Science.gov

Sample records for air limited model

  1. Limitations of symmetry in FE modeling: A comparison of fem and air-coupled resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, R. A.; Dayal, V.; Barnard, D. J.; Hsu, D. K.

    2012-05-01

    It has long been an accepted practice to use symmetry in Finite Element Modeling. Whenever modeling a large structure, we turn to symmetry in order to significantly reduce the model size and computation time. But is symmetry always the solution to long computation times, and is it always accurate? This study is aimed at modeling a whole ceramic tile and several possible symmetric models under several different loading cases and comparing them to each other and Air-Coupled Ultrasonic scans to determine if the Finite Element Models can accurately predict the vibrational resonance patterns. The reason for the accuracy or inaccuracy will also be examined. The understanding of the limitations of using symmetry to model large structures will be very useful in all future modeling.

  2. 76 FR 31800 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited Model DHC-3 (Otter) Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska...-018-AD; Amendment 39-16709; AD 2011-12-02] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited...@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion Recent analysis by the FAA on the Viking Air...

  3. INEEL AIR MODELING PROTOCOL ext

    SciTech Connect

    C. S. Staley; M. L. Abbott; P. D. Ritter

    2004-12-01

    Various laws stemming from the Clean Air Act of 1970 and the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 require air emissions modeling. Modeling is used to ensure that air emissions from new projects and from modifications to existing facilities do not exceed certain standards. For radionuclides, any new airborne release must be modeled to show that downwind receptors do not receive exposures exceeding the dose limits and to determine the requirements for emissions monitoring. For criteria and toxic pollutants, emissions usually must first exceed threshold values before modeling of downwind concentrations is required. This document was prepared to provide guidance for performing environmental compliance-driven air modeling of emissions from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory facilities. This document assumes that the user has experience in air modeling and dose and risk assessment. It is not intended to be a "cookbook," nor should all recommendations herein be construed as requirements. However, there are certain procedures that are required by law, and these are pointed out. It is also important to understand that air emissions modeling is a constantly evolving process. This document should, therefore, be reviewed periodically and revised as needed. The document is divided into two parts. Part A is the protocol for radiological assessments, and Part B is for nonradiological assessments. This document is an update of and supersedes document INEEL/INT-98-00236, Rev. 0, INEEL Air Modeling Protocol. This updated document incorporates changes in some of the rules, procedures, and air modeling codes that have occurred since the protocol was first published in 1998.

  4. 14 CFR 93.319 - Commercial air tour limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Commercial air tour limitations. 93.319... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ § 93.319 Commercial air tour limitations. (a) Unless...

  5. AIR Model Preflight Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) ER-2 preflight analysis, one of the first attempts to obtain a relatively complete measurement set of the high-altitude radiation level environment, is described in this paper. The primary thrust is to characterize the atmospheric radiation and to define dose levels at high-altitude flight. A secondary thrust is to develop and validate dosimetric techniques and monitoring devices for protecting aircrews. With a few chosen routes, we can measure the experimental results and validate the AIR model predictions. Eventually, as more measurements are made, we gain more understanding about the hazardous radiation environment and acquire more confidence in the prediction models.

  6. 14 CFR 93.319 - Commercial air tour limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Commercial air tour limitations. 93.319 Section 93.319 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ...

  7. 40 CFR 60.2860 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators? 60.2860 Section 60.2860 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Construction On or Before November 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2860 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? (a) After the date the initial stack test is required or...

  8. 40 CFR 60.2860 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators? 60.2860 Section 60.2860 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Construction On or Before November 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2860 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? (a) After the date the initial stack test is required or...

  9. Limitations in thermal scale modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, R. K.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal scale modeling limitations for radiation- conduction system of unmanned spacecraft, discussing material thermal properties, model dimensions, instrumentation effects and environment simulation

  10. Air modeling: Air dispersion models; regulatory applications and technological advances

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.; Liles, R.

    1995-09-01

    Air dispersion models are a useful and practical tool for both industry and regulatory agencies. They serve as tools for engineering, permitting, and regulations development. Their cost effectiveness and ease of implementation compared to ambient monitoring is perhaps their most-appealing trait. Based on the current momentum within the U.S. EPA to develop better models and contain regulatory burdens on industry, it is likely that air dispersion modeling will be a major player in future air regulatory initiatives.

  11. Model Misunderstandings. Teach the Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamp, Homer W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the idea that models should be taught by emphasizing limitations rather than focusing on their generality. Two examples of gas behavior models are included--the kinetic and static models. (KR)

  12. 14 CFR 93.319 - Commercial air tour limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ § 93.319 Commercial air tour limitations. (a) Unless excepted... 119 for part 121 or 135 operations may conduct more commercial air tours in the Grand Canyon National... conformance with the routes and airspace authorizations as specified in its Grand Canyon National Park...

  13. 14 CFR 93.319 - Commercial air tour limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ § 93.319 Commercial air tour limitations. (a) Unless excepted... 119 for part 121 or 135 operations may conduct more commercial air tours in the Grand Canyon National... conformance with the routes and airspace authorizations as specified in its Grand Canyon National Park...

  14. 14 CFR 93.319 - Commercial air tour limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ § 93.319 Commercial air tour limitations. (a) Unless excepted... 119 for part 121 or 135 operations may conduct more commercial air tours in the Grand Canyon National... conformance with the routes and airspace authorizations as specified in its Grand Canyon National Park...

  15. QUANTIFYING SUBGRID POLLUTANT VARIABILITY IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to properly assess human risk due to exposure to hazardous air pollutants or air toxics, detailed information is needed on the location and magnitude of ambient air toxic concentrations. Regional scale Eulerian air quality models are typically limited to relatively coar...

  16. Physical modeling of air flow during air sparging remediation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liming; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yan; Meegoda, Jay N; Gao, Shengyan

    2010-05-15

    Air sparging (AS) is one of the most efficient techniques for remediating saturated soils and groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds. A series of physical modeling tests for different sizes of porous media under varied injection pressure were conducted to investigate the effect of particle size and air injection pressure on size and shape of the zone of influence (ZOI). The test results show that ZOI can be expressed by two components: the horizontal expansion due to pneumatic fracture or preferential intrusion around the injection point and the angle of ZOI which is the angle between the vertical line and the boundary of ZOI. There exists a limited angle of ZOI for each type of porous media. The measured minimum and maximum air injection pressures in 1g tests are compared with corresponding theoretical values, and it is found that the measured minimum injection pressure is slightly lower than the theoretical value, while the measured maximum injection pressure is much higher than the theoretical maximum injection pressure. Centrifugal test results confirmed nonapplicability of theoretical maximum injection pressure to air sparging design. All of the above provide valuable information for design and theoretical modeling of air sparging for groundwater remediation.

  17. Lung models: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Musante, C J; Segal, R A; Schroeter, J D; Hwang, D; Dolovich, M A; Burton, R; Spencer, R M; Fleming, J S

    2000-06-01

    The most widely used particle dosimetry models are those proposed by the National Council on Radiation Protection, International Commission for Radiological Protection, and the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (the RIVM model). Those models have inherent problems that may be regarded as serious drawbacks: for example, they are not physiologically realistic. They ignore the presence and commensurate effects of naturally occurring structural elements of lungs (eg, cartilaginous rings, carinal ridges), which have been demonstrated to affect the motion of inhaled air. Most importantly, the surface structures have been shown to influence the trajectories of inhaled particles transported by air streams. Thus, the model presented herein by Martonen et al may be perhaps the most appropriate for human lung dosimetry. In its present form, the model's major "strengths" are that it could be used for diverse purposes in medical research and practice, including: to target the delivery of drugs for diseases of the respiratory tract (eg, cystic fibrosis, asthma, bronchogenic carcinoma); to selectively deposit drugs for systemic distribution (eg, insulin); to design clinical studies; to interpret scintigraphy data from human subject exposures; to determine laboratory conditions for animal testing (ie, extrapolation modeling); and to aid in aerosolized drug delivery to children (pediatric medicine). Based on our research, we have found very good agreement between the predictions of our model and the experimental data of Heyder et al, and therefore advocate its use in the clinical arena. In closing, we would note that for the simulations reported herein the data entered into our computer program were the actual conditions of the Heyder et al experiments. However, the deposition model is more versatile and can simulate many aerosol therapy scenarios. For example, the core model has many computer subroutines that can be enlisted to simulate the

  18. Air-quality-model update

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J.

    1982-01-15

    The Livermore Regional Air Quality Model (LIRAQ) has been updated and improved. This report describes the changes that have been made in chemistry, species treatment, and boundary conditions. The results of smog chamber simulations that were used to verify the chemistry as well as simulations of the entire air quality model for two prototype days in the Bay Area are reported. The results for the prototype day simulations are preliminary due to the need for improvement in meteorology fields, but they show the dependence and sensitivity of high hour ozone to changes in selected boundary and initial conditions.

  19. Hybrid regional air pollution models

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.L.

    1980-03-01

    This discussion deals with a family of air quality models for predicting and analyzing the fine particulate loading in the atmosphere, for assessing the extent and degree of visibility impairment, and for determining the potential of pollutants for increasing the acidity of soils and water. The major horizontal scales of interest are from 400km to 2000km; and the time scales may vary from several hours, to days, weeks, and a few months or years, depending on the EPA regulations being addressed. First the role air quality models play in the general family of atmospheric simulation models is described. Then, the characteristics of a well-designed, comprehensive air quality model are discussed. Following this, the specific objectives of this workshop are outlined, and their modeling implications are summarized. There are significant modeling differences produced by the choice of the coordinate system, whether it be the fixed Eulerian system, the moving Lagrangian system, or some hybrid of the two. These three systems are briefly discussed, and a list of hybrid models that are currently in use are given. Finally, the PNL regional transport model is outlined and a number of research needs are listed.

  20. Air Conditioner Compressor Performance Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Xie, YuLong; Huang, Zhenyu

    2008-09-05

    During the past three years, the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Load Modeling Task Force (LMTF) has led the effort to develop the new modeling approach. As part of this effort, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Southern California Edison (SCE), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Solutions tested 27 residential air-conditioning units to assess their response to delayed voltage recovery transients. After completing these tests, different modeling approaches were proposed, among them a performance modeling approach that proved to be one of the three favored for its simplicity and ability to recreate different SVR events satisfactorily. Funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC) under its load modeling project, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) led the follow-on task to analyze the motor testing data to derive the parameters needed to develop a performance models for the single-phase air-conditioning (SPAC) unit. To derive the performance model, PNNL researchers first used the motor voltage and frequency ramping test data to obtain the real (P) and reactive (Q) power versus voltage (V) and frequency (f) curves. Then, curve fitting was used to develop the P-V, Q-V, P-f, and Q-f relationships for motor running and stalling states. The resulting performance model ignores the dynamic response of the air-conditioning motor. Because the inertia of the air-conditioning motor is very small (H<0.05), the motor reaches from one steady state to another in a few cycles. So, the performance model is a fair representation of the motor behaviors in both running and stalling states.

  1. Limitations of bootstrap current models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Meneghini, O.; Osborne, T. H.

    2014-04-01

    We assess the accuracy and limitations of two analytic models of the tokamak bootstrap current: (1) the well-known Sauter model (1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834, 2002 Phys. Plasmas 9 5140) and (2) a recent modification of the Sauter model by Koh et al (2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 072505). For this study, we use simulations from the first-principles kinetic code NEO as the baseline to which the models are compared. Tests are performed using both theoretical parameter scans as well as core-to-edge scans of real DIII-D and NSTX plasma profiles. The effects of extreme aspect ratio, large impurity fraction, energetic particles, and high collisionality are studied. In particular, the error in neglecting cross-species collisional coupling—an approximation inherent to both analytic models—is quantified. Furthermore, the implications of the corrections from kinetic NEO simulations on MHD equilibrium reconstructions is studied via integrated modeling with kinetic EFIT.

  2. Lean flammability limit of downward propagating hydrogen-air flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, G.; Kailasanath, K.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed multidimensional numerical simulations that include the effects of wall heat losses have been performed to study the dynamics of downward flame propagation and extinguishment in lean hydrogen-air mixtures. The computational results show that a downward propagating flame in an isothermal channel has a flammability limit of around 9.75 percent. This is in excellent agreement with experimental results. Also in excellent agreement are the detailed observations of the flame behavior at the point of extinguishment. The primary conclusion of this work is that detailed numerical simulations that include wall heat losses and the effect of gravity can adequately simulate the dynamics of the extinguishment process in downward-propagating hydrogen-air flames. These simulations can be examined in detail to gain understanding of the actual extinction process.

  3. 75 FR 43092 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited (Type Certificate Previously Held by Bombardier, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... transport airplanes, including the adequacy of existing regulations, the service history of airplanes... Directives; Viking Air Limited (Type Certificate Previously Held by Bombardier, Inc.) Model DHC-7 Airplanes... may review copies of the referenced service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane...

  4. Uncertainty in Air Quality Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Douglas G.

    1984-01-01

    Under the direction of the AMS Steering Committee for the EPA Cooperative Agreement on Air Quality Modeling, a small group of scientists convened to consider the question of uncertainty in air quality modeling. Because the group was particularly concerned with the regulatory use of models, its discussion focused on modeling tall stack, point source emissions.The group agreed that air quality model results should be viewed as containing both reducible error and inherent uncertainty. Reducible error results from improper or inadequate meteorological and air quality data inputs, and from inadequacies in the models. Inherent uncertainty results from the basic stochastic nature of the turbulent atmospheric motions that are responsible for transport and diffusion of released materials. Modelers should acknowledge that all their predictions to date contain some associated uncertainty and strive also to quantify uncertainty.How can the uncertainty be quantified? There was no consensus from the group as to precisely how uncertainty should be calculated. One subgroup, which addressed statistical procedures, suggested that uncertainty information could be obtained from comparisons of observations and predictions. Following recommendations from a previous AMS workshop on performance evaluation (Fox. 1981), the subgroup suggested construction of probability distribution functions from the differences between observations and predictions. Further, they recommended that relatively new computer-intensive statistical procedures be considered to improve the quality of uncertainty estimates for the extreme value statistics of interest in regulatory applications.A second subgroup, which addressed the basic nature of uncertainty in a stochastic system, also recommended that uncertainty be quantified by consideration of the differences between observations and predictions. They suggested that the average of the difference squared was appropriate to isolate the inherent uncertainty that

  5. The cold air drainage model KLAM_21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossmann, M.

    2010-09-01

    A brief description of the physics and numerical techniques of the cold air drainage model KLAM_21 is presented. The model has been developed by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (Sievers, 2005) for simulations of nocturnal airflow in hilly and mountainous terrain under dry fair weather conditions. The model has been widely used as an environmental consultancy tool. Typical model applications include frost protection (cold air ponding) and air quality (nocturnal ventilation). The single-layer model calculates the depth and the mean wind of a surface based stable layer that evolves from a neutrally stratified atmosphere during nighttime. The prediction of the velocity and direction of the cold air drainage is based on vertically averaged momentum tendency equations. Temporal changes in the total heat deficit in the cold air layer are calculated from a prescribed local heat loss rate (describing turbulent and radiative cooling) and advection (donor-cell algorithm). The depth of the cold air layer (depth of the surface based temperature inversion) is calculated diagnostically from the total heat loss deficit. The model is initialised with neutral stratification at sunset (onset time of nocturnal cooling). Optionally, effects of an ambient (regional) wind and/or the dispersion of a passive tracer can be simulated. Integration over time is carried out on a regular Arakawa C grid using dynamically calculated time steps. Spatial gradients are discretised using centred differential quotients. The standard size of the computational domains can reach up to 1500 x 1500 grid cells. Grid resolutions usually range between 10 m and 500 m. High resolution simulation can be limited to a nested inner grid domain, while the courser outer domain is covering the entire airshed of interest. A friendly user interface allows easy setup, control, and evaluation of model simulations. Some selected examples of KLAM_21 applications are shown to illustrate the features and capabilities of the model

  6. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 197 - Air No-Decompression Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air No-Decompression Limits A Appendix A to Part 197... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Pt. 197, App. A Appendix A to Part 197—Air No-Decompression Limits The following table gives the depth versus bottom time limits for single, no-decompression, air dives...

  7. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 197 - Air No-Decompression Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air No-Decompression Limits A Appendix A to Part 197... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Pt. 197, App. A Appendix A to Part 197—Air No-Decompression Limits The following table gives the depth versus bottom time limits for single, no-decompression, air dives...

  8. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 197 - Air No-Decompression Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air No-Decompression Limits A Appendix A to Part 197... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Pt. 197, App. A Appendix A to Part 197—Air No-Decompression Limits The following table gives the depth versus bottom time limits for single, no-decompression, air dives...

  9. Air pollution modeling and its application III

    SciTech Connect

    De Wispelaere, C.

    1984-01-01

    This book focuses on the Lagrangian modeling of air pollution. Modeling cooling tower and power plant plumes, modeling the dispersion of heavy gases, remote sensing as a tool for air pollution modeling, dispersion modeling including photochemistry, and the evaluation of model performances in practical applications are discussed. Specific topics considered include dispersion in the convective boundary layer, the application of personal computers to Lagrangian modeling, the dynamic interaction of cooling tower and stack plumes, the diffusion of heavy gases, correlation spectrometry as a tool for mesoscale air pollution modeling, Doppler acoustic sounding, tetroon flights, photochemical air quality simulation modeling, acid deposition of photochemical oxidation products, atmospheric diffusion modeling, applications of an integral plume rise model, and the estimation of diffuse hydrocarbon leakages from petrochemical factories. This volume constitutes the proceedings of the Thirteenth International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application held in France in 1982.

  10. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  14. Radiation extinction limit of counterflow premixed lean methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.; Ju, Y.; Maruta, Kaoru; Niioka, Takashi; Liu, F.

    1997-06-01

    The application of the laminar flamelet concept to turbulent flame modeling requires a detailed understanding of stretched laminar flames. In this study, the authors used numerical methods, including arc-length continuation, to simulate the extinction characteristics of counterflow premixed fuel-lean, methane-air flames. Attention was primarily paid to the effect of radiative heat loss on the extinction characteristics of these flames. The results show that at medium to low values of the stretch rate, the radiative heat loss has a particularly strong impact on the counterflow premixed fuel-lean, methane-air flames. It was also found that, in addition to the stretch extinction limit at a high stretch rate, there exists a radiation extinction limit at a low stretch rate. Furthermore, the relationship between these two extinction limits and the equivalence ratio is obtained.

  15. 40 CFR 60.2250 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators? 60.2250 Section 60.2250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... 1, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2250 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? (a) Within 60 days after your air curtain incinerator reaches the charge rate at which it...

  16. 40 CFR 60.2250 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators? 60.2250 Section 60.2250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... 1, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2250 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? (a) Within 60 days after your air curtain incinerator reaches the charge rate at which it...

  17. 40 CFR 60.2250 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators? 60.2250 Section 60.2250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... 1, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2250 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? (a) Within 60 days after your air curtain incinerator reaches the charge rate at which it...

  18. Rich methane/air flames: Burning velocities, extinction limits, and flammability limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bui-Pham, M.N.; Miller, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A theoretical investigation has been conducted to establish a reliable chemical kinetic mechanism that can determine the extinction limit of opposed-flow, strained, rich premixed methane-air flames. In the process of developing this kinetic representation for rich methane-air flames, we found that the heat of formation of {sup 1}CH{sub 2}=102.5 kcal/mole, which is 1 kcal/mole higher than the currently available thermochemical data, gives the best agreement with experimental data on burning velocities for equivalence ratios between 0.5 and 1.7. Employing this value for {Delta}H{sub f{sup 1}CH{sub 2}} in our calculations, the extinction stretch rate, K{sub ex}, was found to be K{sub ex}=2250 sec {sup {minus}1} for {phi}=1.0, K{sub ex}=2000 sec{sup {minus}1} for {phi}=1.1, and K{sub ex}=1400 sec{sup {minus}1} for {phi}=1.2. These results agree better with experiments than those using a lower heat of formation of singlet methylene. In comparison with previous calculations made by Kee et al., our predictions are basically the same except that our extinction stretch rate is slightly higher at {phi}=1.0 and that our location of the maximum extinction stretch rate is closer to that found in experiments. In addition, we establish the rich flammability limit using two different criteria to be approximately between {phi}=1.61 and {phi}=1.68, which agrees very well with an experimental value of {phi}=1.67.

  19. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 197 - Air No-Decompression Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air No-Decompression Limits A Appendix A to Part 197... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Pt. 197, App. A Appendix A to Part 197—Air No-Decompression Limits The... within any 12-hour period. The limit is the maximum bottom time in minutes that a diver can spend at...

  20. Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  1. 40 CFR 60.2860 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators? 60.2860 Section 60.2860 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Curtain Incinerators § 60.2860 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? (a) After... for air curtain incinerators? After the date the initial stack test is required or...

  2. 40 CFR 60.2250 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators? 60.2250 Section 60.2250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... of Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2250 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? Within 60 days after your...

  3. 40 CFR 60.2250 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators? 60.2250 Section 60.2250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... of Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2250 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? Within 60 days after your...

  4. Expiratory flow limitation in compressed air divers and oxygen divers.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, K; Friege, L; Reuter, M; Haber, J; Mutzbauer, T; Neubauer, B

    1998-10-01

    Divers are exposed to dense gases under hyperbaric and hyperoxic conditions and, therefore, may be at risk of developing respiratory disease. Long-term effects on respiratory function have been found in commercial divers who perform deep dives. This study was conducted to detect possible lung function changes in scuba divers who dive in shallow water using compressed air or oxygen as a breathing gas. A cross-sectional sample of 180 healthy male divers (152 air divers and 28 oxygen divers) and 34 healthy male controls underwent a diving medical examination including body plethysmography, diffusion capacity measurement and a cold-air isocapnic hyperventilation test (CAIH). Air divers and oxygen divers had a lower mid-expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity (MEF25) than controls (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). Oxygen divers also had a decreased mid-expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity (MEF50) (p<0.05). Divers' groups and controls did not differ with respect to age, smoking or medical history. The prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness to CAIH was 1.4% (n=3 divers). MEF25 and MEF50 were inversely related to years of diving (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). The pattern of lung function changes obtained in scuba divers is consistent with small airways dysfunction and the association between diving exposure and lung function changes may indicate long-term effects on respiratory function.

  5. COMMUNITY SCALE AIR TOXICS MODELING WITH CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consideration and movement for an urban air toxics control strategy is toward a community, exposure and risk-based modeling approach, with emphasis on assessments of areas that experience high air toxic concentration levels, the so-called "hot spots". This strategy will requir...

  6. NASA/Air Force Cost Model: NAFCOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Sharon D.; Hamcher, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM) is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects and is primarily used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels.

  7. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  8. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  9. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  10. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  11. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  12. 40 CFR 60.2860 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? 60.2860 Section 60.2860 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Curtain Incinerators § 60.2860 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? After...

  13. 40 CFR 60.2860 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? 60.2860 Section 60.2860 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Curtain Incinerators § 60.2860 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators? After...

  14. Air Tightness of US Homes: Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.

    2006-05-01

    Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses that database to develop a model for estimating air leakage as a function of climate, building age, floor area, building height, floor type, energy-efficiency and low-income designations. The model developed can be used to estimate the leakage distribution of populations of houses.

  15. Critique of the equivalent air altitude model.

    PubMed

    Conkin, Johnny; Wessel, James H

    2008-10-01

    The adverse effects of hypoxic hypoxia include acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema, and high altitude cerebral edema. It has long been assumed that those manifestations are directly related to reduction in the inspired partial pressure of oxygen (P(I)O2). This assumption underlies the equivalent air altitude (EAA) model, which holds that combinations of barometric pressure (P(B)) and inspired fraction of O2 (F(I)O2) that produce the same P(I)O2 will result in identical physiological responses. However, a growing body of evidence seems to indicate that different combinations of P(B) and P(I)O2 may produce different responses to the same P(I)O2. To investigate this question with respect to AMS, we conducted a search of the literature using the terms hypobaric hypoxia, normobaric hypoxia, and hypobaric normoxia. The results suggest that the EAA model provides only an approximate description of isohypoxia, and that P(B) has an independent effect on hypoxia and AMS. A historical report from 1956 and 15 reports from 1983 to 2005 compare the same hypoxic P(I)O2 at different P(B) with respect to the development of hypoxia and AMS. These data provide evidence for an independent effect of P(B) on hypoxia and AMS, and thereby invalidate EAA as an ideal model of isohypoxia. Refinement of the EAA model is needed, in particular for applications to high altitude where supplemental O2 is inadequate to prevent hypoxic hypoxia. Adjustment through probabilistic statistical modeling to match the current limited experimental observations is one approach to a better isohypoxic model. PMID:18856188

  16. Hanford defined waste model limitations and improvements

    SciTech Connect

    HARMSEN, R.W.

    1999-02-24

    Recommendation 93-5 Implementation Plan, Milestone 5,6.3.1.i requires issuance of this report which addresses ''updates to the tank contents model''. This report summarizes the review of the Hanford Defined Waste, Revision 4, model limitations and provides conclusions and recommendations for potential updates to the model.

  17. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MODELING (CHAPTER 58)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discussses indoor air quality (IAQ) modeling. Such modeling provides a way to investigate many IAQ problems without the expense of large field experiments. Where experiments are planned, IAQ models can be used to help design experiments by providing information on exp...

  18. Limitations and Failures of the Layzer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2007-12-21

    We report several limitations and failure modes of the recently expanded Layzer model for hydrodynamic instabilities. The failures occur for large initial amplitudes, for stable accelerations, and for spikes in two-fluid systems.

  19. Dynamics of flames near the rich-flammability limit of hydrogen-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kailasanath, K.; Ganguly, K.; Patnaik, G.

    1993-01-01

    Flames near the rich-flammability limit of hydrogen-air mixtures are studied using a detailed, time-dependent, one-dimensional Lagrangian model. Results from the numerical simulations indicate that a steady burning velocity is not obtained for very rich hydrogen-air mixtures. As the amount of hydrogen is increased, a damped oscillation is observed in the flame and burning velocities, and then, with further increase in the amount of hydrogen, an undamped oscillation with a complex set of frequencies is observed. Simulations with a simplified one-step irreversible chemical reaction do not show these oscillations, suggesting that chemical kinetics plays a strong role in inducing these oscillations. Further analysis shows that the oscillations are due to a competition for H atoms between chain branching and chain-terminating reactions. Simulations of spherically expanding flames suggest that stretch effects (due to curvature) will cause the oscillations to occur in less rich mixtures than that observed for planar flames. The implications of these oscillations on the rich-flammability limit as well as the role of chemical kinetics in creating a fundamental flammability limit is discussed.

  20. Limitations of ambient air quality standards in evaluating indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.E. )

    1992-03-01

    Analysis of the kinds of data used for the derivation of ambient air quality standards (AAQSs) for carbon monoxide and ozone shows that these values are based on the toxicology of the materials and thus are suitable for evaluating potential health effects of indoor environments, especially on the very young, the aged, and the infirm. A similar analysis shows that the AAQSs for suspended particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide are strictly empirical and that they should not be used for any but their first, intended purpose. The AAQSs for non-methane hydrocarbons are based on photochemical smog production, not injury of any kind, and have no utility for indoor environment evaluation.

  1. Structural equation modeling: strengths, limitations, and misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Tomarken, Andrew J; Waller, Niels G

    2005-01-01

    Because structural equation modeling (SEM) has become a very popular data-analytic technique, it is important for clinical scientists to have a balanced perception of its strengths and limitations. We review several strengths of SEM, with a particular focus on recent innovations (e.g., latent growth modeling, multilevel SEM models, and approaches for dealing with missing data and with violations of normality assumptions) that underscore how SEM has become a broad data-analytic framework with flexible and unique capabilities. We also consider several limitations of SEM and some misconceptions that it tends to elicit. Major themes emphasized are the problem of omitted variables, the importance of lower-order model components, potential limitations of models judged to be well fitting, the inaccuracy of some commonly used rules of thumb, and the importance of study design. Throughout, we offer recommendations for the conduct of SEM analyses and the reporting of results. PMID:17716081

  2. 77 FR 50660 - Limited Approval and Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Nevada; Clark County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... INFORMATION: On July 24, 2012 (77 FR 43206), EPA proposed a limited approval and limited disapproval of the... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Limited Approval and Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Nevada; Clark... regulations for stationary sources in Clark County, Nevada. DATES: Any comments on this proposal must...

  3. Modeling monthly mean air temperature for Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvares, Clayton Alcarde; Stape, José Luiz; Sentelhas, Paulo Cesar; de Moraes Gonçalves, José Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    Air temperature is one of the main weather variables influencing agriculture around the world. Its availability, however, is a concern, mainly in Brazil where the weather stations are more concentrated on the coastal regions of the country. Therefore, the present study had as an objective to develop models for estimating monthly and annual mean air temperature for the Brazilian territory using multiple regression and geographic information system techniques. Temperature data from 2,400 stations distributed across the Brazilian territory were used, 1,800 to develop the equations and 600 for validating them, as well as their geographical coordinates and altitude as independent variables for the models. A total of 39 models were developed, relating the dependent variables maximum, mean, and minimum air temperatures (monthly and annual) to the independent variables latitude, longitude, altitude, and their combinations. All regression models were statistically significant ( α ≤ 0.01). The monthly and annual temperature models presented determination coefficients between 0.54 and 0.96. We obtained an overall spatial correlation higher than 0.9 between the models proposed and the 16 major models already published for some Brazilian regions, considering a total of 3.67 × 108 pixels evaluated. Our national temperature models are recommended to predict air temperature in all Brazilian territories.

  4. Air quality limit and guide values for sulphur dioxide and suspended particulates - A European community directive.

    PubMed

    Smeets, J

    1982-12-01

    On 15 July, 1980, the Council of Ministers of the European Communities adopted a Council Directive on air quality limit values and guide values for sulphur dioxide and suspended particulates. This directive constitutes the first European legislation on stating air quality standards.The guiding principles underlying this directive are analyzed and the consequences of the directive for Member States, in terms of concrete actions destined to improve the air quality, particularly in highly polluted areas, are indicated. PMID:24264120

  5. Air quality limit and guide values for sulphur dioxide and suspended particulates - A European community directive.

    PubMed

    Smeets, J

    1982-12-01

    On 15 July, 1980, the Council of Ministers of the European Communities adopted a Council Directive on air quality limit values and guide values for sulphur dioxide and suspended particulates. This directive constitutes the first European legislation on stating air quality standards.The guiding principles underlying this directive are analyzed and the consequences of the directive for Member States, in terms of concrete actions destined to improve the air quality, particularly in highly polluted areas, are indicated.

  6. An updated model for millimeter wave propagation in moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebe, H. J.

    1985-10-01

    A practical atmospheric Millimeter-Wave Propagation Model is formulated that predicts attenuation, delay, and noise properties of moist air for frequencies up to 1000 GHz. Input variables are height distributions (0-30 km) of pressure, temperature, humidity, and suspended droplet concentration along an anticipated radio path. Spectroscopic data consists of more than 450 parameters describing local O2 and H2O absorption lines complemented by continuum spectra for dry air, water vapor, and hydrosols. For a model limited to frequencies below GHz, the number of spectroscopic parameters can be reduced to less than 200. Recent laboratory measurements at 138 GHz absolute attenuation rates for simulated air with water vapor pressures up to saturation allow the formulation of an improved, though empirical water vapor continuum. Model predictions are compared with selected (2.5-430 GHz) data from both laboratory and field experiments. In general, good agreement is obtained.

  7. 40 CFR 62.14107 - Emission limits for air curtain incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... incinerators. 62.14107 Section 62.14107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... 20, 1994 § 62.14107 Emission limits for air curtain incinerators. The owner or operator of an air curtain incinerator with the capacity to combust greater than 250 tons per day of municipal solid...

  8. 40 CFR 62.14107 - Emission limits for air curtain incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... incinerators. 62.14107 Section 62.14107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... 20, 1994 § 62.14107 Emission limits for air curtain incinerators. The owner or operator of an air curtain incinerator with the capacity to combust greater than 250 tons per day of municipal solid...

  9. 40 CFR 62.14107 - Emission limits for air curtain incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... incinerators. 62.14107 Section 62.14107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... 20, 1994 § 62.14107 Emission limits for air curtain incinerators. The owner or operator of an air curtain incinerator with the capacity to combust greater than 250 tons per day of municipal solid...

  10. 40 CFR 62.14107 - Emission limits for air curtain incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... incinerators. 62.14107 Section 62.14107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... 20, 1994 § 62.14107 Emission limits for air curtain incinerators. The owner or operator of an air curtain incinerator with the capacity to combust greater than 250 tons per day of municipal solid...

  11. 40 CFR 62.14107 - Emission limits for air curtain incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... incinerators. 62.14107 Section 62.14107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... 20, 1994 § 62.14107 Emission limits for air curtain incinerators. The owner or operator of an air curtain incinerator with the capacity to combust greater than 250 tons per day of municipal solid...

  12. Uncertainty in Regional Air Quality Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digar, Antara

    Effective pollution mitigation is the key to successful air quality management. Although states invest millions of dollars to predict future air quality, the regulatory modeling and analysis process to inform pollution control strategy remains uncertain. Traditionally deterministic ‘bright-line’ tests are applied to evaluate the sufficiency of a control strategy to attain an air quality standard. A critical part of regulatory attainment demonstration is the prediction of future pollutant levels using photochemical air quality models. However, because models are uncertain, they yield a false sense of precision that pollutant response to emission controls is perfectly known and may eventually mislead the selection of control policies. These uncertainties in turn affect the health impact assessment of air pollution control strategies. This thesis explores beyond the conventional practice of deterministic attainment demonstration and presents novel approaches to yield probabilistic representations of pollutant response to emission controls by accounting for uncertainties in regional air quality planning. Computationally-efficient methods are developed and validated to characterize uncertainty in the prediction of secondary pollutant (ozone and particulate matter) sensitivities to precursor emissions in the presence of uncertainties in model assumptions and input parameters. We also introduce impact factors that enable identification of model inputs and scenarios that strongly influence pollutant concentrations and sensitivity to precursor emissions. We demonstrate how these probabilistic approaches could be applied to determine the likelihood that any control measure will yield regulatory attainment, or could be extended to evaluate probabilistic health benefits of emission controls, considering uncertainties in both air quality models and epidemiological concentration-response relationships. Finally, ground-level observations for pollutant (ozone) and precursor

  13. Simulation and modeling for military air operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreichauf, Ruth D.; Bedros, Saad; Ateskan, Yusuf; Hespanha, Joao; Kizilocak, Hakan

    2001-09-01

    The Joint Forces Air Component Commander (JFACC) in military air operations controls the allocation of resources (wings, squadrons, air defense systems, AWACS) to different geographical locations in the theater of operations. The JFACC mission is to define a sequence of tasks for the aerospace systems at each location, and providing feedback control for the execution of these tasks in the presence of uncertainties and a hostile enemy. Honeywell Labs has been developing an innovative method for control of military air operations. The novel model predictive control (MPC) method extends the models and optimization algorithms utilized in traditional model predictive control systems. The enhancements include a tasking controller and, in a joint effort with USC, a probabilistic threat/survival map indicating high threat regions for aircraft and suggesting optimal routes to avoid these regions. A simulation/modeling environment using object-oriented methodologies has been developed to serve as an aide to demonstrate the value of MPC and facilitate its development. The simulation/modeling environment is based on an open architecture that enables the integration, evaluation, and implementation of different control approaches. The simulation offers a graphical user interface displaying the battlefield, the control performance, and a probability map displaying high threat regions. This paper describes the features of the different control approaches and their integration into the simulation environment.

  14. Air freight demand models: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dajani, J. S.; Bernstein, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    A survey is presented of some of the approaches which have been considered in freight demand estimation. The few existing continuous time computer simulations of aviation systems are reviewed, with a view toward the assessment of this approach as a tool for structuring air freight studies and for relating the different components of the air freight system. The variety of available data types and sources, without which the calibration, validation and the testing of both modal split and simulation models would be impossible are also reviewed.

  15. Upward excursion limits from air saturation at 5 ATA (Atmospheres Absolute)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Present USN submarine rescue capability makes a prolonged exposure of the submarine crew to hyperbaric air a distinct possibility. The exposure may be to pressures as great as 5 atmospheres absolute (ATA), and for periods of time of up to 72 hours. A series of experimental dives were conducted to establish the safe, upward excursion from 5 ATA (132 FSWG); that is, the maximum, immediate reduction in pressure which these individuals can safely tolerate. This specifies the required pressure in the compartment of a mother submarine to which the rescued personnel would be transferred. In order to minimize the effects of pulmonary oxygen toxicity, the limits first were established using a nitrox equivalent of air at 5 ATA. The upward limit from 4.36 ATA (111 FSWG) was found to be 2.97 ATA (65 FSWG). Once this limit had been set, a series of dives were conducted to test this up limit from standard air at 5 ATA.

  16. AIR QUALITY MODELING OF AMMONIA: A REGIONAL MODELING PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The talk will address the status of modeling of ammonia from a regional modeling perspective, yet the observations and comments should have general applicability. The air quality modeling system components that are central to modeling ammonia will be noted and a perspective on ...

  17. Modeling Air Stripping of Ammonia in an Agitated Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Kofi, Adu-Wusu; Martino, Christopher J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Bennett, William M.; Peters, Robert s.

    2005-11-29

    A model has been developed to predict the rate of removal of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) from solution in a sparged agitated vessel. The model is first-order with respect to liquid-phase concentration of NH{sub 3}. The rate constant for the first-order equation is a function of parameters related to the vessel/impeller characteristics, the air/liquid properties as well as the process conditions. However, the vessel/impeller characteristics, the air/liquid properties, and the process conditions reduce the rate constant dependence to only three parameters, namely, the air sparge rate, the liquid volume or batch size, and the Henry's law constant of NH{sub 3} for the liquid or solution. Thus, the rate of removal is not mass-transfer limited. High air sparge rates, high temperatures, and low liquid volumes or batch sizes increase the rate of removal of NH{sub 3} from solution. The Henry's law constant effect is somewhat reflected in the temperature since Henry's law constant increases with increasing temperature. Data obtained from actual air stripping operation agree fairly well with the model predictions.

  18. Microcavity-array superhydrophobic surfaces: Limits of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Oliveira, M. R. S.; Spirin, R.; Teixeira, F. S.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces formed of microcavities can be designed with specific desired advancing and receding contact angles using a new model described by us in prior work. Here, we discuss the limits of validity of the model, and explore the application of the model to surfaces fabricated with small cavities of radius 250 nm and with large cavities of radius 40 μm. The Wenzel model is discussed and used to calculate the advancing and receding contact angles for samples for which our model cannot be applied. We also consider the case of immersion of a sample containing microcavities in pressurized water. A consideration that then arises is that the air inside the cavities can be dissolved in the water, leading to complete water invasion into the cavities and compromising the superhydrophobic character of the surface. Here, we show that this effect does not destroy the surface hydrophobia when the surface is subsequently removed from the water.

  19. Modeling urban air pollution with optimized hierarchical fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Tashayo, Behnam; Alimohammadi, Abbas

    2016-10-01

    Environmental exposure assessments (EEA) and epidemiological studies require urban air pollution models with appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Uncertain available data and inflexible models can limit air pollution modeling techniques, particularly in under developing countries. This paper develops a hierarchical fuzzy inference system (HFIS) to model air pollution under different land use, transportation, and meteorological conditions. To improve performance, the system treats the issue as a large-scale and high-dimensional problem and develops the proposed model using a three-step approach. In the first step, a geospatial information system (GIS) and probabilistic methods are used to preprocess the data. In the second step, a hierarchical structure is generated based on the problem. In the third step, the accuracy and complexity of the model are simultaneously optimized with a multiple objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO) algorithm. We examine the capabilities of the proposed model for predicting daily and annual mean PM2.5 and NO2 and compare the accuracy of the results with representative models from existing literature. The benefits provided by the model features, including probabilistic preprocessing, multi-objective optimization, and hierarchical structure, are precisely evaluated by comparing five different consecutive models in terms of accuracy and complexity criteria. Fivefold cross validation is used to assess the performance of the generated models. The respective average RMSEs and coefficients of determination (R (2)) for the test datasets using proposed model are as follows: daily PM2.5 = (8.13, 0.78), annual mean PM2.5 = (4.96, 0.80), daily NO2 = (5.63, 0.79), and annual mean NO2 = (2.89, 0.83). The obtained results demonstrate that the developed hierarchical fuzzy inference system can be utilized for modeling air pollution in EEA and epidemiological studies.

  20. Recent improvements in modeling time limited search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Timothy; Vollmerhausen, Richard H.; Cohen, Jeremy; Harris, Tim

    2002-07-01

    Human perception tests have been performed by Night Vision Electronic Sensor Directorate (NVESD) addressing the process of searching an image with the intent of detecting a target of military importance. Experiments were performed using both real thermal imagery and synthetic imagery generated using 'Paint the Night' simulation. It was demonstrated that trained observers acquire targets much more quickly than previously expected. This insight was gained by changing the instructions the observers were given for the test. Rather than telling the observers that they were being timed, the observers were given a time limit, as short as 3 seconds. When time limited, the observers found targets quicker. Although false alarms per second increased with the shorter time limits, the ratio of false alarms to detected targets did not increase. A modification to the traditional NVESD search model has been developed and incorporated into Army war games and simulations.

  1. Computational Study of Near-limit Propagation of Detonation in Hydrogen-air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, S.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    2002-01-01

    A computational investigation of the near-limit propagation of detonation in lean and rich hydrogen-air mixtures is presented. The calculations were carried out over an equivalence ratio range of 0.4 to 5.0, pressures ranging from 0.2 bar to 1.0 bar and ambient initial temperature. The computations involved solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with detailed finite-rate chemistry. The numerical method is based on a second-order spatially accurate total-variation-diminishing (TVD) scheme, and a point implicit, first-order-accurate, time marching algorithm. The hydrogen-air combustion was modeled with a 9-species, 19-step reaction mechanism. A multi-level, dynamically adaptive grid was utilized in order to resolve the structure of the detonation. The results of the computations indicate that when hydrogen concentrations are reduced below certain levels, the detonation wave switches from a high-frequency, low amplitude oscillation mode to a low frequency mode exhibiting large fluctuations in the detonation wave speed; that is, a 'galloping' propagation mode is established.

  2. DESCRIPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Key differences among many types of air quality models are the way atmospheric advection and turbulent diffusion processes are treated. Gaussian models use analytical solutions of the advection-diffusion equations. Lagrangian models use a hypothetical air parcel concept effecti...

  3. Nitric Oxide and Oxygen Air-Contamination Effects on Extinction Limits of Non-Premixed Hydrocarbon-Air Flames for a HIFiRE Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Dawson, Lucy C.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2009-01-01

    Unique nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen air-contamination effects on the extinction Flame Strength (FS) of non-premixed hydrocarbon (HC) vs. air flames are characterized for 7 gaseous HCs, using a new idealized 9.3 mm straight-tube Opposed Jet Burner (OJB) at 1 atm. FS represents a laminar strain-induced extinction limit based on cross-section-average air jet velocity, Uair, that sustains combustion of a counter jet of gaseous fuel just before extinction. Besides ethane, propane, butane, and propylene, the HCs include ethylene, methane, and a 64 mole-% ethylene / 36 % methane mixture, the writer s previously recommended gaseous surrogate fuel for HIFiRE scramjet tests. The HC vs. clean air part of the work is an extension of a May 2008 JANNAF paper that characterized surrogates for the HIFiRE project that should mimic the flameholding of reformed (thermally- or catalytically-cracked) endothermic JP-like fuels. The new FS data for 7 HCs vs. clean air are thus consolidated with the previously validated data, normalized to absolute (local) axial-input strain rates, and co-plotted on a dual kinetically dominated reactivity scale. Excellent agreement with the prior data is obtained for all 7 fuels. Detailed comparisons are also made with recently published (Univ. Va) numerical results for ethylene extinction. A 2009-revised ethylene kinetic model (Univ. Southern Cal) led to predicted limits within approx. 5 % (compared to 45 %, earlier) of this writer s 2008 (and present) ethylene FSs, and also with recent independent data (Univ. Va) obtained on a new OJB system. These +/- 5 % agreements, and a hoped-for "near-identically-performing" reduced kinetics model, would greatly enhance the capability for accurate numerical simulations of surrogate HC flameholding in scramjets. The measured air-contamination effects on normalized FS extinction limits are projected to assess ongoing Arc-Heater-induced "facility test effects" of NO production (e.g., 3 mole-%) and resultant oxygen

  4. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical and computational study of opposed jet diffusion flame for the purpose of understanding the effects of contaminants in the reactants and thermal diffusion of light species on extinction and reignition of diffusion flames is in progress. The methodologies that have been attempted so far are described. Results using a simple, one-step reaction for the hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flame are presented. These results show the correct trends in the profiles of chemical species and temperature. The extinction limit can be clearly seen in the plot of temperature vs. Damkohler number.

  5. Limitations of modeling snow in ski resorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiger, Robert; Abegg, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The body of literature on snow modeling in a ski area operations context has been growing over the last decades in an accelerating speed. The majority of snow model applications for ski areas can be found in the climate change impacts literature. These studies differ in many aspects: the type of model used; the meteorological variables used in the models; the spatial and temporal resolution of the meteorological variables; the method how the climate change signal is derived and applied in the model concept; the number of climate models and emission scenarios used and consequently the handling of uncertainties; the indicators used to interpret the impacts for the skiing tourism industry; the incorporation of adaptation measures (e.g. snowmaking); and the geographical scale of analysis. In this contribution we will present a review of approaches used for modeling snow conditions in a ski area context. The major limitations both from a scientific as well as from a users' perspective will be discussed and solutions for shortcomings of existing approaches will be presented.

  6. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  7. Streaming Limit: New Observations and Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. K.; Reames, D. V.; Tylka, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Solar energetic particle intensities at 1 AU often show an early temporal plateau where the intensity is limited. This early intensity limit may provide a valuable time window for astronauts to seek shelter before large shock-associated intensity increase (if any). The Ng and Reames (1994) time-dependent model of SEP transport through self-amplified Alfvén waves predicts a maximum proton intensity of ~ 250 particles /(cm^2 s str MeV) at ~ 1 MeV, in agreement within a factor of 2 with the observational survey by Reames and Ng (1998). In fact, streaming-limited intensity is implicit in the steady-state shock-acceleration solution of Bell (1978) and Lee (1983). Further studies on the effect of self-amplified waves on SEP intensity spectra have been made by Ng, Reames and Tylka (2003), Vanio (2003), and Lee (2005). Intensities exceeding the Ng and Reames (1994) limit have been reported (e.g., Lario et al. 2009). We present new observations of multi-species SEP spectra at the temporal intensity plateau. We also present new theoretical results on how the streaming limit depends on ion species and energy, ambient wave intensity spectrum, Alfvén speed, solar-wind speed, shock speed, and the presence of interplanetary shocks and interaction regions. Among the new interesting observations is the strong suppression of ion intensities near 1 MeV/amu in events that have high 10-100 MeV proton intensity. New modeling results confirm that this is due to these low-energy ions being strongly scattered at small pitch angles by waves amplified by 10-100 MeV protons at large pitch angles. As the high-energy protons travel upstream and scatter from small to large pitch-angles, they simultaneously amplify waves en route over a range of wavenumbers, including those that are resonant with low-energy protons. Thus, wave amplification by streaming protons and the pitch-angle dependence of the wave-particle resonance condition are essential factors in understanding the limiting behavior

  8. European Air Quality and Climate Change: a numerical modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacressonniere, G.

    2011-12-01

    In the context of climate change, the evolution of air quality in Europe is a challenging scientific question, despite the political measures taken to limit and reduce anthropogenic emissions. Heat waves, changes in transport pathways or synoptic patterns, increase of emissions in other areas in the world, or for instance possible increase of biogenic emissions or changes in deposition and land use may affect adversely future Air Quality levels in Europe. In the context of a project co-funded by the French environment agency ADEME, a numerical modeling study has begun relying on the tools used by Météo-France for its contribution to the 5th IPCC assessment report, to GMES atmospheric services (MACC FP7 project) and to the French national operational Air Quality platform Prév'Air (http://www.prevair.org). In particular, the MOCAGE 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) is used with a configuration comprising a global (2°) and a European domain (0.2°), allowing representation of both long-range transport of pollutants and European Air Quality at relevant resolutions and with a two-ways coupling. MOCAGE includes 47 layers from the surface to 5hPa. The first step of this project was to assess the impact of meteorological forcings, either analyses ("best" meteorology available for the recent past) or climate runs for the current atmosphere, on air quality hindcasts with MOCAGE over Europe. For these climate runs, we rely on Météo-France Earth-System model CNRM-CM, and particularly the ARPEGE-climate general circulation model for the atmosphere. By studying several key variables for Air Quality (surface and low troposphere concentrations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, radicals, PM,...), we investigated the indicators that are robust, through averages over several years, (monthly averages, frequency of exceedances, AOTs, ...) for a given climate when using climatological forcings instead of analyses, which constitutes the reference. Both

  9. Setting limits: Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore US ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenn, Mark E.; Lambert, Kathleen F.; Blett, Tamara F.; Burns, Douglas A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Lovett, Gary M.; Haeuber, Richard A.; Evers, David C.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Jeffries, Dean S.

    2011-01-01

    More than four decades of research provide unequivocal evidence that sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury pollution have altered, and will continue to alter, our nation's lands and waters. The emission and deposition of air pollutants harm native plants and animals, degrade water quality, affect forest productivity, and are damaging to human health. Many air quality policies limit emissions at the source but these control measures do not always consider ecosystem impacts. Air pollution thresholds at which ecological effects are observed, such as critical loads, are effective tools for assessing the impacts of air pollution on essential ecosystem services and for informing public policy. U.S. ecosystems can be more effectively protected and restored by using a combination of emissions-based approaches and science-based thresholds of ecosystem damage.

  10. Mathematical modeling of a primary zinc/air battery

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Z.; White, R.E. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports on the mathematical model developed by Sunu and Bennion that has been extended to include the separator, precipitation of both solid ZnO and K{sub 2}Zn(OH){sub 4}, and the air electrode, and has been used to investigate the behavior of a primary Zn-Air battery with respect to battery design features. Predictions obtained from the model indicate that anode material utilization is predominantly limited by depletion of the concentration of hydroxide ions. The effect of electrode thickness on anode material utilization is insignificant, whereas material loading per unit volume has a great effect on anode material utilization; a higher loading lowers both the anode material utilization and delivered capacity. Use of a thick separator will increase the anode material utilization, but may reduce the cell voltage.

  11. Mathematical modeling of a primary zinc/air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Z.; White, R. E.

    1992-04-01

    The mathematical model developed by Sunu and Bennion has been extended to include the separator, precipitation of both solid ZnO and K2Zn(OH)4, and the air electrode, and has been used to investigate the behavior of a primary Zn-Air battery with respect to battery design features. Predictions obtained from the model indicate that anode material utilization is predominantly limited by depletion of the concentration of hydroxide ions. The effect of electrode thickness on anode material utilization is insignificant, whereas material loading per unit volume has a great effect on anode material utilization; a higher loading lowers both the anode material utilization and delivered capacity. Use of a thick separator will increase the anode material utilization, but may reduce the cell voltage.

  12. Mathematical modeling of a primary zinc/air battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Z.; White, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    The mathematical model developed by Sunu and Bennion has been extended to include the separator, precipitation of both solid ZnO and K2Zn(OH)4, and the air electrode, and has been used to investigate the behavior of a primary Zn-Air battery with respect to battery design features. Predictions obtained from the model indicate that anode material utilization is predominantly limited by depletion of the concentration of hydroxide ions. The effect of electrode thickness on anode material utilization is insignificant, whereas material loading per unit volume has a great effect on anode material utilization; a higher loading lowers both the anode material utilization and delivered capacity. Use of a thick separator will increase the anode material utilization, but may reduce the cell voltage.

  13. Analysis of yellow-tip limits in methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Folga, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Rational design of safe domestic burners requires estimation of yellow-tip limits, which have traditionally indicated limits of safe operation. A bunsen-burner system that allowed for variations in the burner dimensions was constructed to collect overall composition data within yellow-tip limit methane-air flames. Direct measurement of the overall composition at the yellow-tip proved that the yellow-tip corresponds to a particular composition regardless of operating conditions for a given fuel-air system; the value of the characteristic composition for laminar methane-air flames was determined to Phi = 1.29. Composition profiles were determined within two yellow-tip limit methane-air flames. The luminous flame surface is the surface were CH/sub 4/ is consumed completely to form incomplete products of combustion; it is not of constant composition, being nearer to stoichiometric (Phi = 1) near the burner port. The outer cone is associated with the burnout of CO to form CO/sub 2/; like the luminous flame surface, it is not of constant composition. Near the burner port, the outer cone is slightly fuel-lean (Phi = 0.9) with the composition at the counter cone height as Phi = 1.

  14. 76 FR 34011 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited (Type Certificate No. A-815 Formerly Held by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... 2011-05-02, Amendment 39-16611 (76 FR 10220, February 24, 2011), for certain Viking Air Limited (Type...-05-02, Amendment 39-16611 (76 FR 10220, February 24, 2011), and adding the following new AD: Viking... a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February...

  15. Prediction of Indoor Air Exposure from Outdoor Air Quality Using an Artificial Neural Network Model for Inner City Commercial Buildings.

    PubMed

    Challoner, Avril; Pilla, Francesco; Gill, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    NO₂ and particulate matter are the air pollutants of most concern in Ireland, with possible links to the higher respiratory and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity rates found in the country compared to the rest of Europe. Currently, air quality limits in Europe only cover outdoor environments yet the quality of indoor air is an essential determinant of a person's well-being, especially since the average person spends more than 90% of their time indoors. The modelling conducted in this research aims to provide a framework for epidemiological studies by the use of publically available data from fixed outdoor monitoring stations to predict indoor air quality more accurately. Predictions are made using two modelling techniques, the Personal-exposure Activity Location Model (PALM), to predict outdoor air quality at a particular building, and Artificial Neural Networks, to model the indoor/outdoor relationship of the building. This joint approach has been used to predict indoor air concentrations for three inner city commercial buildings in Dublin, where parallel indoor and outdoor diurnal monitoring had been carried out on site. This modelling methodology has been shown to provide reasonable predictions of average NO₂ indoor air quality compared to the monitored data, but did not perform well in the prediction of indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Hence, this approach could be used to determine NO₂ exposures more rigorously of those who work and/or live in the city centre, which can then be linked to potential health impacts.

  16. Prediction of Indoor Air Exposure from Outdoor Air Quality Using an Artificial Neural Network Model for Inner City Commercial Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Challoner, Avril; Pilla, Francesco; Gill, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    NO2 and particulate matter are the air pollutants of most concern in Ireland, with possible links to the higher respiratory and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity rates found in the country compared to the rest of Europe. Currently, air quality limits in Europe only cover outdoor environments yet the quality of indoor air is an essential determinant of a person’s well-being, especially since the average person spends more than 90% of their time indoors. The modelling conducted in this research aims to provide a framework for epidemiological studies by the use of publically available data from fixed outdoor monitoring stations to predict indoor air quality more accurately. Predictions are made using two modelling techniques, the Personal-exposure Activity Location Model (PALM), to predict outdoor air quality at a particular building, and Artificial Neural Networks, to model the indoor/outdoor relationship of the building. This joint approach has been used to predict indoor air concentrations for three inner city commercial buildings in Dublin, where parallel indoor and outdoor diurnal monitoring had been carried out on site. This modelling methodology has been shown to provide reasonable predictions of average NO2 indoor air quality compared to the monitored data, but did not perform well in the prediction of indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Hence, this approach could be used to determine NO2 exposures more rigorously of those who work and/or live in the city centre, which can then be linked to potential health impacts. PMID:26633448

  17. Prediction of Indoor Air Exposure from Outdoor Air Quality Using an Artificial Neural Network Model for Inner City Commercial Buildings.

    PubMed

    Challoner, Avril; Pilla, Francesco; Gill, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    NO₂ and particulate matter are the air pollutants of most concern in Ireland, with possible links to the higher respiratory and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity rates found in the country compared to the rest of Europe. Currently, air quality limits in Europe only cover outdoor environments yet the quality of indoor air is an essential determinant of a person's well-being, especially since the average person spends more than 90% of their time indoors. The modelling conducted in this research aims to provide a framework for epidemiological studies by the use of publically available data from fixed outdoor monitoring stations to predict indoor air quality more accurately. Predictions are made using two modelling techniques, the Personal-exposure Activity Location Model (PALM), to predict outdoor air quality at a particular building, and Artificial Neural Networks, to model the indoor/outdoor relationship of the building. This joint approach has been used to predict indoor air concentrations for three inner city commercial buildings in Dublin, where parallel indoor and outdoor diurnal monitoring had been carried out on site. This modelling methodology has been shown to provide reasonable predictions of average NO₂ indoor air quality compared to the monitored data, but did not perform well in the prediction of indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Hence, this approach could be used to determine NO₂ exposures more rigorously of those who work and/or live in the city centre, which can then be linked to potential health impacts. PMID:26633448

  18. Air pollution impacts of speed limitation measures in large cities: The need for improving traffic data in a metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldasano, José M.; Gonçalves, María; Soret, Albert; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2010-08-01

    Assessing the effects of air quality management strategies in urban areas is a major concern worldwide because of the large impacts on health caused by the exposure to air pollution. In this sense, this work analyses the changes in urban air quality due to the introduction of a maximum speed limit to 80 km h -1 on motorways in a large city by using a novel methodology combining traffic assimilation data and modelling systems implemented in a supercomputing facility. Albeit the methodology has been non-specifically developed and can be extrapolated to any large city or megacity, the case study of Barcelona is presented here. Hourly simulations take into account the entire year 2008 (when the 80 km h -1 limit has been introduced) vs. the traffic conditions for the year 2007. The data has been assimilated in an emission model, which considers hourly variable speeds and hourly traffic intensity in the affected area, taken from long-term measurement campaigns for the aforementioned years; it also permits to take into account the traffic congestion effect. Overall, the emissions are reduced up to 4%; however the local effects of this reduction achieve an important impact for the adjacent area to the roadways, reaching 11%. In this sense, the speed limitation effects assessed represent enhancements in air quality levels (5-7%) of primary pollutants over the area, directly improving the welfare of 1.35 million inhabitants (over 41% of the population of the Metropolitan Area) and affecting 3.29 million dwellers who are potentially benefited from this strategy for air quality management (reducing 0.6% the mortality rates in the area).

  19. Air Pollution Data for Model Evaluation and Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    One objective of designing an air pollution monitoring network is to obtain data for evaluating air quality models that are used in the air quality management process and scientific discovery.1.2 A common use is to relate emissions to air quality, including assessing ...

  20. Modeling population exposures to outdoor sources of hazardous air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Ozkaynak, Halûk; Palma, Ted; Touma, Jawad S; Thurman, James

    2008-01-01

    Accurate assessment of human exposures is an important part of environmental health effects research. However, most air pollution epidemiology studies rely upon imperfect surrogates of personal exposures, such as information based on available central-site outdoor concentration monitoring or modeling data. In this paper, we examine the limitations of using outdoor concentration predictions instead of modeled personal exposures for over 30 gaseous and particulate hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in the US. The analysis uses the results from an air quality dispersion model (the ASPEN or Assessment System for Population Exposure Nationwide model) and an inhalation exposure model (the HAPEM or Hazardous Air Pollutant Exposure Model, Version 5), applied by the US. Environmental protection Agency during the 1999 National Air Toxic Assessment (NATA) in the US. Our results show that the total predicted chronic exposure concentrations of outdoor HAPs from all sources are lower than the modeled ambient concentrations by about 20% on average for most gaseous HAPs and by about 60% on average for most particulate HAPs (mainly, due to the exclusion of indoor sources from our modeling analysis and lower infiltration of particles indoors). On the other hand, the HAPEM/ASPEN concentration ratio averages for onroad mobile source exposures were found to be greater than 1 (around 1.20) for most mobile-source related HAPs (e.g. 1, 3-butadiene, acetaldehyde, benzene, formaldehyde) reflecting the importance of near-roadway and commuting environments on personal exposures to HAPs. The distribution of the ratios of personal to ambient concentrations was found to be skewed for a number of the VOCs and reactive HAPs associated with major source emissions, indicating the importance of personal mobility factors. We conclude that the increase in personal exposures from the corresponding predicted ambient levels tends to occur near locations where there are either major emission sources of HAPs

  1. Urban compaction or dispersion? An air quality modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Helena

    2012-07-01

    Urban sprawl is altering the landscape, with current trends pointing to further changes in land use that will, in turn, lead to changes in population, energy consumption, atmospheric emissions and air quality. Urban planners have debated on the most sustainable urban structure, with arguments in favour and against urban compaction and dispersion. However, it is clear that other areas of expertise have to be involved. Urban air quality and human exposure to atmospheric pollutants as indicators of urban sustainability can contribute to the discussion, namely through the study of the relation between urban structure and air quality. This paper addresses the issue by analysing the impacts of alternative urban growth patterns on the air quality of Porto urban region in Portugal, through a 1-year simulation with the MM5-CAMx modelling system. This region has been experiencing one of the highest European rates of urban sprawl, and at the same time presents a poor air quality. As part of the modelling system setup, a sensitivity study was conducted regarding different land use datasets and spatial distribution of emissions. Two urban development scenarios were defined, SPRAWL and COMPACT, together with their new land use and emission datasets; then meteorological and air quality simulations were performed. Results reveal that SPRAWL land use changes resulted in an average temperature increase of 0.4 °C, with local increases reaching as high as 1.5 °C. SPRAWL results also show an aggravation of PM10 annual average values and an increase in the exceedances to the daily limit value. For ozone, differences between scenarios were smaller, with SPRAWL presenting larger concentration differences than COMPACT. Finally, despite the higher concentrations found in SPRAWL, population exposure to the pollutants is higher for COMPACT because more inhabitants are found in areas of highest concentration levels.

  2. MAVRIC Flutter Model Transonic Limit Cycle Oscillation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Keller, Donald F.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    The Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation semi-span wind-tunnel model (MAVRIC-I), a business jet wing-fuselage flutter model, was tested in NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the goal of obtaining experimental data suitable for Computational Aeroelasticity code validation at transonic separation onset conditions. This research model is notable for its inexpensive construction and instrumentation installation procedures. Unsteady pressures and wing responses were obtained for three wingtip configurations clean, tipstore, and winglet. Traditional flutter boundaries were measured over the range of M = 0.6 to 0.9 and maps of Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) behavior were made in the range of M = 0.85 to 0.95. Effects of dynamic pressure and angle-of-attack were measured. Testing in both R134a heavy gas and air provided unique data on Reynolds number, transition effects, and the effect of speed of sound on LCO behavior. The data set provides excellent code validation test cases for the important class of flow conditions involving shock-induced transonic flow separation onset at low wing angles, including Limit Cycle Oscillation behavior.

  3. Advanced air revitalization system modeling and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dall-Baumann, Liese; Jeng, Frank; Christian, Steve; Edeer, Marybeth; Lin, Chin

    1990-01-01

    To support manned lunar and Martian exploration, an extensive evaluation of air revitalization subsystems (ARS) is being conducted. The major operations under study include carbon dioxide removal and reduction; oxygen and nitrogen production, storage, and distribution; humidity and temperature control; and trace contaminant control. A comprehensive analysis program based on a generalized block flow model was developed to facilitate the evaluation of various processes and their interaction. ASPEN PLUS was used in modelling carbon dioxide removal and reduction. Several life support test stands were developed to test new and existing technologies for their potential applicability in space. The goal was to identify processes which use compact, lightweight equipment and maximize the recovery of oxygen and water. The carbon dioxide removal test stands include solid amine/vacuum desorption (SAVD), regenerative silver oxide chemisorption, and electrochemical carbon dioxide concentration (EDC). Membrane-based carbon dioxide removal and humidity control, catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, and catalytic oxidation of trace contaminants were also investigated.

  4. CONCENTRATIONS OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS IN THE U.S. SIMULATED BY AN AIR QUALITY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the US National Air Toxics Assessment, we have applied the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model, CMAQ, to study the concentrations of twenty gas-phase, toxic, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in the atmosphere over the continental United States. We modified the Carbo...

  5. Exposure Modeling of Residential Air Exchange Rates for NEXUS Participants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improv...

  6. Prediction Models are Basis for Rational Air Quality Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Anders; Bach, Wilfrid

    1973-01-01

    An air quality control scheme employing meteorological diffusion, time averaging and frequency, and cost-benefit models is discussed. The methods outlined provide a constant feedback system for air quality control. Flow charts and maps are included. (BL)

  7. Exposure Modeling of Residential Air Exchange Rates for NEXUS Participants.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improv...

  8. AIR QUALITY MODELING OF PM AND AIR TOXICS AT NEIGHBORHOOD SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current interest in fine particles and toxics pollutants provide an impetus for extending air quality modeling capability towards improving exposure modeling and assessments. Human exposure models require information on concentration derived from interpolation of observati...

  9. Long-range transport modeling of air pollution episodes.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, F A; Leyssius, H J

    1989-02-01

    The air quality network in the Netherlands is based on a regular grid with an interstation distance of 30 to 40 km. In or close to source areas, a higher station density is realized. Atmospheric transport models form an intrinsic part of the air quality monitoring system. The models are constructed in such a way that only routinely available meteorological input data are needed. The models are applied for interpretation and generalization of the measurements in terms of contributions of source categories. In scenario studies, the potential effect of abatement strategies is explored. The output of the models consists of concentration and deposition fields of NOx, NO2, SO2, sulfate, and nitrate on the scale of the Netherlands or on the scale of northwestern Europe. In the present version the models are not directly suitable to estimate exposures to acidic aerosols; however, in combination with limited aerosol measurements, the model predictions can be used to provide information on the spatial and temporal distribution of acidic aerosols as needed for exposure assessment.

  10. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator combusts... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  12. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14815 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  16. AIR QUALITY MODELING FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes recent and evolving advances in the science of numerical air quality simulation modeling. Emphasis is placed on new developments in particulate matter modeling and atmospheric chemistry, diagnostic modeling tools, and integrated modeling systems. New...

  17. Variation of the pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for propane-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belles, Frank E; Simon, Dorothy M

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was made of the variation of the pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for quiescent propane with tube diameter for quiescent propane-air mixtures. Pressure limits were measured in glass tubes of six different inside diameters, with a precise apparatus. Critical diameters for flame propagation were calculated and the effect of pressure was determined. The critical diameters depended on the pressure to the -0.97 power for stoichiometric mixtures. The pressure dependence decreased with decreasing propane concentration. Critical diameters were related to quenching distance, flame speeds, and minimum ignition energy.

  18. Improving ammonia emissions in air quality modelling for France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaoui-Laguel, Lynda; Meleux, Frédérik; Beekmann, Matthias; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Génermont, Sophie; Cellier, Pierre; Létinois, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    We have implemented a new module to improve the representation of ammonia emissions from agricultural activities in France with the objective to evaluate the impact of such emissions on the formation of particulate matter modelled with the air quality model CHIMERE. A novel method has been set up for the part of ammonia emissions originating from mineral fertilizer spreading. They are calculated using the one dimensional 1D mechanistic model “VOLT'AIR” which has been coupled with data on agricultural practices, meteorology and soil properties obtained at high spatial resolution (cantonal level). These emissions display high spatiotemporal variations depending on soil pH, rates and dates of fertilization and meteorological variables, especially soil temperature. The emissions from other agricultural sources (animal housing, manure storage and organic manure spreading) are calculated using the national spatialised inventory (INS) recently developed in France. The comparison of the total ammonia emissions estimated with the new approach VOLT'AIR_INS with the standard emissions provided by EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) used currently in the CHIMERE model shows significant differences in the spatiotemporal distributions. The implementation of new ammonia emissions in the CHIMERE model has a limited impact on ammonium nitrate aerosol concentrations which only increase at most by 10% on the average for the considered spring period but this impact can be more significant for specific pollution episodes. The comparison of modelled PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) and ammonium nitrate aerosol with observations shows that the use of the new ammonia emission method slightly improves the spatiotemporal correlation in certain regions and reduces the negative bias on average by 1 μg m-3. The formation of ammonium nitrate aerosol depends not only on ammonia concentrations but also on nitric acid availability, which

  19. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator combusts 100 percent yard waste, you must only meet the emission limits in... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of...

  20. Effects of radiation and compression on propagating spherical flames of methane/air mixtures near the lean flammability limit

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng

    2010-12-15

    Large discrepancies between the laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths measured in experiments and those predicted by simulations for ultra-lean methane/air mixtures bring a great concern for kinetic mechanism validation. In order to quantitatively explain these discrepancies, a computational study is performed for propagating spherical flames of lean methane/air mixtures in different spherical chambers using different radiation models. The emphasis is focused on the effects of radiation and compression. It is found that the spherical flame propagation speed is greatly reduced by the coupling between thermal effect (change of flame temperature or unburned gas temperature) and flow effect (inward flow of burned gas) induced by radiation and/or compression. As a result, for methane/air mixtures near the lean flammability limit, the radiation and compression cause large amounts of under-prediction of the laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths extracted from propagating spherical flames. Since radiation and compression both exist in the experiments on ultra-lean methane/air mixtures reported in the literature, the measured laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths are much lower than results from simulation and thus cannot be used for kinetic mechanism validation. (author)

  1. Modeling of an air-backed diaphragm in dynamic pressure sensors: Effects of the air cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haijun; Olson, Douglas A.; Yu, Miao

    2014-12-01

    As the key structure of most dynamic pressure sensors, a diaphragm backed by an air cavity plays a critical role in the determination of sensor performance metrics. In this paper, we investigate the influence of air cavity length on the sensitivity and bandwidth. A continuum mechanics model neglecting the air viscous effect is first developed to capture the structural-acoustic coupling between a clamped circular diaphragm and a cylindrical backing air cavity. To facilitate sensor design, close-form approximations are obtained to calculate the static sensitivity and the fundamental natural frequency of the air-backed diaphragm. Parametric studies based on this analytical model show that the air cavity can change both the effective mass and the effective stiffness of the diaphragm. One new finding is that the natural frequency of the air-backed diaphragm behaves differently in three different cavity length ranges. In particular, due to the mass effect of the air cavity being dominant, it is shown for the first time that the natural frequency decreases when the cavity length decreases below a critical value in the short cavity range. Furthermore, a finite element method (FEM) model is developed to validate the continuum mechanics model and to study the damping effect of the air cavity. These results provide important design guidelines for dynamic pressure sensors with air-backed diaphragms.

  2. Evaluating NOx emission inventories for regulatory air quality modeling using satellite and air quality model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemball-Cook, Susan; Yarwood, Greg; Johnson, Jeremiah; Dornblaser, Bright; Estes, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of NOx emissions in the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality's (TCEQ) State Implementation Plan (SIP) modeling inventories of the southeastern U.S. We used retrieved satellite tropospheric NO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) together with NO2 columns from the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) to make top-down NOx emissions estimates using the mass balance method. Two different top-down NOx emissions estimates were developed using the KNMI DOMINO v2.0 and NASA SP2 retrievals of OMI NO2 columns. Differences in the top-down NOx emissions estimates made with these two operational products derived from the same OMI radiance data were sufficiently large that they could not be used to constrain the TCEQ NOx emissions in the southeast. The fact that the two available operational NO2 column retrievals give such different top-down NOx emissions results is important because these retrievals are increasingly being used to diagnose air quality problems and to inform efforts to solve them. These results reflect the fact that NO2 column retrievals are a blend of measurements and modeled data and should be used with caution in analyses that will inform policy development. This study illustrates both benefits and challenges of using satellite NO2 data for air quality management applications. Comparison with OMI NO2 columns pointed the way toward improvements in the CAMx simulation of the upper troposphere, but further refinement of both regional air quality models and the NO2 column retrievals is needed before the mass balance and other emission inversion methods can be used to successfully constrain NOx emission inventories used in U.S. regulatory modeling.

  3. MAVRIC Flutter Model Transonic Limit Cycle Oscillation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Keller, Donald F.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    The Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation semi-span wind-tunnel model (MAVRIC-I), a business jet wing-fuselage flutter model, was tested in NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the goal of obtaining experimental data suitable for Computational Aeroelasticity code validation at transonic separation onset conditions. This research model is notable for its inexpensive construction and instrumentation installation procedures. Unsteady pressures and wing responses were obtained for three wingtip configurations of clean, tipstore, and winglet. Traditional flutter boundaries were measured over the range of M = 0.6 to 0.9 and maps of Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) behavior were made in the range of M = 0.85 to 0.95. Effects of dynamic pressure and angle-of-attack were measured. Testing in both R134a heavy gas and air provided unique data on Reynolds number, transition effects, and the effect of speed of sound on LCO behavior. The data set provides excellent code validation test cases for the important class of flow conditions involving shock-induced transonic flow separation onset at low wing angles, including LCO behavior.

  4. OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2006-11-02

    The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

  5. Modelling of dynamic targeting in the Air Operations Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Edward H. S.; Au, T. Andrew

    2007-12-01

    Air Operations Centres (AOCs) are high stress multitask environments for planning and executing of theatre-wide airpower. Operators have multiple responsibilities to ensure that the orchestration of air assets is coordinated to maximum effect. AOCs utilise a dynamic targeting process to immediately prosecute time-sensitive targets. For this process to work effectively, a timely decision must be made regarding the appropriate course of action before the action is enabled. A targeting solution is typically developed using a number of inter-related processes in the kill chain - the Find, Fix, Track, Target, Engage, and Assess (F2T2EA) model. The success of making a right decision about dynamic targeting is ultimately limited by the cognitive and cooperative skills of the team prosecuting the mission and their associated workload. This paper presents a model of human interaction and tasks within the dynamic targeting sequence. The complex network of tasks executed by the team can be analysed by undertaking simulation of the model to identify possible information-processing bottlenecks and overloads. The model was subjected to various tests to generate typical outcomes, operator utilisation, duration as well as rates of output in the dynamic targeting process. This capability will allow for future "what-if" evaluations of numerous concepts for team formation or task reallocation, complementing live exercises and experiments.

  6. Transboundary air pollution in Asia: Model development and policy implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Tracey

    2001-12-01

    This work investigates transboundary air pollution in Asia through atmospheric modeling and public policy analysis. As an example of models actively shaping environmental policy, the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution in Europe (LRTAP) is selected as a case study. The LRTAP Convention is the only mulit- lateral air pollution agreement to date, and results from the RAINS integrated assessment model were heavily used to calculate nationally differentiated emission ceilings. Atmospheric chemistry and transport are included in RAINS through the use of transfer coefficients (or ``source-receptor relationships'') relating pollutant transfer among European nations. Following past work with ATMOS to simulate sulfur species in Asia, here ATMOS is developed to include odd-nitrogen. Fitting with the linear structure of ATMOS and the emphasis on computational efficiency, a simplified chemical scheme developed for use in the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Global Chemical Transport Model (GFDL GCTM) is adopted. The method solves for the interconversions between NOx, HNO3, and PAN based on five reaction rates stored in look-up tables. ATMOS is used to calculate source-receptor relationships for Asia. Significant exchange of NOy occurs among China, North and South Korea, and Japan. On an annual average basis, China contributes 18% to Japan's total nitrate deposition, 46% to North Korea, and 26% to South Korea. Nitrate deposition is an important component of acidification (along with sulfate deposition), contributing 30-50% to the acid burden over most of Japan, and more than 50% to acid deposition in southeast Asia, where biomass burning emits high levels of NOx. In evaluating the policy-relevance of results from the ATMOS model, four factors are taken into account: the uncertainty and limitations of ATMOS, the environmental concerns facing Asia, the current status of the scientific community in relation to regional air pollution in the region, and

  7. Impact of inherent meteorology uncertainty on air quality model predictions

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well established that there are a number of different classifications and sources of uncertainties in environmental modeling systems. Air quality models rely on two key inputs, namely, meteorology and emissions. When using air quality models for decision making, it is impor...

  8. Good manufacturing practice for modelling air pollution: Quality criteria for computer models to calculate air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, C. M.; Sliggers, C. J.

    To spur on quality assurance for models that calculate air pollution, quality criteria for such models have been formulated. By satisfying these criteria the developers of these models and producers of the software packages in this field can assure and account for the quality of their products. In this way critics and users of such (computer) models can gain a clear understanding of the quality of the model. Quality criteria have been formulated for the development of mathematical models, for their programming—including user-friendliness, and for the after-sales service, which is part of the distribution of such software packages. The criteria have been introduced into national and international frameworks to obtain standardization.

  9. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  10. Setting limits: Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore U.S. ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenn, M.E.; Lambert, K.F.; Blett, T.F.; Burns, Douglas A.; Pardo, L.H.; Lovett, Gary M.; Haeuber, R. A.; Evers, D.C.; Driscoll, C.T.; Jeffries, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    More than four decades of research provide unequivocal evidence that sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury pollution have altered, and will continue to alter, our nation's lands and waters. The emission and deposition of air pollutants harm native plants and animals, degrade water quality, affect forest productivity, and are damaging to human health. Many air quality policies limit emissions at the source but these control measures do not always consider ecosystem impacts. Air pollution thresholds at which ecological effects are observed, such as critical loads, are effective tools for assessing the impacts of air pollution on essential ecosystem services and for informing public policy. U.S. ecosystems can be more effectively protected and restored by using a combination of emissions-based approaches and science-based thresholds of ecosystem damage. Based on the results of a comprehensive review of air pollution thresholds, we conclude: ??? Ecosystem services such as air and water purification, decomposition and detoxification of waste materials, climate regulation, regeneration of soil fertility, production and biodiversity maintenance, as well as crop, timber and fish supplies are impacted by deposition of nitrogen, sulfur, mercury and other pollutants. The consequences of these changes may be difficult or impossible to reverse as impacts cascade throughout affected ecosystems. ??? The effects of too much nitrogen are common across the U.S. and include altered plant and lichen communities, enhanced growth of invasive species, eutrophication and acidification of lands and waters, and habitat deterioration for native species, including endangered species. ??? Lake, stream and soil acidification is widespread across the eastern United States. Up to 65% of lakes within sensitive areas receive acid deposition that exceeds critical loads. ??? Mercury contamination adversely affects fish in many inland and coastal waters. Fish consumption advisories for mercury exist in all 50

  11. A survey of air flow models for multizone structures

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

    1991-03-01

    Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A theoretical analysis of the extinction limits of a methane-air opposed-jet diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; T'Ien, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is described for a methane-air diffusion flame stabilized in the forward stagnation region of a porous metal cylinder in a forced convective flow. The analysis includes effects of radiative heat loss from the porous metal surface and finite rate kinetics but neglects the effects of gravity. The theoretically predicted extinction limits compare well with experimentally observed extinction limits from the literature. After the predicted limits compared well with the experimental limits, a parametric study of the effect of fuel surface emissivity and Lewis number was conducted with the numerical model. It was found that the computed blowoff limit is independent of radiative heat loss for high fuel blowing velocities but is a strong function of Lewis number. At low fuel blowing velocities, the extinction limit varies with both radiative heat loss and Lewis number. It is discovered, however, that even if thermal losses from the fuel surface are absent, the flame can extinguish at the fuel surface independently of Lewis number due to excessive reaction zone thinning.

  13. The flammability limits of hydrogen and methane in air at moderately elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ale, B.B.; Wierzba, I.

    1997-12-31

    The flammability limits of hydrogen and methane in air were determined experimentally at elevated initial mixture temperatures up to 350 C at atmospheric pressure for upward flame propagation in a conventional steel test tube apparatus. Additionally, the extent to which a prolonged exposure (i.e., residence time) of the mixture to elevated temperatures before spark ignition and, consequently, the existence of pre-ignition reactions that may influence the value of the lean and rich flammability limits was also investigated. It was shown that the flammability limits for methane widened approximately linearly with an increase in the initial mixture temperature over the whole range of temperatures tested. These limits were not affected by the length of the residence time before spark ignition. Different behavior was observed for flammability limits of hydrogen. They were also widened with an increase in the initial temperature but only up to 200 C. In this initial temperature range the limits were not affected by the length of the residence time. However, at initial temperature exceeding 200 C the flammability limits, especially, the rich limits narrowed with an increase in the temperature and were significantly affected by the residence time before spark ignition. It was suggested that the substantial drop in the value of the rich limit with the increase in the residence time was caused by the relatively low temperature catalytic reactions on the stainless steel surface of the flame tube. Simple method for calculating the hydrogen conversion to water was proposed. The results of calculations are in fair agreement with the experimental evidence.

  14. Modeling exposure close to air pollution sources in naturally ventilated residences: association of turbulent diffusion coefficient with air change rate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Klepeis, Neil E; Ott, Wayne R; Fringer, Oliver B; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2011-05-01

    For modeling exposure close to an indoor air pollution source, an isotropic turbulent diffusion coefficient is used to represent the average spread of emissions. However, its magnitude indoors has been difficult to assess experimentally due to limitations in the number of monitors available. We used 30-37 real-time monitors to simultaneously measure CO at different angles and distances from a continuous indoor point source. For 11 experiments involving two houses, with natural ventilation conditions ranging from <0.2 to >5 air changes per h, an eddy diffusion model was used to estimate the turbulent diffusion coefficients, which ranged from 0.001 to 0.013 m² s⁻¹. The model reproduced observed concentrations with reasonable accuracy over radial distances of 0.25-5.0 m. The air change rate, as measured using a SF₆ tracer gas release, showed a significant positive linear correlation with the air mixing rate, defined as the turbulent diffusion coefficient divided by a squared length scale representing the room size. The ability to estimate the indoor turbulent diffusion coefficient using two readily measurable parameters (air change rate and room dimensions) is useful for accurately modeling exposures in close proximity to an indoor pollution source.

  15. Assessment and prediction of air quality using fuzzy logic and autoregressive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajal-Hernández, José Juan; Sánchez-Fernández, Luis P.; Carrasco-Ochoa, Jesús A.; Martínez-Trinidad, José Fco.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, artificial intelligence methods have been used for the treatment of environmental problems. This work, presents two models for assessment and prediction of air quality. First, we develop a new computational model for air quality assessment in order to evaluate toxic compounds that can harm sensitive people in urban areas, affecting their normal activities. In this model we propose to use a Sigma operator to statistically asses air quality parameters using their historical data information and determining their negative impact in air quality based on toxicity limits, frequency average and deviations of toxicological tests. We also introduce a fuzzy inference system to perform parameter classification using a reasoning process and integrating them in an air quality index describing the pollution levels in five stages: excellent, good, regular, bad and danger, respectively. The second model proposed in this work predicts air quality concentrations using an autoregressive model, providing a predicted air quality index based on the fuzzy inference system previously developed. Using data from Mexico City Atmospheric Monitoring System, we perform a comparison among air quality indices developed for environmental agencies and similar models. Our results show that our models are an appropriate tool for assessing site pollution and for providing guidance to improve contingency actions in urban areas.

  16. Identifying an indoor air exposure limit for formaldehyde considering both irritation and cancer hazards

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a well-studied chemical and effects from inhalation exposures have been extensively characterized in numerous controlled studies with human volunteers, including asthmatics and other sensitive individuals, which provide a rich database on exposure concentrations that can reliably produce the symptoms of sensory irritation. Although individuals can differ in their sensitivity to odor and eye irritation, the majority of authoritative reviews of the formaldehyde literature have concluded that an air concentration of 0.3 ppm will provide protection from eye irritation for virtually everyone. A weight of evidence-based formaldehyde exposure limit of 0.1 ppm (100 ppb) is recommended as an indoor air level for all individuals for odor detection and sensory irritation. It has recently been suggested by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) that formaldehyde is causally associated with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) and leukemia. This has led US EPA to conclude that irritation is not the most sensitive toxic endpoint and that carcinogenicity should dictate how to establish exposure limits for formaldehyde. In this review, a number of lines of reasoning and substantial scientific evidence are described and discussed, which leads to a conclusion that neither point of contact nor systemic effects of any type, including NPC or leukemia, are causally associated with exposure to formaldehyde. This conclusion supports the view that the equivocal epidemiology studies that suggest otherwise are almost certainly flawed by identified or yet to be unidentified confounding variables. Thus, this assessment concludes that a formaldehyde indoor air limit of 0.1 ppm should protect even particularly susceptible individuals from both irritation effects and any potential cancer hazard. PMID:21635194

  17. AIR TOXICS MODELING RESEARCH PROGRAM: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a Microsoft Powerpoint slide presentation which was given at the joint EPA Region 3 - Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association (MARAMA) Air Toxic Summit in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania held from October 18, 2005 through October 20, 2005. The slide presentat...

  18. VALMET: a valley air pollution model. Final report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.

    1985-04-01

    An air quality model is described for predicting air pollution concentrations in deep mountain valleys arising from nocturnal down-valley transport and diffusion of an elevated pollutant plume, and the fumigation of the plume on the valley floor and sidewalls after sunrise. Included is a technical description of the model, a discussion of the model's applications, the required model inputs, sample calculations and model outputs, and a full listing of the FORTRAN computer program. 55 refs., 27 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. A theoretical study of limit cycle oscillations of plenum air cushions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinchey, M. J.; Sullivan, P. A.

    1981-11-01

    Air cushion vehicles (ACV) are prone to the occurrence of dynamic instabilities which frequently appear as stable finite amplitude oscillations. The aim of this work is to ascertain if the non-linearities characteristics of ACV dynamics generate limit cycle oscillations for cushion systems operating at conditions for which a linear theory predicts instability. The types of non-linearity that can occur are discussed, and an analysis is presented for a single cell flexible skirted plenum chamber constrained to move in pure heave only. Two cushion feed cases are considered: a plenum box supply and a duct. The results obtained by a Galerkin/describing function analysis are compared with those generated by a full numerical simulation. For the plenum box supply system, it is shown that the limit cycles can be suppressed by using a piston to introduce high frequency small amplitude volume oscillations into the plenum chamber.

  20. What is Air? A Standard Model for Combustion Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    2001-08-01

    Most combustion devices utilize air as the oxidizer. Thus, reactive flow simulations of these devices require the specification of the composition of air as part of the physicochemical input. A mixture of only oxygen and nitrogen often is used, although in reality air is a more complex mixture of somewhat variable composition. We summarize some useful parameters describing a standard model of dry air. Then we consider modifications to include water vapor for creating the desired level of humidity. The ''minor'' constituents of air, especially argon and water vapor, can affect the composition by as much as about 5 percent in the mole fractions.

  1. 77 FR 4808 - Conference on Air Quality Modeling

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... AGENCY Conference on Air Quality Modeling AGENCY: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of conference. SUMMARY: The EPA will be hosting the Tenth Conference on Air Quality Modeling on...; suggest alternatives and substitute language for your requested changes. Describe any assumptions...

  2. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION TOOL (AMET); AIR QUALITY MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the development of the Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool (AMET) air quality module. The AMET tool is being developed to aid in the model evaluation. This presentation focuses on the air quality evaluation portion of AMET. Presented are examples of the...

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF AIR QUALITY MODELING SIMULATIONS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentrations of five hazardous air pollutants were simulated using the Community Multi Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Annual simulations were performed over the continental United States for the entire year of 2001 to support human exposure estimates. Results a...

  4. The contrast model method for the thermodynamical calculation of air-air wet heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiugan; Mei, Fang

    1989-02-01

    The 'contrast model' method thermodynamic calculation of air-air crossflow wet heat exchangers with initial air condensation is presented. Contrast-model equations are derived from the actual heat exchanger equations as well as imaginary ones; it is then possible to proceed to a proof that the enthalpy efficiency of the contrast model equations is similar to the temperature efficiency of the dry heat exchanger. Conditions are noted under which it becomes possible to unify thermodynamic calculations for wet and dry heat exchangers.

  5. Inert doublet model and LEP II limits

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstroem, Erik; Gustafsson, Michael; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2009-02-01

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI Collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  6. Potential for reducing air-pollutants while achieving 2 °C global temperature change limit target.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Tatsuya; Akashi, Osamu; Fujiwara, Kazuya; Motoki, Yuko; Hibino, Go

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the potential to reduce air pollutants while achieving the 2 °C global temperature change limit target above pre-industrial levels, by using the bottom-up optimization model, AIM/Enduse[Global]. This study focuses on; 1) estimating mitigation potentials and costs for achieving 2 °C, 2.5 °C, and 3 °C target scenarios, 2) assessing co-benefits of reducing air pollutants such as NOx, SO2, BC, PM, and 3) analyzing features of sectoral attributions in Annex I and Non-Annex I groups of countries. The carbon tax scenario at 50 US$/tCO2-eq in 2050 can reduce GHG emissions more than the 3 °C target scenario, but a higher carbon price around 400 US$/tCO2-eq in 2050 is required to achieve the 2 °C target scenario. However, there is also a co-benefit of large reduction potential of air pollutants, in the range of 60-80% reductions in 2050 from the reference scenario while achieving the 2 °C target. PMID:25028265

  7. Potential for reducing air-pollutants while achieving 2 °C global temperature change limit target.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Tatsuya; Akashi, Osamu; Fujiwara, Kazuya; Motoki, Yuko; Hibino, Go

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the potential to reduce air pollutants while achieving the 2 °C global temperature change limit target above pre-industrial levels, by using the bottom-up optimization model, AIM/Enduse[Global]. This study focuses on; 1) estimating mitigation potentials and costs for achieving 2 °C, 2.5 °C, and 3 °C target scenarios, 2) assessing co-benefits of reducing air pollutants such as NOx, SO2, BC, PM, and 3) analyzing features of sectoral attributions in Annex I and Non-Annex I groups of countries. The carbon tax scenario at 50 US$/tCO2-eq in 2050 can reduce GHG emissions more than the 3 °C target scenario, but a higher carbon price around 400 US$/tCO2-eq in 2050 is required to achieve the 2 °C target scenario. However, there is also a co-benefit of large reduction potential of air pollutants, in the range of 60-80% reductions in 2050 from the reference scenario while achieving the 2 °C target.

  8. Bayesian Analysis of a Reduced-Form Air Quality Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical air quality models are being used for assessing emission control strategies for improving ambient pollution levels across the globe. This paper applies probabilistic modeling to evaluate the effectiveness of emission reduction scenarios aimed at lowering ground-level oz...

  9. INTERCOMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVE VEGETATION DATABASES FOR REGIONAL AIR QUALITY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vegetation cover data are used to characterize several regional air quality modeling processes, including the calculation of heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes with the Mesoscale Meteorological Model (MM5) and the estimate of biogenic volatile organic compound and nitric oxide...

  10. Limit theorems in financial market models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Koji; Murai, Joshin

    2007-09-01

    Invariance principle states that a scaled simple random walk converges to the standard Brownian motion. In this article, we present a discrete time stochastic process, which reflects a microstructure of market dynamics, and prove a convergence to a scaling limit process with a drift term and a jump term. These terms are derived from a macroscopic condition on volumes traded in some time intervals. The mathematical tools for obtaining our results are Dobrushin-Hryniv theory and the method of cluster expansion developed in mathematical studies of statistical mechanics.

  11. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  12. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  13. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2971 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a)...

  14. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator combusts 100 percent yard waste, you must meet only the emission... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of...

  16. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2971 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a)...

  17. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  18. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  19. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2971 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  3. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  4. Scaling in the Diffusion Limited Aggregation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, Anton

    2012-01-01

    We present a self-consistent picture of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) growth based on the assumption that the probability density P(r,N) for the next particle to be attached within the distance r to the center of the cluster is expressible in the scale-invariant form P[r/Rdep(N)]. It follows from this assumption that there is no multiscaling issue in DLA and there is only a single fractal dimension D for all length scales. We check our assumption self-consistently by calculating the particle-density distribution with a measured P(r/Rdep) function on an ensemble with 1000 clusters of 5×107 particles each. We also show that a nontrivial multiscaling function D(x) can be obtained only when small clusters (N<10000) are used to calculate D(x). Hence, multiscaling is a finite-size effect and is not intrinsic to DLA.

  5. Transferability of tubifex limiting factor models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terrell, James W.; Milhous, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    Dense populations of T. tubifex are generally associated with habitats dominated by fine sediments and enriched organic material (e.g. Krueger, 2002). Management of whirling disease positive systems is entering a new phase where channel modifications are being implemented to reduce or isolate this type of habitat. These management actions have the potential to cause new areas of sediment deposition. Descriptions of sediment characteristics associated with high numbers of T. tubifex can help engineers design channel modifications that minimize situations where altered velocity distributions inadvertently create optimum worm habitat. Ongoing studies in two Colorado Rivers with very different flow regimes and watershed characteristics provide preliminary evidence that a median sediment particle diameter greater than 1.4mm in conjunction with at least 30% (dry weight) of sediment with a diameter less than 0.3mm limits T. tubifex densities to approximately less than 10% of maximum densities.

  6. Intercomparisons of AIRS Observations with MERRA Reanalysis and Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearty, T. J.; Vollmer, B.; Theobald, M.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Ding, F.; Esfandiari, A. E.; Ostrenga, D.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Fetzer, E.; Tian, B.; Fishbein, E.; Manning, E.; Yue, Q.

    2012-12-01

    We perform intercomparisons among AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) observations, MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications) reanalysis, and CMIP5 models. One of the greatest challenges of using satellite observations from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to evaluate climate models is to account for differences in the sampling. Climate models are sampled on a regular grid with equal increments in time and space while LEO satellite observations are not. Since AIRS is an infrared instrument its sampling is also affected by clouds. Version 6 of the AIRS processing algorithm will have improved accuracy and increased sampling over the Version 5 algorithm. We compare AIRS and MERRA data with identical sampling to assess how well the satellite observations and reanalysis Water Vapor, Temperature, and Clouds agree when they have the same sampling. Since Version 6 of the AIRS processing algorithms also have improved sampling we use MERRA sampled like AIRS to estimate the improvement in the sampling bias between AIRS Version 5 and Version 6 Results. While the uncertainties in the current generation of climate models are larger than the sampling uncertainties, as the models improve more careful intercomparisons will be necessary. Therefore we compare the differences between AIRS observations and CMIP5 Climate Models to assess the significance of the sampling uncertainties.

  7. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogen Combustion Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2008-04-02

    A detailed chemical kinetic model is used to explore the flammability and detonability of hydrogen mixtures. In the case of flammability, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrogen is coupled to the CHEMKIN Premix code to compute premixed, laminar flame speeds. The detailed chemical kinetic model reproduces flame speeds in the literature over a range of equivalence ratios, pressures and reactant temperatures. A series of calculation were performed to assess the key parameters determining the flammability of hydrogen mixtures. Increased reactant temperature was found to greatly increase the flame speed and the flammability of the mixture. The effect of added diluents was assessed. Addition of water and carbon dioxide were found to reduce the flame speed and thus the flammability of a hydrogen mixture approximately equally well and much more than the addition of nitrogen. The detailed chemical kinetic model was used to explore the detonability of hydrogen mixtures. A Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) detonation model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was used to model the detonation. The effectiveness on different diluents was assessed in reducing the detonability of a hydrogen mixture. Carbon dioxide was found to be most effective in reducing the detonability followed by water and nitrogen. The chemical action of chemical inhibitors on reducing the flammability of hydrogen mixtures is discussed. Bromine and organophosphorus inhibitors act through catalytic cycles that recombine H and OH radicals in the flame. The reduction in H and OH radicals reduces chain branching in the flame through the H + O{sub 2} = OH + O chain branching reaction. The reduction in chain branching and radical production reduces the flame speed and thus the flammability of the hydrogen mixture.

  8. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  9. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  10. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  11. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  12. 14 CFR 93.219 - Allocation of slots for essential air service operations and applicable limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic... or from a High Density Traffic Airport under the Department of Transportation's Essential Air...

  13. Modelling of air pressure effects in casting moulds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attar, E.; Homayonifar, P.; Babaei, R.; Asgari, K.; Davami, P.

    2005-09-01

    In the casting process, as a mould is filled with molten metal, air escapes through the vents. Air pressure in the mould cavity has serious effects upon the filling behaviour such as surface profile of the molten metal and filling time. In this project a computational model was developed for calculation of air pressure during the mould filling. A 3D single phase code based on the SOLA-VOF algorithm was used for the prediction of the fluid flow. The ideal gas assumption, conservation of mass equation and Bernoulli law were used for the calculation of air pressure. A new algorithm was developed to interpolate air pressure on the surface cells. The creation of air pressure was correlated with the sizes of the vents and their locations. An experimental test was designed to verify the modelling results. Comparison between the experimental data and simulation results has shown a good agreement.

  14. Opposed Jet Burner Extinction Limits: Simple Mixed Hydrocarbon Scramjet Fuels vs Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2007-01-01

    Opposed Jet Burner tools have been used extensively by the authors to measure Flame Strength (FS) of laminar non-premixed H2 air and simple hydrocarbon (HC) air counterflow diffusion flames at 1-atm. FS represents a strain-induced extinction limit based on air jet velocity. This paper follows AIAA-2006-5223, and provides new HC air FSs for global testing of chemical kinetics, and for characterizing idealized flameholding potentials during early scramjet-like combustion. Previous FS data included six HCs, pure and N2-diluted; and three HC-diluted H2 fuels, where FS decayed very nonlinearly as HC was added to H2, due to H-atom scavenging. This study presents FSs on mixtures of (candidate surrogate) HCs, some with very high FS ethylene. Included are four binary gaseous systems at 300 K, and a hot ternary system at approx. 600 K. The binaries are methane + ethylene, ethane + ethylene, methane + ethane, and methane + propylene. The first three also form two ternary systems. The hot ternary includes both 10.8 and 21.3 mole % vaporized n-heptane and full ranges of methane + ethylene. Normalized FS data provide accurate means of (1) validating, globally, chemical kinetics for extinction of non-premixed flames, and (2) estimating (scaling by HC) the loss of incipient flameholding in scramjet combustors. The n-heptane is part of a proposed baseline simulant (10 mole % with 30% methane + 60% ethylene) that mimics the ignition of endothermically cracked JP-7 like kerosene fuel, as suggested by Colket and Spadaccini in 2001 in their shock tube Scramjet Fuels Autoignition Study. Presently, we use FS to gauge idealized flameholding, and define HC surrogates. First, FS was characterized for hot nheptane + methane + ethylene; then a hot 36 mole % methane + 64% ethylene surrogate was defined that mimics FS of the baseline simulant system. A similar hot ethane + ethylene surrogate can also be defined, but it has lower vapor pressure at 300 K, and thus exhibits reduced gaseous

  15. Local-Scale Air Quality Modeling in Support of Human Health and Exposure Research (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakov, V.

    2010-12-01

    Spatially- and temporally-sparse information on air quality is a key concern for air-pollution-related environmental health studies. Monitor networks are sparse in both space and time, are costly to maintain, and are often designed purposely to avoid detecting highly localized sources. Recent studies have shown that more narrowly defining the geographic domain of the study populations and improvements in the measured/estimated ambient concentrations can lead to stronger associations between air pollution and hospital admissions and mortality records. Traditionally, ambient air quality measurements have been used as a primary input to support human health and exposure research. However, there is increasing evidence that the current ambient monitoring network is not capturing sharp gradients in exposure due to the presence of high concentration levels near, for example, major roadways. Many air pollutants exhibit large concentration gradients near large emitters such as major roadways, factories, ports, etc. To overcome these limitations, researchers are now beginning to use air quality models to support air pollution exposure and health studies. There are many advantages to using air quality models over traditional approaches based on existing ambient measurements alone. First, models can provide spatially- and temporally-resolved concentrations as direct input to exposure and health studies and thus better defining the concentration levels for the population in the geographic domain. Air quality models have a long history of use in air pollution regulations, and supported by regulatory agencies and a large user community. Also, models can provide bidirectional linkages between sources of emissions and ambient concentrations, thus allowing exploration of various mitigation strategies to reduce risk to exposure. In order to provide best estimates of air concentrations to support human health and exposure studies, model estimates should consider local-scale features

  16. Modeling, Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis of Spacecraft Air Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, W. Fred; Skliar, Mikhail; Narayan, Anand; Morgenthaler, George W.; Smith, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    Progress and results in the development of an integrated air quality modeling, monitoring, fault detection, and isolation system are presented. The focus was on development of distributed models of the air contaminants transport, the study of air quality monitoring techniques based on the model of transport process and on-line contaminant concentration measurements, and sensor placement. Different approaches to the modeling of spacecraft air contamination are discussed, and a three-dimensional distributed parameter air contaminant dispersion model applicable to both laminar and turbulent transport is proposed. A two-dimensional approximation of a full scale transport model is also proposed based on the spatial averaging of the three dimensional model over the least important space coordinate. A computer implementation of the transport model is considered and a detailed development of two- and three-dimensional models illustrated by contaminant transport simulation results is presented. The use of a well established Kalman filtering approach is suggested as a method for generating on-line contaminant concentration estimates based on both real time measurements and the model of contaminant transport process. It is shown that high computational requirements of the traditional Kalman filter can render difficult its real-time implementation for high-dimensional transport model and a novel implicit Kalman filtering algorithm is proposed which is shown to lead to an order of magnitude faster computer implementation in the case of air quality monitoring.

  17. Eight Year Climatologies from Observational (AIRS) and Model (MERRA) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearty, Thomas; Savtchenko, Andrey; Won, Young-In; Theobalk, Mike; Vollmer, Bruce; Manning, Evan; Smith, Peter; Ostrenga, Dana; Leptoukh, Greg

    2010-01-01

    We examine climatologies derived from eight years of temperature, water vapor, cloud, and trace gas observations made by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument flying on the Aqua satellite and compare them to similar climatologies constructed with data from a global assimilation model, the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). We use the AIRS climatologies to examine anomalies and trends in the AIRS data record. Since sampling can be an issue for infrared satellites in low earth orbit, we also use the MERRA data to examine the AIRS sampling biases. By sampling the MERRA data at the AIRS space-time locations both with and without the AIRS quality control we estimate the sampling bias of the AIRS climatology and the atmospheric conditions where AIRS has a lower sampling rate. While the AIRS temperature and water vapor sampling biases are small at low latitudes, they can be more than a few degrees in temperature or 10 percent in water vapor at higher latitudes. The largest sampling biases are over desert. The AIRS and MERRA data are available from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). The AIRS climatologies we used are available for analysis with the GIOVANNI data exploration tool. (see, http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  18. Scaling in the diffusion limited aggregation model.

    PubMed

    Menshutin, Anton

    2012-01-01

    We present a self-consistent picture of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) growth based on the assumption that the probability density P(r,N) for the next particle to be attached within the distance r to the center of the cluster is expressible in the scale-invariant form P[r/R{dep}(N)]. It follows from this assumption that there is no multiscaling issue in DLA and there is only a single fractal dimension D for all length scales. We check our assumption self-consistently by calculating the particle-density distribution with a measured P(r/R{dep}) function on an ensemble with 1000 clusters of 5×10{7} particles each. We also show that a nontrivial multiscaling function D(x) can be obtained only when small clusters (N<10 000) are used to calculate D(x). Hence, multiscaling is a finite-size effect and is not intrinsic to DLA. PMID:22304265

  19. Urban Air Quality Modelling with AURORA: Prague and Bratislava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldeman, N.; Viaene, P.; De Ridder, K.; Peelaerts, W.; Lauwaet, D.; Muhammad, N.; Blyth, L.

    2012-04-01

    The European Commission, in its strategy to protect the health of the European citizens, states that in order to assess the impact of air pollution on public health, information on long-term exposure to air pollution should be available. Currently, indicators of air quality are often being generated using measured pollutant concentrations. While air quality monitoring stations data provide accurate time series information at specific locations, air quality models have the advantage of being able to assess the spatial variability of air quality (for different resolutions) and predict air quality in the future based on different scenarios. When running such air quality models at a high spatial and temporal resolution, one can simulate the actual situation as closely as possible, allowing for a detailed assessment of the risk of exposure to citizens from different pollutants. AURORA (Air quality modelling in Urban Regions using an Optimal Resolution Approach), a prognostic 3-dimensional Eulerian chemistry-transport model, is designed to simulate urban- to regional-scale atmospheric pollutant concentration and exposure fields. The AURORA model also allows to calculate the impact of changes in land use (e.g. planting of trees) or of emission reduction scenario's on air quality. AURORA is currently being applied within the ESA atmospheric GMES service, PASODOBLE (http://www.myair-eu.org), that delivers information on air quality, greenhouse gases, stratospheric ozone, … At present there are two operational AURORA services within PASODOBLE. Within the "Air quality forecast service" VITO delivers daily air quality forecasts for Belgium at a resolution of 5 km and for the major Belgian cities: Brussels, Ghent, Antwerp, Liege and Charleroi. Furthermore forecast services are provided for Prague, Czech Republic and Bratislava, Slovakia, both at a resolution of 1 km. The "Urban/regional air quality assessment service" provides urban- and regional-scale maps (hourly resolution

  20. Addressing Hydro-economic Modeling Limitations - A Limited Foresight Sacramento Valley Model and an Open-source Modeling Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harou, J. J.; Hansen, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    Increased scarcity of world water resources is inevitable given the limited supply and increased human pressures. The idea that "some scarcity is optimal" must be accepted for rational resource use and infrastructure management decisions to be made. Hydro-economic systems models are unique at representing the overlap of economic drivers, socio-political forces and distributed water resource systems. They demonstrate the tangible benefits of cooperation and integrated flexible system management. Further improvement of models, quality control practices and software will be needed for these academic policy tools to become accepted into mainstream water resource practice. Promising features include: calibration methods, limited foresight optimization formulations, linked simulation-optimization approaches (e.g. embedding pre-existing calibrated simulation models), spatial groundwater models, stream-aquifer interactions and stream routing, etc.. Conventional user-friendly decision support systems helped spread simulation models on a massive scale. Hydro-economic models must also find a means to facilitate construction, distribution and use. Some of these issues and model features are illustrated with a hydro-economic optimization model of the Sacramento Valley. Carry-over storage value functions are used to limit hydrologic foresight of the multi- period optimization model. Pumping costs are included in the formulation by tracking regional piezometric head of groundwater sub-basins. To help build and maintain this type of network model, an open-source water management modeling software platform is described and initial project work is discussed. The objective is to generically facilitate the connection of models, such as those developed in a modeling environment (GAMS, MatLab, Octave, "), to a geographic user interface (drag and drop node-link network) and a database (topology, parameters and time series). These features aim to incrementally move hydro- economic models

  1. Improving Air-Conditioner and Heat Pump Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Jon

    2012-03-02

    This presentation describes a new approach to modeling residential air conditioners and heat pumps, which allows users to model systems by specifying only the more readily-available SEER/EER/HSPF-type metrics. Manufacturer data was used to generate full sets of model inputs for over 450 heat pumps and air conditioners. A sensitivity analysis identified which inputs can be safely defaulted “behind-the-scenes” without negatively impacting the reliability of energy simulations.

  2. Improving Air-Conditioner and Heat Pump Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, J.

    2012-03-01

    A new approach to modeling residential air conditioners and heat pumps allows users to model systems by specifying only the more readily-available SEER/EER/HSPF-type metrics. Manufacturer data was used to generate full sets of model inputs for over 450 heat pumps and air conditioners. A sensitivity analysis identified which inputs can be safely defaulted 'behind-the-scenes' without negatively impacting the reliability of energy simulations.

  3. Schlieren imaging of loud sounds and weak shock waves in air near the limit of visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargather, Michael John; Settles, Gary S.; Madalis, Matthew J.

    2010-02-01

    A large schlieren system with exceptional sensitivity and a high-speed digital camera are used to visualize loud sounds and a variety of common phenomena that produce weak shock waves in the atmosphere. Frame rates varied from 10,000 to 30,000 frames/s with microsecond frame exposures. Sound waves become visible to this instrumentation at frequencies above 10 kHz and sound pressure levels in the 110 dB (6.3 Pa) range and above. The density gradient produced by a weak shock wave is examined and found to depend upon the profile and thickness of the shock as well as the density difference across it. Schlieren visualizations of weak shock waves from common phenomena include loud trumpet notes, various impact phenomena that compress a bubble of air, bursting a toy balloon, popping a champagne cork, snapping a wooden stick, and snapping a wet towel. The balloon burst, snapping a ruler on a table, and snapping the towel and a leather belt all produced readily visible shock-wave phenomena. In contrast, clapping the hands, snapping the stick, and the champagne cork all produced wave trains that were near the weak limit of visibility. Overall, with sensitive optics and a modern high-speed camera, many nonlinear acoustic phenomena in the air can be observed and studied.

  4. Equatorial range limits of an intertidal ectotherm are more linked to water than air temperature.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Rui; Wethey, David S; Santos, António M; Gomes, Filipa; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-10-01

    As climate change is expected to impose increasing thermal stress on intertidal organisms, understanding the mechanisms by which body temperatures translate into major biogeographic patterns is of paramount importance. We exposed individuals of the limpet Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, to realistic experimental treatments aimed at disentangling the contribution of water and air temperature for the buildup of thermal stress. Treatments were designed based on temperature data collected at the microhabitat level, from 15 shores along the Atlantic European coast spanning nearly 20° of latitude. Cardiac activity data indicated that thermal stress levels in P. vulgata are directly linked to elevated water temperature, while high air temperature is only stressful if water temperature is also high. In addition, the analysis of the link between population densities and thermal regimes at the studied locations suggests that the occurrence of elevated water temperature may represent a threshold P. vulgata is unable to tolerate. By combining projected temperatures with the temperature threshold identified, we show that climate change will likely result in the westward expansion of the historical distribution gap in the Bay of Biscay (southwest France), and northward contraction of the southern range limit in south Portugal. These findings suggest that even a minor relaxing of the upwelling off northwest Iberia could lead to a dramatic increase in thermal stress, with major consequences for the structure and functioning of the intertidal communities along Iberian rocky shores.

  5. Equatorial range limits of an intertidal ectotherm are more linked to water than air temperature.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Rui; Wethey, David S; Santos, António M; Gomes, Filipa; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-10-01

    As climate change is expected to impose increasing thermal stress on intertidal organisms, understanding the mechanisms by which body temperatures translate into major biogeographic patterns is of paramount importance. We exposed individuals of the limpet Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, to realistic experimental treatments aimed at disentangling the contribution of water and air temperature for the buildup of thermal stress. Treatments were designed based on temperature data collected at the microhabitat level, from 15 shores along the Atlantic European coast spanning nearly 20° of latitude. Cardiac activity data indicated that thermal stress levels in P. vulgata are directly linked to elevated water temperature, while high air temperature is only stressful if water temperature is also high. In addition, the analysis of the link between population densities and thermal regimes at the studied locations suggests that the occurrence of elevated water temperature may represent a threshold P. vulgata is unable to tolerate. By combining projected temperatures with the temperature threshold identified, we show that climate change will likely result in the westward expansion of the historical distribution gap in the Bay of Biscay (southwest France), and northward contraction of the southern range limit in south Portugal. These findings suggest that even a minor relaxing of the upwelling off northwest Iberia could lead to a dramatic increase in thermal stress, with major consequences for the structure and functioning of the intertidal communities along Iberian rocky shores. PMID:27109165

  6. Al-Air Batteries: Fundamental Thermodynamic Limitations from First Principles Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leanne D.; Noerskov, Jens K.; Luntz, Alan C.

    2015-03-01

    The Al-air battery possesses high theoretical specific energy (4140 Wh/kg) and is therefore an attractive candidate for vehicle propulsion applications. However, the experimentally observed open-circuit potential is much lower than what thermodynamics predicts, and this potential loss is widely believed to be an effect of corrosion. We present a detailed study of the Al-air battery using density functional theory. The results suggest that the difference between bulk thermodynamic and surface potentials is due to both the effects of asymmetry in multi-electron transfer reactions that define the anodic dissolution of Al and, more importantly, a large chemical step inherent to the formation of bulk Al(OH)3 from surface intermediates. The former results in an energy loss of 3%, while the latter accounts for 14 -29% of the total thermodynamic energy depending on the surface site where dissolution occurs. Therefore, the maximum open-circuit potential of the Al anode is only -1.87 V vs. SHE in the absence of thermal excitations, contrary to -2.34 V predicted by bulk thermodynamics at pH 14.6. This is a fundamental limitation of the system and governs the maximum output potential, which cannot be improved even if corrosion effects were completely suppressed. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the ReLiable Project (#11-116792) funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research.

  7. Al-Air Batteries: Fundamental Thermodynamic Limitations from First-Principles Theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leanne D; Nørskov, Jens K; Luntz, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    The Al-air battery possesses high theoretical specific energy (4140 W h/kg) and is therefore an attractive candidate for vehicle propulsion. However, the experimentally observed open-circuit potential is much lower than what bulk thermodynamics predicts, and this potential loss is typically attributed to corrosion. Similarly, large Tafel slopes associated with the battery are assumed to be due to film formation. We present a detailed thermodynamic study of the Al-air battery using density functional theory. The results suggest that the maximum open-circuit potential of the Al anode is only -1.87 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode at pH 14.6 instead of the traditionally assumed -2.34 V and that large Tafel slopes are inherent in the electrochemistry. These deviations from the bulk thermodynamics are intrinsic to the electrochemical surface processes that define Al anodic dissolution. This has contributions from both asymmetry in multielectron transfers and, more importantly, a large chemical stabilization inherent to the formation of bulk Al(OH)3 from surface intermediates. These are fundamental limitations that cannot be improved even if corrosion and film effects are completely suppressed. PMID:26263108

  8. Limitations of the biopsychosocial model in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Benning, Tony B

    2015-01-01

    A commitment to an integrative, non-reductionist clinical and theoretical perspective in medicine that honors the importance of all relevant domains of knowledge, not just “the biological,” is clearly evident in Engel’s original writings on the biopsychosocial model. And though this model’s influence on modern psychiatry (in clinical as well as educational settings) has been significant, a growing body of recent literature is critical of it – charging it with lacking philosophical coherence, insensitivity to patients’ subjective experience, being unfaithful to the general systems theory that Engel claimed it be rooted in, and engendering an undisciplined eclecticism that provides no safeguards against either the dominance or the under-representation of any one of the three domains of bio, psycho, or social. PMID:25999775

  9. Recent Advances in WRF Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA uses WRF in conjunction with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) for air quality regulation and research. Over the years we have added physics options and geophysical datasets to the WRF system to enhance model capabilities especially for extended retrospective...

  10. Dispersion modeling of selected PAHs in urban air: A new approach combining dispersion model with GIS and passive air sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáňka, Ondřej; Melymuk, Lisa; Čupr, Pavel; Dvorská, Alice; Klánová, Jana

    2014-10-01

    This study introduces a new combined air concentration measurement and modeling approach that we propose can be useful in medium and long term air quality assessment. A dispersion study was carried out for four high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban area with industrial, traffic and domestic heating sources. A geographic information system (GIS) was used both for processing of input data as well as visualization of the modeling results. The outcomes of the dispersion model were compared to the results of passive air sampling (PAS). Despite discrepancies between measured and modeled concentrations, an approach combining the two techniques is promising for future air quality assessment. Differences between measured and modeled concentrations, in particular when measured values exceed the modeled concentrations, are indicative of undocumented, sporadic pollutant sources. Thus, these differences can also be useful for assessing and refining emission inventories.

  11. Modeling air quality in main cities of Peninsular Malaysia by using a generalized Pareto model.

    PubMed

    Masseran, Nurulkamal; Razali, Ahmad Mahir; Ibrahim, Kamarulzaman; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2016-01-01

    The air pollution index (API) is an important figure used for measuring the quality of air in the environment. The API is determined based on the highest average value of individual indices for all the variables which include sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and suspended particulate matter (PM10) at a particular hour. API values that exceed the limit of 100 units indicate an unhealthy status for the exposed environment. This study investigates the risk of occurrences of API values greater than 100 units for eight urban areas in Peninsular Malaysia for the period of January 2004 to December 2014. An extreme value model, known as the generalized Pareto distribution (GPD), has been fitted to the API values found. Based on the fitted model, return period for describing the occurrences of API exceeding 100 in the different cities has been computed as the indicator of risk. The results obtained indicated that most of the urban areas considered have a very small risk of occurrence of the unhealthy events, except for Kuala Lumpur, Malacca, and Klang. However, among these three cities, it is found that Klang has the highest risk. Based on all the results obtained, the air quality standard in urban areas of Peninsular Malaysia falls within healthy limits to human beings.

  12. Modeling air quality in main cities of Peninsular Malaysia by using a generalized Pareto model.

    PubMed

    Masseran, Nurulkamal; Razali, Ahmad Mahir; Ibrahim, Kamarulzaman; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2016-01-01

    The air pollution index (API) is an important figure used for measuring the quality of air in the environment. The API is determined based on the highest average value of individual indices for all the variables which include sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and suspended particulate matter (PM10) at a particular hour. API values that exceed the limit of 100 units indicate an unhealthy status for the exposed environment. This study investigates the risk of occurrences of API values greater than 100 units for eight urban areas in Peninsular Malaysia for the period of January 2004 to December 2014. An extreme value model, known as the generalized Pareto distribution (GPD), has been fitted to the API values found. Based on the fitted model, return period for describing the occurrences of API exceeding 100 in the different cities has been computed as the indicator of risk. The results obtained indicated that most of the urban areas considered have a very small risk of occurrence of the unhealthy events, except for Kuala Lumpur, Malacca, and Klang. However, among these three cities, it is found that Klang has the highest risk. Based on all the results obtained, the air quality standard in urban areas of Peninsular Malaysia falls within healthy limits to human beings. PMID:26718946

  13. A Physically Based Model for Air-Lift Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FrançOis, Odile; Gilmore, Tyler; Pinto, Michael J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1996-08-01

    A predictive, physically based model for pumping water from a well using air injection (air-lift pumping) was developed for the range of flow rates that we explored in a series of laboratory experiments. The goal was to determine the air flow rate required to pump a specific flow rate of water in a given well, designed for in-well air stripping of volatile organic compounds from an aquifer. The model was validated against original laboratory data as well as data from the literature. A laboratory air-lift system was constructed that consisted of a 70-foot-long (21-m-long) pipe, 5.5 inches (14 cm) inside diameter, in which an air line of 1.3 inches (3.3 cm) outside diameter was placed with its bottom at different elevations above the base of the long pipe. Experiments were conducted for different levels of submergence, with water-pumping rates ranging from 5 to 70 gallons/min (0.32-4.4 L/s), and air flow ranging from 7 to 38 standard cubic feet/min (0.2-1.1 m3 STP/min). The theoretical approach adopted in the model was based on an analysis of the system as a one-dimensional two-phase flow problem. The expression for the pressure gradient includes inertial energy terms, friction, and gas expansion versus elevation. Data analysis revealed that application of the usual drift-flux model to estimate the air void fraction is not adequate for the observed flow patterns: either slug or churn flow. We propose a modified drift-flux model that accurately predicts air-lift pumping requirements for a range of conditions representative of in-well air-stripping operations.

  14. Modeling air quality over China: Results from the Panda project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katinka Petersen, Anna; Bouarar, Idir; Brasseur, Guy; Granier, Claire; Xie, Ying; Wang, Lili; Wang, Xuemei

    2015-04-01

    China faces strong air pollution problems related to rapid economic development in the past decade and increasing demand for energy. Air quality monitoring stations often report high levels of particle matter and ozone all over the country. Knowing its long-term health impacts, air pollution became then a pressing problem not only in China but also in other Asian countries. The PANDA project is a result of cooperation between scientists from Europe and China who joined their efforts for a better understanding of the processes controlling air pollution in China, improve methods for monitoring air quality and elaborate indicators in support of European and Chinese policies. A modeling system of air pollution is being setup within the PANDA project and include advanced global (MACC, EMEP) and regional (WRF-Chem, EMEP) meteorological and chemical models to analyze and monitor air quality in China. The poster describes the accomplishments obtained within the first year of the project. Model simulations for January and July 2010 are evaluated with satellite measurements (SCIAMACHY NO2 and MOPITT CO) and in-situ data (O3, CO, NOx, PM10 and PM2.5) observed at several surface stations in China. Using the WRF-Chem model, we investigate the sensitivity of the model performance to emissions (MACCity, HTAPv2), horizontal resolution (60km, 20km) and choice of initial and boundary conditions.

  15. A FEDERATED PARTNERSHIP FOR URBAN METEOROLOGICAL AND AIR QUALITY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, applications of urban meteorological and air quality models have been performed at resolutions on the order of km grid sizes. This necessitated development and incorporation of high resolution landcover data and additional boundary layer parameters that serve to descri...

  16. Incorporating principal component analysis into air quality model evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of standard air quality model evaluation techniques is becoming compromised as the simulation periods continue to lengthen in response to ever increasing computing capacity. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a statistical approach called Princi...

  17. Control of asthma triggers in indoor air with air cleaners: a modeling analysis

    PubMed Central

    Myatt, Theodore A; Minegishi, Taeko; Allen, Joseph G; MacIntosh, David L

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing exposure to environmental agents indoors shown to increase asthma symptoms or lead to asthma exacerbations is an important component of a strategy to manage asthma for individuals. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that portable air cleaning devices can reduce concentrations of asthma triggers in indoor air; however, their benefits for breathing problems have not always been reproducible. The potential exposure benefits of whole house high efficiency in-duct air cleaners for sensitive subpopulations have yet to be evaluated. Methods We used an indoor air quality modeling system (CONTAM) developed by NIST to examine peak and time-integrated concentrations of common asthma triggers present in indoor air over a year as a function of natural ventilation, portable air cleaners, and forced air ventilation equipped with conventional and high efficiency filtration systems. Emission rates for asthma triggers were based on experimental studies published in the scientific literature. Results Forced air systems with high efficiency filtration were found to provide the best control of asthma triggers: 30–55% lower cat allergen levels, 90–99% lower risk of respiratory infection through the inhalation route of exposure, 90–98% lower environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) levels, and 50–75% lower fungal spore levels than the other ventilation/filtration systems considered. These results indicate that the use of high efficiency in-duct air cleaners provide an effective means of controlling allergen levels not only in a single room, like a portable air cleaner, but the whole house. Conclusion These findings are useful for evaluating potential benefits of high efficiency in-duct filtration systems for controlling exposure to asthma triggers indoors and for the design of trials of environmental interventions intended to evaluate their utility in practice. PMID:18684328

  18. Effects of water-contaminated air on blowoff limits of opposed jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Jentzen, Marilyn E.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Northam, G. Burton

    1988-01-01

    The effects of water-contaminated air on the extinction and flame restoration of the central portion of N2-diluted H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flames are investigated using a coaxial tubular opposed jet burner. The results show that the replacement of N2 contaminant in air by water on a mole for mole basis decreases the maximum sustainable H2 mass flow, just prior to extinction, of the flame. This result contrasts strongly with the analogous substitution of water for N2 in a relatively hot premixed H2-O2-N2 flame, which was shown by Koroll and Mulpuru (1986) to lead to a significant, kinetically controlled increase in laminar burning velocity.

  19. Use of air quality modeling results as exposure estimates in health studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, H. A.; Ivey, C.; Friberg, M.; Zhai, X.; Balachandran, S.; Hu, Y.; Russell, A. G.; Mulholland, J. A.; Tolbert, P. E.; Sarnat, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Air pollutant measurements from regulatory monitoring networks are commonly utilized in combination with spatial averaging techniques to develop air quality metrics for use in epidemiologic studies. While these data provide useful indicators for air pollution in a region, their temporal and spatial information are limited. The growing availability of spatially resolved health data sets (i.e., resident and county level patient records) provides an opportunity to develop and apply corresponding spatially resolved air quality metrics as enhanced exposure estimates when investigating the impact of air pollution on health outcomes. Additionally, the measured species concentrations from monitoring networks cannot directly identify specific emission sources or characterize pollutant mixtures. However, these observations in combination with chemical transport models (e.g., CMAQ) and source apportionment methods (e.g., CMB and PMF) can be used to characterize pollutant mixtures, sources and species impacting both individual locations and wider areas. Extensive analysis using a combination of air quality modeling approaches and observations may be beneficial for health studies whose goal is to assess the health impacts of pollutant mixtures, in both spatially resolved and time-series health analyses. As part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE) unique methods have been developed to effectively analyze air pollution and air quality modeling data to better understand how emission sources combine to impact air quality and to provide air quality metrics for use in health assessments. This presentation will discuss the air quality modeling techniques being utilized in SCAPE investigations that are aimed at providing enhanced exposure metrics for use in spatially resolved (state of Georgia) and time-series epidemiologic analyses (St. Louis and Atlanta). To generate spatially resolved daily air quality estimates of species concentrations and source

  20. The Use of Regulatory Air Quality Models to Develop Successful Ozone Attainment Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canty, T. P.; Salawitch, R. J.; Dickerson, R. R.; Ring, A.; Goldberg, D. L.; He, H.; Anderson, D. C.; Vinciguerra, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed lowering the 8-hr ozone standard to between 65-70 ppb. Not all regions of the U.S. are in attainment of the current 75 ppb standard and it is expected that many regions currently in attainment will not meet the future, lower surface ozone standard. Ozone production is a nonlinear function of emissions, biological processes, and weather. Federal and state agencies rely on regulatory air quality models such as the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model and Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) to test ozone precursor emission reduction strategies that will bring states into compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). We will describe various model scenarios that simulate how future limits on emission of ozone precursors (i.e. NOx and VOCs) from sources such as power plants and vehicles will affect air quality. These scenarios are currently being developed by states required to submit a State Implementation Plan to the EPA. Projections from these future case scenarios suggest that strategies intended to control local ozone may also bring upwind states into attainment of the new NAAQS. Ground based, aircraft, and satellite observations are used to ensure that air quality models accurately represent photochemical processes within the troposphere. We will highlight some of the improvements made to the CMAQ and CAMx model framework based on our analysis of NASA observations obtained by the OMI instrument on the Aura satellite and by the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign.

  1. Validation of a novel air toxic risk model with air monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Gregory C; Dymond, Mary; Ellickson, Kristie; Thé, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    Three modeling systems were used to estimate human health risks from air pollution: two versions of MNRiskS (for Minnesota Risk Screening), and the USEPA National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA). MNRiskS is a unique cumulative risk modeling system used to assess risks from multiple air toxics, sources, and pathways on a local to a state-wide scale. In addition, ambient outdoor air monitoring data were available for estimation of risks and comparison with the modeled estimates of air concentrations. Highest air concentrations and estimated risks were generally found in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area and lowest risks in undeveloped rural areas. Emissions from mobile and area (nonpoint) sources created greater estimated risks than emissions from point sources. Highest cancer risks were via ingestion pathway exposures to dioxins and related compounds. Diesel particles, acrolein, and formaldehyde created the highest estimated inhalation health impacts. Model-estimated air concentrations were generally highest for NATA and lowest for the AERMOD version of MNRiskS. This validation study showed reasonable agreement between available measurements and model predictions, although results varied among pollutants, and predictions were often lower than measurements. The results increased confidence in identifying pollutants, pathways, geographic areas, sources, and receptors of potential concern, and thus provide a basis for informing pollution reduction strategies and focusing efforts on specific pollutants (diesel particles, acrolein, and formaldehyde), geographic areas (urban centers), and source categories (nonpoint sources). The results heighten concerns about risks from food chain exposures to dioxins and PAHs. Risk estimates were sensitive to variations in methodologies for treating emissions, dispersion, deposition, exposure, and toxicity.

  2. Modelling air quality in street canyons: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Fisher, Bernard E. A.; Pericleous, Koulis; Gonzalez-Flesca, Norbert

    High pollution levels have been often observed in urban street canyons due to the increased traffic emissions and reduced natural ventilation. Microscale dispersion models with different levels of complexity may be used to assess urban air quality and support decision-making for pollution control strategies and traffic planning. Mathematical models calculate pollutant concentrations by solving either analytically a simplified set of parametric equations or numerically a set of differential equations that describe in detail wind flow and pollutant dispersion. Street canyon models, which might also include simplified photochemistry and particle deposition-resuspension algorithms, are often nested within larger-scale urban dispersion codes. Reduced-scale physical models in wind tunnels may also be used for investigating atmospheric processes within urban canyons and validating mathematical models. A range of monitoring techniques is used to measure pollutant concentrations in urban streets. Point measurement methods (continuous monitoring, passive and active pre-concentration sampling, grab sampling) are available for gaseous pollutants. A number of sampling techniques (mainly based on filtration and impaction) can be used to obtain mass concentration, size distribution and chemical composition of particles. A combination of different sampling/monitoring techniques is often adopted in experimental studies. Relatively simple mathematical models have usually been used in association with field measurements to obtain and interpret time series of pollutant concentrations at a limited number of receptor locations in street canyons. On the other hand, advanced numerical codes have often been applied in combination with wind tunnel and/or field data to simulate small-scale dispersion within the urban canopy.

  3. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  4. Scale Issues in Air Quality Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews past model evaluation studies investigating the impact of horizontal grid spacing on model performance. It also presents several examples of using a spectral decomposition technique to separate the forcings from processes operating on different time scal...

  5. Mapping real-time air pollution health risk for environmental management: Combining mobile and stationary air pollution monitoring with neural network models.

    PubMed

    Adams, Matthew D; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution poses health concerns at the global scale. The challenge of managing air pollution is significant because of the many air pollutants, insufficient funds for monitoring and abatement programs, and political and social challenges in defining policy to limit emissions. Some governments provide citizens with air pollution health risk information to allow them to limit their exposure. However, many regions still have insufficient air pollution monitoring networks to provide real-time mapping. Where available, these risk mapping systems either provide absolute concentration data or the concentrations are used to derive an Air Quality Index, which provides the air pollution risk for a mix of air pollutants with a single value. When risk information is presented as a single value for an entire region it does not inform on the spatial variation within the region. Without an understanding of the local variation residents can only make a partially informed decision when choosing daily activities. The single value is typically provided because of a limited number of active monitoring units in the area. In our work, we overcome this issue by leveraging mobile air pollution monitoring techniques, meteorological information and land use information to map real-time air pollution health risks. We propose an approach that can provide improved health risk information to the public by applying neural network models within a framework that is inspired by land use regression. Mobile air pollution monitoring campaigns were conducted across Hamilton from 2005 to 2013. These mobile air pollution data were modelled with a number of predictor variables that included information on the surrounding land use characteristics, the meteorological conditions, air pollution concentrations from fixed location monitors, and traffic information during the time of collection. Fine particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide were both modelled. During the model fitting process we reserved

  6. Mapping real-time air pollution health risk for environmental management: Combining mobile and stationary air pollution monitoring with neural network models.

    PubMed

    Adams, Matthew D; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution poses health concerns at the global scale. The challenge of managing air pollution is significant because of the many air pollutants, insufficient funds for monitoring and abatement programs, and political and social challenges in defining policy to limit emissions. Some governments provide citizens with air pollution health risk information to allow them to limit their exposure. However, many regions still have insufficient air pollution monitoring networks to provide real-time mapping. Where available, these risk mapping systems either provide absolute concentration data or the concentrations are used to derive an Air Quality Index, which provides the air pollution risk for a mix of air pollutants with a single value. When risk information is presented as a single value for an entire region it does not inform on the spatial variation within the region. Without an understanding of the local variation residents can only make a partially informed decision when choosing daily activities. The single value is typically provided because of a limited number of active monitoring units in the area. In our work, we overcome this issue by leveraging mobile air pollution monitoring techniques, meteorological information and land use information to map real-time air pollution health risks. We propose an approach that can provide improved health risk information to the public by applying neural network models within a framework that is inspired by land use regression. Mobile air pollution monitoring campaigns were conducted across Hamilton from 2005 to 2013. These mobile air pollution data were modelled with a number of predictor variables that included information on the surrounding land use characteristics, the meteorological conditions, air pollution concentrations from fixed location monitors, and traffic information during the time of collection. Fine particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide were both modelled. During the model fitting process we reserved

  7. Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses a model developed from that database in conjunction with US Census Bureau data for estimating air leakage as a function of location throughout the US.

  8. A diagnostic model for studying daytime urban air quality trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, D. A.; Remsberg, E. E.; Woodbury, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    A single cell Eulerian photochemical air quality simulation model was developed and validated for selected days of the 1976 St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study (RAPS) data sets; parameterizations of variables in the model and validation studies using the model are discussed. Good agreement was obtained between measured and modeled concentrations of NO, CO, and NO2 for all days simulated. The maximum concentration of O3 was also predicted well. Predicted species concentrations were relatively insensitive to small variations in CO and NOx emissions and to the concentrations of species which are entrained as the mixed layer rises.

  9. Animal models in virus research: their utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2013-11-01

    Viral diseases are important threats to public health worldwide. With the number of emerging viral diseases increasing the last decades, there is a growing need for appropriate animal models for virus studies. The relevance of animal models can be limited in terms of mimicking human pathophysiology. In this review, we discuss the utility of animal models for studies of influenza A viruses, HIV and SARS-CoV in light of viral emergence, assessment of infection and transmission risks, and regulatory decision making. We address their relevance and limitations. The susceptibility, immune responses, pathogenesis, and pharmacokinetics may differ between the various animal models. These complexities may thwart translating results from animal experiments to the humans. Within these constraints, animal models are very informative for studying virus immunopathology and transmission modes and for translation of virus research into clinical benefit. Insight in the limitations of the various models may facilitate further improvements of the models.

  10. Contraction limits of the proton-neutron symplectic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganev, H. G.

    2016-01-01

    The algebraic approach to nuclear structure physics allows a certain microscopic collective motion algebra to be also interpreted on macroscopic level which is achieved in the limit of large representation quantum numbers. Such limits are referred to as macroscopic or hydrodynamic limits and show how a given microscopic discrete system starts to behave like a continuous fluid. In the present paper, two contraction limits of the recently introduced fully microscopic proton-neutron symplectic model (PNSM) with the Sp(12; R) dynamical symmetry algebra are considered. As a result, two simplified macroscopic models of nuclear collective motion are obtained in simple geometrical terms. The first one is the U(6)-phonon model with the semi-direct product structure [HW(21)]U(6), which is shown to be actually an alternative formulation of the original proton-neutron symplectic model in the familiar IBM-terms. The second model which appears in double contraction limit is the two-rotor model with the ROTp(3) ⊗ ROTn(3) ⊃ ROT(3) algebraic structure. The latter, in contrast to the original two-rotor model, is not restricted to the case of two coupled axial rotors. In this way, the second contraction limit of the PNSM, provides the phenomenological two-rotor model with a simple microscopic foundation.

  11. Impact of inherent meteorology uncertainty on air quality model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, Robert C.; Hogrefe, Christian; Godowitch, James M.; Napelenok, Sergey; Mathur, Rohit; Rao, S. Trivikrama

    2015-12-01

    It is well established that there are a number of different classifications and sources of uncertainties in environmental modeling systems. Air quality models rely on two key inputs, namely, meteorology and emissions. When using air quality models for decision making, it is important to understand how uncertainties in these inputs affect the simulated concentrations. Ensembles are one method to explore how uncertainty in meteorology affects air pollution concentrations. Most studies explore this uncertainty by running different meteorological models or the same model with different physics options and in some cases combinations of different meteorological and air quality models. While these have been shown to be useful techniques in some cases, we present a technique that leverages the initial condition perturbations of a weather forecast ensemble, namely, the Short-Range Ensemble Forecast system to drive the four-dimensional data assimilation in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with a key focus being the response of ozone chemistry and transport. Results confirm that a sizable spread in WRF solutions, including common weather variables of temperature, wind, boundary layer depth, clouds, and radiation, can cause a relatively large range of ozone-mixing ratios. Pollutant transport can be altered by hundreds of kilometers over several days. Ozone-mixing ratios of the ensemble can vary as much as 10-20 ppb or 20-30% in areas that typically have higher pollution levels.

  12. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    SciTech Connect

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  13. The ASAC Air Carrier Investment Model (Third Generation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Gaier, Eric M.; Santmire, Tara E.

    1998-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. To link the economics of flight with the technology of flight, ASAC requires a parametrically based model with extensions that link airline operations and investments in aircraft with aircraft characteristics. This model also must provide a mechanism for incorporating air travel demand and profitability factors into the airlines' investment decisions. Finally, the model must be flexible and capable of being incorporated into a wide-ranging suite of economic and technical models flat are envisioned for ASAC.

  14. Sooting Limits Of Diffusion Flames With Oxygen-Enriched Air And Diluted Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Chao, B. H.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen-enhanced combustion permits certain benefits and flexibility that are not otherwise available in the design of practical combustors, as discussed by Baukal. The cost of pure and enriched oxygen has declined to the point that oxygen-enhanced combustion is preferable to combustion in air for many applications. Carbon sequestration is greatly facilitated by oxygen enrichment because nitrogen can be eliminated from the product stream. For example, when natural gas (or natural gas diluted with CO2) is burned in pure oxygen, the only significant products are water and CO2. Oxygen-enhanced combustion also has important implications for soot formation, as explored in this work. We propose that soot inception in nonpremixed flames requires a region where C/O ratio, temperature, and residence time are above certain critical values. Soot does not form at low temperatures, with the threshold in nonpremixed flames ranging from about 1250-1650 K, a temperature referred to here as the critical temperature for soot inception, Tc. Soot inception also can be suppressed when residence time is short (equivalently, when the strain rate in counterflow flames is high). Soot induction times of 0.8-15 ms were reported by Tesner and Shurupov for acetylene/nitrogen mixtures at 1473 K. Burner stabilized spherical microgravity flames are employed in this work for two main reasons. First, this configuration offers unrestricted control over convection direction. Second, in steady state these flames are strain-free and thus can yield intrinsic sooting limits in diffusion flames, similar to the way past work in premixed flames has provided intrinsic values of C/O ratio associated with soot inception limits.

  15. A predictive model for the tokamak density limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Q.; Brennan, D. P.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Gates, D. A.; Swerdlow, J.; White, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    The Greenwald density limit, found in all tokamak experiments, is reproduced for the first time using a phenomenologically correct model with parameters in the range of experiments. A simple model of equilibrium evolution and local power balance inside the island has been implemented to calculate the radiation-driven thermo-resistive tearing mode growth and explain the density limit. Strong destabilization of the tearing mode due to an imbalance of local Ohmic heating and radiative cooling in the island predicts the density limit within a few percent. The density limit is found to be a local edge limit and weakly dependent on impurity densities. Results are robust to a substantial variation in model parameters within the range of experiments.

  16. Experimental study of lean flammability limits of methane/hydrogen/air mixtures in tubes of different diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshin, Y.L.; Goey, L.P.H. de

    2010-04-15

    Lean limit flames in methane/hydrogen/air mixtures propagating in tubes of internal diameters (ID) of 6.0, 8.9, 12.3, 18.4, 25.2, 35.0, and 50.2 mm have been experimentally studied. The flames propagated upward from the open bottom end of the tube to the closed upper end. The content of hydrogen in the fuel gas has been varied in the range 0-40 mol%. Lean flammability limits have been determined; flame shapes recorded and the visible speed of flame propagation measured. Most of the observed limit flames in tubes with diameters in the range of 8.9-18.4 mm had enclosed shape, and could be characterized as distorted or spherical flame balls. The tendency was observed for mixtures with higher hydrogen content to form smaller size, more uniform flame balls in a wider range of tube diameters. At hydrogen content of 20% or more in the fuel gas, limit flames in largest diameters (35.0 mm and 50.2 mm ID) tubes had small, compared to the tube diameter, size and were ''lens''-shaped. ''Regular'' open-front lean limit flames were observed only for the smallest diameters (6.0 mm and 8.9 mm) and largest diameters (35.0 and 50.2 mm ID), and only for methane/air and (90% CH{sub 4} + 10% H{sub 2})/air mixtures, except for 6 mm ID tube in which all limit flames had open front. In all experiments, except for the lean limit flames in methane/air and (90% CH{sub 4} + 10% H{sub 2})/air mixtures in the 8.9 mm ID tube, and all limit flames in 6.0 mm ID tube, visible flame speeds very weakly depended on the hydrogen content in the fuel gas and were close to- or below the theoretical estimate of the speed of a rising hot bubble. This observation suggests that the buoyancy is the major factor which determines the visible flame speed for studied limit flames, except that last mentioned. A decrease of the lean flammability limit value with decreasing the tube diameter was observed for methane/air and (90% CH{sub 4} + 10% H{sub 2})/air mixtures for tubes having internal diameters in the range

  17. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  18. A new model for investigating the mortality effects of multiple air pollutants in air pollution mortality time-series studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Steven

    2006-03-01

    Because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates air pollutants independently, the majority of time-series studies on air pollution and mortality have focused on estimating the adverse health effects of a single pollutant. However, due to the sometimes high correlation between air pollutants, the results from studies that focus on a single air pollutant can be difficult to interpret. In addition, the high correlation between air pollutants can produce problems of interpretation for the standard method of investigating the adverse health effects due to multiple air pollutants. The standard method involves simultaneously including the multiple air pollutants in a single statistical model. Because of this, the development of new models to concurrently estimate the adverse health effects of multiple air pollutants has recently been identified as an important area of future research. In this article, a new model for disentangling the joint effects of multiple air pollutants in air pollution mortality time-series studies is introduced. This new model uses the time-series data to assign each air pollutant a weight that indicates the pollutant's contribution to the air pollution mixture that affects mortality and to estimate the effect of this air pollution mixture on mortality. This model offers an improvement in statistical estimation precision over the standard method. It also avoids problems of interpretation that can occur if the standard method is used. This new model is then illustrated by applying it to time-series data from two U.S. counties.

  19. The ASAC Air Carrier Investment Model (Second Generation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Johnson, Jesse P.; Sickles, Robin C.; Good, David H.

    1997-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. To link the economics of flight with the technology of flight, ASAC requires a parametrically based mode with extensions that link airline operations and investments in aircraft with aircraft characteristics. This model also must provide a mechanism for incorporating air travel demand and profitability factors into the airlines' investment decisions. Finally, the model must be flexible and capable of being incorporated into a wide-ranging suite of economic and technical models that are envisioned for ASAC. We describe a second-generation Air Carrier Investment Model that meets these requirements. The enhanced model incorporates econometric results from the supply and demand curves faced by U.S.-scheduled passenger air carriers. It uses detailed information about their fleets in 1995 to make predictions about future aircraft purchases. It enables analysts with the ability to project revenue passenger-miles flown, airline industry employment, airline operating profit margins, numbers and types of aircraft in the fleet, and changes in aircraft manufacturing employment under various user-defined scenarios.

  20. Air-quality modelling in the Lake Baikal region.

    PubMed

    Van de Vel, Karen; Mensink, Clemens; De Ridder, Koen; Deutsch, Felix; Maes, Joachim; Vliegen, Jo; Aloyan, Artash; Yermakov, Alexander; Arutyunyan, Vardan; Khodzher, Tamara; Mijling, Bas

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we assess the status of the air quality in the Lake Baikal region which is strongly influenced by the presence of anthropogenic pollution sources. We combined the local data, with global databases, remote sensing imagery and modelling tools. This approach allows to inventorise the air-polluting sources and to quantify the air-quality concentration levels in the Lake Baikal region to a reasonable level, despite the fact that local data are scarcely available. In the simulations, we focus on the month of July 2003, as for this period, validation data are available for a number of ground-based measurement stations within the Lake Baikal region.

  1. Air Quality Modeling in Support of the Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major challenge in traffic-related air pollution exposure studies is the lack of information regarding pollutant exposure characterization. Air quality modeling can provide spatially and temporally varying exposure estimates for examining relationships between traffic-related a...

  2. Limiting of microjoule femtosecond pulses in air-guided modes of a hollow photonic-crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Konorov, S.O.; Serebryannikov, E.E.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D.A.; Bugar, I.; Chorvat, D. Jr.; Chorvat, D.; Bloemer, M.J.; Scalora, M.; Miles, R.B.; Zheltikov, A.M.

    2004-08-01

    Self-phase-modulation-induced spectral broadening of laser pulses in air-guided modes of hollow photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) is shown to allow the creation of fiber-optic limiters for high-intensity ultrashort laser pulses. The performance of PCF limiters is analyzed in terms of elementary theory of self-phase modulation. Experiments performed with 100 fs microjoule pulses of 800 nm Ti:sapphire laser radiation demonstrate the potential of hollow PCFs as limiters for 10 MW ultrashort laser pulses and show the possibility to switch the limiting level of output radiation energy by guiding femtosecond pulses in different PCF modes.

  3. Meteorological and air pollution modeling for an urban airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, P. R.; Lee, I. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of numerical experiments modeling meteorology, multiple pollutant sources, and nonlinear photochemical reactions for the case of an airport in a large urban area with complex terrain. A planetary boundary-layer model which predicts the mixing depth and generates wind, moisture, and temperature fields was used; it utilizes only surface and synoptic boundary conditions as input data. A version of the Hecht-Seinfeld-Dodge chemical kinetics model is integrated with a new, rapid numerical technique; both the San Francisco Bay Area Air Quality Management District source inventory and the San Jose Airport aircraft inventory are utilized. The air quality model results are presented in contour plots; the combined results illustrate that the highly nonlinear interactions which are present require that the chemistry and meteorology be considered simultaneously to make a valid assessment of the effects of individual sources on regional air quality.

  4. Analytical model for contaminant mass removal by air sparging

    SciTech Connect

    Rabideau, A.J.; Blayden, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    An analytical model was developed to predict the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from ground water by air sparging (AS). The model treats the air sparging zone as a completely mixed reactor subject to the removal of dissolved contaminants by volatilization, advection, and first-order decay. Nonequilibrium desorption is approximated as a first-order mass transfer process. The model reproduces the tailing and rebound behavior often observed at AS sites, and would normally require the estimation of three site-specific parameters. Dimensional analysis demonstrates that predicting tailing can be interpreted in terms of kinetic desorption or diffusion of aqueous phase contaminants into discrete air channels. Related work is ongoing to test the model against field data.

  5. AN INDOOR AIR QUALITY MODEL FOR PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thye paper discusses an indoor air quality (IAQ) model for particulate matter (PM). The standard for PM < 2.5 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter (PM 2.5) proposed by the U.S. EPA has produced considerable interest in indoor exposures to PM. IAQ models provide a useful tool for...

  6. Air Quality Modeling of Traffic-related Air Pollutants for the NEXUS Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents the results of the model applications to estimate exposure metrics in support of an epidemiologic study in Detroit, Michigan. A major challenge in traffic-related air pollution exposure studies is the lack of information regarding pollutant exposure characteriz...

  7. Laminar lean premixed methane/air combustion near the lean flammability limit using nanosecond repetitive pulsed discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Moon Soo; Do, Hyungrok; Mungal, Mark G.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2011-10-01

    Gas chromatographic and temperature measurements have been carried out to investigate the extent of premixed methane/air combustion with the application of nanosecond repetitive pulsed discharges around the lean flammability limit for laminar flows. The results show that the discharges lead to the complete combustion when the equivalence ratio is above 0.54, but when the ratio is below the limit, the combustion is quenched at the downstream flow. To investigate the kinetics in detail, 2-D simulations of plasma-induced combustion have been conducted for methane/air mixtures at below and above the lean flammability limit. The simulations reveal that methane is mostly combusted in the discharge region since the discharge repetition timescale is much shorter than the species diffusion and advection timescales, and so the discharge serves more as a heat and radical source rather than a small combustor, to flame hold near the lean flammability limit.

  8. Modeling limit languages via limit adjacency matrix and Yusof-Goode approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wen Li, Yusof, Yuhani

    2015-05-01

    Limit language was introduced by Goode and Pixton in 2004 under the framework of formal language theory. It is a subset of splicing languages which is restricted to the molecules that will be presented in the splicing system after the reaction of biochemical has run to its completion. In this paper, limit adjacency matrix will be introduced to model the existence of limit languages from splicing languages. Besides, it can be used to characterize the splicing language in terms of active persistent, adult/inert and transient properties based on Yusof-Goode splicing system. In this paper, some examples and theorems that have been formulated via limit adjacency matrix approach will be presented too.

  9. Model of optical nonlinearity of air in the mid-IR wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A

    2014-09-30

    A model of optical nonlinearity of air (atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen) is developed. This model can be used to calculate numerically the propagation of radiation with a wavelength close to 10 μm. It takes into account the electronic Kerr effect, higher order nonlinearities, ionisation of a gas medium by electron impact, and pulse group-velocity dispersion. The applicability limits of the Drude approximation for calculating the impact-ionisation rate are also considered. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  10. Assessing The Policy Relevance of Regional Air Quality Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, T.

    This work presents a framework for discussing the policy relevance of models, and regional air quality models in particular. We define four criteria: 1) The scientific status of the model; 2) Its ability to address primary environmental concerns; 3) The position of modeled environmental issues on the political agenda; and 4) The role of scientific input into the policy process. This framework is applied to current work simulating the transport of nitric acid in Asia with the ATMOS-N model, to past studies on air pollution transport in Europe with the EMEP model, and to future applications of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) Models-3. The Lagrangian EMEP model provided critical input to the development of the 1994 Oslo and 1999 Gothenburg Protocols to the Convention on Long-Range Transbound- ary Air Pollution, as well as to the development of EU directives, via its role as a component of the RAINS integrated assessment model. Our work simulating reactive nitrogen in Asia follows the European example in part, with the choice of ATMOS-N, a regional Lagrangian model to calculate source-receptor relationships for the RAINS- Asia integrated assessment model. However, given differences between ATMOS-N and the EMEP model, as well as differences between the scientific and political cli- mates facing Europe ten years ago and Asia today, the role of these two models in the policy process is very different. We characterize the different aspects of policy relevance between these models using our framework, and consider how the current generation US EPA air quality model compares, in light of its Eulerian structure, dif- ferent objectives, and the policy context of the US.

  11. Air pollution model for an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, N. A.; Venegas, L. E.

    On présente un modèle de diffusion atmosphérique pour des polluants émis en zone urbaine par des sources multiples. On considère l'équation de continuité de la masse et les profils de vent habituels dans la couche limite. On suppose que la distribution verticale des polluants est représentée par une forme polynomiale. Les coefficients du polynôme dépendent des conditions de stabilité atmosphérique. On prend comme hauteur limite supérieure du panache une fonction potentielle de la distance. On compare les estimations de la concentration normalisée aux valeurs obtenues avec le modèle urbain de Gifford-Hanna. Il y a une bonne concordance entre les deux modèles en conditions de stabilité atmosphérique. Les différences augmentent en conditions d'instabilité. L'analyse de la sensibilité du modèle montre que des variations relatives de la rugosité du sol ont peu d'effet sur les valeurs de la concentration calculée. Les variations de l'exposant de la fonction potentielle prise pour le sommet du panache deviennent plus critiques avec la distance. Les distributions de la concentration au sol calculées par le modèle pour Nashville (E.U.), Bremen (R.F.A.) et Frankfort (R.F.A.) sont en bon accord avec les valeurs observées. On obtient un indice de concordance de 0,983 et une erreur relative moyenne de 0,0408 entre les valeurs calculées et observées.

  12. Spatial air pollution modelling for a West-African town.

    PubMed

    Gebreab, Sirak Zenebe; Vienneau, Danielle; Feigenwinter, Christian; Bâ, Hâmpaté; Cissé, Guéladio; Tsai, Ming-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Land use regression (LUR) modelling is a common approach used in European and Northern American epidemiological studies to assess urban and traffic related air pollution exposures. Studies applying LUR in Africa are lacking. A need exists to understand if this approach holds for an African setting, where urban features, pollutant exposures and data availability differ considerably from other continents. We developed a parsimonious regression model based on 48-hour nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations measured at 40 sites in Kaédi, a medium sized West-African town, and variables generated in a geographic information system (GIS). Road variables and settlement land use characteristics were found to be important predictors of 48-hour NO2 concentration in the model. About 68% of concentration variability in the town was explained by the model. The model was internally validated by leave-one-out cross-validation and it was found to perform moderately well. Furthermore, its parameters were robust to sampling variation. We applied the model at 100 m pixels to create a map describing the broad spatial pattern of NO2 across Kaédi. In this research, we demonstrated the potential for LUR as a valid, cost-effective approach for air pollution modelling and mapping in an African town. If the methodology were to be adopted by environmental and public health authorities in these regions, it could provide a quick assessment of the local air pollution burden and potentially support air pollution policies and guidelines. PMID:26618306

  13. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 20 - Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) and Derived Air Concentrations (DACs) of Radionuclides for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...,” and “Water,” are applicable to the assessment and control of dose to the public, particularly in the...). Consideration of non-stochastic limits has not been included in deriving the air and water effluent... water concentrations were derived by taking the most restrictive occupational stochastic oral...

  14. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 20 - Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) and Derived Air Concentrations (DACs) of Radionuclides for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...,” and “Water,” are applicable to the assessment and control of dose to the public, particularly in the...). Consideration of non-stochastic limits has not been included in deriving the air and water effluent... water concentrations were derived by taking the most restrictive occupational stochastic oral...

  15. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 20 - Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) and Derived Air Concentrations (DACs) of Radionuclides for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) and Derived Air... Release to Sewerage B Appendix B to Part 20 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION... Hydrogen H 1 Indium In 49 Iodine I 53 Iridium Ir 77 Iron Fe 26 Krypton Kr 36 Lanthanum La 57 Lead Pb...

  16. Mathematical model of an air-filled alpha stirling refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Patrick; Semperlotti, Fabio; Sen, Mihir

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a mathematical model for an alpha Stirling refrigerator with air as the working fluid and will be useful in optimizing the mechanical design of these machines. Two pistons cyclically compress and expand air while moving sinusoidally in separate chambers connected by a regenerator, thus creating a temperature difference across the system. A complete non-linear mathematical model of the machine, including air thermodynamics, and heat transfer from the walls, as well as heat transfer and fluid resistance in the regenerator, is developed. Non-dimensional groups are derived, and the mathematical model is numerically solved. The heat transfer and work are found for both chambers, and the coefficient of performance of each chamber is calculated. Important design parameters are varied and their effect on refrigerator performance determined. This sensitivity analysis, which shows what the significant parameters are, is a useful tool for the design of practical Stirling refrigeration systems.

  17. Period adding cascades: experiment and modeling in air bubbling.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Felipe Augusto Cardoso; Colli, Eduardo; Sartorelli, José Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Period adding cascades have been observed experimentally/numerically in the dynamics of neurons and pancreatic cells, lasers, electric circuits, chemical reactions, oceanic internal waves, and also in air bubbling. We show that the period adding cascades appearing in bubbling from a nozzle submerged in a viscous liquid can be reproduced by a simple model, based on some hydrodynamical principles, dealing with the time evolution of two variables, bubble position and pressure of the air chamber, through a system of differential equations with a rule of detachment based on force balance. The model further reduces to an iterating one-dimensional map giving the pressures at the detachments, where time between bubbles come out as an observable of the dynamics. The model has not only good agreement with experimental data, but is also able to predict the influence of the main parameters involved, like the length of the hose connecting the air supplier with the needle, the needle radius and the needle length.

  18. Joint space-time geostatistical model for air quality surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, A.; Soares, A.; Pereira, M. J.

    2009-04-01

    Air pollution and peoples' generalized concern about air quality are, nowadays, considered to be a global problem. Although the introduction of rigid air pollution regulations has reduced pollution from industry and power stations, the growing number of cars on the road poses a new pollution problem. Considering the characteristics of the atmospheric circulation and also the residence times of certain pollutants in the atmosphere, a generalized and growing interest on air quality issues led to research intensification and publication of several articles with quite different levels of scientific depth. As most natural phenomena, air quality can be seen as a space-time process, where space-time relationships have usually quite different characteristics and levels of uncertainty. As a result, the simultaneous integration of space and time is not an easy task to perform. This problem is overcome by a variety of methodologies. The use of stochastic models and neural networks to characterize space-time dispersion of air quality is becoming a common practice. The main objective of this work is to produce an air quality model which allows forecasting critical concentration episodes of a certain pollutant by means of a hybrid approach, based on the combined use of neural network models and stochastic simulations. A stochastic simulation of the spatial component with a space-time trend model is proposed to characterize critical situations, taking into account data from the past and a space-time trend from the recent past. To identify near future critical episodes, predicted values from neural networks are used at each monitoring station. In this paper, we describe the design of a hybrid forecasting tool for ambient NO2 concentrations in Lisbon, Portugal.

  19. Integrating snowfall limit forecasts to improve hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, C.; Rinaldo, A.; Schaefli, B.

    2012-04-01

    Flood forecasting in mountainous areas requires accurate partitioning between rain and snowfall; an incorrect snow/rainfall limit (on daily or sub-daily timescales) typically implies a significant over- (or under-)estimation of the source catchment areas contributing to runoff and infiltration. This study details the development of a snow/rainfall partitioning method which incorporates snowfall limit information from Limited Area Models (LAMs) to improve catchment-scale hydrological modeling. LAMs consider the vertical, humid, atmospheric structure including wet bulb temperature in their snowfall limit calculations. Such an approach is more physically-based than inferring snowfall limit estimates based on dry, ground temperature measurements, which is the standard procedure in most hydrological models. A case study involving complex topography in the Swiss Alps demonstrates the potential of the developed method with the integration of COSMO forecast re-analysis snowfall limit information. Such data and the new method are proven here to significantly improve runoff simulation, particularly in the spring when a large part of the catchment is close to saturation. Integrating LAM snowfall limits thereby provides good estimates of runoff contributing areas, with practical implications for operational hydrology in Alpine regions.

  20. AQA - Air Quality model for Austria - Evaluation and Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtl, M.; Krüger, B. C.; Baumann-Stanzer, K.; Skomorowski, P.

    2009-04-01

    The regional weather forecast model ALADIN of the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) is used in combination with the chemical transport model CAMx (www.camx.com) to conduct forecasts of gaseous and particulate air pollution over Europe. The forecasts which are done in cooperation with the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences in Vienna (BOKU) are supported by the regional governments since 2005 with the main interest on the prediction of tropospheric ozone. The daily ozone forecasts are evaluated for the summer 2008 with the observations of about 150 air quality stations in Austria. In 2008 the emission-model SMOKE was integrated into the modelling system to calculate the biogenic emissions. The anthropogenic emissions are based on the newest EMEP data set as well as on regional inventories for the core domain. The performance of SMOKE is shown for a summer period in 2007. In the frame of the COST-action 728 „Enhancing mesoscale meteorological modelling capabilities for air pollution and dispersion applications", multi-model ensembles are used to conduct an international model evaluation. The model calculations of meteorological- and concentration fields are compared to measurements on the ensemble platform at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra. The results for 2 episodes in 2006 show the performance of the different models as well as of the model ensemble.

  1. Air Quality Model System For The Vienna/bratislava Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, B. C.; Schmittner, W.; Kromp-Kolb, H.

    A model system has been build up, consisting of the mesoscale meteorological fore- cast model MM5 and the chemical air-quality model CAMx. The coarse grid covers central Europe. By nesting, a spatial resolution of 3 km is reached for the core area, which includes the cities of Vienna (Austria) and Bratislava (Slovakia). In a first approach, the model system has been applied to a 6-day period in Febru- ary 1997, which was characterized by stagnant meteorological conditions. During this episode, primary pollutants like CO and NO2 have been compared with ambient mea- surements for the validation of the new model system. In the future it is foreseen to improve the spatial resolution, to apply the model system also for ozone and particulates, and to utilize it for a short-time forecast of air-quality parameters.

  2. Modeling the Environmental Impact of Air Traffic Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Neil

    2011-01-01

    There is increased interest to understand and mitigate the impacts of air traffic on the climate, since greenhouse gases, nitrogen oxides, and contrails generated by air traffic can have adverse impacts on the climate. The models described in this presentation are useful for quantifying these impacts and for studying alternative environmentally aware operational concepts. These models have been developed by leveraging and building upon existing simulation and optimization techniques developed for the design of efficient traffic flow management strategies. Specific enhancements to the existing simulation and optimization techniques include new models that simulate aircraft fuel flow, emissions and contrails. To ensure that these new models are beneficial to the larger climate research community, the outputs of these new models are compatible with existing global climate modeling tools like the FAA's Aviation Environmental Design Tool.

  3. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  4. Mathematical models for predicting indoor air quality from smoking activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, W R

    1999-01-01

    Much progress has been made over four decades in developing, testing, and evaluating the performance of mathematical models for predicting pollutant concentrations from smoking in indoor settings. Although largely overlooked by the regulatory community, these models provide regulators and risk assessors with practical tools for quantitatively estimating the exposure level that people receive indoors for a given level of smoking activity. This article reviews the development of the mass balance model and its application to predicting indoor pollutant concentrations from cigarette smoke and derives the time-averaged version of the model from the basic laws of conservation of mass. A simple table is provided of computed respirable particulate concentrations for any indoor location for which the active smoking count, volume, and concentration decay rate (deposition rate combined with air exchange rate) are known. Using the indoor ventilatory air exchange rate causes slightly higher indoor concentrations and therefore errs on the side of protecting health, since it excludes particle deposition effects, whereas using the observed particle decay rate gives a more accurate prediction of indoor concentrations. This table permits easy comparisons of indoor concentrations with air quality guidelines and indoor standards for different combinations of active smoking counts and air exchange rates. The published literature on mathematical models of environmental tobacco smoke also is reviewed and indicates that these models generally give good agreement between predicted concentrations and actual indoor measurements. PMID:10350523

  5. Mathematical model of one-man air revitalization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for simulating the steady state performance in electrochemical CO2 concentrators which utilize (NMe4)2 CO3 (aq.) electrolyte. This electrolyte, which accommodates a wide range of air relative humidity, is most suitable for one-man air revitalization systems. The model is based on the solution of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations derived from mass transport and rate equations for the processes which take place in the cell. The boundary conditions are obtained by solving the mass and energy transport equations. A shooting method is used to solve the differential equations.

  6. Theoretical model for forming limit diagram predictions without initial inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gologanu, Mihai; Comsa, Dan Sorin; Banabic, Dorel

    2013-05-01

    We report on our attempts to build a theoretical model for determining forming limit diagrams (FLD) based on limit analysis that, contrary to the well-known Marciniak and Kuczynski (M-K) model, does not assume the initial existence of a region with material or geometrical inhomogeneity. We first give a new interpretation based on limit analysis for the onset of necking in the M-K model. Considering the initial thickness defect along a narrow band as postulated by the M-K model, we show that incipient necking is a transition in the plastic mechanism from one of plastic flow in both the sheet and the band to another one where the sheet becomes rigid and all plastic deformation is localized in the band. We then draw on some analogies between the onset of necking in a sheet and the onset of coalescence in a porous bulk body. In fact, the main advance in coalescence modeling has been based on a similar limit analysis with an important new ingredient: the evolution of the spatial distribution of voids, due to the plastic deformation, creating weaker regions with higher porosity surrounded by sound regions with no voids. The onset of coalescence is precisely the transition from a mechanism of plastic deformation in both regions to another one, where the sound regions are rigid. We apply this new ingredient to a necking model based on limit analysis, for the first quadrant of the FLD and a porous sheet. We use Gurson's model with some recent extensions to model the porous material. We follow both the evolution of a homogeneous sheet and the evolution of the distribution of voids. At each moment we test for a potential change of plastic mechanism, by comparing the stresses in the uniform region to those in a virtual band with a larger porosity. The main difference with the coalescence of voids in a bulk solid is that the plastic mechanism for a sheet admits a supplementary degree of freedom, namely the change in the thickness of the virtual band. For strain ratios close to

  7. A network model of human aging: Limits, errors, and information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Spencer; Mitnitski, Arnold; Rockwood, Kenneth; Rutenberg, Andrew

    The Frailty Index (FI) quantifies human aging using the fraction of accumulated age-related deficits. The FI correlates strongly with mortality and accumulates non-linearly and stochastically with age. Clinical data shows a nearly universal limit of FI <= 0 . 7 . We computationally model an aging population using a network model of interacting deficits. Deficits damage and repair at rates that depend upon the average damage of connected nodes. The model is parametrized to fit clinical data. We find that attribution errors, especially false negative, allow the model to recover the frailty limit. Mutual information allows us to assess how well the FI can predict mortality. Mutual information provides a non-parametric measure of how the FI predicts mortality. We find that attribution errors have a small effect on the mutual information when many deficits are included in the model. The mutual information of our model and of the clinical data are comparable.

  8. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; Reynoso, Monica; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Yongsheng; Hu, Qiang

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that it is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.

  9. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; Reynoso, Monica; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Yongsheng; Hu, Qiang

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that itmore » is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.« less

  10. Experimental study of limit lean methane/air flame in a standard flammability tube using particle image velocimetry method

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshin, Yuriy; Gorecki, Grzegorz; Jarosinski, Jozef; Fodemski, Tadeusz

    2010-05-15

    Lean limit methane/air flame propagating upward in a standard 50 mm diameter and 1.8 m length tube was studied experimentally using particle image velocimetry method. Local stretch rate along the flame front was determined by measured gas velocity distributions. It was found that local stretch rate is maximum at the flame leading point, which is in agreement with earlier theoretical results. Similar to earlier observations, extinction of upward propagating limit flame was observed to start from the flame top. It is stated that the observed behavior of the extinction of the lean limit methane/air flame can not be explained in terms of the coupled effect of flame stretch and preferential diffusion. To qualitatively explain the observed extinction behavior, it is suggested that the positive strain-induced flame stretch increases local radiation heat losses from the flame front. An experimental methodology for PIV measurements in a round tube is described. (author)

  11. Economic damages of ozone air pollution to crops using combined air quality and GIS modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachokostas, Ch.; Nastis, S. A.; Achillas, Ch.; Kalogeropoulos, K.; Karmiris, I.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Chourdakis, E.; Banias, G.; Limperi, N.

    2010-09-01

    This study aims at presenting a combined air quality and GIS modelling methodological approach in order to estimate crop damages from photochemical air pollution, depict their spatial resolution and assess the order of magnitude regarding the corresponding economic damages. The analysis is conducted within the Greater Thessaloniki Area, Greece, a Mediterranean territory which is characterised by high levels of photochemical air pollution and considerable agricultural activity. Ozone concentration fields for 2002 and for specific emission reduction scenarios for the year 2010 were estimated with the Ozone Fine Structure model in the area under consideration. Total economic damage to crops turns out to be significant and estimated to be approximately 43 M€ for the reference year. Production of cotton presents the highest economic loss, which is over 16 M€, followed by table tomato (9 M€), rice (4.2 M€), wheat (4 M€) and oilseed rape (2.8 M€) cultivations. Losses are not spread uniformly among farmers and the major losses occur in areas with valuable ozone-sensitive crops. The results are very useful for highlighting the magnitude of the total economic impacts of photochemical air pollution to the area's agricultural sector and can potentially be used for comparison with studies worldwide. Furthermore, spatial analysis of the economic damage could be of importance for governmental authorities and decision makers since it provides an indicative insight, especially if the economic instruments such as financial incentives or state subsidies to farmers are considered.

  12. Modelled air pollution levels versus EC air quality legislation - results from high resolution simulation.

    PubMed

    Chervenkov, Hristo

    2013-12-01

    An appropriate method for evaluating the air quality of a certain area is to contrast the actual air pollution levels to the critical ones, prescribed in the legislative standards. The application of numerical simulation models for assessing the real air quality status is allowed by the legislation of the European Community (EC). This approach is preferable, especially when the area of interest is relatively big and/or the network of measurement stations is sparse, and the available observational data are scarce, respectively. Such method is very efficient for similar assessment studies due to continuous spatio-temporal coverage of the obtained results. In the study the values of the concentration of the harmful substances sulphur dioxide, (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter - coarse (PM10) and fine (PM2.5) fraction, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH3) in the surface layer obtained from modelling simulations with resolution 10 km on hourly bases are taken to calculate the necessary statistical quantities which are used for comparison with the corresponding critical levels, prescribed in the EC directives. For part of them (PM2.5, CO and NH3) this is done for first time with such resolution. The computational grid covers Bulgaria entirely and some surrounding territories and the calculations are made for every year in the period 1991-2000. The averaged over the whole time slice results can be treated as representative for the air quality situation of the last decade of the former century.

  13. Likelihood of achieving air quality targets under model uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Digar, Antara; Cohan, Daniel S; Cox, Dennis D; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Boylan, James W

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory attainment demonstrations in the United States typically apply a bright-line test to predict whether a control strategy is sufficient to attain an air quality standard. Photochemical models are the best tools available to project future pollutant levels and are a critical part of regulatory attainment demonstrations. However, because photochemical models are uncertain and future meteorology is unknowable, future pollutant levels cannot be predicted perfectly and attainment cannot be guaranteed. This paper introduces a computationally efficient methodology for estimating the likelihood that an emission control strategy will achieve an air quality objective in light of uncertainties in photochemical model input parameters (e.g., uncertain emission and reaction rates, deposition velocities, and boundary conditions). The method incorporates Monte Carlo simulations of a reduced form model representing pollutant-precursor response under parametric uncertainty to probabilistically predict the improvement in air quality due to emission control. The method is applied to recent 8-h ozone attainment modeling for Atlanta, Georgia, to assess the likelihood that additional controls would achieve fixed (well-defined) or flexible (due to meteorological variability and uncertain emission trends) targets of air pollution reduction. The results show that in certain instances ranking of the predicted effectiveness of control strategies may differ between probabilistic and deterministic analyses. PMID:21138291

  14. Likelihood of achieving air quality targets under model uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Digar, Antara; Cohan, Daniel S; Cox, Dennis D; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Boylan, James W

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory attainment demonstrations in the United States typically apply a bright-line test to predict whether a control strategy is sufficient to attain an air quality standard. Photochemical models are the best tools available to project future pollutant levels and are a critical part of regulatory attainment demonstrations. However, because photochemical models are uncertain and future meteorology is unknowable, future pollutant levels cannot be predicted perfectly and attainment cannot be guaranteed. This paper introduces a computationally efficient methodology for estimating the likelihood that an emission control strategy will achieve an air quality objective in light of uncertainties in photochemical model input parameters (e.g., uncertain emission and reaction rates, deposition velocities, and boundary conditions). The method incorporates Monte Carlo simulations of a reduced form model representing pollutant-precursor response under parametric uncertainty to probabilistically predict the improvement in air quality due to emission control. The method is applied to recent 8-h ozone attainment modeling for Atlanta, Georgia, to assess the likelihood that additional controls would achieve fixed (well-defined) or flexible (due to meteorological variability and uncertain emission trends) targets of air pollution reduction. The results show that in certain instances ranking of the predicted effectiveness of control strategies may differ between probabilistic and deterministic analyses.

  15. Limitations of the scientific basis for the management of air quality in urban New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hoare, John L

    2011-03-04

    As enumerated by Ministry for the Environment, planned reductions in levels of air pollution in New Zealand sufficient to allow compliance with the National Environmental Standards for Air Quality will save, in a cost-effective manner, numerous lives per year. However, as indicated by careful study of the literature and of the methods employed to perform the relevant calculations, such claims are flawed. Instead of a precise number of deaths avoided, small changes in regional life expectancy are a more likely tangible consequence of compliance and, as such, are better suited to assisting calculation of the associated benefits and costs. Some basic data relevant to communities and regions potentially susceptible to the effects of 'poor quality' or inclement air are provided. These support the view that urban air pollution as officially measured and normally encountered in New Zealand nowadays probably has comparatively small substantive mortality consequences.

  16. Air density 2.7 billion years ago limited to less than twice modern levels by fossil raindrop imprints.

    PubMed

    Som, Sanjoy M; Catling, David C; Harnmeijer, Jelte P; Polivka, Peter M; Buick, Roger

    2012-04-19

    According to the 'Faint Young Sun' paradox, during the late Archaean eon a Sun approximately 20% dimmer warmed the early Earth such that it had liquid water and a clement climate. Explanations for this phenomenon have invoked a denser atmosphere that provided warmth by nitrogen pressure broadening or enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations. Such solutions are allowed by geochemical studies and numerical investigations that place approximate concentration limits on Archaean atmospheric gases, including methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen. But no field data constraining ground-level air density and barometric pressure have been reported, leaving the plausibility of these various hypotheses in doubt. Here we show that raindrop imprints in tuffs of the Ventersdorp Supergroup, South Africa, constrain surface air density 2.7 billion years ago to less than twice modern levels. We interpret the raindrop fossils using experiments in which water droplets of known size fall at terminal velocity into fresh and weathered volcanic ash, thus defining a relationship between imprint size and raindrop impact momentum. Fragmentation following raindrop flattening limits raindrop size to a maximum value independent of air density, whereas raindrop terminal velocity varies as the inverse of the square root of air density. If the Archaean raindrops reached the modern maximum measured size, air density must have been less than 2.3 kg m(-3), compared to today's 1.2 kg m(-3), but because such drops rarely occur, air density was more probably below 1.3 kg m(-3). The upper estimate for air density renders the pressure broadening explanation possible, but it is improbable under the likely lower estimates. Our results also disallow the extreme CO(2) levels required for hot Archaean climates. PMID:22456703

  17. Air density 2.7 billion years ago limited to less than twice modern levels by fossil raindrop imprints.

    PubMed

    Som, Sanjoy M; Catling, David C; Harnmeijer, Jelte P; Polivka, Peter M; Buick, Roger

    2012-04-19

    According to the 'Faint Young Sun' paradox, during the late Archaean eon a Sun approximately 20% dimmer warmed the early Earth such that it had liquid water and a clement climate. Explanations for this phenomenon have invoked a denser atmosphere that provided warmth by nitrogen pressure broadening or enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations. Such solutions are allowed by geochemical studies and numerical investigations that place approximate concentration limits on Archaean atmospheric gases, including methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen. But no field data constraining ground-level air density and barometric pressure have been reported, leaving the plausibility of these various hypotheses in doubt. Here we show that raindrop imprints in tuffs of the Ventersdorp Supergroup, South Africa, constrain surface air density 2.7 billion years ago to less than twice modern levels. We interpret the raindrop fossils using experiments in which water droplets of known size fall at terminal velocity into fresh and weathered volcanic ash, thus defining a relationship between imprint size and raindrop impact momentum. Fragmentation following raindrop flattening limits raindrop size to a maximum value independent of air density, whereas raindrop terminal velocity varies as the inverse of the square root of air density. If the Archaean raindrops reached the modern maximum measured size, air density must have been less than 2.3 kg m(-3), compared to today's 1.2 kg m(-3), but because such drops rarely occur, air density was more probably below 1.3 kg m(-3). The upper estimate for air density renders the pressure broadening explanation possible, but it is improbable under the likely lower estimates. Our results also disallow the extreme CO(2) levels required for hot Archaean climates.

  18. Change-point models to estimate the limit of detection.

    PubMed

    May, Ryan C; Chu, Haitao; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Hudgens, Michael G; Lees, Abigail C; Margolis, David M

    2013-12-10

    In many biological and environmental studies, measured data is subject to a limit of detection. The limit of detection is generally defined as the lowest concentration of analyte that can be differentiated from a blank sample with some certainty. Data falling below the limit of detection is left censored, falling below a level that is easily quantified by a measuring device. A great deal of interest lies in estimating the limit of detection for a particular measurement device. In this paper, we propose a change-point model to estimate the limit of detection by using data from an experiment with known analyte concentrations. Estimation of the limit of detection proceeds by a two-stage maximum likelihood method. Extensions are considered that allow for censored measurements and data from multiple experiments. A simulation study is conducted demonstrating that in some settings the change-point model provides less biased estimates of the limit of detection than conventional methods. The proposed method is then applied to data from an HIV pilot study.

  19. Emergence of limit-periodic order in tiling models.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Catherine; Byington, Travis W; Qian, Zongjin; Charbonneau, Patrick; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2014-07-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) lattice model defined on a triangular lattice with nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions based on the Taylor-Socolar monotile is known to have a limit-periodic ground state. The system reaches that state during a slow quench through an infinite sequence of phase transitions. We study the model as a function of the strength of the next-nearest-neighbor interactions and introduce closely related 3D models with only nearest-neighbor interactions that exhibit limit-periodic phases. For models with no next-nearest-neighbor interactions of the Taylor-Socolar type, there is a large degenerate class of ground states, including crystalline patterns and limit-periodic ones, but a slow quench still yields the limit-periodic state. For the Taylor-Socolar lattic model, we present calculations of the diffraction pattern for a particular decoration of the tile that permits exact expressions for the amplitudes and identify domain walls that slow the relaxation times in the ordered phases. For one of the 3D models, we show that the phase transitions are first order, with equilibrium structures that can be more complex than in the 2D case, and we include a proof of aperiodicity for a geometrically simple tile with only nearest-neighbor matching rules. PMID:25122280

  20. Meteorological Processes Affecting Air Quality – Research and Model Development Needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Meteorology modeling is an important component of air quality modeling systems that defines the physical and dynamical environment for atmospheric chemistry. The meteorology models used for air quality applications are based on numerical weather prediction models that were devel...

  1. Reduced-Rank Spatio-Temporal Modeling of Air Pollution Concentrations in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution1

    PubMed Central

    Olives, Casey; Sheppard, Lianne; Lindström, Johan; Sampson, Paul D.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Szpiro, Adam A.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence in the epidemiologic literature of the relationship between air pollution and adverse health outcomes. Prediction of individual air pollution exposure in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funded Multi-Ethnic Study of Atheroscelerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air) study relies on a flexible spatio-temporal prediction model that integrates land-use regression with kriging to account for spatial dependence in pollutant concentrations. Temporal variability is captured using temporal trends estimated via modified singular value decomposition and temporally varying spatial residuals. This model utilizes monitoring data from existing regulatory networks and supplementary MESA Air monitoring data to predict concentrations for individual cohort members. In general, spatio-temporal models are limited in their efficacy for large data sets due to computational intractability. We develop reduced-rank versions of the MESA Air spatio-temporal model. To do so, we apply low-rank kriging to account for spatial variation in the mean process and discuss the limitations of this approach. As an alternative, we represent spatial variation using thin plate regression splines. We compare the performance of the outlined models using EPA and MESA Air monitoring data for predicting concentrations of oxides of nitrogen (NOx)—a pollutant of primary interest in MESA Air—in the Los Angeles metropolitan area via cross-validated R2. Our findings suggest that use of reduced-rank models can improve computational efficiency in certain cases. Low-rank kriging and thin plate regression splines were competitive across the formulations considered, although TPRS appeared to be more robust in some settings. PMID:27014398

  2. Air pollution modeling at road sides using the operational street pollution model--a case study in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ngo Tho; Ketzel, Matthias; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim

    2010-11-01

    In many metropolitan areas, traffic is the main source of air pollution. The high concentrations of pollutants in streets have the potential to affect human health. Therefore, estimation of air pollution at the street level is required for health impact assessment. This task has been carried out in many developed countries by a combination of air quality measurements and modeling. This study focuses on how to apply a dispersion model to cities in the developing world, where model input data and data from air quality monitoring stations are limited or of varying quality. This research uses the operational street pollution model (OSPM) developed by the National Environmental Research Institute in Denmark for a case study in Hanoi, the capital of Vietnam. OSPM predictions from five streets were evaluated against air pollution measurements of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and benzene (BNZ) that were available from previous studies. Hourly measurements and passive sample measurements collected over 3-week periods were compared with model outputs, applying emission factors from previous studies. In addition, so-called "backward calculations" were performed to adapt the emission factors for Hanoi conditions. The average fleet emission factors estimated can be used for emission calculations at other streets in Hanoi and in other locations in Southeast Asia with similar vehicle types. This study also emphasizes the need to further eliminate uncertainties in input data for the street-scale air pollution modeling in Vietnam, namely by providing reliable emission factors and hourly air pollution measurements of high quality.

  3. Homogenization limit for a multiband effective mass model in heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, O.

    2014-06-15

    We study the homogenization limit of a multiband model that describes the quantum mechanical motion of an electron in a quasi-periodic crystal. In this approach, the distance among the atoms that constitute the material (lattice parameter) is considered a small quantity. Our model include the description of materials with variable chemical composition, intergrowth compounds, and heterostructures. We derive the effective multiband evolution system in the framework of the kp approach. We study the well posedness of the mathematical problem. We compare the effective mass model with the standard kp models for uniform and non-uniforms crystals. We show that in the limit of vanishing lattice parameter, the particle density obtained by the effective mass model, converges to the exact probability density of the particle.

  4. Forest models: their development and potential applications for air pollution effects research

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, H.H.; McLaughlin, S.B.; West, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    As research tools for evaluating the effects of chronic air pollution stress, forest simulation models offer one means of integrating forest growth and development data with generalized indices of pollution stress. This approach permits consideration of both the competitive interactions of trees in the forest stand and the influences of the stage of stand development on sensitivity of component species. A review of forest growth models, including tree, stand, and gap models, is provided as a means of evaluating relative strengths, weaknesses, and limits of applicability of representative examples of each type. Data from recent simulations with a gap model of eastern deciduous forest responses to air pollution stress are presented to emphasize the potential importance of competition in modifying individual species' responses in a forest stand. Recent developments in dendroecology are discussed as a potential mechanism for model validation and extended application.

  5. Systematic model researches on the stability limits of the DVL series of float designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W.

    1949-01-01

    To determine the trim range in which a seaplane can take off without porpoising, stability tests were made of a Plexiglas model, composed of float, wing, and tailplane, which corresponded to a full-size research airplane. The model and full-size stability limits are in good agreement. After all structural parts pertaining to the air frame were removed gradually, the aerodynamic forces replaced by weight forces, and the moment of inertia and position of the center of gravity changed, no marked change of limits of the stable zone was noticeable. The latter, therefore, is for practical purposes affected only by hydrodynamic phenomena. The stability limits of the DVL family of floats were determined by a systematic investigation independent of any particular sea-plane design, thus a seaplane may be designed to give a run free from porpoising.

  6. Modeling, Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis of Spacecraft Air Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, W. Fred; Skliar, Mikhail; Narayan, Anand; Morgenthaler, George W.; Smith, Gerald J.

    1998-01-01

    Control of air contaminants is a crucial factor in the safety considerations of crewed space flight. Indoor air quality needs to be closely monitored during long range missions such as a Mars mission, and also on large complex space structures such as the International Space Station. This work mainly pertains to the detection and simulation of air contaminants in the space station, though much of the work is easily extended to buildings, and issues of ventilation systems. Here we propose a method with which to track the presence of contaminants using an accurate physical model, and also develop a robust procedure that would raise alarms when certain tolerance levels are exceeded. A part of this research concerns the modeling of air flow inside a spacecraft, and the consequent dispersal pattern of contaminants. Our objective is to also monitor the contaminants on-line, so we develop a state estimation procedure that makes use of the measurements from a sensor system and determines an optimal estimate of the contamination in the system as a function of time and space. The real-time optimal estimates in turn are used to detect faults in the system and also offer diagnoses as to their sources. This work is concerned with the monitoring of air contaminants aboard future generation spacecraft and seeks to satisfy NASA's requirements as outlined in their Strategic Plan document (Technology Development Requirements, 1996).

  7. Modeling Airborne Beryllium Concentrations From Open Air Dynamic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. M.

    2003-12-01

    A heightened awareness of airborne beryllium contamination from industrial activities was reestablished during the late 1980's and early 1990's when it became recognized that Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD) had not been eradicated, and that the Occupational Health and Safety Administration standards for occupational air exposure to beryllium may not be sufficiently protective. This was in response to the observed CBD increase in multiple industrial settings where beryllium was manufactured and/or machined, thus producing beryllium particulates which are then available for redistribution by airborne transport. Sampling and modeling design activities were expanded at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico to evaluate potential airborne beryllium exposure to workers who might be exposed during dynamic testing activities associated with nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship. Herein is presented the results of multiple types of collected air measurements that were designed to characterize the production and dispersion of beryllium used in components whose performance is evaluated during high explosive detonation at open air firing sites. Data from fallout, high volume air, medium volume air, adhesive film, particle size impactor, and fine-particulate counting techniques will be presented, integrated, and applied in dispersion modeling to assess potential onsite and offsite personal exposures resulting from dynamic testing activities involving beryllium.

  8. Validation of a 3-D hemispheric nested air pollution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohn, L. M.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.; Geels, C.; Hansen, K. M.

    2003-07-01

    Several air pollution transport models have been developed at the National Environmental Research Institute in Denmark over the last decade (DREAM, DEHM, ACDEP and DEOM). A new 3-D nested Eulerian transport-chemistry model: REGIonal high resolutioN Air pollution model (REGINA) is based on modules and parameterisations from these models as well as new methods. The model covers the majority of the Northern Hemisphere with currently one nest implemented. The horizontal resolution in the mother domain is 150 km × 150 km, and the nesting factor is three. A chemical scheme (originally 51 species) has been extended with a detailed description of the ammonia chemistry and implemented in the model. The mesoscale numerical weather prediction model MM5v2 is used as meteorological driver for the model. The concentrations of air pollutants, such as sulphur and nitrogen in various forms, have been calculated, applying zero nesting and one nest. The model setup is currently being validated by comparing calculated values of concentrations to measurements from approximately 100 stations included in the European Monitoring and Evalutation Programme (EMEP). The present paper describes the physical processes and parameterisations of the model together with the modifications of the chemical scheme. Validation of the model calculations by comparison to EMEP measurements for a summer and a winter month is shown and discussed. Furthermore, results from a sensitivity study of the model performance with respect to resolution in emission and meteorology input data is presented. Finally the future prospects of the model are discussed. The overall validation shows that the model performs well with respect to correlation for both monthly and daily mean values.

  9. Scale Issues in Air Quality Modeling Policy Support

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the issues relating to the use of regional photochemical air quality models for evaluating their performance in reproducing the spatio-temporal features embedded in the observations and for designing emission control strategies needed to achieve compliance wit...

  10. AQMEII: A New International Initiative on Air Quality Model Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    We provide a conceptual view of the process of evaluating regional-scale three-dimensional numerical photochemical air quality modeling system, based on an examination of existing approached to the evaluation of such systems as they are currently used in a variety of application....

  11. The analysis of a generic air-to-air missile simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Chappell, Alan R.; Mcmanus, John W.

    1994-01-01

    A generic missile model was developed to evaluate the benefits of using a dynamic missile fly-out simulation system versus a static missile launch envelope system for air-to-air combat simulation. This paper examines the performance of a launch envelope model and a missile fly-out model. The launch envelope model bases its probability of killing the target aircraft on the target aircraft's position at the launch time of the weapon. The benefits gained from a launch envelope model are the simplicity of implementation and the minimal computational overhead required. A missile fly-out model takes into account the physical characteristics of the missile as it simulates the guidance, propulsion, and movement of the missile. The missile's probability of kill is based on the missile miss distance (or the minimum distance between the missile and the target aircraft). The problems associated with this method of modeling are a larger computational overhead, the additional complexity required to determine the missile miss distance, and the additional complexity of determining the reason(s) the missile missed the target. This paper evaluates the two methods and compares the results of running each method on a comprehensive set of test conditions.

  12. InMAP: a new model for air pollution interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2015-10-01

    Mechanistic air pollution models are essential tools in air quality management. Widespread use of such models is hindered, however, by the extensive expertise or computational resources needed to run most models. Here, we present InMAP (Intervention Model for Air Pollution), which offers an alternative to comprehensive air quality models for estimating the air pollution health impacts of emission reductions and other potential interventions. InMAP estimates annual-average changes in primary and secondary fine particle (PM2.5) concentrations - the air pollution outcome generally causing the largest monetized health damages - attributable to annual changes in precursor emissions. InMAP leverages pre-processed physical and chemical information from the output of a state-of-the-science chemical transport model (WRF-Chem) within an Eulerian modeling framework, to perform simulations that are several orders of magnitude less computationally intensive than comprehensive model simulations. InMAP uses a variable resolution grid that focuses on human exposures by employing higher spatial resolution in urban areas and lower spatial resolution in rural and remote locations and in the upper atmosphere; and by directly calculating steady-state, annual average concentrations. In comparisons run here, InMAP recreates WRF-Chem predictions of changes in total PM2.5 concentrations with population-weighted mean fractional error (MFE) and bias (MFB) < 10 % and population-weighted R2 ~ 0.99. Among individual PM2.5 species, the best predictive performance is for primary PM2.5 (MFE: 16 %; MFB: 13 %) and the worst predictive performance is for particulate nitrate (MFE: 119 %; MFB: 106 %). Potential uses of InMAP include studying exposure, health, and environmental justice impacts of potential shifts in emissions for annual-average PM2.5. Features planned for future model releases include a larger spatial domain, more temporal information, and the ability to predict ground-level ozone (O3

  13. Statistical analysis of synaptic transmission: model discrimination and confidence limits.

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, C; Redman, S; Daley, D

    1994-01-01

    Procedures for discriminating between competing statistical models of synaptic transmission, and for providing confidence limits on the parameters of these models, have been developed. These procedures were tested against simulated data and were used to analyze the fluctuations in synaptic currents evoked in hippocampal neurones. All models were fitted to data using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm and a maximum likelihood criterion. Competing models were evaluated using the log-likelihood ratio (Wilks statistic). When the competing models were not nested, Monte Carlo sampling of the model used as the null hypothesis (H0) provided density functions against which H0 and the alternate model (H1) were tested. The statistic for the log-likelihood ratio was determined from the fit of H0 and H1 to these probability densities. This statistic was used to determine the significance level at which H0 could be rejected for the original data. When the competing models were nested, log-likelihood ratios and the chi 2 statistic were used to determine the confidence level for rejection. Once the model that provided the best statistical fit to the data was identified, many estimates for the model parameters were calculated by resampling the original data. Bootstrap techniques were then used to obtain the confidence limits of these parameters. PMID:7948672

  14. Modeling air pollution in the Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, J.D.

    1998-12-31

    The Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF) is a set of interactive computer models for integrated assessment of the Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. TAF is designed to execute in minutes on a personal computer, thereby making it feasible for a researcher or policy analyst to examine quickly the effects of alternate modeling assumptions or policy scenarios. Because the development of TAF involves researchers in many different disciplines, TAF has been given a modular structure. In most cases, the modules contain reduced-form models that are based on more complete models exercised off-line. The structure of TAF as of December 1996 is shown. Both the Atmospheric Pathways Module produce estimates for regional air pollution variables.

  15. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  16. Modelling Limit Order Execution Times from Market Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Adlar; Farmer, Doyne; Lo, Andrew

    2007-03-01

    Although the term ``liquidity'' is widely used in finance literatures, its meaning is very loosely defined and there is no quantitative measure for it. Generally, ``liquidity'' means an ability to quickly trade stocks without causing a significant impact on the stock price. From this definition, we identified two facets of liquidity -- 1.execution time of limit orders, and 2.price impact of market orders. The limit order is an order to transact a prespecified number of shares at a prespecified price, which will not cause an immediate execution. On the other hand, the market order is an order to transact a prespecified number of shares at a market price, which will cause an immediate execution, but are subject to price impact. Therefore, when the stock is liquid, market participants will experience quick limit order executions and small market order impacts. As a first step to understand market liquidity, we studied the facet of liquidity related to limit order executions -- execution times. In this talk, we propose a novel approach of modeling limit order execution times and show how they are affected by size and price of orders. We used q-Weibull distribution, which is a generalized form of Weibull distribution that can control the fatness of tail to model limit order execution times.

  17. An energetic model for oxygen-limited metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Beronio, P.B. Jr. . Amoco Research Center); Tsao, G.T. . Lab. of Renewable Resources Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Microbial production of 2,3-butanediol by Klebsiella oxytoca occurs under conditions of an oxygen limitation. The extent to which substrate is oxidized to 2,3-butanediol and its coproducts, (acetic acid, acetoin, and ethanol) and the relative flow rates of substrate to energetic and biosynthetic pathways are controlled by the degree of oxygen limitation. Two energetic relationships which describe the response to an oxygen limitation have been derived. The first relationship describes the coupling between growth and energy production observed under oxygen-limited conditions. This allows calculation of energetic parameters and modeling of the cell mass and substrate profiles in terms of the degree of oxygen limitation only. The second relationship describes the average degree of oxidation and the rate of the end-product flow. The model has been tested with both batch and continuous culture. During these kinetic studies, two phases of growth have been observed: energy-coupled growth, which was described above; and, energy-uncoupled growth, which arises when the degree of oxygen limitation reaches a critical value. Optimal culture performance with respect to 2,3-butanediol productivity occurs during energy-coupled growth.

  18. The effect of incomplete fuel-air mixing on the lean blowout limit, lean stability limit and NO(x) emissions in lean premixed gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W.-P.; Lee, J. G.; Santavicca, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for both land-based and aircraft propulsion applications are facing regulations on NOx emissions which cannot be met with current combustor technology. A number of alternative combustor strategies are being investigated which have the potential capability of achieving ultra-low NOx emissions, including lean premixed combustors, direct injection combustors, rich burn-quick quench-lean burn combustors and catalytic combustors. The research reported in this paper addresses the effect of incomplete fuel-air mixing on the lean limit performance and the NOx emissions characteristics of lean premixed combustors.

  19. Air pollution dispersion models for human exposure predictions in London.

    PubMed

    Beevers, Sean D; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Williams, Martin L; Kelly, Frank J; Ross Anderson, H; Carslaw, David C

    2013-01-01

    The London household survey has shown that people travel and are exposed to air pollutants differently. This argues for human exposure to be based upon space-time-activity data and spatio-temporal air quality predictions. For the latter, we have demonstrated the role that dispersion models can play by using two complimentary models, KCLurban, which gives source apportionment information, and Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ)-urban, which predicts hourly air quality. The KCLurban model is in close agreement with observations of NO(X), NO(2) and particulate matter (PM)(10/2.5), having a small normalised mean bias (-6% to 4%) and a large Index of Agreement (0.71-0.88). The temporal trends of NO(X) from the CMAQ-urban model are also in reasonable agreement with observations. Spatially, NO(2) predictions show that within 10's of metres of major roads, concentrations can range from approximately 10-20 p.p.b. up to 70 p.p.b. and that for PM(10/2.5) central London roadside concentrations are approximately double the suburban background concentrations. Exposure to different PM sources is important and we predict that brake wear-related PM(10) concentrations are approximately eight times greater near major roads than at suburban background locations. Temporally, we have shown that average NO(X) concentrations close to roads can range by a factor of approximately six between the early morning minimum and morning rush hour maximum periods. These results present strong arguments for the hybrid exposure model under development at King's and, in future, for in-building models and a model for the London Underground.

  20. Modeling of air pollution from the power plant ash dumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksic, Nenad M.; Balać, Nedeljko

    A simple model of air pollution from power plant ash dumps is presented, with emission rates calculated from the Bagnold formula and transport simulated by the ATDL type model. Moisture effects are accounted for by assumption that there is no pollution on rain days. Annual mean daily sedimentation rates, calculated for the area around the 'Nikola Tesla' power plants near Belgrade for 1987, show reasonably good agreement with observations.

  1. Air-water analogy and the study of hydraulic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supino, Giulio

    1953-01-01

    The author first sets forth some observations about the theory of models. Then he established certain general criteria for the construction of dynamically similar models in water and in air, through reference to the perfect fluid equations and to the ones pertaining to viscous flow. It is, in addition, pointed out that there are more cases in which the analogy is possible than is commonly supposed.

  2. The large N 't Hooft limit of coset minimal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Changhyun

    2011-10-01

    Recently, Gaberdiel and Gopakumar proposed that the two-dimensional WA N-1 minimal model conformal field theory in the large N 't Hooft limit is dual to the higher spin theories on the three-dimensional AdS space with two complex scalars. In this paper, we examine this proposal for the W{D_{N/2}} and W{B_{{N - 1}/2}} minimal models initiated by Fateev and Lukyanov in 1988. By analyzing the renormalization group flows on these models, we find that the gravity duals in AdS space are higher spin theories coupled to two equally massive real scalar fields. We also describe the large N 't Hooft limit for the minimal model of the second parafermion theory.

  3. The effect of time of exposure to elevated temperatures on the flammability limits of some common gaseous fuels in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzba, I.; Ale, B.B.

    1999-01-01

    The flammability limits of methane, ethylene, propane, and hydrogen were experimentally determined at elevated initial mixture temperatures up to 350 C at atmospheric pressure for upward flame propagation in a steel test tube apparatus. The existence of preignition reactions at these levels of temperatures that may influence the value of the flammability limits was also investigated. The fuel-air mixtures were exposed to elevated temperatures over different periods of time before spark ignition (up to 2 h). It was shown that the flammability limits for methane widened approximately linearly with an increase in the initial mixture temperature over the entire range of temperatures tested and were not affected by the length of the exposure time to these temperatures before spark ignition. However, different behavior was observed for the flammability limits of the other tested fuels--ethylene, propane, and hydrogen. At higher temperatures the flammability limits narrowed and were very significantly affected by the exposure time. The longer was the exposure time of fuel-air mixtures to the elevated temperatures, the narrower were their flammability limits.

  4. Optimal vaccination policies for an SIR model with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yinggao; Yang, Kuan; Zhou, Kai; Liang, Yiting

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the paper is to use analytical method and optimization tool to suggest a vaccination program intensity for a basic SIR epidemic model with limited resources for vaccination. We show that there are two different scenarios for optimal vaccination strategies, and obtain analytical solutions for the optimal control problem that minimizes the total cost of disease under the assumption of daily vaccine supply being limited. These solutions and their corresponding optimal control policies are derived explicitly in terms of initial conditions, model parameters and resources for vaccination. With sufficient resources, the optimal control strategy is the normal Bang-Bang control. However, with limited resources, the optimal control strategy requires to switch to time-variant vaccination.

  5. Usefulness and limitations of global flood risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Philip; Jongman, Brenden; Salamon, Peter; Simpson, Alanna; Bates, Paul; De Groeve, Tom; Muis, Sanne; Coughlan de Perez, Erin; Rudari, Roberto; Mark, Trigg; Winsemius, Hessel

    2016-04-01

    Global flood risk models are now a reality. Initially, their development was driven by a demand from users for first-order global assessments to identify risk hotspots. Relentless upward trends in flood damage over the last decade have enhanced interest in such assessments. The adoption of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage Associated with Climate Change Impacts have made these efforts even more essential. As a result, global flood risk models are being used more and more in practice, by an increasingly large number of practitioners and decision-makers. However, they clearly have their limits compared to local models. To address these issues, a team of scientists and practitioners recently came together at the Global Flood Partnership meeting to critically assess the question 'What can('t) we do with global flood risk models?'. The results of this dialogue (Ward et al., 2013) will be presented, opening a discussion on similar broader initiatives at the science-policy interface in other natural hazards. In this contribution, examples are provided of successful applications of global flood risk models in practice (for example together with the World Bank, Red Cross, and UNISDR), and limitations and gaps between user 'wish-lists' and model capabilities are discussed. Finally, a research agenda is presented for addressing these limitations and reducing the gaps. Ward et al., 2015. Nature Climate Change, doi:10.1038/nclimate2742

  6. Model-based parameterisation of a hydrocyclone air-core

    PubMed

    Podd; Schlaberg; Hoyle

    2000-03-01

    An important metric for the accurate control of a hydrocyclone is the diameter of its air-core. Ultrasonic data from a 16-transducer, 1.5 MHz pulse-echo tomographic system are analysed to determine the variation of the air-core diameter with various operating conditions. The back-projection image reconstruction method is not accurate enough for this task. Sub-millimetre accuracy is obtained, however, by applying a combination of signal processing and model-based reconstruction, using the fact that there is a small variation in the air-core boundary position. The findings correspond well to the results obtained from X-ray and electrical resistance modalities.

  7. MODELS-3 COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODEL AEROSOL COMPONENT 1: MODEL DESCRIPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerosol component of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is designed to be an efficient and economical depiction of aerosol dynamics in the atmosphere. The approach taken represents the particle size distribution as the superposition of three lognormal subdis...

  8. Developing Mental Models about Air Using Inquiry-Based Instruction with Kindergartners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Stephen; Huziak, Tracy; Nowak, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the development of mental models of air by kindergarten students after completing a series of hands-on, inquiry-based science lessons. The lessons focused on two properties of air: (1) that air takes up space and (2) that it is made of particles ("balls of air"). The students were interviewed about their ideas of air and about…

  9. The nonrelativistic limit of the relativistic point coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaksono, A.; Bürvenich, T.; Maruhn, J. A.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Greiner, W.

    2003-11-01

    We relate the relativistic finite range mean-field model (RMF-FR) to the point-coupling variant and compare the nonlinear density dependence. From this, the effective Hamiltonian of the nonlinear point-coupling model in the nonrelativistic limit is derived. Different from the nonrelativistic models, the nonlinearity in the relativistic models automatically yields contributions in the form of a weak density dependence not only in the central potential but also in the spin-orbit potential. The central potential affects the bulk and surface properties while the spin-orbit potential is crucial for the shell structure of finite nuclei. A modification in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model with a density-dependent spin-orbit potential inspired by the point-coupling model is suggested.

  10. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Hult, Erin L.

    2013-02-26

    A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

  11. A method to derive the relationship between the annual and short-term air quality limits--analysis using the WHO Air Quality Guidelines for health protection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hak-Kan; Hedley, Anthony J; Thach, Thuan-Quoc; Wong, Chit-Ming

    2013-09-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Air Quality Guidelines (AQG) were launched in 2006, but gaps remain in evidence on health impacts and relationships between short-term and annual AQG needed for health protection. We tested whether relationships between WHO short-term and annual AQG for particulates (PM10 and PM2.5) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are concordant worldwide and derived the annual limits for sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3) based on the short-term AQG. We obtained air pollutant data over seven years (2004-2010) in seven cities from Asia-Pacific, North America and Europe. Based on probability distribution concept using maximum as the short-term limit and arithmetic mean as the annual limit, we developed a new method to derive limit value one from another in each paired limits for each pollutant with capability to account for allowable exceedances. We averaged the limit derived each year for each city, then used meta-analysis to pool the limit values in all cities. Pooled mean short-term limit for NO2 (140.5μg/m(3) [130.6-150.4]) was significantly lower than the WHO AQG of 200μg/m(3) while for PM10 (46.4μg/m(3) [95CI:42.1-50.7]) and PM2.5 (28.6μg/m(3) [24.5-32.6]) were not significantly different from the WHO AQG of 50 and 25μg/m(3) respectively. Pooled mean annual limits for SO2 and O3 were 4.6μg/m(3) [3.7-5.5] and 27.0μg/m(3) [21.7-32.2] respectively. Results were robust in various sensitivity analyses. The distribution relationships between the current WHO short-term and annual AQG are supported by empirical data from seven cities for PM10 and PM2.5, but not for NO2. The short-term AQG for NO2 should be lowered for concordance with the selected annual AQG for health protection. PMID:23792417

  12. 76 FR 10220 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited (Type Certificate No. A-815 Formerly Held by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... ] December 7, 2010 (75 FR 75932). That NPRM proposed to require repetitively inspecting the elevator control... Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...-020-AD; Amendment 39-16611; AD 2011-05-02] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air...

  13. 75 FR 75932 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited (Type Certificate No. A-815 Formerly Held by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ..., contact Viking Air Ltd., 9574 Hampden Road, Sidney, BC Canada V8L 5V5; telephone: (800) 663-8444; Internet... edge of the servo tab). Collecting this information will help us better understand the service history... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3)...

  14. Impact of High Resolution Land-Use Data in Meteorology and Air Quality Modeling Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate land use information is important in meteorology for land surface exchanges, in emission modeling for emission spatial allocation, and in air quality modeling for chemical surface fluxes. Currently, meteorology, emission, and air quality models often use outdated USGS Gl...

  15. Increasing the Upper Temperature Oxidation Limit of Alumina Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Unocic, Kinga A; Lance, Michael J; Santella, Michael L; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Walker, Larry R

    2011-01-01

    A family of alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels is under development for use in aggressive oxidizing conditions from {approx}600-900 C. These alloys exhibit promising mechanical properties but oxidation resistance in air with water vapor environments is currently limited to {approx}800 C due to a transition from external protective alumina scale formation to internal oxidation of aluminum with increasing temperature. The oxidation behavior of a series of AFA alloys was systematically studied as a function of Cr, Si, Al, C, and B additions in an effort to provide a basis to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit. Oxidation exposures were conducted in air with 10% water vapor environments from 800-1000 C, with post oxidation characterization of the 900 C exposed samples by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and photo-stimulated luminescence spectroscopy (PSLS). Increased levels of Al, C, and B additions were found to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit in air with water vapor to between 950 and 1000 C. These findings are discussed in terms of alloy microstructure and possible gettering of hydrogen from water vapor at second phase carbide and boride precipitates.

  16. Review of Air Exchange Rate Models for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings, where people spend their time. The AER, which is rate the exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pol...

  17. A Model For the Limiting Time in Vortex Ring Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Gharib, Morteza; Rambod, Edmond; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In another presentation, Gharib et at provide experimental results to show that when a vortex ring is created from a pipe by a piston, there is a limiting time or piston stroke length beyond which multiple rings appear. This time appeared to be insensitive to piston velocity history and Reynolds number. Nature might exploit such a. limit in different contexts to coherently deliver mass or momentum flux with the least number of strokes. Here, a simple hypothesis is considered: the limiting time occurs when the apparatus is no longer able to deliver energy at a rate compatible with the requirement, due to Kelvin, that a steady vortex ring have maximum energy given circulation and impulse. More specifically, the limit is expected to occur when the quantity alpha = E/square root of Gamma(sup 3)I delivered by the piston drops below the value, alpha(sub lim) for a limiting steady vortex ring solution. The resulting predictions agree very well with the experiments (after using alpha(sub lim) measured using the experimental flow fields). The insensitivity to piston history also emerges from the model. Finally, piston histories are designed that may extend the limiting time somewhat.

  18. Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Investment Model-Cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jesse; Santmire, Tara

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Air Cargo Investment Model-Cargo (ACIMC), is to examine the economic effects of technology investment on the air cargo market, particularly the market for new cargo aircraft. To do so, we have built an econometrically based model designed to operate like the ACIM. Two main drivers account for virtually all of the demand: the growth rate of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and changes in the fare yield (which is a proxy of the price charged or fare). These differences arise from a combination of the nature of air cargo demand and the peculiarities of the air cargo market. The net effect of these two factors are that sales of new cargo aircraft are much less sensitive to either increases in GDP or changes in the costs of labor, capital, fuel, materials, and energy associated with the production of new cargo aircraft than the sales of new passenger aircraft. This in conjunction with the relatively small size of the cargo aircraft market means technology improvements to the cargo aircraft will do relatively very little to spur increased sales of new cargo aircraft.

  19. Modeling Prostate Cancer in Mice: Limitations and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Patrick J.; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    The complex dynamics of the tumor microenvironment and prostate cancer heterogeneity have confounded efforts to establish suitable preclinical mouse models to represent human cancer progression from early proliferative phenotypes to aggressive, androgen-independent, and invasive metastatic tumors. Current models have been successful in capitulating individual characteristics of the aggressive tumors. However, none of these models comprehensively mimics human cancer progression, establishing the challenge in their exploitation to study human disease. The ability to tailor phenotypic outcomes in mice by compounding mutations to target specific molecular pathways provides a powerful tool toward disruption of signaling pathways contributing to the initiation and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Each model is characterized by unique features contributing to the understanding of prostate tumorigenesis, as well as limitations challenging our knowledge of the mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Emerging strategies utilize genomic manipulation technology to circumvent these limitations toward the formulation of attractive, physiologically relevant models of prostate cancer progression to advanced disease. This review discusses the current value of the widely used and well-characterized mouse models of prostate cancer progression to metastasis, as well as the opportunities begging exploitation for the development of new models for testing the antitumor efficacy of therapeutic strategies and identifying new biomarkers of disease progression. PMID:21680808

  20. Air Dispersion Modeling for the INL Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emission Cap Component

    SciTech Connect

    Sondrup, Andrus Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is applying for a synthetic minor, Sitewide, air quality permit to construct (PTC) with a facility emission cap (FEC) component from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to limit its potential to emit to less than major facility limits for criteria air pollutants (CAPs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) regulated under the Clean Air Act. This document is supplied as an appendix to the application, Idaho National Laboratory Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emissions Cap Component, hereafter referred to as “permit application” (DOE-ID 2015). Air dispersion modeling was performed as part of the permit application process to demonstrate pollutant emissions from the INL will not cause a violation of any ambient air quality standards. This report documents the modeling methodology and results for the air dispersion impact analysis. All CAPs regulated under Section 109 of the Clean Air Act were modeled with the exception of lead (Pb) and ozone, which are not required to be modeled by DEQ. Modeling was not performed for toxic air pollutants (TAPs) as uncontrolled emissions did not exceed screening emission levels for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic TAPs. Modeling for CAPs was performed with the EPA approved AERMOD dispersion modeling system (Version 14134) (EPA 2004a) and five years (2000-2004) of meteorological data. The meteorological data set was produced with the companion AERMET model (Version 14134) (EPA 2004b) using surface data from the Idaho Falls airport, and upper-air data from Boise International Airport supplied by DEQ. Onsite meteorological data from the Grid 3 Mesonet tower located near the center of the INL (north of INTEC) and supplied by the local National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) office was used for surface wind directions and wind speeds. Surface data (i

  1. New Methods for Air Quality Model Evaluation with Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, T.; Harkey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite major advances in the ability of satellites to detect gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, there remains significant, untapped potential to apply space-based data to air quality regulatory applications. Here, we showcase research findings geared toward increasing the relevance of satellite data to support operational air quality management, focused on model evaluation. Particular emphasis is given to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aboard the NASA Aura satellite, and evaluation of simulations from the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. This work is part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST), and is motivated by ongoing dialog with state and federal air quality management agencies. We present the response of satellite-derived NO2 to meteorological conditions, satellite-derived HCHO:NO2 ratios as an indicator of ozone production regime, and the ability of models to capture these sensitivities over the continental U.S. In the case of NO2-weather sensitivities, we find boundary layer height, wind speed, temperature, and relative humidity to be the most important variables in determining near-surface NO2 variability. CMAQ agreed with relationships observed in satellite data, as well as in ground-based data, over most regions. However, we find that the southwest U.S. is a problem area for CMAQ, where modeled NO2 responses to insolation, boundary layer height, and other variables are at odds with the observations. Our analyses utilize a software developed by our team, the Wisconsin Horizontal Interpolation Program for Satellites (WHIPS): a free, open-source program designed to make satellite-derived air quality data more usable. WHIPS interpolates level 2 satellite retrievals onto a user-defined fixed grid, in effect creating custom-gridded level 3 satellite product. Currently, WHIPS can process the following data products: OMI NO2 (NASA retrieval); OMI NO2 (KNMI retrieval); OMI

  2. Animal Models of Uveal Melanoma: Methods, Applicability, and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Stei, Marta M; Loeffler, Karin U; Holz, Frank G; Herwig, Martina C

    2016-01-01

    Animal models serve as powerful tools for investigating the pathobiology of cancer, identifying relevant pathways, and developing novel therapeutic agents. They have facilitated rapid scientific progress in many tumor entities. However, for establishing a powerful animal model of uveal melanoma fundamental challenges remain. To date, no animal model offers specific genetic attributes as well as histologic, immunologic, and metastatic features of uveal melanoma. Syngeneic models with intraocular injection of cutaneous melanoma cells may suit best for investigating immunologic/tumor biology aspects. However, differences between cutaneous and uveal melanoma regarding genetics and metastasis remain problematic. Human xenograft models are widely used for evaluating novel therapeutics but require immunosuppression to allow tumor growth. New approaches aim to establish transgenic mouse models of spontaneous uveal melanoma which recently provided preliminary promising results. Each model provides certain benefits and may render them suitable for answering a respective scientific question. However, all existing models also exhibit relevant limitations which may have led to delayed research progress. Despite refined therapeutic options for the primary ocular tumor, patients' prognosis has not improved since the 1970s. Basic research needs to further focus on a refinement of a potent animal model which mimics uveal melanoma specific mechanisms of progression and metastasis. This review will summarise and interpret existing animal models of uveal melanoma including recent advances in the field. PMID:27366747

  3. Animal models of enterovirus 71 infection: applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Yu, Chun-Keung

    2014-04-17

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a neuroinvasive virus that is responsible for several outbreaks in the Asia-Pacific region over the past 15 years. Appropriate animal models are needed to understand EV71 neuropathogenesis better and to facilitate the development of effective vaccines and drugs. Non-human primate models have been used to characterize and evaluate the neurovirulence of EV71 after the early outbreaks in late 1990s. However, these models were not suitable for assessing the neurovirulence level of the virus and were associated with ethical and economic difficulties in terms of broad application. Several strategies have been applied to develop mouse models of EV71 infection, including strategies that employ virus adaption and immunodeficient hosts. Although these mouse models do not closely mimic human disease, they have been applied to determine the pathogenesis of and treatment and prevention of the disease. EV71 receptor-transgenic mouse models have recently been developed and have significantly advanced our understanding of the biological features of the virus and the host-parasite interactions. Overall, each of these models has advantages and disadvantages, and these models are differentially suited for studies of EV71 pathogenesis and/or the pre-clinical testing of antiviral drugs and vaccines. In this paper, we review the characteristics, applications and limitation of these EV71 animal models, including non-human primate and mouse models.

  4. Animal Models of Uveal Melanoma: Methods, Applicability, and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Stei, Marta M.; Loeffler, Karin U.; Holz, Frank G.; Herwig, Martina C.

    2016-01-01

    Animal models serve as powerful tools for investigating the pathobiology of cancer, identifying relevant pathways, and developing novel therapeutic agents. They have facilitated rapid scientific progress in many tumor entities. However, for establishing a powerful animal model of uveal melanoma fundamental challenges remain. To date, no animal model offers specific genetic attributes as well as histologic, immunologic, and metastatic features of uveal melanoma. Syngeneic models with intraocular injection of cutaneous melanoma cells may suit best for investigating immunologic/tumor biology aspects. However, differences between cutaneous and uveal melanoma regarding genetics and metastasis remain problematic. Human xenograft models are widely used for evaluating novel therapeutics but require immunosuppression to allow tumor growth. New approaches aim to establish transgenic mouse models of spontaneous uveal melanoma which recently provided preliminary promising results. Each model provides certain benefits and may render them suitable for answering a respective scientific question. However, all existing models also exhibit relevant limitations which may have led to delayed research progress. Despite refined therapeutic options for the primary ocular tumor, patients' prognosis has not improved since the 1970s. Basic research needs to further focus on a refinement of a potent animal model which mimics uveal melanoma specific mechanisms of progression and metastasis. This review will summarise and interpret existing animal models of uveal melanoma including recent advances in the field. PMID:27366747

  5. Understand the limitations of air/water testing of distillation equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.L.; Ludwig, K.A. )

    1994-04-01

    Distillation continues to be a unit operation of major importance--and a dynamic area for technical development. The designs of trays and packings are rapidly evolving, and the application of equipment also is changing. As chemical processes are pushed to become more efficient and lower cost, a general reduction in the traditional values for equipment safety factors are being seen. The net results is that one now has a greater need for a more thorough and fundamental understanding of distillation equipment. One technique to improve the understanding of distillation equipment is air/water testing. Such testing of distillation trays has become very common, and air/water test results for packed columns also are being reported. In this article, the authors will provide some guidance on how to assess the validity of such tests to industrial applications. In addition, they will discuss several possible approaches to test--and develop confidence in--the design of distillation equipment.

  6. POPULATION EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODEL FOR AIR TOXICS: A BENZENE CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing a human exposure and dose model called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Air Toxics (SHEDS-AirToxics) to characterize population exposure to air toxics in support of the National Air ...

  7. Comparison of stationary and personal air sampling with an air dispersion model for children's ambient exposure to manganese.

    PubMed

    Fulk, Florence; Haynes, Erin N; Hilbert, Timothy J; Brown, David; Petersen, Dan; Reponen, Tiina

    2016-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) is ubiquitous in the environment and essential for normal growth and development, yet excessive exposure can lead to impairments in neurological function. This study modeled ambient Mn concentrations as an alternative to stationary and personal air sampling to assess exposure for children enrolled in the Communities Actively Researching Exposure Study in Marietta, OH. Ambient air Mn concentration values were modeled using US Environmental Protection Agency's Air Dispersion Model AERMOD based on emissions from the ferromanganese refinery located in Marietta. Modeled Mn concentrations were compared with Mn concentrations from a nearby stationary air monitor. The Index of Agreement for modeled versus monitored data was 0.34 (48 h levels) and 0.79 (monthly levels). Fractional bias was 0.026 for 48 h levels and -0.019 for monthly levels. The ratio of modeled ambient air Mn to measured ambient air Mn at the annual time scale was 0.94. Modeled values were also time matched to personal air samples for 19 children. The modeled values explained a greater degree of variability in personal exposures compared with time-weighted distance from the emission source. Based on these results modeled Mn concentrations provided a suitable approach for assessing airborne Mn exposure in this cohort. PMID:27168393

  8. Comparison of stationary and personal air sampling with an air dispersion model for children's ambient exposure to manganese.

    PubMed

    Fulk, Florence; Haynes, Erin N; Hilbert, Timothy J; Brown, David; Petersen, Dan; Reponen, Tiina

    2016-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) is ubiquitous in the environment and essential for normal growth and development, yet excessive exposure can lead to impairments in neurological function. This study modeled ambient Mn concentrations as an alternative to stationary and personal air sampling to assess exposure for children enrolled in the Communities Actively Researching Exposure Study in Marietta, OH. Ambient air Mn concentration values were modeled using US Environmental Protection Agency's Air Dispersion Model AERMOD based on emissions from the ferromanganese refinery located in Marietta. Modeled Mn concentrations were compared with Mn concentrations from a nearby stationary air monitor. The Index of Agreement for modeled versus monitored data was 0.34 (48 h levels) and 0.79 (monthly levels). Fractional bias was 0.026 for 48 h levels and -0.019 for monthly levels. The ratio of modeled ambient air Mn to measured ambient air Mn at the annual time scale was 0.94. Modeled values were also time matched to personal air samples for 19 children. The modeled values explained a greater degree of variability in personal exposures compared with time-weighted distance from the emission source. Based on these results modeled Mn concentrations provided a suitable approach for assessing airborne Mn exposure in this cohort.

  9. A continuum limit for the Kronig-Penney model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, Matteo; Ndreca, Sokol; Procacci, Aldo

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the transmission properties of a quantum one-dimensional periodic system of fixed length L, with N barriers of constant height V and width λ and N wells of width δ. In particular, we study the behaviour of the transmission coefficient in the limit N → ∞, with L fixed. This is achieved by letting δ and λ both scale as 1/N, in such a way that their ratio γ = λ/δ is a fixed parameter characterizing the model. In this continuum limit, the multi-barrier system behaves as it were constituted by a unique barrier of constant height Eo = (γV)/(1 + γ). The analysis of the dispersion relation of the model shows the presence of forbidden energy bands at any finite N.

  10. Exposure-Based Cat Modeling, Available data, Advantages, & Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Gero; Hosoe, Taro; Schrah, Mike; Saito, Keiko

    2010-05-01

    This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of exposure data for cat-modeling and considers concepts of scale as well as the completeness of data and data scoring using field/model examples. Catastrophe modeling based on exposure data has been considered the panacea for insurance-related cat modeling since the late 1980's. Reasons for this include: • The ability to extend risk modeling to consider data beyond historical losses, • Usability across many relevant scales, • Flexibility in addressing complex structures and policy conditions, and • Ability to assess dependence of risk results on exposure-attributes and exposure-modifiers, such as lines of business, occupancy types, and mitigation features, at any given scale. In order to calculate related risk, monetary exposure is correlated to vulnerabilities that have been calibrated with historical results, plausibility concepts, and/or physical modeling. While exposure based modeling is widely adopted, we also need to be aware of its limitations which include: • Boundaries in our understanding of the distribution of exposure, • Spatial interdependence of exposure patterns and the time-dependence of exposure, • Incomplete availability of loss information to calibrate relevant exposure attributes/structure with related vulnerabilities and losses, • The scale-dependence of vulnerability, • Potential for missing or incomplete communication of assumptions made during model calibration, • Inefficiencies in the aggregation or disaggregation of vulnerabilities, and • Factors which can influence losses other than exposure, vulnerability, and hazard. Although we might assume that the higher the resolution the better, regional model calibration is often limited to lower than street level resolution with higher resolution being achieved by disaggregating results using topographic/roughness features with often loosely constrained and/or varying effects on losses. This suggests that higher accuracy

  11. Space-Time Fusion Under Error in Computer Model Output: An Application to Modeling Air Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last two decades a considerable amount of research effort has been devoted to modeling air quality with public health objectives. These objectives include regulatory activities such as setting standards along with assessing the relationship between exposure to air pollutan...

  12. 75 FR 64673 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Limiting Emissions of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ...) antiperspirants or deodorants, (5) charcoal lighter materials, and (6) floor wax strippers. Regulation 1141... Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds From Consumer Products AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... 1141 (formerly SIP Regulation No. 41)--Limiting Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from ]...

  13. Simulation model finned water-air-coil withoutcondensation

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A simple simulation model of a finned water-to- air coil without condensation is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows eficient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is short computation time and use of input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important for energy efficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculation or load calculation with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short-time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control performance, are neglected. The part load behavior of the coil is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature on the water side and the air side. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part load conditions. Geometrical data for the coil are not required, The calculation of the convective heat transfer coefficients at nominal conditions is based on the ratio of the air side heat transfer coefficients multiplied by the fin eficiency and divided by the water side heat transfer coefficient. In this approach, the only geometrical information required are the cross section areas, which are needed to calculate the~uid velocities. The formulas for estimating this ratio are presented. For simplicity the model ignores condensation. The model is static and uses only explicit equations. The explicit formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability. This allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods such as automatic system optimization. The paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its

  14. Application of multiphase transport models to field remediation by air sparging and soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Rahbeh, M E; Mohtar, R H

    2007-05-01

    The design and operation of air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) remediation systems remains in large an art due to the absence of reliable physically based models that can utilize the limited available field data. In this paper, a numerical model developed for the design and operation of air sparging and soil vapor extractions systems was used to simulate two field case studies. The first-order mass transfer kinetics were incorporated into the model to account for contaminant mass transfer between the water and air (stripping), NAPL and water (dissolution), NAPL and air (volatilization), and water and soil (sorption/desorption), the model also accounted for soil heterogeneity. Benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylenes (BTEX) were the contaminants of concern in both case studies. In the second case study, the model was used to evaluate the effect of pulsed sparging on the removal rate of BTEX compounds. The pulsed sparging operation was approximated assuming uniform contaminant redistribution at the beginning of the shut-off period. The close comparison between the observed and simulated contaminant concentration in the aqueous phase showed that the approximation of the pulsed sparging operation yielded reasonable prediction of the removal process. Field heterogeneity was simulated using Monte Carlo analysis. The model predicted about 80-85% of the contaminant mass was removed by air-water mass transfer, which was similar to the average removal obtained by Monte Carlo analysis. The analysis of the removal/rebound cycles demonstrated that removal rate was controlled by the organic-aqueous distribution coefficient K(oc). Due to the lack of site-specific data, the aerobic first-order biodegradation coefficients (k(bio)) were obtained from a literature survey, therefore, uncertainty analysis of the k(bio) was conducted to evaluate the contribution of the aerobic biodegradation to total contaminant removal. Results of both case studies showed that

  15. The air quality forecast in Beijing with Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling (CMAQ) System: model evaluation and improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    The MM5-SMOKE-CMAQ model system, which is developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency(U.S. EPA) as the Models-3 system, has been used for the daily air quality forecast in the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center(Beijing MEMC), as a part of the Ensemble Air Quality Forecast System for Beijing(EMS-Beijing) since the Olympic Games year 2008. In this study, we collect the daily forecast results of the CMAQ model in the whole year 2010 for the model evaluation. The results show that the model play a good model performance in most days but underestimate obviously in some air pollution episode. A typical air pollution episode from 11st - 20th January 2010 was chosen, which the air pollution index(API) of particulate matter (PM10) observed by Beijing MEMC reaches to 180 while the prediction of PM10-API is about 100. Taking in account all stations in Beijing, including urban and suburban stations, three numerical methods are used for model improvement: firstly, enhance the inner domain with 4km grids, the coverage from only Beijing to the area including its surrounding cities; secondly, update the Beijing stationary area emission inventory, from statistical county-level to village-town level, that would provide more detail spatial informance for area emissions; thirdly, add some industrial points emission in Beijing's surrounding cities, the latter two are both the improvement of emission. As the result, the peak of the nine national standard stations averaged PM10-API, which is simulated by CMAQ as daily hindcast PM10-API, reach to 160 and much near to the observation. The new results show better model performance, which the correlation coefficent is 0.93 in national standard stations average and 0.84 in all stations, the relative error is 15.7% in national standard stations averaged and 27% in all stations. The time series of 9 national standard in Beijing urban The scatter diagram of all stations in Beijing, the red is the forecast and

  16. The flammability limits of lean fuel-air mixtures: thermochemical and kinetic criteria for explosion hazards.

    PubMed

    Burgess, D; Hertzberg, M

    1975-01-01

    The present state of knowledge is reviewed concisely in terms of the experimental methods used, the effect of apparatus size, accuracy of data, methods of data presentation, and the sensitivity of the limits to initial temperature and pressure. The heat of combustion per mole of gas mixture at the lean limit is a reliable thermochemical criterion for the flammability of organic fuels with comparable reactivities. The limit calorific value for the heavy paraffins is 11.5 +/- 0.1 kcal mole -1. However, kinetic effects strongly influence this value. Highly reactive fuels (hydrogen, acetylene) require lower energy contents, whereas less reactive fuels (ammonia) require higher values. Hydrogen-starved fuels (carbon monoxide, cyanogen) show marked anomalies and are sensitive to impurities that can provide H-atom chain carriers. These kinetic effects are reflected in the experimentally measurable burning velocity of the fuel. This parameter is a key ingredient in the theory of flammable limits, which is briefly sketched. Five competing processes dissipate power from the combustion wave and quench it at some characteristic limit velocity. The prevalent consensus that the limits are controlled by natural convection is clearly demonstrated, and the complex interplay of kinetics and thermochemistry follows logically therefrom.

  17. European Air Quality and Climate Change: first steps of a numerical modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacressonnière, Gwendoline; Peuch, Vincent-Henri; Josse, Béatrice; Joly, Mathieu; Martet, Maud

    2010-05-01

    In the context of climate change, the evolution of air quality in Europe is a challenging scientific question, despite the political measures taken to limit and reduce anthropogenic emissions. Heat waves, changes in transport pathways or synoptic patterns, increase of emissions in other areas in the world (in particular in Asia), or for instance possible increase of biogenic emissions may affect adversely future Air Quality levels in Europe. In the context of a project co-funded by the French environment agency ADEME, a numerical modeling study has begun relying on the tools used by Météo-France for its contribution to the 5th IPCC assessment report, to GMES atmospheric services (MACC FP7 project) and to the French national operational Air Quality platform Prév'Air (http://www.prevair.org). In particular, the MOCAGE 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) is used with a configuration comprising a global (2°) and a European domain (0.2°), allowing representation of both long-range transport of pollutants and European Air Quality at relevant resolutions and with a two-ways coupling. MOCAGE includes 47 layers from the surface to 5hPa. The first step of this project is to assess the impact of meteorological forcings, either analyses ("best" meteorology available for the recent past) or climate runs for the current atmosphere (interpolated on the same high resolution grid), on air quality hindcasts with MOCAGE over Europe. For these climate runs, we rely on Météo-France Earth-System model CNRM-CM, and particularly the ARPEGE-climate general circulation model for the atmosphere. By studying several key variables for Air Quality (surface and low troposphere concentrations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, radicals, PM,…) we aim at investigating the indicators that are robust or not (monthly averages, frequency of exceedances, AOTs,…) for a given climate when using climatological forcings instead of analyses (reference), all the rest in the CTM

  18. Effects of percentage of blockage and flameholder downstream counterbores on lean combustion limits of premixed, prevaporized propane-air mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, M. A. B.

    1983-01-01

    Lean combustion limits were determined for a premixed prevaporized propane air mixture with flat plate flame stabilizers. Experiments were conducted in a constant area flame tube combustor utilizing flameholders of varying percentages of blockage and downstream counterbores. Combustor inlet air velocity at ambient conditions was varied from 4 to 9 meters per second. Flameholders with a center hole and four half holes surrounding it were tested with 63, 73, and 85 percent blockage and counterbore diameters of 112 and 125 percent of the thru hole diameter, in addition to the no counterbore configuration. Improved stability was obtained by using counterbore flameholders and higher percentages of blockage. Increases in mixture velocity caused the equivalence ratio at blowout to increase in all cases.

  19. Time-based collision risk modeling for air traffic management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Alan E.

    Since the emergence of commercial aviation in the early part of last century, economic forces have driven a steadily increasing demand for air transportation. Increasing density of aircraft operating in a finite volume of airspace is accompanied by a corresponding increase in the risk of collision, and in response to a growing number of incidents and accidents involving collisions between aircraft, governments worldwide have developed air traffic control systems and procedures to mitigate this risk. The objective of any collision risk management system is to project conflicts and provide operators with sufficient opportunity to recognize potential collisions and take necessary actions to avoid them. It is therefore the assertion of this research that the currency of collision risk management is time. Future Air Traffic Management Systems are being designed around the foundational principle of four dimensional trajectory based operations, a method that replaces legacy first-come, first-served sequencing priorities with time-based reservations throughout the airspace system. This research will demonstrate that if aircraft are to be sequenced in four dimensions, they must also be separated in four dimensions. In order to separate aircraft in four dimensions, time must emerge as the primary tool by which air traffic is managed. A functional relationship exists between the time-based performance of aircraft, the interval between aircraft scheduled to cross some three dimensional point in space, and the risk of collision. This research models that relationship and presents two key findings. First, a method is developed by which the ability of an aircraft to meet a required time of arrival may be expressed as a robust standard for both industry and operations. Second, a method by which airspace system capacity may be increased while maintaining an acceptable level of collision risk is presented and demonstrated for the purpose of formulating recommendations for procedures

  20. Preclinical modeling of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation - advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Stolfi, Jessica L; Pai, Chien-Chun S; Murphy, William J

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which was first successfully performed in the 1950s, remains a critical therapeutic modality for treatment of a diverse array of diseases, including a multitude of hematological malignancies, autoimmune disorders, amyloidosis and inherited genetic hematological disorders. Although great advances have been made in understanding and application of this therapy, significant complications still exist, warranting further investigation. Of critical importance, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in both acute and chronic forms, remains a major complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, responsible for both the development of chronic illness and morbidity, as well as mortality. Use of an appropriate preclinical model may provide significant insight into the mechanistic pathways leading to the development and progression of graft-versus-host disease, as well as cancer in general. However, existing preclinical modeling systems exhibit significant limitations, and development of models that recapitulate the complex and comprehensive clinical scenario and provide a tool by which therapeutic intervention may be developed and assessed is of utmost importance. Here, we review the present status of the field of graft-versus-host disease research. We discuss and summarize the preclinical models currently in use, as well as their advantages and limitations.

  1. A model of impairment and functional limitation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Agustín; Haas, Roy W; del Rincón, Inmaculada

    2005-01-01

    Background We have previously proposed a theoretical model for studying physical disability and other outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The purpose of this paper is to test a model of impairment and functional limitation in (RA), using empirical data from a sample of RA patients. We based the model on the disablement process framework. Methods We posited two distinct types of impairment in RA: 1) Joint inflammation, measured by the tender, painful and swollen joint counts; and 2) Joint deformity, measured by the deformed joint count. We hypothesized direct paths from the two impairments to functional limitation, measured by the shirt-button speed, grip strength and walking velocity. We used structural equation modeling to test the hypothetical relationships, using empirical data from a sample of RA patients recruited from six rheumatology clinics. Results The RA sample was comprised of 779 RA patients. In the structural equation model, the joint inflammation impairment displayed a strong significant path toward the measured variables of joint pain, tenderness and swelling (standardized regression coefficients 0.758, 0.872 and 0.512, P ≤ 0.001 for each). The joint deformity impairment likewise displayed significant paths toward the measured upper limb, lower limb, and other deformed joint counts (standardized regression coefficients 0.849, 0.785, 0.308, P ≤ 0.001 for each). Both the joint inflammation and joint deformity impairments displayed strong direct paths toward functional limitation (standardized regression coefficients of -0.576 and -0.564, respectively, P ≤ 0.001 for each), and explained 65% of its variance. Model fit to data was fair to good, as evidenced by a comparative fit index of 0.975, and the root mean square error of approximation = 0.058. Conclusion This evidence supports the occurrence of two distinct impairments in RA, joint inflammation and joint deformity, that together, contribute strongly to functional limitations in this disease

  2. Methodology for Modeling the Microbial Contamination of Air Filters

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Yun Haeng; Yoon, Ki Young; Hwang, Jungho

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a theoretical model to simulate microbial growth on contaminated air filters and entrainment of bioaerosols from the filters to an indoor environment. Air filter filtration and antimicrobial efficiencies, and effects of dust particles on these efficiencies, were evaluated. The number of bioaerosols downstream of the filter could be characterized according to three phases: initial, transitional, and stationary. In the initial phase, the number was determined by filtration efficiency, the concentration of dust particles entering the filter, and the flow rate. During the transitional phase, the number of bioaerosols gradually increased up to the stationary phase, at which point no further increase was observed. The antimicrobial efficiency and flow rate were the dominant parameters affecting the number of bioaerosols downstream of the filter in the transitional and stationary phase, respectively. It was found that the nutrient fraction of dust particles entering the filter caused a significant change in the number of bioaerosols in both the transitional and stationary phases. The proposed model would be a solution for predicting the air filter life cycle in terms of microbiological activity by simulating the microbial contamination of the filter. PMID:24523908

  3. Accuracy limit of rigid 3-point water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, Saeed; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2016-08-01

    Classical 3-point rigid water models are most widely used due to their computational efficiency. Recently, we introduced a new approach to constructing classical rigid water models [S. Izadi et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 5, 3863 (2014)], which permits a virtually exhaustive search for globally optimal model parameters in the sub-space that is most relevant to the electrostatic properties of the water molecule in liquid phase. Here we apply the approach to develop a 3-point Optimal Point Charge (OPC3) water model. OPC3 is significantly more accurate than the commonly used water models of same class (TIP3P and SPCE) in reproducing a comprehensive set of liquid bulk properties, over a wide range of temperatures. Beyond bulk properties, we show that OPC3 predicts the intrinsic charge hydration asymmetry (CHA) of water — a characteristic dependence of hydration free energy on the sign of the solute charge — in very close agreement with experiment. Two other recent 3-point rigid water models, TIP3PFB and H2ODC, each developed by its own, completely different optimization method, approach the global accuracy optimum represented by OPC3 in both the parameter space and accuracy of bulk properties. Thus, we argue that an accuracy limit of practical 3-point rigid non-polarizable models has effectively been reached; remaining accuracy issues are discussed.

  4. Accuracy limit of rigid 3-point water models.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Saeed; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2016-08-21

    Classical 3-point rigid water models are most widely used due to their computational efficiency. Recently, we introduced a new approach to constructing classical rigid water models [S. Izadi et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 5, 3863 (2014)], which permits a virtually exhaustive search for globally optimal model parameters in the sub-space that is most relevant to the electrostatic properties of the water molecule in liquid phase. Here we apply the approach to develop a 3-point Optimal Point Charge (OPC3) water model. OPC3 is significantly more accurate than the commonly used water models of same class (TIP3P and SPCE) in reproducing a comprehensive set of liquid bulk properties, over a wide range of temperatures. Beyond bulk properties, we show that OPC3 predicts the intrinsic charge hydration asymmetry (CHA) of water - a characteristic dependence of hydration free energy on the sign of the solute charge - in very close agreement with experiment. Two other recent 3-point rigid water models, TIP3PFB and H2ODC, each developed by its own, completely different optimization method, approach the global accuracy optimum represented by OPC3 in both the parameter space and accuracy of bulk properties. Thus, we argue that an accuracy limit of practical 3-point rigid non-polarizable models has effectively been reached; remaining accuracy issues are discussed. PMID:27544113

  5. Updraft Model for Development of Autonomous Soaring Uninhabited Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Large birds and glider pilots commonly use updrafts caused by convection in the lower atmosphere to extend flight duration, increase cross-country speed, improve range, or simply to conserve energy. Uninhabited air vehicles may also have the ability to exploit updrafts to improve performance. An updraft model was developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) to investigate the use of convective lift for uninhabited air vehicles in desert regions. Balloon and surface measurements obtained at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Surface Radiation station (Desert Rock, Nevada) enabled the model development. The data were used to create a statistical representation of the convective velocity scale, w*, and the convective mixing-layer thickness, zi. These parameters were then used to determine updraft size, vertical velocity profile, spacing, and maximum height. This paper gives a complete description of the updraft model and its derivation. Computer code for running the model is also given in conjunction with a check case for model verification.

  6. Estimating Lightning NOx Emissions for Regional Air Quality Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, T.; Scotty, E.; Harkey, M.

    2014-12-01

    Lightning emissions have long been recognized as an important source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) on a global scale, and an essential emission component for global atmospheric chemistry models. However, only in recent years have regional air quality models incorporated lightning NOx emissions into simulations. The growth in regional modeling of lightning emissions has been driven in part by comparisons with satellite-derived estimates of column NO2, especially from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard the Aura satellite. We present and evaluate a lightning inventory for the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Our approach follows Koo et al. [2010] in the approach to spatially and temporally allocating a given total value based on cloud-top height and convective precipitation. However, we consider alternate total NOx emission values (which translate into alternate lightning emission factors) based on a review of the literature and performance evaluation against OMI NO2 for July 2007 conditions over the U.S. and parts of Canada and Mexico. The vertical distribution of lightning emissions follow a bimodal distribution from Allen et al. [2012] calculated over 27 vertical model layers. Total lightning NO emissions for July 2007 show the highest above-land emissions in Florida, southeastern Texas and southern Louisiana. Although agreement with OMI NO2 across the domain varied significantly depending on lightning NOx assumptions, agreement among the simulations at ground-based NO2 monitors from the EPA Air Quality System database showed no meaningful sensitivity to lightning NOx. Emissions are compared with prior studies, which find similar distribution patterns, but a wide range of calculated magnitudes.

  7. ONE ATMOSPHERE MODELING FOR AIR QUALITY: BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS THAT TRANSITION RESEARCH INTO APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Miultiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system is a "one atmosphere" chemical transport model that simulates the transport and fate of air pollutants from urban to continental scales and from daily to annual time intervals.

  8. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  9. Metabolic models to investigate energy limited anaerobic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Premier, G C; Guwy, A J; Dinsdale, R; Kleerebezem, R

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is shifting from a philosophy of solely pollutants removal to a philosophy of combined resource recovery and waste treatment. Simultaneous wastewater treatment with energy recovery in the form of energy rich products, brings renewed interest to non-methanogenic anaerobic bioprocesses such as the anaerobic production of hydrogen, ethanol, solvents, VFAs, bioplastics and even electricity from microbial fuel cells. The existing kinetic-based modelling approaches, widely used in aerobic and methanogenic wastewater treatment processes, do not seem adequate in investigating such energy limited microbial ecosystems. The great diversity of similar microbial species, which share many of the fermentative reaction pathways, makes quantify microbial groups very difficult and causes identifiability problems. A modelling approach based on the consideration of metabolic reaction networks instead of on separated microbial groups is suggested as an alternative to describe anaerobic microbial ecosystems and in particular for the prediction of product formation as a function of environmental conditions imposed. The limited number of existing relevant fermentative pathways in conjunction with the fact that anaerobic reactions proceed very close to thermodynamic equilibrium reduces the complexity of such approach and the degrees of freedom in terms of product formation fluxes. In addition, energy limitation in these anaerobic microbial ecosystems makes plausible that selective forces associated with energy further define the system activity by favouring those conversions/microorganisms which provide the most energy for growth under the conditions imposed. PMID:19809129

  10. Animal models of myasthenia gravis: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Mantegazza, Renato; Cordiglieri, Chiara; Consonni, Alessandra; Baggi, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a chronic autoimmune disease caused by the immune attack of the neuromuscular junction. Antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) induce receptor degradation, complement cascade activation, and postsynaptic membrane destruction, resulting in functional reduction in AChR availability. Besides anti-AChR antibodies, other autoantibodies are known to play pathogenic roles in MG. The experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) models have been of great help over the years in understanding the pathophysiological role of specific autoantibodies and T helper lymphocytes and in suggesting new therapies for prevention and modulation of the ongoing disease. EAMG can be induced in mice and rats of susceptible strains that show clinical symptoms mimicking the human disease. EAMG models are helpful for studying both the muscle and the immune compartments to evaluate new treatment perspectives. In this review, we concentrate on recent findings on EAMG models, focusing on their utility and limitations. PMID:27019601

  11. Effects of platinum stagnation surface on the lean extinction limits of premixed methane/air flames at moderate surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiswall, J.T.; Li, J.; Wooldridge, M.S.; Im, H.G.

    2011-01-15

    A stagnation flow reactor was used to study the effects of platinum on the lean flammability limits of atmospheric pressure premixed methane/air flames at moderate stagnation surface temperatures. Experimental and computational methods were used to quantify the equivalence ratio at the lean extinction limit ({phi}{sub ext}) and the corresponding stagnation surface temperature (T{sub s}). A range of flow rates (57-90 cm/s) and corresponding strain rates were considered. The results indicate that the gas-phase methane/air flames are sufficiently strong relative to the heterogeneous chemistry for T{sub s} conditions less than 750 K that the platinum does not affect {phi}{sub ext}. The computational results are in good agreement with the experimentally observed trends and further indicate that higher reactant flow rates (>139 cm/s) and levels of dilution (>{proportional_to}10% N{sub 2}) are required to weaken the gas-phase flame sufficiently for surface reaction to play a positive role on extending the lean flammability limits. (author)

  12. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  13. 77 FR 64039 - Limited Approval and Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Nevada; Clark County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ....5 than for prior PM standards addressing larger particles''); see also 75 FR 80118 (December 21... are not counted as part of BAE. See 67 FR 80186, 80195 (December 31, 2002) (source owners/operators... of Proposed Action On July 24, 2012 (77 FR 43206), EPA proposed a limited approval and...

  14. 75 FR 77798 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Limiting Emissions of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds From Portable Fuel Containers AGENCY: Environmental Protection...'s regulation for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from Consumer and Commercial Products, Section 3.0... Implementation Plans; Delaware; Limiting Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Portable Fuel...

  15. Exercise performance while wearing a tight-fitting powered air purifying respirator with limited flow.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arthur T; Mackey, Kathryn R; Scott, William H; Koh, Frank C; Chiou, Ken Y H; Phelps, Stephanie J

    2005-07-01

    Sixteen subjects exercised at 80-85% of maximal aerobic capacity on a treadmill while wearing a tight-fitting, FRM40-Turbo Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR). The PAPR was powered by a DC power supply to give flow rates of 0%, 30%, 66%, 94%, and 100% of rated maximum blower capacity of 110 L/min. As flow rate was reduced, so was performance time. There was a 20% reduction in performance time as blower flow changed from 100% to 0% of maximum. Significant differences in breathing apparatus comfort and facial thermal comfort were found as flow rate varied. It was concluded that inadequate blower flow rate decreases performance time, facial cooling, and respirator comfort. PMID:16020100

  16. Off-site air monitoring following methyl bromide chamber and building fumigations and evaluation of the ISCST air dispersion model

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, T.; Swgawa, R.; Wofford, P.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Pesticide Regulation`s preliminary risk characterization of methyl bromide indicated an inadequate margin of safety for several exposure scenarios. Characterization of the air concentrations associated with common methyl bromide use patterns was necessary to determine specific scenarios that result in an unacceptable margin of safety. Field monitoring data were used in conjunction with the Industrial Source Complex, Short Tenn (ISCST) air dispersion model to characterize air concentrations associated with various types of methyl bromide applications. Chamber and building fumigations were monitored and modelled. For each fumigation the emission rates, chamber or building specifications and on-site meteorological data were input into the ISCST model. The model predicted concentrations were compared to measured air concentrations. The concentrations predicted by the ISCST model reflect both the pattern and magnitude of the measured concentrations. Required buffer zones were calculated using the ISCST output.

  17. A simple model for calculating air pollution within street canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venegas, Laura E.; Mazzeo, Nicolás A.; Dezzutti, Mariana C.

    2014-04-01

    This paper introduces the Semi-Empirical Urban Street (SEUS) model. SEUS is a simple mathematical model based on the scaling of air pollution concentration inside street canyons employing the emission rate, the width of the canyon, the dispersive velocity scale and the background concentration. Dispersive velocity scale depends on turbulent motions related to wind and traffic. The parameterisations of these turbulent motions include two dimensionless empirical parameters. Functional forms of these parameters have been obtained from full scale data measured in street canyons at four European cities. The sensitivity of SEUS model is studied analytically. Results show that relative errors in the evaluation of the two dimensionless empirical parameters have less influence on model uncertainties than uncertainties in other input variables. The model estimates NO2 concentrations using a simple photochemistry scheme. SEUS is applied to estimate NOx and NO2 hourly concentrations in an irregular and busy street canyon in the city of Buenos Aires. The statistical evaluation of results shows that there is a good agreement between estimated and observed hourly concentrations (e.g. fractional bias are -10.3% for NOx and +7.8% for NO2). The agreement between the estimated and observed values has also been analysed in terms of its dependence on wind speed and direction. The model shows a better performance for wind speeds >2 m s-1 than for lower wind speeds and for leeward situations than for others. No significant discrepancies have been found between the results of the proposed model and that of a widely used operational dispersion model (OSPM), both using the same input information.

  18. Urban scale air quality modelling using detailed traffic emissions estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrego, C.; Amorim, J. H.; Tchepel, O.; Dias, D.; Rafael, S.; Sá, E.; Pimentel, C.; Fontes, T.; Fernandes, P.; Pereira, S. R.; Bandeira, J. M.; Coelho, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric dispersion of NOx and PM10 was simulated with a second generation Gaussian model over a medium-size south-European city. Microscopic traffic models calibrated with GPS data were used to derive typical driving cycles for each road link, while instantaneous emissions were estimated applying a combined Vehicle Specific Power/Co-operative Programme for Monitoring and Evaluation of the Long-range Transmission of Air Pollutants in Europe (VSP/EMEP) methodology. Site-specific background concentrations were estimated using time series analysis and a low-pass filter applied to local observations. Air quality modelling results are compared against measurements at two locations for a 1 week period. 78% of the results are within a factor of two of the observations for 1-h average concentrations, increasing to 94% for daily averages. Correlation significantly improves when background is added, with an average of 0.89 for the 24 h record. The results highlight the potential of detailed traffic and instantaneous exhaust emissions estimates, together with filtered urban background, to provide accurate input data to Gaussian models applied at the urban scale.

  19. A statistical model for characterizing common air pollutants in air-conditioned offices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, L. T.; Mui, K. W.; Hui, P. S.

    Maintaining acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ) for a healthy environment is of primary concern, policymakers have developed different strategies to address the performance of it based on proper assessment methodologies and monitoring plans. It could be cost prohibitive to sample all toxic pollutants in a building. In search of a more manageable number of parameters for cost-effective IAQ assessment, this study investigated the probable correlations among the 12 indoor environmental parameters listed in the IAQ certification scheme of the Hong Kong Environment Protection Department (HKEPD) in 422 Hong Kong offices. These 12 parameters consists of nine indoor air pollutants: carbon dioxide (CO 2), carbon monoxide (CO), respirable suspended particulates (RSP), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2), ozone (O 3), formaldehyde (HCHO), total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), radon (Rn), airborne bacteria count (ABC); and three thermal comfort parameters: temperature ( T), relative humidity (RH) and air velocity ( V). The relative importance of the correlations derived, from largest to smallest loadings, was ABC, Rn, CO, RH, RSP, CO 2, TVOC, O 3, T, V, NO 2 and HCHO. Together with the mathematical expressions derived, an alternative sampling protocol for IAQ assessment with the three 'most representative and independent' parameters namely RSP, CO 2 and TVOC measured in an office environment was proposed. The model validity was verified with on site measurements from 43 other offices in Hong Kong. The measured CO 2, RSP and TVOC concentrations were used to predict the probable levels of the other nine parameters and good agreement was found between the predictions and measurements. This simplified protocol provides an easy tool for performing IAQ monitoring in workplaces and will be useful for determining appropriate mitigation measures to finally honor the certification scheme in a cost-effective way.

  20. Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality model version 5.1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality model is a state-of-the-science air quality model that simulates the emission, transport and fate of numerous air pollutants, including ozone and particulate matter. The Atmospheric Modeling and Analysis Division (AMAD) of the U.S. Environment...

  1. A review and evaluation of intraurban air pollution exposure models.

    PubMed

    Jerrett, Michael; Arain, Altaf; Kanaroglou, Pavlos; Beckerman, Bernardo; Potoglou, Dimitri; Sahsuvaroglu, Talar; Morrison, Jason; Giovis, Chris

    2005-03-01

    The development of models to assess air pollution exposures within cities for assignment to subjects in health studies has been identified as a priority area for future research. This paper reviews models for assessing intraurban exposure under six classes, including: (i) proximity-based assessments, (ii) statistical interpolation, (iii) land use regression models, (iv) line dispersion models, (v) integrated emission-meteorological models, and (vi) hybrid models combining personal or household exposure monitoring with one of the preceding methods. We enrich this review of the modelling procedures and results with applied examples from Hamilton, Canada. In addition, we qualitatively evaluate the models based on key criteria important to health effects assessment research. Hybrid models appear well suited to overcoming the problem of achieving population representative samples while understanding the role of exposure variation at the individual level. Remote sensing and activity-space analysis will complement refinements in pre-existing methods, and with expected advances, the field of exposure assessment may help to reduce scientific uncertainties that now impede policy intervention aimed at protecting public health.

  2. Assessing the impact of modeling limits on intelligent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, William B.; Hammer, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The knowledge bases underlying intelligent systems are validated. A general conceptual framework is provided for considering the roles in intelligent systems of models of physical, behavioral, and operational phenomena. A methodology is described for identifying limits in particular intelligent systems, and the use of the methodology is illustrated via an experimental evaluation of the pilot-vehicle interface within the Pilot's Associate. The requirements and functionality are outlined for a computer based knowledge engineering environment which would embody the approach advocated and illustrated in earlier discussions. Issues considered include the specific benefits of this functionality, the potential breadth of applicability, and technical feasibility.

  3. Evaluation of Observation-Fused Regional Air Quality Model Results for Population Air Pollution Exposure Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Li, Jingyi; Ying, Qi; Sherman, Seth; Perkins, Neil; Rajeshwari, Sundaram; Mendola, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was applied to predict ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations during 2001 to 2010 in 15 hospital referral regions (HRRs) using a 36-km horizontal resolution domain. An inverse distance weighting based method was applied to produce exposure estimates based on observation-fused regional pollutant concentration fields using the differences between observations and predictions at grid cells where air quality monitors were located. Although the raw CMAQ model is capable of producing satisfying results for O3 and PM2.5 based on EPA guidelines, using the observation data fusing technique to correct CMAQ predictions leads to significant improvement of model performance for all gaseous and particulate pollutants. Regional average concentrations were calculated using five different methods: 1) inverse distance weighting of observation data alone, 2) raw CMAQ results, 3) observation-fused CMAQ results, 4) population-averaged raw CMAQ results and 5) population-averaged fused CMAQ results. It shows that while O3 (as well as NOx) monitoring networks in the HRR regions are dense enough to provide consistent regional average exposure estimation based on monitoring data alone, PM2.5 observation sites (as well as monitors for CO, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 components) are usually sparse and the difference between the average concentrations estimated by the inverse distance interpolated observations, raw CMAQ and fused CMAQ results can be significantly different. Population-weighted average should be used to account spatial variation in pollutant concentration and population density. Using raw CMAQ results or observations alone might lead to significant biases in health outcome analyses. PMID:24747248

  4. Animal models of obsessive-compulsive disorder: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Pino; López-Solà, Clara; Real, Eva; Segalàs, Cinto; Menchón, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling and common neuropsychiatric condition of poorly known etiology. Many attempts have been made in the last few years to develop animal models of OCD with the aim of clarifying the genetic, neurochemical, and neuroanatomical basis of the disorder, as well as of developing novel pharmacological and neurosurgical treatments that may help to improve the prognosis of the illness. The latter goal is particularly important given that around 40% of patients with OCD do not respond to currently available therapies. This article summarizes strengths and limitations of the leading animal models of OCD including genetic, pharmacologically induced, behavioral manipulation-based, and neurodevelopmental models according to their face, construct, and predictive validity. On the basis of this evaluation, we discuss that currently labeled "animal models of OCD" should be regarded not as models of OCD but, rather, as animal models of different psychopathological processes, such as compulsivity, stereotypy, or perseverance, that are present not only in OCD but also in other psychiatric or neurological disorders. Animal models might constitute a challenging approach to study the neural and genetic mechanism of these phenomena from a trans-diagnostic perspective. Animal models are also of particular interest as tools for developing new therapeutic options for OCD, with the greatest convergence focusing on the glutamatergic system, the role of ovarian and related hormones, and the exploration of new potential targets for deep brain stimulation. Finally, future research on neurocognitive deficits associated with OCD through the use of analogous animal tasks could also provide a genuine opportunity to disentangle the complex etiology of the disorder. PMID:26346234

  5. Animal models of obsessive–compulsive disorder: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Pino; López-Solà, Clara; Real, Eva; Segalàs, Cinto; Menchón, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling and common neuropsychiatric condition of poorly known etiology. Many attempts have been made in the last few years to develop animal models of OCD with the aim of clarifying the genetic, neurochemical, and neuroanatomical basis of the disorder, as well as of developing novel pharmacological and neurosurgical treatments that may help to improve the prognosis of the illness. The latter goal is particularly important given that around 40% of patients with OCD do not respond to currently available therapies. This article summarizes strengths and limitations of the leading animal models of OCD including genetic, pharmacologically induced, behavioral manipulation-based, and neurodevelopmental models according to their face, construct, and predictive validity. On the basis of this evaluation, we discuss that currently labeled “animal models of OCD” should be regarded not as models of OCD but, rather, as animal models of different psychopathological processes, such as compulsivity, stereotypy, or perseverance, that are present not only in OCD but also in other psychiatric or neurological disorders. Animal models might constitute a challenging approach to study the neural and genetic mechanism of these phenomena from a trans-diagnostic perspective. Animal models are also of particular interest as tools for developing new therapeutic options for OCD, with the greatest convergence focusing on the glutamatergic system, the role of ovarian and related hormones, and the exploration of new potential targets for deep brain stimulation. Finally, future research on neurocognitive deficits associated with OCD through the use of analogous animal tasks could also provide a genuine opportunity to disentangle the complex etiology of the disorder. PMID:26346234

  6. Collisional radiative coarse-grain model for ionization in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesi, Marco; Lani, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    We present a reduced kinetic mechanism for the modeling of the behavior of the electronic states of the atomic species in air mixtures. The model is built by lumping the electronically excited states of the atomic species and by performing Maxwell-Boltzmann averages of the rate constants describing the elementary kinetic processes of the individual states within each group. The necessary reaction rate coefficients are taken from the model compiled by Bultel et al. ["Collisional-radiative model in air for earth re-entry problems," Phys. Plasmas 13, 043502 (2006), 10.1063/1.2194827]. The reduced number of pseudo-states considered leads to a significant reduction of the computational cost, thus enabling the application of the state of the art collisional radiative models to bi-dimensional and three-dimensional problems. The internal states of the molecular species are assumed to be in equilibrium. The rotational energy mode is assumed to quickly equilibrate with the translational energy mode at the kinetic temperature of the heavy species as opposed to the electronic and the vibrational modes, assumed to be in Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium at a common temperature TV. In a first step we validate the model by using simple zero- and one-dimensional test cases for which the full kinetic mechanism can be run efficiently. Finally, the reduced kinetic model is used to analyze the strong non-equilibrium flow surrounding the FIRE II flight experiment during the early part of its re-entry trajectory. It is found that the reduced kinetic mechanism is capable of reproducing the ionizational non-equilibrium phenomena, responsible for the drastic reduction of the radiative heat loads on the space capsules during the re-entry phase.

  7. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay-Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described.

  8. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay–Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay–Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described. PMID:27499644

  9. Uses and limitations of the soil survey in hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, E.; Boll, J.

    2009-12-01

    One of the greatest challenges in hydrologic modeling is characterizing the effects of soil structure of hydrologic flow paths in complex watersheds. The Predictions in Ungauged Basins (PUB) initiative is pushing scientists to come up with innovative ways to reduce model calibration and predictive uncertainty and improve process understanding. Some of these innovative approaches have included incorporating ‘soft data’ as information for developing conceptual watershed frameworks and guiding calibration. In this study we examine the uses and limitations of the soil survey in hydrologic modeling. County soil surveys were initiated in 1899 and now digital maps are available throughout most of the US. Although these surveys were initially meant to guide selection and development of land, these surveys now include a great wealth of information from specific physical properties to indicators of saturation and development of perched water tables. To what degree does the information in the soil survey improve understanding of dominant hydrologic processes in a watershed? At what point must a hydrologist exercise discretion in using this information? We will discuss the extent to which the soil survey can be used to 1.) conceptualize the basic hydrology of a watershed, 2.) provide input data to a process-based hydrologic model, and 3.) validate spatial predictions of runoff and erosion from distributed hydrologic models. We will demonstrate each of these uses through case studies from multiple ecological regions across the country.

  10. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay-Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described. PMID:27499644

  11. Air assisted lamellar keratectomy for the corneal haze model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soohyun; Park, Young Woo; Lee, Euiri; Park, Sang Wan; Park, Sungwon; Kim, Jong Whi; Seong, Je Kyung; Seo, Kangmoon

    2015-01-01

    To standardize the corneal haze model in the resection depth and size for efficient corneal haze development, air assisted lamellar keratectomy was performed. The ex vivo porcine corneas were categorized into four groups depending on the trephined depth: 250 µm (G1), 375 µm (G2), 500 µm(G3) and 750 µm (G4). The stroma was equally ablated at the five measurement sites in all groups. Significant differences were observed between the trephined corneal depths for resection and ablated corneal thickness in G1 (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed between the trephined corneal depth for resection and the ablated corneal thickness in G2, G3, and G4. The resection percentage was similar in all groups after microscopic imaging of corneal sections. Air assisted lamellar keratectomy (AK) and conventional keratectomy (CK) method were applied to six beagles, after which development of corneal haze was evaluated weekly until postoperative day 28. The occurrence of corneal haze in the AK group was significantly higher than that in the CK group beginning 14 days after surgery. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression was significantly higher in the AK group (p < 0.001) than the CK group. Air assisted lamellar keratectomy was used to achieve the desired corneal thickness after resection and produce sufficient corneal haze.

  12. Air assisted lamellar keratectomy for the corneal haze model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soohyun; Park, Young Woo; Lee, Euiri; Park, Sang Wan; Park, Sungwon; Kim, Jong Whi; Seong, Je Kyung

    2015-01-01

    To standardize the corneal haze model in the resection depth and size for efficient corneal haze development, air assisted lamellar keratectomy was performed. The ex vivo porcine corneas were categorized into four groups depending on the trephined depth: 250 µm (G1), 375 µm (G2), 500 µm (G3) and 750 µm (G4). The stroma was equally ablated at the five measurement sites in all groups. Significant differences were observed between the trephined corneal depths for resection and ablated corneal thickness in G1 (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed between the trephined corneal depth for resection and the ablated corneal thickness in G2, G3, and G4. The resection percentage was similar in all groups after microscopic imaging of corneal sections. Air assisted lamellar keratectomy (AK) and conventional keratectomy (CK) method were applied to six beagles, after which development of corneal haze was evaluated weekly until postoperative day 28. The occurrence of corneal haze in the AK group was significantly higher than that in the CK group beginning 14 days after surgery. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression was significantly higher in the AK group (p < 0.001) than the CK group. Air assisted lamellar keratectomy was used to achieve the desired corneal thickness after resection and produce sufficient corneal haze. PMID:25797296

  13. Evaluation of air pollution modelling tools as environmental engineering courseware.

    PubMed

    Souto González, J A; Bello Bugallo, P M; Casares Long, J J

    2004-01-01

    The study of phenomena related to the dispersion of pollutants usually takes advantage of the use of mathematical models based on the description of the different processes involved. This educational approach is especially important in air pollution dispersion, when the processes follow a non-linear behaviour so it is difficult to understand the relationships between inputs and outputs, and in a 3D context where it becomes hard to analyze alphanumeric results. In this work, three different software tools, as computer solvers for typical air pollution dispersion phenomena, are presented. Each software tool developed to be implemented on PCs, follows approaches that represent three generations of programming languages (Fortran 77, VisualBasic and Java), applied over three different environments: MS-DOS, MS-Windows and the world wide web. The software tools were tested by students of environmental engineering (undergraduate) and chemical engineering (postgraduate), in order to evaluate the ability of these software tools to improve both theoretical and practical knowledge of the air pollution dispersion problem, and the impact of the different environment in the learning process in terms of content, ease of use and visualization of results. PMID:15193095

  14. A NEW COMBINED LOCAL AND NON-LOCAL PBL MODEL FOR METEOROLOGY AND AIR QUALITY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new version of the Asymmetric Convective Model (ACM) has been developed to describe sub-grid vertical turbulent transport in both meteorology models and air quality models. The new version (ACM2) combines the non-local convective mixing of the original ACM with local eddy diff...

  15. Force Limited Random Vibration Test of TESS Camera Mass Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlicek, Alexandra; Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Rey, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a spaceborne instrument consisting of four wide field-of-view-CCD cameras dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets around the brightest stars. As part of the environmental testing campaign, force limiting was used to simulate a realistic random vibration launch environment. While the force limit vibration test method is a standard approach used at multiple institutions including Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), it is still difficult to find an actual implementation process in the literature. This paper describes the step-by-step process on how the force limit method was developed and applied on the TESS camera mass model. The process description includes the design of special fixtures to mount the test article for properly installing force transducers, development of the force spectral density using the semi-empirical method, estimation of the fuzzy factor (C2) based on the mass ratio between the supporting structure and the test article, subsequent validating of the C2 factor during the vibration test, and calculation of the C.G. accelerations using the Root Mean Square (RMS) reaction force in the spectral domain and the peak reaction force in the time domain.

  16. The limitations of mathematical modeling in high school physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forjan, Matej

    The theme of the doctoral dissertation falls within the scope of didactics of physics. Theoretical analysis of the key constraints that occur in the transmission of mathematical modeling of dynamical systems into field of physics education in secondary schools is presented. In an effort to explore the extent to which current physics education promotes understanding of models and modeling, we analyze the curriculum and the three most commonly used textbooks for high school physics. We focus primarily on the representation of the various stages of modeling in the solved tasks in textbooks and on the presentation of certain simplifications and idealizations, which are in high school physics frequently used. We show that one of the textbooks in most cases fairly and reasonably presents the simplifications, while the other two half of the analyzed simplifications do not explain. It also turns out that the vast majority of solved tasks in all the textbooks do not explicitly represent model assumptions based on what we can conclude that in high school physics the students do not develop sufficiently a sense of simplification and idealizations, which is a key part of the conceptual phase of modeling. For the introduction of modeling of dynamical systems the knowledge of students is also important, therefore we performed an empirical study on the extent to which high school students are able to understand the time evolution of some dynamical systems in the field of physics. The research results show the students have a very weak understanding of the dynamics of systems in which the feedbacks are present. This is independent of the year or final grade in physics and mathematics. When modeling dynamical systems in high school physics we also encounter the limitations which result from the lack of mathematical knowledge of students, because they don't know how analytically solve the differential equations. We show that when dealing with one-dimensional dynamical systems

  17. Space-Time Analysis of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) Phase 1 Air Quality Simulations

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents an evaluation of summertime daily maximum ozone concentrations over North America (NA) and Europe (EU) using the database generated during Phase 1 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). The analysis focuses on identifying tempor...

  18. Singular Limits in a Model of Radiative Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducomet, Bernard; Nečasová, Šárka

    2015-06-01

    We consider a "semi-relativistic" model of radiative viscous compressible Navier-Stokes-Fourier system coupled to the radiative transfer equation extending the classical model introduced in Ducomet et al. (Ann Inst Henri Poincarè AN 28:797-812, 2011) and we study some of its singular limits (low Mach and diffusion) in the case of well-prepared initial data and Dirichlet boundary condition for the velocity field. In the low Mach number case we prove the convergence toward the incompressible Navier-Stokes system coupled to a system of two stationary transport equations. In the diffusion case we prove the convergence toward the compressible Navier-Stokes with modified state functions (equilibrium case) or toward the compressible Navier-Stokes coupled to a diffusion equation (non equilibrium case).

  19. Modeling realistic breast lesions using diffusion limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Elangovan, Premkumar; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Diaz, Oliver; Wells, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Synthesizing the appearance of malignant masses and inserting these into digital mammograms can be used as part of a wider framework for investigating the radiological detection task in X-ray mammography. However, the randomness associated with cell division within cancerous masses and the associated complex morphology challenges the realism of the modeling process. In this paper, Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA), a type of fractal growth process is proposed and utilized for modeling breast lesions. Masses of different sizes, shapes and densities were grown by controlling DLA growth parameters either prior to growth, or dynamically updating these during growth. A validation study was conducted by presenting 30 real and 30 simulated masses in a random order to a team of radiologists. The results from the validation study suggest that the observers found it difficult to differentiate between the real and simulated lesions.

  20. A multi agent model for the limit order book dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolozzi, M.

    2010-11-01

    In the present work we introduce a novel multi-agent model with the aim to reproduce the dynamics of a double auction market at microscopic time scale through a faithful simulation of the matching mechanics in the limit order book. The agents follow a noise decision making process where their actions are related to a stochastic variable, the market sentiment, which we define as a mixture of public and private information. The model, despite making just few basic assumptions over the trading strategies of the agents, is able to reproduce several empirical features of the high-frequency dynamics of the market microstructure not only related to the price movements but also to the deposition of the orders in the book.

  1. Air Pollution Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) in Health Studies: Evaluation for Ambient PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health studies of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) often use outdoor concentrations as exposure surrogates, which fail to account for indoor attenuation of ambient PM2.5 and time indoors. To address these limitations, we developed an air pollution exposure model for individuals (E...

  2. Vibration amplitude and induced temperature limitation of high power air-borne ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic impedances of matching layers, their internal loss and vibration amplitude are the most important and influential parameters in the performance of high power airborne ultrasonic transducers. In this paper, the optimum acoustic impedances of the transducer matching layers were determined by using a genetic algorithm, the powerful tool for optimizating domain. The analytical results showed that the vibration amplitude increases significantly for low acoustic impedance matching layers. This enhancement is maximum and approximately 200 times higher for the last matching layer where it has the same interface with the air than the vibration amplitude of the source, lead zirconate titanate-pizo electric while transferring the 1 kW is desirable. This large amplitude increases both mechanical failure and temperature of the matching layers due to the internal loss of the matching layers. It has analytically shown that the temperature in last matching layer with having the maximum vibration amplitude is high enough to melt or burn the matching layers. To verify suggested approach, the effect of the amplitude of vibration on the induced temperature has been investigated experimentally. The experimental results displayed good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  3. Assimilation of Satellite Data in Regional Air Quality Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnider, Richard T.; Norris, William B.; Casey, Daniel; Pleim, Jonathan E.; Roselle, Shawn J.; Lapenta, William M.

    1997-01-01

    In terms of important uncertainty in regional-scale air-pollution models, probably no other aspect ranks any higher than the current ability to specify clouds and soil moisture on the regional scale. Because clouds in models are highly parameterized, the ability of models to predict the correct spatial and radiative characteristics is highly suspect and subject to large error. The poor representation of cloud fields from point measurements at National Weather Services stations and the almost total absence of surface moisture availability observations has made assimilation of these variables difficult to impossible. Yet, the correct inclusion of clouds and surface moisture are of first-order importance in regional-scale photochemistry.

  4. Modeling and Analysis of Aluminum/Air Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Armando J.

    The technical and scientific challenges to provide reliable sources energy for US and global economy are enormous tasks, and especially so when combined with strategic and recent economic concerns of the last five years. It is clear that as part of the mix of energy sources necessary to deal with these challenges, fuel cells technology will play critical or even a central role. The US Department of Energy, as well as a number of the national laboratories and academic institutions have been aware of the importance such technology for some time. Recently, car manufacturers, transportation experts, and even utilities are paying attention to this vital source of energy for the future. In this thesis, a review of the main fuel cell technologies is presented with the focus on the modeling, and control of one particular and promising fuel cell technology, aluminum air fuel cells. The basic principles of this fuel cell technology are presented. A major part of the study consists of a description of the electrochemistry of the process, modeling, and simulations of aluminum air FC using Matlab Simulink(TM). The controller design of the proposed model is also presented. In sequel, a power management unit is designed and analyzed as an alternative source of power. Thus, the system commutes between the fuel cell output and the alternative power source in order to fulfill a changing power load demand. Finally, a cost analysis and assessment of this technology for portable devices, conclusions and future recommendations are presented.

  5. NASA Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM): Capabilities and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAfee, Julie; Culver, George; Naderi, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    NAFCOM is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. Uses cost estimating relationships (CERs) which correlate historical costs to mission characteristics to predict new project costs. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects. It is intended to be used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels and estimates development and production costs. NAFCOM is applicable to various types of missions (crewed spacecraft, uncrewed spacecraft, and launch vehicles). There are two versions of the model: a government version that is restricted and a contractor releasable version.

  6. Extinction of Lean Near-Limit Methane/Air Flames at Elevated Pressures under Normal- and Micro-Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Fan, R.; Wang, S.; Tian, X.; Xu, K.; Wan, S.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

    2011-01-01

    The extinction limits of lean, near-limit, counterflowing, CH{sub 4}/air twin premixed flames were studied experimentally at evaluated pressures and under normal- and micro-gravity conditions utilizing the 3.5 s drop tower of the National Microgravity Laboratory of China. The results showed that under micro-gravity conditions the natural convection is minimized and the flames become more planar and symmetric compared to normal gravity. In both normal- and micro-gravity experiments and for a given strain rate and fuel concentration, the flame luminosity was found to enhance as the pressure increases. On the other hand, at a given pressure, the flame luminosity was determined to weaken as the strain rate decreases. At a given strain rate, the fuel concentration at extinction was found to vary non-monotonically with pressure, namely it first increases and subsequently decreases with pressure. The limit fuel concentration peaks around 3 and 4 atm under normal- and micro-gravity, respectively. The extinction limits measured at micro-gravity were in good agreement with predictions obtained through detailed numerical simulations but they are notably lower compared to the data obtained under normal gravity. The simulations confirmed the non-monotonic variation of flammability limits with pressure, in agreement with previous studies. Sensitivity analysis showed that for pressures between one and 5 atm, the near-limit flame response is dominated by the competition between the main branching, H + O{sub 2} → OH + O, and the pressure sensitive termination, H + O{sub 2} + M → HO{sub 2} + M, reaction. However, for pressures greater than 5 atm it was determined that the HO{sub 2} kinetics result in further chain branching in a way that is analogous to the third explosion limit of H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures.

  7. Electronic Cigarettes and Indoor Air Quality: A Simple Approach to Modeling Potential Bystander Exposures to Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Colard, Stéphane; O’Connell, Grant; Verron, Thomas; Cahours, Xavier; Pritchard, John D.

    2014-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes (“vaping”) in Europe, North America and elsewhere. With such increased prevalence, there is currently a debate on whether the aerosol exhaled following the use of e-cigarettes has implications for the quality of air breathed by bystanders. Conducting chemical analysis of the indoor environment can be costly and resource intensive, limiting the number of studies which can be conducted. However, this can be modelled reasonably accurately based on empirical emissions data and using some basic assumptions. Here, we present a simplified model, based on physical principles, which considers aerosol propagation, dilution and extraction to determine the potential contribution of a single puff from an e-cigarette to indoor air. From this, it was then possible to simulate the cumulative effect of vaping over time. The model was applied to a virtual, but plausible, scenario considering an e-cigarette user and a non-user working in the same office space. The model was also used to reproduce published experimental studies and showed good agreement with the published values of indoor air nicotine concentration. With some additional refinements, such an approach may be a cost-effective and rapid way of assessing the potential exposure of bystanders to exhaled e-cigarette aerosol constituents. PMID:25547398

  8. Electronic cigarettes and indoor air quality: a simple approach to modeling potential bystander exposures to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Colard, Stéphane; O'Connell, Grant; Verron, Thomas; Cahours, Xavier; Pritchard, John D

    2015-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes ("vaping") in Europe, North America and elsewhere. With such increased prevalence, there is currently a debate on whether the aerosol exhaled following the use of e-cigarettes has implications for the quality of air breathed by bystanders. Conducting chemical analysis of the indoor environment can be costly and resource intensive, limiting the number of studies which can be conducted. However, this can be modelled reasonably accurately based on empirical emissions data and using some basic assumptions. Here, we present a simplified model, based on physical principles, which considers aerosol propagation, dilution and extraction to determine the potential contribution of a single puff from an e-cigarette to indoor air. From this, it was then possible to simulate the cumulative effect of vaping over time. The model was applied to a virtual, but plausible, scenario considering an e-cigarette user and a non-user working in the same office space. The model was also used to reproduce published experimental studies and showed good agreement with the published values of indoor air nicotine concentration. With some additional refinements, such an approach may be a cost-effective and rapid way of assessing the potential exposure of bystanders to exhaled e-cigarette aerosol constituents. PMID:25547398

  9. An Air Temperature Cloud Height Precipitation Phase Determination Scheme for Surface Based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiccabrino, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many hydrological and ecological models use simple surface temperature threshold equations rather than coupling with a complex meteorological model to determine if precipitation is rain or snow. Some comparative studies have found, the most common rain/snow threshold variable, air temperature to have more precipitation phase error than dew-point or wet-bulb temperature, which account for the important secondary role of humidity in the melting and sublimation processes. However, just like surface air temperature, surface humidity is often effected by soil conditions and vegetation and is therefore not always representative of the atmospheric humidity precipitation falls through. A viable alternative to using surface humidity as a proxy for atmospheric moisture would be to adjust the rain snow threshold for changes in cloud height. The height of a cloud base above the ground gives the depth of an unsaturated layer. An unsaturated atmospheric layer should have much different melting and sublimation rates than a saturated cloud layer. Therefore, rain and snow percentages at a given surface air temperature should change with the height of the lowest cloud base. This study uses hourly observations from 12 U.S. manually augmented meteorological stations located in the Great Plains and Midwest upwind or away from major water bodies in relatively flat areas in an attempt to limit geographical influences. The surface air temperature threshold for the ground to 200 feet (under 100m) was 0.0°C, 0.6°C for 300-600 feet (100-200m), 1.1°C for 700-1200 feet (300-400m), 1.7°C for 1300-2000 feet (500-600m), and 2.2°C for 2100-3300 feet (700-1000m). Total precipitation error for these cloud height air temperature thresholds reduced the error from the single air temperature threshold 1.1°C by 15% from 14% to 12% total error between -2.2°C and 3.9°C. These air temperature cloud height thresholds resulted in 1.5% less total error than the dew-point temperature threshold 0.0

  10. Conceptual model for assessing criteria air pollutants in a multipollutant context: A modified adverse outcome pathway approach.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Barbara; Farraj, Aimen

    2015-09-01

    Air pollution consists of a complex mixture of particulate and gaseous components. Individual criteria and other hazardous air pollutants have been linked to adverse respiratory and cardiovascular health outcomes. However, assessing risk of air pollutant mixtures is difficult since components are present in different combinations and concentrations in ambient air. Recent mechanistic studies have limited utility because of the inability to link measured changes to adverse outcomes that are relevant to risk assessment. New approaches are needed to address this challenge. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe a conceptual model, based on the adverse outcome pathway approach, which connects initiating events at the cellular and molecular level to population-wide impacts. This may facilitate hazard assessment of air pollution mixtures. In the case reports presented here, airway hyperresponsiveness and endothelial dysfunction are measurable endpoints that serve to integrate the effects of individual criteria air pollutants found in inhaled mixtures. This approach incorporates information from experimental and observational studies into a sequential series of higher order effects. The proposed model has the potential to facilitate multipollutant risk assessment by providing a framework that can be used to converge the effects of air pollutants in light of common underlying mechanisms. This approach may provide a ready-to-use tool to facilitate evaluation of health effects resulting from exposure to air pollution mixtures.

  11. Chronic air-flow limitation does not increase respiratory epithelial permeability assessed by aerosolized solute, but smoking does

    SciTech Connect

    Huchon, G.J.; Russell, J.A.; Barritault, L.G.; Lipavsky, A.; Murray, J.F.

    1984-09-01

    To determine the separate influences of smoking and severe air-flow limitation on aerosol deposition and respiratory epithelial permeability, we studied 26 normal nonsmokers, 12 smokers without airway obstruction, 12 nonsmokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 11 smokers with COPD. We aerosolized 99mTc-labeled diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid to particles approximately 1 micron activity median aerodynamic diameter. Levels of radioactivity were plotted semilogarithmically against time to calculate clearance as percent per minute. The distribution of radioactivity was homogeneous in control subjects and in smokers, but patchy in both groups with COPD. No difference was found between clearances of the control group (1.18 +/- 0.31% min-1), and nonsmoker COPD group (1.37 +/- 0.82% min-1), whereas values in smokers without COPD (4.00 +/- 1.70% min-1) and smokers with COPD (3.62 +/- 2.88% min-1) were significantly greater than in both nonsmoking groups. We conclude that (1) small particles appear to deposit peripherally, even with severe COPD; (2) respiratory epithelial permeability is normal in nonsmokers with COPD; (3) smoking increases permeability by a mechanism unrelated to air-flow limitation.

  12. Uncertainty characterization and quantification in air pollution models. Application to the CHIMERE model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debry, Edouard; Mallet, Vivien; Garaud, Damien; Malherbe, Laure; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Rouïl, Laurence

    2010-05-01

    Prev'Air is the French operational system for air pollution forecasting. It is developed and maintained by INERIS with financial support from the French Ministry for Environment. On a daily basis it delivers forecasts up to three days ahead for ozone, nitrogene dioxide and particles over France and Europe. Maps of concentration peaks and daily averages are freely available to the general public. More accurate data can be provided to customers and modelers. Prev'Air forecasts are based on the Chemical Transport Model CHIMERE. French authorities rely more and more on this platform to alert the general public in case of high pollution events and to assess the efficiency of regulation measures when such events occur. For example the road speed limit may be reduced in given areas when the ozone level exceeds one regulatory threshold. These operational applications require INERIS to assess the quality of its forecasts and to sensitize end users about the confidence level. Indeed concentrations always remain an approximation of the true concentrations because of the high uncertainty on input data, such as meteorological fields and emissions, because of incomplete or inaccurate representation of physical processes, and because of efficiencies in numerical integration [1]. We would like to present in this communication the uncertainty analysis of the CHIMERE model led in the framework of an INERIS research project aiming, on the one hand, to assess the uncertainty of several deterministic models and, on the other hand, to propose relevant indicators describing air quality forecast and their uncertainty. There exist several methods to assess the uncertainty of one model. Under given assumptions the model may be differentiated into an adjoint model which directly provides the concentrations sensitivity to given parameters. But so far Monte Carlo methods seem to be the most widely and oftenly used [2,3] as they are relatively easy to implement. In this framework one

  13. Micro air vehicle motion tracking and aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Daniel V.

    Aerodynamic performance of small-scale fixed-wing flight is not well understood, and flight data are needed to gain a better understanding of the aerodynamics of micro air vehicles (MAVs) flying at Reynolds numbers between 10,000 and 30,000. Experimental studies have shown the aerodynamic effects of low Reynolds number flow on wings and airfoils, but the amount of work that has been conducted is not extensive and mostly limited to tests in wind and water tunnels. In addition to wind and water tunnel testing, flight characteristics of aircraft can be gathered through flight testing. The small size and low weight of MAVs prevent the use of conventional on-board instrumentation systems, but motion tracking systems that use off-board triangulation can capture flight trajectories (position and attitude) of MAVs with minimal onboard instrumentation. Because captured motion trajectories include minute noise that depends on the aircraft size, the trajectory results were verified in this work using repeatability tests. From the captured glide trajectories, the aerodynamic characteristics of five unpowered aircraft were determined. Test results for the five MAVs showed the forces and moments acting on the aircraft throughout the test flights. In addition, the airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip angle were also determined from the trajectories. Results for low angles of attack (less than approximately 20 deg) showed the lift, drag, and moment coefficients during nominal gliding flight. For the lift curve, the results showed a linear curve until stall that was generally less than finite wing predictions. The drag curve was well described by a polar. The moment coefficients during the gliding flights were used to determine longitudinal and lateral stability derivatives. The neutral point, weather-vane stability and the dihedral effect showed some variation with different trim speeds (different angles of attack). In the gliding flights, the aerodynamic characteristics

  14. Analysis of air pollution from swine production by using air dispersion model and GIS in Quebec.

    PubMed

    Sarr, Joachim H; Goïta, Kalifa; Desmarais, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Swine production, the second most important contributor to Quebec's agricultural revenue, faces many problems. Intensive piggeries, with up to 599 animal units, are used to raise finishing pigs for slaughter. Among the great number of gaseous species emitted to the atmospheric environment from livestock buildings and manure storage units is NH3, which is one of the most important and most offensive with respect to human health. Under appropriate meteorological and topographical conditions, gaseous contaminants can spread and cause a public nuisance--up to a 1-km radius around the farm. To mitigate these effects, the Quebec Government adopted regulations that set minimum buffer distances to be observed by any expansion of an existing or new pig farm. The objectives of this study were (i) to assess the efficiency of the current buffer distance prescriptions in Quebec in mitigating effects of air pollution from swine units and (ii) to identify potential areas for establishing pig farm operations that will not be offensive to people. The air dispersion American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) with receptors distributed at 1.6 km around each source was used first, followed by a spatial geographic information system (GIS) model. Results from the dispersion model showed that the highest hourly concentration with a 99.5% compliance frequency for a single farm was 3078.1 microg/m3 and exceeded the NH3 odor criterion hourly standard set by the Quebec Government at 183.4 microg/m3. Thus, for public safety, densely populated areas like housing developments must be located >1300 m from a pig farm. This distance is in the range of setback distances (723 to 1447 m) obtained by using abacuses defined in the L'Erable Regional County Municipality. That is why we can say the current rules established by the Quebec Government, if rigorously applied, can prevent odor nuisance, due to NH3 emission, from swine farms. In the spatial model

  15. A fluid model simulation of a simplified plasma limiter based on spectral-element time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Cheng; Ding, Dazhi Fan, Zhenhong; Chen, Rushan

    2015-03-15

    A simplified plasma limiter prototype is proposed and the fluid model coupled with Maxwell's equations is established to describe the operating mechanism of plasma limiter. A three-dimensional (3-D) simplified sandwich structure plasma limiter model is analyzed with the spectral-element time-domain (SETD) method. The field breakdown threshold of air and argon at different frequency is predicted and compared with the experimental data and there is a good agreement between them for gas microwave breakdown discharge problems. Numerical results demonstrate that the two-layer plasma limiter (plasma-slab-plasma) has better protective characteristics than a one-layer plasma limiter (slab-plasma-slab) with the same length of gas chamber.

  16. A fluid model simulation of a simplified plasma limiter based on spectral-element time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Cheng; Ding, Dazhi; Fan, Zhenhong; Chen, Rushan

    2015-03-01

    A simplified plasma limiter prototype is proposed and the fluid model coupled with Maxwell's equations is established to describe the operating mechanism of plasma limiter. A three-dimensional (3-D) simplified sandwich structure plasma limiter model is analyzed with the spectral-element time-domain (SETD) method. The field breakdown threshold of air and argon at different frequency is predicted and compared with the experimental data and there is a good agreement between them for gas microwave breakdown discharge problems. Numerical results demonstrate that the two-layer plasma limiter (plasma-slab-plasma) has better protective characteristics than a one-layer plasma limiter (slab-plasma-slab) with the same length of gas chamber.

  17. Modeling Air Traffic Management Technologies with a Queuing Network Model of the National Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Dou; Lee, David; Johnson, Jesse; Gaier, Eric; Kostiuk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This report describes an integrated model of air traffic management (ATM) tools under development in two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs -Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) and Advanced Air Transport Technologies (AATT). The model is made by adjusting parameters of LMINET, a queuing network model of the National Airspace System (NAS), which the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) developed for NASA. Operating LMINET with models of various combinations of TAP and AATT will give quantitative information about the effects of the tools on operations of the NAS. The costs of delays under different scenarios are calculated. An extension of Air Carrier Investment Model (ACIM) under ASAC developed by the Institute for NASA maps the technologies' impacts on NASA operations into cross-comparable benefits estimates for technologies and sets of technologies.

  18. Performance criteria to evaluate air quality modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thunis, P.; Pederzoli, A.; Pernigotti, D.

    2012-11-01

    A set of statistical indicators fit for air quality model evaluation is selected based on experience and literature: The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), the bias, the Standard Deviation (SD) and the correlation coefficient (R). Among these the RMSE is proposed as the key one for the description of the model skill. Model Performance Criteria (MPC) to investigate whether model results are 'good enough' for a given application are calculated based on the observation uncertainty (U). The basic concept is to allow for model results a similar margin of tolerance (in terms of uncertainty) as for observations. U is pollutant, concentration level and station dependent, therefore the proposed MPC are normalized by U. Some composite diagrams are adapted or introduced to visualize model performance in terms of the proposed MPC and are illustrated in a real modeling application. The Target diagram, used to visualize the RMSE, is adapted with a new normalization on its axis, while complementary diagrams are proposed. In this first application the dependence of U on concentrations level is ignored, and an assumption on the pollutant dependent relative error is made. The advantages of this new approach are finally described.

  19. A synthesis of transplant experiments and ecological niche models suggests that range limits are often niche limits.

    PubMed

    Lee-Yaw, Julie A; Kharouba, Heather M; Bontrager, Megan; Mahony, Colin; Csergő, Anna Mária; Noreen, Annika M E; Li, Qin; Schuster, Richard; Angert, Amy L

    2016-06-01

    Global change has made it important to understand the factors that shape species' distributions. Central to this area of research is the question of whether species' range limits primarily reflect the distribution of suitable habitat (i.e. niche limits) or arise as a result of dispersal limitation. Over-the-edge transplant experiments and ecological niche models are commonly used to address this question, yet few studies have taken advantage of a combined approach for inferring the causes of range limits. Here, we synthesise results from existing transplant experiments with new information on the predicted suitability of sites based on niche models. We found that individual performance and habitat suitability independently decline beyond range limits across multiple species. Furthermore, inferences from transplant experiments and niche models were generally concordant within species, with 31 out of 40 cases fully supporting the hypothesis that range limits are niche limits. These results suggest that range limits are often niche limits and that the factors constraining species' ranges operate at scales detectable by both transplant experiments and niche models. In light of these findings, we outline an integrative framework for addressing the causes of range limits in individual species. PMID:27111656

  20. European Continental Scale Hydrological Model, Limitations and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouholahnejad, E.; Abbaspour, K.

    2014-12-01

    The pressures on water resources due to increasing levels of societal demand, increasing conflict of interest and uncertainties with regard to freshwater availability create challenges for water managers and policymakers in many parts of Europe. At the same time, climate change adds a new level of pressure and uncertainty with regard to freshwater supplies. On the other hand, the small-scale sectoral structure of water management is now reaching its limits. The integrated management of water in basins requires a new level of consideration where water bodies are to be viewed in the context of the whole river system and managed as a unit within their basins. In this research we present the limitations and challenges of modelling the hydrology of the continent Europe. The challenges include: data availability at continental scale and the use of globally available data, streamgauge data quality and their misleading impacts on model calibration, calibration of large-scale distributed model, uncertainty quantification, and computation time. We describe how to avoid over parameterization in calibration process and introduce a parallel processing scheme to overcome high computation time. We used Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) program as an integrated hydrology and crop growth simulator to model water resources of the Europe continent. Different components of water resources are simulated and crop yield and water quality are considered at the Hydrological Response Unit (HRU) level. The water resources are quantified at subbasin level with monthly time intervals for the period of 1970-2006. The use of a large-scale, high-resolution water resources models enables consistent and comprehensive examination of integrated system behavior through physically-based, data-driven simulation and provides the overall picture of water resources temporal and spatial distribution across the continent. The calibrated model and results provide information support to the European Water

  1. Two-stage Bayesian model to evaluate the effect of air pollution on chronic respiratory diseases using drug prescriptions.

    PubMed

    Blangiardo, Marta; Finazzi, Francesco; Cameletti, Michela

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to high levels of air pollutant concentration is known to be associated with respiratory problems which can translate into higher morbidity and mortality rates. The link between air pollution and population health has mainly been assessed considering air quality and hospitalisation or mortality data. However, this approach limits the analysis to individuals characterised by severe conditions. In this paper we evaluate the link between air pollution and respiratory diseases using general practice drug prescriptions for chronic respiratory diseases, which allow to draw conclusions based on the general population. We propose a two-stage statistical approach: in the first stage we specify a space-time model to estimate the monthly NO2 concentration integrating several data sources characterised by different spatio-temporal resolution; in the second stage we link the concentration to the β2-agonists prescribed monthly by general practices in England and we model the prescription rates through a small area approach. PMID:27494955

  2. Model-based estimation of changes in air temperature seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Trigo, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    Seasonality is a ubiquitous feature in climate time series. Climate change is expected to involve not only changes in the mean of climate parameters but also changes in the characteristics of the corresponding seasonal cycle. Therefore the identification and quantification of changes in seasonality is a highly relevant topic in climate analysis, particularly in a global warming context. However, the analysis of seasonality is far from a trivial task. A key challenge is the discrimination between long-term changes in the mean and long-term changes in the seasonal pattern itself, which requires the use of appropriate statistical approaches in order to be able to distinguish between overall trends in the mean and trends in the seasons. Model based approaches are particularly suitable for the analysis of seasonality, enabling to assess uncertainties in the amplitude and phase of seasonal patterns within a well defined statistical framework. This work addresses the changes in the seasonality of air temperature over the 20th century. The analysed data are global air temperature values close to surface (2m above ground) and mid-troposphere (500 hPa geopotential height) from the recently developed 20th century reanalysis. This new 3-D Reanalysis dataset is available since 1891, considerably extending all other Reanalyses currently in use (e.g. NCAR, ECWMF), and was obtained with the Ensemble Filter (Compo et al., 2006) by assimilation of pressure observations into a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model that includes the radiative effects of historical time-varying CO2 concentrations, volcanic aerosol emissions and solar output variations. A modeling approach based on autoregression (Barbosa et al, 2008; Barbosa, 2009) is applied within a Bayesian framework for the estimation of a time varying seasonal pattern and further quantification of changes in the amplitude and phase of air temperature over the 20th century. Barbosa, SM, Silva, ME, Fernandes, MJ

  3. An optimization model for the US Air-Traffic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulvey, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic approach for monitoring U.S. air traffic was developed in the context of system-wide planning and control. Towards this end, a network optimization model with nonlinear objectives was chosen as the central element in the planning/control system. The network representation was selected because: (1) it provides a comprehensive structure for depicting essential aspects of the air traffic system, (2) it can be solved efficiently for large scale problems, and (3) the design can be easily communicated to non-technical users through computer graphics. Briefly, the network planning models consider the flow of traffic through a graph as the basic structure. Nodes depict locations and time periods for either individual planes or for aggregated groups of airplanes. Arcs define variables as actual airplanes flying through space or as delays across time periods. As such, a special case of the network can be used to model the so called flow control problem. Due to the large number of interacting variables and the difficulty in subdividing the problem into relatively independent subproblems, an integrated model was designed which will depict the entire high level (above 29000 feet) jet route system for the 48 contiguous states in the U.S. As a first step in demonstrating the concept's feasibility a nonlinear risk/cost model was developed for the Indianapolis Airspace. The nonlinear network program --NLPNETG-- was employed in solving the resulting test cases. This optimization program uses the Truncated-Newton method (quadratic approximation) for determining the search direction at each iteration in the nonlinear algorithm. It was shown that aircraft could be re-routed in an optimal fashion whenever traffic congestion increased beyond an acceptable level, as measured by the nonlinear risk function.

  4. On eddy accumulation with limited conditional sampling to measure air-surface exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.; Hart, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of turbulence data collected at a height of 12.3 m above grasslands was carried out to illustrate some of the limitations and possible improvements in methods to compute vertical fluxes of trace substances by the eddy accumulation technique with conditional sampling. The empirical coefficient used in the technique has a slight dependence on atmospheric stability, which can be minimized by using a threshold vertical velocity equal to approximately 0.75{sigma}{sub w}, below which chemical sampling is suspended. This protocol results in a smaller chemical sample but increases the differences in concentrations by approximately 70%. For effective conditional sampling when mass is being accumulated in a trap or reservoir, the time of sampling during updrafts versus downdrafts should be measured and used to adjust estimates of the mean concentrations.

  5. Modeled occupational exposures to gas-phase medical laser-generated air contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Julia F; Lacey, Steven E; Jones, Rachael M

    2014-01-01

    Exposure monitoring data indicate the potential for substantive exposure to laser-generated air contaminants (LGAC); however the diversity of medical lasers and their applications limit generalization from direct workplace monitoring. Emission rates of seven previously reported gas-phase constituents of medical laser-generated air contaminants (LGAC) were determined experimentally and used in a semi-empirical two-zone model to estimate a range of plausible occupational exposures to health care staff. Single-source emission rates were generated in an emission chamber as a one-compartment mass balance model at steady-state. Clinical facility parameters such as room size and ventilation rate were based on standard ventilation and environmental conditions required for a laser surgical facility in compliance with regulatory agencies. All input variables in the model including point source emission rates were varied over an appropriate distribution in a Monte Carlo simulation to generate a range of time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations in the near and far field zones of the room in a conservative approach inclusive of all contributing factors to inform future predictive models. The concentrations were assessed for risk and the highest values were shown to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than the relevant occupational exposure limits (OELs). Estimated values do not appear to present a significant exposure hazard within the conditions of our emission rate estimates. PMID:24762065

  6. A Well-Mixed Computational Model for Estimating Room Air Levels of Selected Constituents from E-Vapor Product Use

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Ali A.; Pithawalla, Yezdi B.; Liu, Jianmin; Oldham, Michael J.; Wagner, Karl A.; Frost-Pineda, Kimberly; Sarkar, Mohamadi A.

    2016-01-01

    Concerns have been raised in the literature for the potential of secondhand exposure from e-vapor product (EVP) use. It would be difficult to experimentally determine the impact of various factors on secondhand exposure including, but not limited to, room characteristics (indoor space size, ventilation rate), device specifications (aerosol mass delivery, e-liquid composition), and use behavior (number of users and usage frequency). Therefore, a well-mixed computational model was developed to estimate the indoor levels of constituents from EVPs under a variety of conditions. The model is based on physical and thermodynamic interactions between aerosol, vapor, and air, similar to indoor air models referred to by the Environmental Protection Agency. The model results agree well with measured indoor air levels of nicotine from two sources: smoking machine-generated aerosol and aerosol exhaled from EVP use. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increasing air exchange rate reduces room air level of constituents, as more material is carried away. The effect of the amount of aerosol released into the space due to variability in exhalation was also evaluated. The model can estimate the room air level of constituents as a function of time, which may be used to assess the level of non-user exposure over time. PMID:27537903

  7. A Well-Mixed Computational Model for Estimating Room Air Levels of Selected Constituents from E-Vapor Product Use.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Ali A; Pithawalla, Yezdi B; Liu, Jianmin; Oldham, Michael J; Wagner, Karl A; Frost-Pineda, Kimberly; Sarkar, Mohamadi A

    2016-01-01

    Concerns have been raised in the literature for the potential of secondhand exposure from e-vapor product (EVP) use. It would be difficult to experimentally determine the impact of various factors on secondhand exposure including, but not limited to, room characteristics (indoor space size, ventilation rate), device specifications (aerosol mass delivery, e-liquid composition), and use behavior (number of users and usage frequency). Therefore, a well-mixed computational model was developed to estimate the indoor levels of constituents from EVPs under a variety of conditions. The model is based on physical and thermodynamic interactions between aerosol, vapor, and air, similar to indoor air models referred to by the Environmental Protection Agency. The model results agree well with measured indoor air levels of nicotine from two sources: smoking machine-generated aerosol and aerosol exhaled from EVP use. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increasing air exchange rate reduces room air level of constituents, as more material is carried away. The effect of the amount of aerosol released into the space due to variability in exhalation was also evaluated. The model can estimate the room air level of constituents as a function of time, which may be used to assess the level of non-user exposure over time. PMID:27537903

  8. Air quality modeling of selected aromatic and non-aromatic air toxics in the Houston urban and industrial airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coarfa, Violeta Florentina

    2007-12-01

    Air toxics, also called hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), pose a serious threat to human health and the environment. Their study is important in the Houston area, where point sources, mostly located along the Ship Channel, mobile and area sources contribute to large emissions of such toxic pollutants. Previous studies carried out in this area found dangerous levels of different HAPs in the atmosphere. This thesis presents several studies that were performed for the aromatic and non-aromatic air toxics in the HGA. For these studies we developed several tools: (1) a refined chemical mechanism, which explicitly represents 18 aromatic air toxics that were lumped under two model species by the previous version, based on their reactivity with the hydroxyl radical; (2) an engineering version of an existing air toxics photochemical model that enables us to perform much faster long-term simulations compared to the original model, that leads to a 8--9 times improvement in the running time across different computing platforms; (3) a combined emission inventory based on the available emission databases. Using the developed tools, we quantified the mobile source impact on a few selected air toxics, and analyzed the temporal and spatial variation of selected aromatic and non-aromatic air toxics in a few regions within the Houston area; these regions were characterized by different emissions and environmental conditions.

  9. Technical Note: A generic law-of-the-minimum flux limiter for simulating substrate limitation in biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present a generic flux limiter to account for mass limitations from an arbitrary number of substrates in a biogeochemical reaction network. The flux limiter is based on the observation that substrate (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus) limitation in biogeochemical models can be represented as to ensure mass conservative and non-negative numerical solutions to the governing ordinary differential equations. Application of the flux limiter includes two steps: (1) formulation of the biogeochemical processes with a matrix of stoichiometric coefficients and (2) application of Liebig's law of the minimum using the dynamic stoichiometric relationship of the reactants. This approach contrasts with the ad hoc down-regulation approaches that are implemented in many existing models (such as CLM4.5 and the ACME (Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy) Land Model (ALM)) of carbon and nutrient interactions, which are error prone when adding new processes, even for experienced modelers. Through an example implementation with a CENTURY-like decomposition model that includes carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus, we show that our approach (1) produced almost identical results to that from the ad hoc down-regulation approaches under non-limiting nutrient conditions, (2) properly resolved the negative solutions under substrate-limited conditions where the simple clipping approach failed, (3) successfully avoided the potential conceptual ambiguities that are implied by those ad hoc down-regulation approaches. We expect our approach will make future biogeochemical models easier to improve and more robust.

  10. Future Air Traffic Growth and Schedule Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, William M. (Technical Monitor); Smith, Jeremy C.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2004-01-01

    The Future Air Traffic Growth and Schedule Model was developed as an implementation of the Fratar algorithm to project future traffic flow between airports in a system and of then scheduling the additional flights to reflect current passenger time-of-travel preferences. The methodology produces an unconstrained future schedule from a current (or baseline) schedule and the airport operations growth rates. As an example of the use of the model, future schedules are projected for 2010 and 2022 for all flights arriving at, departing from, or flying between all continental United States airports that had commercial scheduled service for May 17, 2002. Inter-continental US traffic and airports are included and the traffic is also grown with the Fratar methodology to account for their arrivals and departures to the continental US airports. Input data sets derived from the Official Airline Guide (OAG) data and FAA Terminal Area Forecast (TAF) are included in the examples of the computer code execution.

  11. Future Air Traffic Growth and Schedule Model, Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, William M. (Technical Monitor); Smith, Jeremy C.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2004-01-01

    The Future Air Traffic Growth and Schedule Model was developed as an implementation of the Fratar algorithm to project future traffic flow between airports in a system and of then scheduling the additional flights to reflect current passenger time-of-travel preferences. The methodology produces an unconstrained future schedule from a current (or baseline) schedule and the airport operations growth rates. As an example of the use of the model, future schedules are projected for 2010 and 2022 for all flights arriving at, departing from, or flying between all continental United States airports that had commercial scheduled service for May 17, 2002. Inter-continental US traffic and airports are included and the traffic is also grown with the Fratar methodology to account for their arrivals and departures to the continental US airports. Input data sets derived from the Official Airline Guide (OAG) data and FAA Terminal Area Forecast (TAF) are included in the examples of the computer code execution.

  12. Validation of two air quality models for Indian mining conditions.

    PubMed

    Chaulya, S K; Ahmad, M; Singh, R S; Bandopadhyay, L K; Bondyopadhay, C; Mondal, G C

    2003-02-01

    All major mining activity particularly opencast mining contributes to the problem of suspended particulate matter (SPM) directly or indirectly. Therefore, assessment and prediction are required to prevent and minimize the deterioration of SPM due to various opencast mining operations. Determination of emission rate of SPM for these activities and validation of air quality models are the first and foremost concern. In view of the above, the study was taken up for determination of emission rate for SPM to calculate emission rate of various opencast mining activities and validation of commonly used two air quality models for Indian mining conditions. To achieve the objectives, eight coal and three iron ore mining sites were selected to generate site specific emission data by considering type of mining, method of working, geographical location, accessibility and above all resource availability. The study covers various mining activities and locations including drilling, overburden loading and unloading, coal/mineral loading and unloading, coal handling or screening plant, exposed overburden dump, stock yard, workshop, exposed pit surface, transport road and haul road. Validation of the study was carried out through Fugitive Dust Model (FDM) and Point, Area and Line sources model (PAL2) by assigning the measured emission rate for each mining activity, meteorological data and other details of the respective mine as an input to the models. Both the models were run separately for the same set of input data for each mine to get the predicted SPM concentration at three receptor locations for each mine. The receptor locations were selected such a way that at the same places the actual filed measurement were carried out for SPM concentration. Statistical analysis was carried out to assess the performance of the models based on a set measured and predicted SPM concentration data. The value of coefficient of correlation for PAL2 and FDM was calculated to be 0.990-0.994 and 0

  13. THE EMERGENCE OF NUMERICAL AIR QUALITY FORCASTING MODELS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years the U.S. and other nations have begun programs for short-term local through regional air quality forecasting based upon numerical three-dimensional air quality grid models. These numerical air quality forecast (NAQF) models and systems have been developed and test...

  14. THE EMERGENCE OF NUMERICAL AIR QUALITY FORECASTING MODELS AND THEIR APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years the U.S. and other nations have begun programs for short-term local through regional air quality forecasting based upon numerical three-dimensional air quality grid models. These numerical air quality forecast (NAQF) models and systems have been developed and test...

  15. Measuring and modeling air exchange rates inside taxi cabs in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shi; Yu, Nu; Wang, Yueyan; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-12-01

    Air exchange rates (AERs) have a direct impact on traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) levels inside vehicles. Taxi drivers are occupationally exposed to TRAP on a daily basis, yet there is limited measurement of AERs in taxi cabs. To fill this gap, AERs were quantified in 22 representative Los Angeles taxi cabs including 10 Prius, 5 Crown Victoria, 3 Camry, 3 Caravan, and 1 Uplander under realistic driving (RD) conditions. To further study the impacts of window position and ventilation settings on taxi AERs, additional tests were conducted on 14 taxis with windows closed (WC) and on the other 8 taxis with not only windows closed but also medium fan speed (WC-MFS) under outdoor air mode. Under RD conditions, the AERs in all 22 cabs had a mean of 63 h-1 with a median of 38 h-1. Similar AERs were observed under WC condition when compared to those measured under RD condition. Under WC-MFS condition, AERs were significantly increased in all taxi cabs, when compared with those measured under RD condition. A General Estimating Equation (GEE) model was developed and the modeling results showed that vehicle model was a significant factor in determining the AERs in taxi cabs under RD condition. Driving speed and car age were positively associated with AERs but not statistically significant. Overall, AERs measured in taxi cabs were much higher than typical AERs people usually encounter in indoor environments such as homes, offices, and even regular passenger vehicles.

  16. Rocket exhaust effluent modeling for tropospheric air quality and environmental assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Stewart, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    The various techniques for diffusion predictions to support air quality predictions and environmental assessments for aerospace applications are discussed in terms of limitations imposed by atmospheric data. This affords an introduction to the rationale behind the selection of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion (REED) program. The models utilized in the NASA/MSFC REED program are explained. This program is then evaluated in terms of some results from a joint MSFC/Langley Research Center/Kennedy Space Center Titan Exhaust Effluent Prediction and Monitoring Program.

  17. Molecular Limits to the Quantum Confinement Model in Diamond Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Dahl, J E; Liu, S E; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Moller, T

    2005-04-07

    The electronic structure of monodisperse, hydrogen-passivated diamond clusters in the gas phase has been studied with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the bulk-related unoccupied states do not exhibit any quantum confinement. Additionally, density of states below the bulk absorption edge appears, consisting of features correlated to CH and CH{sub 2} hydrogen surface termination, resulting in an effective red shift of the lowest unoccupied states. The results contradict the commonly used and very successful quantum confinement model for semiconductors which predicts increasing band edge blue shifts with decreasing particle size. Our findings indicate that in the ultimate size limit for nanocrystals a more molecular description is necessary.

  18. Thermodynamical Limit for Correlated Gaussian Random Energy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contucci, P.; Esposti, M. Degli; Giardinà, C.; Graffi, S.

    Let {EΣ(N)}ΣΣN be a family of |ΣN|=2N centered unit Gaussian random variables defined by the covariance matrix CN of elements cN(Σ,τ):=Av(EΣ(N)Eτ(N)) and the corresponding random Hamiltonian. Then the quenched thermodynamical limit exists if, for every decomposition N=N1+N2, and all pairs (Σ,τ)ΣN×ΣN: where πk(Σ),k=1,2 are the projections of ΣΣN into ΣNk. The condition is explicitly verified for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick, the even p-spin, the Derrida REM and the Derrida-Gardner GREM models.

  19. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  20. Application of SIM-air modeling tools to assess air quality in Indian cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttikunda, Sarath K.; Jawahar, Puja

    2012-12-01

    A prerequisite to an air quality management plan for a city is some idea of the main sources of pollution and their contributions for a city. This paper presents the results of an application of the SIM-air modeling tool in six Indian cities - Pune, Chennai, Indore, Ahmedabad, Surat, and Rajkot. Using existing and publicly available data, we put together a baseline of multi-pollutant emissions for each of the cities and then calculate concentrations, health impacts, and model alternative scenarios for 2020. The measured annual PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 micron meter) concentrations in μg m-3 averaged 94.7 ± 45.4 in Pune, 73.1 ± 33.7 in Chennai, 118.8 ± 44.3 in Indore, 94.0 ± 20.4 in Ahmedabad, 89.4 ± 12.1 in Surat, and 105.0 ± 25.6 in Rajkot, all exceeding the annual standard of 60 μg m-3. The PM10 inventory in tons/year for the year 2010 of 38,400 in Pune, 50,200 in Chennai, 18,600 in Indore, 31,900 in Ahmedabad, 20,000 in Surat, and 14,000 in Rajkot, is further spatially segregated into 1 km grids and includes all known sources such as transport, road dust, residential, power plants, industries (including the brick kilns), waste burning, and diesel generator sets. We use the ATMoS chemical transport model to validate the emissions inventory and estimate an annual premature mortality due to particulate pollution of 15,200 for the year 2010 for the six cities. Of the estimated 21,400 premature deaths in the six cities in 2020, we estimate that implementation of the six interventions in the transport and brick kiln sectors, can potentially save 5870 lives (27%) annually and result in an annual reduction of 16.8 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities.

  1. PREFACE SPECIAL ISSUE ON MODEL EVALUATION: EVALUATION OF URBAN AND REGIONAL EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Preface to the Special Edition on Model Evaluation: Evaluation of Urban and Regional Eulerian Air Quality Models" is a brief introduction to the papers included in a special issue of Atmospheric Environment. The Preface provides a background for the papers, which have thei...

  2. AIR QUALITY MODELING AT NEIGHBORHOOD SCALES TO IMPROVE HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality modeling is an integral component of risk assessment and of subsequent development of effective and efficient management of air quality. Urban areas introduce of fresh sources of pollutants into regional background producing significant spatial variability of the co...

  3. Limitations to soybean photosynthesis at elevated carbon dioxide in free-air enrichment and open top chamber systems.

    PubMed

    Bunce, James A

    2014-09-01

    It has been suggested that the stimulation of soybean photosynthesis by elevated CO2 was less in free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems than in open top chambers (OTC), which might explain smaller yield increases at elevated CO2 in FACE systems. However, this has not been tested using the same cultivars grown in the same location. I tested whether soybean photosynthesis at high light and elevated CO2 (ambient+180 μmol mol(-1)) was limited by electron transport (J) in FACE systems but by ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylation capacity (VCmax) in OTC. FACE systems with daytime and continuous CO2 enrichment were also compared. The results indicated that in both cultivars examined, midday photosynthesis at high light was always limited by VCmax, both in the FACE and in the OTC systems. Daytime only CO2 enrichment did not affect photosynthetic parameters or limitations, but did result in significantly smaller yields in both cultivars than continuous elevation. Photosynthesis measured at low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) was not higher at elevated than at ambient CO2, because of an acclimation to elevated CO2 which was only evident at low measurement PPFDs.

  4. Atmospheric Modelling for Air Quality Study over the complex Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surapipith, Vanisa; Panday, Arnico; Mukherji, Aditi; Banmali Pradhan, Bidya; Blumer, Sandro

    2014-05-01

    An Atmospheric Modelling System has been set up at International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) for the assessment of Air Quality across the Himalaya mountain ranges. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model version 3.5 has been implemented over the regional domain, stretching across 4995 x 4455 km2 centred at Ichhyakamana , the ICIMOD newly setting-up mountain-peak station (1860 m) in central Nepal, and covering terrains from sea-level to the Everest (8848 m). Simulation is carried out for the winter time period, i.e. December 2012 to February 2013, when there was an intensive field campaign SusKat, where at least 7 super stations were collecting meteorology and chemical parameters on various sites. The very complex terrain requires a high horizontal resolution (1 × 1 km2), which is achieved by nesting the domain of interest, e.g. Kathmandu Valley, into 3 coarser ones (27, 9, 3 km resolution). Model validation is performed against the field data as well as satellite data, and the challenge of capturing the necessary atmospheric processes is discussed, before moving forward with the fully coupled chemistry module (WRF-Chem), having local and regional emission databases as input. The effort aims at finding a better understanding of the atmospheric processes and air quality impact on the mountain population, as well as the impact of the long-range transport, particularly of Black Carbon aerosol deposition, to the radiative budget over the Himalayan glaciers. The higher rate of snowcap melting, and shrinkage of permafrost as noticed by glaciologists is a concern. Better prediction will supply crucial information to form the proper mitigation and adaptation strategies for saving people lives across the Himalayas in the changing climate.

  5. Regional Air Toxics Modeling in California's San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martien, P. T.; Tanrikulu, S.; Tran, C.; Fairley, D.; Jia, Y.; Fanai, A.; Reid, S.; Yarwood, G.; Emery, C.

    2011-12-01

    Regional toxics modeling conducted for California's San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) estimated potential cancer risk from diesel particulate matter (DPM) and four key reactive toxic gaseous pollutants (1,3-butadiene, benzene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde). Concentrations of other non-cancerous gaseous toxic air contaminants, including acrolein, were also generated. In this study, meteorological fields generated from July and December periods in 2000 and emissions from 2005 provided inputs to a three-dimensional air quality model at high spatial resolution (1x1 km^2 grid), from which a baseline set of annual risk values was estimated. Simulated risk maps show highest annual average DPM concentrations and cancer risks were located near and downwind of major freeways and near the Port of Oakland, a major container port in the area. Population weighted risks, using 2000 census data, were found to be highest in highly urbanized areas adjacent to significant DPM sources. For summer, the ratio of mean measured elemental carbon to mean modeled DPM was 0.78, conforming roughly to expectations. But for winter the ratio is 1.13, suggesting other sources of elemental carbon, such as wood smoke, are important. Simulated annual estimates for benzene and 1-3, butadiene compared well to measured annual estimates. Simulated acrolein and formaldehyde significantly under-predicted observed values. Simulations repeated using projected 2015 toxic emissions predicted that potential cancer risk dropped significantly in all areas throughout the SFBA. Emissions estimates for 2015 included the State of California's recently adopted on-road truck rule. Emission estimates of DPM are projected to drop about 70% between 2005 and 2015 in the SFBA, with a commensurate reduction in potential cancer risks. However, due to projected shifts in population during this period, with urban densification close to DPM sources outpacing emission reductions, there are some areas where population-weighted risks

  6. The balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The study of turnover of carbon and oxygen is an important line of scientific investigation. This line takes on special significance in conditions of soil degradation, which leads to the excess content of carbon dioxide and, as result, decrease of oxygen in the atmosphere. The aim of this article is a statement the balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air (ratio O/C) depending on consumption and assimilation by plants of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the value of the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh). Basis of model was the following: green vascular plants are facultative heterotrophic organisms with symbiotic digestion and nutrition. According to the trophology viewpoint, the plant consumption of organic compounds broadens greatly a notion about the plant nutrition and ways of its regulation. In particular, beside the main known cycle of carbon: plant - litter - humus - carbon dioxide - plant, there is the second carbon cycle (turnover of organic compounds): plant - litter - humus - DOM - plant. The biogeochemical meaning of consumption of organic compounds by plants is that plants build the structural and functional blocks of biological macromolecules in their bodies. It provides receiving of a certain "energy payoff" by plants, which leads to increase of plant biomass by both an inclusion of allochthonous organic molecules in plant tissues, and positive effect of organic compounds on plant metabolic processes. One more of powerful ecological consequence of a heterotrophic nutrition of green plants is oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air. As the organic molecules in the second biological cycle of carbon are built in plants without considerable chemical change, the atmospheric air is enriched on that amount of oxygen, which would be required on oxidation of the organic molecules absorbed by plants, in result. It was accepted that: plant-soil system was climax, the plant community was grassy, initial contents of carbon in phytomass was accepted

  7. Impact of air traffic emissions on airport air quality. Multi-scale modeling, test bed and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.; Vuillot, F.; Durand, Y.; Courbet, B.; Janin, F.; Copalle, A.; Guin, C.; Paux, E.; Vannier, F.; Talbaut, M.; Weill, M.

    2004-12-01

    Air traffic emissions are playing a significant role in airport air quality. Engine emissions contribute to the ozone and PM formation. There is an emergence of a need to develop advanced numerical tools and airport emission databases for air pollution studies. Field monitoring at airports necessary to support model assessment is still limited in time and space. The French ONERA AIRPUR project has focused on three objectives: emission inventories; dispersion models; field measurements. Results are presented and discussed in this paper. The ground spatial distribution of LTO emissions using realistic aircraft trajectories, aircraft-engine classification by ICAO, fuel flow methodology and diurnal variations of fleet number, is presented and discussed. Exhaust species time evolution is simulated using a chemical-dispersion model. Results show high emissions of NOx during LTO, and a maximum of CO and Hydrocarbons during taxi. Depending on seasons, the NOx lifetime is varying differently; lower concentration is calculated far away from LTO emissions. Longer-lived pollutants such as ozone are formed downstream and require the use of advanced dispersion models. For this reason, two interactive models coupling the micro and the regional scales are developed and used in this work. A 3D CFD model (CEDRE) simulates the flow characteristics around buildings and the dispersion of emissions. CEDRE boundary conditions are provided by the 3D nested dispersion model MEDIUM/MM5, which includes a surface boundary layer chemistry and calculates the concentration of pollutants from the local to the airport vicinities. The CFD results show a tracer accumulation calculated downstream beside terminals, consistent with observations at some mega-airports. Sensibility studies are conducted to highlight the impact of emissions on ozone formation with MEDIUM. Results show that longer-lived species are produced downstream, their concentration depending on NOx, aromatics and VOC released by

  8. Modelling of air pollution on a military airfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Kotlarz, Wojciech

    The paper presents a numerical study of exhaust emission and pollutant dispersion of carbon monoxide on a military airfield. Investigations have been carried out for typical conditions of aircraft usage in the Polish Air Force Academy in Dęblin. Two different types of aircraft have been taken into account. One of them is an MI-2 helicopter, the second is a TS-11 plane. Both are used in military pilot education in Poland. Exhaust emission of CO from those aircrafts has been obtained in an experiment carried out on an engine test stand. CO concentrations have been calculated for different meteorological conditions (averaged from 5 years observations) and selected conditions of aircraft use. The finite volume method has been used to discretise the equation describing the process of pollutant dispersion. In addition, the two-cycle decomposition method has been employed to solve the set of ordinary differential equations of the first order obtained after discretisation of the advection-diffusion equation. A meteorological pre-processor, based on relationships resulting from the Monin-Obukhov theory, is used to define eddy diffusivity and the profile of air speed in the lower layer of the atmosphere. In the paper, the computer model and calculated average concentration of CO in the Dęblin airfield during typical flights are presented. The goal of the computational analysis is to predict CO pollution level in the workplace of aircraft service personnel.

  9. Numerical models for afterburning of TNT detonation products in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, L.; Zhang, F.; Ripley, R. C.

    2013-11-01

    Afterburning occurs when fuel-rich explosive detonation products react with oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere. This energy release can further contribute to the air blast, resulting in a more severe explosion hazard particularly in confined scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the products equation of state (EOS) on the prediction of the efficiency of trinitrotoluene (TNT) afterburning and the times of arrival of reverberating shock waves in a closed chamber. A new EOS is proposed, denoted the Afterburning (AB) EOS. This EOS employs the JWL EOS in the high pressure regime, transitioning to a Variable-Gamma (VG) EOS at lower pressures. Simulations of three TNT charges suspended in a explosion chamber were performed. When compared to numerical results using existing methods, it was determined that the Afterburning EOS delays the shock arrival times giving better agreement with the experimental measurements in the early to mid time. In the late time, the Afterburning EOS roughly halved the error between the experimental measurements and results obtained using existing methods. Use of the Afterburning EOS for products with the Variable-Gamma EOS for the surrounding air further significantly improved results, both in the transient solution and the quasi-static pressure. This final combination of EOS and mixture model is recommended for future studies involving afterburning explosives, particularly those in partial and full confinement.

  10. Air Quality Modeling of Ozone Radical Precursors in Houston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglueck, B.; Czader, B.; Li, X.

    2013-05-01

    The Houston-Galveston area has one of the highest ozone concentrations in the U.S., often exceeding the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone. Photochemical modeling of ozone formation in the Houston area generally underestimates the concentrations of free radical precursors contributing to ozone formation. Here we present modeling results using the Weather Research Forecast - Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ) modeling system for the Houston-Galveston area. Meteorological parameters predicted by WRF are well simulated most of the time, including planetary boundary layer heights. Air quality simulations for the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria area using the combined WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ system showed overall good results for ozone and many other trace gases. HONO morning peaks are no longer underpredicted, on some occasions they are slightly overpredicted, which can be linked to NO2 overprediction. However, CMAQ mispredicts other trace gases like HO2, H2O2 and CH3OOH concentrations. The WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ system was also used to elucidate the relative importance of various photolysis processes as radical sources in the Houston atmosphere. Morning HOx formation is dominated by HONO while ozone contributes the most during midday. HONO contribution to HOx formation is more pronounced at the surface layer where most of it is formed. On the other hand, radical production from ozone is more important at elevated levels where higher concentrations of ozone are observed. Formaldehyde contributes up to 40% and also peaks during mid-day, but on days when high morning concentrations of formaldehyde are observed its contribution to HOx in the morning exceeds that of ozone. Photolysis of H2O2 is a minor contributor to radical levels. The process analysis tool available in CMAQ was utilized to analyze photochemical processes leading to ozone production and chemical transformations along trajectories linking a site at the Houston Ship Channel and the University of

  11. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Modeling for Combined Meteorology and Air Quality Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric Eulerian grid models for mesoscale and larger applications require sub-grid models for turbulent vertical exchange processes, particularly within the Planetary Boundary Layer (PSL). In combined meteorology and air quality modeling systems consistent PSL modeling of wi...

  12. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beans (LAMFI-USP) by the 10B ( p ,αγ(7Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 1016 at/cm2.

  13. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-11

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI-USP) by the {sup 10}B(p,αγ({sup 7}Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 10{sup 16} at/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Air Pollution Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) in Health Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    In health studies, traffic-related air pollution is associated with adverse respiratory effects. Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect ...

  15. Zebrafish models of human motor neuron diseases: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Babin, Patrick J; Goizet, Cyril; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2014-07-01

    Motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are an etiologically heterogeneous group of disorders of neurodegenerative origin, which result in degeneration of lower (LMNs) and/or upper motor neurons (UMNs). Neurodegenerative MNDs include pure hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), which involves specific degeneration of UMNs, leading to progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. In contrast, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) involves the specific degeneration of LMNs, with symmetrical muscle weakness and atrophy. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common adult-onset MND, is characterized by the degeneration of both UMNs and LMNs, leading to progressive muscle weakness, atrophy, and spasticity. A review of the comparative neuroanatomy of the human and zebrafish motor systems showed that, while the zebrafish was a homologous model for LMN disorders, such as SMA, it was only partially relevant in the case of UMN disorders, due to the absence of corticospinal and rubrospinal tracts in its central nervous system. Even considering the limitation of this model to fully reproduce the human UMN disorders, zebrafish offer an excellent alternative vertebrate model for the molecular and genetic dissection of MND mechanisms. Its advantages include the conservation of genome and physiological processes and applicable in vivo tools, including easy imaging, loss or gain of function methods, behavioral tests to examine changes in motor activity, and the ease of simultaneous chemical/drug testing on large numbers of animals. This facilitates the assessment of the environmental origin of MNDs, alone or in combination with genetic traits and putative modifier genes. Positive hits obtained by phenotype-based small-molecule screening using zebrafish may potentially be effective drugs for treatment of human MNDs.

  16. Zebrafish models of human motor neuron diseases: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Babin, Patrick J; Goizet, Cyril; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2014-07-01

    Motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are an etiologically heterogeneous group of disorders of neurodegenerative origin, which result in degeneration of lower (LMNs) and/or upper motor neurons (UMNs). Neurodegenerative MNDs include pure hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), which involves specific degeneration of UMNs, leading to progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. In contrast, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) involves the specific degeneration of LMNs, with symmetrical muscle weakness and atrophy. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common adult-onset MND, is characterized by the degeneration of both UMNs and LMNs, leading to progressive muscle weakness, atrophy, and spasticity. A review of the comparative neuroanatomy of the human and zebrafish motor systems showed that, while the zebrafish was a homologous model for LMN disorders, such as SMA, it was only partially relevant in the case of UMN disorders, due to the absence of corticospinal and rubrospinal tracts in its central nervous system. Even considering the limitation of this model to fully reproduce the human UMN disorders, zebrafish offer an excellent alternative vertebrate model for the molecular and genetic dissection of MND mechanisms. Its advantages include the conservation of genome and physiological processes and applicable in vivo tools, including easy imaging, loss or gain of function methods, behavioral tests to examine changes in motor activity, and the ease of simultaneous chemical/drug testing on large numbers of animals. This facilitates the assessment of the environmental origin of MNDs, alone or in combination with genetic traits and putative modifier genes. Positive hits obtained by phenotype-based small-molecule screening using zebrafish may potentially be effective drugs for treatment of human MNDs. PMID:24705136

  17. Equivalent Air Spring Suspension Model for Quarter-Passive Model of Passenger Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Haider J.; Chen, Jie; Nassar, Ameen A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the GENSIS air spring suspension system equivalence to a passive suspension system. The SIMULINK simulation together with the OptiY optimization is used to obtain the air spring suspension model equivalent to passive suspension system, where the car body response difference from both systems with the same road profile inputs is used as the objective function for optimization (OptiY program). The parameters of air spring system such as initial pressure, volume of bag, length of surge pipe, diameter of surge pipe, and volume of reservoir are obtained from optimization. The simulation results show that the air spring suspension equivalent system can produce responses very close to the passive suspension system. PMID:27351020

  18. Equivalent Air Spring Suspension Model for Quarter-Passive Model of Passenger Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Abid, Haider J; Chen, Jie; Nassar, Ameen A

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the GENSIS air spring suspension system equivalence to a passive suspension system. The SIMULINK simulation together with the OptiY optimization is used to obtain the air spring suspension model equivalent to passive suspension system, where the car body response difference from both systems with the same road profile inputs is used as the objective function for optimization (OptiY program). The parameters of air spring system such as initial pressure, volume of bag, length of surge pipe, diameter of surge pipe, and volume of reservoir are obtained from optimization. The simulation results show that the air spring suspension equivalent system can produce responses very close to the passive suspension system.

  19. RESOLVING NEIGHBORHOOD-SCALE AIR TOXICS MODELING: A CASE STUDY IN WILMINGTON, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality modeling is useful for characterizing exposures to air pollutants. While models typically provide results on regional scales, there is a need for refined modeling approaches capable of resolving concentrations on the scale of tens of meters, across modeling domains 1...

  20. Air Conditioning Stall Phenomenon Testing, Model Development, and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Irminger, Philip; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Huijuan; Smith, Travis; Rice, C Keith; Li, Fangxing; Adhikari, Sarina

    2012-01-01

    Electric distribution systems are experiencing power quality issues of extended reduced voltage due to fault-induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR). FIDVR occurs in part because modern air conditioner (A/C) and heat pump compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage sag or dip such as a sub-transmission fault. They are more susceptible than older A/C compressor motors due to the low inertia of these newer and more energy efficient motors. There is a concern that these local reduced voltage events on the distribution system will become more frequent and prevalent and will combine over larger areas and challenge transmission system voltage and ultimately power grid reliability. The Distributed Energy Communications and Controls (DECC) Laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been employed to (1) test, (2) characterize and (3) model the A/C stall phenomenon.

  1. Air-Flow Simulation in Realistic Models of the Trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, T; Schwartz, P; Trebotich, D

    2004-12-09

    In this article we present preliminary results from a new technique for flow simulation in realistic anatomical airways. The airways are extracted by means of Level-Sets methods that accurately model the complex and varying surfaces of anatomical objects. The surfaces obtained are defined at the sub-pixel level where they intersect the Cartesian grid of the image domain. It is therefore straightforward to construct embedded boundary representations of these objects on the same grid, for which recent work has enabled discretization of the Navier- Stokes equations for incompressible fluids. While most classical techniques require construction of a structured mesh that approximates the surface in order to extrapolate a 3D finite-element gridding of the whole volume, our method directly simulates the air-flow inside the extracted surface without losing any complicated details and without building additional grids.

  2. Hybrid Air Quality Modeling Approach for use in the Hear-road Exposures to Urban air pollutant Study(NEXUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a hybrid air quality modeling approach and its application in NEXUS in order to provide spatial and temporally varying exposure estimates and identification of the mobile source contribution to the total pollutant exposure. Model-based exposure metrics, associa...

  3. Two-target game model of an air combat with fire-and-forget all-aspect missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidovitz, A.; Shinar, J.

    1989-01-01

    An air combat duel between similar aggressive fighter aircraft, both equipped with the same type of guided missiles, is formulated as a two-target differential game using the dynamic model of the game of two identical cars. Each of the identical target sets represents the effective firing envelope of an all-aspect fire-and-forget air-to-air missile. The firing range limits depend on the target aspect angle and are approximated by analytical functions. The maximum range, computed by taking into account the optimal missile avoidance maneuver of the target, determines the no-escape firing envelope. The solution consists of the decomposition of the game space into four regions: the respective winning zones of the two opponents, the draw zone, and the region where the game terminates by a mutual kill. The solution provides a new insight for future air combat analysis.

  4. Microwave landing system modeling with application to air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulose, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Compared to the current instrument landing system, the microwave landing system (MLS), which is in the advanced stage of implementation, can potentially provide significant fuel and time savings as well as more flexibility in approach and landing functions. However, the expanded coverage and increased accuracy requirements of the MLS make it more susceptible to the features of the site in which it is located. An analytical approach is presented for evaluating the multipath effects of scatterers that are commonly found in airport environments. The approach combines a multiplane model with a ray-tracing technique and a formulation for estimating the electromagnetic fields caused by the antenna array in the presence of scatterers. The model is applied to several airport scenarios. The reduced computational burden enables the scattering effects on MLS position information to be evaluated in near real time. Evaluation in near real time would permit the incorporation of the modeling scheme into air traffic control automation; it would adaptively delineate zones of reduced accuracy within the MLS coverage volume, and help establish safe approach and takeoff trajectories in the presence of uneven terrain and other scatterers.

  5. Comparisons of Air Radiation Model with Shock Tube Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; McCorkle, Evan; Bogdanoff, David W.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of shock layer radiation model appropriate for NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle lunar return entry. A detailed set of spectrally resolved radiation intensity comparisons are made with recently conducted tests in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The spectral range spanned from vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 115 nm to infrared wavelength of 1400 nm. The analysis is done for 9.5-10.5 km/s shock passing through room temperature synthetic air at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.7 Torr. The comparisons between model and measurements show discrepancies in the level of background continuum radiation and intensities of atomic lines. Impurities in the EAST facility in the form of carbon bearing species are also modeled to estimate the level of contaminants and their impact on the comparisons. The discrepancies, although large is some cases, exhibit order and consistency. A set of tests and analyses improvements are proposed as forward work plan in order to confirm or reject various proposed reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  6. An annual assessment of air quality with the CALIOPE modeling system over Spain.

    PubMed

    Baldasano, J M; Pay, M T; Jorba, O; Gassó, S; Jiménez-Guerrero, P

    2011-05-01

    The CALIOPE project, funded by the Spanish Ministry of the Environment, aims at establishing an air quality forecasting system for Spain. With this goal, CALIOPE modeling system was developed and applied with high resolution (4km×4km, 1h) using the HERMES emission model (including emissions of resuspended particles from paved roads) specifically built up for Spain. The present study provides an evaluation and the assessment of the modeling system, coupling WRF-ARW/HERMES/CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b for a full-year simulation in 2004 over Spain. The evaluation focuses on the capability of the model to reproduce the temporal and spatial distribution of gas phase species (NO(2), O(3), and SO(2)) and particulate matter (PM10) against ground-based measurements from the Spanish air quality monitoring network. The evaluation of the modeling results on an hourly basis shows a strong dependency of the performance of the model on the type of environment (urban, suburban and rural) and the dominant emission sources (traffic, industrial, and background). The O(3) chemistry is best represented in summer, when mean hourly variability and high peaks are generally well reproduced. The mean normalized error and bias meet the recommendations proposed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) and the European regulations. Modeled O(3) shows higher performance for urban than for rural stations, especially at traffic stations in large cities, since stations influenced by traffic emissions (i.e., high-NO(x) environments) are better characterized with a more pronounced daily variability. NO(x)/O(3) chemistry is better represented under non-limited-NO(2) regimes. SO(2) is mainly produced from isolated point sources (power generation and transformation industries) which generate large plumes of high SO(2) concentration affecting the air quality on a local to national scale where the meteorological pattern is crucial. The contribution of mineral dust from the Sahara desert through

  7. Meteorological analyses data set for air quality assessment modelling from national to local scale: verification and applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finardi, S.; Pace, G.; Tinarelli, G.; Vitali, C.

    2009-09-01

    Since 2002, on behalf of the Italian Ministry of the Environment, ENEA has been leading a national Project, named MINNI (National Integrated Modelling system for International Negotiation), for the development of an Integrated Assessment Modelling system. The objective of the project is to support policy makers in the elaboration and assessment of air pollution policies at international, national and local level, by means of the more recent understandings of the atmospheric processes. The project activities include the realisation of air quality analysis and assessment at national and sub-national scale through model simulations with space resolution of 20x20 and 4x4 km2 and hourly time step on different target years. A Eulerian Atmospheric Modelling System (AMS), built around the chemical transport model FARM, has been applied to years 1999 and 2005 during the first phase of the project, while a second phase is presently ongoing and foresees simulations for years 2003 and 2007. The meteorological analyses used to drive the quality model have been produced by means of the meteorological models RAMS (http://atmet.com/) and LAPS (http://laps.noaa.gov/) using ECMWF synoptic analyses and surface observations as main input data. The meteorological data set is being used for MINNI project but also distributed to Regional Environmental Protection Agencies and other users to support air quality simulations at local scale employing different air quality model types. To verify the meteorological fields reliability and possibly define the usability limits of the dataset, model results have been compared with independent observations over different areas of the country (Friuli, Piedmont, Sardinia, Lazio and Puglia). The comparison confirmed that analysed meteorological fields can be considered representative over most part of the country, even if some critical areas emerged mainly due to the limited density of the input observations network and to the coarse resolution of

  8. Climate-forced air-quality modeling at the urban scale: sensitivity to model resolution, emissions and meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, K.; Valari, M.; Perrussel, O.; Sanchez, O.; Honore, C.

    2015-07-01

    While previous research helped to identify and prioritize the sources of error in air-quality modeling due to anthropogenic emissions and spatial scale effects, our knowledge is limited on how these uncertainties affect climate-forced air-quality assessments. Using as reference a 10-year model simulation over the greater Paris (France) area at 4 km resolution and anthropogenic emissions from a 1 km resolution bottom-up inventory, through several tests we estimate the sensitivity of modeled ozone and PM2.5 concentrations to different potentially influential factors with a particular interest over the urban areas. These factors include the model horizontal and vertical resolution, the meteorological input from a climate model and its resolution, the use of a top-down emission inventory, the resolution of the emissions input and the post-processing coefficients used to derive the temporal, vertical and chemical split of emissions. We show that urban ozone displays moderate sensitivity to the resolution of emissions (~ 8 %), the post-processing method (6.5 %) and the horizontal resolution of the air-quality model (~ 5 %), while annual PM2.5 levels are particularly sensitive to changes in their primary emissions (~ 32 %) and the resolution of the emission inventory (~ 24 %). The air-quality model horizontal and vertical resolution have little effect on model predictions for the specific study domain. In the case of modeled ozone concentrations, the implementation of refined input data results in a consistent decrease (from 2.5 up to 8.3 %), mainly due to inhibition of the titration rate by nitrogen oxides. Such consistency is not observed for PM2.5. In contrast this consistency is not observed for PM2.5. In addition we use the results of these sensitivities to explain and quantify the discrepancy between a coarse (~ 50 km) and a fine (4 km) resolution simulation over the urban area. We show that the ozone bias of the coarse run (+9 ppb) is reduced by ~ 40 % by adopting

  9. Rigid-plug elastic-water model for transient pipe flow with entrapped air pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; OU, CHANGQI

    2011-01-01

    Pressure transients in a rapidly filling pipe with an entrapped air pocket are investigated analytically. A rigid-plug elastic water model is developed by applying elastic water hammer to the majority of the water column while applying rigid water analysis to a small portion near the air-water interface, which avoids effectively the interpolation error of previous approaches. Moreover, another two simplified models are introduced respectively based on constant water length and by neglecting water elasticity. Verification of the three models is confirmed by experimental results. Calculations show that the simplification of constant water length is feasible for small air pockets. The complete rigid water model is appropriate for cases with large initial air volume. The rigid-plug elastic model can predict all the essential features for the entire range of initial air fraction considered in this study, and it is the effective model for analysis of pressure transients of entrapped air.

  10. CMAQ MODELING FOR AIR TOXICS AT FINE SCALES: A PROTOTYPE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic air pollutants (TAPs) or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) exhibit considerable spatial and temporal variability across urban areas. Therefore, the ability of chemical transport models (CTMs), e.g. Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ), to reproduce the spatial and tempor...

  11. Description, evaluation, and sensitivity analyses of principal US EPA air quality prediction models

    SciTech Connect

    Greenway, A.R.; Ellis, H.M.; Deland, R.J.

    1980-08-01

    The scientific validity of the principal assumptions used in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air pollution prediction models was reviewed. The computational assumptions and equations used in the principal EPA models were reviewed, as was the recommended applicability of these models and their performance as reported in validation and comparison studies. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of model response to input parameter changes was conducted. The performance of the CRSTER, the Urban and Rural RAM Models, and by inference the MPTER Model of the UNAMAP series was reviewed and evaluated based on available studies of the performance of these models. It is concluded that the RAM (Urban) Model tends to overpredict the impact of sources with tall stacks, even in urban areas due to the treatment of unstable cases. The RAM (Urban) Model implicitly accounts for building-effect downwash through enhanced plume spreading rates. The CRSTER Model performs well when the ratio of stack height to receptor height is high, but leads to overpredictions when the ratio is low. This, in complex terrain cases involving moderate stack heights, the CRSTER Model tends to overpredict. A sensitivity analysis showed that the CRSTER Model is more sensitive to input parameter values than the RAM Model. The CRSTER Model is most sensitive to changes in wind speed, stack height, stack gas exit velocity and stack gas exit temperature. Thus, these parameters should be well defined. This sensitivity increases as the ratio of stack height to receptor height decreases. Since the MPTER Model has not yet been released for use by US EPA, the evaluation of this model was more limited. Since it is basically a multi-source version of the single source CRSTER Model, conclusions concerning MPTER are inferred from the CRSTER evaluations.

  12. Dispersion Modeling of Traffic-Related Air Pollutant Exposures and Health Effects Among Children with Asthma in Detroit, Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Ganguly, Rajiv; Isakov, Vlad; Burke, Janet; Arunachalam, Saravanan; Snyder, Michelle; Robins, Thomas; Lewis, Toby

    2015-01-01

    Vehicular traffic is a major source of ambient air pollution in urban areas. Traffic-related air pollutants, including carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter, and diesel exhaust emissions, have been associated with adverse human health effects, especially in areas near major roads. In addition to emissions from vehicles, ambient concentrations of air pollutants include contributions from stationary sources and background (or regional) sources. Although dispersion models have been widely used to evaluate air quality strategies and policies and can represent the spatial and temporal variation in environments near roads, the use of these models in health studies to estimate air pollutant exposures has been relatively limited. This paper summarizes the modeling system used to estimate exposures in the Near-Roadway Exposure and Urban Air Pollutant Study, an epidemiological study that examined 139 children with asthma or symptoms consistent with asthma, most of whom lived near major roads in Detroit, Michigan. Air pollutant concentrations were estimated with a hybrid modeling framework that included detailed inventories of mobile and stationary sources on local and regional scales; the RLINE, AERMOD, and CMAQ dispersion models; and monitored observations of pollutant concentrations. The temporal and spatial variability in emissions and exposures over the 2.5-year study period and at more than 300 home and school locations was characterized. The paper highlights issues with the development and understanding of the significance of traffic-related exposures through the use of dispersion models in urban-scale exposure assessments and epidemiology studies. PMID:26139957

  13. A Diagnostic Scoring Model for Leptospirosis in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Weeratunga, Praveen; Niloofa, Roshan; Fernando, Narmada; de Silva, Nipun Lakshitha; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Maduranga, Sachith; Nandasiri, Nuwanthi; Premawansa, Sunil; Karunanayake, Lilani; de Silva, H. Janaka; Handunnetti, Shiroma

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection with significant morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of leptospirosis is known to mimic the clinical profile of other prevalent tropical fevers. Laboratory confirmation of leptospirosis is based on the reference standard microscopic agglutination test (MAT), direct demonstration of the organism, and isolation by culture and DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. However these methods of confirmation are not widely available in resource limited settings where the infection is prevalent, and reliance is placed on clinical features for provisional diagnosis. In this prospective study, we attempted to develop a model for diagnosis of leptospirosis, based on clinical features and standard laboratory test results. Methods The diagnostic score was developed based on data from a prospective multicentre study in two hospitals in the Western Province of Sri Lanka. All patients presenting to these hospitals with a suspected diagnosis of leptospirosis, based on the WHO surveillance criteria, were recruited. Confirmed disease was defined as positive genus specific MAT (Leptospira biflexa). A derivation cohort and a validation cohort were randomly selected from available data. Clinical and laboratory manifestations associated with confirmed leptospirosis in the derivation cohort were selected for construction of a multivariate regression model with correlation matrices, and adjusted odds ratios were extracted for significant variables. The odds ratios thus derived were subsequently utilized in the criteria model, and sensitivity and specificity examined with ROC curves. Results A total of 592 patients were included in the final analysis with 450 (180 confirmed leptospirosis) in the derivation cohort and 142 (52 confirmed leptospirosis) in the validation cohort. The variables in the final model were: history of exposure to a possible source of leptospirosis (adjusted OR = 2.827; 95% CI = 1

  14. Development and Evaluation of Land-Use Regression Models Using Modeled Air Quality Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Land-use regression (LUR) models have emerged as a preferred methodology for estimating individual exposure to ambient air pollution in epidemiologic studies in absence of subject-specific measurements. Although there is a growing literature focused on LUR evaluation, fu...

  15. Dynamic Model of the BIO-Plex Air Revitalization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Cory; Meyers, Karen; Duffield, Bruce; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BIO-Plex facility will need to support a variety of life support system designs and operation strategies. These systems will be tested and evaluated in the BIO-Plex facility. An important goal of the life support program is to identify designs that best meet all size and performance constraints for a variety of possible future missions. Integrated human testing is a necessary step in reaching this goal. System modeling and analysis will also play an important role in this endeavor. Currently, simulation studies are being used to estimate air revitalization buffer and storage requirements in order to develop the infrastructure requirements of the BIO-Plex facility. Simulation studies are also being used to verify that the envisioned operation strategy will be able to meet all performance criteria. In this paper, a simulation study is presented for a nominal BIO-Plex scenario with a high-level of crop growth. A general description of the dynamic mass flow model is provided, along with some simulation results. The paper also discusses sizing and operations issues and describes plans for future simulation studies.

  16. APPLICATION OF FINE SCALE AIR TOXICS MODELING WITH CMAQ TO HAPEM5

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides a preliminary demonstration of the EPA neighborhood scale modeling paradigm for air toxics by linking concentration from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to the fifth version of the Hazardous Pollutant Exposure Model (HAPEM5). For t...

  17. FINE SCALE AIR QUALITY MODELING USING DISPERSION AND CMAQ MODELING APPROACHES: AN EXAMPLE APPLICATION IN WILMINGTON, DE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterization of spatial variability of air pollutants in an urban setting at fine scales is critical for improved air toxics exposure assessments, for model evaluation studies and also for air quality regulatory applications. For this study, we investigate an approach that su...

  18. A Flexible Spatio-Temporal Model for Air Pollution with Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Covariates

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Johan; Szpiro, Adam A; Sampson, Paul D; Oron, Assaf P; Richards, Mark; Larson, Tim V; Sheppard, Lianne

    2013-01-01

    The development of models that provide accurate spatio-temporal predictions of ambient air pollution at small spatial scales is of great importance for the assessment of potential health effects of air pollution. Here we present a spatio-temporal framework that predicts ambient air pollution by combining data from several different monitoring networks and deterministic air pollution model(s) with geographic information system (GIS) covariates. The model presented in this paper has been implemented in an R package, SpatioTemporal, available on CRAN. The model is used by the EPA funded Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air) to produce estimates of ambient air pollution; MESA Air uses the estimates to investigate the relationship between chronic exposure to air pollution and cardiovascular disease. In this paper we use the model to predict long-term average concentrations of NOx in the Los Angeles area during a ten year period. Predictions are based on measurements from the EPA Air Quality System, MESA Air specific monitoring, and output from a source dispersion model for traffic related air pollution (Caline3QHCR). Accuracy in predicting long-term average concentrations is evaluated using an elaborate cross-validation setup that accounts for a sparse spatio-temporal sampling pattern in the data, and adjusts for temporal effects. The predictive ability of the model is good with cross-validated R2 of approximately 0.7 at subject sites. Replacing four geographic covariate indicators of traffic density with the Caline3QHCR dispersion model output resulted in very similar prediction accuracy from a more parsimonious and more interpretable model. Adding traffic-related geographic covariates to the model that included Caline3QHCR did not further improve the prediction accuracy. PMID:25264424

  19. Short-term 222Rn activity concentration changes in underground spaces with limited air exchange with the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fijałkowska-Lichwa, L.; Przylibski, T. A.

    2011-04-01

    The authors investigated short-time changes in 222Rn activity concentration occurring yearly in two underground tourist facilities with limited air exchange with the atmosphere. One of them is Niedźwiedzia (Bear) Cave in Kletno, Poland - a natural space equipped with locks ensuring isolation from the atmosphere. The other site is Fluorite Adit in Kletno, a section of a disused uranium mine. This adit is equipped with a mechanical ventilation system, operated periodically outside the opening times (at night). Both sites are situated within the same metamorphic rock complex, at similar altitudes, about 2 km apart. The measurements conducted revealed spring and autumn occurrence of convective air movements. In Bear Cave, this process causes a reduction in 222Rn activity concentration in the daytime, i.e. when tourists, guides and other staff are present in the cave. From the point of view of radiation protection, this is the best situation. For the rest of the year, daily concentrations of 222Rn activity in the cave are very stable. In Fluorite Adit, on the other hand, significant variations in daily 222Rn activity concentrations are recorded almost all year round. These changes are determined by the periods of activity and inactivity of mechanical ventilation. Unfortunately this is inactive in the daytime, which results in the highest values of 222Rn activity concentration at the times when tourists and staff are present in the adit. Slightly lower concentrations of radon in Fluorite Adit are recorded in the winter season, when convective air movements carry a substantial amount of radon out into the atmosphere. The incorrect usage of mechanical ventilation in Fluorite Adit results in the most unfavourable conditions in terms of radiation protection. The staff working in that facility are exposed practically throughout the year to the highest 222Rn activity concentrations, both at work (in the adit) and at home (outside their working hours). Therefore, not very well

  20. A simplified model for estimating population-scale energy impacts of building envelope air-tightening and mechanical ventilation retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Turner, William J. N.; Walker, Iain S.; Singer, Brett C.

    2015-01-19

    Changing the air exchange rate of a home (the sum of the infiltration and mechanical ventilation airflow rates) affects the annual thermal conditioning energy. Large-scale changes to air exchange rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the residential sector's energy consumption. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models is a barrier to the accurate quantification of the impact of policy changes on a state or national level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study combines the output of simple air exchange models with a limited set of housing characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modellers to use existing databases of housing characteristics to determine the impact of ventilation policy change on a population scale. The IVE model estimates of energy change when applied to US homes with limited parameterisation are shown to be comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model.

  1. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Reconstruction is Commenced on or After June 16, 2006 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean... only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Within 60 days after your air curtain...

  2. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Reconstruction is Commenced on or After June 16, 2006 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean... only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Within 60 days after your air curtain...

  3. Development of a comprehensive air quality modeling framework for a coastal urban airshed in south Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooqui, Mohmmed Zuber

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the major air pollution problems affecting urban areas of United States as well as other countries in the world. Analysis of surface observed ozone levels in south and central Texas revealed several days exceeding 8-hour average ozone National Ambient of Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) over the past decade. Two major high ozone episodes were identified during September of 1999 and 2002. A photochemical modeling framework for the high ozone episodes in 1999 and 2002 were developed for the Corpus Christi urban airshed. The photochemical model was evaluated as per U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended statistical methods and the models performed within the limits set by EPA. An emission impact assessment of various sources within the urban airshed was conducted using the modeling framework. It was noted that by nudging MM5 with surface observed meteorological parameters and sea-surface temperature, the coastal meteorological predictions improved. Consequently, refined meteorology helped the photochemical model to better predict peak ozone levels in urban airsheds along the coastal margins of Texas including in Corpus Christi. The emissions assessment analysis revealed that Austin and San Antonio areas were significantly affected by on-road mobile emissions from light-duty gasoline and heavy-duty diesel vehicles. The urban areas of San Antonio, Austin, and Victoria areas were estimated to be NOx sensitive. Victoria was heavily influenced by point sources in the region while Corpus Christi was influenced by both point and non-road mobile sources and was identified to be sensitive to VOC emissions. A rise in atmospheric temperature due to climate change potentially increase ozone exceedances and the peak ozone levels within the study region and this will be a major concern for air quality planners. This study noted that any future increase in ambient temperature would result in a significant increase in the urban and regional

  4. Adjusting exposure limits for long and short exposure periods using a physiological pharmacokinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, M.E.; MacNaughton, M.G.; Clewell, H.J. III; Paustenbach, D.J.

    1987-04-01

    This paper advocates use of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model for determining adjustment factors for unusual exposure schedules. The PB-PK model requires data on the blood:air and tissue:blood partition coefficients, the rate of metabolism of the chemical, organ volumes, organ blood flows and ventilation rates in humans. Laboratory data on two industrially important chemicals - styrene and methylene chloride - were used to illustrate the PB-PK approach. At inhaled concentrations near their respective 8-hr Threshold Limit Value - Time-weighted averages both of these chemicals are primarily eliminated from the body by metabolism. For these two chemicals, the appropriate risk indexing parameters are integrated tissue dose or total amount of parent chemical metabolized. These examples also illustrate how the model can be used to calculate risk based on various other measures of delivered dose. For the majority of volatile chemicals, the parameter most closely associated with risk is the integrated tissue dose. This analysis suggests that when pharmacokinetic data are not available, a simple inverse formula may be sufficient for adjustment in most instances and application of complex kinetic models unnecessary. At present, this PB-PK approach is recommended only for exposure periods of 4 to 16 hr/day, because the mechanisms of toxicity for some chemicals may vary for very short- or very long-term exposures. For these altered schedules, more biological information on recovery in rest periods and changing mechanisms of toxicity are necessary before any adjustment is attempted.

  5. FVCOM model estimate of the location of Air France 447

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changsheng; Limeburner, Richard; Gao, Guoping; Xu, Qichun; Qi, Jianhua; Xue, Pengfei; Lai, Zhigang; Lin, Huichan; Beardsley, Robert; Owens, Breck; Carlson, Barry

    2012-06-01

    On June 1, 2009, Air France AF447 disappeared in the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean en route from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to Paris, France. On June 6-19, 2009, bodies and debris from the aircraft were recovered floating in the equatorial ocean. This paper describes efforts on using the global-local nested finite volume community ocean model (FVCOM) to model reversely the tracks of bodies and debris back to the time of the crash and to help searchers locate the cockpit voice and flight data recorders and learn why this tragic accident occurred. To validate the reliability and reality of FVCOM, eight surface drifters were deployed by the French Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses pour la sécurité de l'aviation civile (BEA) near the last known position in early June 2010 for a period of 3 weeks. These drifter data were used to optimize the spatial and temporal correlation scales of the adaptive sampling data assimilation method of FVCOM. Applying an optimized FVCOM system to assimilate all available drifter- and float-tracking-derived currents in May-June 2009 under three different wind conditions, we reproduced the June 2009 current fields in the area near the LKP and used these fields to reversely track bodies and debris from locations where they were found to the time when the crash occurred. Possible locations for the crashed plane were suggested based on our model results and were made available to the French investigators and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution REMUS autonomous underwater vehicle Operations Group who successfully located the aircraft debris field in April 2011 on the seafloor at a depth of 3,900 m.

  6. Modelling future impacts of air pollution using the multi-scale UK Integrated Assessment Model (UKIAM).

    PubMed

    Oxley, Tim; Dore, Anthony J; ApSimon, Helen; Hall, Jane; Kryza, Maciej

    2013-11-01

    Integrated assessment modelling has evolved to support policy development in relation to air pollutants and greenhouse gases by providing integrated simulation tools able to produce quick and realistic representations of emission scenarios and their environmental impacts without the need to re-run complex atmospheric dispersion models. The UK Integrated Assessment Model (UKIAM) has been developed to investigate strategies for reducing UK emissions by bringing together information on projected UK emissions of SO2, NOx, NH3, PM10 and PM2.5, atmospheric dispersion, criteria for protection of ecosystems, urban air quality and human health, and data on potential abatement measures to reduce emissions, which may subsequently be linked to associated analyses of costs and benefits. We describe the multi-scale model structure ranging from continental to roadside, UK emission sources, atmospheric dispersion of emissions, implementation of abatement measures, integration with European-scale modelling, and environmental impacts. The model generates outputs from a national perspective which are used to evaluate alternative strategies in relation to emissions, deposition patterns, air quality metrics and ecosystem critical load exceedance. We present a selection of scenarios in relation to the 2020 Business-As-Usual projections and identify potential further reductions beyond those currently being planned.

  7. Interfacing air pathway models with other media models for impact assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.L.

    1980-10-01

    The assessment of the impacts/effects of a coal conversion industry on human health, ecological systems, property and aesthetics requires knowledge about effluent and fugitive emissions, dispersion of pollutants in abiotic media, chemical and physical transformations of pollutants during transport, and pollutant fate passing through biotic pathways. Some of the environmental impacts that result from coal conversion facility effluents are subtle, acute, subacute or chronic effects in humans and other ecosystem members, acute or chronic damage of materials and property, odors, impaired atmospheric visibility, and impacts on local, regional and global weather and climate. This great variety of impacts and effects places great demands on the abiotic and biotic numerical simulators (modelers) in terms of time and space scales, transformation rates, and system structure. This paper primarily addresses the demands placed on the atmospheric analyst. The paper considers the important air pathway processes, the interfacing of air pathway models with other media models, and the classes of air pathway models currently available. In addition, a strong plea is made for interaction and communication between all modeling groups to promote efficient construction of intermedia models that truly interface across pathway boundaries.

  8. Modeling near-road air quality using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD-VIT-RIT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Jason; Zhang, K Max

    2009-10-15

    It is well recognized that dilution is an important mechanism governing the near-road air pollutant concentrations. In this paper, we aim to advance our understanding of turbulent mixing mechanisms on and near roadways using computation fluid dynamics. Turbulent mixing mechanisms can be classified into three categories according to their origins: vehicle-induced turbulence (VIT), road-induced turbulence (RIT), and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. RIT includes the turbulence generated by road embankment, road surface thermal effects, and roadside structures. Both VIT and RIT are affected by the roadway designs. We incorporate the detailed treatment of VIT and RIT into the CFD (namely CFD-VIT-RIT) and apply the model in simulating the spatial gradients of carbon monoxide near two major highways with different traffic mix and roadway configurations. The modeling results are compared to the field measurements and those from CALINE4 and CFD without considering VIT and RIT. We demonstrate that the incorporation of VIT and RIT considerably improves the modeling predictions, especially on vertical gradients and seasonal variations of carbon monoxide. Our study implies that roadway design can significantly influence the near-road air pollution. Thus we recommend that mitigating near-road air pollution through roadway designs be considered in the air quality and transportation management In addition, thanks to the rigorous representation of turbulent mixing mechanisms, CFD-VIT-RIT can become valuable tools in the roadway designs process.

  9. The Atlanta Urban Heat Island Mitigation and Air Quality Modeling Project: How High-Resoution Remote Sensing Data Can Improve Air Quality Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William L.; Khan, Maudood N.

    2006-01-01

    The Atlanta Urban Heat Island and Air Quality Project had its genesis in Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air quality) that began in 1996. Project ATLANTA examined how high-spatial resolution thermal remote sensing data could be used to derive better measurements of the Urban Heat Island effect over Atlanta. We have explored how these thermal remote sensing, as well as other imaged datasets, can be used to better characterize the urban landscape for improved air quality modeling over the Atlanta area. For the air quality modeling project, the National Land Cover Dataset and the local scale Landpro99 dataset at 30m spatial resolutions have been used to derive land use/land cover characteristics for input into the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model that is one of the foundations for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to assess how these data can improve output from CMAQ. Additionally, land use changes to 2030 have been predicted using a Spatial Growth Model (SGM). SGM simulates growth around a region using population, employment and travel demand forecasts. Air quality modeling simulations were conducted using both current and future land cover. Meteorological modeling simulations indicate a 0.5 C increase in daily maximum air temperatures by 2030. Air quality modeling simulations show substantial differences in relative contributions of individual atmospheric pollutant constituents as a result of land cover change. Enhanced boundary layer mixing over the city tends to offset the increase in ozone concentration expected due to higher surface temperatures as a result of urbanization.

  10. Methods to infer the compliance status with interval-averaged and with instantaneous occupational exposure limits from the results of longer-duration, integrated air sampling.

    PubMed

    Hunsaker, Harry A

    2016-01-01

    The duration of integrated air sampling for a substance may exceed the time frame of a substance's occupational exposure limit. Nonetheless, the compliance status of a limit may be inferred, under some circumstances, by the application of certain methods to the results of longer-duration samples. The purpose of this article is to define the inference methods and to illustrate their utility with actual and hypothetical examples. A review of articles and reports in U.S.-based Industrial Hygiene publications and databases revealed that the methods often were not but arguably should have been applied. Also revealed were inappropriate conclusions about the compliance status with exposure limits. Among the benefits of employing the inference methods is gaining information on exposures that might otherwise be overlooked. This article discusses the potential limitations of using the methods, and highlights some of the challenges of using integrated air sampling for assessing compliance with shorter-term exposure limits. PMID:26366477

  11. The Lee-Friedrichs Model: Continuous Limit and Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laura, Roberto; Castagnino, Mario

    2007-09-01

    We analyze the thermodynamic limit of the Hamiltonian, states and observables, of a system containing an oscillator interacting with a thermal bath We use the results to a compare environment and self induced decoherence.

  12. Air Quality Modeling in Support of the Near-road EXposures and effects of Urban air pollutants Study (NEXUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents the results of the model applications to estimate exposure metrics in support of an epidemiologic study in Detroit, Michigan. The Near-road Exposures to Urban air pollutant Study (NEXUS) design includes determining if children in Detroit, MI with asthma living ...

  13. Comparison of stationary and personal air sampling with an air dispersion model for children’s ambient exposure to manganese

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese (Mn) is ubiquitous in the environment and essential for normal growth and development, yet excessive exposure can lead to impairments in neurological function. This study modeled ambient Mn concentrations as an alternative to stationary and personal air sampling to asse...

  14. Incorporating Detailed Chemical Characterization of Biomass Burning Emissions into Air Quality Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsanti, K.; Hatch, L. E.; Yokelson, R. J.; Stockwell, C.; Orlando, J. J.; Emmons, L. K.; Knote, C. J.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 500 Tg/yr of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) are emitted by biomass burning (BB) to the global atmosphere, leading to the photochemical production of ozone (O3) and secondary particulate matter (PM). Until recently, in studies of BB emissions, a significant mass fraction of NMOCs (up to 80%) remained uncharacterized or unidentified. Models used to simulate the air quality impacts of BB thus have relied on very limited chemical characterization of the emitted compounds. During the Fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-IV), an unprecedented fraction of emitted NMOCs were identified and quantified through the application of advanced analytical techniques. Here we use FLAME-IV data to improve BB emissions speciation profiles for individual fuel types. From box model simulations we evaluate the sensitivity of predicted precursor and pollutant concentrations (e.g., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and terpene oxidation products) to differences in the emission speciation profiles, for a range of ambient conditions (e.g., high vs. low NOx). Appropriate representation of emitted NMOCs in models is critical for the accurate prediction of downwind air quality. Explicit simulation of hundreds of NMOCs is not feasible; therefore we also investigate the consequences of using existing assumptions and lumping schemes to map individual NMOCs to model surrogates and we consider alternative strategies. The updated BB emissions speciation profiles lead to markedly different surrogate compound distributions than the default speciation profiles, and box model results suggest that these differences are likely to affect predictions of PM and important gas-phase species in chemical transport models. This study highlights the potential for further BB emissions characterization studies, with concerted model development efforts, to improve the accuracy of BB predictions using necessarily simplified mechanisms.

  15. Treatment of Uncertainty in Groundwater Modeling: A (Limited) Research Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Cohen, Stephen J.

    2010-05-16

    Groundwater systems are complex, exhibiting significant heterogeneity across multiple scales, multiple interacting processes, and nonlinear behaviors. Groundwater systems are also open, often with poorly defined boundaries and time-dependent, uncertain boundary forcings (e.g., recharge). As a consequence, a groundwater model cannot be expected to precisely reflect the system it represents and the model results are uncertain quantities. The dominant language of uncertainty is probability and the majority of research in the treatment of uncertainty in groundwater modeling has been directed at developing and improving probabilistic methods for these models. One area of recent research has been methods for assessing the impact of model uncertainty in groundwater analyses. This line of research is part of a long-term trend of increasing appreciation for the importance of providing estimates of uncertainty in groundwater model outputs. The research was motivated by observations of nonuniqueness in model parameterizations, the sensitivity of groundwater model output to model structural choices, and a history of practice that established the importance of iterative improvement in the conceptual basis of groundwater models. Among the methods proposed for assessing model uncertainty, we discuss Bayesian model averaging, it’s theoretical basis and research development. We outline critical arguments and discuss alternative approaches. Finally, we briefly describe a regulatory application of groundwater modeling that used Bayesian model averaging concepts to resolve a key conceptual model uncertainty.

  16. Limitations of quantitative oculoplethysmography and of directional Doppler ultrasonography in cerebrovascular diagnosis: assessment of an air-filled OPG system.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, M D; Greenwood, S A; Goldberg, H I

    1981-01-01

    500 consecutive patients were evaluated for extracranial disease of the internal carotid arteries by an automated, air-filled, digital oculoplethysmographic system (OPG) of the Kartchner type (Zira) and by supraorbital (SO) and supratrochlear (ST) directional Doppler ultrasonography. Cerebral arteriograms were performed in 58 patients (110 vessels), and OPG timing criteria for detecting hemodynamically significant carotid artery stenosis (60% or greater diameter reduction) were ascertained. Optimal criteria were a delay of one ocular pulse, relative to the other, of greater than 12 msec; and a delay of an ocular pulse, relative to the earlier ear (external carotid) pulse, of greater than 36 msec. These criteria correctly identified 73% of vessels with 0 to 59% stenosis and 76% of vessels with 60 to 100% stenosis. However, in 26% of the vessels, OPG was either inconclusive or inaccurate. Correct diagnosis of bilateral hemodynamically significant carotid artery stenoses was made by OPG in 6 of 9 affected patients. SO Doppler was normal in 70% of vessels with 0-59% stenosis, and abnormal in 75% of vessels with 60-100% stenosis. Corresponding percentages for ST Doppler were 95% and 44%. Abnormal Doppler responses to compression of contralateral facial branches were predictive of intracranial cross-collateralization in only 25% of patients. These results suggest that both quantitative OPG in its present form and directional Doppler studies have serious limitations as non-invasive diagnostic methods.

  17. Existing air sparging model and literature review for the development of an air sparging optimization decision tool

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this Report are two-fold: (1) to provide overviews of the state-of-the-art and state-of-the-practice with respect to air sparging technology, air sparging models and related or augmentation technologies (e.g., soil vapor extraction); and (2) to provide the basis for the development of the conceptual Decision Tool. The Project Team conducted an exhaustive review of available literature. The complete listing of the documents, numbering several hundred and reviewed as a part of this task, is included in Appendix A. Even with the large amount of material written regarding the development and application of air sparging, there still are significant gaps in the technical community`s understanding of the remediation technology. The results of the literature review are provided in Section 2. In Section 3, an overview of seventeen conceptual, theoretical, mathematical and empirical models is presented. Detailed descriptions of each of the models reviewed is provided in Appendix B. Included in Appendix D is a copy of the questionnaire used to compile information about the models. The remaining sections of the document reflect the analysis and synthesis of the information gleaned during the literature and model reviews. The results of these efforts provide the basis for development of the decision tree and conceptual decision tool for determining applicability and optimization of air sparging. The preliminary decision tree and accompanying information provided in Section 6 describe a three-tiered approach for determining air sparging applicability: comparison with established scenarios; calculation of conceptual design parameters; and the conducting of pilot-scale studies to confirm applicability. The final two sections of this document provide listings of the key success factors which will be used for evaluating the utility of the Decision Tool and descriptions of potential applications for Decision Tool use.

  18. Satellite Characterization of Fire Emissions of Aerosols and Gases Relevant to Air-Quality Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Ellison, L.; Yue, Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Because of the transient and widespread nature of wildfires and other types of open biomass burning, satellite remote sensing has become an indispensable technique for characterizing their smoke emissions for modeling applications, especially at regional to global scales. Fire radiative energy (FRE), whose instantaneous rate of release or fire radiative power (FRP) is measurable from space, has been found to be proportional to both the biomass consumption and emission of aerosol particulate matter. We have leveraged this relationship to generate a global, gridded smoke-aerosol emission coefficients (Ce) dataset based on FRP and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements from the MODIS sensors aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. Ce is a simple coefficient to convert FRE to smoke aerosol emissions, in the same manner as traditional emission factors are used to convert burned biomass to emissions. The first version of this Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER.v1) global gridded Ce product at 1°x1° resolution is available at http://feer.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Based on published emission ratios, the FEER.v1 Ce product for total smoke aerosol has also been used to generate similar products for specific fire-emitted aerosols and gases, including those that are regulated as 'criteria pollutants' under the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), such as particulate matter (PM) and carbon monoxide (CO). These gridded Ce products were used in conjunction with satellite measurements of FRP to derive emissions of several smoke constituents, which were applied to WRF-Chem fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model simulations, with promising results. In this presentation, we analyze WRF-Chem simulations of surface-level concentrations of various pollutants based on FEER.v1 emission products to illustrate their value for air-quality modeling, particularly in parts of Africa and southeast Asia where ground-based air

  19. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-05-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  20. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  1. Modeling forest C and N allocation responses to free-air CO2 enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, Kristina; De Kauwe, Martin; Walker, Anthony; Werner, Christian; Iversen, Colleen; McCarthy, Heather; Medlyn, Belinda; Norby, Richard; Oren, Ram; Zak, Donald; Zaehle, Sönke

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation allocation patterns and soil-vegetation partitioning of C and N are predicted to change in response to rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2. These allocation responses to rising CO2 have been examined at the ecosystem level through through free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments, and their global implications for the timing of progressive N limitation (PNL) and C sequestration have been predicted for ~100 years using a variety of ecosystem models. However, recent FACE model-data syntheses studies [1,2,3] have indicated that ecosystem models do not capture the 5-10 year site-level ecosystem allocation responses to elevated CO2. This may be due in part to the missing representation of the rhizosphere interactions between plants and soil biota in models. Ecosystem allocation of C and N is altered by interactions between soil and vegetation through the priming effect: as plant N availability diminishes, plants respond physiologically by altering their tissue allocation strategies so as to increase rates of root growth and rhizodeposition. In response, either soil organic material begins to accumulate, which hastens the onset of PNL, or soil microbes start to decompose C more rapidly, resulting in increased N availability for plant uptake, which delays PNL. In this study, a straightforward approach for representing rhizosphere interactions in ecosystem models was developed through which C and N allocation to roots and rhizodeposition responds dynamically to elevated CO2 conditions, modifying soil decomposition rates without pre-specification of the direction in which soil C and N accumulation should shift in response to elevated CO2. This approach was implemented in a variety of ecosystem models ranging from stand (G'DAY), to land surface (CLM 4.5, O-CN), to dynamic global vegetation (LPJ-GUESS) models. Comparisons against data from three forest FACE sites (Duke, Oak Ridge & Rhinelander) indicated that representing rhizosphere interactions allowed

  2. Double scaling limit for matrix models with nonanalytic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbina, Mariya

    2008-03-01

    We study the double scaling limit for unitary invariant ensembles of random matrices with nonanalytic potentials and find the asymptotic expansion for the entries of the corresponding Jacobi matrix. Our approach is based on the perturbation expansion for the string equations. The first order perturbation terms of the Jacobi matrix coefficients are expressed through the Hastings-McLeod solution of the Painleve II equation. The limiting reproducing kernel is expressed in terms of solutions of the Dirac system of differential equations with a potential defined by the first order terms of the expansion.

  3. Assessing Air-Sea Interaction in the Evolving NASA GEOS Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how the climate responds to variations in forcing, one necessary component is to understand the full distribution of variability of exchanges of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and ocean. Surface heat and moisture fluxes are critical to the generation and decay of many coupled air-sea phenomena. These mechanisms operate across a number of scales and contain contributions from interactions between the anomalous (i.e. non-mean), often extreme-valued, flux components. Satellite-derived estimates of the surface turbulent and radiative heat fluxes provide an opportunity to assess results from modeling systems. Evaluation of only time mean and variability statistics, however only provides limited traceability to processes controlling what are often regime-dependent errors. This work will present an approach to evaluate the representation of the turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface in the current and evolving Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model. A temperature and moisture vertical profile-based clustering technique is used to identify robust weather regimes, and subsequently intercompare the turbulent fluxes and near-surface parameters within these regimes in both satellite estimates and GEOS-driven data sets. Both model reanalysis (MERRA) and seasonal-to-interannual coupled GEOS model simulations will be evaluated. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the distribution of the fluxes including extremes, and the representation of near-surface forcing variables directly related to their estimation. Results from these analyses will help identify the existence and source of regime-dependent biases in the GEOS model ocean surface turbulent fluxes. The use of the temperature and moisture profiles for weather-state clustering will be highlighted for its potential broad application to 3-D output typical of model simulations.

  4. Diagnostic Analysis of Ozone Concentrations Simulated by Two Regional-Scale Air Quality Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ) and the Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model (WRF/Chem) use different approaches to simulate the interaction of meteorology and chemistry, this study compares the CMAQ and WRF/Chem air quality simu...

  5. The AQMEII Two-Continent Regional Air Quality Model Evaluation Study: Fueling Ideas with Unprecedented Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although strong collaborations in the air pollution field have existed among the North American (NA) and European (EU) countries over the past five decades, regional-scale air quality model developments and model performance evaluations have been carried out independently unlike ...

  6. Dynamic Evaluation of a Regional Air Quality Model: Assessing the Emissions-Induced Weekly Ozone Cycle

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality models are used to predict changes in pollutant concentrations resulting from envisioned emission control policies. Recognizing the need to assess the credibility of air quality models in a policy-relevant context, we perform a dynamic evaluation of the community Mult...

  7. Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) - Utrecht, Netherlands The May 8, 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 4th workshop of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) was held on May 8 in Utrecht, The Netherlands, in conjunction with the NATO/SPS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application. AQMEII was launched in 2009 as a l...

  8. SIMULATION OF AEROSOL DYNAMICS: A COMPARATIVE REVIEW OF ALGORITHMS USED IN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparative review of algorithms currently used in air quality models to simulate aerosol dynamics is presented. This review addresses coagulation, condensational growth, nucleation, and gas/particle mass transfer. Two major approaches are used in air quality models to repres...

  9. Dynamic Evaluation of Long-Term Air Quality Model Simulations Over the Northeastern U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dynamic model evaluation assesses a modeling system's ability to reproduce changes in air quality induced by changes in meteorology and/or emissions. In this paper, we illustrate various approaches to dynamic mode evaluation utilizing 18 years of air quality simulations perform...

  10. Urban Landscape Characterization Using Remote Sensing Data For Input into Air Quality Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William; Khan, Maudood

    2005-01-01

    The urban landscape is inherently complex and this complexity is not adequately captured in air quality models that are used to assess whether urban areas are in attainment of EPA air quality standards, particularly for ground level ozone. This inadequacy of air quality models to sufficiently respond to the heterogeneous nature of the urban landscape can impact how well these models predict ozone pollutant levels over metropolitan areas and ultimately, whether cities exceed EPA ozone air quality standards. We are exploring the utility of high-resolution remote sensing data and urban growth projections as improved inputs to meteorological and air quality models focusing on the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area as a case study. The National Land Cover Dataset at 30m resolution is being used as the land use/land cover input and aggregated to the 4km scale for the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling schemes. Use of these data have been found to better characterize low density/suburban development as compared with USGS 1 km land use/land cover data that have traditionally been used in modeling. Air quality prediction for future scenarios to 2030 is being facilitated by land use projections using a spatial growth model. Land use projections were developed using the 2030 Regional Transportation Plan developed by the Atlanta Regional Commission. This allows the State Environmental Protection agency to evaluate how these transportation plans will affect future air quality.

  11. Modelling relationships between lichen bioindicators, air quality and climate on a national scale: results from the UK OPAL air survey.

    PubMed

    Seed, Lindsay; Wolseley, Pat; Gosling, Laura; Davies, Linda; Power, Sally A

    2013-11-01

    Air pollution has many negative effects on the natural environment, from changes in plant growth patterns to loss of ecosystem function. This study uses citizen science to investigate national-scale patterns in the distribution and abundance of selected lichen species on tree trunks and branches, and to relate these to air pollution and climate. Volunteers collected data for nine lichen indicators on 19,334 deciduous trees. Submitted data provided information on species-level patterns, and were used to derive composite lichen indices. Multiple linear regression and ANCOVA were used to model the relationships between lichen response variables on Quercus spp. and pollution, climate and location. The study demonstrated significant relationships between patterns in indicator lichens and levels of N- and S-containing pollutants on trunks and twigs. The derived lichen indices show great potential as a tool to provide information on local, site-specific levels of air quality. PMID:23992684

  12. High-resolution modelling of health impacts from air pollution using the integrated model system EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Jørgen; Andersen, Mikael S.; Bønløkke, Jakob; Christensen, Jesper H.; Geels, Camilla; Hansen, Kaj M.; Jensen, Steen S.; Ketzel, Matthias; Plejdrup, Marlene S.; Sigsgaard, Torben; Silver, Jeremy D.

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution assessment of health impacts from air pollution and related external cost has been conducted for Denmark using the integrated EVA model system. The EVA system has been further developed by implementing an air quality model with a 1 km x 1 km resolution covering the whole of Denmark. New developments of the integrated model system will be presented as well as results for health impacts and related external costs over several decades. Furthermore, the sensitivity of health impacts to model resolution will be studied. We have developed an integrated model system EVA (Economic Valuation of Air pollution), based on the impact-pathway chain, to assess the health impacts and health-related economic externalities of air pollution resulting from specific emission sources or sectors. The system is used to support policymaking with respect to emission control. In Brandt et al. (2013a; 2013b), the EVA system was used to assess the impacts in Europe and Denmark from the past, present and future total air pollution levels as well as the contribution from the major anthropogenic emission sectors. The EVA system was applied using the hemispheric chemistry-transport model, the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM), with nesting capability for higher resolution over Europe (50 km x 50 km) and Northern Europe (16.7 km x 16.7 km). In this study an Urban Background Model (UBM) has been further developed to cover the whole of Denmark with a 1 km x 1 km resolution and the model has been implemented as a part of the integrated model system, EVA. The EVA system is based on the impact-pathway methodology. The site-specific emissions will result (via atmospheric transport and chemistry) in a concentration distribution, which together with detailed population data, are used to estimate the population-level exposure. Using exposure-response functions and economic valuations, the exposure is transformed into impacts on human health and related external costs. In this study

  13. Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model. Version 2.0; User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etheridge, Melvin; Plugge, Joana; Retina, Nusrat

    1998-01-01

    The Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 (FAM 2.0), is a discrete event simulation model designed to support analysis of alternative concepts in air traffic management and control. FAM 2.0 was developed by the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract. This document provides a guide for using the model in analysis. Those interested in making enhancements or modification to the model should consult the companion document, Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 Technical Description.

  14. Comparing three vegetation monoterpene emission models to measured gas concentrations with a model of meteorology, air chemistry and chemical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolander, S.; He, Q.; Mogensen, D.; Zhou, L.; Bäck, J.; Ruuskanen, T.; Noe, S.; Guenther, A.; Aaltonen, H.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, M.

    2013-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are essential in atmospheric chemistry because of their chemical reactions that produce and destroy tropospheric ozone, their effects on aerosol formation and growth, and their potential influence on global warming. As one of the important BVOC groups, monoterpenes have been a focus of scientific attention in atmospheric research. Detailed regional measurements and model estimates are needed to study emission potential and the monoterpene budget on a global scale. Since the use of empirical measurements for upscaling is limited by many physical and biological factors such as genetic variation, temperature and light, water availability, seasonal changes, and environmental stresses, comprehensive inventories over larger areas are difficult to obtain. We applied the boundary layer-chemistry-transport model SOSA to investigate Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) monoterpene emissions in a boreal coniferous forest at the SMEAR II site, Southern Finland. SOSA was applied to simulate monoterpene emissions with three different emission modules: the semi-empirical G95, MEGAN 2.04 with improved descriptions of temperature and light responses and including also carbonyl emissions, and a process-based model SIM-BIM. For the first time, the emission models included seasonal and diurnal variations in both quantity and chemical species of emitted monoterpenes, based on parameterizations obtained from field measurements. Results indicate that modelling and observations agreed reasonably well, and that the model can be used for investigating regional air chemistry questions related to monoterpenes. The predominant modelled monoterpene concentrations, α-pinene and Δ3-carene, are consistent with observations.

  15. A fully coupled regional atmospheric numerical model for integrated air quality and weather forecasting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.; Marecal, V.; Pirre, M.; Gmai, T.

    2012-04-01

    A new numerical modelling tool devoted to local and regional studies of atmospheric chemistry from surface to the lower stratosphere designed for both operational and research purposes will be presented. This model is based on the limited-area model CATT-BRAMS (Coupled Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System, Freitas et al. 2009, Longo et al. 2010) which is a meteorological model (BRAMS) including transport processes of gaseous and aerosols (CATT model). BRAMS is a version of the RAMS model (Walko et al. 2000) adapted to better represent tropical and subtropical processes and several new features. CATT-BRAMS has been used operationally at CPTEC (Brazilian Center for Weather Prediction and Climate Studies) since 2003 providing coupled weather and air quality forecast. In the Chemistry-CATT-BRAMS (called hereafter CCATT-BRAMS) a chemical module is fully coupled to the meteorological/tracer transport model CATT-BRAMS. This module includes gaseous chemistry, photochemistry, scavenging and dry deposition. The CCATT-BRAMS model takes advantages of the BRAMS specific development for the tropics/subtropics and of the recent availability of preprocessing tools for chemical mechanisms and of fast codes for photolysis rates. Similarly to BRAMS this model is conceived to run for horizontal resolutions ranging from a few meters to more than a hundred kilometres depending on the chosen scientific objective. In the last decade CCATT-BRAMS has being broadly (or extensively) used for applications mainly over South America, with strong emphasis over the Amazonia area and the main South American megacities. An overview of the model development and main applications will be presented.

  16. Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model for Simulating Winter Ozone Formation in the Uinta Basin with Intensive Oil and Gas Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matichuk, R.; Tonnesen, G.; Luecken, D.; Roselle, S. J.; Napelenok, S. L.; Baker, K. R.; Gilliam, R. C.; Misenis, C.; Murphy, B.; Schwede, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The western United States is an important source of domestic energy resources. One of the primary environmental impacts associated with oil and natural gas production is related to air emission releases of a number of air pollutants. Some of these pollutants are important precursors to the formation of ground-level ozone. To better understand ozone impacts and other air quality issues, photochemical air quality models are used to simulate the changes in pollutant concentrations in the atmosphere on local, regional, and national spatial scales. These models are important for air quality management because they assist in identifying source contributions to air quality problems and designing effective strategies to reduce harmful air pollutants. The success of predicting oil and natural gas air quality impacts depends on the accuracy of the input information, including emissions inventories, meteorological information, and boundary conditions. The treatment of chemical and physical processes within these models is equally important. However, given the limited amount of data collected for oil and natural gas production emissions in the past and the complex terrain and meteorological conditions in western states, the ability of these models to accurately predict pollution concentrations from these sources is uncertain. Therefore, this presentation will focus on understanding the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model's ability to predict air quality impacts associated with oil and natural gas production and its sensitivity to input uncertainties. The results will focus on winter ozone issues in the Uinta Basin, Utah and identify the factors contributing to model performance issues. The results of this study will help support future air quality model development, policy and regulatory decisions for the oil and gas sector.

  17. MODELING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO OUTDOOR SOURCES OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate assessment of human exposures is an important part of environmental health effects research. However, most air pollution epidemiology studies rely upon imperfect surrogates of personal exposures, such as information based on available central-site outdoor concentration ...

  18. Semi-Lagrangian Methods in Air Pollution Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buus Hansen, A.; Kaas, E.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.

    2009-04-01

    Various semi-Lagrangian methods are tested for use in air pollution model- ing. The aim is to find a method fulfilling as many of the desirable properties by Rasch and Williamson (1990) and Machenhauer et al. (2008) as possi- ble. The focus is on accuracy, local mass conservation and computational efficiency. The methods tested are, first, classical semi-Lagrangian cubic interpola- tion, see e.g. Durran (1999), second, semi-Lagrangian cubic cascade inter- polation, by Nair et al. (2002), third, semi-Lagrangian cubic interpolation with the modified interpolation weights, by Kaas (2008), and last, semi- Lagrangian cubic interpolation with a locally mass conserving monotonic filter by Kaas and Nielsen (2008). Semi-Lagrangian (sL) interpolation is a classical method for atmospheric modeling, cascade interpolation is more efficient computationally, modified interpolation weights assure mass conservation and the locally mass con- serving monotonic filter imposes monotonicity. All schemes are tested with advection alone or with advection and chem- istry together under both typical rural and urban conditions using different temporal and spatial resolution. The methods are compared with a current state-of-the-art scheme presently used at the National Environmental Re- search Institute (NERI) in Denmark. The test cases are based either on the traditional slotted cylinder, see e.g. Zerroukat et al. (2002), or the rotating cone, see e.g. Molenkamp (1968) and Crowley (1968), where the schemes' ability to model both steep gradi- ents and slopes are challenged. The tests showed that the locally mass conserving monotonic filter im- proved the results significantly for some of the test cases, however, not for all. It was found that the semi-Lagrangian schemes, in almost every case, were not able to outperform the currently used ASD scheme used in DEHM, see e.g. Frohn et al. (2002). The present study is a part of the research of the Center for Energy, Envi- ronment and Health

  19. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent non-premixed methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, J. M.; Chen, J. H.; Day, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulent non-premixed stoichiometric methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics have been studied using the direct numerical simulation approach. The simulations include realistic chemical kinetics, and the molecular transport is modeled with constant Lewis numbers for individual species. The effect of turbulence on the internal flame structure and extinction characteristics of methane-air flames is evaluated. Consistent with earlier DNS with simple one-step chemistry, the flame is wrinkled and in some regions extinguished by the turbulence, while the turbulence is weakened in the vicinity of the flame due to a combination of dilatation and an increase in kinematic viscosity. Unlike previous results, reignition is observed in the present simulations. Lewis number effects are important in determining the local stoichiometry of the flame. The results presented in this work are preliminary but demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating reduced kinetics for the oxidation of methane with direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulence to evaluate the limitations of various levels of reduction in the kinetics and to address the formation of thermal and prompt NO(x).

  20. Development of Gridded Fields of Urban Canopy Parameters for Advanced Urban Meteorological and Air Quality Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban dispersion and air quality simulation models applied at various horizontal scales require different levels of fidelity for specifying the characteristics of the underlying surfaces. As the modeling scales approach the neighborhood level (~1 km horizontal grid spacing), the...

  1. Model-experiment interaction to improve representation of phosphorus limitation in land models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norby, R. J.; Yang, X.; Cabugao, K. G. M.; Childs, J.; Gu, L.; Haworth, I.; Mayes, M. A.; Porter, W. S.; Walker, A. P.; Weston, D. J.; Wright, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-nutrient interactions play important roles in regulating terrestrial carbon cycle responses to atmospheric and climatic change. None of the CMIP5 models has included routines to represent the phosphorus (P) cycle, although P is commonly considered to be the most limiting nutrient in highly productive, lowland tropical forests. Model simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM-CNP) show that inclusion of P coupling leads to a smaller CO2 fertilization effect and warming-induced CO2 release from tropical ecosystems, but there are important uncertainties in the P model, and improvements are limited by a dearth of data. Sensitivity analysis identifies the relative importance of P cycle parameters in determining P availability and P limitation, and thereby helps to define the critical measurements to make in field campaigns and manipulative experiments. To improve estimates of P supply, parameters that describe maximum amount of labile P in soil and sorption-desorption processes are necessary for modeling the amount of P available for plant uptake. Biochemical mineralization is poorly constrained in the model and will be improved through field observations that link root traits to mycorrhizal activity, phosphatase activity, and root depth distribution. Model representation of P demand by vegetation, which currently is set by fixed stoichiometry and allometric constants, requires a different set of data. Accurate carbon cycle modeling requires accurate parameterization of the photosynthetic machinery: Vc,max and Jmax. Relationships between the photosynthesis parameters and foliar nutrient (N and P) content are being developed, and by including analysis of covariation with other plant traits (e.g., specific leaf area, wood density), we can provide a basis for more dynamic, trait-enabled modeling. With this strong guidance from model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, field studies are underway in Puerto Rico and Panama to collect model-relevant data on P

  2. Flame temperature theory-based model for evaluation of the flammable zones of hydrocarbon-air-CO2 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shu, Gequn; Long, Biao; Tian, Hua; Wei, Haiqiao; Liang, Xingyu

    2015-08-30

    Theoretical models to evaluate the flammable zones of mixtures made up of hydrocarbon, carbon dioxide and air have been proposed in present study. A three-step reaction hypothesis for hydrocarbon combustion was introduced for predicting the upper flammability limit. The method to predict the parameters at fuel inertization point was put forward as well. Validation of these models has been conducted on existing experimental data reported in the literature, including the cases of methane, propane, propylene and isobutane, and an acceptable precision has been achieved. The average relative differences between the estimated results and experimental ones, except for the results at fuel inertization point, are less than 8.8% and 3.3% for upper and lower flammability limit, respectively. This work also indicated that these models possess practical application capacity and can provide safe prediction limits for nonflammable ranges of hydrocarbon diluted with carbon dioxide. PMID:25867586

  3. Human surrogate models of neuropathic pain: validity and limitations.

    PubMed

    Binder, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Human surrogate models of neuropathic pain in healthy subjects are used to study symptoms, signs, and the hypothesized underlying mechanisms. Although different models are available, different spontaneous and evoked symptoms and signs are inducible; 2 key questions need to be answered: are human surrogate models conceptually valid, ie, do they share the sensory phenotype of neuropathic pain states, and are they sufficiently reliable to allow consistent translational research?

  4. Developing and Transitioning Numerical Air Quality Models to Improve Air Quality and Public Health Decision-Making in El Salvador and Costa Rica As Part of the Servir Applied Sciences Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A.; Huff, A. K.; Gomori, S. G.; Sadoff, N.

    2014-12-01

    In order to enhance the capacity for air quality modeling and improve air quality monitoring and management in the SERVIR Mesoamerica region, members of SERVIR's Applied Sciences Team (AST) are developing national numerical air quality models for El Salvador and Costa Rica. We are working with stakeholders from the El Salvador Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources (MARN); National University of Costa Rica (UNA); the Costa Rica Ministry of the Environment, Energy, and Telecommunications (MINAET); and Costa Rica National Meteorological Institute (IMN), who are leaders in air quality monitoring and management in the Mesoamerica region. Focusing initially on these institutions will build sustainability in regional modeling activities by developing air quality modeling capability that can be shared with other countries in Mesoamerica. The air quality models are based on the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model and incorporate meteorological inputs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, as well as national emissions inventories from El Salvador and Costa Rica. The models are being optimized for urban air quality, which is a priority of decision-makers in Mesoamerica. Once experimental versions of the modeling systems are complete, they will be transitioned to servers run by stakeholders in El Salvador and Costa Rica. The numerical air quality models will provide decision support for stakeholders to identify 1) high-priority areas for expanding national ambient air monitoring networks, 2) needed revisions to national air quality regulations, and 3) gaps in national emissions inventories. This project illustrates SERVIR's goal of the transition of science to support decision-making through capacity building in Mesoamerica, and it aligns with the Group on Earth Observations' health societal benefit theme. This presentation will describe technical aspects of the development of the models and outline key steps in our successful

  5. A review of methods for predicting air pollution dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, J. J., Jr.; Grose, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Air pollution modeling, and problem areas in air pollution dispersion modeling were surveyed. Emission source inventory, meteorological data, and turbulent diffusion are discussed in terms of developing a dispersion model. Existing mathematical models of urban air pollution, and highway and airport models are discussed along with their limitations. Recommendations for improving modeling capabilities are included.

  6. Multiple-to-dominant path collapse of linked-flux model for diffusion-limited nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. H.; Wu, D. T.

    2013-01-01

    While capable of estimating diffusion-limited nucleation rates, Kelton's linked-flux model has no simple solution. To increase the model's usability, we simplify the model by retaining only the dominant nucleation path to obtain a series solution. The solution agrees well with the Kelton's model's predictions of the nucleation rate, and thus provides a simple estimate of diffusion-limited nucleation rates.

  7. Sharing limited Ethernet resources with a client-server model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownless, D. M.; Burton, P. D.

    1994-12-01

    The new control system proposed for the ISIS facility at Rutherford uses an Ethernet spine to provide mutual communications between disparate equipment, including the control computers. This paper describes the limitations imposed on the use of Ethernet in Local/Wide Area Networks and how a client-server based system can be used to circumvent them. The actual system we developed is discussed with particular reference to the problems we have faced, implementing data standards and the performance statistics attained.

  8. Linking environmental effects to health impacts: a computer modelling approach for air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Mindell, J.; Barrowcliffe, R.

    2005-01-01

    Study objective and Setting: To develop a computer model, using a geographical information system (GIS), to quantify potential health effects of air pollution from a new energy from waste facility on the surrounding urban population. Design: Health impacts were included where evidence of causality is sufficiently convincing. The evidence for no threshold means that annual average increases in concentration can be used to model changes in outcome. The study combined the "contours" of additional pollutant concentrations for the new source generated by a dispersion model with a population database within a GIS, which is set up to calculate the product of the concentration increase with numbers of people exposed within each enumeration district exposure response coefficients, and the background rates of mortality and hospital admissions for several causes. Main results: The magnitude of health effects might result from the increased PM10 exposure is small—about 0.03 deaths each year in a population of 3 500 000, with 0.04 extra hospital admissions for respiratory disease. Long term exposure might bring forward 1.8–7.8 deaths in 30 years. Conclusions: This computer model is a feasible approach to estimating impacts on human health from environmental effects but sensitivity analyses are recommended. Relevance to clinical or professional practice: The availability of GIS and dispersion models on personal computers enables quantification of health effects resulting from the additional air pollution new industrial development might cause. This approach could also be used in environmental impact assessment. Care must be taken in presenting results to emphasise methodological limitations and uncertainties in the numbers. PMID:16286501

  9. Limited interactions in flocks: relating model simulations to empirical data

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Nikolai W. F.; Franks, Daniel W.; Wood, A. Jamie

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of self-organization resulting in coordinated collective motion has received wide attention from a range of scientists interested in both its technical and biological relevance. Models have been highly influential in highlighting how collective motion can be produced from purely local interactions between individuals. Typical models in this field are termed ‘metric’ because each individual only reacts to conspecifics within a fixed distance. A recent large-scale study has, however, provided evidence that interactions ruling collective behaviour occur between a fixed number of nearest neighbours (‘topological’ framework). Despite their importance in clarifying the nature of the mechanism underlying animal interactions, these findings have yet to be produced by either metric or topological models. Here, we present an original individual-based model of collective animal motion that reproduces the previous findings. Our approach bridges the current gap between previous model analysis and recent evidence, and presents a framework for further study. PMID:20826476

  10. Model analysis and nonlinear control of air compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Gholam-Reza

    For decades, gas turbines have been important, widespread, and reliable devices in the field of power generation, petrochemical industry, and aeronautics. They employ centrifugal and axial compressors which suffer from aerodynamic instabilities, namely, surge and rotating stall. These performance limiting instabilities can cause component stress, lifespan reduction, noise, and vibration. Furthermore, in variable speed axial compressors (VSACs), speed variations affect the system stability and can lead to surge and rotating stall. This limits the rate of speed variations and results in important performance penalties. The present work firstly addresses the bifurcation analysis of VSACs' model to investigate the impact of speed dynamics on the stability of efficient operating points. Here, the rate of speed variations (acceleration rate) is defined as a new parameter of the model and a detailed numerical bifurcation analysis is provided. The results of time-domain simulations not only validate the results of bifurcation analysis, but also broaden our knowledge about the transient response of the model, which is a matter of importance as well. The analysis reveals that speed variations can lead to a fully developed rotating stall as well as the previously reported temporary stall developments. The results show that the developed instabilities depend to a great extent on the acceleration rate. The impact of other key issues such as throttle gain, viscosity factor, initial speed, final speed, and the contribution of stall modes are also explored. From the control point of view, despite reported achievements, robust control design for compression systems remains a challenging problem. In this work, at first, two nonlinear approaches are proposed to tackle the stability problem of constant-speed axial compressors (CSACs). The first approach is a robust passivity-based control and the second one is a second order sliding mode control. The approaches tackle the challenging

  11. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or... percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  12. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or... percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  13. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or... percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  14. How Small Can We Go: Exploring the Limitations and Scaling laws of Air-Microfluidic Particulate Matter Sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air-microfluidics is a field that has the potential to dramatically reduce the size, cost, and power requirements of future air quality sensors. Microfabrication provides a suite of relatively new tools for the development of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) that can be ap...

  15. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or... percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  16. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of Soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO2] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on 1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the ma...

  17. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Model Rule-Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units 5 Table 5 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES...

  18. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Model Rule-Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units 5 Table 5 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES...

  19. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Model Rule-Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units 5 Table 5 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES...

  20. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Model Rule-Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units 5 Table 5 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES...