor and synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence is presented. The impactor collection efficiency curves and size segregation characteristics were investigated in an experiment with oil and salt particles. Cutoff diameters were determined through the ratio of size distributions measured with two particles sizers. Furthermore, an external calibration technique to empirically link fluorescence intensities to ambient concentrations was developed. Solutions of elemental standards were applied with an ink-jet printer on thin films and area concentrations were subsequently evaluated with external wet chemical methods. These customized and reusable reference standards enable quantification of different data sets analyzed under varying experimental conditions.

  14. Development and calibration of real-time PCR for quantification of airborne microorganisms in air samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hey Reoun; Mainelis, Gediminas; White, Lori

    This manuscript describes the coupling of bioaerosol collection and the use of real-time PCR (RT-PCR) to quantify the airborne bacteria. The quantity of collected bacteria determined by RT-PCR is compared with conventional quantification techniques, such as culturing, microscopy and airborne microorganism counting by using optical particle counter (OPC). Our data show that an experimental approach used to develop standard curves for use with RT-PCR is critical for accurate sample quantification. Using universal primers we generated 12 different standard curves which were used to quantify model organism Escherichia coli (Migula) Catellani from air samples. Standard curves prepared using a traditional approach, where serially diluted genomic DNA extracted from pure cultured bacteria were used in PCR reaction as a template DNA yielded significant underestimation of sample quantities compared to airborne microorganism concentration as measured by an OPC. The underestimation was especially pronounced when standard curves were built using colony forming units (CFUs). In contrast, the estimate of cell concentration in an air sample by RT-PCR was more accurate (˜60% compared to the airborne microorganism concentration) when the standard curve was built using aerosolized E. coli. The accuracy improved even further (˜100%) when air samples used to build the standard curves were diluted first, then the DNA extracted from each dilution was amplified by the RT-PCR—to mimic the handling of air samples with unknown and possibly low concentration. Therefore, our data show that standard curves used for quantification by RT-PCR needs to be prepared using the same environmental matrix and procedures as handling of the environmental sample in question. Reliance on the standard curves generated with cultured bacterial suspension (a traditional approach) may lead to substantial underestimation of microorganism quantities in environmental samples.

  15. Field calibration of polyurethane foam disk passive air samplers for PBDEs.

    PubMed

    Chaemfa, Chakra; Barber, Jonathan L; Moeckel, Claudia; Gocht, Tilman; Harner, Tom; Holoubek, Ivan; Klanova, Jana; Jones, Kevin C

    2009-10-01

    A field study was performed to derive uptake rates of airborne polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) to polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers (PAS) and to investigate the influence of deployment location and device design. Data are presented on the gas-particle partitioning of PBDEs, since atmospheric phase distribution was considered to be a variable which could affect sampler performance. Uptake rates for these compounds were similar to those derived previously for other classes of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) (approximately 2-6 m(3)/day), with rates higher for the higher brominated species. Whilst other compound classes (e.g. polychlorinated biphenyls) are predominantly present in the air in the gas phase, heavier PBDEs have an association with particulates in the atmosphere at ambient temperatures. In this study, the PUF disk PAS therefore sampled PBDEs present in the gas phase and on fine aerosols with a similar sampling efficiency to those which are predominantly gas phase compounds. Compounds which are exclusively on particles are sampled less efficiently. A comparison of the three most commonly used PUF deployment configurations, used by different research groups, indicated little difference in uptake rates. The ranges of derived air concentrations for BDE-47, -99, and -183 between three sampler designs were 7.5-9.8, 7.4-12.4, and 4.7-6.6 pg/m(3), respectively. This suggests the robustness of this sampler in comparisons between regional and global campaigns where these three designs are employed.

  16. Force versus current and air gap calibration of a double acting magnetic thrust bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Baun, D.O.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Force versus current and air gap measurements were obtained for a double acting thrust bearing. Static force measurements were made for various air gap settings and bearing current combinations. The resulting data was reduced and an optimized expression representing the force versus current and air gap relationship of the bearing was found. In addition, a theoretical force model was developed using simple magnetic circuit theory and magnetic properties obtained from standard magnetic material tests. The theoretical and the experimentally derived force models were compared. Hysteresis tests were conducted with the thrust disk in the centered position for various current perturbation amplitudes about the design bias current. Hysteresis effects were shown to cause a difference between the measured force as the current was increasing as compared to when the current was decreasing. A second order polynomial expression was developed to express the coercive force as a function of the perturbation current amplitude. The bearing frequency response was examined by injecting sinusoidal currents of varying frequencies into the bearing. A maximum actuator bandwidth of approximately 700 Hz was determined. Above 700 Hz the bearing frequency response could not be distinguished from the test fixture frequency response.

  17. Modification and calibration of a passive air sampler for monitoring vapor and particulate phase brominated flame retardants in indoor air: application to car interiors.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Harrad, Stuart

    2010-04-15

    A passive air sampler was modified to monitor both vapor and particulate phase brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in indoor air using polyurethane foam disks and glass fiber filters (GFF). Significant correlation (p < 0.01) was observed between passive (ng day(-1)) and active sampler (ng m(-3)) derived BFR concentrations in an office microenvironment (r = 0.94 and 0.89 for vapor and particulate phase BFRs, respectively). A calibration experiment was performed where concentrations of target BFRs were obtained for an office using a low volume active sampler operated over a 50 day period alongside passive samplers. The passive uptake rates of each studied BFR ranged between (0.558-1.509 ng day(-1)) and (0.448-0.579 ng day(-1)) for vapor and particulate phases, respectively. The passive entrapment of particles by the GFF was investigated using environmental scanning electron microscopy which revealed gravitational deposition of particles as the main mechanism involved. The developed sampler was applied to monitor BFR concentrations in 21 cars. Average concentrations of SigmaHBCDs, TBBP-A, and Sigmatetra-deca BDEs were 400, 3, and 2200 pg m(-3) in cabins and 400, 1, and 1600 pg m(-3) in trunks. No significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed between levels of SigmaHBCDs and Sigmatrito hexa- BDEs in cabins and trunks. However, TBBP-A, BDE-209, and SigmaPBDEs concentrations were significantly higher in vehicle cabins.

  18. Evaluating the PAS-SIM model using a passive air sampler calibration study for pesticides.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Andrés Ramírez; Hayward, Stephen J; Armitage, James M; Wania, Frank

    2015-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a model for simulating the uptake of various pesticides on passive air samplers (PAS). From 2006-2007 a series of PAS using XAD-resin were deployed at Egbert, a rural agricultural site in southern Ontario, Canada, to measure the uptake of pesticides for time periods ranging from two months to one year. A continuous increase in sequestered amounts was observed for most pesticides, except for trifluralin and pendimethalin, which could conceivably be subject to substantial degradation inside the sampler. Continuous low-volume active air samples taken during the same period, along with data on weather conditions, allowed for the simulation of the uptake of the pesticides using the model (PAS-SIM). The modelled accumulation of pesticides on the PAS over the deployment period was in good agreement with the experimental data in most cases (i.e., within a factor of two) providing insight into the uptake kinetics of this type of sampler in the field. Passive sampling rates (PSR, m(3) d(-1)) were determined from the empirical data generated for this study using three different methods and compared with the PSRs generated by the model. Overall, the PAS-SIM model, which is capable of accounting for the influence of temperature and wind variations on PSRs, provided reasonable results that range between the three empirical approaches employed and well-established literature values. Further evaluation and application of the PAS-SIM model to explore the potential spatial and temporal variability in PAS uptake kinetics is warranted, particularly for established monitoring sites where detailed meteorological data are more likely to be available.

  19. Space-based retrievals of air-sea gas transfer velocities using altimeters: Calibration for dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddijn-Murphy, Lonneke; Woolf, David K.; Marandino, Christa

    2012-08-01

    This study is the first to directly correlate gas transfer velocity, measured at sea using the eddy-correlation (EC) technique, and satellite altimeter backscattering. During eight research cruises in different parts of the world, gas transfer velocity of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was measured. The sample times and locations were compared with overpass times and locations of remote sensing satellites carrying Ku-band altimeters: ERS-1, ERS-2, TOPEX, POSEIDON, GEOSAT Follow-On, JASON-1, JASON-2 and ENVISAT. The result was 179 pairs of gas transfer velocity measurements and backscattering coefficients. An inter-calibration of the different altimeters significantly reduced data scatter. The inter-calibrated data was best fitted to a quadratic relation between the inverse of the backscattering coefficients and the gas transfer velocity measurements. A gas transfer parameterization based on backscattering, corresponding with sea surface roughness, might be expected to perform better than wind speed-based parameterizations. Our results, however, did not show improvement compared to direct correlation of shipboard wind speeds. The relationship of gas transfer velocity to satellite-derived backscatter, or wind speed, is useful to provide retrieval algorithms. Gas transfer velocity (cm/hr), corrected to a Schmidt number of 660, is proportional to wind speed (m/s). The measured gas transfer velocity is controlled by both the individual water-side and air-side gas transfer velocities. We calculated the latter using a numerical scheme, to derive water-side gas transfer velocity. DMS is sufficiently soluble to neglect bubble-mediated gas transfer, thus, the DMS transfer velocities could be applied to estimate water-side gas transfer velocities through the unbroken surface of any other gas.

  20. Energy absorption buildup factors, exposure buildup factors and Kerma for optically stimulated luminescence materials and their tissue equivalence for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Badiger, N. M.

    2014-11-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) materials are sensitive dosimetric materials used for precise and accurate dose measurement for low-energy ionizing radiation. Low dose measurement capability with improved sensitivity makes these dosimeters very useful for diagnostic imaging, personnel monitoring and environmental radiation dosimetry. Gamma ray energy absorption buildup factors and exposure build factors were computed for OSL materials using the five-parameter Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV for penetration depths up to 40 mean free path. The computed energy absorption buildup factor and exposure buildup factor values were studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. Effective atomic numbers and Kerma relative to air of the selected OSL materials and tissue equivalence were computed and compared with that of water, PMMA and ICRU standard tissues. The buildup factors and kerma relative to air were found dependent upon effective atomic numbers. Buildup factors determined in the present work should be useful in radiation dosimetry, medical diagnostics and therapy, space dosimetry, accident dosimetry and personnel monitoring.

  1. Improved spatial monitoring of air temperature in forested complex terrain: an energy-balance based calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. M.; Thomas, C. K.; Pypker, T. G.; Bond, B. J.; Selker, J. S.; Unsworth, M. H.

    2009-12-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) has great potential for spatial monitoring in hydrology and atmospheric science. DTS systems have an advantage over conventional individual temperature sensors in that thousands of quasi-concurrent temperature measurements may be made along the entire length of a fiber at 1 meter increments by a single instrument, thus increasing measurement precision. However, like any other temperature sensors, the fiber temperature is influenced by energy exchange with its environment, particularly by radiant energy (solar and long-wave) and by wind speed. The objective of this research is to perform an energy-balance based calibration of a DTS fiber system that will reduce the uncertainty of air temperature measurements in open and forested environments. To better understand the physics controlling the fiber temperature reported by the DTS, alternating black and white fiber optic cables were installed on vertical wooden jigs inside a recirculating wind tunnel. A constant irradiance from six 600W halogen lamps was directed on a two meter section of fiber to permit controlled observations of the resulting temperature difference between the black and white fibers as wind speed was varied. The net short and longwave radiation balance of each fiber was measured with an Eppley pyranometer and Kipp and Zonen pyrgeometer. Additionally, accurate air temperature was recorded from a screened platinum resistance thermometer, and sonic anemometers were positioned to record wind speed and turbulence. Relationships between the temperature excess of each fiber, net radiation, and wind speed were developed and will be used to derive correction terms in future field work. Preliminary results indicate that differential heating of fibers (black-white) is driven largely by net radiation with wind having a smaller but consistent effect. Subsequent work will require field verification to confirm that the observed wind tunnel correction algorithms are

  2. Effect of the Scattering Radiation in Air and Two Type of Slap Phantom between PMMA and the ISO Water Phantom for Personal Dosimeters Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamwang, N.; Rungseesumran, T.; Saengchantr, D.; Monthonwattana, S.; Pungkun, V.

    2017-06-01

    The calibration of personal dosimeter to determine the quantities of the personal dose equivalent, Hp(d), is required to be placed on a suitable phantom in order to provide a reasonable approximation to the radiation backscattering properties as equivalent as part of body. The dosimeter which is worn on the trunk usually calibrated with slap phantom which recommended in ICRU 47 with dimension of 30 cm (w) x 30 cm (h) x 15 cm (t) PMMA slab phantom to achieve uniformity in calibration procedures, on the other hand the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), ISO 4037-3, proposed the ISO water slap phantom, with PMMA walls, same dimension but different wall thickness (front wall 2.5 mm and other side wall 10 mm thick) and fill with water. However, some laboratories are still calibrating a personal dosimeter in air in term of ambient dose equivalent, H*(d). This research study the effect of the scattering radiation in two type of those slap phantoms and in air, to calibrate two type of OSL (XA and LA) and electronic personal dosimeters. The X-ray and Cs-137 radiation field with the energy range from 33 to 662 keV were used. The results of this study will be discussed.

  3. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  4. Elucidating inequality in Nubia: an examination of entheseal changes at Kerma (Sudan).

    PubMed

    Schrader, Sarah A

    2015-02-01

    Located 10 km south of the Third Cataract of the Nile River, the ancient city of Kerma was once capital to the second largest state in Africa. The Eastern Cemetery at Kerma (∼4 km east of city center) encompasses 80+ hectares and was used over a period of 1,500 years (3,200-1,500 BC). Excavated in the early 20th century by George Reisner, the cemetery contained an estimated 20,000-40,000 individuals. Reisner classified these burials into multiple categories, including chiefs and human sacrifices, based on burial position and grave goods. This study investigates the skeletal embodiment of social inequality by examining variation in entheseal severity between the Kerma burial classifications. Seventeen entheses were examined using the Hawkey and Merbs (1995) scoring method (n = 205 individuals); age, sex, and body size variables were considered by employing Mann-Whitney U tests and partial Spearman's correlations. This analysis suggests that significant differences in entheseal changes existed between select burial types. Specifically, "corridor sacrifices" had significantly higher rates of entheseal changes while "chiefs" and "subsidiary burials" had similar entheseal changes; furthermore, within these burial categories, males had higher entheseal scores despite body size controls. The elevated entheseal changes in the sacrificial burials may be due to an intensive agro-pastoral lifestyle or other demanding forms of manual labor. In conclusion, the disparity of entheseal markers between burial subgroups at Kerma might reflect a degree of social inequality within this state level society. This bioarchaeological research informs our understanding of socially-defined categories of persons as well as everyday life in Ancient Kerma.

  5. Influence of the non-homogeneity of Ir-192 wires in calibration of well chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Calatayud, J.; Ballester, F.; Granero, D.; Brosed, A.

    2003-12-01

    All international recommendations point out as necessary the calibration or verification of the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) for brachytherapy sources (independent of manufacturer established value) prior to their clinical use. The most common procedure for RAKR measurement in iridium wires is based on the use of well chambers with specific inserts that set the wire in a fixed position; previously, the electrometer plus well chamber with insert (EWI) was calibrated by using a source obtained from an accredited laboratory for which the RKAR was established precisely, called the 'reference' source. The distribution of Ir-192 material in the wire could be not perfectly homogeneous all along its length, and in this case the influence of these inhomogeneities in the calibration process should be studied. This paper focuses on the evaluation of this topic and an analytical and experimental study is presented taking into account the non-homogeneity of Ir-192 material along the wire for both the reference source (of length 14 cm) and a wire of unknown RAKR. This study is based on measurements with a 1 cm iridium wire on a rectilinear insert considering either of the two available reference sources (1 or 14 cm length), and has been experimentally evaluated using two typical well chambers. The main conclusion of the study is that if the non-homogeneity of the wires is lower than 5% the effect of non-homogeneity on RAKR measurements is negligible for rectilinear inserts even for short well chambers.

  6. Performance evaluation of diagnostic radiology dosimeters in clinical and calibration x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, Costantine John; Boziari, Argyro; Manetou, Aggeliki

    2010-05-01

    Diagnostic radiology dosimeters should comply with International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61674 standard in order to perform measurements with sufficient accuracy and reliability. The calibration of a dosimeter is performed under, and pertains to, reference conditions. However, in most cases, dosimeters are used for clinical measurements under non-reference conditions. The performance, in terms of accuracy of dose measurements, of six commercial diagnostic radiology dosimeters was tested at reference calibration and at clinical non-reference conditions. The results showed that all dosimeters being tested exhibited limits of variation within the +/-5% IEC limits. Depending on the detector's physical and operational properties, the dosimeters' energy dependence of response values varied from -4.7% to +4.2%. To address this variation of response, calibration at three radiation qualities (RQR 3, RQR 5, and RQR 9), at least, is recommended. Different irradiation conditions such as air kerma rate, x-ray tube design, x-ray system, and dosimeter operational modes affect the dosimeters' response by less than 3%. A dosimeter that complies with IEC standards and operates according to its specifications could be used at typical clinical irradiation conditions taking into account only corrections for the energy dependence of response. In this case, the error in dose accuracy is expected to be less than 3%.

  7. SU-E-T-155: Calibration of Variable Longitudinal Strength 103Pd Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J; Radtke, J; Micka, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy sources with variable longitudinal strength (VLS) allow for a customized intensity along the length of the source. These have applications in focal brachytherapy treatments of prostate cancer where dose boosting can be achieved through modulation of intra-source strengths. This work focused on development of a calibration methodology for VLS sources based on measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of five 1 cm {sup 10} {sup 3}Pd sources each containing four regions of variable {sup 103}Pd strength. Methods: The air-kerma strengths of the sources were measured with a variable-aperture free-air chamber (VAFAC). Source strengths were also measured using a well chamber. The in-air azimuthal and polar anisotropy of the sources were measured by rotating them in front of a NaI scintillation detector and were calculated with MC simulations. Azimuthal anisotropy results were normalized to their mean intensity values. Polar anisotropy results were normalized to their average transverse axis intensity values. The relative longitudinal strengths of the sources were measured via on-contact irradiations with radiochromic film, and were calculated with MC simulations. Results: The variable {sup 103}Pd loading of the sources was validated by VAFAC and well chamber measurements. Ratios of VAFAC air-kerma strengths and well chamber responses were within ±1.3% for all sources. Azimuthal anisotropy results indicated that ≥95% of the normalized values for all sources were within ±1.7% of the mean values. Polar anisotropy results indicated variations within ±0.3% for a ±7.6° angular region with respect to the source transverse axis. Locations and intensities of the {sup 103}Pd regions were validated by radiochromic film measurements and MC simulations. Conclusion: The calibration methodology developed in this work confirms that the VLS sources investigated have a high level of polar uniformity, and that the strength and longitudinal intensity can be

  8. Prospects of using Bayesian model averaging for the calibration of one-month forecasts of surface air temperature over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chansoo; Suh, Myoung-Seok

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the prospect of calibrating probabilistic forecasts of surface air temperature (SAT) over South Korea by using Bayesian model averaging (BMA). We used 63 months of simulation results from four regional climate models (RCMs) with two boundary conditions (NCEP-DOE and ERA-interim) over the CORDEX East Asia. Rank histograms and residual quantile-quantile (R-Q-Q) plots showed that the simulation skills of the RCMs differ according to season and geographic location, but the RCMs show a systematic cold bias irrespective of season and geographic location. As a result, the BMA weights are clearly dependent on geographic location, season, and correlations among the models. The one-month equal weighted ensemble (EWE) outputs for the 59 stations over South Korea were calibrated using the BMA method for 48 monthly time periods based on BMA weights obtained from the previous 15 months of training data. The predictive density function was calibrated using BMA and the individual forecasts were weighted according to their performance. The raw ensemble forecasts were assessed using the flatness of the rank histogram and the R-Q-Q plot. The results showed that BMA improves the calibration of the EWE and the other weighted ensemble forecasts irrespective of season, simulation skill of the RCM, and geographic location. In addition, deterministic-style BMA forecasts usually perform better than the deterministic forecast of the single best member.

  9. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  10. Primary calibration of coiled {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, Adam B.; Culberson, Wesley S.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Micka, John A.

    2008-01-15

    Coiled {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources have been developed by RadioMed Corporation for use as low-dose-rate (LDR) interstitial implants. The coiled sources are provided in integer lengths from 1 to 6 cm and address many common issues seen with traditional LDR brachytherapy sources. The current standard for determining the air-kerma strength (S{sub K}) of low-energy LDR brachytherapy sources is the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Wide-Angle Free-Air Chamber (NIST WAFAC). Due to geometric limitations, however, the NIST WAFAC is unable to determine the S{sub K} of sources longer than 1 cm. This project utilized the University of Wisconsin's Variable-Aperture Free-Air Chamber (UW VAFAC) to determine the S{sub K} of the longer coiled sources. The UW VAFAC has shown agreement in S{sub K} values of 1 cm length coils to within 1% of those determined with the NIST WAFAC, but the UW VAFAC does not share the same geometric limitations as the NIST WAFAC. A new source holder was constructed to hold the coiled sources in place during measurements with the UW VAFAC. Correction factors for the increased length of the sources have been determined and applied to the measurements. Using the new source holder and corrections, the S{sub K} of 3 and 6 cm coiled sources has been determined. Corrected UW VAFAC data and ionization current measurements from well chambers have been used to determine calibration coefficients for use in the measurement of 3 and 6 cm coiled sources in well chambers. Thus, the UW VAFAC has provided the first transferable, primary measurement of low-energy LDR brachytherapy sources with lengths greater than 1 cm.

  11. Low-Cost 3D Laser Scanning in Air or Water Using Self-Calibrating Structured Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleier, M.; Nüchter, A.

    2017-02-01

    In-situ calibration of structured light scanners in underwater environments is time-consuming and complicated. This paper presents a self-calibrating line laser scanning system, which enables the creation of dense 3D models with a single fixed camera and a freely moving hand-held cross line laser projector. The proposed approach exploits geometric constraints, such as coplanarities, to recover the depth information and is applicable without any prior knowledge of the position and orientation of the laser projector. By employing an off-the-shelf underwater camera and a waterproof housing with high power line lasers an affordable 3D scanning solution can be built. In experiments the performance of the proposed technique is studied and compared with 3D reconstruction using explicit calibration. We demonstrate that the scanning system can be applied to above-the-water as well as underwater scenes.

  12. Shock shapes on blunt bodies in hypersonic-hypervelocity helium, air, and CO2 flows, and calibration results in Langley 6-inch expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1975-01-01

    Shock shape results for flat-faced cylinders, spheres, and spherically blunted cones in various test gases, along with preliminary results from a calibration study performed in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube are presented. Free-stream velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec are generated at hypersonic conditions with helium, air, and CO2, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Ideal-gas shock shape predictions, in which an effective ratio of specific heats is used as input, are compared with the measured results. The effect of model diameter is examined to provide insight to the thermochemical state of the flow in the shock layer. The regime for which equilibrium exists in the shock layer for the present air and CO2 test conditions is defined. Test core flow quality, test repeatability, and comparison of measured and predicted expansion-tube flow quantities are discussed.

  13. Absorbed Dose and Collision Kerma Relationship for High-Energy Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibata, Claudio Hissao

    Historically, exposure has been used as an important quantity to specify X- or (gamma)- ray beams. For any photon beam the energy fluence is proportional to the exposure. Exposure can be calculated and/or measured if the spectrum of the beam is known and charged particle equilibrium (CPE) exists. For low energy photons (up to approximately 1 MeV), due to the existence of CPE, absorbed dose (D) is equal to the collision kerma (K(,c)). For megavoltage photons this equality is lost due to CPE failure, which also restricts the measurement of exposure. It is possible, though, to find a relationship between the absorbed dose and collision kerma when transient charged particle equilibrium (TCPE) exists. This basic idea was originally proposed by Roesch in 1958 and its refinement has been discussed by Attix in 1979 and 1983. The modified Roesch's formula which enables us to measure exposure even for high-energy photons is given by D = (beta) K(,c) (TURNEQ) K(,c) (1 + (mu)' ) where (mu)' is the effective linear attenuation coefficient and is the mean distance the secondary electrons carry kinetic energy in the direction of the photon beam while depositing it as absorbed dose. The symbol (beta) is the quotient of the absorbed dose and the collision kerma. The importance of Roesch's formula has been recognized and used implicitly in the recent dosimetry protocol of the AAPM (Task Group 21). However, the value used in the protocol is based on theoretical calculations which do not include photon scattering. As a result of the present effort the parameters (mu)' and have been determined experimentally, for the first time. The dependence of (beta) on several factors has been studied and (beta) has been obtained including the effects of scattering. Calculations were also performed for several photon energies and materials, using the Roesch method, which does not include photon scattering effects. Comparisons of measured and calculated values of show

  14. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M.; Gazdic-Santic, Maja

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and

  15. Comparison of measurements on tissue kerma and photon radiation dose made with emergency dosemeters

    SciTech Connect

    Golub, V.V.; Lashuk, A.I.; Shalin, V.A.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the tissue equivalence and tissue kerma for dosimetric tissue-equivalent detectors with allowance for the neutron spectra. Results are given for the calculated dose sensitivities for the DINA and GNEIS dosemeters for a portion of the neutron spectra recommended by IAEA for comparative tests. The measurements were made with five nuclear systems - BR-10, RF-GS, BR-1-21, BR-1-21, and IBR-30 - as well as with accelerators. Doses from photon radiation were also measured using thermoluminescent and photoluminescent dosemeters sensitive to neutrons.

  16. Comparative investigation of laser ablation plumes in air and argon by analysis of spectral line shapes: Insights on calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Jörg; Gerhard, Christoph; Axente, Emanuel; Dutouquet, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the characteristic features of plume expansion in air and argon resulting from ultraviolet laser ablation of solid matter in conditions typically applied in material analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Barite crown glass is chosen as a target material for the characteristic emission spectrum suitable for plasma diagnostics. The space-integrated plasma emission spectrum recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector is compared to the computed spectral radiance of a nonuniform plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. In particular, resonance lines of neutral sodium atoms and barium ions are observed to probe gradients of temperature and density within the plume. It is shown that laser ablation in argon leads to an almost uniform plasma whereas gradients of temperature and density are evidenced in ambient air. The discrepancy is attributed to the different physical properties of both gases leading to a stronger vapor-gas energy exchange in the case of air. However, strong gradients occur only in a thin peripheral zone, close to the vapor-gas contact front. The larger plasma core appears almost uniform. The peripheral zone of low temperature mostly contributes to the plasma emission spectrum by absorption and material analysis via calibration-free LIBS in air may ignore the nonuniform character of the plasma if only transitions of small optical thickness are considered.

  17. [Development of the 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water (N(D,w))].

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Akifumi; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukahori, Mai; Sakata, Suoh

    2012-01-01

    A primary standard for the absorbed dose rate to water in a 60Co gamma-ray field was established at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) in fiscal year 2011. Then, a 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water was developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL). The results of an IAEA/WHO TLD SSDL audit demonstrated that there was good agreement between NIRS stated absorbed dose to water and IAEA measurements. The IAEA guide based on the ISO standard was used to estimate the relative expanded uncertainty of the calibration factor for a therapy-level Farmer type ionization chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water (N(D,w)) with the new field. The uncertainty of N(D,w) was estimated to be 1.1% (k = 2), which corresponds to approximately one third of the value determined in the existing air kerma field. The dissemination of traceability of the calibration factor determined in the new field is expected to diminish the uncertainty of dose delivered to patients significantly.

  18. Calibrating R-LINE model results with observational data to develop annual mobile source air pollutant fields at fine spatial resolution: Application in Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xinxin; Russell, Armistead G.; Sampath, Poornima; Mulholland, James A.; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Kim, Yunhee; D'Onofrio, David

    2016-12-01

    The Research LINE-source (R-LINE) dispersion model for near-surface releases is a dispersion model developed to estimate the impacts of line sources, such as automobiles, on primary air pollutant levels. In a multiyear application in Atlanta, R-LINE simulations overestimated concentrations and spatial gradients compared to measurements. In this study we present a computationally efficient procedure for calculating annual average spatial fields and develop an approach for calibrating R-LINE concentrations with observational data. Simulated hourly concentrations of PM2.5, CO and NOx from mobile sources at 250 m resolution in the 20-county Atlanta area based on average diurnal emission profiles and meteorological categories were used to estimate annual averages. Compared to mobile source PM2.5 impacts estimated by chemical mass balance with gas constraints (CMB-GC), a source apportionment model based on PM2.5 speciation measurements, R-LINE estimates of traffic-generated PM2.5 impacts were found to be higher by a factor of 1.8 on average across all sites. Compared to observations of daily 1 h maximum CO and NOx, R-LINE estimates were higher by factors of 1.3 and 4.2 on average, respectively. Annual averages estimated by R-LINE were calibrated by regression with observations from 2002 to 2011 at multiple sites for daily 1 h maximum CO and NOx and with measurement-based mobile source impacts estimated by CMB-GC for PM2.5. The calibration reduced normalized mean bias (NMB) from 29% to 0.3% for PM2.5, from 22% to -1% for CO, and from 303% to 49% for NOx. Cross-validation analysis (withholding sites one at a time) leads to NMB of 13%, 1%, and 69% for PM2.5, CO, and NOx, respectively. The observation-calibrated R-LINE annual average spatial fields were compared with pollutant fields from observation-blended, 12 km resolution Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model fields for CO and NOx, with Pearson correlation R2 values of 0.55 for CO and 0.54 for NOx found. The

  19. TU-G-BRD-04: A Round Robin Dosimetry Intercomparison of Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Calibration Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, R; Alvarez, P; Bednarz, G; Bourland, J; DeWerd, L; Meltsner, S; Neyman, G; Novotny, J; Petti, P; Rivard, M; Shiu, A; Goetsch, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this multi-institutional study was to compare two new gamma stereotactic radiosurgery (GSRS) dosimetry protocols to existing calibration methods. The ultimate goal was to guide AAPM Task Group 178 in recommending a standard GSRS dosimetry protocol. Methods: Nine centers (ten GSRS units) participated in the study. Each institution made eight sets of dose rate measurements: six with two different ionization chambers in three different 160mm-diameter spherical phantoms (ABS plastic, Solid Water and liquid water), and two using the same ionization chambers with a custom in-air positioning jig. Absolute dose rates were calculated using a newly proposed formalism by the IAEA working group for small and non-standard radiation fields and with a new air-kerma based protocol. The new IAEA protocol requires an in-water ionization chamber calibration and uses previously reported Monte-Carlo generated factors to account for the material composition of the phantom, the type of ionization chamber, and the unique GSRS beam configuration. Results obtained with the new dose calibration protocols were compared to dose rates determined by the AAPM TG-21 and TG-51 protocols, with TG-21 considered as the standard. Results: Averaged over all institutions, ionization chambers and phantoms, the mean dose rate determined with the new IAEA protocol relative to that determined with TG-21 in the ABS phantom was 1.000 with a standard deviation of 0.008. For TG-51, the average ratio was 0.991 with a standard deviation of 0.013, and for the new in-air formalism it was 1.008 with a standard deviation of 0.012. Conclusion: Average results with both of the new protocols agreed with TG-21 to within one standard deviation. TG-51, which does not take into account the unique GSRS beam configuration or phantom material, was not expected to perform as well as the new protocols. The new IAEA protocol showed remarkably good agreement with TG-21. Conflict of Interests: Paula Petti

  20. Tissue kerma vs distance relationships for initial nuclear radiation from the atomic devices detonated over Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III; Scott, W.H. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    Initial nuclear radiation is comprised of prompt neutrons and prompt primary gammas from an exploding nuclear device, prompt secondary gammas produced by neutron interactions in the environment, and delayed neutrons and delayed fission-product gammas from the fireball formed after the nuclear device explodes. These various components must all be considered in establishing tissue kerma vs distance relationships which describe the decrease of initial nuclear radiation with distance in Hiroshima and in Nagasaki. The tissue kerma at ground evel from delayed fission-product gammas and delayed neutrons was investigated using the NUIDEA code developed by Science Applications, Inc. This code incorporates very detailed models which can take into account such features as the rise of the fireball, the rapid radioactive decay of fission products in it, and the perturbation of the atmosphere by the explosion. Tissue kerma vs distance relationships obtained by summing results of these current state-of-the-art calculations will be discussed. Our results clearly show that the prompt secondary gammas and delayed fission-product gammas are the dominant components of total tissue kerma from initial nuclear radiation in the cases of the atomic (or pure-fission) devices detonated over Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  1. Design and Calibration of a Flush Air Data System (FADS) for Prediction of the Atmospheric Properties During Re-Entry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    during re- entry Professor Olivier P. Chazot Von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics (VKI) 72 Chaussee de Waterloo Rhode-Saint-Genese... entry 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-11-1-3079 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 11-3079 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Professor...no prior knowledge. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Instrumentation, Hypersonics, FADS, Flush Air Data System, Atmospheric Re- entry

  2. Measuring (13) C-enriched CO2 in air with a cavity ring-down spectroscopy gas analyser: Evaluation and calibration.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Dane; Bodé, Samuel; Boeckx, Pascal

    2017-08-25

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) is becoming increasingly popular for δ(13) C-CO2 analysis of air. However, little is known about the effect of high (13) C abundances on CRDS performance. Overlap between (12) CO2 and (13) CO2 spectral lines may adversely affect isotopic-CO2 CRDS measurements of (13) C-enriched samples. Resolving this issue is important so that CRDS analysers can be used in CO2 flux studies involving (13) C-labelled tracers. We tested a Picarro G2131-i CRDS isotopic-CO2 gas analyser with specialty gravimetric standards of widely varying (13) C abundance (from natural to 20.1 atom%) and CO2 mole fraction (xCO2 : <0.1 to 2116 ppm) in synthetic air. The presence of spectroscopic interference between (12) CO2 and (13) CO2 bands was assessed by analysing errors in measurements of the standards. A multi-component calibration strategy was adopted, incorporating isotope ratio and mole fraction data to ensure accuracy and consistency in corrected values of δ(13) C-CO2 , x(12) CO2 , and x(13) CO2 . CRDS measurements of x(13) CO2 were found to be accurate throughout the tested range (<0.005 to 100 ppm). On the other hand, spectral cross-talk in x(12) CO2 measurements of standards containing elevated levels of (13) CO2 led to inaccuracy in x(12) CO2 , total-xCO2 (x(12) CO2 + x(13) CO2 ), and δ(13) C-CO2 data. An empirical relationship for x(12) CO2 measures that incorporated (13) C/(12) C isotope ratio (i.e. (13) CO2 /(12) CO2 , RCO2 ) as a secondary (non-linear) variable was found to compensate for the perturbations, and enabled accurate instrument calibration for all CO2 compositions covered by our standard gases. (13) C-enrichement in CO2 leads to minor errors in CRDS measurements of x(12) CO2 . We propose an empirical correction for measurements of (13) C-enriched CO2 in air by CRDS instruments such as the Picarro G2131-i. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. The determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air with free hanging filters as passive samplers, and a new calibration method using fritted bubblers.

    PubMed

    Heeres, Paul; Setiawan, Rineksa; Krol, Maarten Cornelis; Adema, Eduard Hilbrand

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes two new methods for the determination of NO(2) in the ambient air. The first method consists of free hanging filters with a diameter of 2.5 cm as passive samplers. The filters are impregnated with triethanolamine to bind NO(2). With standard colorimetrical analysis, the amount of NO(2) on the filters is determined. The second method is performed with fritted bubblers filled with Saltzman reagent, where, with a special procedure the absorption efficiencies of the bubblers are determined using ambient air, without the use of standard gases and electronic analytical instruments. The results of the bubblers are used to calibrate the free hanging filters. The two methods were applied simultaneously in the city of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The methods are inexpensive and very well suited for use in low-budget situations. A characteristic of the free filter is the Sampling Volume, SV. This is the ratio of the amount of NO(2) on the filter and the ambient concentration. With the filter used in this study, the amount of triethanolamine and exposure time, the SV is 0.0166 m(3). The sampling rate (SR) of the filter, 4.6 cm(3)/s, is high. Hourly averaged measurements are performed for 15 hours per day in four busy streets. The measured amounts of NO(2) on the filters varied between 0.57 and 2.02 microg NO(2), at ambient air concentrations of 32 to 141 microg/m(3) NO(2). During the experiments the wind velocity was between 0.2 and 2.0 m/s, the relative humidity between 24 and 83 % and the temperature between 295 K and 311 K. These variations in weather conditions have no influence on the uptake of NO(2).

  4. Calibration of Raman spectroscopy in the stress measurement of air-plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Lord, Oliver; Flewitt, Peter E J

    2012-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used widely on a range of components that operate at high temperatures. We report measurement of the factor that is required to convert the Raman shift to stress for air plasma sprayed yttria (7 wt %) stabilized tetragonal zirconia (ZrO(2)) (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings. The factor is evaluated for the as-coated condition and also following a heat treatment at 1000 °C for 1050 h. Two Raman bands at 608 cm(-1) and 640 cm(-1) have been investigated in a diamond anvil cell under hydrostatic pressure up to ~24 GPa. In the range of zero to ~1.6 GPa, a linear behavior was observed in terms of the shifts of these two Raman bands with a gradient similar to dense bulk tetragonal ZrO(2). From these measurements the factors to convert wavenumber shift to stress have been derived. The application of these conversion factors to stress measurement in TBC coated test specimens and components is discussed.

  5. K{sub Air} and H*(10) Rate Constants for Gamma Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Juarez, R. Rodriguez; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Davila, V. M. Hernandez; Mercado, G. A.

    2008-08-11

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to estimate the Air Kerma rate constant and the Ambient dose equivalent rate constant for 139 monoenergetic photon sources. The factor that relates activity to air kerma rate or to ambient dose equivalent is useful to estimate the dose from a photon emitter source. Here 139 point-like and monoenergetic gamma-ray sources, ranging from 0.01 to 10 MeV were utilized in Monte Carlo calculations to estimate both gamma factors. These factors were utilized to calculate the air kerma-and-ambient dose equivalent rate constants for {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba, {sup 198}Au, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 131}I, whose values were compared with those published in the literature.

  6. Absolute calorimetric calibration of low energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Kurt E.

    In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in the use of permanent radioactive source implants in the treatment of prostate cancer. A small radioactive source encapsulated in a titanium shell is used in this type of treatment. The radioisotopes used are generally 125I or 103Pd. Both of these isotopes have relatively short half-lives, 59.4 days and 16.99 days, respectively, and have low-energy emissions and a low dose rate. These factors make these sources well suited for this application, but the calibration of these sources poses significant metrological challenges. The current standard calibration technique involves the measurement of ionization in air to determine the source air-kerma strength. While this has proved to be an improvement over previous techniques, the method has been shown to be metrologically impure and may not be the ideal means of calbrating these sources. Calorimetric methods have long been viewed to be the most fundamental means of determining source strength for a radiation source. This is because calorimetry provides a direct measurement of source energy. However, due to the low energy and low power of the sources described above, current calorimetric methods are inadequate. This thesis presents work oriented toward developing novel methods to provide direct and absolute measurements of source power for low-energy low dose rate brachytherapy sources. The method is the first use of an actively temperature-controlled radiation absorber using the electrical substitution method to determine total contained source power of these sources. The instrument described operates at cryogenic temperatures. The method employed provides a direct measurement of source power. The work presented here is focused upon building a metrological foundation upon which to establish power-based calibrations of clinical-strength sources. To that end instrument performance has been assessed for these source strengths. The intent is to establish the limits of

  7. MTS-6 detectors calibration by using 239Pu-Be neutron source.

    PubMed

    Wrzesień, Małgorzata; Albiniak, Łukasz; Al-Hameed, Hiba

    2017-09-28

    Thermoluminescent detectors, type MTS-6, containing isotope 6Li (lithium) are sensitive in the range of thermal neutron energy; the 239Pu-Be (plutonium-and-beryllium) source emits neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 11 MeV. These seemingly contradictory elements may be combined by using the paraffin moderator, a determined density of thermal neutrons in the paraffin block and a conversion coefficient neutron flux to kerma, not forgetting the simultaneous registration of the photon radiation inseparable from the companion neutron radiation. The main aim of this work is to present the idea of calibration of thermoluminescent detectors that consist of a 6Li isotope, by using 239Pu-Be neutron radiation source. In this work, MTS-6 and MTS-7 thermoluminescent detectors and a plutonium-and-beryllium (239Pu-Be) neutron source were used. Paraffin wax fills the block, acting as a moderator. The calibration idea was based on the determination of dose equivalent rate based on the average kerma rate calculated taking into account the empirically determined function describing the density of thermal neutron flux in the paraffin block and a conversion coefficient neutron flux to kerma. The calculated value of the thermal neutron flux density was 1817.5 neutrons/cm2/s and the average value of kerma rate determined on this basis amounted to 244 μGy/h, and the dose equivalent rate 610 μSv/h. The calculated value allowed for the assessment of the length of time of exposure of the detectors directly in the paraffin block. The calibration coefficient for the used batch of detectors is (6.80±0.42)×10-7 Sv/impulse. Med Pr 2017;68(6).

  8. Accuracy and calibration of integrated radiation output indicators in diagnostic radiology: A report of the AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 190

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Pei-Jan P.; Schueler, Beth A.; Balter, Stephen; Strauss, Keith J.; Wunderle, Kevin A.; LaFrance, M. Terry; Kim, Don-Soo; Behrman, Richard H.; Shepard, S. Jeff; Bercha, Ishtiaq H.

    2015-12-15

    Due to the proliferation of disciplines employing fluoroscopy as their primary imaging tool and the prolonged extensive use of fluoroscopy in interventional and cardiovascular angiography procedures, “dose-area-product” (DAP) meters were installed to monitor and record the radiation dose delivered to patients. In some cases, the radiation dose or the output value is calculated, rather than measured, using the pertinent radiological parameters and geometrical information. The AAPM Task Group 190 (TG-190) was established to evaluate the accuracy of the DAP meter in 2008. Since then, the term “DAP-meter” has been revised to air kerma-area product (KAP) meter. The charge of TG 190 (Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators in Diagnostic Radiology) has also been realigned to investigate the “Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators” which is reflected in the title of the task group, to include situations where the KAP may be acquired with or without the presence of a physical “meter.” To accomplish this goal, validation test protocols were developed to compare the displayed radiation output value to an external measurement. These test protocols were applied to a number of clinical systems to collect information on the accuracy of dose display values in the field.

  9. Calibration and validation of an air-displacement plethysmography method for estimating percentage body fat in an elderly population: a comparison among compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Yee, A J; Fuerst, T; Salamone, L; Visser, M; Dockrell, M; Van Loan, M; Kern, M

    2001-11-01

    The use of hydrostatic weighing (HW) to measure body composition in the elderly can be difficult and is based on the assumption of constancy of body compartments. We calibrated and validated a new air-displacement plethysmography (AP) method for measuring body composition in the elderly. A 4-compartment equation for calculating percentage body fat (%BF) that used body density (D(b)), total body water, and bone mineral content was used as the criterion for evaluating %BF estimated by the 2- and 3-compartment models. D(b) was measured by HW [D(b(HW))] and by use of the AP instrument [D(b(AP))] in 30 elderly men and 28 elderly women aged 70-79 y. D(b(AP)) was not significantly different from D(b(HW)). However, analysis of variance showed a significant two-way interaction between sex and compartment model (P < 0.02), indicating that the comparisons between the sexes were different across all compartment models. The %BF calculated for the women was significantly higher than that calculated for the men by both HW and AP and for all compartment models. Our data indicate that D(b(AP)) was not significantly different from D(b(HW)). Although differences were seen in %BF between the sexes, we observed no significant differences among the compartment models within each sex for this group of older individuals.

  10. The IPEM code of practice for electron dosimetry for radiotherapy beams of initial energy from 4 to 25 MeV based on an absorbed dose to water calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites (Chair), IPEM Working Party: D. I.; Du Sautoy, A. R.; Jordan, T.; McEwen, M. R.; Nisbet, A.; Nahum, A. E.; Pitchford, W. G.

    2003-09-01

    This report contains the recommendations of the Electron Dosimetry Working Party of the UK Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The recommendations consist of a code of practice for electron dosimetry for radiotherapy beams of initial energy from 4 to 25 MeV. The code is based on the absorbed dose to water calibration service for electron beams provided by the UK standards laboratory, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). This supplies direct ND,w calibration factors, traceable to a calorimetric primary standard, at specified reference depths over a range of electron energies up to approximately 20 MeV. Electron beam quality is specified in terms of R50,D, the depth in water along the beam central axis at which the dose is 50% of the maximum. The reference depth for any given beam at the NPL for chamber calibration and also for measurements for calibration of clinical beams is 0.6R50,D - 0.1 cm in water. Designated chambers are graphite-walled Farmer-type cylindrical chambers and the NACP- and Roos-type parallel-plate chambers. The practical code provides methods to determine the absorbed dose to water under reference conditions and also guidance on methods to transfer this dose to non-reference points and to other irradiation conditions. It also gives procedures and data for extending up to higher energies above the range where direct calibration factors are currently available. The practical procedures are supplemented by comprehensive appendices giving discussion of the background to the formalism and the sources and values of any data required. The electron dosimetry code improves consistency with the similar UK approach to megavoltage photon dosimetry, in use since 1990. It provides reduced uncertainties, approaching 1% standard uncertainty in optimal conditions, and a simpler formalism than previous air kerma calibration based recommendations for electron dosimetry.

  11. NOTE: Monte Carlo evaluation of kerma in an HDR brachytherapy bunker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Calatayud, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Casal, E.; Crispin, V.; Puchades, V.; León, A.; Verdú, G.

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, the use of high dose rate (HDR) after-loader machines has greatly increased due to the shift from traditional Cs-137/Ir-192 low dose rate (LDR) to HDR brachytherapy. The method used to calculate the required concrete and, where appropriate, lead shielding in the door is based on analytical methods provided by documents published by the ICRP, the IAEA and the NCRP. The purpose of this study is to perform a more realistic kerma evaluation at the entrance maze door of an HDR bunker using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The Monte Carlo results were validated experimentally. The spectrum at the maze entrance door, obtained with Monte Carlo, has an average energy of about 110 keV, maintaining a similar value along the length of the maze. The comparison of results from the aforementioned values with the Monte Carlo ones shows that results obtained using the albedo coefficient from the ICRP document more closely match those given by the Monte Carlo method, although the maximum value given by MC calculations is 30% greater.

  12. Field evaluation and calibration of a small axial passive air sampler for gaseous and particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated PAHs.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Roger; Arnoldsson, Kristina; Lejon, Christian; Hägglund, Lars; Wingfors, Håkan

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated analogues (OPAHs) are ubiquitous air pollutants known to cause adverse health effects. PAH air levels are commonly monitored by active sampling but passive sampling has become popular because of its lower cost and simplicity, which facilitate long-term sampling and increased spatial coverage. However, passive samplers are less suitable for short-term sampling and are in general less accurate than active samplers because they require reliable sampling rate (Rs) measurements for individual analytes under diverse environmental conditions. In this study a small passive sampler designed to sample both particle-bound and gaseous compounds was evaluated and calibrated for PAHs and OPAHs in a traffic environment by co-deployment with active samplers for two weeks. Despite the relatively low average air concentrations of PM10 (20 μg/m(3)), PM2.5 (5 μg/m(3)), total PAHs (4.2 ng/m(3)), and OPAHs (2.3 ng/m(3)) at the site, detectable quantities (on average 24 times above blank values) of the full range of PAHs and OPAHs were captured, with low variability (average RSD of 16%). This was accomplished by using a Tenax(®) TA-modified glass fiber substrate that is compatible with highly sensitive thermal desorption GC-MS analysis, which made it possible to achieve detection limits per sample in the pg range. Experiments with inverted samplers revealed that the relative contribution of gravitational settling to the sampling of particles carrying PAHs and OPAHs was around 3.5 times larger than other deposition mechanisms. Average Rs values for individual OPAHs and PAHs were 0.046 ± 0.03 m(3)/day and 0.12 ± 0.07 m(3)/day, respectively, with no appreciable difference between the values for particle-associated and gaseous compounds. Furthermore, the Rs values were competitive with other currently used passive samplers if normalized for substrate area. Overall, the new sampler's performance, simplicity and

  13. Measuring H, O, li, B, and BE on Planetary Surfaces: Calibration of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (libs) Data Under Air, Vacuum, and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Nelms, M.; Breves, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    other light elements are directly measured are nearly nonexistent in the 1-2 g quantities needed for LIBS analyses. For this study, we have obtained two sample suites that provide calibrations needed for accurate analyses of H, O, B, Be, and Li in geological samples. The first suite of 11 samples was analyzed for oxygen by fast neutron activation analysis. The second suite includes 11 gem-quality minerals representing the major rock-forming species for B, Li, and Be-rich parageneses. Light elements were directly analyzed using a combination of EMPA, XRF, ion microprobe, uranium extraction, proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), and prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA). LIBS spectra were acquired at Mount Holyoke College under air, vacuum, and CO2 to simulate terrestrial, lunar, and martian environments. Spectra were then used to develop three separate calibration models (one for each environment), enabling LIBS characterization of light elements using multivariate analyses. Results show that when direct analyses of H, O, Li, B, and Be are used rather than LOI results, inferred, or indirectly calculated values, optimal root mean squared errors of prediction result. We are actively adding samples to these calibration suites, and we expect that prediction errors (accuracies) of <1wt% for these elements are possible.

  14. In-situ calibration of clinical built-in KAP meters with traceability to a primary standard using a reference KAP meter.

    PubMed

    Malusek, A; Helmrot, E; Sandborg, M; Grindborg, J-E; Carlsson, G Alm

    2014-12-07

    The air kerma-area product (KAP) is used for settings of diagnostic reference levels. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends that doses in diagnostic radiology (including the KAP values) be estimated with an accuracy of at least ± 7% (k = 2). Industry standards defined by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) specify that the uncertainty of KAP meter measurements should be less than ± 25% (k = 2). Medical physicists willing to comply with the IAEA's recommendation need to apply correction factors to KAP values reported by x-ray units. The aim of this work is to present and evaluate a calibration method for built-in KAP meters on clinical x-ray units. The method is based on (i) a tandem calibration method, which uses a reference KAP meter calibrated to measure the incident radiation, (ii) measurements using an energy-independent ionization chamber to correct for the energy dependence of the reference KAP meter, and (iii) Monte Carlo simulations of the beam quality correction factors that correct for differences between beam qualities at a standard laboratory and the clinic. The method was applied to the KAP meter in a Siemens Aristos FX plus unit. It was found that values reported by the built-in KAP meter differed from the more accurate values measured by the reference KAP meter by more than 25% for high tube voltages (more than 140 kV) and heavily filtered beams (0.3 mm Cu). Associated uncertainties were too high to claim that the IEC's limit of 25% was exceeded. Nevertheless the differences were high enough to justify the need for a more accurate calibration of built-in KAP meters.

  15. In-situ calibration of clinical built-in KAP meters with traceability to a primary standard using a reference KAP meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malusek, A.; Helmrot, E.; Sandborg, M.; Grindborg, J.-E.; Alm Carlsson, G.

    2014-12-01

    The air kerma-area product (KAP) is used for settings of diagnostic reference levels. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends that doses in diagnostic radiology (including the KAP values) be estimated with an accuracy of at least ±7% (k = 2). Industry standards defined by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) specify that the uncertainty of KAP meter measurements should be less than +/- 25% (k = 2). Medical physicists willing to comply with the IAEA’s recommendation need to apply correction factors to KAP values reported by x-ray units. The aim of this work is to present and evaluate a calibration method for built-in KAP meters on clinical x-ray units. The method is based on (i) a tandem calibration method, which uses a reference KAP meter calibrated to measure the incident radiation, (ii) measurements using an energy-independent ionization chamber to correct for the energy dependence of the reference KAP meter, and (iii) Monte Carlo simulations of the beam quality correction factors that correct for differences between beam qualities at a standard laboratory and the clinic. The method was applied to the KAP meter in a Siemens Aristos FX plus unit. It was found that values reported by the built-in KAP meter differed from the more accurate values measured by the reference KAP meter by more than 25% for high tube voltages (more than 140 kV) and heavily filtered beams (0.3 mm Cu). Associated uncertainties were too high to claim that the IEC’s limit of 25% was exceeded. Nevertheless the differences were high enough to justify the need for a more accurate calibration of built-in KAP meters.

  16. GPI Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.

    2017-09-01

    "The Gemini Planet Imager requires a large set of Calibrations. These can be split into two major sets, one set associated with each observation and one set related to biweekly calibrations. The observation set is to optimize the correction of miscroshifts in the IFU spectra and the latter set is for correction of detector and instrument cosmetics."

  17. Anemometer calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bate, T.; Calkins, D. E.; Price, P.; Veikins, O.

    1971-01-01

    Calibrator generates accurate flow velocities over wide range of gas pressure, temperature, and composition. Both pressure and flow velocity can be maintained within 0.25 percent. Instrument is essentially closed loop hydraulic system containing positive displacement drive.

  18. Calibration of Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) polarization measurements, and in-flight comparisons with the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) and the Spectropolarimeter for Planetary EXploration (SPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harten, G.; Diner, D. J.; Rheingans, B. E.; Daugherty, B. J.; Xu, F.; Bull, M. A.; Tkatcheva, I. N.; Garay, M. J.; Seidel, F.; Chipman, R. A.; Smit, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) is a remote sensing instrument for the characterization of atmospheric aerosols and clouds. AirMSPI, flying onboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft at 20 km altitude, participates in field campaigns since 2013, including ORACLES (2016). The pushbroom camera is mounted on a programmable, motorized gimbal for multi-angle observations at 10x10 m2 resolution. Eight spectral bands within 355-935 nm are recorded, 3 of which also measure linear polarization. Photoelastic modulators (PEMs) encode the polarized and total intensities in each polarimetric pixel as the amplitude and offset of a modulated intensity pattern, such that the ratio of the two is insensitive to pixel-to-pixel differences. This technique, developed to enable the high-accuracy imaging polarimetry required for aerosol species discrimination, will also be applied in the Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA) satellite instrument. We present the calibration and accuracy validation of AirMSPI polarization measurements. The main calibration, describing the instrument's response to any degree (DoLP) and angle of linear polarization, is performed in the lab using a recently updated, carefully designed and characterized polarization state generator (PSG-2). Validation measurements using an independent polarimeter show agreement in DoLP to within 0.001 for several DoLPs across the 0-1 range. The PEMs' retardances and phases, which are different and not necessarily stable in flight, are extracted from measurements of the on-board validator, a partially polarized light source located inside the instrument housing, which is viewed before and after each target. Although this calibration does not rely on the validator's DoLP, and the validator was not designed for DoLP calibration, the frequent measurements of its DoLP provide an upper limit for AirMSPI's in-flight polarimetric stability, which is 0.001. A correction for the actual PEM retardances and phases in the

  19. Reflectors used to calibrate the DC-8's AirSAR seen here setup in the Costa Rican rain forest by scientist Paul Siqueira from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-05

    Reflectors setup in the La Selva region of the Costa Rican rain forest by scientist Paul Siqueira from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab. These reflectors are used by JPL scientists onboard Dryden's DC-8 aircraft to calibrate the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AirSAR) system. Scientists place these reflectors at known points on the ground, allowing researchers onboard the aircraft to verify their data. AirSAR 2004 Mesoamerica is a three-week expedition by an international team of scientists that uses an all-weather imaging tool, called the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AirSAR) which is located onboard NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory. Scientists from many parts of the world including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are combining ground research done in several areas in Central America with NASA's AirSAR technology to improve and expand on the quality of research they are able to conduct. The radar, developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, can penetrate clouds and also collect data at night. Its high-resolution sensors operate at multiple wavelengths and modes, allowing AirSAR to see beneath treetops, through thin sand, and dry snow pack. AirSAR's 2004 campaign is a collaboration of many U.S. and Central American institutions and scientists, including NASA; the National Science Foundation; the Smithsonian Institution; National Geographic; Conservation International; the Organization of Tropical Studies; the Central American Commission for Environment and Development; and the Inter-American Development Bank.

  20. DS02 fluence spectra for neutrons and gamma rays at Hiroshima and Nagasaki with fluence-to-kerma coefficients and transmission factors for sample measurements.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D; Cullings, Harry M

    2007-11-01

    Fluence spectra at several ground distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are provided along with associated fluence-to-kerma coefficients from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). Also included are transmission factors for calculating expected responses of in situ sample measurements of neutron activation products such as (32)P,(36)Cl,(39)Ar,(41)Ca, (60)Co,(63)Ni,(152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The free-in-air (FIA) fluences calculated in 2002 are available for 240 angles, 69 energy groups, 101 ground distances, 5 heights, 4 radiation source components, 2 cities. The DS02 code uses these fluences partitioned to a prompt and delayed portion, collapsed to 58 energy groups and restricted to 97 ground distances. This is because the fluence spectra were required to be in the same format that was used in the older Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) computer code, of which the DS02 computer code is a modification. The 2002 calculation fluences and the collapsed DS02 code fluences are presented and briefly discussed. A report on DS02, which is available on the website at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, provides tables and figures of the A-bomb neutron and gamma-ray output used as the sources in the 2002 radiation transport calculations. While figures illustrating the fluence spectra at several ground ranges are presented in the DS02 Report, it does not include any tables of the calculated fluence spectra in the DS02 report. This paper provides, at several standard distances from the hypocenter, the numerical information which is required to translate the FIA neutron fluences given in DS02 to a neutron activation measurement or neutron and gamma-ray soft-tissue dose.

  1. Calibration Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurz, Peter; Balogh, Andre; Coffey, Victoria; Dichter, Bronislaw K.; Kasprzak, Wayne T.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Lennartsson, Walter; McFadden, James P.

    Calibration and characterization of particle instruments with supporting flight electronics is necessary for the correct interpretation of the returned data. Generally speaking, the instrument will always return a measurement value (typically in form of a digital number), for example a count rate, for the measurement of an external quantity, which could be an ambient neutral gas density, an ion composition (species measured and amount), or electron density. The returned values are used then to derive parameters associated with the distribution such as temperature, bulk flow speed, differential energy flux and others. With the calibration of the instrument the direct relationship between the external quantity and the returned measurement value has to be established so that the data recorded during flight can be correctly interpreted. While calibration and characterization of an instrument are usually done in ground-based laboratories prior to integration of the instrument in the spacecraft, it can also be done in space.

  2. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  3. 40 CFR 1065.325 - Intake-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Intake-flow calibration. (a) Calibrate intake-air flow meters upon initial installation. Follow the... recommend using a calibration subsonic venturi, ultrasonic flow meter or laminar flow element. We recommend... remove system components for off-site calibration. When installing a flow meter with an...

  4. Recoil proton, alpha particle, and heavy ion impacts on microdosimetry and RBE of fast neutrons: analysis of kerma spectra calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pignol, J P; Slabbert, J

    2001-02-01

    Fast neutrons (FN) have a higher radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) compared with photons, however the mechanism of this increase remains a controversial issue. RBE variations are seen among various FN facilities and at the same facility when different tissue depths or thicknesses of hardening filters are used. These variations lead to uncertainties in dose reporting as well as in the comparisons of clinical results. Besides radiobiology and microdosimetry, another powerful method for the characterization of FN beams is the calculation of total proton and heavy ion kerma spectra. FLUKA and MCNP Monte Carlo code were used to simulate these kerma spectra following a set of microdosimetry measurements performed at the National Accelerator Centre. The calculated spectra confirmed major classical statements: RBE increase is linked to both slow energy protons and alpha particles yielded by (n,alpha) reactions on carbon and oxygen nuclei. The slow energy protons are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 10 MeV, while the alpha particles are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 15 MeV. Looking at the heavy ion kerma from <15 MeV and the proton kerma from neutrons <10 MeV, it is possible to anticipate y* and RBE trends.

  5. Gain and offset calibration reduces variation in exposure-dependent SNR among systems with identical digital flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Charles E.; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Lofton, Brad K.; White, R. Allen

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The conditions under which vendor performance criteria for digital radiography systems are obtained do not adequately simulate the conditions of actual clinical imaging with respect to radiographic technique factors, scatter production, and scatter control. Therefore, the relationship between performance under ideal conditions and performance in clinical practice remains unclear. Using data from a large complement of systems in clinical use, the authors sought to develop a method to establish expected performance criteria for digital flat-panel radiography systems with respect to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) versus detector exposure under clinical conditions for thoracic imaging. Methods: The authors made radiographic exposures of a patient-equivalent chest phantom at 125 kVp and 180 cm source-to-image distance. The mAs value was modified to produce exposures above and below the mAs delivered by automatic exposure control. Exposures measured free-in-air were corrected to the imaging plane by the inverse square law, by the attenuation factor of the phantom, and by the Bucky factor of the grid for the phantom, geometry, and kilovolt peak. SNR was evaluated as the ratio of the mean to the standard deviation (SD) of a region of interest automatically selected in the center of each unprocessed image. Data were acquired from 18 systems, 14 of which were tested both before and after gain and offset calibration. SNR as a function of detector exposure was interpolated using a double logarithmic function to stratify the data into groups of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mR exposure (1.8, 4.5, 9.0, 18, and 45 {mu}Gy air KERMA) to the detector. Results: The mean SNR at each exposure interval after calibration exhibited linear dependence on the mean SNR before calibration (r{sup 2} = 0.9999). The dependence was greater than unity (m = 1.101 {+-} 0.006), and the difference from unity was statistically significant (p < 0.005). The SD of mean SNR after calibration also

  6. Gain and offset calibration reduces variation in exposure-dependent SNR among systems with identical digital flat-panel detectors.

    PubMed

    Willis, Charles E; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y; Lofton, Brad K; White, R Allen

    2011-07-01

    The conditions under which vendor performance criteria for digital radiography systems are obtained do not adequately simulate the conditions of actual clinical imaging with respect to radiographic technique factors, scatter production, and scatter control. Therefore, the relationship between performance under ideal conditions and performance in clinical practice remains unclear. Using data from a large complement of systems in clinical use, the authors sought to develop a method to establish expected performance criteria for digital flat-panel radiography systems with respect to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) versus detector exposure under clinical conditions for thoracic imaging. The authors made radiographic exposures of a patient-equivalent chest phantom at 125 kVp and 180 cm source-to-image distance. The mAs value was modified to produce exposures above and below the mAs delivered by automatic exposure control. Exposures measured free-in-air were corrected to the imaging plane by the inverse square law, by the attenuation factor of the phantom, and by the Bucky factor of the grid for the phantom, geometry, and kilovolt peak. SNR was evaluated as the ratio of the mean to the standard deviation (SD) of a region of interest automatically selected in the center of each unprocessed image. Data were acquired from 18 systems, 14 of which were tested both before and after gain and offset calibration. SNR as a function of detector exposure was interpolated using a double logarithmic function to stratify the data into groups of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mR exposure (1.8, 4.5, 9.0, 18, and 45 microGy air KERMA) to the detector. The mean SNR at each exposure interval after calibration exhibited linear dependence on the mean SNR before calibration (r2=0.9999). The dependence was greater than unity (m = 1.101 +/- 0.006), and the difference from unity was statistically significant (p <0.005). The SD of mean SNR after calibration also exhibited linear dependence on the SD of

  7. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  8. SNLS calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnault, N.

    2015-08-01

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) is a massive imaging survey, conducted between 2003 and 2008, with the MegaCam instrument, mounted on the CFHT-3.6-m telescope. With a 1 degree wide focal plane, made of 36 2048 × 4612 sensors totalling 340 megapixels, MegaCam was at the time the largest imager on the sky. The Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) uses the cadenced observations of the 4 deg2 wide "DEEP" layer of the CFHTLS to search and follow-up Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and study the acceleration of the cosmic expansion. The reduction and calibration of the CFHTLS/SNLS datasets has posed a series of challenges. In what follows, we give a brief account of the photometric calibration work that has been performed on the SNLS data over the last decade.

  9. Temperature Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Accuracy of temperature measurements is vital to many experiments. In this project, we design an algorithm to calibrate thermocouples' temperature measurements. To collect data, we rely on incremental heating to calculate the diffusion coefficients of argon through sanidine glasses. These coefficients change according to an arrhenius equation that depends on temperature, time, and the size and geometry of the glass; thus by fixing the type of glass and the time of each heating step, we obtain many data points by varying temperature. Because the dimension of temperature is continuous, obtaining data is simpler in noble gas diffusion experiments than in measuring the discrete melting points of various metals. Due to the nature of electrical connections, the need to reference to the freezing point of ice, thermal gradients in the sample, the time dependent dissipation of heat into the surroundings, and other inaccuracies with thermocouple temperature measurements, it is necessary to calibrate the experimental measurements with the expected or theoretical measurements. Since the diffusion constant equation is exponential with the inverse of temperature, we transform the exponential D vs T graph into a linear log(D) vs 1/T graph. Then a simple linear regression yields the equation of the line, and we find a mapping function from the experimental temperature to the expected temperature. By relying on the accuracy of the diffusion constant measurement, the mapping function provides the temperature calibration. Theoretical (Temperature, Diffusion Coefficient, Fractional Loss, Zeta)

  10. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  11. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  12. SU-E-T-90: Accuracy of Calibration of Lithium-6 and -7 Enriched LiF TLDs for Neutron Measurements in High Energy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keehan, S; Franich, R; Taylor, M; Lonski, P; Kron, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the potential error involved in the interpretation of neutron measurements from medical linear accelerators (linacs) using TLD-600H and TLD-700H if standard AmBe and {sup 252}Cf neutron sources are used for calibration without proper inclusion of neutron energy spectrum information. Methods: The Kerma due to neutrons can be calculated from the energy released by various nuclear interactions (elastic and inelastic scatter, (n,α), (n,p), (n,d), (n,t), (n,2n), etc.). The response of each TLD can be considered the sum of the neutron and gamma components; each proportional to the Kerma. Using the difference between the measured TLD responses and the ratio of the calculated Kerma for each material, the neutron component of the response can be calculated. The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 has been used to calculate the neutron energy spectra resulting from photonuclear interactions in a Varian 21EX linac. TLDs have been exposed to the mixed (γ-n) field produced by a linac and AmBe and {sup 252}Cf standard neutron sources. Results: For dosimetry of neutrons from AmBe or {sup 252}Cf sources, assuming TLD-700H insensitivity to neutrons will Result in 10% or 20% overestimation of neutron doses respectively.For dosimetry of neutrons produced in a Varian 21EX, applying a calibration factor derived from a standard AmBe or {sup 252}Cf source will Result in an overestimation of neutron fluence, by as much as a factor of 47.The assumption of TLD-700H insensitivity to neutrons produced by linacs leads to a negligible error due to the extremely high Kerma ratio (600H/700H) of 3000 for the assumed neutron spectrum. Conclusion: Lithium-enriched TLDs calibrated with AmBe and/or {sup 252}Cf neutron sources are not accurate for use under the neutron energy spectrum produced by a medical linear accelerator.

  13. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  14. Dynamic Torque Calibration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agronin, Michael L.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed dynamic torque calibration unit (DTCU) measures torque in rotary actuator components such as motors, bearings, gear trains, and flex couplings. Unique because designed specifically for testing components under low rates. Measures torque in device under test during controlled steady rotation or oscillation. Rotor oriented vertically, supported by upper angular-contact bearing and lower radial-contact bearing that floats axially to prevent thermal expansion from loading bearings. High-load capacity air bearing available to replace ball bearings when higher load capacity or reduction in rate noise required.

  15. Dynamic Torque Calibration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agronin, Michael L.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed dynamic torque calibration unit (DTCU) measures torque in rotary actuator components such as motors, bearings, gear trains, and flex couplings. Unique because designed specifically for testing components under low rates. Measures torque in device under test during controlled steady rotation or oscillation. Rotor oriented vertically, supported by upper angular-contact bearing and lower radial-contact bearing that floats axially to prevent thermal expansion from loading bearings. High-load capacity air bearing available to replace ball bearings when higher load capacity or reduction in rate noise required.

  16. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  17. PTRAC File Utilization for Calculation of Free-Air Ionization Chamber Correction Factors by MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolc, Jaroslav; Sochor, Vladimír

    2014-06-01

    A free-air ionization chamber is used as a standard of photon air-kerma. Several correction factors are applied to the air-kerma value. Correction factors for electron loss (kloss) and for additional ionization current caused by photon scatter (ksc), photon fluorescence (kfl), photon transmission through diaphragm edge (kdtr), and photon scatter from the surface of the diaphragm aperture (kdsc) were determined by the MCNPX code utilizing information stored in Particle Track (PTRAC) output files. Individual steps of the procedure are described and the calculated values of the correction factors are presented. The values are in agreement with the correction factors published in a literature for similar free-air chambers.

  18. Air mass 1.5 global and direct solar simulation and secondary reference cell calibration using a filtered large area pulsed solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral mismatch between a solar simulator and a desired spectrum can result in nearly 20 percent measurement error in the output of photovoltaic devices. This occurs when a crystalline silicon cell monitors the intensity of an unfiltered large area pulsed solar simulator (LAPSS) simulating the ASTM air mass 1.5 direct spectrum and the test device is amorphous silicon. The LAPSS spectral irradiance is modified with readily available glass UV filters to closely match either the ASTM air mass 1.5 direct or global spectrum. Measurement error is reduced to about 1 percent when using either filter if the reference cell and test device are the same general type.

  19. Monte Carlo calculations of the ionization chamber wall correction factors for 192Ir and 60Co gamma rays and 250 kV x-rays for use in calibration of 192Ir HDR brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, I H; de Almeida, C E; Marre, D; Marechal, M H; Bridier, A; Chavaudra, J

    1999-08-01

    As in the method for the calibration of 192Ir high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources, the ionization chamber wall correction factor A(w), is needed for 192Ir and 60Co gamma rays and 250 kV x-rays. This factor takes into account the variation in chamber response due to the attenuation of the photon beam in the chamber wall and build-up cap and the contribution of scattered photons. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the EGS4 code system with the PRESTA algorithm, to calculate the A(w) factor for 51 commercial ionization chambers and build-up caps exposed to the typical energy spectrum of 192Ir and 60Co gamma rays and 250 kV x-rays. The calculated A(w) correction factors for 192Ir and 60Co sources and 250 kV x-rays agree very well to within 0.1% with published experimental data (the statistical uncertainty is less than 0.1% of the calculated correction factor value). For the 192Ir sources, A(w) varies from 0.973 to 0.993 and for the 250 kV x-rays the minimum value of A(w) for all chambers studied is 0.983. The calculated A(w) correction factors can be used to calculate the air kerma calibration factor of HDR brachytherapy sources, when interpolative methods are considered, contributing to the reduction in the overall uncertainties in the calibration procedure.

  20. Achieving calibration cost savings through data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, A.H.; Clark, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    Air displacement type pipettes have been used effectively at the Savannah River Site (SRS) since the mid-1980`s when they replaced expensive glass microliter pipettes. A paper presented at the 1987 INMM Annual Meeting by John P. Clark detailed the implementation at SRS. At that time, calibration frequency and required documentation were established according to regulatory and standard practice requirements. Pipettes are still being used at SRS in compliance with NQA-1-12, ``Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M and TE)`` requirements, which includes defined calibration intervals and 5-year calibration record retention. A recent analysis of the pipette calibration historical data indicated that pipettes were rarely out of calibration when they were checked. In other words, calibration checks were being performed too frequently. As a result, pipette calibration frequencies were decreased, with the potential accompanying annual cost savings of over $30,000 in reduced labor and materials. Concurrently, the number of calibration check replicates was increased to prevent statistical errors in calibration check decision making. The benefits derived in the pipette calibration example are applicable to any M and TE where calibration history data are maintained and where analysis indicates excessive calibration checks. Details of the data analysis and cost savings are presented in the paper.

  1. Calibration of a TLD-100 powder dosimetric system to verify the absorbed dose to water imparted by 137Cs sources in low dose rate brachytherapy at the oncology unit in the Hospital General de Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Romero, J T; Tovar Muñoz, V M; de León, B Salinas; Oviedo, J O Hernández; Barcenas, L Santillán; Milo, C Molero; Monterrubio, J Montoya

    2006-01-01

    A thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) system was characterised at SSDL-ININ to verify the air-kerma strength (S(K)) and dose-to-water (D(W)) values for (137)Cs sources used in low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatments at the Hospital General de Mexico (HGM). It consists of a Harshaw 3500 reader and a set of TLD-100 powder capsules. The samples of TLD-100 powder were calibrated in terms of D(W) vs. nC or nC mg(-1), and their dose response curves were corrected for supralinearity. The D(W) was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 formalism using S(K) for a CDCSM4 (137)Cs reference source. The S(K) value was obtained by using a NE 2611 chamber, and with two well chambers. The angular anisotropy factor was measured with the NE 2611 chamber for this source. The HGM irradiated TLD-100 powder capsules to a reference dose D(W) of 2 Gy with their (137)Cs sources. The percent deviations between the imparted and reference doses were 1.2% < or = Delta < or = 6.5%, which are consistent with the combined uncertainties: 5.6% < or = u(c) < or = 9.8% for D(W).

  2. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Data is given in graphical and tabular form.

  3. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Additional information is given in tabular form.

  4. Effect of air composition (N2, O2, Ar, and H2O) on CO2 and CH4 measurement by wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy: calibration and measurement strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, H.; Tanimoto, H.; Tohjima, Y.; Mukai, H.; Nojiri, Y.; Katsumata, K.; Rella, C. W.

    2012-11-01

    within the typical analytical precision at sufficiently low water concentrations (<0.7% for CO2 and <0.6% for CH4). For accurate measurements of CO2 and CH4 in ambient air, we concluded that WS-CRDS measurements should be performed under complete dehumidification of air samples, or moderate dehumidification followed by application of a water vapor correction function, along with calibration by natural air-based standard gases or purified air-balanced synthetic standard gases with the isotopic correction.

  5. Cross sections and partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at En = 21.6 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsson, N; Ramström, E; Trostell, B

    1990-09-01

    The Studsvik high-resolution, low-background time-of-flight facility has been used to measure differential neutron scattering cross sections for nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at a neutron energy of 21.6 MeV. Angular distributions in the range 10 degrees-160 degrees have been measured for both elastic and inelastic scattering from some low-lying levels in the three nuclei. Angle-integrated cross sections have been determined by fitting Legendre polynomial expansions to the differential data. Partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic scattering have been deduced from these fits. Analyses in terms of the spherical optical model and the distorted-wave Born approximation have provided information on potential parameters and deformations, which have been used to calculate cross sections and partial kerma factors. Comparisons have been made with other recent data sets and model predictions, as well as with the evaluated neutron data file ENDF/B-V.

  6. Evaluated cross section libraries and kerma factors for neutrons up to 100 MeV on {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1995-07-01

    We present evaluations of the interaction of 20 to 100 MeV neutrons with oxygen and nitrogen nuclei, which follows on from our previous work on carbon. Our aim is to accurately represent integrated cross sections, inclusive emission spectra, and kerma factors, in a data library which can be used in radiation transport calculations. We apply the FKK-GNASH nuclear model code, which includes Hauser-Feshbach, preequilibrium, and direct reaction mechanisms, and use experimental measurements to optimize the calculations. We determine total, elastic, and nonelastic cross sections, angle-energy correlated emission spectra, for light ejectiles with A{<=}4 and gamma-rays, and average energy depositions. Our results for charged-particle emission spectra agree well with the measurements of Subramanian et al.. We compare kerma factors derived from our evaluated cross sections with experimental data, providing an integral benchmarking of our work. The evaluated data libraries are available as electronic files.

  7. I-125 seed calibration using the SeedSelectron® afterloader: a practical solution to fulfill AAPM-ESTRO recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Richart, Jose; Guirado, Damián; Pérez-García, Jordi; Rodríguez, Silvia; Santos, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose SeedSelectron® v1.26b (Nucletron BV, The Netherlands) is an afterloader system used in prostate interstitial permanent brachytherapy with I-125 selectSeed seeds. It contains a diode array to assay all implanted seeds. Only one or two seeds can be extracted during the surgical procedure and assayed using a well chamber to check the manufacturer air-kerma strength (SK) and to calibrate the diode array. Therefore, it is not feasible to assay 5–10% seeds as required by the AAPM-ESTRO. In this study, we present a practical solution of the SeedSelectron® users to fulfill the AAPM- ESTRO recommendations. Material and methods The method is based on: a) the SourceCheck® well ionization chamber (PTW, Germany) provided with a PTW insert; b) n = 10 selectSeed from the same batch and class as the seeds for the implant; c) the Nucletron insert to accommodate the n = 10 seeds on the SourceCheck® and to measure their averaged SK. Results for 56 implants have been studied comparing the SK value from the manufacturer with the one obtained with the n = 10 seeds using the Nucletron insert prior to the implant and with the SK of just one seed measured with the PTW insert during the implant. Results We are faced with SK deviation for individual seeds up to 7.8%. However, in the majority of cases SK is in agreement with the manufacturer value. With the method proposed using the Nucletron insert, the large deviations of SK are reduced and for 56 implants studied no deviation outside the range of the class were found. Conclusions The new Nucletron insert and the proposed procedure allow to evaluate the SK of the n = 10 seeds prior to the implant, fulfilling the AAPM-ESTRO recommendations. It has been adopted by Nucletron to be extended to seedSelectron® users under request. PMID:23346136

  8. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma

  9. Mercury Calibration System

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  10. Influence of ion chamber response on in-air profile measurements in megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Tonkopi, E; McEwen, M R; Walters, B R B; Kawrakow, I

    2005-09-01

    This article presents an investigation of the influence of the ion chamber response, including buildup caps, on the measurement of in-air off-axis ratio (OAR) profiles in megavoltage photon beams using Monte Carlo simulations with the EGSnrc system. Two new techniques for the calculation of OAR profiles are presented. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are compared to measurements performed in 6, 10 and 25 MV photon beams produced by an Elekta Precise linac and shown to agree within the experimental and simulation uncertainties. Comparisons with calculated in-air kerma profiles demonstrate that using a plastic mini phantom gives more accurate air-kerma measurements than using high-Z material buildup caps and that the variation of chamber response with distance from the central axis must be taken into account.

  11. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operating adjustment using the appropriate FID fuel and zero-grade air. (2) Optimize on the most common... optimize performance. (2) Zero the hydrocarbon analyzer with zero-grade air. (3) Calibrate on each normally...

  12. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operating adjustment using the appropriate FID fuel and zero-grade air. (2) Optimize on the most common... optimize performance. (2) Zero the hydrocarbon analyzer with zero-grade air. (3) Calibrate on each normally...

  13. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operating adjustment using the appropriate FID fuel and zero-grade air. (2) Optimize on the most common... optimize performance. (2) Zero the hydrocarbon analyzer with zero-grade air. (3) Calibrate on each normally...

  14. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operating adjustment using the appropriate FID fuel and zero-grade air. (2) Optimize on the most common... optimize performance. (2) Zero the hydrocarbon analyzer with zero-grade air. (3) Calibrate on each normally...

  15. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operating adjustment using the appropriate FID fuel and zero-grade air. (2) Optimize on the most common... optimize performance. (2) Zero the hydrocarbon analyzer with zero-grade air. (3) Calibrate on each normally...

  16. A method of calibrating wind velocity sensors with a modified gas flow calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure was described for calibrating air velocity sensors in the exhaust flow of a gas flow calibrator. The average velocity in the test section located at the calibrator exhaust was verified from the mass flow rate accurately measured by the calibrator's precision sonic nozzles. Air at elevated pressures flowed through a series of screens, diameter changes, and flow straighteners, resulting in a smooth flow through the open test section. The modified system generated air velocities of 2 to 90 meters per second with an uncertainty of about two percent for speeds below 15 meters per second and four percent for the higher speeds. Wind tunnel data correlated well with that taken in the flow calibrator.

  17. Practical Study of Psychrometer Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentved, Anders Bonde; Heinonen, Martti; Hudoklin, Domen

    2012-09-01

    Psychrometers remain the most widely used instruments for controlling the humidity in climatic test chambers, yet the calibration of these instruments is particularly challenging. Psychrometer calibrations require careful consideration of influence variables such as the fitting and cleanliness of the wick, the effect of the calibration chamber on the air flow past the sensors, on radiation incident on the sensors, and on the dissipation heat from the built-in fan (if included). In addition, uncertainty requirements for calibration of such psychrometers are typically around 1 %rh to 2 %rh, i.e., close to the best calibration and measurement uncertainties (CMCs) claimed by national metrology institutes (NMIs). As well as their role in supporting CMCs, inter-comparisons provide a good test-ground to ensure all influence variables are controlled or otherwise accounted for in the uncertainty budget. This paper presents the results of a comparison of psychrometer calibrations performed by the NMIs in Denmark, Slovenia, and Finland. The comparison was carried out under EURAMET Project No. 1033 with the aim to investigate the equivalence of psychrometer calibrations performed at the highest level and to gather practical experience to be used in similar comparisons in the future. An aspirated electro-psychrometer was used for the comparison, and calibrations were carried out in the range from 15 %rh to 93 %rh in a temperature range from 15 °C to 70 °C. While the results show good agreement at high relative humidity, significant differences at low relative humidity are reported. It is suggested that the differences are caused by a combination of psychrometer wick contamination and a difference in the wick-wetting methods used by the participant laboratories.

  18. 40 CFR 86.1524 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.1524 Section 86.1524 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Procedures § 86.1524 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. (a) The calibration requirements for the...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1524 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.1524 Section 86.1524 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Procedures § 86.1524 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. (a) The calibration requirements for the...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1524 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.1524 Section 86.1524 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Procedures § 86.1524 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. (a) The calibration requirements for the...

  1. 40 CFR 86.1524 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.1524 Section 86.1524 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Procedures § 86.1524 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. (a) The calibration requirements for the...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1524 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.1524 Section 86.1524 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Procedures § 86.1524 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. (a) The calibration requirements for the dilute...

  3. 40 CFR 91.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CVS calibration frequency. 91.425 Section 91.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or critical flow venturi...

  4. 40 CFR 91.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CVS calibration frequency. 91.425 Section 91.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or critical flow venturi...

  5. 40 CFR 90.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CVS calibration frequency. 90.425 Section 90.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Test Procedures § 90.425 CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or...

  6. 40 CFR 90.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true CVS calibration frequency. 90.425 Section 90.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Test Procedures § 90.425 CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or...

  7. 40 CFR 91.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CVS calibration frequency. 91.425 Section 91.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or critical flow venturi...

  8. 40 CFR 90.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CVS calibration frequency. 90.425 Section 90.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Test Procedures § 90.425 CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or...

  9. 40 CFR 91.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true CVS calibration frequency. 91.425 Section 91.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or critical flow venturi...

  10. 40 CFR 90.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CVS calibration frequency. 90.425 Section 90.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Test Procedures § 90.425 CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or...

  11. 40 CFR 92.115 - Calibrations; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calibrations; frequency and overview. 92.115 Section 92.115 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR....115 Calibrations; frequency and overview. (a) Calibrations shall be performed as specified in §§...

  12. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  13. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: Upgrade and Cloud Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, NASA Glenn s Icing Research Tunnel underwent a major modification to it s refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. This paper presents the results of the subsequent full cloud calibration. Details of the calibration procedure and results are presented herein. The steps include developing a nozzle transfer map, establishing a uniform cloud, conducting a drop sizing calibration and finally a liquid water content calibration. The goal of the calibration is to develop a uniform cloud, and to build a transfer map from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the output of median volumetric droplet diameter and liquid water content.

  14. Calibration of sound calibrators: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of calibration of sound calibrators. Initially, traditional calibration methods are presented. Following, the international standard IEC 60942 is discussed emphasizing parameters, target measurement uncertainty and criteria for conformance to the requirements of the standard. Last, Regional Metrology Organizations comparisons are summarized.

  15. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  16. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  17. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-15

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 deg. C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min{sup -1}, equal to 2.0 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min{sup -1} and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min{sup -1}, up to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min{sup -1} and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min{sup -1} with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min{sup -1} with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l{sup -1} min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min{sup -1}, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l{sup -1} min.

  18. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: measurement principle and static calibration.

    PubMed

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 °C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min(-1). The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l(-1) min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min(-1), equal to 2.0 V l(-1) min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min(-1) and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min(-1), up to 5.7 V l(-1) min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min(-1) and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min(-1). The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min(-1) with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l(-1) min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min(-1) with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l(-1) min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min(-1), corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l(-1) min.

  19. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 °C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min-1, equal to 2.0 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min-1 and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min-1, up to 5.7 V l-1 min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min-1 and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min-1 with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l-1 min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min-1 with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l-1 min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min-1, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l-1 min.

  20. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  1. Cross Calibration and Validation Using CLARREO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut; Gohlke, Jan; Ruzmaikin, Alex; Elliott, Denis

    2008-01-01

    The presentation focuses on study questions, effort, and result. Study questions include a focus on MW/LW, error sources and what can be expected, how validation will be performed and what resolution is required, and spatial resolution required for cross-calibration. Study effort includes empirical approach by examining AIRS ,IASI and MODIS cross-calibration methods already in place and estimate the number of clear and Dome C observations possible versus spatial resolution. Study results include 5000 sampler per cross-calibration recommended, insufficient cloud free and Dome C AWS observations for cross calibration and validation at 100km, and less than 20 km IFOV at 100 km swath needed to achieve sufficient samples for cross-calibration of CLARREO.

  2. Cross Calibration and Validation Using CLARREO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut; Gohlke, Jan; Ruzmaikin, Alex; Elliott, Denis

    2008-01-01

    The presentation focuses on study questions, effort, and result. Study questions include a focus on MW/LW, error sources and what can be expected, how validation will be performed and what resolution is required, and spatial resolution required for cross-calibration. Study effort includes empirical approach by examining AIRS ,IASI and MODIS cross-calibration methods already in place and estimate the number of clear and Dome C observations possible versus spatial resolution. Study results include 5000 sampler per cross-calibration recommended, insufficient cloud free and Dome C AWS observations for cross calibration and validation at 100km, and less than 20 km IFOV at 100 km swath needed to achieve sufficient samples for cross-calibration of CLARREO.

  3. Improving self-calibration.

    PubMed

    Enßlin, Torsten A; Junklewitz, Henrik; Winderling, Lars; Greiner, Maksim; Selig, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Response calibration is the process of inferring how much the measured data depend on the signal one is interested in. It is essential for any quantitative signal estimation on the basis of the data. Here, we investigate self-calibration methods for linear signal measurements and linear dependence of the response on the calibration parameters. The common practice is to augment an external calibration solution using a known reference signal with an internal calibration on the unknown measurement signal itself. Contemporary self-calibration schemes try to find a self-consistent solution for signal and calibration by exploiting redundancies in the measurements. This can be understood in terms of maximizing the joint probability of signal and calibration. However, the full uncertainty structure of this joint probability around its maximum is thereby not taken into account by these schemes. Therefore, better schemes, in sense of minimal square error, can be designed by accounting for asymmetries in the uncertainty of signal and calibration. We argue that at least a systematic correction of the common self-calibration scheme should be applied in many measurement situations in order to properly treat uncertainties of the signal on which one calibrates. Otherwise, the calibration solutions suffer from a systematic bias, which consequently distorts the signal reconstruction. Furthermore, we argue that nonparametric, signal-to-noise filtered calibration should provide more accurate reconstructions than the common bin averages and provide a new, improved self-calibration scheme. We illustrate our findings with a simplistic numerical example.

  4. Calibration of pneumotachographs using a calibrated syringe.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongquan; Turner, Martin J; Yem, Johnny S; Baker, A Barry

    2003-08-01

    Pneumotachograph require frequent calibration. Constant-flow methods allow polynomial calibration curves to be derived but are time consuming. The iterative syringe stroke technique is moderately efficient but results in discontinuous conductance arrays. This study investigated the derivation of first-, second-, and third-order polynomial calibration curves from 6 to 50 strokes of a calibration syringe. We used multiple linear regression to derive first-, second-, and third-order polynomial coefficients from two sets of 6-50 syringe strokes. In part A, peak flows did not exceed the specified linear range of the pneumotachograph, whereas flows in part B peaked at 160% of the maximum linear range. Conductance arrays were derived from the same data sets by using a published algorithm. Volume errors of the calibration strokes and of separate sets of 70 validation strokes (part A) and 140 validation strokes (part B) were calculated by using the polynomials and conductance arrays. Second- and third-order polynomials derived from 10 calibration strokes achieved volume variability equal to or better than conductance arrays derived from 50 strokes. We found that evaluation of conductance arrays using the calibration syringe strokes yields falsely low volume variances. We conclude that accurate polynomial curves can be derived from as few as 10 syringe strokes, and the new polynomial calibration method is substantially more time efficient than previously published conductance methods.

  5. Consistency of absorbed dose to water measurements using 21 ion-chamber models following the AAPM TG51 and TG21 calibration protocols.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Ramesh C; Hanson, William F; Wells, Nathan; Ibbott, Geoffrey S

    2006-06-01

    In 1999, the AAPM introduced a reference dosimetry protocol, known as TG51, based on an absorbed dose standard. This replaced the previous protocol, known as TG21, which was based on an air kerma standard. A significant body of literature has emerged discussing the improved accuracy and robustness of the absorbed dose standard, and quantifying the changes in baseline dosimetry with the introduction of the absorbed dose protocol. A significant component playing a role in the overall accuracy of beam output determination is the variability due to the use of different dosimeters. This issue, not adequately addressed in the past, is the focus of the present study. This work provides a comparison of absorbed dose determinations using 21 different makes and models of ion chambers for low- and high-energy photon and electron beams. The study included 13 models of cylindrical ion chambers and eight models of plane-parallel chambers. A high degree of precision (<0.25%) resulted from measurements with all chambers in a single setting, a sufficient number of repeat readings, and the use of high quality ion chambers as external monitors. Cylindrical chambers in photon beams show an improvement in chamber-to-chamber consistency with TG51. For electron dosimetry with plane-parallel chambers, the parameters Ngas and the product ND,w x k(ecal) were each determined in two ways, based on (i) an ADCL calibration, and (ii) a cross comparison with an ADCL-calibrated cylindrical chamber in a high-energy electron beam. Plane-parallel chamber results, therefore, are presented for both methods of chamber calibration. Our electron results with technique (i) show that plane-parallel chambers, as a group, overestimate the beam output relative to cylindrical chambers by 1%-2% with either protocol. Technique (ii), by definition, normalizes the plane-parallel results to the cylindrical results. In all cases, the maximum spread in output from the various cylindrical chambers is <2% implying a

  6. New technique for calibrating hydrocarbon gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Puster, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration correction factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters is described. It is based on the Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion products of the test hydrocarbon, burned in oxygen-enriched air, with that in normal air. It is applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for a number of hydrocarbons. The calibration correction factors measured using this technique are in good agreement with the values obtained by other independent procedures. The technique is successfully applied to the measurement of differences as low as one percent of the effective hydrocarbon content of the natural gas test samples.

  7. Human occupations and environmental changes in the Nile valley during the Holocene: The case of Kerma in Upper Nubia (northern Sudan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honegger, Matthieu; Williams, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Our article presents a detailed Holocene archaeological sequence from the Nile Valley at Kerma in Upper Nubia, northern Sudan. This sequence retraces the evolution of human populations thanks to the study of several sites, supported by 90 14C dates. Reconstruction of the environmental changes was supported by a study of dated stratigraphic sections located near the archaeological sites studied, and illustrates the effects on human occupation of changes in river flow and floods, which are in turn forced by climatic changes. The results shed new light on the evolutionary dynamics of the Holocene populations in Nile Valley, little known due to the numerous hiatuses in occupation. When compared with the situation in the Sahara and the rest of the Nile Valley, they confirm that the initial occupation took place ca. 10.5 kyr BP after the start of the African Humid Period, followed by a migration towards the banks of the Nile commencing 7.3 kyr BP. They also confirm the appearance of the Neolithic by ca. 8.0 kyr BP. The Kerma stratigraphic sequences show two prosperous periods (10-8 and 7-6 kyr BP) and two hiatuses in the occupation of the sites (7.5-7.1 and 6.0-5.4 kyr BP), resulting from increased aridity.

  8. Photon and neutron fluence-to-kerma conversion factors for ICRP-1975 reference man using improved elemental compositions for bone and marrow of the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.

    1982-11-01

    A twelve-element approximation of the total-body, soft-tissue and skeletal components of ICRP-1975 Reference Man is used to investigate particle fluence-to-kerma conversion factors for photons with energies between 1 keV and 20 MeV and neutrons with energies between 0.0253 eV and 20 MeV. Several recent ICRP revisions to the elemental composition of Reference Man, which have not been included in other kerma-factor calculations, are taken into account. This work suggests some additional revisions to the major-element content (i.e., H, C, N, and O) and to the mineral and trace-element content (i.e., Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe) of various total-body, soft-tissue, and skeletal components of Reference Man. The revisions to the bone and red marrow of the skeleton offer significant new refinements in red-bone-marrow dosimetry.

  9. Calibration methods for rotating shadowband irradiometers and evaluation of calibration duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, W.; Wilbert, S.; Nouri, B.; Geuder, N.; Fritz, H.

    2015-10-01

    Resource assessment for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) needs accurate Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) measurements. An option for such measurement campaigns are Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers (RSIs) with a thorough calibration. Calibration of RSIs and Si-sensors in general is complex because of the inhomogeneous spectral response of such sensors and incorporates the use of several correction functions. A calibration for a given atmospheric condition and air mass might not work well for a different condition. This paper covers procedures and requirements for two calibration methods for the calibration of Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers. The necessary duration of acquisition of test measurements is examined in regard to the site specific conditions at Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain. Data sets of several long-term calibration periods from PSA are used to evaluate the deviation of results from calibrations with varying duration from the long-term result. The findings show that seasonal changes of environmental conditions are causing small but noticeable fluctuation of calibration results. Certain periods (i.e. November to January and April to May) show a higher likelihood of particularly adverse calibration results. These effects can partially be compensated by increasing the inclusions of measurements from outside these periods. Consequently, the duration of calibrations at PSA can now be selected depending on the time of the year in which measurements are commenced.

  10. Calibrating Wide Field Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Fernández, Carlos; Irwin, M.; Lewis, J.; González Solares, E.

    2017-09-01

    "In this talk I will review the strategies in CASU to calibrate wide field surveys, in particular applied to data taken with the VISTA telescope. These include traditional night-by-night calibrations along with the search for a global, coherent calibration of all the data once observations are finished. The difficulties of obtaining photometric accuracy of a few percent and a good absolute calibration will also be discussed."

  11. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  12. ORNL calibrations facility

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.D.; Gupton, E.D.; Lane, B.H.; Miller, J.H.; Nichols, S.W.

    1982-08-01

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL.

  13. Atmospheric effects on solar-cell calibration and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, R.E.; Hulstrom, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    Results are presented that illustrate atmospheric effects on cell short currents and calibration numbers for silicon, gallium arsenide, and cadmium sulfide cells. Rigorous radiative transfer codes are used in this analysis to illustrate the effects of precipitable water, turbidity, air mass, and global normal irradiance compared with direct normal irradiance on cell performance. Precipitable water is shown to have a relatively large effect on GaAs (5%) as compared to a small effect (2%) on other cells. The quantitative effects of air mass and turbidity are illustrated. It was found that under some atmospheric conditions global calibration methods have a greater dependence on air mass than direct normal calibrations methods.

  14. SUMS calibration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Calibration was performed on the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS). The results of the calibration and the as run test procedures are presented. The output data is described, and engineering data conversion factors, tables and curves, and calibration on instrument gauges are included. Static calibration results which include: instrument sensitive versus external pressure for N2 and O2, data from each scan of calibration, data plots from N2 and O2, and sensitivity of SUMS at inlet for N2 and O2, and ratios of 14/28 for nitrogen and 16/32 for oxygen are given.

  15. Analysis of radiometer calibration effects with TOUCHSTONE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, William D.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave circuit analysis program TOUCHSTONE is used to study two effects of importance in radiometer calibration. The two effects are impedance mismatches at the antenna-air and cold load-air interfaces and dissipatives losses, which radiate thermal noise into the system. The results predicted by TOUCHSTONE are shown to be in very close agreement with earlier results obtained by purely analytical methods. The techniques used in establishing the circuit models and in processing the resulting data are described in detail.

  16. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  17. SU-F-I-13: Correction Factor Computations for the NIST Ritz Free Air Chamber for Medium-Energy X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) uses 3 free-air chambers to establish primary standards for radiation dosimetry at x-ray energies. For medium-energy × rays, the Ritz free-air chamber is the main measurement device. In order to convert the charge or current collected by the chamber to the radiation quantities air kerma or air kerma rate, a number of correction factors specific to the chamber must be applied. Methods: We used the Monte Carlo codes EGSnrc and PENELOPE. Results: Among these correction factors are the diaphragm correction (which accounts for interactions of photons from the x-ray source in the beam-defining diaphragm of the chamber), the scatter correction (which accounts for the effects of photons scattered out of the primary beam), the electron-loss correction (which accounts for electrons that only partially expend their energy in the collection region), the fluorescence correction (which accounts for ionization due to reabsorption ffluorescence photons and the bremsstrahlung correction (which accounts for the reabsorption of bremsstrahlung photons). We have computed monoenergetic corrections for the NIST Ritz chamber for the 1 cm, 3 cm and 7 cm collection plates. Conclusion: We find good agreement with other’s results for the 7 cm plate. The data used to obtain these correction factors will be used to establish air kerma and it’s uncertainty in the standard NIST x-ray beams.

  18. Calibration methods for rotating shadowband irradiometers and optimizing the calibration duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, Wilko; Wilbert, Stefan; Nouri, Bijan; Geuder, Norbert; Fritz, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Resource assessment for concentrated solar power (CSP) needs accurate direct normal irradiance (DNI) measurements. An option for such measurement campaigns is the use of thoroughly calibrated rotating shadowband irradiometers (RSIs). Calibration of RSIs and Si-sensors is complex because of the inhomogeneous spectral response of these sensors and incorporates the use of several correction functions. One calibration for a given atmospheric condition and air mass might not be suitable under different conditions. This paper covers procedures and requirements of two calibration methods for the calibration of rotating shadowband irradiometers. The necessary duration of acquisition of test measurements is examined with regard to the site-specific conditions at Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in Spain. Seven data sets of long-term test measurements were collected. For each data set, calibration results of varying durations were compared to its respective long-term result. Our findings show that seasonal changes of environmental conditions are causing small but noticeable fluctuation of calibration results. Calibration results within certain periods (i.e. November to January and April to May) show a higher likelihood of deviation. These effects can partially be attenuated by including more measurements from outside these periods. Consequently, the duration of calibrations at PSA can now be selected depending on the time of year in which measurements commence.

  19. In-Flight Pitot-Static Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John V. (Inventor); Cunningham, Kevin (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A GPS-based pitot-static calibration system uses global output-error optimization. High data rate measurements of static and total pressure, ambient air conditions, and GPS-based ground speed measurements are used to compute pitot-static pressure errors over a range of airspeed. System identification methods rapidly compute optimal pressure error models with defined confidence intervals.

  20. AUTOMATIC CALIBRATING SYSTEM FOR PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, E.L.; Rodgers, G.W.

    1958-01-01

    An automatic system for calibrating a number of pressure transducers is described. The disclosed embodiment of the invention uses a mercurial manometer to measure the air pressure applied to the transducer. A servo system follows the top of the mercury column as the pressure is changed and operates an analog- to-digital converter This converter furnishes electrical pulses, each representing an increment of pressure change, to a reversible counterThe transducer furnishes a signal at each calibration point, causing an electric typewriter and a card-punch machine to record the pressure at the instant as indicated by the counter. Another counter keeps track of the calibration points so that a number identifying each point is recorded with the corresponding pressure. A special relay control system controls the pressure trend and programs the sequential calibration of several transducers.

  1. Calibration of Cryogenic Thermometers for the Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balle, Ch.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Vauthier, N.; Thermeau, J. P.

    2008-03-01

    6000 cryogenic temperature sensors of resistive type covering the range from room temperature down to 1.6 K are installed on the LHC machine. In order to meet the stringent requirements on temperature control of the superconducting magnets, each single sensor needs to be calibrated individually. In the framework of a special contribution, IPN (Institut de Physique Nucléaire) in Orsay, France built and operated a calibration facility with a throughput of 80 thermometers per week. After reception from the manufacturer, the thermometer is first assembled onto a support specific to the measurement environment, and then thermally cycled ten times and calibrated at least once from 1.6 to 300 K. The procedure for each of these interventions includes various measurements and the acquired data is recorded in an ORACLE®-database. Furthermore random calibrations on some samples are executed at CERN to crosscheck the coherence between the approximation data obtained by both IPN and CERN. In the range of 1.5 K to 30 K, the calibration apparatuses at IPN and CERN are traceable to standards maintained in a national metrological laboratory by using a set of rhodium-iron temperature sensors of metrological quality. This paper presents the calibration procedure, the quality assurance applied, the results of the calibration campaigns and the return of experience.

  2. 40 CFR 90.322 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calibration of other equipment. 90.322 Section 90.322 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... engineering practice. ...

  3. Chaos, Consternation and CALIPSO Calibration: New Strategies for Calibrating the CALIOP 1064 nm Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Mark; Garnier, Anne; Liu, Zhaoyan; Josset, Damien; Hu, Yongxiang; Lee, Kam-Pui; Hunt, William; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Rodier, Sharon; Pelon, Jaques; hide

    2012-01-01

    The very low signal-to-noise ratios of the 1064 nm CALIOP molecular backscatter signal make it effectively impossible to employ the "clear air" normalization technique typically used to calibrate elastic back-scatter lidars. The CALIPSO mission has thus chosen to cross-calibrate their 1064 nm measurements with respect to the 532 nm data using the two-wavelength backscatter from cirrus clouds. In this paper we discuss several known issues in the version 3 CALIOP 1064 nm calibration procedure, and describe the strategies that will be employed in the version 4 data release to surmount these problems.

  4. 40 CFR 86.226-94 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calibration of other equipment. 86.226-94 Section 86.226-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.226-94 Calibration of other...

  5. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoke meter calibration. 92.122 Section 92.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... meter calibration. The smokemeter shall be checked according to the following procedure prior to...

  6. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoke meter calibration. 92.122 Section 92.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... meter calibration. The smokemeter shall be checked according to the following procedure prior to...

  7. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoke meter calibration. 92.122 Section 92.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... meter calibration. The smokemeter shall be checked according to the following procedure prior to...

  8. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoke meter calibration. 92.122 Section 92.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... meter calibration. The smokemeter shall be checked according to the following procedure prior to...

  9. 40 CFR 89.311 - Analyzer calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analyzer calibration frequency. 89.311 Section 89.311 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 89.311 Analyzer calibration frequency. (a) Prior to initial use and after major...

  10. 40 CFR 89.311 - Analyzer calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analyzer calibration frequency. 89.311 Section 89.311 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 89.311 Analyzer calibration frequency. (a) Prior to initial use and after major...

  11. 40 CFR 89.311 - Analyzer calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Analyzer calibration frequency. 89.311 Section 89.311 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 89.311 Analyzer calibration frequency. (a) Prior to initial use and after major...

  12. 40 CFR 89.311 - Analyzer calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analyzer calibration frequency. 89.311 Section 89.311 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 89.311 Analyzer calibration frequency. (a) Prior to initial use and after major...

  13. 40 CFR 86.1416 - Calibration; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calibration; frequency and overview. 86.1416 Section 86.1416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... overview. (a) Calibrations are performed as specified in § 85.2233 of this chapter, with the exception...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.320 - Fuel-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel-flow calibration. 1065.320 Section 1065.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.320...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.320 - Fuel-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel-flow calibration. 1065.320 Section 1065.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.320...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.320 - Fuel-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel-flow calibration. 1065.320 Section 1065.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.320...

  17. 40 CFR 1066.140 - Diluted exhaust flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: (i) The mean flow rate of the reference flow meter, Q ref. This may include several measurements of... v, at measured values of pressure, temperature and air flow. Calibrate the CFV at the lowest... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Diluted exhaust flow calibration....

  18. 40 CFR 1065.320 - Fuel-flow calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel-flow calibration. 1065.320 Section 1065.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.320...

  19. 40 CFR 86.330-79 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NDIR analyzer calibration. 86.330-79 Section 86.330-79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... NDIR analyzer calibration. (a) Detector optimization. If necessary, follow the...

  20. 40 CFR 90.321 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NDIR analyzer calibration. 90.321 Section 90.321 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 90.321 NDIR analyzer calibration. (a) Detector optimization. If necessary, follow...

  1. 40 CFR 91.321 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NDIR analyzer calibration. 91.321 Section 91.321 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS....321 NDIR analyzer calibration. (a) Detector optimization. If necessary, follow the...

  2. 40 CFR 1066.240 - Torque transducer verification and calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Torque transducer verification and...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.240 Torque transducer verification and calibration. Calibrate torque-measurement systems as described in 40 CFR 1065.310....

  3. 40 CFR 1066.240 - Torque transducer verification and calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Torque transducer verification and...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.240 Torque transducer verification and calibration. Calibrate torque-measurement systems as described in 40 CFR 1065.310....

  4. 40 CFR 85.2232 - Calibrations, adjustments-EPA 81.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calibrations, adjustments-EPA 81. 85.2232 Section 85.2232 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Tests § 85.2232 Calibrations, adjustments—EPA 81. (a) Applicability. The requirements of this...

  5. 40 CFR 85.2232 - Calibrations, adjustments-EPA 81.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calibrations, adjustments-EPA 81. 85.2232 Section 85.2232 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Tests § 85.2232 Calibrations, adjustments—EPA 81. (a) Applicability. The requirements of this...

  6. 40 CFR 85.2232 - Calibrations, adjustments-EPA 81.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Calibrations, adjustments-EPA 81. 85.2232 Section 85.2232 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Tests § 85.2232 Calibrations, adjustments—EPA 81. (a) Applicability. The requirements of this...

  7. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  8. 40 CFR 1066.215 - Summary of verification and calibration procedures for chassis dynamometers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer... calibrations. In some cases, dynamometers are designed with internal diagnostic and control features to...

  9. Airdata Measurement and Calibration. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This Section provides a brief introduction to airdata measurement and calibration. Readers will learn about typical test objectives, quantities to measure, and flight maneuvers and operations for calibration. The Section informs readers about tower-flyby, trailing cone, pacer, radar-tracking, and dynamic airdata calibration maneuvers. Readers will also begin to understand how some data analysis considerations and special airdata cases, including high-angle-of-attack flight, high-speed flight, and nonobtrusive sensors are handled. This section is not intended to be all inclusive; readers should review AGARDograph 300, Volume 1, "Calibration of Airdata Systems and Flow Direction Sensors" for more detailed information. [11-1] References 11-2, 11-3, and 11-4 also supply pertinent information to better understand airdata measurement and calibration and related terminology. Airdata are vital to successfully complete an aircraft's mission and are derived from the air surrounding the aircraft. These airdata encompass indicated and true airspeed, pressure altitude, ambient air temperature, angles of attack and sideslip, Mach number, and rate of climb. Typically, pitot and static pressures are sensed and converted (by mechanical means in the instruments themselves) into indications on the altimeter, vertical speed indicator, airspeed indicator, and Machmeter. Similarly, measured local flow angles establish angles of attack and sideslip, and the outside air temperature is measured and indicated in the cockpit. (Instruments that can perform the conversion, such as airspeed indicators, altimeters, and Machmeters, do not correct for errors in the input values.) These measured parameters are commonly input to the airdata computer which, using appropriate algorithms and correction factors (or calibrations, as discussed later), can provide other parameters, such as true airspeed, required by the aircraft's avionics or flight control system. The presence of the aircraft in the

  10. RF impedance measurement calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, P.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-02-12

    The intent of this note is not to explain all of the available calibration methods in detail. Instead, we will focus on the calibration methods of interest for RF impedance coupling measurements and attempt to explain: (1). The standards and measurements necessary for the various calibration techniques. (2). The advantages and disadvantages of each technique. (3). The mathematical manipulations that need to be applied to the measured standards and devices. (4). An outline of the steps needed for writing a calibration routine that operated from a remote computer. For further details of the various techniques presented in this note, the reader should consult the references.

  11. Intercomparison of ionisation chamber measurements from (125)I seeds.

    PubMed

    Davies, J B; Enari, K F; Baldock, C

    2007-05-01

    The reference air kerma rates of a set of individual (125)I seeds were calculated from current measurements of a calibrated re-entrant ionisation chamber. Single seeds were distributed to seven Australian brachytherapy centres for the same measurement with the user's instrumentation. Results are expressed as the ratio of the reference air kerma rate measured by the Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation (ANSTO) to the reference air kerma rate measured at the centre. The intercomparison ratios of all participants were within +/-5% of unity.

  12. SU-E-T-297: Dosimetric Assessment of An Air-Filled Balloon Applicator in HDR Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy Using the Monte Carlo Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H; Lee, Y; Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As an alternative to cylindrical applicators, air inflated balloon applicators have been introduced into HDR vaginal cuff brachytherapy treatment to achieve sufficient dose to vagina mucosa as well as to spare rectum and bladder. In general, TG43 formulae based treatment planning systems do not take into account tissue inhomogeneity, and air in the balloon applicator can cause higher delivered dose to mucosa than treatment plan reported. We investigated dosimetric effect of air in balloon applicator using the Monte Carlo method. Methods: The thirteen-catheter Capri applicator with a Nucletron Ir-192 seed was modeled for various balloon diameters (2cm to 3.5cm) using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Ir-192 seed was placed in both central and peripheral catheters to replicate real patient situations. Existence of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) with air balloon was evaluated by comparing kerma and dose at various distances (1mm to 70mm) from surface of air-filled applicator. Also mucosa dose by an air-filled applicator was compared with by a water-filled applicator to evaluate dosimetry accuracy of planning system without tissue inhomogeneity correction. Results: Beyond 1mm from air/tissue interface, the difference between kerma and dose was within 2%. CPE (or transient CPE) condition was deemed existent, and in this region no electron transport was necessary in Monte Carlo simulations. At 1mm or less, the deviation of dose from kerma became more apparent. Increase of dose to mucosa depended on diameter of air balloon. The increment of dose to mucosa was 2.5% and 4.3% on average for 2cm and 3.5cm applicators, respectively. Conclusion: After introduction of air balloon applicator, CPE fails only at the proximity of air/tissue interface. Although dose to mucosa is increased, there is no significant dosimetric difference (<5%) between air and water filled applicators. Tissue inhomogeneity correction is not necessary for air-filled applicators.

  13. Calculations for Calibration of a Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2008-01-01

    A computer program performs calculations to calibrate a quadrupole mass spectrometer in an instrumentation system for identifying trace amounts of organic chemicals in air. In the operation of the mass spectrometer, the mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of ions being counted at a given instant of time is a function of the instantaneous value of a repeating ramp voltage waveform applied to electrodes. The count rate as a function of time can be converted to an m/z spectrum (equivalent to a mass spectrum for singly charged ions), provided that a calibration of m/z is available. The present computer program can perform the calibration in either or both of two ways: (1) Following a data-based approach, it can utilize the count-rate peaks and the times thereof measured when fed with air containing known organic compounds. (2) It can utilize a theoretical proportionality between the instantaneous m/z and the instantaneous value of an oscillating applied voltage. The program can also estimate the error of the calibration performed by the data-based approach. If calibrations are performed in both ways, then the results can be compared to obtain further estimates of errors.

  14. Calibration facility safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    A set of requirements is presented to insure the highest practical standard of safety for the Apollo 17 Calibration Facility in terms of identifying all critical or catastrophic type hazard areas. Plans for either counteracting or eliminating these areas are presented. All functional operations in calibrating the ultraviolet spectrometer and the testing of its components are described.

  15. OLI Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Morfitt, Ron; Kvaran, Geir; Biggar, Stuart; Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Goals: (1) Present an overview of the pre-launch radiance, reflectance & uniformity calibration of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) (1a) Transfer to orbit/heliostat (1b) Linearity (2) Discuss on-orbit plans for radiance, reflectance and uniformity calibration of the OLI

  16. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  17. Calibration and Lag of a Friez Type Cup Anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Robert M

    1930-01-01

    Tests on a Friez type cup anemometer have been made in the variable density wind tunnel of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory to calibrate the instrument and to determine its suitability for velocity measurements of wind gusts. The instrument was calibrated against a Pitot-static tube placed directly above the anemometer at air densities corresponding to sea level, and to an altitude of approximately 6000 feet. Air-speed acceleration tests were made to determine the lag in the instrument reading. The calibration results indicate that there should be an altitude correction. It is concluded that the cup anemometer is too sluggish for velocity measurements of wind gusts.

  18. Triple redundant hydrogen sensor with in situ calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, J. B.; Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Koszenski, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    To meet sensing and calibration needs, an in situ calibration technique was developed. It is based on electrolytic generation of a hydrogen/air atmosphere within a hydrogen sensor. The hydrogen is generated from water vapor in the air, and being electrical in nature, the in situ calibration can be performed completely automatically in remote locations. Triply redundant sensor elements are integrated within a single, compact housing, and digital logic provides inter-sensor comparisons to warn of and identify malfunctioning sensor elements. An evaluation of this concept is presented.

  19. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhen, M.D.; Dean, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  20. Configurations and calibration methods for passive sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Gangfeng; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2007-10-19

    Passive sampling technology has developed very quickly in the past 15 years, and is widely used for the monitoring of pollutants in different environments. The design and quantification of passive sampling devices require an appropriate calibration method. Current calibration methods that exist for passive sampling, including equilibrium extraction, linear uptake, and kinetic calibration, are presented in this review. A number of state-of-the-art passive sampling devices that can be used for aqueous and air monitoring are introduced according to their calibration methods.

  1. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: 2014 Cloud Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura; Acosta, Waldo J.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the December 2013 to February 2014 Icing Research Tunnel full icing cloud calibration are being presented to the SAE AC-9C committee, as represented in the 2014 cloud calibration report. The calibration steps included establishing a uniform cloud and conducting drop size and liquid water content calibrations. The goal of the calibration was to develop a uniform cloud, and to generate a transfer function from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the outputs of median volumetric drop diameter and liquid water content. This was done for both 14 CFR Parts 25 and 29, Appendix C (typical icing) and soon-to-be released Appendix O (supercooled large drop) conditions.

  2. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  3. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  4. The COS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Philip E.; Kaiser, M. E.; Keyes, C. D.; Ake, T. B.; Aloisi, A.; Friedman, S. D.; Oliveira, C. M.; Shaw, B.; Sahnow, D. J.; Penton, S. V.; Froning, C. S.; Beland, S.; Osterman, S.; Green, J.; COS/STIS STScI Team; IDT, COS

    2008-05-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, COS, (Green, J, et al., 2000, Proc SPIE, 4013) will be installed in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the next servicing mission. This will be the most sensitive ultraviolet spectrograph ever flown aboard HST. The program (CALCOS) for pipeline calibration of HST/COS data has been developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute. As with other HST pipelines, CALCOS uses an association table to list the data files to be included, and it employs header keywords to specify the calibration steps to be performed and the reference files to be used. COS includes both a cross delay line detector for the far ultraviolet (FUV) and a MAMA detector for the near ultraviolet (NUV). CALCOS uses a common structure for both channels, but the specific calibration steps differ. The calibration steps include pulse-height filtering and geometric correction for FUV, and flat-field, deadtime, and Doppler correction for both detectors. A 1-D spectrum will be extracted and flux calibrated. Data will normally be taken in TIME-TAG mode, recording the time and location of each detected photon, although ACCUM mode will also be supported. The wavelength calibration uses an on-board spectral line lamp. To enable precise wavelength calibration, default operations will simultaneously record the science target and lamp spectrum by executing brief (tag-flash) lamp exposures at least once per external target exposure.

  5. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  6. Airdata Measurement and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This memorandum provides a brief introduction to airdata measurement and calibration. Readers will learn about typical test objectives, quantities to measure, and flight maneuvers and operations for calibration. The memorandum informs readers about tower-flyby, trailing cone, pacer, radar-tracking, and dynamic airdata calibration maneuvers. Readers will also begin to understand how some data analysis considerations and special airdata cases, including high-angle-of-attack flight, high-speed flight, and nonobtrusive sensors are handled. This memorandum is not intended to be all inclusive; this paper contains extensive reference and bibliography sections.

  7. Dynamic Pressure Calibration Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.; Cate, K. H.; Young, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrating columns of fluid used to calibrate transducers. Dynamic pressure calibration standard developed for calibrating flush diaphragm-mounted pressure transducers. Pressures up to 20 kPa (3 psi) accurately generated over frequency range of 50 to 1,800 Hz. System includes two conically shaped aluminum columns one 5 cm (2 in.) high for low pressures and another 11 cm (4.3 in.) high for higher pressures, each filled with viscous fluid. Each column mounted on armature of vibration exciter, which imparts sinusoidally varying acceleration to fluid column. Signal noise low, and waveform highly dependent on quality of drive signal in vibration exciter.

  8. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  9. Compact radiometric microwave calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wollack, E. J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Fixsen, S. M.

    2006-06-15

    The calibration methods for the ARCADE II instrument are described and the accuracy estimated. The Steelcast coated aluminum cones which comprise the calibrator have a low reflection while maintaining 94% of the absorber volume within 5 mK of the base temperature (modeled). The calibrator demonstrates an absorber with the active part less than one wavelength thick and only marginally larger than the mouth of the largest horn and yet black (less than -40 dB or 0.01% reflection) over five octaves in frequency.

  10. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  11. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  12. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Groetz, J.-E. Mavon, C.; Fromm, M.; Ounoughi, N.; Belafrites, A.

    2014-08-15

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  13. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groetz, J.-E.; Ounoughi, N.; Mavon, C.; Belafrites, A.; Fromm, M.

    2014-08-01

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  14. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Smoke meter calibration. 92.122 Section 92.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.122 Smoke...

  15. 40 CFR 1066.625 - Flow meter calibration calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... diluted exhaust and dilution air, you may assume M mix is a function only of the amount of water in the... mixture, M mix, for all calibration and all testing if you control the amount of water in dilution air and... ER28AP14.115 Where: m 0 = Sutherland reference viscosity. T 0 = Sutherland reference temperature....

  16. 40 CFR 86.1322-84 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate... be used. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3... either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3) Calibrate on each used operating range with a...

  17. 40 CFR 86.1322-84 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate... be used. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3... either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3) Calibrate on each used operating range with a...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1322-84 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate... be used. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3... either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3) Calibrate on each used operating range with a...

  19. 40 CFR 89.324 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-fit straight line is 2 percent or less of the value at each non-zero data point and within ± 0.3...-grade air. (3) Calibrate on each normally used operating range with CH4 in air with nominal... factor for that range. If the deviation exceeds these limits, the best-fit non-linear equation...

  20. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: 2012 Cloud Calibration Procedure and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, NASA Glenn s Icing Research Tunnel underwent a major modification to it s refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. This paper presents the results of the subsequent full cloud calibration. Details of the calibration procedure and results are presented herein. The steps include developing a nozzle transfer map, establishing a uniform cloud, conducting a drop sizing calibration and finally a liquid water content calibration. The goal of the calibration is to develop a uniform cloud, and to build a transfer map from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the output of median volumetric droplet diameter and liquid water content.

  1. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV multispectral sensor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Yan, Lei; Gou, Zhi-Yang; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Da-Ping; Duan, Yi-Ni

    2012-12-01

    Based on the data of the scientific experiment in Urad Front Banner for UAV Remote Sensing Load Calibration Field project, with the help of 6 hyperspectral radiometric targets with good Lambertian property, the wide-view multispectral camera in UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. The result reveals that for green, red and infrared channel, whose images were successfully captured, the linear correlation coefficients between the DN and radiance are all larger than 99%. In final analysis, the comprehensive error is no more than 6%. The calibration results demonstrate that the hyperspectral targets equipped by the calibration field are well suitable for air-borne multispectral load in-flight calibration. The calibration result is reliable and could be used in the retrieval of geophysical parameters.

  2. Roundness calibration standard

    DOEpatents

    Burrus, Brice M.

    1984-01-01

    A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

  3. SRAM Detector Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soli, G. A.; Blaes, B. R.; Beuhler, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    Custom proton sensitive SRAM chips are being flown on the BMDO Clementine missions and Space Technology Research Vehicle experiments. This paper describes the calibration procedure for the SRAM proton detectors and their response to the space environment.

  4. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers; H. Liu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  5. Meteorological radar calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    A meteorological radar calibration technique is developed. It is found that the integrated, range corrected, received power saturates under intense rain conditions in a manner analogous to that encountered for the radiometric path temperature. Furthermore, it is found that this saturation condition establishes a bound which may be used to determine an absolution radar calibration for the case of radars operating at attenuating wavelengths. In the case of less intense rainfall or for radars at nonattenuating wavelengths, the relationship for direct calibration in terms of an independent measurement of radiometric path temperature is developed. This approach offers the advantage that the calibration is in terms of an independent measurement of the rainfall through the same elevated region as that viewed by the radar.

  6. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina; Webb, Craig

    2016-05-02

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the progress on the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations for all shortwave and longwave radiometers that are deployed by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program.

  7. Scanner calibration revisited

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2.) reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides. PMID:20594322

  8. Scanner calibration revisited.

    PubMed

    Pozhitkov, Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2.) reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  9. 40 CFR 1065.303 - Summary of required calibration and verifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.303 Summary of... installation, within 370 days before testing, and after major maintenance. Intake-air, dilution air, diluted...% based on a chemical balance of carbon or oxygen of the intake air, fuel, and diluted exhaust. [76...

  10. Differential absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays at the mono-energetic neutron calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Takada, M; Baba, M; Yamaguchi, H; Fujitaka, K

    2005-01-01

    Absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays of mono-energetic neutron sources from 140 keV to 15 MeV were measured in the Fast Neutron Laboratory at Tohoku University. By using both a tissue-equivalent plastic walled counter and a graphite-walled low-pressure proportional counter, absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons were obtained separately from those for gamma rays. This method needs no knowledge of energy spectra and dose distributions for gamma rays. The gamma-ray contribution in this neutron calibration field >1 MeV neutron was <3%, while for <550 keV it was >40%. The measured neutron absolute absorbed doses per unit neutron fluence agreed with the LA150 evaluated kerma factors. By using this method, absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays in an unknown neutron field can be obtained separately.

  11. Important comments on KERMA factors and DPA cross-section data in ACE files of JENDL-4.0, JEFF-3.2 and ENDF/B-VII.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Chikara; Tada, Kenichi; Kwon, Saerom; Ohta, Masayuki; Sato, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    We have studied reasons of differences of KERMA factors and DPA cross-section data among nuclear data libraries. Here the KERMA factors and DPA cross-section data included in the official ACE files of JENDL-4.0, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JEFF-3.2 are examined in more detail. As a result, it is newly found out that the KERMA factors and DPA cross-section data of a lot of nuclei are different among JENDL-4.0, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JEFF-3.2 and reasons of the differences are the followings: 1) large secondary particle production yield, 2) no secondary gamma data, 3) secondary gamma data in files12-15 mt = 3, 4) mt = 103-107 data without mt = 600 s-800 s data in file6. The issue 1) is considered to be due to nuclear data, while the issues 2)-4) seem to be due to NJOY. The ACE files of JENDL-4.0, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JEFF-3.2 with these problems should be revised after correcting wrong nuclear data and NJOY problems.

  12. Integrated calibration sphere and calibration step fixture for improved coordinate measurement machine calibration

    DOEpatents

    Clifford, Harry J [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. A number of embodiments are disclosed that allow for new and retrofit manufacture to perform as integrated calibration sphere and calibration fixture devices. This invention renders unnecessary the removal of a calibration sphere prior to CMM measurement of calibration features on calibration fixtures, thereby greatly reducing the time spent qualifying a CMM.

  13. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  14. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  15. Polarimetric Palsar Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzi, R.; Shimada, M.

    2008-11-01

    Polarimetric PALSAR system parameters are assessed using data sets collected over various calibration sites. The data collected over the Amazonian forest permits validating the zero Faraday rotation hypotheses near the equator. The analysis of the Amazonian forest data and the response of the corner reflectors deployed during the PALSAR acquisitions lead to the conclusion that the antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB). Theses results are confirmed using data collected over the Sweden and Ottawa calibration sites. The 5-m height trihedrals deployed in the Sweden calibration site by the Chalmers University of technology permits accurate measurement of antenna parameters, and detection of 2-3 degree Faraday rotation during day acquisition, whereas no Faraday rotation was noted during night acquisition. Small Faraday rotation angles (2-3 degree) have been measured using acquisitions over the DLR Oberpfaffenhofen and the Ottawa calibration sites. The presence of small but still significant Faraday rotation (2-3 degree) induces a CR return at the cross-polarization HV and VH that should not be interpreted as the actual antenna cross-talk. PALSAR antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB), and diagonal antenna distortion matrices (with zero cross-talk terms) can be used for accurate calibration of PALSAR polarimetric data.

  16. STIS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulbert, S.; Hodge, P.; Lindler, D.; Shaw, R.; Goudfrooij, P.; Katsanis, R.; Keener, S.; McGrath, M.; Bohlin, R.; Baum, S.

    1997-05-01

    Routine calibration of STIS observations in the HST data pipeline is performed by the CALSTIS task. CALSTIS can: subtract the over-scan region and a bias image from CCD observations; remove cosmic ray features from CCD observations; correct global nonlinearities for MAMA observations; subtract a dark image; and, apply flat field corrections. In the case of spectral data, CALSTIS can also: assign a wavelength to each pixel; apply a heliocentric correction to the wavelengths; convert counts to absolute flux; process the automatically generated spectral calibration lamp observations to improve the wavelength solution; rectify two-dimensional (longslit) spectra; subtract interorder and sky background; and, extract one-dimensional spectra. CALSTIS differs in significant ways from the current HST calibration tasks. The new code is written in ANSI C and makes use of a new C interface to IRAF. The input data, reference data, and output calibrated data are all in FITS format, using IMAGE or BINTABLE extensions. Error estimates are computed and include contributions from the reference images. The entire calibration can be performed by one task, but many steps can also be performed individually.

  17. GTC Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cesare, M. A.; Hammersley, P. L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    We are currently developing the calibration programme for GTC using techniques similar to the ones use for the space telescope calibration (Hammersley et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 207; Cohen et al. 1999, AJ, 117, 1864). We are planning to produce a catalogue with calibration stars which are suitable for a 10-m telescope. These sources will be not variable, non binary and do not have infrared excesses if they are to be used in the infrared. The GTC science instruments require photometric calibration between 0.35 and 2.5 microns. The instruments are: OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy), ELMER and EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) and the Acquisition and Guiding boxes (Di Césare, Hammersley, & Rodriguez Espinosa 2005, RevMexAA Ser. Conf., 24, 231). The catalogue will consist of 30 star fields distributed in all of North Hemisphere. We will use fields containing sources over the range 12 to 22 magnitude, and spanning a wide range of spectral types (A to M) for the visible and near infrared. In the poster we will show the method used for selecting these fields and we will present the analysis of the data on the first calibration fields observed.

  18. Calibrating the genome.

    PubMed

    Markward, Nathan J; Fisher, William P

    2004-01-01

    This project demonstrates how to calibrate different samples and scales of genomic information to a common scale of genomic measurement. 1,113 persons were genotyped at the 13 Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) short tandem repeat (STR) marker loci used by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for human identity testing. A measurement model of form ln[(P(nik))/(1-P(nik))] = B(n)-D(i)-L(k) is used to construct person measures and locus calibrations from information contained in the CODIS database. Winsteps (Wright and Linacre, 2003) is employed to maximize initial estimates and to investigate the necessity and sufficiency of different rating classification schema. Model fit is satisfactory in all analyses. Study outcomes are found in Tables 1-6. Additive, divisible, and interchangeable measures and calibrations can be created from raw genomic information that transcend sample- and scale-dependencies associated with racial and ethnic descent, chromosomal location, and locus-specific allele expansion structures.

  19. Calibration Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2006-02-01

    The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact Quantum Cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared imaging systems. These on-board systems will improve the calibration technology for passive sensors, which enable stand-off detection for the proliferation or use of weapons of mass destruction, by replacing on-board blackbodies with QC laser-based systems. This alternative technology can minimize the impact on instrument size and weight while improving the quality of instruments for a variety of missions. The potential of replacing flight blackbodies is made feasible by the high output, stability, and repeatability of the QC laser spectral radiance.

  20. BATSE spectroscopy detector calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Ford, L.; Matteson, J.; Lestrade, J. P.; Teegarden, B.; Schaefer, B.; Cline, T.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the channel-to-energy calibration of the Spectroscopy Detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). These detectors consist of NaI(TI) crystals viewed by photomultiplier tubes whose output in turn is measured by a pulse height analyzer. The calibration of these detectors has been complicated by frequent gain changes and by nonlinearities specific to the BATSE detectors. Nonlinearities in the light output from the NaI crystal and in the pulse height analyzer are shifted relative to each other by changes in the gain of the photomultiplier tube. We present the analytical model which is the basis of our calibration methodology, and outline how the empirical coefficients in this approach were determined. We also describe the complications peculiar to the Spectroscopy Detectors, and how our understanding of the detectors' operation led us to a solution to these problems.

  1. TA489A calibrator: SANDUS

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, R.

    1987-08-01

    The TA489A Calibrator, designed to operate in the MA164 Digital Data Acquisition System, is used to calibrate up to 128 analog-to-digital recording channels. The TA489A calibrates using a dc Voltage Source or any of several special calibration modes. Calibration schemes are stored in the TA489A memory and are initiated locally or remotely through a Command Link.

  2. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  3. Minerva Detector Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza

    2013-04-01

    Current and future neutrino oscillation experiments depend on precise knowledge of neutrino-nucleus cross-sections. Minerva is a neutrino scattering experiment at Fermilab. Minerva was designed to make precision measurements of low energy neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on a variety of different materials (plastic scintillator, C, Fe, Pb, He and H2O). In Order to make these measurements, it is crucial that the detector is carefully calibrated.This talk will describe how MINERvA uses muons from upstream neutrino interactions as a calibration source to convert electronics output to absolute energy deposition.

  4. Calibrated entanglement entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmatov, I.; Deger, N. S.; Gutowski, J.; Colgáin, E. Ó.; Yavartanoo, H.

    2017-07-01

    The Ryu-Takayanagi prescription reduces the problem of calculating entanglement entropy in CFTs to the determination of minimal surfaces in a dual anti-de Sitter geometry. For 3D gravity theories and BTZ black holes, we identify the minimal surfaces as special Lagrangian cycles calibrated by the real part of the holomorphic one-form of a spacelike hypersurface. We show that (generalised) calibrations provide a unified way to determine holographic entanglement entropy from minimal surfaces, which is applicable to warped AdS3 geometries. We briefly discuss generalisations to higher dimensions.

  5. New in-situ, non-intrusive calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, Heather; Adrian, Ronald; Ding, Liuyang; Prestridge, Kathy

    2014-11-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments require precise and accurate camera calibration. Standard techniques make assumptions about hard-to-measure camera parameters (i.e. optical axis angle, distortions, etc.)-reducing the calibration accuracy. Additionally, vibrations and slight movements after calibration may cause significant errors-particularly for tomographic PIV. These problems are exacerbated when a calibration target cannot be placed within the test section. A new PIV camera calibration method has been developed to permit precise calibration without placing a calibration target inside the test section or scanning the target over a volume. The method is capable of correcting for dynamic calibration changes occurring between PIV laser pulses. A transparent calibration plate with fine marks on both sides is positioned on the test section window. Dual-plane mapping makes it possible to determine a mapping function containing both position and angular direction of central rays from particles. From this information, central rays can be traced into the test section with high accuracy. Image distortion by the lens and refraction at various air-glass-liquid interfaces are accounted for, and no information about the position or angle of the camera(s) is required.

  6. Laser-induced incandescence calibration via gravimetric sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, M. Y.; Vander Wal, R. L.; Zhou, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Absolute calibration of laser-induced incandescence (LII) is demonstrated via comparison of LII signal intensities with gravimetrically determined soot volume fractions. This calibration technique does not rely upon calculated or measured optical characteristics of soot. The variation of the LII signal with gravimetrically measured soot volume fractions ranging from 0.078 to 1.1 ppm established the linearly of the calibration. With the high spatial and temporal resolution capabilities of laser-induced incandescence (LII), the spatial and temporal fluctuations of the soot field within a gravimetric chimney were characterized. Radial uniformity of the soot volume fraction, f(sub v) was demonstrated with sufficient averaging of the single laser-shot LII images of the soot field thus confirming the validity of the calibration method for imaging applications. As illustration, instantaneous soot volume fractions within a Re = 5000 ethylene/air diffusion flame measured via planar LII were established quantitatively with this calibration.

  7. ODERACS preflight optical calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madler, Ronald A.; Culp, Robert D.; Maclay, Timothy D.

    1993-09-01

    Detection and measurement of small space debris objects are vital to verify the validity of debris models for the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Calibration of optical instruments is necessary so that reliable estimates of the size and albedo of man-made orbiting objects can be found. The Orbital Debris Radar Calibration Spheres (ODERACS) project is being conducted by NASA and the DoD to calibrate both radar and optical tracking facilities for small objects. This paper discusses the pre-flight optical calibration of the spheres. The purpose of this study is to determine the spectral reflectivity, scattering characteristics and albedo for the visible wavelength region. The measurements are performed by illuminating the flight spheres with a collimated beam of light, and measuring the reflected visible light over possible phase angles. This allows one to estimate the specular and scattering characteristics as well as the albedo. Tests were conducted on several flight and test metal spheres with varying diameters and surface characteristics. The polished metal spheres are shown to be very good specular reflectors, while the diffuse surfaces exhibit both specular and scattering reflection characteristics.

  8. Improved Regression Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrondal, Anders; Kuha, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood for generalized linear models with covariate measurement error cannot in general be expressed in closed form, which makes maximum likelihood estimation taxing. A popular alternative is regression calibration which is computationally efficient at the cost of inconsistent estimation. We propose an improved regression calibration…

  9. Optical detector calibrator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, James P. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An optical detector calibrator system simulates a source of optical radiation to which a detector to be calibrated is responsive. A light source selected to emit radiation in a range of wavelengths corresponding to the spectral signature of the source is disposed within a housing containing a microprocessor for controlling the light source and other system elements. An adjustable iris and a multiple aperture filter wheel are provided for controlling the intensity of radiation emitted from the housing by the light source to adjust the simulated distance between the light source and the detector to be calibrated. The geared iris has an aperture whose size is adjustable by means of a first stepper motor controlled by the microprocessor. The multiple aperture filter wheel contains neutral density filters of different attenuation levels which are selectively positioned in the path of the emitted radiation by a second stepper motor that is also controlled by the microprocessor. An operator can select a number of detector tests including range, maximum and minimum sensitivity, and basic functionality. During the range test, the geared iris and filter wheel are repeatedly adjusted by the microprocessor as necessary to simulate an incrementally increasing simulated source distance. A light source calibration subsystem is incorporated in the system which insures that the intensity of the light source is maintained at a constant level over time.

  10. Thermistor mount efficiency calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1980-05-01

    Thermistor mount efficiency calibration is accomplished by use of the power equation concept and by complex signal-ratio measurements. A comparison of thermistor mounts at microwave frequencies is made by mixing the reference and the reflected signals to produce a frequency at which the amplitude and phase difference may be readily measured.

  11. Commodity-Free Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Commodity-free calibration is a reaction rate calibration technique that does not require the addition of any commodities. This technique is a specific form of the reaction rate technique, where all of the necessary reactants, other than the sample being analyzed, are either inherent in the analyzing system or specifically added or provided to the system for a reason other than calibration. After introduction, the component of interest is exposed to other reactants or flow paths already present in the system. The instrument detector records one of the following to determine the rate of reaction: the increase in the response of the reaction product, a decrease in the signal of the analyte response, or a decrease in the signal from the inherent reactant. With this data, the initial concentration of the analyte is calculated. This type of system can analyze and calibrate simultaneously, reduce the risk of false positives and exposure to toxic vapors, and improve accuracy. Moreover, having an excess of the reactant already present in the system eliminates the need to add commodities, which further reduces cost, logistic problems, and potential contamination. Also, the calculations involved can be simplified by comparison to those of the reaction rate technique. We conducted tests with hypergols as an initial investigation into the feasiblility of the technique.

  12. Uncertainty in audiometer calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurélio Pedroso, Marcos; Gerges, Samir N. Y.; Gonçalves, Armando A., Jr.

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this work is to present a metrology study necessary for the accreditation of audiometer calibration procedures at the National Brazilian Institute of Metrology Standardization and Industrial Quality—INMETRO. A model for the calculation of measurement uncertainty was developed. Metrological aspects relating to audiometer calibration, traceability and measurement uncertainty were quantified through comparison between results obtained at the Industrial Noise Laboratory—LARI of the Federal University of Santa Catarina—UFSC and the Laboratory of Electric/acoustics—LAETA of INMETRO. Similar metrological performance of the measurement system used in both laboratories was obtained, indicating that the interlaboratory results are compatible with the expected values. The uncertainty calculation was based on the documents: EA-4/02 Expression of the Uncertainty of Measurement in Calibration (European Co-operation for Accreditation 1999 EA-4/02 p 79) and Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (International Organization for Standardization 1993 1st edn, corrected and reprinted in 1995, Geneva, Switzerland). Some sources of uncertainty were calculated theoretically (uncertainty type B) and other sources were measured experimentally (uncertainty type A). The global value of uncertainty calculated for the sound pressure levels (SPLs) is similar to that given by other calibration institutions. The results of uncertainty related to measurements of SPL were compared with the maximum uncertainties Umax given in the standard IEC 60645-1: 2001 (International Electrotechnical Commission 2001 IEC 60645-1 Electroacoustics—Audiological Equipment—Part 1:—Pure-Tone Audiometers).

  13. TWSTFT Link Calibration Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Serrano, G. Brunetti (2013) Relative Calibration of the Time Transfer Link between CERN and LNGS for Precise Neutrino Time of Flight Measurements. Proc...Esteban, M. Pallavicini, Va. Pettiti, C. Plantard, A. Razeto (2012) Measurement of CNGS Muon Neutrinos Speed with Borexino: INRIM and ROA Contribution

  14. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    SciTech Connect

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  15. Calibrating Communication Competencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surges Tatum, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The Many-faceted Rasch measurement model is used in the creation of a diagnostic instrument by which communication competencies can be calibrated, the severity of observers/raters can be determined, the ability of speakers measured, and comparisons made between various groups.

  16. Pleiades Absolute Calibration : Inflight Calibration Sites and Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachérade, S.; Fourest, S.; Gamet, P.; Lebègue, L.

    2012-07-01

    In-flight calibration of space sensors once in orbit is a decisive step to be able to fulfil the mission objectives. This article presents the methods of the in-flight absolute calibration processed during the commissioning phase. Four In-flight calibration methods are used: absolute calibration, cross-calibration with reference sensors such as PARASOL or MERIS, multi-temporal monitoring and inter-bands calibration. These algorithms are based on acquisitions over natural targets such as African deserts, Antarctic sites, La Crau (Automatic calibration station) and Oceans (Calibration over molecular scattering) or also new extra-terrestrial sites such as the Moon and selected stars. After an overview of the instrument and a description of the calibration sites, it is pointed out how each method is able to address one or several aspects of the calibration. We focus on how these methods complete each other in their operational use, and how they help building a coherent set of information that addresses all aspects of in-orbit calibration. Finally, we present the perspectives that the high level of agility of PLEIADES offers for the improvement of its calibration and a better characterization of the calibration sites.

  17. Simplified Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A measurement-based radiance estimation approach for vicarious radiometric calibration of spaceborne multispectral remote sensing systems has been developed. This simplified process eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and reduces the number of atmospheric assumptions required to perform sensor calibrations. Like prior approaches, the simplified method involves the collection of ground truth data coincident with the overpass of the remote sensing system being calibrated, but this approach differs from the prior techniques in both the nature of the data collected and the manner in which the data are processed. In traditional vicarious radiometric calibration, ground truth data are gathered using ground-viewing spectroradiometers and one or more sun photometer( s), among other instruments, located at a ground target area. The measured data from the ground-based instruments are used in radiative transfer models to estimate the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) target radiances at the time of satellite overpass. These TOA radiances are compared with the satellite sensor readings to radiometrically calibrate the sensor. Traditional vicarious radiometric calibration methods require that an atmospheric model be defined such that the ground-based observations of solar transmission and diffuse-to-global ratios are in close agreement with the radiative transfer code estimation of these parameters. This process is labor-intensive and complex, and can be prone to errors. The errors can be compounded because of approximations in the model and inaccurate assumptions about the radiative coupling between the atmosphere and the terrain. The errors can increase the uncertainty of the TOA radiance estimates used to perform the radiometric calibration. In comparison, the simplified approach does not use atmospheric radiative transfer models and involves fewer assumptions concerning the radiative transfer properties of the atmosphere. This new technique uses two neighboring uniform

  18. SU-E-T-207: Comparison of Integrated Tissue Air Ratio (ITAR) to Traditional TAR for Kilovoltage Pencil-Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, J; Koruga, I; Chell, E; Pintaske, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Clinically viable depth dose determination in kilovoltage pencil-beams is a great challenge that resulted in a published dosimetry method called ITAR, which involves measurement of air kerma and attenuation with a detector in a low scatter environment coupled with MCNP scatter calculations. The objective of this work is to compare ITAR to traditional TAR using inherently water-proof microchambers that have only recently become commercially available. Methods: An Exradin A26 microchamber was centered 150 mm from a 100 kVp x-ray source with 2 mm aluminum HVL. Depth dose in water from 16 to 24 mm in 2 mm increments was determined by: (1) placing blocks of Plastic Water LR near the source to minimize scatter and using previously published conversion coefficients [ITAR method] and (2) submerging the detector in a water tank with 2 mm thick Plastic Water LR walls and jogging the tank with motor controllers while keeping the detector position fixed [traditional TAR method]. Each method was repeated four to five times. For each repetition, dose was measured free in-air to normalize the data for exponential regression. Results: Traditional TAR indicated higher depth dose than ITAR; differences ranged from 2.1% at 24 mm depth to 2.5% at 16 mm depth. However, the results of traditional TAR did not include a correction for Pq,cham because it is unknown for this detector type in these conditions. It is estimated that the component of Pq,cham due to the effect of water displacement alone is ∼0.94, but Pq,cham is likely several percent larger than 0.94 due to the energy dependency of the microchamber in the presence of low energy scatter that is not present during in-air calibration. Conclusion: The ITAR method remains preferable for clinical depth dose determination in kilovoltage pencil-beams due to Pq,cham being unknown for suitable detectors in relevant conditions. All four of the authors are either current full time employees, which include stock option grants, or

  19. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: 2014 Cloud Calibration Procedure and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Judith F.; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura E.; Acosta, Waldo J.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the December 2013 to February 2014 Icing Research Tunnel full icing cloud calibration are presented. The calibration steps included establishing a uniform cloud and conducting drop size and liquid water content calibrations. The goal of the calibration was to develop a uniform cloud, and to generate a transfer function from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the outputs of median volumetric drop diameter and liquid water content. This was done for both 14 CFR Parts 25 and 29, Appendix C ('typical' icing) and soon-to-be released Appendix O (supercooled large drop) conditions.

  20. MIRO Calibration Switch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suchman, Jason; Salinas, Yuki; Kubo, Holly

    2001-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed, analyzed, built, and tested a calibration switch mechanism for the MIRO instrument on the ROSETTA spacecraft. MIRO is the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter; this instrument hopes to investigate the origin of the solar system by studying the origin of comets. Specifically, the instrument will be the first to use submillimeter and millimeter wave heterodyne receivers to remotely examine the P-54 Wirtanen comet. In order to calibrate the instrument, it needs to view a hot and cold target. The purpose of the mechanism is to divert the instrument's field of view from the hot target, to the cold target, and then back into space. This cycle is to be repeated every 30 minutes for the duration of the 1.5 year mission. The paper describes the development of the mechanism, as well as analysis and testing techniques.

  1. HIRDLS monochromator calibration equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepplewhite, Christopher L.; Barnett, John J.; Djotni, Karim; Whitney, John G.; Bracken, Justain N.; Wolfenden, Roger; Row, Frederick; Palmer, Christopher W. P.; Watkins, Robert E. J.; Knight, Rodney J.; Gray, Peter F.; Hammond, Geoffory

    2003-11-01

    A specially designed and built monochromator was developed for the spectral calibration of the HIRDLS instrument. The High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) is a precision infra-red remote sensing instrument with very tight requirements on the knowledge of the response to received radiation. A high performance, vacuum compatible monochromator, was developed with a wavelength range from 4 to 20 microns to encompass that of the HIRDLS instrument. The monochromator is integrated into a collimating system which is shared with a set of tiny broad band sources used for independent spatial response measurements (reported elsewhere). This paper describes the design and implementation of the monochromator and the performance obtained during the period of calibration of the HIRDLS instrument at Oxford University in 2002.

  2. Phase calibration generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A phase calibration system was developed for the Deep Space Stations to generate reference microwave comb tones which are mixed in with signals received by the antenna. These reference tones are used to remove drifts of the station's receiving system from the detected data. This phase calibration system includes a cable stabilizer which transfers a 20 MHz reference signal from the control room to the antenna cone. The cable stabilizer compensates for delay changes in the long cable which connects its control room subassembly to its antenna cone subassembly in such a way that the 20 MHz is transferred to the cone with no significant degradation of the hydrogen maser atomic clock stability. The 20 MHz reference is used by the comb generator and is also available for use as a reference for receiver LO's in the cone.

  3. Pipeline Calibration for STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Hulbert, S. J.; Lindler, D.; Busko, I.; Hsu, J.-C.; Baum, S.; McGrath, M.; Goudfrooij, P.; Shaw, R.; Katsanis, R.; Keener, S.; Bohlin, R.

    The CALSTIS program for calibration of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph data in the OPUS pipeline differs in several significant ways from calibration for earlier HST instruments, such as the use of FITS format, computation of error estimates, and association of related exposures. Several steps are now done in the pipeline that previously had to be done off-line by the user, such as cosmic ray rejection and extraction of 1-D spectra. Although the program is linked with IRAF for image and table I/O, it is written in ANSI C rather than SPP, which should make the code more accessible. FITS extension I/O makes use of the new IRAF FITS kernel for images and the HEASARC FITSIO package for tables.

  4. Calibration of hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorefice, Salvatore; Malengo, Andrea

    2006-10-01

    After a brief description of the different methods employed in periodic calibration of hydrometers used in most cases to measure the density of liquids in the range between 500 kg m-3 and 2000 kg m-3, particular emphasis is given to the multipoint procedure based on hydrostatic weighing, known as well as Cuckow's method. The features of the calibration apparatus and the procedure used at the INRiM (formerly IMGC-CNR) density laboratory have been considered to assess all relevant contributions involved in the calibration of different kinds of hydrometers. The uncertainty is strongly dependent on the kind of hydrometer; in particular, the results highlight the importance of the density of the reference buoyant liquid, the temperature of calibration and the skill of operator in the reading of the scale in the whole assessment of the uncertainty. It is also interesting to realize that for high-resolution hydrometers (division of 0.1 kg m-3), the uncertainty contribution of the density of the reference liquid is the main source of the total uncertainty, but its importance falls under about 50% for hydrometers with a division of 0.5 kg m-3 and becomes somewhat negligible for hydrometers with a division of 1 kg m-3, for which the reading uncertainty is the predominant part of the total uncertainty. At present the best INRiM result is obtained with commercially available hydrometers having a scale division of 0.1 kg m-3, for which the relative uncertainty is about 12 × 10-6.

  5. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  6. Calibration Chamber Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-30

    penetrometers of different designs, (iii) the effect of rod friction, (iv) the effect of discontinuous operation, and (v) sensing an interface between two sand...layers. Other test results on two designs of 10 cm2 Fugro penetrometers, each with a different position of friction sleeve, assisted in the selection...at different stages in the penetration of a specimen. The calibration tests had the prime purpose of establishing correlations between the penetration

  7. SOFIE instrument ground calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Scott; Fish, Chad; Romrell, Devin; Gordley, Larry; Hervig, Mark

    2006-08-01

    Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL), in partnership with GATS, Inc., designed and built an instrument to conduct the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE). SOFIE is the primary infrared sensor in the NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) instrument suite. AIM's mission is to study polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). SOFIE will make measurements in 16 separate spectral bands, arranged in eight pairs between 0.29 and 5.3 μm. Each band pair will provide differential absorption limb-path transmission profiles for an atmospheric component of interest, by observing the sun through the limb of the atmosphere during solar occultation as AIM orbits Earth. A pointing mirror and imaging sun sensor coaligned with the detectors are used to track the sun during occultation events and maintain stable alignment of the sun on the detectors. Ground calibration experiments were performed to measure SOFIE end-to-end relative spectral response, nonlinearity, and spatial characteristics. SDL's multifunction infrared calibrator #1 (MIC1) was used to present sources to the instrument for calibration. Relative spectral response (RSR) measurements were performed using a step-scan Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Out-of-band RSR was measured to approximately 0.01% of in-band peak response using the cascaded filter Fourier transform spectrometer (CFFTS) method. Linearity calibration was performed using a calcium fluoride attenuator in combination with a 3000K blackbody. Spatial characterization was accomplished using a point source and the MIC1 pointing mirror. SOFIE sun sensor tracking algorithms were verified using a heliostat and relay mirrors to observe the sun from the ground. These techniques are described in detail, and resulting SOFIE performance parameters are presented.

  8. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. H. Liu

    2003-02-14

    This report has documented the methodologies and the data used for developing rock property sets for three infiltration maps. Model calibration is necessary to obtain parameter values appropriate for the scale of the process being modeled. Although some hydrogeologic property data (prior information) are available, these data cannot be directly used to predict flow and transport processes because they were measured on scales smaller than those characterizing property distributions in models used for the prediction. Since model calibrations were done directly on the scales of interest, the upscaling issue was automatically considered. On the other hand, joint use of data and the prior information in inversions can further increase the reliability of the developed parameters compared with those for the prior information. Rock parameter sets were developed for both the mountain and drift scales because of the scale-dependent behavior of fracture permeability. Note that these parameter sets, except those for faults, were determined using the 1-D simulations. Therefore, they cannot be directly used for modeling lateral flow because of perched water in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. Further calibration may be needed for two- and three-dimensional modeling studies. As discussed above in Section 6.4, uncertainties for these calibrated properties are difficult to accurately determine, because of the inaccuracy of simplified methods for this complex problem or the extremely large computational expense of more rigorous methods. One estimate of uncertainty that may be useful to investigators using these properties is the uncertainty used for the prior information. In most cases, the inversions did not change the properties very much with respect to the prior information. The Output DTNs (including the input and output files for all runs) from this study are given in Section 9.4.

  9. Calibration of Germanium Resistance Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladner, D.; Urban, E.; Mason, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    Largely completed thermometer-calibration cryostat and probe allows six germanium resistance thermometers to be calibrated at one time at superfluid-helium temperatures. In experiments involving several such thermometers, use of this calibration apparatus results in substantial cost savings. Cryostat maintains temperature less than 2.17 K through controlled evaporation and removal of liquid helium from Dewar. Probe holds thermometers to be calibrated and applies small amount of heat as needed to maintain precise temperature below 2.17 K.

  10. Fast calibration of gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Digital unit automates calibration sequence using calculator IC and programmable read-only memory to solve calibration equations. Infrared sensors start and stop calibration sequence. Instrument calibrates mass flowmeters or rotameters where flow measurement is based on mass or volume. This automatic control reduces operator time by 80 percent. Solid-state components are very reliable, and digital character allows system accuracy to be determined primarily by accuracy of transducers.

  11. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehej

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency.

  12. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP

    DOEpatents

    Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

    1958-04-22

    The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

  13. Radiation calibration targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera.

    A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  14. Radiation Calibration Targets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-05

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera. A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00620

  15. Self Calibrated Wireless Distributed Environmental Sensory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fishbain, Barak; Moreno-Centeno, Erick

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in sensory and communication technologies have made Wireless Distributed Environmental Sensory Networks (WDESN) technically and economically feasible. WDESNs present an unprecedented tool for studying many environmental processes in a new way. However, the WDESNs’ calibration process is a major obstacle in them becoming the common practice. Here, we present a new, robust and efficient method for aggregating measurements acquired by an uncalibrated WDESN, and producing accurate estimates of the observed environmental variable’s true levels rendering the network as self-calibrated. The suggested method presents novelty both in group-decision-making and in environmental sensing as it offers a most valuable tool for distributed environmental monitoring data aggregation. Applying the method on an extensive real-life air-pollution dataset showed markedly more accurate results than the common practice and the state-of-the-art. PMID:27098279

  16. Self Calibrated Wireless Distributed Environmental Sensory Networks.

    PubMed

    Fishbain, Barak; Moreno-Centeno, Erick

    2016-04-21

    Recent advances in sensory and communication technologies have made Wireless Distributed Environmental Sensory Networks (WDESN) technically and economically feasible. WDESNs present an unprecedented tool for studying many environmental processes in a new way. However, the WDESNs' calibration process is a major obstacle in them becoming the common practice. Here, we present a new, robust and efficient method for aggregating measurements acquired by an uncalibrated WDESN, and producing accurate estimates of the observed environmental variable's true levels rendering the network as self-calibrated. The suggested method presents novelty both in group-decision-making and in environmental sensing as it offers a most valuable tool for distributed environmental monitoring data aggregation. Applying the method on an extensive real-life air-pollution dataset showed markedly more accurate results than the common practice and the state-of-the-art.

  17. Energy calibration of the fly's eye detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, S.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    The methods used to calibrate the Fly's eye detector to evaluate the energy of EAS are discussed. The energy of extensive air showers (EAS) as seen by the Fly's Eye detector are obtained from track length integrals of observed shower development curves. The energy of the parent cosmic ray primary is estimated by applying corrections to account for undetected energy in the muon, neutrino and hadronic channels. Absolute values for E depend upon the measurement of shower sizes N sub e(x). The following items are necessary to convert apparent optical brightness into intrinsical optical brightness: (1) an assessment of those factors responsible for light production by the relativistic electrons in an EAS and the transmission of light thru the atmosphere, (2) calibration of the optical detection system, and (3) a knowledge of the trajectory of the shower.

  18. Generating Multiple Calibrating Voltages Simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutreix, Lionel J.

    1992-01-01

    Calibrating unit containing signal generator controlled by microprocessor puts out ac signals of known voltages on fifty channels simultaneously. Signals used to calibrate high-frequency tape recorder channels for multiple, ac-coupled strain gauges simultaneously. Calibrating voltage required on each tape channel determined by remote computer, and corresponding data and commands transmitted to microprocessor via modems.

  19. Internet-Based Calibration of a Multifunction Calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-12-19

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multijunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  20. Internet-based calibration of a multifunction calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-04-17

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multifunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  1. Automatic temperature-calibration system

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.L.; Stant, R.S.

    1982-08-23

    A relatively inexpensive, computer-controlled temperature calibration system is described. The system will provide working standard level calibration between -90/sup 0/C and +1100/sup 0/C for multiple resistance thermometers or thermocouples. It is designed to collect the data in a cooldown or ballistic state using either a platinum resistance thermometer (PRT) or a precision thermocouple as a standard. The use of this calibration system increases measurement repeatability, while greatly reducing the man-hours required for a calibration. Construction and basic software details of the temperature calibration system are provided.

  2. Calibration of triaxial fluxgate gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vcelak, Jan

    2006-04-15

    The description of simple and fast calibration procedures used for double-probe triaxial fluxgate gradiometer is provided in this paper. The calibration procedure consists of three basic steps. In the first step both probes are calibrated independently in order to reach constant total field reading in every position. Both probes are numerically aligned in the second step in order that the gradient reading is zero in homogenous magnetic field. The third step consists of periodic drift calibration during measurement. The results and detailed description of each calibration step are presented and discussed in the paper. The gradiometer is finally verified during the detection of the metal object in the measuring grid.

  3. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  4. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  5. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, Alice T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within +/-0.05% the entire system has an accuracy of +/-0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  6. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, Alice T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within .+-.0.05%, the entire system has an accuracy of a .+-.0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  7. Air Sampling Instruments for Evaluation of Atmospheric Contaminants. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, Cincinnati, OH.

    This text, a revision and extension of the first three editions, consists of papers discussing the basic considerations in sampling air for specific purposes, sampler calibration, systems components, sample collectors, and descriptions of air-sampling instruments. (BT)

  8. Final report on COOMET.AUV.A-S1: Technical report on supplementary comparison 'Comparison of national standards of the sound pressure unit in air through calibration of working reference microphones'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozdeeva, Valentina; Chalyy, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The supplementary comparison COOMET.AUV.A-S1 for secondary calibration methods using WS1 and WS2 measurement microphones was carried out from 2009 to 2010. The results were submitted to and approved by CCAUV in April 2014. Four National Metrology Institutes took part in this comparison and are as follows: BelGIM (Belarus), VNIIFTRI (Russia), SMU (Slovakia) and DP NDI 'Sistema' (Ukraine). Three of the above NMIs (VNIIFTRI, SMU and DP NDI 'Sistema') had earlier participated in COOMET key comparisons and one NMI (VNIIFTRI) had also participated in CCAUV key comparisons. The Comparison Reference Values were calculated as the weighted mean values from results obtained by three institutes. The comparison results show agreement for all participants in the frequency range from 20 Hz to 12.5 kHz for WS1 microphones, and in the frequency range from 20 Hz to 16 kHz for WS2 microphones. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  10. Uncertainty and Dimensional Calibrations.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Ted; Stoup, John

    1997-01-01

    The calculation of uncertainty for a measurement is an effort to set reasonable bounds for the measurement result according to standardized rules. Since every measurement produces only an estimate of the answer, the primary requisite of an uncertainty statement is to inform the reader of how sure the writer is that the answer is in a certain range. This report explains how we have implemented these rules for dimensional calibrations of nine different types of gages: gage blocks, gage wires, ring gages, gage balls, roundness standards, optical flats indexing tables, angle blocks, and sieves.

  11. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  12. Uncertainty and Dimensional Calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Doiron, Ted; Stoup, John

    1997-01-01

    The calculation of uncertainty for a measurement is an effort to set reasonable bounds for the measurement result according to standardized rules. Since every measurement produces only an estimate of the answer, the primary requisite of an uncertainty statement is to inform the reader of how sure the writer is that the answer is in a certain range. This report explains how we have implemented these rules for dimensional calibrations of nine different types of gages: gage blocks, gage wires, ring gages, gage balls, roundness standards, optical flats indexing tables, angle blocks, and sieves. PMID:27805114

  13. Calibrating bacterial evolution

    PubMed Central

    Ochman, Howard; Elwyn, Susannah; Moran, Nancy A.

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to calibrate bacterial evolution have relied on the assumption that rates of molecular sequence divergence in bacteria are similar to those of higher eukaryotes, or to those of the few bacterial taxa for which ancestors can be reliably dated from ecological or geological evidence. Despite similarities in the substitution rates estimated for some lineages, comparisons of the relative rates of evolution at different classes of nucleotide sites indicate no basis for their universal application to all bacteria. However, there is evidence that bacteria have a constant genome-wide mutation rate on an evolutionary time scale but that this rate differs dramatically from the rate estimated by experimental methods. PMID:10535975

  14. White Dwarf Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colina, Luis

    1994-01-01

    As a result of last November calibration workshop, all parties agreed that the HST should be switched to the WD basis for absolute fluxes. This proposal implements that decision. A measurement of the absolute sensitivity of the FOS detectors will be performed using theoretical pure hydrogen model atmosphere calculations for three white dwarfs. The high resolution gratings will be used in the 1 arcsec aperture. A four stage peakup of the standard star provides centering in the aperture. Observations are requested for fall 94 with repeated observations about two months after.

  15. Transient Calorimeter Calibration System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    can withstand the high heat flux levels encountered during calibration. 3 d. The verification of absorptivity of a colloidal graphite coat- ing used...CC4-)Ŕ ýz- ix w- Vj m ~ CL 4) > r- 4-) r-)W *. M 0 0 a 4) u.) . CJ C4) Lfl 𔃺 4%. C6 0) 0 ~ 4 -0 E 36 The colloidal graphite remains the most...before and after exposure. Such tests performed with the colloidal graphite coating yielded no apparent change in absorptivity up through 5 kW/cm2 . In

  16. ALTEA: The instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Belli, F.; Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; di Fino, L.; Narici, L.; Picozza, P.; Rinaldi, A.; Sannita, W. G.; Finetti, N.; Nurzia, G.; Rantucci, E.; Scrimaglio, R.; Segreto, E.; Schardt, D.

    2008-05-01

    The ALTEA program is an international and multi-disciplinary project aimed at studying particle radiation in space environment and its effects on astronauts’ brain functions, as the anomalous perception of light flashes first reported during Apollo missions. The ALTEA space facility includes a 6-silicon telescopes particle detector, and is onboard the International Space Station (ISS) since July 2006. In this paper, the detector calibration at the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS18 at GSI Darmstadt will be presented and compared to the Geant 3 Monte Carlo simulation. Finally, the results of a neural network analysis that was used for ion discrimination on fragmentation data will also be presented.

  17. Calibration and Alignment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassotti, Christopher; Iskenderian, Haig; Hoffman, Ross N.

    1999-06-01

    Discrepancies between estimates of rainfall from ground-based radar and satellite observing systems can be attributed to either calibration differences or to geolocation and sampling differences. These latter include differences due to radar or satellite misregistration, differences in observation times, or variations in instrument and retrieval algorithm sensitivities. A new methodology has been developed and tested for integrating radar- and satellite-based estimates of precipitation using a feature calibration and alignment (FCA) technique. The parameters describing the calibration and alignment are found using a variational approach, and are composed of displacement and amplitude adjustments to the satellite rainfall retrievals, which minimize the differences with respect to the radar data and satisfy additional smoothness and magnitude constraints. In this approach the amplitude component represents a calibration of the satellite estimate to the radar, whereas the displacement components correct temporal and/or geolocation differences between the radar and satellite data.The method has been tested on a number of cases of the NASA WetNet PIP-2 dataset. These data consist of coincident estimates of rainfall by ground-based radar and the DMSP SSM/I. Sensitivity tests were conducted to tune the parameters of the algorithm. Results indicate the effectiveness of the technique in minimizing the discrepancies between radar and satellite observations of rainfall for a variety of rainfall events ranging from midlatitude frontal precipitation to heavy convection associated with a tropical cyclone (Hurricane Andrew). A remaining issue to be resolved is the incorporation of knowledge about location dependencies in the errors of the radar and microwave estimates.Once the satellite data have been adjusted to match the radar observations, the two independent estimates (radar and adjusted SSM/I rain rates) may be blended to improve the overall depiction of the rainfall event

  18. 40 CFR 86.219-94 - CVS calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CVS calibration. 86.219-94 Section 86.219-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later Model Year Gasoline-Fueled New Light-Duty Vehicles, New Light-Duty Trucks and New Medium-Duty...

  19. 40 CFR 86.218-94 - Dynamometer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer calibration. 86.218-94 Section 86.218-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... 1994 and Later Model Year Gasoline-Fueled New Light-Duty Vehicles, New Light-Duty Trucks and New Medium...

  20. 40 CFR 86.224-94 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.224-94 Section 86.224-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.224-94 Carbon dioxide...

  1. 40 CFR 86.224-94 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.224-94 Section 86.224-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.224-94 Carbon dioxide...

  2. 40 CFR 86.224-94 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.224-94 Section 86.224-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.224-94 Carbon dioxide...

  3. 40 CFR 86.224-94 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.224-94 Section 86.224-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.224-94 Carbon dioxide...

  4. 40 CFR 89.306 - Dynamometer specifications and calibration weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.306 Dynamometer specifications and calibration weights. (a) Dynamometer specifications. The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of power output...

  5. 40 CFR 89.323 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NDIR analyzer calibration. 89.323 Section 89.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  6. 40 CFR 89.306 - Dynamometer specifications and calibration weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.306 Dynamometer specifications and calibration weights. (a) Dynamometer specifications. The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of power output...

  7. 40 CFR 89.313 - Initial calibration of analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Initial calibration of analyzers. 89.313 Section 89.313 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  8. 40 CFR 89.323 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NDIR analyzer calibration. 89.323 Section 89.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  9. 40 CFR 89.313 - Initial calibration of analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Initial calibration of analyzers. 89.313 Section 89.313 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  10. 40 CFR 86.216-94 - Calibrations, frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calibrations, frequency and overview. 86.216-94 Section 86.216-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR..., frequency and overview. The provisions of § 86.116-94 apply to this subpart. ...

  11. 40 CFR 86.222-94 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration. 86.222-94 Section 86.222-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.222-94 Carbon...

  12. 40 CFR 86.222-94 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration. 86.222-94 Section 86.222-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.222-94 Carbon...

  13. 40 CFR 86.222-94 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration. 86.222-94 Section 86.222-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.222-94 Carbon...

  14. 40 CFR 86.222-94 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration. 86.222-94 Section 86.222-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.222-94 Carbon...

  15. 40 CFR 86.216-94 - Calibrations, frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calibrations, frequency and overview. 86.216-94 Section 86.216-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR..., frequency and overview. The provisions of § 86.116-94 apply to this subpart....

  16. Atmospheric simulator and calibration system for remote sensing radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A system for calibrating the MAPS (measurement of air pollution from satellites) instruments was developed. The design of the system provides a capability for simulating a broad range of radiant energy source temperatures and a broad range of atmospheric pressures, temperatures, and pollutant concentrations for a single slab atmosphere. The system design and the system operation are described.

  17. 40 CFR 86.1318-84 - Engine dynamometer system calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine dynamometer system calibrations...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1318-84 - Engine dynamometer system calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine dynamometer system calibrations...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1318-84 - Engine dynamometer system calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer system calibrations...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.640 - Flow meter calibration calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flow meter calibration calculations. 1065.640 Section 1065.640 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.640 Flow...

  1. 40 CFR 86.122-78 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle... nitrogen. (3) Bubble a mixture of 3 percent CO2 in N2 through water at room temperature and record analyzer... either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3) Calibrate on each normally used operating range...

  2. 40 CFR 86.122-78 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle... nitrogen. (3) Bubble a mixture of 3 percent CO2 in N2 through water at room temperature and record analyzer... either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3) Calibrate on each normally used operating range...

  3. 40 CFR 86.122-78 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle... nitrogen. (3) Bubble a mixture of 3 percent CO2 in N2 through water at room temperature and record analyzer... either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3) Calibrate on each normally used operating range...

  4. 40 CFR 86.122-78 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle... nitrogen. (3) Bubble a mixture of 3 percent CO2 in N2 through water at room temperature and record analyzer... either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3) Calibrate on each normally used operating range...

  5. 40 CFR 86.221-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86.221-94 Section 86.221-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.221-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer...

  6. 40 CFR 86.221-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86.221-94 Section 86.221-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.221-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer...

  7. 40 CFR 86.221-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86.221-94 Section 86.221-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.221-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer...

  8. 40 CFR 86.221-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86.221-94 Section 86.221-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.221-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1216-90 - Calibrations; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Evaporative Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1216-90 Calibrations; frequency...

  10. 40 CFR 86.1216-90 - Calibrations; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Evaporative Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1216-90 Calibrations; frequency...

  11. 40 CFR 86.1216-90 - Calibrations; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Evaporative Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1216-90 Calibrations; frequency...

  12. 40 CFR 86.1221-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and liquefied petroleum gas-fuel shall be optimized using propane. Analyzers used with natural gas-fuel may be optimized using methane, or if calibrated using propane the FID response to methane shall... appropriate FID fuel and zero-grade air. (2) Optimize on the most common operating range. Introduce into the...

  13. 40 CFR 86.1221-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and liquefied petroleum gas-fuel shall be optimized using propane. Analyzers used with natural gas-fuel may be optimized using methane, or if calibrated using propane the FID response to methane shall... appropriate FID fuel and zero-grade air. (2) Optimize on the most common operating range. Introduce into the...

  14. 40 CFR 86.1221-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and liquefied petroleum gas-fuel shall be optimized using propane. Analyzers used with natural gas-fuel may be optimized using methane, or if calibrated using propane the FID response to methane shall... appropriate FID fuel and zero-grade air. (2) Optimize on the most common operating range. Introduce into the...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1221-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and liquefied petroleum gas-fuel shall be optimized using propane. Analyzers used with natural gas-fuel may be optimized using methane, or if calibrated using propane the FID response to methane shall... appropriate FID fuel and zero-grade air. (2) Optimize on the most common operating range. Introduce into the...

  16. 40 CFR 90.315 - Analyzer initial calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... engineering practice. The combustion flame of the FID or HFID analyzer must be optimized in order to meet the specifications in § 90.316(b). (c) Zero setting and calibration. Using purified synthetic air (or nitrogen), set...) Rechecking of zero setting. Recheck the zero setting and, if necessary, repeat the procedure described......

  17. 40 CFR 86.219-94 - CVS calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CVS calibration. 86.219-94 Section 86.219-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1994 and...

  18. 40 CFR 91.322 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calibration of other equipment. 91.322 Section 91.322 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... manufacturer or as necessary according to good engineering practice. ...

  19. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  20. The MISR Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; Diner, David J.; Duval, Valerie G.

    1996-01-01

    The Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is currently under development for NASA's Earth Observing System. The instrument consists of nine pushbroom cameras, each with four spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared. The cameras point in different view directions to provide measurements from nadir to highly oblique view angles in the along-track plane. Multiple view-angle observations provide a unique resource for studies of clouds, aerosols, and the surface. MISR is built to challenging radiometric and geometric performance specifications. Radiometric accuracy, for example, must be within +/- 3%/ 1 sigma, and polarization insensitivity must be better than +/- 1 %. An onboard calibrator (OBC) provides monthly updates to the instrument gain coefficients. Spectralon diffuse panels are used within the OBC to provide a uniform target for the cameras to view. The absolute radiometric scale is established both preflight and in orbit through the use of detector standards. During the mission, ground data processing to accomplish radiometric calibration, geometric rectification and registration of the nine view-angle imagery, and geophysical retrievals will proceed in an automated fashion. A global dataset is produced every 9 days. This paper details the preflight characterization of the MISR instrument, the design of the OBC, and the radiance product processing.