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Sample records for air liquid interface

  1. Exposure of Mammalian Cells to Air-Pollutant Mixtures at the Air-Liquid Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been widely accepted that exposure of mammalian cells to air-pollutant mixtures at the air-liquid interface is a more realistic approach than exposing cell under submerged conditions. The VITROCELL systems, are commercially available systems for air-liquid interface expo...

  2. Phase Segregation at the Liquid-Air Interface Prior to Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Salguero, Carolina; Gracia-Fadrique, Jesús

    2015-08-13

    Binary systems with partial miscibility segregate into two liquid phases when their overall composition lies within the interval defined by the saturation points; out of this interval, there is one single phase, either solvent-rich or solute-rich. In most systems, in the one-phase regions, surface tension decreases with increasing solute concentration due to solute adsorption at the liquid-air interface. Therefore, the solute concentration at the surface is higher than in the bulk, leading to the hypothesis that phase segregation starts at the liquid-air interface with the formation of two surface phases, before the liquid-liquid equilibrium. This phenomenon is called surface segregation and is a step toward understanding liquid segregation at a molecular level and detailing the constitution of fluid interfaces. Surface segregation of aqueous binary systems of alkyl acetates with partial miscibility was theoretically demonstrated by means of a thermodynamic stability test based on energy minimization. Experimentally, the coexistence of two surface regions was verified through Brewster's angle microscopy. The observations were further interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations, which show the diffusion of the acetates from the bulk toward the liquid-air interface, where acetates aggregate into acetate-rich domains.

  3. LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.

    2010-12-16

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development

  4. Hydrodynamical entrapment of ciliates at the air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferracci, Jonathan; Ueno, Hironori; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2012-11-01

    We found the new phenomenon of the entrapment of ciliates at the air-water interface, though they are not trapped by a solid interface. We first characterize the behaviours of cells at the interface by comparing it to those away from interfaces. The results showed that the cell's swimming velocity is considerably reduced at the air-water interface. In order to experimentally verify the possible physiological causes of the entrapment, we observed their behaviours in absence of positive chemotaxis for oxygen and the negative geotaxis. The results illustrated that the entrapment phenomenon was not dependent on these physiological conditions. The experiments using surfactant revealed that the entrapment phenomenon was strongly affected by the velocity-stress conditions at the interface. This fact was confirmed numerically by a boundary element method, i.e. the stress-free condition at the air-liquid interface is one of the main mechanisms of the entrapment phenomenon found in the experiments. Since the entrapment phenomenon found in this study affects the cell-cell interactions and the mass transport at the interface, the knowledge obtained in this study is useful for better understanding the complex behaviours of swimming microorganisms in nature. PhD student in the Physiological Flow Studies Laboratory.

  5. Self-assembly of a surfactin nanolayer at solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Nasser, M S; Al-Lagtah, Nasir M A

    2016-05-01

    Surfactin, a sustainable and environmentally friendly surface active agent, is used as a model to study the adsorption of biosurfactants at hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid-liquid interfaces as well as the air-liquid interface. Surfactin adsorption was monitored as a function of time and concentration using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique in the case of the solid-liquid interfaces or the drop shape analysis (DSA) technique in the case of the air-liquid interface. The results obtained in this study showed that surfactin adsorption at the "hard" hydrophobic (functionalized with octadecanethiol) solid-liquid and the "soft" air-liquid interface were 1.12 ± 0.01 mg m(-2) (area per molecule of 157 ± 2 Å(2)) and 1.11 ± 0.05 mg m(-2) (area per molecule of 159 ± 7 Å(2)), respectively, demonstrating the negligible effect of the interface "hardness" on surfactin adsorption. The adsorption of surfactin at the hydrophilic (functionalized with β-mercaptoethanol) solid-liquid interface was about threefold lower than its adsorption at the hydrophobic-liquid interfaces, revealing the importance of hydrophobic interaction in surfactin adsorption process. The affinity constant of surfactin for the investigated interfaces follows the following order: air > octadecanethiol > β-mercaptoethanol. Biosurfactants, such as surfactin, are expected to replace the conventional fossil-based surfactants in several applications, and therefore the current study is a contribution towards the fundamental understanding of biosurfactant behavior, on a molecular level, at hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid-liquid interfaces in addition to the air-liquid interface. Such understanding might aid further optimization of the utilization of surfactin in a number of industrial applications such as enhanced oil recovery, bioremediation, and detergency.

  6. Biofilm formation at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces by Acinetobacter species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The members of the genus Acinetobacter are Gram-negative cocobacilli that are frequently found in the environment but also in the hospital setting where they have been associated with outbreaks of nosocomial infections. Among them, Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as the most common pathogenic species involved in hospital-acquired infections. One reason for this emergence may be its persistence in the hospital wards, in particular in the intensive care unit; this persistence could be partially explained by the capacity of these microorganisms to form biofilm. Therefore, our main objective was to study the prevalence of the two main types of biofilm formed by the most relevant Acinetobacter species, comparing biofilm formation between the different species. Findings Biofilm formation at the air-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces was investigated in different Acinetobacter spp. and it appeared to be generally more important at 25°C than at 37°C. The biofilm formation at the solid-liquid interface by the members of the ACB-complex was at least 3 times higher than the other species (80-91% versus 5-24%). In addition, only the isolates belonging to this complex were able to form biofilm at the air-liquid interface; between 9% and 36% of the tested isolates formed this type of pellicle. Finally, within the ACB-complex, the biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface was almost 4 times higher for A. baumannii and Acinetobacter G13TU than for Acinetobacter G3 (36%, 27% & 9% respectively). Conclusions Overall, this study has shown the capacity of the Acinetobacter spp to form two different types of biofilm: solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces. This ability was generally higher at 25°C which might contribute to their persistence in the inanimate hospital environment. Our work has also demonstrated for the first time the ability of the members of the ACB-complex to form biofilm at the air-liquid interface, a feature that was not observed in other

  7. Dynamics of a solid sphere bouncing on or penetrating through a liquid-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Jin; Jung, Sunghwan; Lee, Sungyon

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the dynamics of a solid particle moving from liquid to air through a liquid-air interface. The experimental setup consists of an air-piston system that shoots a solid particle into water towards the free surface from below. Experimental results indicate that the particle either penetrates or bounces back depending on the particle size, impact speed, and surface tension. In particular, the particle needs to overcome the resistive interfacial forces in order to penetrate through the liquid-air interface. This transition from bouncing to penetration regimes is captured theoretically by conducting a simple force balance and is further compared with experiments.

  8. Particle separation by a moving air-liquid interface in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengkun; Chon, Chan Hee; Li, Dongqing

    2010-12-15

    Particle separation is an important topic in microfluidic field and has recently gained significant attention in sample preparations for biological and chemical studies. In this paper, a novel particle separation method was proposed. In this method, the particles were separated by the air-liquid interface in a microchannel. The motion of the air-liquid interface was controlled with a syringe pump. Depending on the air-liquid interface speed, the liquid film thickness and the viscous force on particles were changed and the particles were separated by sizes. We observed the separation of 1.01 μm particles from the larger particles when the air-liquid interface speed was less than 11 μm/s, and the separation of both 1.01 μm and 5.09 μm particles from the larger particles when the interface speed was between 11 μm/s and 120 μm/s. When the speed was higher than 120 μm/s, the drag force of the liquid flow generated by the advancing interface on particles was so strong that the flow removed all particles off from the bottom channel wall and there were no particles left behind the advancing interface.

  9. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Exposure Devices for In Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to atmospheric pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of attached cells submerged in liquid medium. However, there is still limited understanding of the ideal ALI device design features that permit reproducible a...

  10. Swimming of a model ciliate near an air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Ardekani, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the role of the hydrodynamic forces on a swimming microorganism near an air-liquid interface is studied. The lubrication theory is utilized to analyze hydrodynamic effects within the narrow gap between a flat interface and a small swimmer. By using an archetypal low-Reynolds-number swimming model called “squirmer,” we find that the magnitude of the vertical swimming velocity is on the order of O(ɛlnɛ), where ɛ is the ratio of the gap width to the swimmer's body size. The reduced swimming velocity near an interface can explain experimental observations of the aggregation of microorganisms near a liquid interface.

  11. Swimming of a model ciliate near an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Ardekani, A M

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the role of the hydrodynamic forces on a swimming microorganism near an air-liquid interface is studied. The lubrication theory is utilized to analyze hydrodynamic effects within the narrow gap between a flat interface and a small swimmer. By using an archetypal low-Reynolds-number swimming model called "squirmer," we find that the magnitude of the vertical swimming velocity is on the order of O(εlnε), where ε is the ratio of the gap width to the swimmer's body size. The reduced swimming velocity near an interface can explain experimental observations of the aggregation of microorganisms near a liquid interface.

  12. Insulin Aggregation at a Dynamic Solid-Liquid-Air Triple Interface.

    PubMed

    Frachon, Thibaut; Bruckert, Franz; Le Masne, Quentin; Monnin, Emmanuel; Weidenhaupt, Marianne

    2016-12-13

    Therapeutic proteins are privileged in drug development because of their exquisite specificity, which is due to their three-dimensional conformation in solution. During their manufacture, storage, and delivery, interactions with material surfaces and air interfaces are known to affect their stability. The growing use of automated devices for handling and injection of therapeutics increases their exposure to protocols involving intermittent wetting, during which the solid-liquid and liquid-air interfaces meet at a triple contact line, which is often dynamic. Using a microfluidic setup, we analyze the effect of a moving triple interface on insulin aggregation in real time over a hydrophobic surface. We combine thioflavin T fluorescence and reflection interference microscopy to concomitantly monitor insulin aggregation and the morphology of the liquid as it dewets the surface. We demonstrate that insulin aggregates in the region of a moving triple interface and not in regions submitted to hydrodynamic shear stress alone, induced by the moving liquid. During dewetting, liquid droplets form on the surface anchored by adsorbed proteins, and the accumulation of amyloid aggregates is observed exclusively as fluorescent rings growing eccentrically around these droplets. The fluorescent rings expand until the entire channel surface sweeped by the triple interface is covered by amyloid fibers. On the basis of our experimental results, we propose a model describing the growth mechanism of insulin amyloid fibers at a moving triple contact line, where proteins adsorbed at a hydrophobic surface are exposed to the liquid-air interface.

  13. A Method To Measure Protein Unfolding at an Air-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Leiske, Danielle L; Shieh, Ian C; Tse, Martha Lovato

    2016-10-04

    Proteins are surface-active molecules that have a propensity to adsorb to hydrophobic interfaces, such as the air-liquid interface. Surface flow can increase aggregation of adsorbed proteins, which may be an undesirable consequence depending on the application. As changes in protein conformation upon adsorption are thought to induce aggregation, the ability to measure the folded state of proteins at interfaces is of particular interest. However, few techniques currently exist to measure protein conformation at interfaces. Here we describe a technique capable of measuring the hydrophobicity, and therefore the conformation and folded state, of proteins at air-liquid interfaces by exploiting the environmentally sensitive fluorophore Nile red. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high (mAb1) and low (mAb2) surface activity were used to highlight the technique. Both mAbs showed low background fluorescence of Nile red in the liquid subphase and at a glass-liquid interface. In contrast, at the air-liquid interface Nile red fluorescence for mAb1 increased immediately after protein adsorption, whereas the Nile red fluorescence of the mAb2 film evolved more slowly in time even though the adsorbed quantity of protein remained constant. The results demonstrate that hydrophobicity upon mAb adsorption to the air-liquid interface evolves in a time-dependent manner. Interfacial hydrophobicity may be indicative of protein conformation or folded state, where rapid unfolding of mAb1 upon adsorption would be consistent with increased protein aggregation compared to mAb2. The ability to measure protein hydrophobicity at interfaces using Nile red, combined with small sample requirements and minimal sample preparation, fills a gap in existing interfacial techniques.

  14. Quantitative assessment of radiation force effect at the dielectric air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Capeloto, Otávio Augusto; Zanuto, Vitor Santaella; Malacarne, Luis Carlos; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Lukasievicz, Gustavo Vinicius Bassi; Bialkowski, Stephen Edward; Astrath, Nelson Guilherme Castelli

    2016-01-01

    We induce nanometer-scale surface deformation by exploiting momentum conservation of the interaction between laser light and dielectric liquids. The effect of radiation force at the air-liquid interface is quantitatively assessed for fluids with different density, viscosity and surface tension. The imparted pressure on the liquids by continuous or pulsed laser light excitation is fully described by the Helmholtz electromagnetic force density. PMID:26856622

  15. Determinative factors of competitive advantage between aerobic bacteria for niches at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Haruta, Shin; Kato, Souichiro; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    We focused on bacterial interspecies relationships at the air-liquid interface where the formation of pellicles by aerobes was observed. Although an obligate aerobe (Brevibacillus sp. M1-5) was initially dominant in the pellicle population, a facultative aerobe (Pseudoxanthomonas sp. M1-3) emerged and the viability of M1-5 rapidly decreased due to severe competition for oxygen. Supplementation of the medium with carbohydrates allowed the two species to coexist at the air-liquid interface. These results indicate that the population dynamics within pellicles are primarily governed by oxygen utilization which was affected by a combination of carbon sources.

  16. Evaluation of air-liquid interface exposure systems for in vitro assessment of airborne pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to airborne pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of submerged cells. The published literature, however, describes irreproducible and/or unrealistic experimental conditions using ALI systems. We have compared fi...

  17. Detachment force of particles from air-liquid interfaces of films and bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ally, Javed; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Amirfazli, A

    2010-12-07

    The detachment force required to pull a microparticle from an air-liquid interface is measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the colloidal probe technique. Water, solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and silicone oils are tested in order to study the effects of surface tension and viscosity. Two different liquid geometries are considered: the air-liquid interface of a bubble and a liquid film on a solid substrate. It was shown that detaching particles from liquid films is fundamentally different than from bubbles or drops due to the restricted flow of the liquid phase. Additional force is required to detach a particle from a film, and the maximum force during detachment is not necessarily at the position where the particle breaks away from the interface (as seen in bubble or drop systems). This is due to the dynamics of meniscus formation and viscous effects, which must be considered if the liquid is constrained in a film. The magnitude of these effects is related to the liquid viscosity, film thickness, and detachment speed.

  18. Computational study of ion distributions at the air/liquid methanol interface

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiuquan; Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2011-06-16

    Molecular dynamic simulations with polarizable potentials were performed to systematically investigate the distribution of NaCl, NaBr, NaI, and SrCl2 at the air/liquid methanol interface. The density profiles indicated that there is no substantial enhancement of anions at the interface for the NaX systems in contrast to what was observed at the air/aqueous interface. The surfactant-like shape of the larger more polarizable halide anions is compensated by the surfactant nature of methanol itself. As a result, methanol hydroxy groups strongly interacted with one side of polarizable anions, in which their induced dipole points, and methanol methyl groups were more likely to be found near the positive pole of anion induced dipoles. Furthermore, salts were found to disrupt the surface structure of methanol, reducing the observed enhancement of methyl groups at the outer edge of the air/liquid methanol interface. With the additional of salts to methanol, the computed surface potentials increased, which is in contrast to what is observed in corresponding aqueous systems, where the surface potential decreases with the addition of salts. Both of these trends have been indirectly observed with experiments. This was found to be due to the propensity of anions for the air/water interface that is not present at the air/liquid methanol interface. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  19. Emergent phenomena in far-from-equilibrium magnetic granular ensembles at a liquid-air interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I.; Belkin, M.; Materials Science Division

    2009-01-01

    Remarkable nontrivially ordered self-assembled structures are formed in ensembles of magnetic microparticles suspended at a liquid/air interface and energized by an alternating magnetic field. These dynamic structures emerge as a result of a competition between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Each structure (snake) is accompanied by a hydrodynamic vortex quadrupole. Under certain conditions snakes spontaneously break the symmetry of surface flows and turn into swimmers. Observed phenomena have been successfully described by a phenomenological model.

  20. UV-Vis reflection spectroscopy under variable angle incidence at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Carmona, Cristina; Rubia-Payá, Carlos; Pérez-Morales, Marta; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2014-03-07

    The UV-Vis reflection spectroscopy (UV-Vis-RS) in situ at the air-liquid interface provides information about tilt and aggregation of chromophores in Langmuir monolayers. This information is particularly important given in most cases the chromophore is located at the polar region of the Langmuir monolayer. This region of the Langmuir monolayers has been hardly accessible by other experimental techniques. In spite of its enormous potential, the application of UV-Vis-RS has been limited mainly to reflection measurements under light normal incidence or at lower incidence angles than the Brewster angle. Remarkably, this technique is quite sensitive to the tilt of the chromophores at values of incidence angles close to or larger than the Brewster angle. Therefore, a novel method to obtain the order parameter of the chromophores at the air-liquid interface by using s- and p-polarized radiation at different incidence angles is proposed. This method allowed for the first time the experimental observation of the two components with different polarization properties of a single UV-Vis band at the air-liquid interface. The method of UV-Vis spectroscopy under variable angle incidence is presented as a new tool for obtaining rich detailed information on Langmuir monolayers.

  1. The production of drops by the bursting of a bubble at an air liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrozes, J. S.; Ligneul, P.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism arising during the bursting of a bubble at an air-liquid interface is described. A single bubble was followed from an arbitrary depth in the liquid, up to the creation and motion of the film and jet drops. Several phenomena were involved and their relative order of magnitude was compared in order to point out the dimensionless parameters which govern each step of the motion. High-speed cinematography is employed. The characteristic bubble radius which separates the creation of jet drops from cap bursting without jet drops is expressed mathematically. The corresponding numerical value for water is 3 mm and agrees with experimental observations.

  2. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, C. Gupta, Adbhut Joshi, Aditya Manjuladevi, V. Gupta, Raj Kumar; Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  3. The DNA Adsorption by the Charged Cholesterol Monolayer at the Air-liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsang-Lang; Hu, Yuan; Wu, Jui-Ching; Yang, Chun-Pang; Jeng, U.-Ser; Shih, M.-C.

    2004-04-01

    The adsorption of DNA by the 3-,-[N-(N',N'-dimethyl amino ethane) carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-Chol) monolayer at the air-liquid interface was studied by using the Langmuir-Blodgett film balance. With the presence of 1 μ M DNA in the subphase, the surface pressure increases right at the beginning of the compression. The liquid expanded phase of the DC-Chol disappears due to the adsorption of DNA. The AFM image of the prepared DC-Chol/DNA film has tree-branch-like fractal structure with a height of 2 nm that correspond to the diameter of DNA.

  4. UV-Vis Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy at air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubia-Payá, Carlos; de Miguel, Gustavo; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-11-01

    UV-Visible Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (UVRAS) technique is reviewed with a general perspective on fundamental and applications. UVRAS is formally identical to IR Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS), and therefore, the methodology developed for this IR technique can be applied in the UV-visible region. UVRAS can be applied to air-solid, air-liquid or liquid-liquid interfaces. This review focuses on the use of UVRAS for studying Langmuir monolayers. We introduce the theoretical framework for a successful understanding of the UVRAS data, and we illustrate the usage of this data treatment to a previous study from our group comprising an amphiphilic porphyrin. For ultrathin films with a thickness of few nm, UVRAS produces positive or negative bands when p-polarized radiation is used, depending on the incidence angle and the orientation of dipole absorption. UVRAS technique provides highly valuable information on tilt of chromophores at the air-liquid interface, and moreover allows the determination of optical parameters. We propose UVRAS as a powerful technique to investigate the in situ optical properties of Langmuir monolayers.

  5. A novel method for pulmonary research: assessment of bioenergetic function at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiling; Janocha, Allison J; Leahy, Rachel A; Klatte, Ryan; Dudzinski, Dave; Mavrakis, Lori A; Comhair, Suzy A A; Lauer, Mark E; Cotton, Calvin U; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2014-01-01

    Air-liquid interface cell culture is an organotypic model for study of differentiated functional airway epithelium in vitro. Dysregulation of cellular energy metabolism and mitochondrial function have been suggested to contribute to airway diseases. However, there is currently no established method to determine oxygen consumption and glycolysis in airway epithelium in air-liquid interface. In order to study metabolism in differentiated airway epithelial cells, we engineered an insert for the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer that enabled the measure of respiration by oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and glycolysis by extracellular acidification rate (ECAR). Oxidative metabolism and glycolysis in airway epithelial cells cultured on the inserts were successfully measured. The inserts did not affect the measures of OCR or ECAR. Cells under media with apical and basolateral feeding had less oxidative metabolism as compared to cells on the inserts at air-interface with basolateral feeding. The design of inserts that can be used in the measure of bioenergetics in small numbers of cells in an organotypic state may be useful for evaluation of new drugs and metabolic mechanisms that underlie airway diseases.

  6. Analysis of Bacterial Detachment from Substratum Surfaces by the Passage of Air-Liquid Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Suárez, Cristina; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the detachment of bacteria adhering to substratum surfaces upon the passage of an air-liquid interface is given, together with experimental results for bacterial detachment in the absence and presence of a conditioning film on different substratum surfaces. Bacteria (Streptococcus sobrinus HG1025, Streptococcus oralis J22, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V-J1, Bacteroides fragilis 793E, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 974K) were first allowed to adhere to hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass in a parallel-plate flow chamber until a density of 4 × 106 cells cm−2 was reached. For S. sobrinus HG1025, S. oralis J22, and A. naeslundii T14V-J1, the conditioning film consisted of adsorbed salivary components, while for B. fragilis 793E and P. aeruginosa 974K, the film consisted of adsorbed human plasma components. Subsequently, air bubbles were passed through the flow chamber and the bacterial detachment percentages were measured. For some experimental conditions, like with P. aeruginosa 974K adhering to DDS-coated glass and an air bubble moving at high velocity (i.e., 13.6 mm s−1), no bacteria detached upon passage of an air-liquid interface, while for others, detachment percentages between 80 and 90% were observed. The detachment percentage increased when the velocity of the passing air bubble decreased, regardless of the bacterial strain and substratum surface hydrophobicity involved. However, the variation in percentages of detachment by a passing air bubble depended greatly upon the strain and substratum surface involved. At low air bubble velocities the hydrophobicity of the substratum had no influence on the detachment, but at high air bubble velocities all bacterial strains were more efficiently detached from hydrophilic glass substrata. Furthermore, the presence of a conditioning film could either inhibit or stimulate detachment. The shape of the bacterial cell played a major role in detachment at high

  7. Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous Liquid-Air Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, Douglas J.; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Levin, Yan; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2013-04-01

    Chemistry occurring at or near the surfaces of aqueous droplets and thin films in the atmosphere influences air quality and climate. Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming increasingly useful for gaining atomic-scale insight into the structure and reactivity of aqueous interfaces in the atmosphere. Here we review simulation studies of atmospherically relevant aqueous liquid-air interfaces, with an emphasis on ions that play important roles in the chemistry of atmospheric aerosols. In addition to surveying results from simulation studies, we discuss challenges to the refinement and experimental validation of the methodology for simulating ion adsorption to the air-water interface, and recent advances in elucidating the driving forces for adsorption. We also review the recent development of a dielectric continuum theory that is capable of reproducing simulation and experimental data on ion behavior at aqueous interfaces. MDB and CJM acknowledge support from the US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. MDB is supported by the Linus Pauling Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at PNNL.

  8. Quantum chemical approach in the description of the amphiphile clusterization at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces with phase nature accounting. I. Aliphatic normal alcohols at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Belyaeva, Elena A; Kartashynska, Elena S; Fainerman, Valentine B; Smirnova, Natalia A

    2015-02-19

    A new model based on the quantum chemical approach is proposed to describe structural and thermodynamic parameters of clusterization for substituted alkanes at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces. The new model by the authors, unlike the previous one, proposes an explicit account of the liquid phase (phases) influence on the parameters of monomers, clusters and monolayers of substituted alkanes at the regarded interface. The calculations were carried out in the frameworks of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method (Mopac 2012), using the COSMO procedure. The new model was tested in the calculations of the clusterization parameters of fatty alcohols under the standard conditions at the air/water interface. The enthalpy, Gibbs' energy and absolute entropy of formation for alcohol monomers alongside with clusterization parameters for the cluster series including the monolayer at air/water interface were calculated. In our calculations the sinkage of monomers, molecules in clusters and monolayers was varied from 1 up to 5 methylene groups. Thermodynamic parameters calculated using the proposed model for the alcohol monolayers are in a good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. However, the proposed model cannot define the most energetically preferable immersion of the monolayer molecules in the water phase.

  9. Solid mesostructured polymer-surfactant films at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Jonathan C; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Pioneering work by Edler et al. has spawned a new sub-set of mesostructured materials. These are solid, self-supporting films comprising surfactant micelles encased within polymer hydrogel; composite polymer-surfactant films can be grown spontaneously at the air-liquid interface and have defined and controllable mesostructures. Addition of siliconalkoxide to polymer-surfactant mixtures allows for the growth of mesostructured hybrid polymer-surfactant silica films that retain film geometry after calcinations and exhibit superior mechanical properties to typically brittle inorganic films. Growing films at the air-liquid interface provides a rapid and simple means to prepare ordered solid inorganic films, and to date the only method for generating mesostructured films thick enough (up to several hundred microns) to be removed from the interface. Applications of these films could range from catalysis to encapsulation of hydrophobic species and drug delivery. Film properties and mesostructures are sensitive to surfactant structure, polymer properties and polymer-surfactant phase behaviour: herein it will be shown how film mesostructure can be tailored by directing these parameters, and some interesting analogies will be drawn with more familiar mesostructured silica materials.

  10. Lamellar Bodies Form Solid Three-dimensional Films at the Respiratory Air-Liquid Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Ravasio, Andrea; Olmeda, Bárbara; Bertocchi, Cristina; Haller, Thomas; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for lung function. It is assembled, stored and secreted as particulate entities (lamellar body-like particles; LBPs). LBPs disintegrate when they contact an air-liquid interface, leading to an instantaneous spreading of material and a decline in surface tension. Here, we demonstrate that the film formed by the adsorbed material spontaneously segregate into distinct ordered and disordered lipid phase regions under unprecedented near-physiological conditions and, unlike natural surfactant purified from bronchoalveolar lavages, dynamically reorganized into highly viscous multilayer domains with complex three-dimensional topographies. Multilayer domains, in coexistence with liquid phases, showed a progressive stiffening and finally solidification, probably driven by a self-driven disassembly of LBPs from a sub-surface compartment. We conclude that surface film formation from LBPs is a highly dynamic and complex process, leading to a more elaborated scenario than that observed and predicted by models using reconstituted, lavaged, or fractionated preparations. PMID:20558742

  11. Molecular threading: mechanical extraction, stretching and placement of DNA molecules from a liquid-air interface.

    PubMed

    Payne, Andrew C; Andregg, Michael; Kemmish, Kent; Hamalainen, Mark; Bowell, Charlotte; Bleloch, Andrew; Klejwa, Nathan; Lehrach, Wolfgang; Schatz, Ken; Stark, Heather; Marblestone, Adam; Church, George; Own, Christopher S; Andregg, William

    2013-01-01

    We present "molecular threading", a surface independent tip-based method for stretching and depositing single and double-stranded DNA molecules. DNA is stretched into air at a liquid-air interface, and can be subsequently deposited onto a dry substrate isolated from solution. The design of an apparatus used for molecular threading is presented, and fluorescence and electron microscopies are used to characterize the angular distribution, straightness, and reproducibility of stretched DNA deposited in arrays onto elastomeric surfaces and thin membranes. Molecular threading demonstrates high straightness and uniformity over length scales from nanometers to micrometers, and represents an alternative to existing DNA deposition and linearization methods. These results point towards scalable and high-throughput precision manipulation of single-molecule polymers.

  12. In vitro toxicity testing of cigarette smoke based on the air-liquid interface exposure: A review.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Cigarette smoke is a complex aerosol comprising particulate phase and gaseous vapour phase. The air-liquid interface exposure provides a possible technical means to implement whole smoke exposure for the assessment of tobacco products. In this review, the research progress in the in vitro toxicity testing of cigarette smoke based on the air-liquid interface exposure is summarized. The contents presented involve mainly cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, systems toxicology, 3D culture and cigarette smoke dosimetry related to cigarette smoke, as well as the assessment of electronic cigarette aerosol. Prospect of the application of the air-liquid interface exposure method in assessing the biological effects of tobacco smoke is discussed.

  13. SO{sub 2} uptake on ice spheres: Liquid nature of the ice-air interface

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, M.H.; Bales, R.C.

    1993-09-20

    The amount of SO{sub 2} gas absorbed by ice of known surface area at equilibrium was used to estimate the volume of liquid water present at the ice-air interface at temperatures from {minus}1 to {minus}60{degrees}C. Calculations were based on Henry`s law and acid dissociation equilibrium. The liquid volume is lowest at lower temperatures and ionic strength and under most conditions was greater than the volumes calculated based on freezing-point depression. The equivalent layer thickness, assuming that liquid water is uniformly distributed around the grains, ranged from 3-30 nm at {minus}60{degrees}C to 500-3000 nm at {minus}1{degrees}C. Corresponding ionic strengths for the two temperatures were 1.7-0.0012 M and 0.005-0.00009 M. Lower values were for ice made from distilled water, and higher values were for ice made from 10{sup {minus}3} M NaCl. Estimated pH values were from 2.9 at {minus}60{degrees}C to 4.1 at {minus}1{degrees}C. Results demonstrate that gas absorption can be used to estimate an equivalent liquid volume and thickness for the ice-air interfacial region. While not directly comparable to physical measurements, the estimated values should be directly applicable to modeling uptake of SO{sub 2} and other trace gases by ice. Lack of good thermodynamic data for temperature below 0{degrees}C is the main limitation to applying this method. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Neutron reflectivity studies on the DNA adsorption on lipid monolayers at the air liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Jeng, U.-Ser; Torikai, Naoya

    2006-11-01

    In situ neutron reflectivity was used to study the DC-Chol and TC-Chol monolayers at the air-liquid interface in the presence and absence of DNA in the subphase. It was found that the DC-Chol is more effective in adsorbing the DNA than the TC-Chol. It was also found that a compact DNA layer formed beneath the DC-Chol monolayer with a DNA gap spacing around 20 Å and a less compact DNA layer adsorbed to the TC-Chol monolayer with a DNA spacing around 60 Å, as estimated from the determined neutron scattering length density. From the determined neutron scattering length density profiles, the adsorbed DNA somewhat penetrates into the head group region of the charged lipids.

  15. Stability and minimum size of colloidal clusters on a liquid-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergamenshchik, V. M.

    2012-02-01

    A vertical force applied to each of two colloids, trapped at a liquid-air interface, induces their logarithmic pairwise attraction. I recently showed [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.79.011407 79, 011407 (2009)] that in clusters of size R much larger than the capillary length λ, the attraction changes to that of a power law and is much stronger due to a many-body effect, and I derived two equations that describe the equilibrium coarse-grained meniscus profile and colloid density in such clusters. In this paper, this theory is shown also to describe small clusters with R≪ λ provided the number N of colloids therein is sufficiently large. An analytical solution for a small circular cluster with an arbitrary short-range power-law pairwise repulsion is found. The energy of a cluster is obtained as a function of its radius R and colloid number N. As in large clusters, the attraction force and energy universally scale with the distance L between colloids as L-3 and L-2, respectively, for any repulsion forces. The states of an equilibrium cluster, predicted by the theory, are shown to be stable with respect to small perturbations of the meniscus profile and colloid density. The minimum number of colloids in a circular cluster, which sustains the thermal motion, is estimated. For standard parameters, it can be very modest, e.g., in the range 20-200, which is in line with experimental findings on reversible clusterization on a liquid-air interface.

  16. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect.

  17. A dose-controlled system for air-liquid interface cell exposure and application to zinc oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and their toxicological effects on human health, as well as on the ecosystem, have become a concern. Since initial contact with nanoparticles occurs at the epithelium in the lungs (or skin, or eyes), in vitro cell studies with nanoparticles require dose-controlled systems for delivery of nanoparticles to epithelial cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Results A novel air-liquid interface cell exposure system (ALICE) for nanoparticles in liquids is presented and validated. The ALICE generates a dense cloud of droplets with a vibrating membrane nebulizer and utilizes combined cloud settling and single particle sedimentation for fast (~10 min; entire exposure), repeatable (<12%), low-stress and efficient delivery of nanoparticles, or dissolved substances, to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Validation with various types of nanoparticles (Au, ZnO and carbon black nanoparticles) and solutes (such as NaCl) showed that the ALICE provided spatially uniform deposition (<1.6% variability) and had no adverse effect on the viability of a widely used alveolar human epithelial-like cell line (A549). The cell deposited dose can be controlled with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) over a dynamic range of at least 0.02-200 μg/cm2. The cell-specific deposition efficiency is currently limited to 0.072 (7.2% for two commercially available 6-er transwell plates), but a deposition efficiency of up to 0.57 (57%) is possible for better cell coverage of the exposure chamber. Dose-response measurements with ZnO nanoparticles (0.3-8.5 μg/cm2) showed significant differences in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-8) and oxidative stress (HO-1) markers when comparing submerged and air-liquid interface exposures. Both exposure methods showed no cellular response below 1 μg/cm2 ZnO, which indicates that ZnO nanoparticles are not toxic at occupationally allowed exposure levels. Conclusion The ALICE

  18. Growth of human bronchial epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface alters the response to particle exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: We tested the hypothesis that relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface would have an altered response to particle exposure. RNA for IL-8, IL-6, heme oxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 increased following exposure of submer...

  19. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen.

  20. Characterisation of Pellicles Formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster’s Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen. PMID:25360550

  1. Cigarette smoke alters primary human bronchial epithelial cell differentiation at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Schamberger, Andrea C; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A; Mise-Racek, Nikica; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-02-02

    The differentiated human airway epithelium consists of different cell types forming a polarized and pseudostratified epithelium. This is dramatically altered in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by basal and goblet cell hyperplasia, and squamous cell metaplasia. The effect of cigarette smoke on human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) differentiation remains to be elucidated. We analysed whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affected primary (p)HBEC differentiation and function. pHBEC were differentiated at the air-liquid interface (ALI) and differentiation was quantified after 7, 14, 21, or 28 days by assessing acetylated tubulin, CC10, or MUC5AC for ciliated, Clara, or goblet cells, respectively. Exposure of differentiating pHBEC to CSE impaired epithelial barrier formation, as assessed by resistance measurements (TEER). Importantly, CSE exposure significantly reduced the number of ciliated cells, while it increased the number of Clara and goblet cells. CSE-dependent cell number changes were reflected by a reduction of acetylated tubulin levels, an increased expression of the basal cell marker KRT14, and increased secretion of CC10, but not by changes in transcript levels of CC10, MUC5AC, or FOXJ1. Our data demonstrate that cigarette smoke specifically alters the cellular composition of the airway epithelium by affecting basal cell differentiation in a post-transcriptional manner.

  2. Usefulness of toxicological validation of VOCs catalytic degradation by air-liquid interface exposure system.

    PubMed

    Al Zallouha, Margueritta; Landkocz, Yann; Brunet, Julien; Cousin, Renaud; Genty, Eric; Courcot, Dominique; Siffert, Stéphane; Shirali, Pirouz; Billet, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Toluene is one of the most used Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the industry despite its major health impacts. Catalytic oxidation represents an efficient remediation technique in order to reduce its emission directly at the source, but it can release by-products. To complete the classical performance assessment using dedicated analytical chemistry methods, we propose to perform an untargeted toxicological validation on two efficient catalysts. Using biological system allows integrating synergy and antagonism in toxic effects of emitted VOCs and by-products, often described in case of multi-exposure condition. Catalysts Pd/α-Al2O3 and Pd/γ-Al2O3 developed for the oxidation of toluene were both coupled to a Vitrocell(®) Air-Liquid Interface (ALI) system, for exposure of human A549 lung cells during 1h to toluene or to catalysts exhaust before quantification of xenobiotics metabolizing enzymes. This study validated initially the Vitrocell(®) as an innovative, direct and dynamic model of ALI exposure in the assessment of the performances of new catalysts, showing the presence of chemically undetected by-products. The comparison of the two catalysts showed then that fewer organic compounds metabolizing genes were induced by Pd/γ-Al2O3 in comparison to Pd/α-Al2O3, suggesting that Pd/γ-Al2O3 is more efficient for toluene total oxidation from a toxicological point of view.

  3. Optimization of an air-liquid interface exposure system for assessing toxicity of airborne nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Latvala, Siiri; Hedberg, Jonas; Möller, Lennart; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Karlsson, Hanna L; Elihn, Karine

    2016-10-01

    The use of refined toxicological methods is currently needed for characterizing the risks of airborne nanoparticles (NPs) to human health. To mimic pulmonary exposure, we have developed an air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure system for direct deposition of airborne NPs on to lung cell cultures. Compared to traditional submerged systems, this allows more realistic exposure conditions for characterizing toxicological effects induced by airborne NPs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the deposition of silver NPs (AgNPs) is affected by different conditions of the ALI system. Additionally, the viability and metabolic activity of A549 cells was studied following AgNP exposure. Particle deposition increased markedly with increasing aerosol flow rate and electrostatic field strength. The highest amount of deposited particles (2.2 μg cm(-2) ) at cell-free conditions following 2 h exposure was observed for the highest flow rate (390 ml min(-1) ) and the strongest electrostatic field (±2 kV). This was estimated corresponding to deposition efficiency of 94%. Cell viability was not affected after 2 h exposure to clean air in the ALI system. Cells exposed to AgNPs (0.45 and 0.74 μg cm(-2) ) showed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced metabolic activities (64 and 46%, respectively). Our study shows that the ALI exposure system can be used for generating conditions that were more realistic for in vitro exposures, which enables improved mechanistic and toxicological studies of NPs in contact with human lung cells.Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. PREFACE: Functionalized Liquid Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Hubert; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Monroe, Charles W.; Urbakh, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Most natural processes take place at interfaces. For this reason, surface science has been a focal point of modern research. At solid-liquid interfaces one can induce various species to adsorb or react, and thus may study interactions between the substrate and adsorbates, kinetic processes, optical properties, etc. Liquid-liquid interfaces, formed by immiscible liquids such as water and oil, have a number of distinctive features. Both sides of the interface are amenable to detailed physical and chemical analysis. By chemical or electrochemical means, metal or semiconductor nanoparticles can be formed or localised at the interface. Surfactants can be used to tailor surface properties, and also to place organic molecular or supermolecular constructions at the boundary between the liquids. Electric fields can be used to drive ions from one fluid to another, or even change the shape of the interface itself. In many cases, both liquids are optically transparent, making functionalized liquid-liquid interfaces promising for various optical applications based on the transmission or reflection of light. An advantage common to most of these systems is self-assembly; because a liquid-liquid interface is not mechanically constrained like a solid-liquid interface, it can easily access its most stable state, even after it has been driven far from equilibrium. This special issue focuses on four modes of liquid-liquid interfacial functionalization: the controlled adsorption of molecules or nanoparticles, the formation of adlayers or films, electrowetting, and ion transfer or interface-localized reactions. Interfacial adsorption can be driven electrically, chemically, or mechanically. The liquid-liquid interface can be used to study how anisotropic particles orient at a surface under the influence of a field, how surfactants interact with other adsorbates, and how nanoparticles aggregate; the transparency of the interface also makes the chirality of organic adsorbates amenable to

  5. Studies of molecular monolayers at air-liquid interfaces by second harmonic generation: question of orientational phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Shen, Y.R.; Kim, M.W.; Grubb, S.; Bock, J.

    1985-06-01

    Insoluble molecular monolayers at gas-liquid interfaces provide an insight to the understanding of surfactants, wetting, microemulsions and membrane structures and offer a possibility to study the rich world of 2-dimensional phase transitions. In the interpretation of the observed properties of these systems various assumptions about the molecular orientation are often made, but so far few clear experimental data exist. In this paper we will show how optical second harmonic generation (SHG) can be used to measure the molecular orientation of monolayers of surfactant molecules at water-air interfaces. By simultaneously measuring the surface pressure versus surface molecular area we can show for the first time that the observed liquid condensed-liquid expanded transition is an orientational phase transition. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Quantitative analysis of amyloid-integrated biofilms formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cynthia; Lim, Ji Youn; Fuller, Gerald G; Cegelski, Lynette

    2012-08-08

    Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular assemblies, characterized by a heterogeneous extracellular polymeric matrix, that have emerged as hallmarks of persistent infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative data are needed to elucidate the composition and architecture of biofilms, and such data need to be correlated with mechanical and physicochemical properties that relate to function. We performed a panel of interfacial rheological measurements during biofilm formation at the air-liquid interface by the Escherichia coli strain UTI89, which is noted for its importance in studies of urinary tract infection and for its assembly of functional amyloid fibers termed curli. Brewster-angle microscopy and measurements of the surface elasticity (G(s)') and stress-strain response provided sensitive and quantitative parameters that revealed distinct stages during bacterial colonization, aggregation, and eventual formation of a pellicle at the air-liquid interface. Pellicles that formed under conditions that upregulate curli production exhibited an increase in strength and viscoelastic properties as well as a greater ability to recover from stress-strain perturbation. The results suggest that curli, as hydrophobic extracellular amyloid fibers, enhance the strength, viscoelasticity, and resistance to strain of E. coli biofilms formed at the air-liquid interface.

  7. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact.

  8. Ionic Liquid Films at the Water-Air Interface: Langmuir Isotherms of Tetra-alkylphosphonium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Karina; Canongia Lopes, José N; Gonçalves da Silva, Amélia M P S

    2015-08-04

    The behavior of ionic liquids trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide and trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium dicyanamide, [P6 6 6 14][Ntf2] and [P6 6 6 14][N(CN)2], respectively, at the water-air interface was investigated using the Langmuir trough technique. The obtained surface pressure versus mean molecular area (MMA) isotherms, π-A, and surface potential versus MMA isotherms, ΔV-A, show distinct interfacial behavior between the two systems. The results were interpreted at a molecular level using molecular dynamics simulations: the different compression regimes along the [P6 6 6 14][Ntf2] isotherm correspond to the self-organization of the ions at the water surface into compact and planar monolayers that coalesce at an MMA value of ca. 1.85 nm(2)/ion pair to form an expanded liquidlike layer. Upon further compression, the monolayer collapses at around 1.2 nm(2)/ion pair to yield a progressively thicker and less organized layer. These transitions are much more subdued in the [P6 6 6 14][N(CN)2] system because of the more hydrophilic nature of the dicyanamide anion. The numerical density profiles obtained from the MD simulation trajectories are also able to emphasize the very unusual packing of the four long alkyl side chains of the cation above and below the ionic layer that forms at the water surface. Such a distribution is also different for the two studied systems during the different compression regimes.

  9. Benchmarking the Self-Assembly of Surfactin Biosurfactant at the Liquid-Air Interface to those of Synthetic Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Nasser, M S; Al-Lagtah, Nasir M A

    The adsorption of surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, at the liquid-air interface has been investigated in this work. The maximum adsorption density and the nature and the extent of lateral interaction between the adsorbed surfactin molecules at the interface were estimated from surface tension data using the Frumkin model. The quantitative information obtained using the Frumkin model was also compared to those obtained using the Gibbs equation and the Langmuir-Szyszkowski model. Error analysis showed a better agreement between the experimental and the calculated values using the Frumkin model relative to the other two models. The adsorption of surfactin at the liquid-air interface was also compared to those of synthetic anionic, sodium dodecylbenzenesulphonate (SDBS), and nonionic, octaethylene glycol monotetradecyl ether (C14E8), surfactants. It has been estimated that the area occupied by a surfactin molecule at the interface is about 3- and 2.5-fold higher than those occupied by SDBS and C14E8 molecules, respectively. The interaction between the adsorbed molecules of the anionic biosurfactant (surfactin) was estimated to be attractive, unlike the mild repulsive interaction between the adsorbed SDBS molecules.

  10. A Diffuse Interface Model for solid-liquid-air dissolution problems based on a porous medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Quintard, M.; Debenest, G.; Laouafa, F.

    2011-12-01

    The underground cavities may be dissolved by the flows of groundwater where the dissolution mainly happens at the liquid-solid interface. In many real cases, the cavities are not occupied only by the water, but also the gas phase, e.g., air, or other gases. In this case, there are solid-liquid-gas three phases. Normally, the air does not participate the dissolution. However, it may influence the dissolution as the position of the solid-liquid interface may gradually lower down with the dissolution process. Simulating the dissolution problems with multi- moving interfaces is a difficult task but rather interesting to study the evolution of the underground cavities. In this paper, we propose a diffuse interface model (DIM) to simulate the three-phase dissolution problem, based on a porous medium theory and a volume averaging theory te{Whitaker1999,Golfier2002,Quintard1994}. The interface is regarded as a continuous layer where the phase indicator (mainly for solid-liquid interface) and phase saturation (mainly for liquid-gas interface) vary rapidly but smoothly. The DIM equations enable us to simulate the moving interface under a fixed mesh system, instead of a deformed or moving mesh. Suppose we have three phases, solid, liquid and gas. The solid phase contains only species A. The gas phase contains only the air. The volume averaging theory is used to upscale the balance equations. The final DIM equations are presented below. The balance equation of solid phase can be written as {partialrho_{s}(1-\\varepsilon_{f})}/{partial t}=-K_{sl} where \\varepsilonf represents the volume fraction of the fluids (liquid+gas) and Ksl refers to the mass exchange between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Ksl cam be expressed as K_{sl}=rho_{l}alpha(omega_{eq}-Omega_{Al}). The balance equations of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho_{l}\\varepsilon_{f}S_{l}}/{partial t}+nabla\\cdot(rho_{l}{V}_{l})= K_{sl}. The balance equation of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho

  11. Increased transfer of a multidrug resistance plasmid in Escherichia coli biofilms at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Król, Jaroslaw E; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Rogers, Linda M; Beyenal, Haluk; Krone, Stephen M; Top, Eva M

    2011-08-01

    Although biofilms represent a common bacterial lifestyle in clinically and environmentally important habitats, there is scant information on the extent of gene transfer in these spatially structured populations. The objective of this study was to gain insight into factors that affect transfer of the promiscuous multidrug resistance plasmid pB10 in Escherichia coli biofilms. Biofilms were grown in different experimental settings, and plasmid transfer was monitored using laser scanning confocal microscopy and plate counting. In closed flow cells, plasmid transfer in surface-attached submerged biofilms was negligible. In contrast, a high plasmid transfer efficiency was observed in a biofilm floating at the air-liquid interface in an open flow cell with low flow rates. A vertical flow cell and a batch culture biofilm reactor were then used to detect plasmid transfer at different depths away from the air-liquid interface. Extensive plasmid transfer occurred only in a narrow zone near that interface. The much lower transfer frequencies in the lower zones coincided with rapidly decreasing oxygen concentrations. However, when an E. coli csrA mutant was used as the recipient, a thick biofilm was obtained at all depths, and plasmid transfer occurred at similar frequencies throughout. These results and data from separate aerobic and anaerobic matings suggest that oxygen can affect IncP-1 plasmid transfer efficiency, not only directly but also indirectly, through influencing population densities and therefore colocalization of donors and recipients. In conclusion, the air-liquid interface can be a hot spot for plasmid-mediated gene transfer due to high densities of juxtaposed donor and recipient cells.

  12. Polysaccharide films at an air/liquid and a liquid/silicon interface: effect of the polysaccharide and liquid type on their physical properties.

    PubMed

    Taira, Yasunori; McNamee, Cathy E

    2014-11-14

    We investigated the effect of the polysaccharide type, the subphase on which the Langmuir monolayers were prepared, and the liquid in which the properties of the transferred monolayers were measured on the physical properties of the polysaccharide films at an air/aqueous interface and at a silicon substrate, and the forces and friction of the polysaccharide transferred films when measured in solution against a silica probe. Chitosan was modified with a silane coupling agent to make chitosan derived compounds with a low and a medium molecular weight. Chitin and the chitosan-derived compounds were used to make Langmuir monolayers at air/water and air/pH 9 buffer interfaces. The monolayers were transferred to silicon substrates via Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, and the chitosan-derived compounds subsequently chemically reacted with the silicon substrates. Atomic force microscope force and friction measurements were made in water and in the pH 9 buffer, where the water and the pH 9 buffer acted as a good and a bad solvent for the polysaccharides, respectively. The polysaccharide type affected the friction of the polysaccharide film, where the physically adsorbed chitin gave the lowest friction. The friction of L-chitosan was higher than that of M-chitosan in water, suggesting that the molecular weight of the polymer affects its lubricating ability. The forces and friction of the polysaccharide films changed when the subphase on which the Langmuir monolayers were formed was changed or when the liquid in which the properties of the films adsorbed at the silicon substrate were measured was changed. The friction increased significantly when the liquid was changed from water to the pH 9 buffer. This increase was explained by the reduced charge of the chitin and chitosan-derived materials due to the pH increase, the screening of the charges by the salts in the buffer, and the possible hardening of the monolayer caused by the adsorption of salts from the buffer.

  13. Towards Organized Hybrid Nanomaterials at the Air/Water Interface Based on Liquid-Crystal/ZnO Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Paczesny, Jan; Wolska-Pietkiewicz, Małgorzata; Binkiewicz, Ilona; Wróbel, Zbigniew; Wadowska, Monika; Matuła, Kinga; Dzięcielewski, Igor; Pociecha, Damian; Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Lewiński, Janusz; Hołyst, Robert

    2015-11-16

    The ability to self-assemble nanosized ligand-stabilized metal oxide or semiconductor materials offers an intriguing route to engineer nanomaterials with new tailored properties from the disparate components. We describe a novel one-pot two-step organometallic approach to prepare ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) coated with deprotonated 4-(dodecyloxy)benzoic acid (i.e., an X-type liquid-crystalline ligand) as a model LC system (termed ZnO-LC1 NCs). Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films of the resulting hybrids are investigated. The observed behavior of the ZnO NCs at the air/water interface is rationalized by invoking a ZnO-interdigitation process mediated by the anchored liquid-crystalline shell. The ordered superstructures form according to mechanism based on a ZnO-interdigitation process mediated by liquid crystals (termed ZIP-LC). The external and directed force applied upon compression at the air/water interface and the packing of the ligands that stabilize the ZnO cores drives the formation of nanorods of ordered internal structure. To study the process in detail, we follow a nontraditional protocol of thin-film investigation. We collect the films from the air/water interface in powder form (ZnO-LC1 LB), resuspend the powder in organic solvents and utilize otherwise unavailable experimental techniques. The structural and physical properties of the resulting superlattices were studied by using electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray studies, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetric analysis, UV/Vis absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  14. Study of roughness-induced diffuse and specular reflectance at silver-air and silver-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, S. O.

    1980-07-01

    Surface plasma wave absorption and roughness induced optical scattering from an interface of silver and air were investigated. The position of the surface plasma resonance minimum in reflectivity for a stochastically roughened metal silver surface was studied as a function of a number of distinct roughness perturbations. In the case of a transparent liquid-silver boundary the frequency red shift of the resonance minimum was determined and the location of the surface plasmon dip for various liquids is shown to agree well with a simple roughness theory. The additional interfacial properties due to the formation of a thin inhomogeneous oxide layer occurring either spontaneously or due to application of a small interfacial electrical potential are more complex. The optical constants of the interlayer were determined from differential specular reflectance measurements at the boundary.

  15. Trade-off between oxygen and iron acquisition in bacterial cells at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2011-07-01

    The air-liquid interface is a selectively advantageous niche for aerobes due to the accessibility to oxygen. Various species of aerobes form a biofilm-like structure at air-liquid interfaces, known as a pellicle. Although the pellicle is one of the major growth modes of microorganisms, the metabolic features of pellicle cells and the determinative factors for pellicle formation are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the factors affecting pellicle growth by the facultative aerobe Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and also examined the gene expression profiles of pellicle cells in order to characterize features of the pellicle lifestyle. A mutant strain deficient in the production of exopolysaccharides displayed poor pellicle-forming ability and a growth disadvantage under static conditions compared with the wild-type strain. Notably, supplementation of culture medium with an alternative electron acceptor, nitrate, led to diminished pellicle formation. Nitrate facilitated the growth of an anaerobic planktonic cell subpopulation that acted as a competitor for iron with the aerobic subpopulation, resulting in the observed pellicle reduction. Transcriptome analysis revealed that pellicle cells were under aerobic and iron-depleted states. Thus, although pellicle formation certainly confers a growth advantage under static conditions, pellicle cells face a nutritional trade-off between oxygen and iron acquisition.

  16. Effects of liquid VOC concentration and salt content on partitioning equilibrium of hydrophilic VOC at air-sweat interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Chu, Fu-Sui; Su, Tzy-I.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) must initially be absorbed by sweat on the surface of skin for human VOC dermal exposure. The partitioning equilibrium at the air-sweat interface is given by p=Cg*/C, where pc is the partitioning coefficient, and Cg* is the gaseous concentration in equilibrium with the aqueous VOC concentration ( CL) at a constant water temperature ( Tw). A series of thermodynamic functions of Cg*(C,T) are presented, as well as the values of pc, and the heat of gaseous-liquid phase transfer (Δ Htr) for tested VOCs, including iso-propanol (IPA, CL=12-120 mg L -1) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK, CL=10-80 mg L -1) to determine the effects of liquid VOC concentration and salt contents of sweat on pc of hydrophilic VOCs. Experimental data reveal that the pc values of IPA and MEK drop as the liquid VOC concentrations increasing from 10 to 120 mg L -1. However, sodium salt content in human sweat (sodium chloride and sodium lactate) induces the effect of salt, indicating the increase in pc. Notably, neither urea nor ammonia in human sweat increase pc. Artificial sweat, consisting of sodium chloride 0.47%, urea 0.05%, ammonia 0.004% and sodium lactate 0.6%, was used to evaluate the increase in the pc values of IPA and MEK. The liquid VOC concentration effect simultaneously develops together with the salt effect on the partition at the interface of air-sweat for hydrophilic VOC solutions. The pc values of IPA for artificial sweat decrease as much as 32.5% as CL increases from 12 to 120 mg L -1 at 300 K, and those of MEK drop by as much as 70.9% as CL increases from 10 to 80 mg L -1 at 300 K. This investigation provides a basis for elucidating the assessment of human dermal exposure to hydrophilic VOCs.

  17. Cell deformation at the air-liquid interface induces Ca2+-dependent ATP release from lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsingh, Ronaldo; Grygorczyk, Alexandra; Solecki, Anna; Cherkaoui, Lalla Siham; Berthiaume, Yves; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2011-04-01

    Extracellular nucleotides regulate mucociliary clearance in the airways and surfactant secretion in alveoli. Their release is exquisitely mechanosensitive and may be induced by stretch as well as airflow shear stress acting on lung epithelia. We hypothesized that, in addition, tension forces at the air-liquid interface (ALI) may contribute to mechanosensitive ATP release in the lungs. Local depletion of airway surface liquid, mucins, and surfactants, which normally protect epithelial surfaces, facilitate such release and trigger compensatory mucin and fluid secretion processes. In this study, human bronchial epithelial 16HBE14o(-) and alveolar A549 cells were subjected to tension forces at the ALI by passing an air bubble over the cell monolayer in a flow-through chamber, or by air exposure while tilting the cell culture dish. Such stimulation induced significant ATP release not involving cell lysis, as verified by ethidium bromide staining. Confocal fluorescence microscopy disclosed reversible cell deformation in the monolayer part in contact with the ALI. Fura 2 fluorescence imaging revealed transient intracellular Ca(2+) elevation evoked by the ALI, which did not entail nonspecific Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space. ATP release was reduced by ∼40 to ∼90% from cells loaded with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM and was completely abolished by N-ethylmalemide (1 mM). These experiments demonstrate that in close proximity to the ALI, surface tension forces are transmitted directly on cells, causing their mechanical deformation and Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic ATP release. Such a signaling mechanism may contribute to the detection of local deficiency of airway surface liquid and surfactants on the lung surface.

  18. Anomalous effective polarity of an air/liquid-mixture interface: a heterodyne-detected electronic and vibrational sum frequency generation study.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sudip Kumar; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-10-07

    We study the effective polarity of an air/liquid-mixture interface by using interface-selective heterodyne-detected electronic sum frequency generation (HD-ESFG) and vibrational sum frequency generation (HD-VSFG) spectroscopies. With water and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) chosen as two components of the liquid mixture, the bulk polarity of the mixture is controlled nearly arbitrarily by the mixing ratio. The effective polarity of the air/mixture interface is evaluated by HD-ESFG with a surface-active solvatochromic molecule used as a polarity indicator. Surprisingly, the interfacial effective polarity of the air/mixture interface increases significantly, when the bulk polarity of the mixture decreases (i.e. when the fraction of DMF increases). Judging from the hydrogen-bond structure at the air/mixture interface clarified by HD-VSFG, this anomalous change of the interfacial effective polarity is attributed to the interface-specific solvation structure around the indicator molecule at the air/mixture interface.

  19. TESTING VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID-AIR INTERFACE CORROSION IN SIMULATED ENVIRONMENTS OF HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELLED TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.

    2013-05-30

    Electrochemical coupon testing were performed on 6 Hanford tank solution simulants and corresponding condensate simulants to evaluate the susceptibility of vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion. Additionally, partial-immersion coupon testing were performed on the 6 tank solution simulants to compliment the accelerated electrochemical testing. Overall, the testing suggests that the SY-102 high nitrate solution is the most aggressive of the six solution simulants evaluated. Alternatively, the most passive solution, based on both electrochemical testing and coupon testing, was AY-102 solution. The presence of ammonium nitrate in the simulants at the lowest concentration tested (0.001 M) had no significant effect. At higher concentrations (0.5 M), ammonium nitrate appears to deter localized corrosion, suggesting a beneficial effect of the presence of the ammonium ion. The results of this research suggest that there is a threshold concentration of ammonium ions leading to inhibition of corrosion, thereby suggesting the need for further experimentation to identify the threshold.

  20. An Air-Liquid Interface Culture System for 3D Organoid Culture of Diverse Primary Gastrointestinal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingnan; Ootani, Akifumi; Kuo, Calvin

    2016-01-01

    Conventional in vitro analysis of gastrointestinal epithelium usually relies on two-dimensional (2D) culture of epithelial cell lines as monolayer on impermeable surfaces. However, the lack of context of differentiation and tissue architecture in 2D culture can hinder the faithful recapitulation of the phenotypic and morphological characteristics of native epithelium. Here, we describe a robust long-term three-dimensional (3D) culture methodology for gastrointestinal culture, which incorporates both epithelial and mesenchymal/stromal components into a collagen-based air-liquid interface 3D culture system. This system allows vigorously expansion of primary gastrointestinal epithelium for over 60 days as organoids with both proliferation and multilineage differentiation, indicating successful long-term intestinal culture within a microenvironment accurately recapitulating the stem cell niche.

  1. Non-equilibrium magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces: dynamic patterns, magnetic order and self-assembled swimmers.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.

    2011-04-20

    Colloidal dispersions of interacting particles subjected to an external periodic forcing often develop nontrivial self-assembled patterns and complex collective behavior. A fundamental issue is how collective ordering in such non-equilibrium systems arises from the dynamics of discrete interacting components. In addition, from a practical viewpoint, by working in regimes far from equilibrium new self-organized structures which are generally not available through equilibrium thermodynamics can be created. In this review spontaneous self-assembly phenomena in magnetic colloidal dispersions suspended at liquid-air interfaces and driven out of equilibrium by an alternating magnetic field are presented. Experiments reveal a new type of nontrivially ordered self-assembled structures emerging in such systems in a certain range of excitation parameters. These dynamic structures emerge as a result of the competition between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces and have complex unconventional magnetic ordering. Nontrivial self-induced hydrodynamic fields accompany each out-of-equilibrium pattern. Spontaneous symmetry breaking of the self-induced surface flows leading to a formation of self-propelled microstructures has been discovered. Some features of the self-localized structures can be understood in the framework of the amplitude equation (Ginzburg-Landau type equation) for parametric waves coupled to the conservation law equation describing the evolution of the magnetic particle density and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows. To understand the fundamental microscopic mechanisms governing self-assembly processes in magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces a first-principle model for a non-equilibrium self-assembly is presented. The latter model allows us to capture in detail the entire process of out-of-equilibrium self-assembly in the system and reproduces most of the observed phenomenology.

  2. Stationary rotary force waves on the liquid-air core interface of a swirl atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, J. J.; Cooper, D.; Yule, A. J.; Nasr, G. G.

    2016-10-01

    A one-dimensional wave equation, applicable to the waves on the surface of the air-core of a swirl atomizer is derived analytically, by analogy to the similar one-dimensional wave equation derivation for shallow-water gravity waves. In addition an analogy to the flow of water over a weir is used to produce an analytical derivation of the flow over the lip of the outlet of a swirl atomizer using the principle of maximum flow. The principle of maximum flow is substantiated by reference to continuity of the discharge in the direction of streaming. For shallow-water gravity waves, the phase velocity is the same expression as for the critical velocity over the weir. Similarly, in the present work, the wave phase velocity on the surface of the air-core is shown to be the same expression as for the critical velocity for the flow at the outlet. In addition, this wave phase velocity is shown to be the square root of the product of the radial acceleration and the liquid thickness, as analogous with the wave phase velocity for shallow water gravity waves, which is the square root of the product of the acceleration due to gravity and the water depth. The work revisits the weirs and flumes work of Binnie et al. but using a different methodology. The results corroborate with the work of Binnie. High speed video, Laser Doppler Anemometry and deflected laser beam experimental work has been carried out on an oversize Perspex (Plexiglas) swirl atomizer. Three distinctive types of waves were detected: helical striations, low amplitude random ripples and low frequency stationary waves. It is the latter wave type that is considered further in this article. The experimentally observed waves appear to be stationary upon the axially moving flow. The mathematical analysis allows for the possibility of a negative value for the phase velocity expression. Therefore the critical velocity and the wave phase velocity do indeed lead to stationary waves in the atomizer. A quantitative comparison

  3. Effects of Female Sex Hormones on Susceptibility to HSV-2 in Vaginal Cells Grown in Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung; Dizzell, Sara E.; Leung, Vivian; Nazli, Aisha; Zahoor, Muhammad A.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-01-01

    The lower female reproductive tract (FRT) is comprised of the cervix and vagina, surfaces that are continuously exposed to a variety of commensal and pathogenic organisms. Sexually transmitted viruses, such as herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), have to traverse the mucosal epithelial lining of the FRT to establish infection. The majority of current culture systems that model the host-pathogen interactions in the mucosal epithelium have limitations in simulating physiological conditions as they employ a liquid-liquid interface (LLI), in which both apical and basolateral surfaces are submerged in growth medium. We designed the current study to simulate in vivo conditions by growing an immortalized vaginal epithelial cell line (Vk2/E6E7) in culture with an air-liquid interface (ALI) and examined the effects of female sex hormones on their growth, differentiation, and susceptibility to HSV-2 under these conditions, in comparison to LLI cultures. ALI conditions induced Vk2/E6E7 cells to grow into multi-layered cultures compared to the monolayers present in LLI conditions. Vk2 cells in ALI showed higher production of cytokeratin in the presence of estradiol (E2), compared to cells grown in progesterone (P4). Cells grown under ALI conditions were exposed to HSV-2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the highest infection and replication was observed in the presence of P4. Altogether, this study suggests that ALI cultures more closely simulate the in vivo conditions of the FRT compared to the conventional LLI cultures. Furthermore, under these conditions P4 was found to confer higher susceptibility to HSV-2 infection in vaginal cells. The vaginal ALI culture system offers a better alternative to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27589787

  4. Effects of Female Sex Hormones on Susceptibility to HSV-2 in Vaginal Cells Grown in Air-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung; Dizzell, Sara E; Leung, Vivian; Nazli, Aisha; Zahoor, Muhammad A; Fichorova, Raina N; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-08-30

    The lower female reproductive tract (FRT) is comprised of the cervix and vagina, surfaces that are continuously exposed to a variety of commensal and pathogenic organisms. Sexually transmitted viruses, such as herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), have to traverse the mucosal epithelial lining of the FRT to establish infection. The majority of current culture systems that model the host-pathogen interactions in the mucosal epithelium have limitations in simulating physiological conditions as they employ a liquid-liquid interface (LLI), in which both apical and basolateral surfaces are submerged in growth medium. We designed the current study to simulate in vivo conditions by growing an immortalized vaginal epithelial cell line (Vk2/E6E7) in culture with an air-liquid interface (ALI) and examined the effects of female sex hormones on their growth, differentiation, and susceptibility to HSV-2 under these conditions, in comparison to LLI cultures. ALI conditions induced Vk2/E6E7 cells to grow into multi-layered cultures compared to the monolayers present in LLI conditions. Vk2 cells in ALI showed higher production of cytokeratin in the presence of estradiol (E2), compared to cells grown in progesterone (P4). Cells grown under ALI conditions were exposed to HSV-2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the highest infection and replication was observed in the presence of P4. Altogether, this study suggests that ALI cultures more closely simulate the in vivo conditions of the FRT compared to the conventional LLI cultures. Furthermore, under these conditions P4 was found to confer higher susceptibility to HSV-2 infection in vaginal cells. The vaginal ALI culture system offers a better alternative to study host-pathogen interactions.

  5. Role of conductivity in the electrohydrodynamic patterning of air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gambhire, P; Thaokar, R M

    2012-09-01

    The effect of electrical conductivity on the wavelength of an electrohydrodynamic instability of a leaky dielectric-perfect dielectric (LD-PD) fluid interface is investigated. For instabilities induced by dc fields, two models, namely the PD-PD model, which is independent of the conductivity, and the LD-PD model, which shows very weak dependence on the conductivity of the LD fluid, have been previously suggested. In the past, experiments have been compared with either of these two models. In the present work, experiments, analytical theory, and simulations are used to elucidate the dependence of the wavelength obtained under dc fields on the ratio of the instability time (τs=1/smax) and the charge relaxation time (τc=εε0/σ, where ε0 is the permittivity of vacuum, ε is the dielectric constant, and σ is the electrical conductivity). Sensitive dependence of the wavelength on the nondimensional conductivity S2=σ2μ2h0(2)/(ε0(2)φ0(2)δ2) (where σ2 is the electrical conductivity, μ2 is the viscosity, h0 is the thickness of the thin liquid film, φ0 is the rms value of the applied field, and δ is a small parameter) is observed and the PD-PD and the LD-PD cases are observed only as limiting behaviors at very low and very high values of S2, respectively. Under an alternating field, the frequency of the applied voltage can be altered to realize several regimes of relative magnitudes of the three time scales inherent to the system, namely τc, τs, and the time period of the applied field, τf. The wavelength in the various regimes that result from a systematic variation of these three time scales is studied. It is observed that the linear Floquet theory is invalid in most of these regimes and nonlinear analysis is used to complement it. Systematic dependence of the wavelength of the instability on the frequency of the applied field is presented and it is demonstrated that nonlinear simulations are necessary to explain the experimental results.

  6. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iron homeostas...

  7. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iro...

  8. Aerosol generation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Polk, William W; Sharma, Monita; Sayes, Christie M; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-04-23

    Aerosol generation and characterization are critical components in the assessment of the inhalation hazards of engineered nanomaterials (NMs). An extensive review was conducted on aerosol generation and exposure apparatus as part of an international expert workshop convened to discuss the design of an in vitro testing strategy to assess pulmonary toxicity following exposure to aerosolized particles. More specifically, this workshop focused on the design of an in vitro method to predict the development of pulmonary fibrosis in humans following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Aerosol generators, for dry or liquid particle suspension aerosolization, and exposure chambers, including both commercially available systems and those developed by independent researchers, were evaluated. Additionally, characterization methods that can be used and the time points at which characterization can be conducted in order to interpret in vitro exposure results were assessed. Summarized below is the information presented and discussed regarding the relevance of various aerosol generation and characterization techniques specific to aerosolized MWCNTs exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The generation of MWCNT aerosols relevant to human exposures and their characterization throughout exposure in an ALI system is critical for extrapolation of in vitro results to toxicological outcomes in humans.

  9. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-04-01

    The liquid interface is a narrow, highly anisotropic region, characterized by rapidly varying density, polarity, and molecular structure. I review several aspects of interfacial solvation and show how these affect reactivity at liquid/liquid interfaces. I specifically consider ion transfer, electron transfer, and SN2 reactions, showing that solvent effects on these reactions can be understood by examining the unique structure and dynamics of the liquid interface region.

  10. Reaction dynamics at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-04-01

    The liquid interface is a narrow, highly anisotropic region, characterized by rapidly varying density, polarity, and molecular structure. I review several aspects of interfacial solvation and show how these affect reactivity at liquid/liquid interfaces. I specifically consider ion transfer, electron transfer, and SN2 reactions, showing that solvent effects on these reactions can be understood by examining the unique structure and dynamics of the liquid interface region.

  11. Liquid Surface X-ray Studies of Gold Nanoparticle-Phospholipid Films at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    You, Siheng Sean; Heffern, Charles T R; Dai, Yeling; Meron, Mati; Henderson, J Michael; Bu, Wei; Xie, Wenyi; Lee, Ka Yee C; Lin, Binhua

    2016-09-01

    Amphiphilic phospholipids and nanoparticles functionalized with hydrophobic capping ligands have been extensively investigated for their capacity to self-assemble into Langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface. However, understanding of composite films consisting of both nanoparticles and phospholipids, and by extension, the complex interactions arising between nanomaterials and biological membranes, remains limited. In this work, dodecanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) with an average core diameter of 6 nm were incorporated into 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayers with surface densities ranging from 0.1 to 20% area coverage at a surface pressure of 30 mN/m. High resolution liquid surface X-ray scattering studies revealed a phase separation of the DPPC and Au-NP components of the composite film, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy after the film was transferred to a substrate. At low Au-NP content, the structural organization of the phase-separated film is best described as a DPPC film containing isolated islands of Au-NPs. However, increasing the Au-NP content beyond 5% area coverage transforms the structural organization of the composite film to a long-range interconnected network of Au-NP strands surrounding small seas of DPPC, where the density of the Au-NP network increases with increasing Au-NP content. The observed phase separation and structural organization of the phospholipid and nanoparticle components in these Langmuir monolayers are useful for understanding interactions of nanoparticles with biological membranes.

  12. Pulmonary surfactant and macrophages studied at the air/liquid interface revealed by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesford, Dana-Marie; Allen, Heather; Carlson, Tracy; Schlesinger, Larry

    2012-04-01

    The alveolus is lined with a complex mixture of lipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant (PS) that lower surface tension at the alveolar air/liquid interface. The surface area of the lung for a 70 kg adult human at total lung capacity is ˜70 m^2. The large surface area and the direct exposure to the environment with every inhalation make this organ more susceptible to invasion by viruses, bacteria, and small particles. The most abundant cell recovered in human lung lavage is the alveolar macrophage which accounts for 85% of the total. The primary function of the alveolar macrophage is to defend the lung against invasion, but also in the clearance of surfactant components in the lung. Quintero and Wright,^1 in an in vitro study observing alveolar macrophage metabolism of two lipid components dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), noted that DPPG was removed at a faster rate. The mechanism by which this process takes place is not fully understood and our aim is to investigate the interactions of macrophages with different lipids using Brewster angle microscopy. Preliminary studies suggest that THP-1 differentiated macrophages do not significantly perturb DPPC and DPPG monolayers and research utilizing alveolar macrophages is underway. The effect of PS SP-A and SP-D is also discussed.

  13. Magnetic Nanodrug Delivery Through the Mucus Layer of Air-Liquid Interface Cultured Primary Normal Human Tracheobronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Economou, E C; Marinelli, S; Smith, M C; Routt, A A; Kravets, V V; Chu, H W; Spendier, K; Celinski, Z J

    2016-09-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) and highly anisotropic barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) nanoparticles were coated with an anti-inflammatory drug and magnetically transported through mucus produced by primary human airway epithelial cells. Using wet planetary ball milling, dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid-coated BaFe12O19 nano-particles (BaNPs) of 1-100 nm in diameter were prepared in water. BaNPs and conventional 20-30-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (FeNPs) were then encased in a polymer (PLGA) loaded with dexamethasone (Dex) and tagged for imaging. PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Both PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were transferred to the surface of a ~100-μm thick mucus layer of air-liquid interface cultured primary normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTE) cells. Within 30 min, the nanoparticles were pulled successfully through the mucus layer by a permanent neodymium magnet. The penetration time of the nanomedicine was monitored using confocal microscopy and tailored by varying the thickness of the PLGA-Dex coating around the particles.

  14. Magnetic Nanodrug Delivery Through the Mucus Layer of Air-Liquid Interface Cultured Primary Normal Human Tracheobronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Economou, E. C.; Marinelli, S.; Smith, M. C.; Routt, A. A.; Kravets, V. V.; Chu, H. W.; Spendier, K.; Celinski, Z. J.

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) and highly anisotropic barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) nanoparticles were coated with an anti-inflammatory drug and magnetically transported through mucus produced by primary human airway epithelial cells. Using wet planetary ball milling, dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid-coated BaFe12O19 nano-particles (BaNPs) of 1–100 nm in diameter were prepared in water. BaNPs and conventional 20–30-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (FeNPs) were then encased in a polymer (PLGA) loaded with dexamethasone (Dex) and tagged for imaging. PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Both PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were transferred to the surface of a ~100-μm thick mucus layer of air-liquid interface cultured primary normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTE) cells. Within 30 min, the nanoparticles were pulled successfully through the mucus layer by a permanent neodymium magnet. The penetration time of the nanomedicine was monitored using confocal microscopy and tailored by varying the thickness of the PLGA-Dex coating around the particles. PMID:27774374

  15. Lung toxicity determination by in vitro exposure at the air liquid interface with an integrated online dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mülhopt, Sonja; Diabaté, S.; Krebs, T.; Weiss, C.; Paur, H.-R.

    2009-05-01

    Epidemiological studies show an association between the concentration of ultrafine particles in the atmosphere and the rate of mortality or morbidity due to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. For the quantitative assessment of the toxicity of airborne nanoparticles the dose-response relationship is tested in in vitro test systems using bioassays of cell cultures as sensor. For the air-liquid interface exposure of cell cultures towards aerosols the Karlsruhe exposure system was developed. The human lung cell cultures are exposed in VITROCELL® system modules with a constant flow of the conditioned aerosol. After exposure the cells are analyzed to measure the biological responses such as viability, inflammatory or oxidative stress. For the determination of the dose response relationship the accurate knowledge of the deposited particle mass is essential. A new online method is developed in the Karlsruhe exposure system: the sensor of a quartz crystal microbalance is placed in an exposure chamber instead of the membrane insert and exposed to the aerosol in the same way as the cell cultures. The deposited mass per area unit is monitored as a function of exposure time showing a linear relationship for a constant aerosol flow with defined particle concentration. A comparison of this new dose signal to a dosimetry method using fluorescein sodium particles shows a very good correlation between the sensor signal of the quartz crystal microbalance and the deposited mass on the membranes shown by spectroscopy. This system for the first time provides an online dose measurement for in vitro experiments with nanoparticles.

  16. Vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ankur; SenGupta, Sumana; Kumar, Awadhesh; Choudhury, Sipra; Naik, Prakash D.

    2016-08-01

    The structure and orientation of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate [PF3(C2F5)3], commonly known as [bmim][fap], have been investigated at the air-[bmim][fap] and air-water interfaces, employing vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. The VSFG spectra in the CH stretch region suggest presence of the [bmim] cation at the interfaces. Studies reveal that the butyl chain protrudes out into air, and the imidazolium ring lies almost planar to the interface. The CH stretch intensities get enhanced at the air-water interface, mainly because of polar orientation of imidazolium cation induced by interfacial water molecules. The OH stretch intensities are also enhanced at the air-water interface due to polar orientation of interfacial water molecules induced by [bmim][fap]. The Brewster angle microscopy suggests self aggregation of [bmim][fap] in the presence of water, and the aggregation becomes extensive showing dense surface domains with time. However, the surface pressure is almost unaffected due to aggregation.

  17. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces.

  18. Automated system for measuring the surface dilational modulus of liquid-air interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Dominik; Hofmann, Matthias J.; Motschmann, Hubert; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    The surface dilational modulus is a crucial parameter for describing the rheological properties of aqueous surfactant solutions. These properties are important for many technological processes. The present paper describes a fully automated instrument based on the oscillating bubble technique. It works in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 500 Hz, where surfactant exchange dynamics governs the relaxation process. The originality of instrument design is the consistent combination of modern measurement technologies with advanced imaging and signal processing algorithms. Key steps on the way to reliable and precise measurements are the excitation of harmonic oscillation of the bubble, phase sensitive evaluation of the pressure response, adjustment and maintenance of the bubble shape to half sphere geometry for compensation of thermal drifts, contour tracing of the bubbles video images, removal of noise and artefacts within the image for improving the reliability of the measurement, and, in particular, a complex trigger scheme for the measurement of the oscillation amplitude, which may vary with frequency as a result of resonances. The corresponding automation and programming tasks are described in detail. Various programming strategies, such as the use of MATLAB® software and native C++ code are discussed. An advance in the measurement technique is demonstrated by a fully automated measurement. The instrument has the potential to mature into a standard technique in the fields of colloid and interface chemistry and provides a significant extension of the frequency range to established competing techniques and state-of-the-art devices based on the same measurement principle.

  19. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of mixed DPPC/fibrinogen layer behavior at the air/liquid interface under a continuous compression-expansion condition.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chia-Lin; Chang, Chien-Hsiang

    2006-07-18

    The mixed layer behavior of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) with fibrinogen at continuously compressed-expanded air/liquid interfaces was analyzed in situ by infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). The reflectance-absorbance (RA) intensities and/or wavenumbers of nu(a)-CH2 and amide I bands for a mixed DPPC/fibrinogen layer at the interface were obtained directly by an infrared spectrometer with a monolayer/grazing angle accessory and a removable Langmuir trough. The nu(a)-CH2 RA intensity-area hysteresis curves of a DPPC monolayer indicate a significant loss of free DPPC molecules at the interface during the first compression stage, which is also supported by the corresponding nu(a)-CH2 wavenumber-area hysteresis curves. For a mixed DPPC/fibrinogen layer at the interface, the amide I RA intensity-area hysteresis curves suggest that the fibrinogen molecules were expelled from the interface upon compression, apparently because of the presence of insoluble DPPC molecules. The squeeze-out of fibrinogen evidently removed a pronounced amount of DPPC from the interface, as judged from the corresponding nu(a)-CH2 intensity and wavenumber data. Moreover, significant adsorption of fibrinogen was found during the subsequent interface expansion stage. With the in situ IRRAS analysis of the mixed layer behavior at the interface, the induced loss of DPPC by fibrinogen expulsion from the compressed interface and the dominant adsorption of fibrinogen to the expanded interface were clearly demonstrated.

  20. Coherent Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear Spectroscopy: A Comparison with the Air/DMSO Liquid Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Lu, Zhou; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-27

    In this report we present a comparative study on the C-H stretching vibrations at air/DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) interface with both the free-induction decay (FID) coherent vibrational dynamics and sub-wavenumber high resolution sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy measurements. In principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurements should generate identical information for a given molecular system. However, when the molecular systems are with several coupled or overlapping vibrational modes, to obtain detailed spectroscopic and coherent dynamics information is not as straightforward and rather difficult from either the time-domain or the frequency domain measurements. For the case of air/DMSO interface that is with moderately complex vibrational spectra, we show that the frequency-domain measurement with sub-wavenumber high-resolution SFGVS is probably more advantageous than the time-domain measurement in obtaining quantitative understanding of the structure and coherent dynamics of the molecular interface.

  1. Self-assembly mechanism of nanoparticles of Ni-based Prussian Blue analogues at the air/liquid interface: a synchrotron X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Giner-Casares, Juan J; Clemente-León, Miguel; Coronado, Eugenio; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2015-08-24

    Prussian Blue analogue (PBA) nanoparticles can be self-assembled at air/liquid interfaces to build novel materials with interesting magnetic features. Herein, we study the influence of the size of PBA Cs0.4 Ni[Cr(CN)6 ]0.9 and K0.25 Ni[Fe(CN)6 ]0.75 nanoparticles on the self-assembly behavior by synchrotron X-ray reflectivity. Both nanoparticles show similar Z-potential values. The phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and the amino surfactant dimethyldioctadecylammonium have been used as Langmuir monolayers to anchor the PBA nanoparticles and study the interplay of forces directing the self-assembly of the nanoparticles at the surfactant/liquid interface. Whereas Cs0.4 Ni[Cr(CN)6 ]0.9 nanoparticles with a diameter of 8 nm form an incomplete layer at the surfactant/water interface, the larger K0.25 Ni[Fe(CN)6 ]0.75 nanoparticles with a diameter of 20 nm generate complete layers that can be stacked to one another. The size of the PBA nanoparticles is the main parameter determining the final arrangement at the air/liquid interface, due to the different extent of interparticle interaction. This study aims at the rationale design of PBA nanoparticles for an effective interfacial self-assembly, ultimately leading to functional materials.

  2. Effects and uptake of gold nanoparticles deposited at the air-liquid interface of a human epithelial airway model

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, C.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Muehlfeld, C.; Schmid, O.; Ferron, G.A.; Maier, K.L.; Gehr, P.; Lenz, A.-G.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine and biology has increased rapidly in recent years. Gold NPs have advantageous properties such as chemical stability, high electron density and affinity to biomolecules, making them very promising candidates as drug carriers and diagnostic tools. However, diverse studies on the toxicity of gold NPs have reported contradictory results. To address this issue, a triple cell co-culture model simulating the alveolar lung epithelium was used and exposed at the air-liquid interface. The cell cultures were exposed to characterized aerosols with 15 nm gold particles (61 ng Au/cm{sup 2} and 561 ng Au/cm{sup 2} deposition) and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. Experiments were repeated six times. The mRNA induction of pro-inflammatory (TNFalpha, IL-8, iNOS) and oxidative stress markers (HO-1, SOD2) was measured, as well as protein induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, GM-CSF, TNFalpha, INFgamma). A pre-stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was performed to further study the effects of particles under inflammatory conditions. Particle deposition and particle uptake by cells were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and design-based stereology. A homogeneous deposition was revealed, and particles were found to enter all cell types. No mRNA induction due to particles was observed for all markers. The cell culture system was sensitive to LPS but gold particles did not cause any synergistic or suppressive effects. With this experimental setup, reflecting the physiological conditions more precisely, no adverse effects from gold NPs were observed. However, chronic studies under in vivo conditions are needed to entirely exclude adverse effects.

  3. Aerosolized ZnO nanoparticles induce toxicity in alveolar type II epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yumei; Williams, Nolann G.; Tolic, Ana; Chrisler, William B.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Maddux, Bettye L.; Pounds, Joel G.; Laskin, Alexander; Orr, Galya

    2012-01-20

    The majority of in vitro studies characterizing the impact of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cells that line the respiratory tract were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in suspension. This approach introduces processes that are unlikely to occur during inhaled NP exposures in vivo, such as the shedding of toxic doses of dissolved ions. ZnO NPs are used extensively and pose significant sources for human exposure. Exposures to airborne ZnO NPs can induce adverse effects, but the relevance of the dissolved Zn2+ to the observed effects in vivo is still unclear. Our goal was to mimic in vivo exposures to airborne NPs and decipher the contribution of the intact NP from the contribution of the dissolved ions to airborne ZnO NP toxicity. We established the exposure of alveolar type II epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI), and compared the impact of aerosolized ZnO NPs and NPs in suspension at the same cellular doses, measured as the number of particles per cell. By evaluating membrane integrity and cell viability 6 and 24 hours post exposure we found that aerosolized NPs induced toxicity at the ALI at doses that were in the same order of magnitude as doses required to induce toxicity in submersed cultures. In addition, distinct patterns of oxidative stress were observed in the two exposure systems. These observations unravel the ability of airborne ZnO NPs to induce toxicity without the contribution of dissolved Zn2+ and suggest distinct mechanisms at the ALI and in submersed cultures.

  4. Second harmonic studies of liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, S.

    1992-12-31

    This thesis reports on experimental studies of kinetics and equilibria at liquid interfaces using the technique of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG). In the first part, SHG was used to study the kinetics of adsorption of p-nitrophenol at the air/water interface of a flowing liquid jet. Measurements of the SH signal strength and the polarization of the SH light at various distances (times) along the jet axis yield information about the development of the density and orientation of p-nitrophenol at the air/water interface. The kinetics of adsorption was interpreted in terms of the Langmuir theory and was found to be consistent with this model. The free energy of adsorption obtained from the jet experiments was found to be the same as that obtained from static (equilibrium) experiments. The orientation of p-nitrophenol at the jet air/solution interface was the same as for the static (equilibrium) interface,which indicates that orientational equilibrium was rapidly achieved. It was also found that adsorption of nitrophenol to the air/water interface is not diffusion controlled, but rather is kinetically controlled by a barrier. SHG was then used to probe the silica/water interface.

  5. Interaction behaviors at the interface between liquid Al-Si and solid Ti-6Al-4V in ultrasonic-assisted brazing in air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoguang; Yan, Jiuchun; Gao, Fei; Wei, Jinghui; Xu, Zhiwu; Fan, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Power ultrasonic vibration (20 kHz, 6 μm) was applied to assist the interaction between a liquid Al-Si alloy and solid Ti-6Al-4V substrate in air. The interaction behaviors, including breakage of the oxide film on the Ti-6Al-4V surface, chemical dissolution of solid Ti-6Al-4V, and interfacial chemical reactions, were investigated. Experimental results showed that numerous 2-20 μm diameter-sized pits formed on the Ti-6Al-4V surface. Propagation of ultrasonic waves in the liquid Al-Si alloy resulted in ultrasonic cavitation. When this cavitation occurred at or near the liquid/solid interface, many complex effects were generated at the small zones during the bubble implosion, including micro-jets, hot spots, and acoustic streaming. The breakage behavior of oxide films on the solid Ti-6Al-4V substrate, excessive chemical dissolution of solid Ti-6Al-4V into liquid Al-Si, abnormal interfacial chemical reactions at the interface, and phase transformation between the intermetallic compounds could be wholly ascribed to these ultrasonic effects. An effective bond between Al-Si and Ti-6Al-4V can be produced by ultrasonic-assisted brazing in air.

  6. Exposure of silver-nanoparticles and silver-ions to lung cells in vitro at the air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to its antibacterial properties, silver (Ag) has been used in more consumer products than any other nanomaterial so far. Despite the promising advantages posed by using Ag-nanoparticles (NPs), their interaction with mammalian systems is currently not fully understood. An exposure route via inhalation is of primary concern for humans in an occupational setting. Aim of this study was therefore to investigate the potential adverse effects of aerosolised Ag-NPs using a human epithelial airway barrier model composed of A549, monocyte derived macrophage and dendritic cells cultured in vitro at the air-liquid interface. Cell cultures were exposed to 20 nm citrate-coated Ag-NPs with a deposition of 30 and 278 ng/cm2 respectively and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. To elucidate whether any effects of Ag-NPs are due to ionic effects, Ag-Nitrate (AgNO3) solutions were aerosolised at the same molecular mass concentrations. Results Agglomerates of Ag-NPs were detected at 24 h post exposure in vesicular structures inside cells but the cellular integrity was not impaired upon Ag-NP exposures. Minimal cytotoxicity, by measuring the release of lactate dehydrogenase, could only be detected following a higher concentrated AgNO3-solution. A release of pro-inflammatory markers TNF-α and IL-8 was neither observed upon Ag-NP and AgNO3 exposures as well as was not affected when cells were pre-stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Also, an induction of mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-8, could only be observed for the highest AgNO3 concentration alone or even significantly increased when pre-stimulated with LPS after 4 h. However, this effect disappeared after 24 h. Furthermore, oxidative stress markers (HMOX-1, SOD-1) were expressed after 4 h in a concentration dependent manner following AgNO3 exposures only. Conclusions With an experimental setup reflecting physiological exposure conditions in the human lung more realistic, the present study indicates that Ag

  7. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, Saskia

    2002-01-01

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  8. Effects of aggregates on mixed adsorption layers of poly(ethylene imine) and sodium dodecyl sulfate at the air/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Tonigold, Katrin; Varga, Imre; Nylander, Tommy; Campbell, Richard A

    2009-04-07

    We have exploited the spatial and kinetic resolution of ellipsometry to monitor the lateral movement of inhomogeneous patches of material in mixed adsorption layers of poly(ethylene imine) and sodium dodecyl sulfate at the air/liquid interface. We show that the choice of sample preparation methods can have a profound effect on the state of the interface for chemically equivalent samples. The extent of aggregation in the bulk solution on relevant time scales is affected by specific details of the polymer/surfactant mixing process, which produces varying numbers of aggregates that can become trapped in the interfacial layer, resulting in an enhanced and fluctuating ellipsometry signal. It can be beneficial to apply the surface-cleaning method of aspiration prior to physical measurements to remove trapped aggregates through the creation of a fresh interface. At low pH, the ellipsometry signal of samples prepared with surface cleaning is remarkably constant over a factor of >500 in the bulk composition below charge equivalence, which is discussed in terms of possible adsorption mechanisms. At high pH, through observing temporal fluctuations in the ellipsometry signal of samples prepared with surface cleaning, we reveal two important processes: there is the spontaneous adsorption of aggregates > 0.2 microm in diameter into the interfacial layer, and with time there is the fusion of smaller aggregates to generate new large surface aggregates. We attribute the favorability of the adsorption and fusion processes at high pH to reduced electrostatic barriers resulting from the low surface charge density of the aggregates. It is inappropriate in this case to consider the interface to comprise a homogeneous adsorption layer that is in dynamic equilibrium with the bulk solution. Our work shows that it can be helpful to consider whether there are macroscopic particles embedded in molecular layers at the air/liquid interface for systems where there is prior knowledge of

  9. Detection of the cytotoxicity of water-insoluble fraction of cigarette smoke by direct exposure to cultured cells at an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Nara, Hidenori; Fukano, Yasuo; Nishino, Tomoki; Aufderheide, Michaela

    2013-07-01

    For the biological evaluation of cigarette smoke in vitro, the particulate phase (PP) and the gas vapor phase (GVP) of mainstream smoke have usually been collected individually and exposed to biological material such as cultured cells. Using this traditional method, the GVP is collected by bubbling in an aqueous solution such as phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). In such a way the water-insoluble GVP fraction is excluded from the GVP, meaning that the toxic potential of the water-insoluble GVP fraction has hardly been investigated so far. In our experiments we used a direct exposure method to expose cells at the air-liquid interface (ALI) to the water-insoluble GVP fraction for demonstrating its toxicological/biological activity. In order to isolate the water-insoluble GVP fraction from mainstream smoke, the GVP was passed through 6 impingers connected in series with PBS. After direct exposure of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) with the water-insoluble GVP fraction in the CULTEX(®) system its cytotoxicity was assayed by using the neutral red uptake assay. The water-insoluble GVP fraction was proven to be less cytotoxic than the water-soluble GVP fraction, but showed a significant effect in a dose-dependent manner. The results of this study showed that the direct exposure of cultivated cells at the air-liquid interface offers the possibility to analyze the biological and toxicological activities of all fractions of cigarette smoke including the water-insoluble GVP fraction.

  10. The adherence of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 to stainless steel: the importance of the air-liquid interface and nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Giaouris, Efstathios D; Nychas, George-John E

    2006-12-01

    Biofilm formation on stainless steel by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 during growth in three different nutritious conditions was studied. The ability of micro-organisms to generate biofilms on the stainless steel surfaces was studied for a total period of 18 days at 20 degrees C, under three different experimental treatments: (i) growth medium (tryptone soy broth) was not refreshed (no further nutrients were provided) during the incubation period, (ii) growth medium was renewed every 2 days and (iii) growth medium was renewed every 2 days and at the same time the planktonic cells from the old medium were transferred to the new fresh medium. It was found that biofilms developed better and a higher number of adherent cells (ca. 10(7) cfu/cm(2)) were recovered when the organism was grown in periodically renewed nutrient medium than when the growth medium was not refreshed. Regardless of the availability of nutrients, biofilm development was better (range 2-3 logs greater) when coupons were not totally covered by the growth medium and part of the surface was exposed to the air-liquid interface, than when coupons were submerged in the medium. The results suggest that existence of air-liquid interface and adequate nutrient conditions provide the best environment for Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 biofilm formation on stainless steel. The possible role of stationary phase planktonic cells in biofilm development by sessile/attached microbial cells is also discussed.

  11. A method to form semiconductor quantum dot (QD) thin films by igniting a flame at air-liquid interface: CdS and WO3.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Aarti H; Patil, Sagar H; Sathaye, Shivaram D; Patil, Kashinath R

    2015-02-01

    We reveal an easy, inexpensive, efficient one stepflame synthesis of semiconductor/metal oxide thin films at air-liquid interface, subsequently, transferred on suitable substrate. The method has been illustrated by the formation of CdS and WO3 QDs thin films. The features of the present method are (1) Growth of thin films consisting of0.5-2.0nm sized Quantum Dots (QDs)/(ultra-small nanoparticles) in a short time, at the air-liquid interface which can be suitably transferred by a well-known Blodgett technique to an appropriate substrate, (2) The method is suitable to apply layer by layer (LbL) technique to increase the film thickness as well as forming various compositions as revealed by AFM measurements. The films are characterized for their structure (SAED), morphology (TEM), optical properties (UV-Vis.) and photoluminescence (PL). Possible mechanism of formation of QDs thin film and effect of capping in case of CdS QDs is discussed.

  12. Magnetic field-directed self-assembly of FePt-based nanoparticles at the liquid-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokprasombat, K.; Sirisathitkul, Y.; Sirisathitkul, C.

    2016-10-01

    The self-assembly of nanoparticles is a prominent strategy for fabricating nanomaterials and nanodevices. Herein, FePt-based nanoparticles are self-assembled at a diethylene glycol-air interface, under an applied in-plane static magnetic field. The effect of the field on the self-assembly is apparent at a field strength of 60 mT, whereby nanoparticles arranged into randomly oriented nanoparticle chains. Increasing the field strength to 90-120 mT resulted in the nanoparticle chains becoming increasingly disintegrated, and large islands form at the expense of the uniform nanoparticle monolayer. The pattern arising from self-assembly is described based on the drag force and ligand-ligand interactions, which compete with van der Waals forces and magnetic dipole interactions induced by the applied magnetic field.

  13. Redox chemistry at liquid/liquid interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, A. G.; Deamer, D. W.

    1997-01-01

    The interface between two immiscible liquids with immobilized photosynthetic pigments can serve as the simplest model of a biological membrane convenient for the investigation of photoprocesses accompanied by spatial separation of charges. As it follows from thermodynamics, if the resolvation energies of substrates and products are very different, the interface between two immiscible liquids may act as a catalyst. Theoretical aspects of charge transfer reactions at oil/water interfaces are discussed. Conditions under which the free energy of activation of the interfacial reaction of electron transfer decreases are established. The activation energy of electron transfer depends on the charges of the reactants and dielectric permittivity of the non-aqueous phase. This can be useful when choosing a pair of immiscible solvents to decrease the activation energy of the reaction in question or to inhibit an undesired process. Experimental interfacial catalytic systems are discussed. Amphiphilic molecules such as chlorophyll or porphyrins were studied as catalysts of electron transfer reactions at the oil/water interface.

  14. Dispersion of Particles on Fluid-Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, B.; Gurupatham, S.; Hossain, M.; Fischer, I.; Singh, P.; Joseph, D.

    2011-11-01

    This talk is concerned with the dispersion of particles on the fluid-liquid interface. In our previous studies we have shown that when small particles, e.g., flour, pollen, etc., come in contact with an air-liquid interface, they disperse in a manner that appears explosive. This is due to the fact that the capillary force pulls particles into the interface causing them to accelerate to a relatively-large velocity. The motion of particles in the direction normal to the interface is inertia dominated, and so they oscillate vertically about the equilibrium position before coming to a stop under viscous drag. This causes a radially-outward lateral flow on the interface that causes nearby particles to move away. In experiments the strength of the lateral flow was measured using tracer particles that were placed on the interface for this purpose. The dispersion on a liquid-liquid interface was relatively weaker than on an air-liquid interface, and occurred over a longer period of time. This partly was a consequence of the fact that particles became separated while sedimenting through the upper liquid and reached the interface over a time interval that lasted for several seconds. The rate of dispersion depended on the size of particles, the particle and liquids densities, the viscosities of the liquids involved, and the contact angle.

  15. Liquid air cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosevear, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a definition of Liquid Air Cycle Engines (LACE) and existing relevant technologies. Heat exchanger design and fabrication techniques, the handling of liquid hydrogen to achieve the greatest heat sink capabilities, and air decontamination to prevent heat exchanger fouling are discussed. It was concluded that technology needs to be extended in the areas of design and fabrication of heat exchangers to improve reliability along with weight and volume reductions. Catalysts need to be improved so that conversion can be achieved with lower quantities and lower volumes. Packaging studies need to be investigated both analytically and experimentally. Recycling with slush hydrogen needs further evaluation with experimental testing.

  16. Validation of an air-liquid interface toxicological set-up using Cu, Pd, and Ag well-characterized nanostructured aggregates and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, C. R.; Ameer, S. S.; Ludvigsson, L.; Ali, N.; Alhamdow, A.; Messing, M. E.; Pagels, J.; Gudmundsson, A.; Bohgard, M.; Sanfins, E.; Kåredal, M.; Broberg, K.; Rissler, J.

    2016-04-01

    Systems for studying the toxicity of metal aggregates on the airways are normally not suited for evaluating the effects of individual particle characteristics. This study validates a set-up for toxicological studies of metal aggregates using an air-liquid interface approach. The set-up used a spark discharge generator capable of generating aerosol metal aggregate particles and sintered near spheres. The set-up also contained an exposure chamber, The Nano Aerosol Chamber for In Vitro Toxicity (NACIVT). The system facilitates online characterization capabilities of mass mobility, mass concentration, and number size distribution to determine the exposure. By dilution, the desired exposure level was controlled. Primary and cancerous airway cells were exposed to copper (Cu), palladium (Pd), and silver (Ag) aggregates, 50-150 nm in median diameter. The aggregates were composed of primary particles <10 nm in diameter. For Cu and Pd, an exposure of sintered aerosol particles was also produced. The doses of the particles were expressed as particle numbers, masses, and surface areas. For the Cu, Pd, and Ag aerosol particles, a range of mass surface concentrations on the air-liquid interface of 0.4-10.7, 0.9-46.6, and 0.1-1.4 µg/cm2, respectively, were achieved. Viability was measured by WST-1 assay, cytokines (Il-6, Il-8, TNF-a, MCP) by Luminex technology. Statistically significant effects and dose response on cytokine expression were observed for SAEC cells after exposure to Cu, Pd, or Ag particles. Also, a positive dose response was observed for SAEC viability after Cu exposure. For A549 cells, statistically significant effects on viability were observed after exposure to Cu and Pd particles. The set-up produced a stable flow of aerosol particles with an exposure and dose expressed in terms of number, mass, and surface area. Exposure-related effects on the airway cellular models could be asserted.

  17. Toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in lung epithelial cells exposed at the air-liquid interface compared with in vivo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xuefang; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of spark-generated copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) was evaluated in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) and lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) using an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure system. Dose-response results were compared to in vivo inhalation and instillation studies of CuONP. Cells were exposed to particle-free clean air (controls) or spark-generated CuONPs. The number median diameter, geometric standard deviation and total number concentration of CuONPs were 9.2 nm, 1.48 and 2.27×107 particles/cm3, respectively. Outcome measures included cell viability, cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and proinflammatory chemokine production. Exposure to clean air (2 or 4 hr) did not induce toxicity in HBEC or A549 cells. Compared with controls, CuONP exposures significantly reduced cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. A549 cells were significantly more susceptible to CuONP effects than HBEC. Antioxidant treatment reduced CuONP-induced cytotoxicity. When dose was expressed per area of exposed epithelium there was good agreement of toxicity measures with murine in vivo studies. This demonstrates that in vitro ALI studies can provide meaningful data on nanotoxicity of metal oxides. PMID:25575782

  18. Human bronchial epithelial cells exposed in vitro to cigarette smoke at the air-liquid interface resemble bronchial epithelium from human smokers.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Carole; Poussin, Carine; Weisensee, Dirk; Gebel, Stephan; Hengstermann, Arnd; Sewer, Alain; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Xiang, Yang; Ansari, Sam; Wagner, Sandra; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2013-04-01

    Organotypic culture of human primary bronchial epithelial cells is a useful in vitro system to study normal biological processes and lung disease mechanisms, to develop new therapies, and to assess the biological perturbations induced by environmental pollutants. Herein, we investigate whether the perturbations induced by cigarette smoke (CS) and observed in the epithelium of smokers' airways are reproducible in this in vitro system (AIR-100 tissue), which has been shown to recapitulate most of the characteristics of the human bronchial epithelium. Human AIR-100 tissues were exposed to mainstream CS for 7, 14, 21, or 28 min at the air-liquid interface, and we investigated various biological endpoints [e.g., gene expression and microRNA profiles, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) release] at multiple postexposure time points (0.5, 2, 4, 24, 48 h). By performing a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we observed a significant enrichment of human smokers' bronchial epithelium gene signatures derived from different public transcriptomics datasets in CS-exposed AIR-100 tissue. Comparison of in vitro microRNA profiles with microRNA data from healthy smokers highlighted various highly translatable microRNAs associated with inflammation or with cell cycle processes that are known to be perturbed by CS in lung tissue. We also found a dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 release by AIR-100 tissue 48 h after CS exposure in agreement with the known effect of CS on this collagenase expression in smokers' tissues. In conclusion, a similar biological perturbation than the one observed in vivo in smokers' airway epithelium could be induced after a single CS exposure of a human organotypic bronchial epithelium-like tissue culture.

  19. Liquid-Air Breathing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    Compact unit supplies air longer than compressed-air unit. Emergency breathing apparatus stores air as cryogenic liquid instead of usual compressed gas. Intended for firefighting or rescue operations becoming necessary during planned potentially hazardous procedures.

  20. LSPR properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilin; Chen, Shu; Fang, Pingping; Ren, Bin; Girault, Hubert H; Tian, Zhongqun

    2013-04-21

    Unlike the solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces, the optical properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface have not been theoretically exploited to date. In this work, the three dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD) method is employed to clarify the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based optical properties of gold nanoparticles (NPs) adsorbed at the water-oil interface, including near field distribution, far field absorption and their relevance. The LSPR spectra of NPs located at a liquid-liquid interface are shown to differ significantly from those in a uniform liquid environment or at the other interfaces. The absorption spectra exhibit two distinct LSPR peaks, the positions and relative strengths of which are sensitive to the dielectric properties of each liquid and the exact positions of the NPs with respect to the interface. Precise control of the particles' position and selection of the appropriate wavelength of the excitation laser facilitates the rational design and selective excitation of localized plasmon modes for interfacial NPs, a necessary advance for the exploration of liquid-liquid interfaces via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). According to our calculations, the SERS enhancement factor for Au nanosphere dimers at the water-oil interface can be as high as 10(7)-10(9), implying significant promise for future investigations of interfacial structure and applications of liquid-liquid interfaces towards chemical analysis.

  1. Pattern formation at liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidel, Barbara; Knobler, Charles M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative experimental investigations of pattern formation at a liquid interface are described. The reaction studied is the photoreduction of Fe 3+ in aqueous solution and the subsequent formation of Turnbull's Blue. Both the wavelength of the pattern and the time at which the break in homogeneity occurs have been studied as functions of the concentrations of the reactants and the viscosity of the solvent. Many of the features of the process are consistent with a mechanism in which autocatalysis is enhanced by double diffusion. Preliminary studies of pattern formation in the KI/starch/chloralhydrate system are also presented.

  2. Evaluation of an air-liquid interface cell culture model for studies on the inflammatory and cytotoxic responses to tobacco smoke aerosols.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, David; Haswell, Linsey E; Foss-Smith, Geoff; Hewitt, Katherine; Asquith, Nathan; Corke, Sarah; Phillips, Gary

    2015-10-01

    In vitro toxicological studies for tobacco product assessment have traditionally been undertaken using the particulate phase of tobacco smoke. However, this does not truly reflect exposure conditions that occur in smokers. Thus in vitro cell culture systems are required in which cells are exposed to tobacco whole smoke (WS) at the air-liquid interface (ALI). In this study bronchial epithelial cells were cultured on semi-permeable membranes, transitioned to the ALI and the robustness and sensitivity of the cells to tobacco WS and vapour phase (VP) assessed. Although no effect of air exposure was observed on cell viability, IL-6 and IL-8 release was increased. Exposure to WS resulted in a significant dose dependent decrease in cell viability and a significant non-dose dependent increase in inflammatory mediator secretion. The VP was found to contribute approximately 90% of the total cytotoxicity derived from WS. The cell culture system was also able to differentiate between two smoking regimens and was sensitive to passage number with increased inflammatory mediator secretion and lower cell viability observed in cell cultures of low passage number following WS exposure. This simple cell culture system may facilitate studies on the toxicological impact of future tobacco products and nicotine delivery devices.

  3. Development of three-dimensional lung multicellular spheroids in air- and liquid-interface culture for the evaluation of anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Meenach, Samantha A; Tsoras, Alexandra N; McGarry, Ronald C; Mansour, Heidi M; Hilt, J Zach; Anderson, Kimberly W

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) lung multicellular spheroids (MCS) in liquid-covered culture (LCC) and air-interface culture (AIC) conditions have both been developed for the evaluation of aerosol anticancer therapeutics in solution and aerosols, respectively. The MCS were formed by seeding lung cancer cells on top of collagen where they formed spheroids due to the prevalence of cell-to-cell interactions. LCC MCS were exposed to paclitaxel (PTX) in media whereas AIC MCS were exposed to dry powder PEGylated phospholipid aerosol microparticles containing paclitaxel. The difference in viability for 2D versus 3D culture for both LCC and AIC was evaluated along with the effects of the particles on lung epithelium via transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements. For LCC and AIC conditions, the 3D spheroids were more resistant to treatment with higher IC50 values for A549 and H358 cell lines. TEER results initially indicated a decrease in resistance upon drug or particle exposure, however, these values increased over the course of several days indicating the ability of the cells to recover. Overall, these studies offer a comprehensive in vitro evaluation of aerosol particles used in the treatment of lung cancer while introducing a new method for culturing lung cancer MCS in both LCC and AIC conditions.

  4. Culture of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Epithelial Cells at Air-Liquid Interface Can Alter Ciliary Phenotype but Remains a Robust and Informative Diagnostic Aid

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Janice L.; Williams, Gwyneth; Rutman, Andrew; Goggin, Patricia M.; Adam, Elizabeth C.; Page, Anthony; Evans, Hazel J.; Lackie, Peter M.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Lucas, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) requires the analysis of ciliary function and ultrastructure. Diagnosis can be complicated by secondary effects on cilia such as damage during sampling, local inflammation or recent infection. To differentiate primary from secondary abnormalities, re-analysis of cilia following culture and re-differentiation of epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface (ALI) aids the diagnosis of PCD. However changes in ciliary beat pattern of cilia following epithelial cell culture has previously been described, which has brought the robustness of this method into question. This is the first systematic study to evaluate ALI culture as an aid to diagnosis of PCD in the light of these concerns. Methods We retrospectively studied changes associated with ALI-culture in 158 subjects referred for diagnostic testing at two PCD centres. Ciliated nasal epithelium (PCD n = 54; non-PCD n = 111) was analysed by high-speed digital video microscopy and transmission electron microscopy before and after culture. Results Ciliary function was abnormal before and after culture in all subjects with PCD; 21 PCD subjects had a combination of static and uncoordinated twitching cilia, which became completely static following culture, a further 9 demonstrated a decreased ciliary beat frequency after culture. In subjects without PCD, secondary ciliary dyskinesia was reduced. Conclusions The change to ciliary phenotype in PCD samples following cell culture does not affect the diagnosis, and in certain cases can assist the ability to identify PCD cilia. PMID:24586956

  5. Air-liquid interface cultures enhance the oxygen supply and trigger the structural and functional differentiation of intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC).

    PubMed

    Nossol, Constanze; Diesing, A-K; Walk, N; Faber-Zuschratter, H; Hartig, R; Post, A; Kluess, J; Rothkötter, H-J; Kahlert, S

    2011-07-01

    The specific function of the epithelium as critical barrier between the intestinal lumen and the organism's internal microenvironment is reflected by permanent maintenance of intercellular junctions and cellular polarity. The intestinal epithelial cells are responsible for absorption of nutritional components, facing mechanical stress and a changing oxygen supplementation via blood stream. Oxygen itself can regulate the barrier and the absorptive function of the epithelium. Therefore, we compared the dish cell culture, the transwell-like membrane culture and the oxygen enriched air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. We demonstrated strong influence of the different culture conditions on morphology and function of intestinal porcine epithelial cell lines in vitro. ALI culture resulted in a significant increase in cell number, epithelial cell layer thickness and expression as well as apical localisation of the microvilli-associated protein villin. Remarkable similarities regarding the morphological parameters were observed between ALI cultures and intestinal epithelial cells in vivo. Furthermore, the functional analysis of protein uptake and degradation by the epithelial cells demonstrated the necessity of sufficient oxygen supply as achieved in ALI cultures. Our study is the first report providing marked evidence that optimised oxygen supply using ALI cultures directly affects the morphological differentiation and functional properties of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

  6. Newborn pig trachea cell line cultured in air-liquid interface conditions allows a partial in vitro representation of the porcine upper airway tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The domestic pig is an excellent animal model to study human microbial diseases due to its similarity to humans in terms of anatomy, physiology, and genetics. We assessed the suitability of an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) culture system for newborn pig trachea (NPTr) cells as a practical tool for analyzing the immune response of respiratory epithelial cells to aggressors. This cell line offers a wide microbial susceptibility spectrum to both viruses and bacteria. The purpose of our study was to evaluate and characterize diverse aspects of cell differentiation using different culture media. After the NPTr cells reached confluence, the apical medium was removed and the cells were fed by medium from the basal side. Results We assessed the cellular layer’s capacity to polarize and differentiate in ALI conditions. Using immunofluorescence and electronic microscopy we evaluated the presence of goblet and ciliated cells, the epithelial junction organization, and the transepithelial electrical resistance. We found that the cellular layer develops a variable density of mucus producing cells and acquires a transepithelial resistance. We also identified increased development of cellular junctions over the culture period. Finally, we observed variable expression of transcripts associated to proteins such as keratin 8, mucins (MUC1, MUC2, and MUC4), occludin, and villin 1. Conclusions The culture of NPTr cells in ALI conditions allows a partial in vitro representation of porcine upper airway tissue that could be used to investigate some aspects of host/respiratory pathogen interactions. PMID:24885012

  7. A new computer-controlled air-liquid interface cultivation system for the generation of differentiated cell cultures of the airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Förster, Christine; Beschay, Morris; Branscheid, Detlev; Emura, Makito

    2016-01-01

    The increased application of in vitro systems in pharmacology and toxicology requires cell culture systems that facilitate the cultivation process and ensure stable, reproducible and controllable cultivation conditions. Up to now, some devices have been developed for the cultivation of cells under submersed conditions. However, systems meeting the requirements of an air-liquid interface (ALI) cultivation for the special needs of bronchial epithelial cells for example are still lacking. In order to obtain in vivo like organization and differentiation of these cells they need to be cultivated under ALI conditions on microporous membranes in direct contact with the environmental atmosphere. For this purpose, a Long-Term-Cultivation system was developed (CULTEX(®) LTC-C system) for the computer-controlled cultivation of such cells. The transwell inserts are placed in an incubator module (24 inserts), which can be adjusted for the medium level (ultrasonic pulse-echosensor), time and volume-dependent medium exchange, and frequency for mixing the medium with a rotating disc for homogeneous distribution of medium and secretion components. Normal primary freshly isolated bronchial epithelial cells were cultivated for up to 38 days to show the efficiency of such a cultivation procedure for generating 3D cultures exhibiting in vivo-like pseudostratified organization of the cells as well as differentiation characteristics like mucus-producing and cilia-forming cells.

  8. Self-diffusion in liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Herth, Simone; Ye, Feng; Eggersmann, Martin; Gutfleisch, Oliver; Würschum, Roland

    2004-03-05

    For studying self-diffusion in liquid interfaces, 59Fe tracer diffusion was measured on ultrafine-grained Nd2Fe14B which undergoes an intergranular melting transition for low Nd excess. The diffusion coefficient in the intergranular liquid layers is found to be lower than in bulk melts indicating a hampered atomic mobility due to confinement. Well above the intergranular melting transition, the diffusivity in the liquid interfaces approaches a value characteristic for bulk melts.

  9. Superhydrophobic-like tunable droplet bouncing on slippery liquid interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Chonglei; Li, Jing; Liu, Yuan; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yahua; Liu, Rong; Che, Lufeng; Zhou, Wenzhong; Sun, Dong; Li, Lawrence; Xu, Lei; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-01-01

    Droplet impacting on solid or liquid interfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature. Although complete rebound of droplets is widely observed on superhydrophobic surfaces, the bouncing of droplets on liquid is usually vulnerable due to easy collapse of entrapped air pocket underneath the impinging droplet. Here, we report a superhydrophobic-like bouncing regime on thin liquid film, characterized by the contact time, the spreading dynamics, and the restitution coefficient independent of underlying liquid film. Through experimental exploration and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that the manifestation of such a superhydrophobic-like bouncing necessitates an intricate interplay between the Weber number, the thickness and viscosity of liquid film. Such insights allow us to tune the droplet behaviours in a well-controlled fashion. We anticipate that the combination of superhydrophobic-like bouncing with inherent advantages of emerging slippery liquid interfaces will find a wide range of applications. PMID:26250403

  10. Superhydrophobic-like tunable droplet bouncing on slippery liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Chonglei; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-11-01

    Droplet impacting on solid or liquid interfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature. Although complete rebound of droplets is widely observed on superhydrophobic surfaces, the bouncing of droplets on liquid is usually vulnerable due to easy collapse of entrapped air pocket underneath the impinging droplet. Here, we report a superhydrophobic-like bouncing regime on thin liquid film, characterized by the contact time, the spreading dynamics, and the restitution coefficient independent of underlying liquid film. Through experimental exploration and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that the manifestation of such a superhydrophobic-like bouncing necessitates an intricate interplay between the Weber number, the thickness and viscosity of liquid film. Such insights allow us to tune the droplet behaviors in a well-controlled fashion. We anticipate that the combination of superhydrophobic-like bouncing with inherent advantages of emerging slippery liquid interfaces will find a wide range of applications.

  11. Superhydrophobic-like tunable droplet bouncing on slippery liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Chonglei; Li, Jing; Liu, Yuan; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yahua; Liu, Rong; Che, Lufeng; Zhou, Wenzhong; Sun, Dong; Li, Lawrence; Xu, Lei; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-08-01

    Droplet impacting on solid or liquid interfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature. Although complete rebound of droplets is widely observed on superhydrophobic surfaces, the bouncing of droplets on liquid is usually vulnerable due to easy collapse of entrapped air pocket underneath the impinging droplet. Here, we report a superhydrophobic-like bouncing regime on thin liquid film, characterized by the contact time, the spreading dynamics, and the restitution coefficient independent of underlying liquid film. Through experimental exploration and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that the manifestation of such a superhydrophobic-like bouncing necessitates an intricate interplay between the Weber number, the thickness and viscosity of liquid film. Such insights allow us to tune the droplet behaviours in a well-controlled fashion. We anticipate that the combination of superhydrophobic-like bouncing with inherent advantages of emerging slippery liquid interfaces will find a wide range of applications.

  12. Superhydrophobic-like tunable droplet bouncing on slippery liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chonglei; Li, Jing; Liu, Yuan; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yahua; Liu, Rong; Che, Lufeng; Zhou, Wenzhong; Sun, Dong; Li, Lawrence; Xu, Lei; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-08-07

    Droplet impacting on solid or liquid interfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature. Although complete rebound of droplets is widely observed on superhydrophobic surfaces, the bouncing of droplets on liquid is usually vulnerable due to easy collapse of entrapped air pocket underneath the impinging droplet. Here, we report a superhydrophobic-like bouncing regime on thin liquid film, characterized by the contact time, the spreading dynamics, and the restitution coefficient independent of underlying liquid film. Through experimental exploration and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that the manifestation of such a superhydrophobic-like bouncing necessitates an intricate interplay between the Weber number, the thickness and viscosity of liquid film. Such insights allow us to tune the droplet behaviours in a well-controlled fashion. We anticipate that the combination of superhydrophobic-like bouncing with inherent advantages of emerging slippery liquid interfaces will find a wide range of applications.

  13. Use of a feline respiratory epithelial cell culture system grown at the air-liquid interface to characterize the innate immune response following feline herpesvirus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Nelli, Rahul K; Maes, Roger; Kiupel, Matti; Hussey, Gisela Soboll

    2016-03-02

    Infection with feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) accounts for 50% of viral upper respiratory diseases in domestic cats and is a significant cause of ocular diseases. Despite the clinical significance and high prevalence of FHV-1 infection, currently available vaccines cannot completely protect cats from infection and lifelong latency. FHV-1 infects via the mucous membranes and replicates in respiratory epithelial cells, but very little is known about the early innate immunity at this site. To address questions about immunity to FHV-1, feline respiratory epithelial cells cultured at air-liquid interface (ALI-FRECs) were established by collecting respiratory tracts from 6 healthy cats after euthanasia. Cells were isolated, cultured and characterized histologically and immunologically before infection with FHV-1. The expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokine and chemokine responses were measured by real time PCR. ALI-FRECs morphologically resembled the natural airways of cats with multilayered columnar epithelial cells and cilia. Immunological properties of the natural airways were maintained in ALI-FRECs, as evidenced by the expression of TLRs, cytokines, chemokines, interferons, beta-defensins, and other regulatory genes. Furthermore, ALI-FRECs were able to support infection and replication of FHV-1, as well as modulate transcriptional regulation of various immune genes in response to infection. IL-1β and TNFα were increased in ALI-FRECs by 24hpi, whereas expression levels of IFN-α and TLR9 were not increased until 36hpi. In contrast, TLR3, GM-CSF and TGF-1β expression was down-regulated at 36hpi. The data presented show the development of a system ideal for investigating the molecular pathogenesis and immunity of FHV-1 or other respiratory pathogens.

  14. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  15. Study of a liquid bridge subjected to interface shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponenko, Yu.; Glockner, S.; Mialdun, A.; Shevtsova, V.

    2011-08-01

    We report on numerical and experimental study of two-phase flows in a tall annulus. The geometry corresponds to a cylindrical liquid column co-axially placed into an outer cylinder with solid walls. The internal column consists of solid supports at the bottom and top, while the central part is a liquid zone filled with viscous liquid and kept in its position by surface tension. Gas enters into the annular duct and entrains initially quiescent liquid. The liquid bridge interface is deformed by gravity and by a co-axial gas flow which is co- and counter directed with respect to gravity. A new experimental set-up including an optical system for precise measurements of the interface displacement has been designed and developed. In the experiments silicone oil 5cSt was used as a test liquid and air as gas. On numerical side the dynamical response of an isothermal liquid bridge to a coaxial gas flow is examined by simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The attention is focused on the following points: time-dependent formation of the equilibrium shape of a liquid bridge in gravity conditions and its deformation by a gas flow, simulation of a flow pattern in a liquid/gas system with deformed free surface. The comparison of the numerical and experimental results for the interface deformation exhibits a satisfactory agreement.

  16. Use of the liquid-liquid interface for generating ultrathin nanocrystalline films of metals, chalcogenides, and oxides.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N R; Kulkarni, G U; Agrawal, Ved Varun; Gautam, Ujjal K; Ghosh, Moumita; Tumkurkar, Usha

    2005-09-15

    The air-water interface has traditionally been employed to prepare particle assemblies and films of metals and semiconductors. The interface between water and an organic liquid, however, has not been investigated sufficiently for possible use in preparing nanocrystals and thin films of materials. In this article, we demonstrate the use of the liquid-liquid interface as a medium for preparing ultrathin films of metals, chalcogenides and oxides. The method involves the reaction at the interface between a metal-organic compound in the organic layer and an appropriate reagent for reduction, sulfidation, etc. in the aqueous layer. Some of the materials discussed are nanocrystalline films of gold, CuS, CuSe, CuO, and Cu(OH)2 formed at the liquid-liquid interface. The results reported in this article should demonstrate the versatility and potential of the liquid-liquid interface for preparing nanomaterials and ultrathin films and encourage further research in this area.

  17. Polymer Crystallization at Curved Liquid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda

    Liquid/liquid interface, either flat or curved, is a unique template for studying self-assembly of a variety of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles and nanorods. The resultant monolayer films can be ordered or disordered depending on the regularity of the nanomaterials. Integration of nanoparticles into two-dimensional structure leads to intriguing collective properties of the nanoparticles. Crystallization can also be guided by liquid/liquid interface. Due to the particular shape of the interface, crystallization can happen in a different manner comparing to the normal solution crystallization. In this dissertation, liquid/liquid interface is employed to guide the crystallization of polymers, mainly focusing on using curved liquid/liquid interface. Due to the unique shape of the interface and feasibility to control the curvature, polymer crystallization can take place in different manner and lead to the formation of curved or vesicular crystals. Curved liquid/liquid interface is typically created through o/w emulsions. With the presence of surfactant, the emulsions are controlled to be stable at least for the polymer crystallization periods. The difference to normal solution crystallization is: the nuclei will diffuse to the curved interface due to the Pickering effect and guide the crystallization along the curved liquid/liquid interface. If the supercooling can be controlled to be very small, crystal growth in the bulk droplets can be avoided. The advantages of this strategy are: 1) the formation process of vesicular type crystals can be monitored by controlling the polymer supply; 2) curved crystals, bowl-like structures and enclosed capsules can be easily obtained comparing to the self-assembly method for vesicle formation; 3) the obtained vesicles will be made of polymer crystals, which will possess the extraordinary mechanical properties. Based on the nucleation type, this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part is focused on the self

  18. Nanomaterials at Liquid/Liquid Interfaces-A Review.

    PubMed

    Divya, V; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2015-09-01

    The charge transfer processes occurring at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions are of considerable importance in diverse fields of chemistry and biology. The introduction to nanoparticles and analysis of nanostructures in diverse branches of science and engineering are provided. The chemical and electrochemical techniques pertaining to the synthesis of metal nanoparticles, polymeric nanostructures and metal-polymer nanocomposites at liquid/liquid interfaces are surveyed. The unique features pertaining to the chemical synthesis of metal nanoparticles while employing diverse electrolytes and solvents are outlined. The advantages of various electrochemical synthetic protocols such as four-electrode assembly, thin film electrode, Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy and Solid/liquid/liquid interfaces for the study of nanoparticles at liquid/liquid interfaces are emphasized. The crucial role played by the liquid/liquid interfaces in altering the morphological patterns of metal nanoparticles, conducting polymers and metal-polymer nanocomposites is indicated. A few typical novel applications of these nanomaterials in fabrication of biosensors, electrochemical supercapacitors, and electrocatalysts have been outlined.

  19. Low frequency ionic conduction across liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Francisco J.; Guerrero, Guillermo Ivan; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    Ionic conduction in liquid media is a central component of many recently proposed technologies. As in the case of solid state systems, the presence of heterogeneous media gives rise to interesting nonlinear phenomena. We present simulations and theoretical analysis of the low frequency ionic conduction in a two-liquid system. In the case analyzed, the conduction is driven by an electric field perpendicular to the liquid-liquid interface. We show that the dielectric contrast between the liquids produces non-linear effects in the effective conductivity of the system and discuss the effects of the ion solubility in the media.

  20. Energy conversion at liquid/liquid interfaces: artificial photosynthetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, A. G.; Gugeshashvili, M. I.; Deamer, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter focuses on multielectron reactions in organized assemblies of molecules at the liquid/liquid interface. We describe the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such reactions, including the structure of the reaction centers, charge movement along the electron transfer pathways, and the role of electric double layers in artificial photosynthesis. Some examples of artificial photosynthesis at the oil/water interface are considered, including water photooxidation to the molecular oxygen, oxygen photoreduction, photosynthesis of amphiphilic compounds and proton evolution by photochemical processes.

  1. Hydroxyl radical reactivity at the air-ice interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahan, T. F.; Zhao, R.; Donaldson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals are important oxidants in the atmosphere and in natural waters. They are also expected to be important in snow and ice, but their reactivity has not been widely studied in frozen aqueous solution. We have developed a spectroscopic probe to monitor the formation and reactions of hydroxyl radicals in situ. Hydroxyl radicals are produced in aqueous solution via the photolysis of nitrite, nitrate, and hydrogen peroxide, and react rapidly with benzene to form phenol. Similar phenol formation rates were observed in aqueous solution and bulk ice. However, no reaction was observed at air-ice interfaces, or when bulk ice samples were crushed prior to photolysis to increase their surface area. We also monitored the heterogeneous reaction between benzene present at air-water and air-ice interfaces with gas-phase OH produced from HONO photolysis. Rapid phenol formation was observed on water surfaces, but no reaction was observed at the surface of ice. Under the same conditions, we observed rapid loss of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anthracene at air-water interfaces, but no loss was observed at air-ice interfaces. Our results suggest that the reactivity of hydroxyl radicals toward aromatic organics is similar in bulk ice samples and in aqueous solution, but is significantly suppressed in the quasi-liquid layer (QLL) that exists at air-ice interfaces.

  2. Hydroxyl radical reactivity at the air-ice interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahan, T. F.; Zhao, R.; Donaldson, D. J.

    2009-10-01

    Hydroxyl radicals are important oxidants in the atmosphere and in natural waters. They are also expected to be important in snow and ice, but their reactivity has not been widely studied in frozen aqueous solution. We have developed a spectroscopic probe to monitor the formation and reactions of hydroxyl radicals in situ. Hydroxyl radicals are produced in aqueous solution via the photolysis of nitrite, nitrate, and hydrogen peroxide, and react rapidly with benzene to form phenol. Similar phenol formation rates were observed in aqueous solution and bulk ice. However, no reaction was observed at the air-ice interface, or when bulk ice samples were crushed prior to photolysis to increase their surface area. We also monitored the heterogeneous reaction between benzene present at air-water and air-ice interfaces with gas-phase OH produced from HONO photolysis. Rapid phenol formation was observed on water surfaces, but no reaction was observed at the surface of ice. Under the same conditions, we observed rapid loss of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anthracene at the air-water interface, but no loss was observed at the air-ice interface. Our results suggest that the reactivity of hydroxyl radicals toward aromatic organics is similar in bulk ice samples and in aqueous solution, but is significantly suppressed in the quasi-liquid layer (QLL) that exists at the air-ice interface.

  3. Particles adsorbed at various non-aqueous liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel; Binks, Bernard P; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, Miguel Angel; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2017-02-07

    Particles adsorbed at liquid interfaces are commonly used to stabilise water-oil Pickering emulsions and water-air foams. The fundamental understanding of the physics of particles adsorbed at water-air and water-oil interfaces is improving significantly due to novel techniques that enable the measurement of the contact angle of individual particles at a given interface. The case of non-aqueous interfaces and emulsions is less studied in the literature. Non-aqueous liquid-liquid interfaces in which water is replaced by other polar solvents have properties similar to those of water-oil interfaces. Nanocomposites of non-aqueous immiscible polymer blends containing inorganic particles at the interface are of great interest industrially and consequently more work has been devoted to them. By contrast, the behaviour of particles adsorbed at oil-oil interfaces in which both oils are immiscible and of low dielectric constant (ε<3) is scarcely studied. Hydrophobic particles are required to stabilise these oil-oil emulsions due to their irreversible adsorption, high interfacial activity and elastic shell behaviour.

  4. Reactions and Polymerizations at the Liquid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Piradashvili, Keti; Alexandrino, Evandro M; Wurm, Frederik R; Landfester, Katharina

    2016-02-24

    Reactions and polymerizations at the interface of two immiscible liquids are reviewed. The confinement of two reactants at the interface to form a new product can be advantageous in terms of improved reaction kinetics, higher yields, and selectivity. The presence of the liquid-liquid interface can accelerate the reaction, or a phase-transfer catalyst is employed to draw the reaction in one phase of choice. Furthermore, the use of immiscible systems, e.g., in emulsions, offers an easy means of efficient product separation and heat dissipation. A general overview on low molecular weight organic chemistry is given, and the applications of heterophase polymerization, occurring at or in proximity of the interface, (mostly) in emulsions are presented. This strategy can be used for the efficient production of nano- and microcarriers for various applications.

  5. Structural Transitions at Ionic Liquid Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Benjamin; Salanne, Mathieu

    2015-12-17

    Recent advances in experimental and computational techniques have allowed for an accurate description of the adsorption of ionic liquids on metallic electrodes. It is now well-established that they adopt a multilayered structure and that the composition of the layers changes with the potential of the electrode. In some cases, potential-driven ordering transitions in the first adsorbed layer have been observed in experiments probing the interface on the molecular scale or by molecular simulations. This perspective gives an overview of the current understanding of such transitions and of their potential impact on the physical and (electro)chemical processes at the interface. In particular, peaks in the differential capacitance, slow dynamics at the interface, and changes in the reactivity have been reported in electrochemical studies. Interfaces between ionic liquids and metallic electrodes are also highly relevant for their friction properties, the voltage-dependence of which opens the way to exciting applications.

  6. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  7. A molecular theory of liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio

    2005-04-21

    We propose a site site generalization of the Lovett-Mow-Buff-Wertheim integro-differential equation for the one-particle density distributions to polyatomic fluids. The method provides microscopic description of liquid interfaces of molecular fluids and solutions. It uses the inhomogeneous site-site direct correlation function of molecular fluid consistently constructed by nonlinear interpolation between the homogeneous ones. The site site correlations of the coexisting bulk phases are obtained from the reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equation with our closure approximation. For illustration, we calculated the structure of the planar liquid-vapor as well as liquid-liquid interfaces of n-hexane and methanol at ambient conditions.

  8. Particle Behavior at Anisotropically Curved Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnnis, Kathleen; Zeng, Chuan; Davidovitch, Benny; Dinsmore, Anthony; Russell, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    A particle bound to an anisotropically curved liquid interface, such as a cylinder or catenoid, cannot maintain a constant contact angle without deforming the interface. Theory suggests that the particles will experience a force that depends on the interfacial shape and migrate to minimize the total interfacial energy. To test these predictions, particles were deposited on top of liquid semi-cylinders of ionic liquid or melted polystyrene confined on chemically patterned surfaces. Particles were also deposited on liquid catenoid structures created by placing a melted polymer film under an electric field. The location of the particles on these structures was observed by optical, confocal, and scanning electron microscopy. The implications for the directed assembly of particles and stability of Pickering emulsions are also discussed.

  9. Gas-liquid interface of room-temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cherry S; Baldelli, Steven

    2010-06-01

    The organization of ions at the interface of ionic liquids and the vacuum is an ideal system to test new ideas and concepts on the interfacial chemistry of electrolyte systems in the limit of no solvent medium. Whilst electrolyte systems have numerous theoretical and experimental methods used to investigate their properties, the ionic liquids are relatively new and our understanding of the interfacial properties is just beginning to be explored. In this critical review, the gas-liquid interface is reviewed, as this interface does not depend on the preparation of another medium and thus produces a natural interface. The interface has been investigated by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ultra-high vacuum techniques. The results provide a detailed molecular-level view of the surface composition and structure. These have been complemented by theoretical studies. The combinations of treatments on this interface are starting to provide a somewhat convergent description of how the ions are organized at this neat interface (108 references).

  10. Anomalous Transmission of Infrasound Through Air-Water and Air-Ground Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, O. A.

    2009-05-01

    Speed of compressional waves in air is smaller than in water and in the ground, while mass density of air is much smaller than mass densities of water and the ground. This results in a very strong acoustic impedance contrast at air-water and air-ground interfaces. Sound transmission through a boundary with a strong impedance contrast is normally very weak. This paper reports theoretical studies of the power output of localized sound sources and acoustic power fluxes through plane gas-liquid and gas-solid interfaces in a layered medium. It is found that the transparency of the interfaces increases dramatically at low frequencies. For low-frequency sound, a phenomenon of anomalous transparency can occur where most of the acoustic power generated by a source in water is radiated into the atmosphere. Contrary to the conventional wisdom based on ray-theoretical predictions and observations at higher frequencies, infrasonic energy from localized waterborne sources can be effectively transmitted into air. The main physical mechanism responsible for the anomalous transparency of air-water interface is found to be an acoustic power transfer by inhomogeneous (evanescent) waves in the plane-wave decomposition of the acoustic field in water. The effects of ocean and atmosphere stratification and of guided sound propagation in water or in air on the anomalous transparency of the air-water interface are considered. In the case of air-ground interface, the increase of the acoustic power flux into atmosphere, when a compact source approaches the interface from below, proves to be even larger than for an underwater source. The physics behind the increase of the power flux into the atmosphere, when the source depth decreases, is shown to be rather different for the air-ground and air-water interfaces. Depending on attenuation of compressional and shear waves in the ground, a leaky interface wave supported by the air-ground interface can be responsible for the bulk of acoustic power

  11. Solid-Liquid Interface Characterization Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.

    2000-01-01

    The objective is to develop enabling technology to characterize the solid-liquid interface during directional solidification to unprecedented levels with real-time measurement hardware. Existing x-ray imaging hardware is combined with compact Seebeck furnaces and thermal profiling hardware, under development, to accomplish the measurements. Furnace thermal profiles are continuously measured in addition to the sample characteristics.

  12. Microrheology and Particle Dynamics at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yanmei

    The rheological properties at liquid-liquid interfaces are important in many industrial processes such as manufacturing foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and petroleum products. This dissertation focuses on the study of linear viscoelastic properties at liquid-liquid interfaces by tracking the thermal motion of particles confined at the interfaces. The technique of interfacial microrheology is first developed using one- and two-particle tracking, respectively. In one-particle interfacial microrheology, the rheological response at the interface is measured from the motion of individual particles. One-particle interfacial microrheology at polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oil-water interfaces depends strongly on the surface chemistry of different tracer particles. In contrast, by tracking the correlated motion of particle pairs, two-particle interfacial microrheology significantly minimizes the effects from tracer particle surface chemistry and particle size. Two-particle interfacial microrheology is further applied to study the linear viscoelastic properties of immiscible polymer-polymer interfaces. The interfacial loss and storage moduli at PDMS-polyethylene glycol (PEG) interfaces are measured over a wide frequency range. The zero-shear interfacial viscosity, estimated from the Cross model, falls between the bulk viscosities of two individual polymers. Surprisingly, the interfacial relaxation time is observed to be an order of magnitude larger than that of the PDMS bulk polymers. To explore the fundamental basis of interfacial nanorheology, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to investigate the nanoparticle dynamics. The diffusion of single nanoparticles in pure water and low-viscosity PDMS oils is reasonably consistent with the prediction by the Stokes-Einstein equation. To demonstrate the potential of nanorheology based on the motion of nanoparticles, the shear moduli and viscosities of the bulk phases and interfaces are calculated from single

  13. Liquid film/polymer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Allara, David L.

    2003-06-12

    The objectives were: (1) Through experimental studies, advance the fundamental understanding of the principles that govern adsorption and wetting phenomena at polymer and organic surfaces. (2) Establish a firm scientific basis for improving the design of coatings for metal fin cooling surfaces used to control the wetting of water condensate for optimum energy efficiency. Several important findings were: (1) water adsorbed at hydrophobic surfaces has a liquid-like structure, in contrast to the generally held view of an ordered structure; (2) Correlations of large amounts of contact angle wetting data of grafted alkyl chain compounds showed a distinct link between the contact angle and the conformational ordering of the chains; (3) water adsorption at long chain alkysiloxane films showed a strong pH dependence on the film stability, which can be attributed to interfacial chemical effects on the siloxane network.

  14. Reacting chemistry at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Morgan, Thomas; Huwel, Lutz; Graham, William

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interaction with gas-liquid interfaces is becoming increasingly important in biological applications, chemical analysis and medicine. It introduces electrons, new ionic species and reactive species and contributes to chemical and electrical self-organization at the interface. To provide insight into the associated physics and chemistry at work in the evolution of the plasma in the air-water interface (AWI), a time-dependent one-dimensional modelling has been developed. The numerical simulation is used to solve the kinetic equations and help identify the important reaction mechanisms and describe the phenomena associated with hundreds of reacting pathways in gas-phase and liquid-phase AWI chemistry. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K04998.

  15. Savinase action on bovine serum albumin (BSA) monolayers demonstrated with measurements at the air-water interface and liquid Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging.

    PubMed

    Balashev, Konstantin; Callisen, Thomas H; Svendsen, Allan; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    We studied the enzymatic action of Savinase on bovine serum albumin (BSA) organized in a monolayer spread at the air/water interface or adsorbed at the mica surface. We carried out two types of experiments. In the first one we followed the degradation of the protein monolayer by measuring the surface pressure and surface area decrease versus time. In the second approach we applied AFM imaging of the supported BSA monolayers adsorbed on mica solid supports and extracted information for the enzyme action by analyzing the obtained images of the surface topography in the course of enzyme action. In both cases we obtained an estimate for the turnover number (TON) of the enzyme reaction.

  16. Interfaces Select Specific Stereochemical Conformations: The Isomerization of Glyoxal at the Liquid Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Kais, Sabre; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Francisco, Joseph S; Gladich, Ivan

    2017-01-11

    Interfacial chemistry involving glyoxal at aerosol surfaces is postulated to catalyze aerosol growth. This chemistry remains speculative due to a lack of detailed information concerning the physicochemical behavior of glyoxal at the interface of atmospheric aerosols. Here, we report results from high-level electronic structure calculations as well as both classical and Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of glyoxal solvation at the air/liquid water interface. When compared to the gas phase, the trans to cis isomerization of glyoxal at the liquid water interface is found to be catalyzed; additionally, the trans conformation is selectively solvated within the bulk to a greater degree than is the cis conformation. These two processes, i.e., the catalytic effect at the water interface and the differentially selective solvation, act to enhance the concentration of the cis isomer of glyoxal at the water interface. This has important consequences for the interpretation of experiments and for the modeling of glyoxal chemistry both at the interface of water clouds and at aerosols. Broader implications of this work relate to describing the role of interfaces in selecting specific stereo molecular structures at interfacial environments.

  17. Liquid-vapor interfaces of patchy colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksy, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the liquid-vapor interface of a model of patchy colloids. This model consists of hard spheres decorated with short-ranged attractive sites ("patches") of different types on their surfaces. We focus on a one-component fluid with two patches of type A and nine patches of type B (2 A 9 B colloids), which has been found to exhibit reentrant liquid-vapor coexistence curves and very low-density liquid phases. We have used the density-functional theory form of Wertheim's first-order perturbation theory of association, as implemented by Yu and Wu [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 7094 (2002), 10.1063/1.1463435], to calculate the surface tension, and the density and degree of association profiles, at the liquid-vapor interface of our model. In reentrant systems, where A B bonds dominate, an unusual thickening of the interface is observed at low temperatures. Furthermore, the surface tension versus temperature curve reaches a maximum, in agreement with Bernardino and Telo da Gama's mesoscopic Landau-Safran theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 116103 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.116103]. If B B attractions are also present, competition between A B and B B bonds gradually restores the monotonic temperature dependence of the surface tension. Lastly, the interface is "hairy," i.e., it contains a region where the average chain length is close to that in the bulk liquid, but where the density is that of the vapor. Sufficiently strong B B attractions remove these features, and the system reverts to the behavior seen in atomic fluids.

  18. Systems and methods for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G; Lewis, Monte A.; Clark, Roger F

    2013-06-11

    Systems and methods are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface during a casting process. The systems and methods enable determination of the location of a solid-liquid interface during the casting process.

  19. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  20. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  1. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  2. VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID/AIR INTERFACECORROSION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2009-11-09

    The phenomena of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion of carbon steel in simulated liquid waste environments have been investigated. Initial experiments have explored the hypothesis that vapor space corrosion may be accelerated by the formation of a corrosive electrolyte on the tank wall by a process of evaporation of relatively warmer waste and condensation of the vapor on the relatively cooler tank wall. Results from initial testing do not support the hypothesis of electrolyte transport by evaporation and condensation. The analysis of the condensate collected by a steel specimen suspended over a 40 C simulated waste solution showed no measurable concentrations of the constituents of the simulated solution and a decrease in pH from 14 in the simulant to 5.3 in the condensate. Liquid/air interface corrosion was studied as a galvanic corrosion system, where steel at the interface undergoes accelerated corrosion while steel in contact with bulk waste is protected. The zero-resistance-ammeter technique was used to measure the current flow between steel specimens immersed in solutions simulating (1) the high-pH bulk liquid waste and (2) the expected low-pH meniscus liquid at the liquid/air interface. Open-circuit potential measurements of the steel specimens were not significantly different in the two solutions, with the result that (1) no consistent galvanic current flow occurred and (2) both the meniscus specimen and bulk specimen were subject to pitting corrosion.

  3. Emissions of NH3, CO2 and H2S during swine wastewater management: Characterization of transient emissions after air-liquid interface disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanes-Vidal, V.; Guàrdia, M.; Dai, X. R.; Nadimi, E. S.

    2012-07-01

    Air contaminants emitted from stored animal wastewater affect human health and the environment. Measurements of gaseous emissions from undisturbed animal wastewater are abundant in the literature. However, in-barn wastewater management is characterized by the frequent occurrence of surface liquid disturbances. Information about emissions during and after wastewater disturbances is scarce. This study evaluates emissions of NH3, CO2 and H2S under transient conditions after wastewater disturbances (caused by slurry addition, water addition and mixing), and describes the mechanisms involved until reaching steady-state conditions. All three disturbances modified the gas emission patterns. Emissions of NH3 immediately decreased after the disturbances (-61% after slurry and water addition and by -91% after mixing), and then gradually increased during 90-200 min. Emissions of CO2 increased during the disturbances (40% during slurry and water addition and 1515% during mixing), and then decreased during up to 30 min after the disturbance. H2S emissions sharply increased during all three disturbances and then decreased for 2 min to 20 min. Emissions under transient conditions were related to the formation of a pH profile. Transient emissions should be considered in gas emission studies as they may represent an important part of the cumulative gas emissions during slurry storage.

  4. Solidification along the interface between demixed liquids in monotectic systems.

    PubMed

    Hüter, C; Boussinot, G; Brener, E A; Temkin, D E

    2011-05-01

    The steady-state solidification along the liquid-liquid interface in the monotectic system is discussed. A boundary-integral formulation describing the diffusion in the two liquid phases is given and the corresponding equations for the three interfaces (two solid-liquid interfaces and one liquid-liquid interface) are solved. Scaling relations are extracted from the results and supported by analytic arguments in the limit of small deviation from the monotectic temperature. We present also a complementary phase-field simulation, which proves the stability of the process.

  5. Electroviscoelasticity of liquid/liquid interfaces: fractional-order model.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Aleksandar M; Lazarevic, Mihailo P

    2005-02-01

    A number of theories that describe the behavior of liquid-liquid interfaces have been developed and applied to various dispersed systems, e.g., Stokes, Reiner-Rivelin, Ericksen, Einstein, Smoluchowski, and Kinch. A new theory of electroviscoelasticity describes the behavior of electrified liquid-liquid interfaces in fine dispersed systems and is based on a new constitutive model of liquids. According to this model liquid-liquid droplet or droplet-film structure (collective of particles) is considered as a macroscopic system with internal structure determined by the way the molecules (ions) are tuned (structured) into the primary components of a cluster configuration. How the tuning/structuring occurs depends on the physical fields involved, both potential (elastic forces) and nonpotential (resistance forces). All these microelements of the primary structure can be considered as electromechanical oscillators assembled into groups, so that excitation by an external physical field may cause oscillations at the resonant/characteristic frequency of the system itself (coupling at the characteristic frequency). Up to now, three possible mathematical formalisms have been discussed related to the theory of electroviscoelasticity. The first is the tension tensor model, where the normal and tangential forces are considered, only in mathematical formalism, regardless of their origin (mechanical and/or electrical). The second is the Van der Pol derivative model, presented by linear and nonlinear differential equations. Finally, the third model presents an effort to generalize the previous Van der Pol equation: the ordinary time derivative and integral are now replaced with the corresponding fractional-order time derivative and integral of order p<1.

  6. Phenotypic modification of human airway epithelial cells in air-liquid interface culture induced by exposure to the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK).

    PubMed

    Carson, Johnny L; Brighton, Luisa E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-04-01

    The nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is a potent tobacco-specific carcinogen. We used an air-liquid interface epithelial cell culture system to model changes associated with NNK exposure relative to pathologies documented in human tobacco-related illnesses. Although in vitro systems exhibit certain limitations, they often offer accentuation of subtle pathologies. While the distribution of cell types in control cultures typically favors the ciliated cell phenotype, NNK-exposed cultures transitioned to non-ciliated cell phenotypes as well as reflecting features consistent with squamous metaplasia. We conclude that NNK impacts normal growth and differentiation of human airway epithelium in a short interval of time in vitro.

  7. Single Fusion Events at Polarized Liquid-Liquid Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela; Espín, Vanesa Fernández; Martínez-Ortiz, Francisco; García de la Torre, José; Compton, Richard G

    2017-01-16

    A new electrochemical framework for tracking individual soft particles in solution and monitoring their fusion with polarized liquid-liquid interfaces is reported. The physicochemical principle lies in the interfacial transfer of an ionic probe confined in the particles dispersed in solution and that is released upon their collision and fusion with the fluid interface. As a proof-of-concept, spike-like transients of a stochastic nature are reported in the current-time response of 1,2-dichloroethane(DCE)|water(W) submilli-interfaces after injection of DCE-in-W emulsions. The sign and potential dependence of the spikes reflect the charge and lipophilicity of the ionic load of the droplets. A comparison with dynamic light scattering measurements indicates that each spike is associated with the collision of a single sub-picoliter droplet. This opens a new framework for the study of single fusion events at the micro- and nanoscale and of ion transport across biomimetic soft interfaces.

  8. Layerless fabrication with continuous liquid interface production

    PubMed Central

    Janusziewicz, Rima; Tumbleston, John R.; Quintanilla, Adam L.; Mecham, Sue J.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing (AM), the technique has not developed beyond the realm of rapid prototyping. This confinement of the field can be attributed to the inherent flaws of layer-by-layer printing and, in particular, anisotropic mechanical properties that depend on print direction, visible by the staircasing surface finish effect. Continuous liquid interface production (CLIP) is an alternative approach to AM that capitalizes on the fundamental principle of oxygen-inhibited photopolymerization to generate a continual liquid interface of uncured resin between the growing part and the exposure window. This interface eliminates the necessity of an iterative layer-by-layer process, allowing for continuous production. Herein we report the advantages of continuous production, specifically the fabrication of layerless parts. These advantages enable the fabrication of large overhangs without the use of supports, reduction of the staircasing effect without compromising fabrication time, and isotropic mechanical properties. Combined, these advantages result in multiple indicators of layerless and monolithic fabrication using CLIP technology. PMID:27671641

  9. Layerless fabrication with continuous liquid interface production.

    PubMed

    Janusziewicz, Rima; Tumbleston, John R; Quintanilla, Adam L; Mecham, Sue J; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2016-10-18

    Despite the increasing popularity of 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing (AM), the technique has not developed beyond the realm of rapid prototyping. This confinement of the field can be attributed to the inherent flaws of layer-by-layer printing and, in particular, anisotropic mechanical properties that depend on print direction, visible by the staircasing surface finish effect. Continuous liquid interface production (CLIP) is an alternative approach to AM that capitalizes on the fundamental principle of oxygen-inhibited photopolymerization to generate a continual liquid interface of uncured resin between the growing part and the exposure window. This interface eliminates the necessity of an iterative layer-by-layer process, allowing for continuous production. Herein we report the advantages of continuous production, specifically the fabrication of layerless parts. These advantages enable the fabrication of large overhangs without the use of supports, reduction of the staircasing effect without compromising fabrication time, and isotropic mechanical properties. Combined, these advantages result in multiple indicators of layerless and monolithic fabrication using CLIP technology.

  10. Wave-based liquid-interface metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, N.; Xia, H.; Punzmann, H.; Fontana, P. W.; Shats, M.

    2017-02-01

    The control of matter motion at liquid-gas interfaces opens an opportunity to create two-dimensional materials with remotely tunable properties. In analogy with optical lattices used in ultra-cold atom physics, such materials can be created by a wave field capable of dynamically guiding matter into periodic spatial structures. Here we show experimentally that such structures can be realized at the macroscopic scale on a liquid surface by using rotating waves. The wave angular momentum is transferred to floating micro-particles, guiding them along closed trajectories. These orbits form stable spatially periodic patterns, the unit cells of a two-dimensional wave-based material. Such dynamic patterns, a mirror image of the concept of metamaterials, are scalable and biocompatible. They can be used in assembly applications, conversion of wave energy into mean two-dimensional flows and for organising motion of active swimmers.

  11. Polydopamine Films from the Forgotten Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Florian; Payamyar, Payam; Schneider, Anne; Winterhalter, Mathias; Bour, Jérôme; Addiego, Frédéric; Krafft, Marie-Pierre; Hemmerle, Joseph; Ball, Vincent

    2014-10-02

    The formation of polydopamine under mild oxidation conditions from dopamine solutions with mechanical agitation leads to the formation of films that can functionalize all kinds of materials. In the absence of stirring of the solution, we report the formation of polydopamine films at the air/water interface (PDA A/W) and suggest that it arises from an homogeneous nucleation process. These films grow two times faster than in solution and can be deposited on hydrophilic or hydrophobic substrates by the Langmuir-Schaeffer technique. Thanks to this new method, porous and hydrophobic materials like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes can be completely covered with a 35 nm thick PDA A/W film after only 3h of reaction. Finally the oxidation of a monomer followed by a polymerization in water is not exclusive to polydopamine since we also transferred polyaniline functional films from the air/water interface to solid substrates. These findings suggest that self-assembly from a solution containing hydrophilic monomers undergoing a chemical transformation (here oxidation and oligomerization) could be a general method to produce films at the liquid/air interface.

  12. AirJump: Using Interfaces to Instantly Perform Simultaneous Extractions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Analyte isolation is an important process that spans a range of biomedical disciplines, including diagnostics, research, and forensics. While downstream analytical techniques have advanced in terms of both capability and throughput, analyte isolation technology has lagged behind, increasingly becoming the bottleneck in these processes. Thus, there exists a need for simple, fast, and easy to integrate analyte separation protocols to alleviate this bottleneck. Recently, a new class of technologies has emerged that leverages the movement of paramagnetic particle (PMP)-bound analytes through phase barriers to achieve a high efficiency separation in a single or a few steps. Specifically, the passage of a PMP/analyte aggregate through a phase interface (aqueous/air in this case) acts to efficiently “exclude” unbound (contaminant) material from PMP-bound analytes with higher efficiency than traditional washing-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) protocols (i.e., bind, wash several times, elute). Here, we describe for the first time a new type of “exclusion-based” sample preparation, which we term “AirJump”. Upon realizing that much of the contaminant carryover stems from interactions with the sample vessel surface (e.g., pipetting residue, wetting), we aim to eliminate the influence of that factor. Thus, AirJump isolates PMP-bound analyte by “jumping” analyte directly out of a free liquid/air interface. Through careful characterization, we have demonstrated the validity of AirJump isolation through comparison to traditional washing-based isolations. Additionally, we have confirmed the suitability of AirJump in three important independent biological isolations, including protein immunoprecipitation, viral RNA isolation, and cell culture gene expression analysis. Taken together, these data sets demonstrate that AirJump performs efficiently, with high analyte yield, high purity, no cross contamination, rapid time-to-isolation, and excellent reproducibility

  13. Wave-based liquid-interface metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Fontana, P W; Shats, M

    2017-01-01

    The control of matter motion at liquid–gas interfaces opens an opportunity to create two-dimensional materials with remotely tunable properties. In analogy with optical lattices used in ultra-cold atom physics, such materials can be created by a wave field capable of dynamically guiding matter into periodic spatial structures. Here we show experimentally that such structures can be realized at the macroscopic scale on a liquid surface by using rotating waves. The wave angular momentum is transferred to floating micro-particles, guiding them along closed trajectories. These orbits form stable spatially periodic patterns, the unit cells of a two-dimensional wave-based material. Such dynamic patterns, a mirror image of the concept of metamaterials, are scalable and biocompatible. They can be used in assembly applications, conversion of wave energy into mean two-dimensional flows and for organising motion of active swimmers. PMID:28181490

  14. The liquid-liquid interface as a medium to generate nanocrystalline films of inorganic materials.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N R; Kalyanikutty, K P

    2008-04-01

    Unlike the air-water interface, the organic-aqueous (liquid-liquid) interface has not been exploited sufficiently for materials synthesis. In this Account, we demonstrate how ultrathin nanocrystalline films of metals such as gold and silver as well as of inorganic materials such as semiconducting metal chalcogenides (e.g., CdS, CuS, CdSe) and oxides are readily generated at the liquid-liquid interface. What is particularly noteworthy is that single-crystalline films of certain metal chalcogenides are also obtained by this method. The as-prepared gold films at the toluene-water interface comprise fairly monodisperse nanocrystals that are closely packed, the nature and properties of the films being influenced by various reaction parameters such as reaction temperature, time, reactant concentrations, mechanical vibrations, and the viscosity of the medium. The surface plasmon band of gold is markedly red-shifted in the films due to electronic coupling between the particles. The shift of the surface plasmon band of the Au film toward higher wavelengths with an accompanying increase in intensity as a function of reaction time marks the growth of the film. Depending on the reaction temperature, the Au films show interesting electrical transport properties. Films of metals such as gold are disintegrated by the addition of alkanethiols, the effectiveness depending on the alkane chain length, clearly evidenced by shifts of the surface plasmon bands. A time evolution study of the polycrystalline Au and CdS films as well as the single-crystalline CuS films is carried out by employing atomic force microscopy. X-ray reflectivity studies reveal the formation of a monolayer of capped clusters having 13 gold atoms each, arranged in a hexagonal manner at the toluene-water interface. The measurements also reveal an extremely small value of the interfacial tension. Besides describing features of such nanocrystalline films and their mode of formation, their rheological properties have

  15. Towards active microfluidics: Interface turbulence in thin liquid films with floating molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Sergio; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2009-06-01

    Thin liquid films with floating active protein machines are considered. Cyclic mechanical motions within the machines, representing microscopic swimmers, lead to molecular propulsion forces applied to the air-liquid interface. We show that when the rate of energy supply to the machines exceeds a threshold, the flat interface becomes linearly unstable. As a result of this instability, the regime of interface turbulence, characterized by irregular traveling waves and propagating machine clusters, is established. Numerical investigations of this nonlinear regime are performed. Conditions for the experimental observation of the instability are discussed.

  16. Repeated whole cigarette smoke exposure alters cell differentiation and augments secretion of inflammatory mediators in air-liquid interface three-dimensional co-culture model of human bronchial tissue.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Ito, Shigeaki

    2017-02-01

    In vitro models of human bronchial epithelium are useful for toxicological testing because of their resemblance to in vivo tissue. We constructed a model of human bronchial tissue which has a fibroblast layer embedded in a collagen matrix directly below a fully-differentiated epithelial cell layer. The model was applied to whole cigarette smoke (CS) exposure repeatedly from an air-liquid interface culture while bronchial epithelial cells were differentiating. The effects of CS exposure on differentiation were determined by histological and gene expression analyses on culture day 21. We found a decrease in ciliated cells and perturbation of goblet cell differentiation. We also analyzed the effects of CS exposure on the inflammatory response, and observed a significant increase in secretion of IL-8, GRO-α, IL-1β, and GM-CSF. Interestingly, secretion of these mediators was augmented with repetition of whole CS exposure. Our data demonstrate the usefulness of our bronchial tissue model for in vitro testing and the importance of exposure repetition in perturbing the differentiation and inflammation processes.

  17. Understanding Atomic-Scale Behavior of Liquid Crystals at Aqueous Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Sadati, Monirosadat; Rahimi, Mohammad; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Roux, Benoît; de Pablo, Juan J

    2017-01-10

    The ordered environment presented by liquid crystals at interfaces enables a range of novel functionalities that is only now beginning to be exploited in applications ranging from light focusing devices to biosensors. One key feature of liquid crystals is that molecular events occurring at an interface propagate over large distances through the bulk. In spite of their importance, our fundamental understanding of liquid crystal-water and liquid crystal-air interfaces remains limited. In this work, we present results from large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on the organization of the nematic and isotropic phases of the nitrile-containing mesogenic molecule 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) in the vicinity of vacuum and aqueous interfaces. Hybrid boundary conditions are imposed by confining 5CB films between vacuum and an aqueous medium to examine how those two types of interfaces influence the specific structural arrangement and ordering of 5CB. Consistent with experiments, our results indicate that 5CB exhibits homeotropic anchoring at the vacuum interface, and planar alignment at aqueous interfaces. Two-dimensional molecular dynamics potential of mean force calculations and average polarization densities show that the polar nitrile group of 5CB remains hydrated near the aqueous interface, where it modulates the orientation of water molecules. Estimates of the anchoring strength reveal an oscillatory decay and a semilinear decay with distance from the interface in vacuum and water, respectively.

  18. (The physics of pattern formation at liquid interfaces)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses pattern formation at liquid interfaces and interfaces within disordered materials. The particular topics discussed are: a racetrack for competing viscous fingers; an experimental realization of periodic boundary conditions; what sets the length scale for patterns between miscible liquids; the fractal dimension of radial Hele-Shaw patterns; detailed analyses of low-contrast Saffman-Taylor flows; and the wetting/absorption properties of polystyrene spheres in binary liquid mixtures. (LSP)

  19. Ciliatoxicity in human primary bronchiolar epithelial cells after repeated exposure at the air-liquid interface with native mainstream smoke of K3R4F cigarettes with and without charcoal filter.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Scheffler, Stefanie; Ito, Shigeaki; Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Emura, Makito

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance is the primary physical mechanism to protect the human airways against harmful effects of inhaled particles. Environmental factors play a significant role in the impairment of this defense mechanism, whereas cigarette smoke is discussed to be one of the clinically most important causes. Impaired mucociliary clearance in smokers has been connected to changes in ciliated cells such as decreased numbers, altered structure and beat frequency. Clinical studies have shown that cilia length is reduced in healthy smokers and that long-term exposure to cigarette smoke leads to reduced numbers of ciliated cells in mice. We present an in vitro model of primary normal human bronchiolar epithelial (NHBE) cells with in vivo like morphology to study the influence of cigarette mainstream smoke on ciliated cells. We exposed mucociliary differentiated cultures repeatedly to non-toxic concentrations of mainstream cigarette smoke (4 cigarettes, 5 days/week, 8 repetitions in total) at the air-liquid interface. Charcoal filter tipped cigarettes were compared to those being equipped with standard cellulose acetate filters. Histopathological analyses of the exposed cultures showed a reduction of cilia bearing cells, shortening of existing cilia and finally disappearance of all cilia in cigarette smoke exposed cells. In cultures exposed to charcoal filtered cigarette smoke, little changes in cilia length were seen after four exposure repetitions, but those effects were reversed after a two day recovery period. Those differences indicate that volatile organic compounds, being removed by the charcoal filter tip, affect primary bronchiolar epithelial cells concerning their cilia formation and function comparable with the in vivo situation. In conclusion, our in vitro model presents a valuable tool to study air-borne ciliatoxic compounds.

  20. Detachment of colloids from a solid surface by a moving air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Flury, Markus; Zhou, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Colloid attachment to liquid-gas interfaces is an important process used in industrial applications to separate suspended colloids from the fluid phase. Moving gas bubbles can also be used to remove colloidal dust from surfaces. Similarly, moving liquid-gas interfaces lead to colloid mobilization in the natural subsurface environment, such as in soils and sediments. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of moving air-water interfaces on the detachment of colloids deposited on an air-dried glass surface, as a function of colloidal properties and interface velocity. We selected four types of polystyrene colloids (positive and negative surface charge, hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The colloids were deposited on clean microscope glass slides using a flow-through deposition chamber. Air-water interfaces were passed over the colloid-deposited glass slides, and we varied the number of passages and the interface velocity. The amounts of colloids deposited on the glass slides were visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy and quantified by image analysis. Our results showed that colloids attached under unfavorable conditions were removed in significantly greater amounts than those attached under favorable conditions. Hydrophobic colloids were detached more than hydrophilic colloids. The effect of the air-water interface on colloid removal was most pronounced for the first two passages of the air-water interface. Subsequent passages of air-water interfaces over the colloid-deposited glass slides did not cause significant additional colloid removal. Increasing interface velocity led to decreased colloid removal. The force balances, calculated from theory, supported the experimental findings, and highlight the dominance of detachment forces (surface tension forces) over the attachment forces (DLVO forces).

  1. Adsorption of naphthalene and ozone on atmospheric air/ice interfaces coated with surfactants: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; Hung, Francisco R

    2012-03-15

    The adsorption of gas-phase naphthalene and ozone molecules onto air/ice interfaces coated with different surfactant species (1-octanol, 1-hexadecanol, or 1-octanal) was investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Naphthalene and ozone exhibit a strong preference to be adsorbed at the surfactant-coated air/ice interfaces, as opposed to either being dissolved into the bulk of the quasi-liquid layer (QLL) or being incorporated into the ice crystals. The QLL becomes thinner when the air/ice interface is coated with surfactant molecules. The adsorption of both naphthalene and ozone onto surfactant-coated air/ice interfaces is enhanced when compared to bare air/ice interface. Both naphthalene and ozone tend to stay dissolved in the surfactant layer and close to the QLL, rather than adsorbing on top of the surfactant molecules and close to the air region of our systems. Surfactants prefer to orient at a tilted angle with respect to the air/ice interface; the angular distribution and the most preferred angle vary depending on the hydrophilic end group, the length of the hydrophobic tail, and the surfactant concentration at the air/ice interface. Naphthalene prefers to have a flat orientation on the surfactant coated air/ice interface, except at high concentrations of 1-hexadecanol at the air/ice interface; the angular distribution of naphthalene depends on the specific surfactant and its concentration at the air/ice interface. The dynamics of naphthalene molecules at the surfactant-coated air/ice interface slow down as compared to those observed at bare air/ice interfaces. The presence of surfactants does not seem to affect the self-association of naphthalene molecules at the air/ice interface, at least for the specific surfactants and the range of concentrations considered in this study.

  2. Effect of Particulate Contaminants on the Development of Biofilms at Air/Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon

    2016-03-22

    The development of biofilms at air/water or oil/water interfaces has important ramifications on several applications, but it has received less attention than biofilm formation on solid surfaces. A key difference between the growth of biofilms on solid surfaces versus liquid interfaces is the range of complicated boundary conditions the liquid interface can create that may affect bacteria, as they adsorb onto and grow on the interface. This situation is exacerbated by the existence of complex interfaces in which interfacially adsorbed components can even more greatly affect interfacial boundary conditions. In this work, we present evidence as to how particle-laden interfaces impact biofilm growth at an air/water interface. We find that particles can enhance the rate of growth and final strength of biofilms at liquid interfaces by providing sites of increased adhesive strength for bacteria. The increased adhesion stems from creating localized areas of hydrophobicity that protrude in the water phase and provide sites where bacteria preferentially adhere. This mechanism is found to be primarily controlled by particle composition, with particle size providing a secondary effect. This increased adhesion through interfacial conditions creates biofilms with properties similar to those observed when adhesion is increased through biological means. Because of the generally understood ubiquity of increased bacteria attachment to hydrophobic surfaces, this result has general applicability to pellicle formation for many pellicle-forming bacteria.

  3. Polarity of the interface in ionic liquid in oil microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Andújar-Matalobos, María; García-Río, Luis; López-García, Susana; Rodríguez-Dafonte, Pedro

    2011-11-01

    Ionic liquid based microemulsions were characterized by absorption solvatochromic shifts, (1)H NMR and kinetic measurements in order to investigate the properties of the ionic liquid within the restricted geometry provided by microemulsions and the interactions of the ionic liquid with the interface. Experimental results show a significant difference between the interfaces of normal water and the new ionic liquid microemulsions. Absorption solvatochromic shift experiments and kinetic studies on the aminolysis of 4-nitrophenyl laurate by n-decylamine show that the polarity at the interface of the ionic liquid in oil microemulsions (IL/O) is higher than at the interface of water in oil microemulsions (W/O) despite the fact that the polarity of [bmim][BF(4)(-)] is lower than the polarity of water. (1)H NMR experiments showed that an increase in the ionic liquid content of the microemulsion led to an increase in the interaction between [bmim][BF(4)(-)] and TX-100. The reason for the higher polarity of the microemulsions with the ionic liquid can be explained in terms of the incorporation of higher levels of the ionic liquid at the interface of the microemulsions, as compared to water in the traditional systems.

  4. Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Gordon, B. P.; McWilliams, L.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that aqueous-phase processing of atmospheric α-dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG) could constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected due to the fact that its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form diols, as well as the fact that MG can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active but an improved description of its surface behaviour is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation, in addition to understanding its gas-to-particle partitioning and cloud forming potential. Here, we employ a combined experimental and theoretical approach involving vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFS), surface tensiometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations to study MG's surface adsorption, in both the presence and absence of salts. We are particularly interested in determining MG's hydration state at the surface. Our experimental results indicate that MG slowly adsorbs to the air-water interface and strongly perturbs the water structure there. This perturbation is enhanced in the presence of NaCl. Together our experimental and theoretical results suggest that singly-hydrated MG is the dominant form of MG at the surface.

  5. Thermal Convection Affects Shape Of Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennetrier, C.; Chopra, M. A.; Yao, M.; De Groh, H. C., III; Yeoh, G. H.; De Vahl Davis, G.; Leonardi, E.

    1994-01-01

    Report describes experimental and theoretical study of effect of thermal convection on shape of interface between solid and liquid succinonitrile, clear commercially available plastic, in Bridgman (directional-solidification) apparatus in vertical and horizontal orientations.

  6. Probing Electrochemical Reactions at a Plasma-Liquid Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-16

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The goal of this ARO STIR was to conduct preliminary investigations toward understanding electrochemical reactions...Mar-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: STIR: Probing Electrochemical Reactions at a Plasma-Liquid Interface (7.2...in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: STIR: Probing Electrochemical Reactions at a Plasma-Liquid Interface (7.2 Electrochemistry) Report Title The

  7. Computer modelling of the surface tension of the gas-liquid and liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2016-03-07

    This review presents the state of the art in molecular simulations of interfacial systems and of the calculation of the surface tension from the underlying intermolecular potential. We provide a short account of different methodological factors (size-effects, truncation procedures, long-range corrections and potential models) that can affect the results of the simulations. Accurate calculations are presented for the calculation of the surface tension as a function of the temperature, pressure and composition by considering the planar gas-liquid interface of a range of molecular fluids. In particular, we consider the challenging problems of reproducing the interfacial tension of salt solutions as a function of the salt molality; the simulations of spherical interfaces including the calculation of the sign and size of the Tolman length for a spherical droplet; the use of coarse-grained models in the calculation of the interfacial tension of liquid-liquid surfaces and the mesoscopic simulations of oil-water-surfactant interfacial systems.

  8. Enzyme Activity and Biomolecule Templating at Liquid and Solid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey W. Blanch

    2004-12-01

    There are two main components of this research program. The first involves studies of the adsorption and catalytic activity of proteins at fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces; the second employs biological macromolecules as templates at the solid-liquid interface for controlled crystallization of inorganic materials, to provide materials with specific functionality.

  9. Nanofluidic transport governed by the liquid/vapour interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongho; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit

    2014-04-01

    Liquid/vapour interfaces govern the behaviour of a wide range of systems but remain poorly understood, leaving ample margin for the exploitation of intriguing functionalities for applications. Here, we systematically investigate the role of liquid/vapour interfaces in the transport of water across apposing liquid menisci in osmosis membranes comprising short hydrophobic nanopores that separate two fluid reservoirs. We show experimentally that mass transport is limited by molecular reflection from the liquid/vapour interface below a certain length scale, which depends on the transmission probability of water molecules across the nanopores and on the condensation probability of a water molecule incident on the liquid surface. This fundamental yet elusive condensation property of water is measured under near-equilibrium conditions and found to decrease from 0.36 ± 0.21 at 30 °C to 0.18 ± 0.09 at 60 °C. These findings define the regime in which liquid/vapour interfaces govern nanofluidic transport and have implications for understanding mass transport in nanofluidic devices, droplets and bubbles, biological components and porous media involving liquid/vapour interfaces.

  10. Ripples on a rising bubble through an immiscible two-liquid interface generate numerous micro droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, T.; Ueda, Y.; Iguchi, M.

    2010-11-01

    The mass transfer between immiscible two liquid phases can be greatly accelerated by bubbling gas through a reactor (Bird R. B., Stewart W. E. and Lightfoot E. N., Transport Phenomena, 2nd edition (John Wiley and Sons) 2002). Therefore, the physical phenomenon occurring during the passage of a rising bubble through an immiscible two-liquid interface is of particular interest. The passage of the bubble through the oil (upper phase)/water (lower phase) interface starts with an upward lifting of the interface, and the bubble attracts a column of the water phase upwards keeping a film of the water phase around itself. In the present study, a particular remark is given to the influence of different interface tensions retracting the water film, after the water film ruptured, which lays on the interface between air and silicone oil. Unlike the previous studies on the rupture of a single liquid film in a gas which is pulled due to the identical surface tension, this system can form concentric ripples on the outer interface of the water film (oil/water interface) around the bubble due to the weak interface tension. Then, numerous micro water droplets break out from the fully grown ripples.

  11. Ion-specific induced fluctuations and free energetics of aqueous protein hydrophobic interfaces: toward connecting to specific-ion behaviors at aqueous liquid-vapor interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Peters, Eric; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-05-01

    We explore anion-induced interface fluctuations near protein-water interfaces using coarse-grained representations of interfaces as proposed by Willard and Chandler ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2010 , 114 , 1954 - 1958 ). We use umbrella sampling molecular dynamics to compute potentials of mean force along a reaction coordinate bridging the state where the anion is fully solvated and one where it is biased via harmonic restraints to remain at the protein-water interface. Specifically, we focus on fluctuations of an interface between water and a hydrophobic region of hydrophobin-II (HFBII), a 71 amino acid residue protein expressed by filamentous fungi and known for its ability to form hydrophobically mediated self-assemblies at interfaces such as a water/air interface. We consider the anions chloride and iodide that have been shown previously by simulations as displaying specific-ion behaviors at aqueous liquid-vapor interfaces. We find that as in the case of a pure liquid-vapor interface, at the hydrophobic protein-water interface, the larger, less charge-dense iodide anion displays a marginal interfacial stability compared with that of the smaller, more charge-dense chloride anion. Furthermore, consistent with the results at aqueous liquid-vapor interfaces, we find that iodide induces larger fluctuations of the protein-water interface than chloride.

  12. Methods and systems for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G.; Clark, Roger F.; Kary, Tim

    2010-07-20

    Methods and systems are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface, including providing a vessel configured to contain an at least partially melted material; detecting radiation reflected from a surface of a liquid portion of the at least partially melted material that is parallel with the liquid surface; measuring a disturbance on the surface; calculating at least one frequency associated with the disturbance; and determining a thickness of the liquid portion based on the at least one frequency, wherein the thickness is calculated based on.times. ##EQU00001## where g is the gravitational constant, w is the horizontal width of the liquid, and f is the at least one frequency.

  13. Interfacing dielectric elastomer actuators with liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Maffli, Luc; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    Methods and materials for liquid encapsulation in thin (19 μm) silicone membranes are presented in this work. A set of 12 liquids including solvents, oils, silicone pre-polymers and one ionic liquid are experimentally tested. We show that all selected liquids are chemically inert to silicone and that vapor pressure is the key parameter for stable encapsulation. It is demonstrated that encapsulated volume of silicone pre-polymers and ionic liquids can stay stable for more than 1 month. The actuation of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) in conductive liquids is also investigated. An analysis of the equivalent electrical circuits of immersed DEAs shows that non-overlapping regions of the electrodes should be minimized. It also provides guidelines to determine when the electrodes should be passivated. The effects of immersion in a conductive liquid are assessed by measuring the actuation strain and capacitance over periodic actuation. The experimental results show no sign of liquid-induced degradation over more than 45k actuation cycles.

  14. Dynamic Self-Assembly and Self-Propulsion in Nonequilibrium Magnetic Colloidal Ensembles at a Liquid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor

    2011-03-01

    Ensembles of interacting particles subject to external periodic energy fluxes often develop nontrivial dynamics. Magnetic colloidal particles suspended over an interface of two immiscible liquids and energized by vertical alternating magnetic fields give rise to novel dynamic self-assembled structures (``asters'') which are not accessible at the liquid/air interfaces. Ferromagnetically ordered nickel spherical particles have been used in our experiments. Novel structures are attributed to the interplay between surface waves, generated at the liquid/liquid interface by the collective response of magnetic microparticles to the alternating magnetic field, and hydrodynamic fields induced in the boundary layers of both liquids forming the interface. Two types of magnetic order is reported. We show that self-assembled aster structures become distorted in the presence of a small in-plane dc magnetic field and develop self-propulsion. The speed of locomotion can be effectively tuned by the amplitude of the dc field. The research was supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  15. Ultrastable Liquid-Liquid Interface as Viable Route for Controlled Deposition of Biodegradable Polymer Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Raffaele; Iaccarino, Giulia; Bianchini, Paolo; Marotta, Roberto; D'autilia, Francesca; Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Diaspro, Alberto; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-01

    Liquid-liquid interfaces are highly dynamic and characterized by an elevated interfacial tension as compared to solid-liquid interfaces. Therefore, they are gaining an increasing interest as viable templates for ordered assembly of molecules and nanoparticles. However, liquid-liquid interfaces are more difficult to handle compared to solid-liquid interfaces; their intrinsic instability may affect the assembly process, especially in the case of multiple deposition. Indeed, some attempts have been made in the deposition of polymer multilayers at liquid-liquid interfaces, but with limited control over size and stability. This study reports on the preparation of an ultrastable liquid-liquid interface based on an O/W secondary miniemulsion and its possible use as a template for the self-assembly of polymeric multilayer nanocapsules. Such polymer nanocapsules are made of entirely biodegradable materials, with highly controlled size-well under 200 nm-and multi-compartment and multifunctional features enriching their field of application in drug delivery, as well as in other bionanotechnology fields.

  16. Thermodynamics of iodide adsorption at the instantaneous air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2013-03-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations using both polarizable and non-polarizable force fields to study the adsorption of iodide to the air-water interface. A novel aspect of our analysis is that the progress of ion adsorption is measured as the distance from the instantaneous interface, which is defined by a coarse-graining scheme proposed recently by Willard and Chandler ["Instantaneous liquid interfaces," J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954-1958 (2010), 10.1021/jp909219k]. Referring structural and thermodynamic quantities to the instantaneous interface unmasks molecular-scale details that are obscured by thermal fluctuations when the same quantities are referred to an average measure of the position of the interface, such as the Gibbs dividing surface. Our results suggest that an ion adsorbed at the interface resides primarily in the topmost water layer, and the interfacial location of the ion is favored by enthalpy and opposed by entropy.

  17. Preparation and attachment of liquid-infused porous supra-particles to liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Al-Shehri, Hamza; Horozov, Tommy S; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2016-10-12

    We prepared model porous composite supra-particles and investigated the effect of the initial infused fluid phase on their attachment at the liquid-fluid interface. We used a simple method for fabrication of millimetre-sized spherical porous supra-particles from much smaller monodisperse latex microparticles as building blocks by evaporation of a polystyrene sulphate latex suspension on a hot super-hydrophobic surface. We annealed the dried supra-particles at the polymer's glass transition temperature to fuse partially their latex particle building blocks. Spherical porous supra-particles were produced above 40 wt% initial concentration of the latex particles in the suspension, which had a rough surface, with a porous and amorphous structure. We controlled the supra-particle size by varying the initial volume of the latex suspension drop, the latex particle concentration and the drop evaporation temperature. This preparation technique allowed limited control over the porosity of the supra-particles by varying the initial concentration of the latex particle suspension, the rate of evaporation and the annealing temperature. We characterised the surface morphology and the inner structure of supra-particles by SEM imaging. We report for the first time results of an MRI study of supra-particles attached to an air-water or an oil-water interface, which indicated that only the surface layer of the building block particles attaches to the liquid interface while the pore fluid was not displaced by the outer fluid. We observed that supra-particles infused with water had different wettability and attachment positions at the oil-water interface compared with the same particles infused with oil. Similarly, the infusion of the porous supra-particles with water led to a different attachment at the air-water interface compared to the attachment of the same supra-particle when dry. The fundamental importance of this result is that the porous particles (or colloid particle

  18. Air-water interface equilibrium partitioning coefficients of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Chu, Fu-Sui; Liou, Jia-Jiunn

    The single equilibration technique was used to determine the equilibrium partitioning coefficients ( pc) of an air-water interface for target aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene. The tested liquid concentrations ( CL) of VOC ranged from 0.5 to 20 mg/l, and the temperatures ( Tw) of the solutions were 300, 305, 310 and 315 K, respectively. The pc values were calculated using the gaseous concentrations ( Cg*) of aromatic hydrocarbons in equilibrium with the aqueous phase and the formula pc=( Cg*/ CL). The heats of VOC of liquid and gaseous phase transfer (Δ Htr) in pure water, and the highly linear regression relationship (with squared correlation coefficients, R2, from 0.900 to 0.999) between ( ln C g*) and (1/ Tw) are also evaluated. Experimental results indicated that the pc values of the target VOC components increase with Tw but, in contrast, are not significantly affected by CL in pure water. However, pc of more soluble compounds, like iso-propanol and methyl ethyl ketone, have been evaluated to be significant with CL in the earlier investigation. Finally, the co-solute effect on pc is also evaluated in this work, as determining pc of the aromatic hydrocarbons by using aqueous ethanol (in a volume ration of 1-15%) as solutes.

  19. Vapor condensation on a turbulent liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, M. R.; Khoo, B. C.; Sonin, A. A.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation which seeks the fundamental relationship between the interfacial condensation rate and the parameters which control it when the liquid side is turbulent is discussed. The scaling laws for free-surface condensation are discussed for this case. It is argued that the condensation of cryogenic liquids can, in principle, be simulated in experiments using steam and water. Data are presented for the condensation rate in terms of the dimensionless scaling parameters which involve the fluid properties and the liquid-side turbulence velocity and length scales.

  20. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    valuable information regarding the structure of aqueous interfaces, but structure alone is inadequate to decipher the function. By similar analogy, theoretical predictions based on classical molecular dynamics have remained limited in their scope. Recently, we have adapted an analytical electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (ESIMS) for probing reactions at the gas-liquid interface in real time. This technique is direct, surface-specific, and provides unambiguous mass-to-charge ratios of interfacial species. With this innovation, we have been able to investigate the following: 1. How do anions mediate proton transfers at the air-water interface? 2. What is the basis for the negative surface potential at the air-water interface? 3. What is the mechanism for catalysis 'on-water'? In addition to our experiments with the ESIMS, we applied quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics to simulate our experiments toward gaining insight at the molecular scale. Our results unambiguously demonstrated the role of electrostatic-reorganization of interfacial water during proton transfer events. With our experimental and theoretical results on the 'superacidity' of the surface of mildly acidic water, we also explored implications on atmospheric chemistry and green chemistry. Our most recent results explained the basis for the negative charge of the air-water interface and showed that the water-hydrophobe interface could serve as a site for enhanced autodissociation of water compared to the condensed phase. In a nutshell, this thesis presents an in-depth account of complementary experiments and theory employed to answer the questions listed above. It is primarily based on the following articles: 1. H. Mishra, S. Enami, L. A. Stewart, R. J. Nielsen, M. R. Hoffmann, W. A. Goddard III, A. J. Colussi, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2012), 109(46), 18679--18683; 2. H. Mishra, S. Enami, R. J. Nielsen, W. A. Goddard III, M.R. Hoffmann, A. J. Colussi, Proceedings of the National

  1. Multiple liquid bridges with non-smooth interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel, Leonid G.; Rubinstein, Boris Y.; Ratner, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    We consider a coexistence of two axisymmetric liquid bridges LB i and LB m of two immiscible liquids i and m which are immersed in a third liquid (or gas) e and trapped between two smooth solid bodies with axisymmetric surfaces S 1, S 2 and free contact lines. Evolution of liquid bridges allows two different configurations of LB i and LB m with multiple (five or three) interfaces of non-smooth shape. We formulate a variational problem with volume constraints and present its governing equations supplemented by boundary conditions. We find a universal relationship between curvature of the interfaces and discuss the Neumann triangle relations at the singular curve where all liquids meet together.

  2. Chemical Identification at the Solid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Söngen, Hagen; Marutschke, Christoph; Spijker, Peter; Holmgren, Eric; Hermes, Ilka; Bechstein, Ralf; Klassen, Stefanie; Tracey, John; Foster, Adam S; Kühnle, Angelika

    2017-01-10

    Solid-liquid interfaces are decisive for a wide range of natural and technological processes, including fields as diverse as geochemistry and environmental science as well as catalysis and corrosion protection. Dynamic atomic force microscopy nowadays provides unparalleled structural insights into solid-liquid interfaces, including the solvation structure above the surface. In contrast, chemical identification of individual interfacial atoms still remains a considerable challenge. So far, an identification of chemically alike atoms in a surface alloy has only been demonstrated under well-controlled ultrahigh vacuum conditions. In liquids, the recent advent of three-dimensional force mapping has opened the potential to discriminate between anionic and cationic surface species. However, a full chemical identification will also include the far more challenging situation of alike interfacial atoms (i.e., with the same net charge). Here we demonstrate the chemical identification capabilities of dynamic atomic force microscopy at solid-liquid interfaces by identifying Ca and Mg cations at the dolomite-water interface. Analyzing site-specific vertical positions of hydration layers and comparing them with molecular dynamics simulations unambiguously unravels the minute but decisive difference in ion hydration and provides a clear means for telling calcium and magnesium ions apart. Our work, thus, demonstrates the chemical identification capabilities of dynamic AFM at the solid-liquid interface.

  3. Direct measurements of ionic liquid layering at a single mica-liquid interface and in nano-films between two mica-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Lucy R; Browning, Kathryn L; Clarke, Stuart M; Smith, Alexander M; Perkin, Susan; Skoda, M W A; Norman, Sarah E

    2016-12-21

    The layering of ionic liquids close to flat, charged interfaces has been identified previously through theoretical and some experimental measurements. Here we present evidence for oscillations in ion density ('layering') in a long chain ionic liquid (1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide) near the interface with mica using two complementary approaches. Neutron reflection at the ionic liquid-mica interface is used to detect structure at a single interface, and surface force balance (SFB) measurements carried out with the same ionic liquid reveal oscillatory density in the liquid confined between two mica sheets. Our findings imply the interfacial structure is not induced by confinement alone. Structural forces between two mica surfaces extend to approximately twice the distance of the density oscillations measured at a single interface and have similar period in both cases.

  4. Real Space Imaging of Nanoparticle Assembly at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces with Nanoscale Resolution.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luca; Li-Destri, Giovanni; Thomson, Neil H; Konovalov, Oleg; Pontoni, Diego

    2016-09-14

    Bottom up self-assembly of functional materials at liquid-liquid interfaces has recently emerged as method to design and produce novel two-dimensional (2D) nanostructured membranes and devices with tailored properties. Liquid-liquid interfaces can be seen as a "factory floor" for nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly, because NPs are driven there by a reduction of interfacial energy. Such 2D assembly can be characterized by reciprocal space techniques, namely X-ray and neutron scattering or reflectivity. These techniques have drawbacks, however, as the structural information is averaged over the finite size of the radiation beam and nonperiodic isolated assemblies in 3D or defects may not be easily detected. Real-space in situ imaging methods are more appropriate in this context, but they often suffer from limited resolution and underperform or fail when applied to challenging liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we study the surfactant-induced assembly of SiO2 nanoparticle monolayers at a water-oil interface using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) achieving nanoscale resolved imaging capabilities. Hitherto, AFM imaging has been restricted to solid-liquid interfaces because applications to liquid interfaces have been hindered by their softness and intrinsic dynamics, requiring accurate sample preparation methods and nonconventional AFM operational schemes. Comparing both AFM and grazing incidence X-ray small angle scattering data, we unambiguously demonstrate correlation between real and reciprocal space structure determination showing that the average interfacial NP density is found to vary with surfactant concentration. Additionally, the interaction between the tip and the interface can be exploited to locally determine the acting interfacial interactions. This work opens up the way to studying complex nanostructure formation and phase behavior in a range of liquid-liquid and complex liquid interfaces.

  5. Snap-in of particles at curved liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Moradiafrapoli, Momene; Marston, Jeremy

    2016-11-01

    The contact of particles with liquid interfaces constitutes the first stage in the formation of a particle-laden interface, the so-called "snap-in effect". Here, we report on an experimental study using high-speed video to directly visualize the snap-in process and the approach to the equilibrium state of a particle at a curved liquid interface (i.e. droplet surface). We image the evolution of the contact line, which is found to follow a power-law scaling in time, and the dynamic contact angle during the snap-in. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic particles are explored and we match the lift-off stage of the particles with a simple force balance. We also explore some multi-particle experiments, eluding to the dynamics of particle-laden interface formation.

  6. Energy dispersive-EXAFS of Pd nucleation at a liquid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.-Y.; Booth, S. G.; Uehara, A.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Cibin, G.; Pham, V.-T.; Nataf, L.; Dryfe, R. A. W.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Energy dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EDE) has been applied to Pd nanoparticle nucleation at a liquid/liquid interface under control over the interfacial potential and thereby the driving force for nucleation. Preliminary analysis focusing on Pd K edge-step height determination shows that under supersaturated conditions the concentration of Pd near the interface fluctuate over a period of several hours, likely due to the continuous formation and dissolution of sub-critical nuclei. Open circuit potential measurements conducted ex-situ in a liquid/liquid electrochemical cell support this view, showing that the fluctuations in Pd concentration are also visible as variations in potential across the liquid/liquid interface. By decreasing the interfacial potential through inclusion of a common ion (tetraethylammonium, TEA+) the Pd nanoparticle growth rate could be slowed down, resulting in a smooth nucleation process. Eventually, when the TEA+ ions reached an equilibrium potential, Pd nucleation and particle growth were inhibited.

  7. Enzyme structure and activity at liquid-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Beverung, C.J.; Tupy, M.J.; Radke, C.J.; Blanch, H.W.

    1997-12-31

    Understanding the behavior of proteins interaction at oil/water interfaces is crucial to the design of two-phase bioprocesses (aqueous/organic). An examination of the mechanism of protein adsorption at the oil/water interface was undertaken using tensiometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a novel total internal reflection fluorescence spectrometer (TIRFS), constructed to monitor adsorption dynamics. Dynamic interfacial tension measurements of protein adsorption show three regimes which can be described by diffusion to the interface, adsorption and denaturation of the adsorbed protein. TEM micrographs show a network of proteins in the adsorbed layer at long times. TIRFS data show that this network formation or protein entanglement in the adsorbed state requires a long period of time to occur. A series of two-monomer random polyamino acids used as model proteins demonstrate many of the adsorption characteristics observed for natural proteins.

  8. Particle self-assembly at ionic liquid-based interfaces.

    PubMed

    Frost, Denzil S; Nofen, Elizabeth M; Dai, Lenore L

    2014-04-01

    This review presents an overview of the nature of ionic liquid (IL)-based interfaces and self-assembled particle morphologies of IL-in-water, oil- and water-in-IL, and novel IL-in-IL Pickering emulsions with emphasis on their unique phenomena, by means of experimental and computational studies. In IL-in-water Pickering emulsions, particles formed monolayers at ionic liquid-water interfaces and were close-packed on fully covered emulsion droplets or aggregated on partially covered droplets. Interestingly, other than equilibrating at the ionic liquid-water interfaces, microparticles with certain surface chemistries were extracted into the ionic liquid phase with a high efficiency. These experimental findings were supported by potential of mean force calculations, which showed large energy drops as hydrophobic particles crossed the interface into the IL phase. In the oil- and water-in-IL Pickering emulsions, microparticles with acidic surface chemistries formed monolayer bridges between the internal phase droplets rather than residing at the oil/water-ionic liquid interfaces, a significant deviation from traditional Pickering emulsion morphology. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed aspects of the mechanism behind this bridging phenomenon, including the role of the droplet phase, surface chemistry, and inter-particle film. Novel IL-in-IL Pickering emulsions exhibited an array of self-assembled morphologies including the previously observed particle absorption and bridging phenomena. The appearance of these morphologies depended on the particle surface chemistry as well as the ILs used. The incorporation of particle self-assembly with ionic liquid science allows for new applications at the intersection of these two fields, and have the potential to be numerous due to the tunability of the ionic liquids and particles incorporated, as well as the particle morphology by combining certain groups of particle surface chemistry, IL type (protic or aprotic), and whether oil

  9. Ionic structure in liquids confined by dielectric interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yufei; Jadhao, Vikram; Zwanikken, Jos W.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-11-01

    The behavior of ions in liquids confined between macromolecules determines the outcome of many nanoscale assembly processes in synthetic and biological materials such as colloidal dispersions, emulsions, hydrogels, DNA, cell membranes, and proteins. Theoretically, the macromolecule-liquid boundary is often modeled as a dielectric interface and an important quantity of interest is the ionic structure in a liquid confined between two such interfaces. The knowledge gleaned from the study of ionic structure in such models can be useful in several industrial applications, such as in the design of double-layer supercapacitors for energy storage and in the extraction of metal ions from wastewater. In this article, we compute the ionic structure in a model system of electrolyte confined by two planar dielectric interfaces using molecular dynamics simulations and liquid state theory. We explore the effects of high electrolyte concentrations, multivalent ions, dielectric contrasts, and external electric field on the ionic distributions. We observe the presence of non-monotonic ionic density profiles leading to a layered structure in the fluid which is attributed to the competition between electrostatic and steric (entropic) interactions. We find that thermal forces that arise from symmetry breaking at the interfaces can have a profound effect on the ionic structure and can oftentimes overwhelm the influence of the dielectric discontinuity. The combined effect of ionic correlations and inhomogeneous dielectric permittivity significantly changes the character of the effective interaction between the two interfaces.

  10. Locomotion and phenotypic transformation of the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Preston, Terence M; King, Conrad A

    2003-01-01

    The protozoon Naegleria gruberi is able to carry out amoeboid locomotion at the water-air interface in a manner indistinguishable from that exhibited on solid substrata with the production of focal contacts and associated filopodia. The speed of locomotion at this interface can be modulated by changes in electrolyte concentrations; these speed changes are identical to those observed at a water-glass interface. The nature of the water-air interface is discussed leading to the hypothesis that surface tension alone could provide suitable properties for the adhesion and translocation of amoebae at this interface without necessitating specific, absorbed molecules. The temporary swimming flagellate stage of Naegleria is able to dock at the interface, make stable adhesions to it, and revert to the amoeboid phenotype. Conversely, amoebae resident at the water-air interface can transform to swimming flagellates and escape into the bulk liquid phase. We report the presence of Naegleria amoebae in the surface microlayers of natural ponds; thus, in freshwater bodies there may be active shuttling of Naegleria amoebae from the benthos to the surface microlayers by means of the non-feeding, swimming flagellate phenotype. The public health implication of this behaviour in the case of the pathogenic relative, Naegleria fowleri, is discussed.

  11. Nanoparticle self-assembly at the interface of liquid crystal droplets.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F; Armas-Pérez, Julio C; Wang, Xiaoguang; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-04-28

    Nanoparticles adsorbed at the interface of nematic liquid crystals are known to form ordered structures whose morphology depends on the orientation of the underlying nematic field. The origin of such structures is believed to result from an interplay between the liquid crystal orientation at the particles' surface, the orientation at the liquid crystal's air interface, and the bulk elasticity of the underlying liquid crystal. In this work, we consider nanoparticle assembly at the interface of nematic droplets. We present a systematic study of the free energy of nanoparticle-laden droplets in terms of experiments and a Landau-de Gennes formalism. The results of that study indicate that, even for conditions under which particles interact only weakly at flat interfaces, particles aggregate at the poles of bipolar droplets and assemble into robust, quantized arrangements that can be mapped onto hexagonal lattices. The contributions of elasticity and interfacial energy corresponding to different arrangements are used to explain the resulting morphologies, and the predictions of the model are shown to be consistent with experimental observations. The findings presented here suggest that particle-laden liquid crystal droplets could provide a unique and versatile route toward building blocks for hierarchical materials assembly.

  12. Liquid-vapor interface of a polydisperse fluid.

    PubMed

    Buzzacchi, Matteo; Wilding, Nigel B

    2005-06-01

    We report a grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation study of the liquid-vapor interface of a model fluid exhibiting polydispersity in terms of the particle size sigma. The bulk density distribution, rho0(sigma), of the system is controlled by the imposed chemical potential distribution mu(sigma), the form of which is specified such that rho0(sigma) assumes a Schulz form with associated degree of polydispersity approximately = 14%. By introducing a smooth attractive wall, a planar liquid-vapor interface is formed for bulk state points within the region of liquid-vapor coexistence. Owing to fractionation, the pure liquid phase is enriched in large particles, with respect to the coexisting vapor. We investigate how the spatial variation of the density near the liquid-vapor interface affects the evolution of the local distribution of particle sizes between the limiting pure phase forms. We find [as previously predicted by density-functional theory, Bellier-Castella, Phys. Rev. E 65, 021503 (2002)] a segregation of smaller particles to the interface. The magnitude of this effect as a function of sigma is quantified via measurements of the relative adsorption. Additionally, we consider the utility of various estimators for the interfacial width and highlight the difficulty of isolating the intrinsic contribution of polydispersity to this width.

  13. Universal fluctuations of growing interfaces: evidence in turbulent liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kazumasa A; Sano, Masaki

    2010-06-11

    We investigate growing interfaces of topological-defect turbulence in the electroconvection of nematic liquid crystals. The interfaces exhibit self-affine roughening characterized by both spatial and temporal scaling laws of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang theory in 1+1 dimensions. Moreover, we reveal that the distribution and the two-point correlation of the interface fluctuations are universal ones governed by the largest eigenvalue of random matrices. This provides quantitative experimental evidence of the universality prescribing detailed information of scale-invariant fluctuations.

  14. Charge-Controlled Colloids on Liquid-Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Daniel A.; Reck, Bernd; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2014-03-01

    The tendency of colloidal particles to stabilize interfaces has been exploited for many years to generate Pickering emulsions with a variety of industrial applications. However, the exact stabilization mechanism and its dependence on the surface properties of the colloidal particles are not yet fully understood. We provide new interfacial studies on the nonequilibrium dynamics of a colloidal system with tunable surface charge density. We push individual sub-micron colloidal particles towards an oil-water interface and track their motion in three-dimensions using holographic microscopy to examine the influence of zeta potential on the dynamics of the system. This project was funded by the BASF Advanced Research Initiative, BASF SE, Germany.

  15. Alkyl Chain Ordering of Asymmetric Phosphatidyicholines Adsorbed at a Liquid-Liquid Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    polarizability when COIR is tuned across allowed molecular vibrational transitions. Our measurements are sensitive only to this resonant component of the second...nonzero for the particular vibration. As COIR approaches the frequency of an allowed vibrational transition, ot(2) in Eq. 2 becomes very large and a...the CCU-water interface utilizing a total internal reflection geometry, ©vis and COIR are incident on the liquid-liquid interface at their respective

  16. Adsorption of the natural protein surfactant Rsn-2 onto liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Brandani, Giovanni B; Vance, Steven J; Schor, Marieke; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Smith, Brian O; MacPhee, Cait E; Cheung, David L

    2017-03-22

    To stabilize foams, droplets and films at liquid interfaces a range of protein biosurfactants have evolved in nature. Compared to synthetic surfactants, these combine surface activity with biocompatibility and low solution aggregation. One recently studied example is Rsn-2, a component of the foam nest of the frog Engystomops pustulosus, which has been predicted to undergo a clamshell-like opening transition at the air-water interface. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and surface tension measurements we study the adsorption of Rsn-2 onto air-water and cyclohexane-water interfaces. The protein adsorbs readily at both interfaces, with adsorption mediated by the hydrophobic N-terminus. At the cyclohexane-water interface the clamshell opens, due to the favourable interaction between hydrophobic residues and cyclohexane molecules and the penetration of cyclohexane molecules into the protein core. Simulations of deletion mutants showed that removal of the N-terminus inhibits interfacial adsorption, which is consistent with the surface tension measurements. Deletion of the hydrophilic C-terminus also affects adsorption, suggesting that this plays a role in orienting the protein at the interface. The characterisation of the interfacial behaviour gives insight into the factors that control the interfacial adsorption of proteins, which may inform new applications of this and similar proteins in areas including drug delivery and food technology and may also be used in the design of synthetic molecules showing similar changes in conformation at interfaces.

  17. Molecular structure of the coalescence of liquid interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    When two bodies of liquid merge, their interfaces must also rupture and rearrange into one. Virtually no information is available concerning the small-scale dynamics of this process. Molecular dynamics simulations of coalescence in systems of about 10,000 Lennard-Jones particles have been performed, arranged so as to mimic laboratory experiments on dense liquids. The coalescence event begins when molecules near the boundary of one liquid body thermally fluctuate into the range of attraction of the other, forming a string of mutually attracting molecules. These molecules gradually thicken into a tendril, which continues to thicken as the bodies smoothly combine in a zipper-like merger.

  18. Laser triangulation for liquid film thickness measurements through multiple interfaces.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jerrod P; Peterson, Richard B

    2006-07-10

    Laser triangulation is used to measure the thickness of a liquid film in a test section consisting of a quartz viewing window, a water layer, and a hydrophobic membrane. The triangulation sensor acquires measurements to the bounding surfaces of the film while peering through multiple interfaces. This allows the difference between the two measurements to constitute the local film thickness. A refraction model is developed and applied to the analysis of data collected from the experiment. For verification, an empirical method is also developed and compared to the analytical approach. The measurement technique is intended to assess the stability of liquid films for use as gas-liquid contactors.

  19. Measuring the optical chirality of molecular aggregates at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Watarai, Hitoshi; Adachi, Kenta

    2009-10-01

    Some new experimental methods for measuring the optical chirality of molecular aggregates formed at liquid-liquid interfaces have been reviewed. Chirality measurements of interfacial aggregates are highly important not only in analytical spectroscopy but also in biochemistry and surface nanochemistry. Among these methods, a centrifugal liquid membrane method was shown to be a highly versatile method for measuring the optical chirality of the liquid-liquid interface when used in combination with a commercially available circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimeter, provided that the interfacial aggregate exhibited a large molar absorptivity. Therefore, porphyrin and phthalocyanine were used as chromophoric probes of the chirality of itself or guest molecules at the interface. A microscopic CD method was also demonstrated for the measurement of a small region of a film or a sheet sample. In addition, second-harmonic generation and Raman scattering methods were reviewed as promising methods for detecting interfacial optical molecules and measuring bond distortions of chiral molecules, respectively.

  20. Liquid-Vapor Interface Configurations Investigated in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert; Weislogel, Mark M.

    1998-01-01

    The Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) is part of a multifaceted study that is exploring the often striking behavior of liquid-vapor interfaces in low-gravity environments. Although the experiment was posed largely as a test of current mathematical theory, applications of the results should be manifold. In space almost every fluid system is affected, if not dominated, by capillarity (the effects of surface tension). As a result, knowledge of fluid interface behavior, in particular an equilibrium interface shape from which any analysis must begin, is fundamental--from the control of liquid fuels and oxygen in storage tanks to the design and development of inspace thermal systems, such as heat pipes and capillary pumped loops. ICE has increased, and should continue to increase, such knowledge as it probes the specific peculiarities of current theory upon which our present understanding rests. Several versions of ICE have been conducted in the drop towers at the NASA Lewis Research Center, on the space shuttles during the first and second United States Microgravity Laboratory missions (USML-1 and USML-2), and most recently aboard the Russian Mir space station. These studies focused on interfacial problems concerning the existence, uniqueness, configuration, stability, and flow characteristics of liquid-vapor interfaces. Results to date have clearly demonstrated the value of the present theory and the extent to which it can predict the behavior of capillary systems.

  1. Near Axisymmetric Partial Wetting Using Interface-Localized Liquid Dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Brabcova, Zuzana; McHale, Glen; Wells, Gary George; Brown, Carl V; Newton, Michael Ian; Edwards, Andrew M J

    2016-10-03

    The wetting of solid surfaces can be modified by altering the surface free energy balance between the solid, liquid, and vapour phases. Liquid dielectrophoresis (L-DEP) can produce wetting on normally non-wetting surfaces, without modification of the surface topography or chemistry. L-DEP is a bulk force acting on the dipoles of a dielectric liquid and is not normally considered to be a localized effect acting at the interface between the liquid and a solid or other fluid. However, if this force is induced by a non-uniform electric field across a solid-liquid interface, it can be used to enhance and control the wetting of a dielectric liquid. Recently, it was reported theoretically and experimentally that this approach can cause a droplet of oil to spread along parallel interdigitated electrodes thus forming a stripe of liquid. Here we show that by using spiral shaped electrodes actuated with four 90º successive phase shifted signals, a near axisymmetric spreading of droplets can be achieved. Experimental observations show that the induced wetting can achieve film formation, an effect not possible with electrowetting. We show that the spreading is reversible thus enabling a wide range of partial wetting droplet states to be achieved in a controllable manner. Furthermore, we find that the cosine of the contact angle has a quadratic dependence on applied voltage during spreading and deduce a scaling law for the dependence of the strength of the effect on the electrode size. .

  2. Air Emission, Liquid Effluent Inventory and Reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Tina

    1998-08-18

    The IES maintains an inventory of radiological air and liquid effluents released to the atmosphere. The IES utilizes the official stack numbers. Data may be entered by generators for any monitoring time period. Waste volumes released as well as their radiological constituents are tracked. The IES provides data to produce a report for NESHAPS as well as several administrative action/anomaly reports. These reports flag unusual occurences (releases) that are above normal range releases.

  3. Simulated Solvation of Organic Ions II: Study of Linear Alkylated Carboxylate Ions in Water Nanodrops and in Liquid Water. Propensity for Air/Water Interface and Convergence to Bulk Solvation Properties.

    PubMed

    Houriez, Céline; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; Masella, Michel

    2015-09-10

    We investigated the solvation of carboxylate ions from formate to hexanoate, in droplets of 50 to 1000 water molecules and neat water, by computations using standard molecular dynamics and sophisticated polarizable models. The carboxylate ions from methanoate to hexanoate show strong propensity for the air/water interface in small droplets. Only the ions larger than propanoate retain propensity for the interface in larger droplets, where their enthalpic stabilization by ion/water dispersion is reduced there by 3 kcal mol(-1) per CH2 group. This is compensated by entropy effects over +3.3 cal mol(-1) K(-1) per CH2 group. On the surface, the anionic headgroups are strongly oriented toward the aqueous core, while the hydrophobic alkyl chains are repelled into air and lose their structure-making effects. These results reproduce the structure-making effects of alkyl groups in solution, and suggest that the hydrocarbon chains of ionic headgroups and alkyl substituents solvate independently. Extrapolation to bulk solution using standard extrapolation schemes yields absolute carboxylate solvation energies. The results for formate and acetate yield a proton solvation enthalpy of about 270 kcal mol(-1), close to the experiment-based value. The largest carboxylate ions yield a value smaller by about 10 kcal mol(-1), which requires studies in much larger droplets.

  4. Lithium-Air and ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The final portion of this project was accomplished at Sandia National Labs, Livermore, with the overall goal being to optimize lithium-air cells with an ionic liquid electrolyte. Both of these are potential future routes for lithium-ion technology. Lithiumair presents the advantage of higher gravimetric energy density, and ionic liquids present the advantage of greater hydrophobicity and much lower volatility, along with a larger window of electrochemical stability. Ionic liquids however have several drawbacks for the battery industry. Currently they are not as cost effective as many organic solvents. Additionally, because of the added viscosity of ionic interactions compared to the typical dipole interactions of a solvent, the ionic conductivity is lower than for common organic solvents.

  5. Numerical investigation of a turbulent hydraulic jump: Interface statistics and air entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Milad; Kim, Dokyun; Mani, Ali; Moin, Parviz

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an understanding of formation of bubbles due to turbulence/interface interactions and nonlinear surface wave phenomena. As a model problem a statistically stationary turbulent hydraulic jump has been considered. Turbulent hydraulic jump with an inflow Froude number of 2 and Reynolds number of 88000-based on inflow height-has been numerically simulated. Based on typical air- water systems, a density ratio of 831 has been selected for our calculations. A refined level-set method is employed to track the detailed dynamics of the interface evolution. Comparison of flow statistics with experimental results of Murzyn et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2005) will be presented. The probability density function of principal curvatures of the air- water interface and curvature distribution patterns in the chaotic regions are investigated. The importance of liquid impact events in bubble generation will be discussed. Supported by the Office of Naval Research, with Dr. Pat Purtell, program manager.

  6. Experiments on the impact and turbulent coalescence of a blob at a liquid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeau, Maylis; Olson, Peter; Deguen, Renaud; Hirsh, Ben; Earth; Planetary Sciences Team

    2015-11-01

    We present experiments on finite liquid volumes, hereafter referred to as blobs, of variable densities impacting an interface between two immiscible liquids at high Reynolds and Weber numbers. Such processes occurred on a massive scale during the giant impacts that formed terrestrial planets and satellites, including the Earth and the Moon. We find that the fall distance of the blob controls an abrupt transition in coalescence regime and in the amount of mixing with the lower liquid. This transition coincides with a brief and global breakup of the impacting blob into drops. For small fall distances, the large-scale flow following impact behaves as a turbulent fountain: a mixture of immiscible liquids penetrates in the lower liquid, collapses and spreads along the immiscible interface. We derive an experimental scaling relation for turbulent mixing of the impacting blob with the lower liquid as a function of a Richardson number.

  7. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy of surfactants at liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Paulo B.

    1998-12-14

    Surfactants are widely used to modify physical and chemical properties of interfaces. They play an important role in many technological problems. Surfactant monolayer are also of great scientific interest because they are two-dimensional systems that may exhibit a very rich phase transition behavior and can also be considered as a model system for biological interfaces. In this Thesis, we use a second-order nonlinear optical technique (Sum-Frequency Generation - SFG) to obtain vibrational spectra of surfactant monolayer at Iiquidhapor and solid/liquid interfaces. The technique has several advantages: it is intrinsically surface-specific, can be applied to buried interfaces, has submonolayer sensitivity and is remarkably sensitive to the confirmational order of surfactant monolayers.

  8. Oxygen-selective immobilized liquid membranes for operation of lithium-air batteries in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Liu, Wei

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, nonaqueous-electrolyte-based Li-air batteries with O2-selective immobilized liquid membranes have been developed and operated in ambient air with 20~30% relative humidity(RH). Continuous anhydrous O2 can be supplied from the ambient through a membrane barrier layer at interface of the cathode and ambient air. The membranes allow O2 permeate through while blocking moisture. These membranes were prepared by loading O2-selective liquid fluids such as silicone oils into porous supports such as porous metal sheets and Teflon (PTFE) films. It was found that silicone oil of high viscosity shows better performance. The membrane performance was not affected by the oil loading temperature. The immobilized silicone oil (viscosity 100,000cst) membrane in porous PTFE film enabled the Li-air batteries with Ketjen black carbon air electrodes to operate in ambient air (with 20% RH) for 16.3 days with a specific capacity of 789 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 2182 Wh/kg carbon. Its performance is much better than reference battery assembled with the same battery material but by use of a commercial, porous PTFE diffusion membranes as the moisture barrier layer on the cathode, which only had a discharge time of 5.5 days corresponding to a specific capacity of 267 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 704 Wh/kg carbon. The Li-air battery with the present selective membrane barrier layer even showed better performance in ambient air operation (20% RH) than the reference battery tested in the dry air box (< 1% RH).

  9. Relaxation of surface tension in the liquid-solid interfaces of Lennard-Jones liquids.

    PubMed

    Lukyanov, Alex V; Likhtman, Alexei E

    2013-11-19

    We have established the surface tension relaxation time in the liquid-solid interfaces of Lennard-Jones (LJ) liquids by means of direct measurements in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The main result is that the relaxation time is found to be almost independent of the molecular structures and viscosity of the liquids (at 70-fold change) used in our study and lies in such a range that in slow hydrodynamic motion the interfaces are expected to be at equilibrium. The implications of our results for the modeling of dynamic wetting processes and interpretation of dynamic contact angle data are discussed.

  10. A moving mesh interface tracking method for simulation of liquid-liquid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charin, A. H. L. M.; Tuković, Ž.; Jasak, H.; Silva, L. F. L. R.; Lage, P. L. C.

    2017-04-01

    This manuscript presents a moving mesh interface tracking procedure, with a novel treatment for phase coupling. The new coupling strategy allows accurate predictions for the interface behaviour in a wide range of macroscopic properties with great potential to explore liquid-liquid systems. In this approach, governing equations are applied to each phase individually while the interface is represented by a zero-thickness surface that contemplates inter-phase jumps. These equations are described in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume framework. Computations consider the pressure-corrector PISO method. The new treatment for phase coupling incorporates the interfacial jump updates within the pressure/velocity calculations. Additionally, cell-centred values from both phases are considered when calculating convective and diffusive terms at the interface. The employment of GGI (Generalized Grid-Interface) interpolation provides conservative data mapping between surfaces for non-conformal meshes. The prediction capability of the new formulation is evaluated under different dominant effects governing interface motion. Simulated cases include gravity and capillary waves in a sloshing tank, three-dimensional drop oscillation for liquid-liquid systems and drop deformation due to shear flow. The numerical results show good agreement with analytical transient profiles of interface position. The procedure is able to successfully represent systems with similar macroscopic properties, i.e. density and viscosity ratios approaching unity, and a broad range of interfacial tensions.

  11. Spatial scanning spectroelectrochemistry. Study of the electrodeposition of Pd nanoparticles at the liquid/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Daniel; Martinez, Alberto; Heras, Aranzazu; Lopez-Palacios, Jesus; Ruiz, Virginia; Dryfe, Robert A W; Colina, Alvaro

    2012-07-03

    Spatial scanning spectroelectrochemistry is a new analytical technique that provides spectral information at different distances from an electrified liquid/liquid interface where an electrochemical process takes place. As a proof of concept, we have studied two different electrochemical processes at the electrified liquid/liquid interface: (1) Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) transfer through the water/1,2-dichloroethane interface and (2) electrodeposition of Pd nanoparticles at the water/1,2-dichloroethane interface. The instrumental setup developed consists of a movable slit for the light beam to sample at well-defined positions on both sides of the interface, providing important information about the chemical process occurring. If the slit is scanned at different distances from the interface during an electrochemical experiment, a complete picture of the reactions and equilibria in the diffusion layer can be obtained. For example, in the case of the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+), the experiments show clearly how the complex is transferred from one phase to the other. In the case of electrosynthesis of Pd nanoparticles, it is demonstrated that nanoparticles are not only deposited at the interface but diffuse to the aqueous bulk solution. These in situ observations were confirmed by ex situ experiments using transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Final Report: Thermal Conductance of Solid-Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cahil, David, G.; Braun, Paul, V.

    2006-05-31

    Research supported by this grant has significantly advanced fundamental understanding of the thermal conductance of solid-liquid interfaces, and the thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanoscale composite materials. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between carbon nanotubes and a surrounding matrix of organic molecules is exceptionally small and this small value of the interface conductance limits the enhancement in thermal conductivity that can be achieved by loading a fluid or a polymer with nanotubes. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between metal nanoparticles coated with hydrophilic surfactants and water is relatively high and surprisingly independent of the details of the chemical structure of the surfactant. • We extended our experimental methods to enable studies of planar interfaces between surfactant-coated metals and water where the chemical functionalization can be varied between strongly hydrophobic and strongly hydrophilic. The thermal conductance of hydrophobic interfaces establishes an upper-limit of 0.25 nm on the thickness of the vapor-layer that is often proposed to exist at hydrophobic interfaces. • Our high-precision measurements of fluid suspensions show that the thermal conductivity of fluids is not significantly enhanced by loading with a small volume fraction of spherical nanoparticles. These experimental results directly contradict some of the anomalous results in the recent literature and also rule-out proposed mechanisms for the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids that are based on modification of the fluid thermal conductivity by the coupling of fluid motion and the Brownian motion of the nanoparticles.

  13. Emulsification at the Liquid/Liquid Interface: Effects of Potential, Electrolytes and Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Mehrin; Kataky, Ritu

    2016-01-04

    Emulsification of oils at liquid/liquid interfaces is of fundamental importance across a range of applications, including detergency. Adsorption and partitioning of the anionic surface active ions at the interface between two immiscible solutions is known to cause predictable chaos at the transfer potential region of the surfactant. In this work, the phenomenon that leads to the chaotic behaviour shown by sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) at the water/1,2-dichloroethane interface is applied to commercial surfactants and aqueous/glyceryl trioleate interface. Electrochemical methods, electrocapillary curves, optical microscopy and conductivity measurements demonstrated that at 1.5 mm of SDBS, surfactants are adsorbed at the interface and assemble into micelles, leading to interfacial instability. As the concentration of the anionic surfactant was enhanced to 8 and 13.4 mm, the Marangoni effect and the interfacial emulsification became more prominent. The chaotic behaviour was found to be dependent on the surfactant concentration and the electrolytes present.

  14. Crystalline Graphdiyne Nanosheets Produced at a Gas/Liquid or Liquid/Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Ryota; Sakamoto, Ryota; Hoshiko, Ken; Sasaki, Sono; Masunaga, Hiroyasu; Nagashio, Kosuke; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2017-02-15

    Synthetic two-dimensional polymers, or bottom-up nanosheets, are ultrathin polymeric frameworks with in-plane periodicity. They can be synthesized in a direct, bottom-up fashion using atomic, ionic, or molecular components. However, few are based on carbon-carbon bond formation, which means that there is a potential new field of investigation into these fundamentally important chemical bonds. Here, we describe the bottom-up synthesis of all-carbon, π-conjugated graphdiyne nanosheets. A liquid/liquid interfacial protocol involves layering a dichloromethane solution of hexaethynylbenzene on an aqueous layer containing a copper catalyst at room temperature. A multilayer graphdiyne (thickness, 24 nm; domain size, >25 μm) emerges through a successive alkyne-alkyne homocoupling reaction at the interface. A gas/liquid interfacial synthesis is more successful. Sprinkling a very small amount of hexaethynylbenzene in a mixture of dichloromethane and toluene onto the surface of the aqueous phase at room temperature generated single-crystalline graphdiyne nanosheets, which feature regular hexagonal domains, a lower degree of oxygenation, and uniform thickness (3.0 nm) and lateral size (1.5 μm).

  15. Fugacity gradients of hydrophobic organics across the air-water interface measured with a novel passive sampler.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chou; Yao, Yao; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wu, Feng-Chang; Wong, Charles S; Tao, Shu; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-11-01

    Mass transfer of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) across the air-water interface is an important geochemical process controlling the fate and transport of HOCs at the regional and global scales. However, few studies have characterized concentration or fugacity profiles of HOCs near both sides of the air-water interface, which is the driving force for the inter-compartmental mass transfer of HOCs. Herein, we introduce a novel passive sampling device which is capable of measuring concentration (and therefore fugacity) gradients of HOCs across the air-water interface. Laboratory studies indicated that the escaping fugacity values of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water to air were negatively correlated to their volatilization half-lives. Results for field deployment were consistent between the passive sampler and an active method, i.e., a combination of grab sampling and liquid-liquid extraction. In general, the fugacity profiles of detected PAHs were indicative of an accumulation mechanism in the surface microlayer of the study regions (Haizhu Lake and Hailing Bay of Guangdong Province, China), while p,p'-DDD tended to volatilize from water to the atmosphere in Hailing Bay. Furthermore, the fugacity profiles of the target analytes increased towards the air-water interface, reflecting the complexity of environmental behavior of the target analytes near the air-water interface. Overall, the passive sampling device provides a novel means to better characterize the air-water diffusive transfer of HOCs, facilitating the understanding of the global cycling of HOCs.

  16. Vibration-Induced Gas-Liquid Interface Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hern, Timothy; Torczynski, John; Romero, Ed; Shelden, Bion

    2010-11-01

    Gas-liquid interfaces can be forced to break up when subjected to vibrations within critical ranges of frequency and amplitude. This breakup mechanism was examined experimentally using deep layers of silicone oils over a range of viscosity and sinusoidal, primarily axial vibration conditions that can produce dramatic disturbances at the gas-liquid free surface. Although small-amplitude vibrations produce standing Faraday waves, large-amplitude vibrations produce liquid jets into the gas, droplets pinching off from the jets, gas cavities in the liquid from droplet impact, and bubble transport below the interface. Experiments used several different silicone oils over a range of pressures and vibration conditions. Computational simulations exhibiting similar behavior will be included in the presentation. Applications include liquid fuel rockets, inertial sensing devices, moving vehicles, mixing processes, and acoustic excitation. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Hydrogen-bonding molecular ruler surfactants as probes of specific solvation at liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Siler, A Renee; Brindza, Michael R; Walker, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    Resonance-enhanced, second harmonic generation (SHG) is used to measure the electronic structure of solutes sensitive to specific solvation adsorbed to liquid/liquid and liquid/solid interfaces. Here, specific solvation refers to solvent-solute interactions that are directional and localized. N-methyl-p-methoxyaniline (NMMA) is a solute whose first allowed electronic transition wavelength remains almost constant (approximately 315 nm) in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents regardless of solvent polarity. However, in hydrogen-bond-accepting solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide, NMMA's absorbance shifts to longer wavelengths (320 nm), whereas in hydrogen-bond-donating solvents (e.g., water), the absorbance shifts to shorter wavelengths (approximately 300 nm). SHG experiments show that at alkane/silica interfaces, surface silanol groups serve as moderately strong hydrogen-bond donors as evidenced by NMMA's absorbance of 307 nm. At the carbon tetrachloride/water interface, NMMA absorbance also shifts to slightly shorter wavelengths (298 nm) implying that water molecules at this liquid/liquid interface are donating strong hydrogen bonds to the adsorbed NMMA solutes. In contrast, experiments using newly developed molecular ruler surfactants with NMMA as a model hydrophobic solute and a hydrophilic, cationic headgroup imply that, as NMMA migrates across an aqueous/alkane interface, it carries with it water that functions as a hydrogen-bond-accepting partner.

  18. Nanoscale thermal transport at solid-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhenbin

    This thesis focuses on the experimental study of nanoscale thermal transport across solidliquid interfaces in both nanoparticle system and planar thin film system. Thermal conductance of solid-liquid interfaces, G, will be measured using time-domain thermo-reflectance and pump-probe transient absorption. Interface thermal conductance, G, relates the temperature drop DeltaT at an interface to the flux of heat F that crosses the interface, F = GDeltaT. In nanoparticle systems, using pump-probe transient absorption measurement, we find that nanoparticles, ranging in size from 3-24 rim. with widely varying hydrophilic surface chemistry, give thermal conductances G ˜ 100-300 MW m-2 K-1 for the particle-water interfaces, approximately an order of magnitude larger than the conductance of the interfaces between alkanethiol-terminated AuPd nanoparticles and toluene. The relatively large thermal conductances between particle-water interfaces indicate that the thermal coupling between hydrophilic nanoparticles and water is strong regardless of the self-assembled stabilizing group. In planar systems, using time-domain thermoreflectance, we find that the thermal conductance between water and planar hydrophilic surfaces ranges between 100 and 180 MW m-2 K-1, which is in good agreement with the nanoparticles systems. While in hydrophobic-water interfaces, interface thermal conductance is smaller, ranging between 45 and 65 MW m-2 K-1 indicating that the thermal coupling between hydrophobic surfaces and water is weaker than with hydrophilic surfaces. The Kapitza length---the thermal conductivity of water divided by the thermal conductance per unit area of the interface---at hydrophobic interfaces (10-12 nm) is a factor of 2-3 larger than the Kapitza length at hydrophilic interfaces (3-6 nm). We also utilized the pump-probe transient absorption measurement to probe thermal transport in Au-core polymer-shell nanoparticles. The addition of an organic co-solvent to the suspension

  19. Additive manufacturing. Continuous liquid interface production of 3D objects.

    PubMed

    Tumbleston, John R; Shirvanyants, David; Ermoshkin, Nikita; Janusziewicz, Rima; Johnson, Ashley R; Kelly, David; Chen, Kai; Pinschmidt, Robert; Rolland, Jason P; Ermoshkin, Alexander; Samulski, Edward T; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-03-20

    Additive manufacturing processes such as 3D printing use time-consuming, stepwise layer-by-layer approaches to object fabrication. We demonstrate the continuous generation of monolithic polymeric parts up to tens of centimeters in size with feature resolution below 100 micrometers. Continuous liquid interface production is achieved with an oxygen-permeable window below the ultraviolet image projection plane, which creates a "dead zone" (persistent liquid interface) where photopolymerization is inhibited between the window and the polymerizing part. We delineate critical control parameters and show that complex solid parts can be drawn out of the resin at rates of hundreds of millimeters per hour. These print speeds allow parts to be produced in minutes instead of hours.

  20. Interaction of Porosity with a Planar Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu; Kaukler, William K.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, an investigation of the interaction between gas porosity and a planar solid/liquid (SL) interface is reported. A two-dimensional numerical model able to accurately track sharp SL interfaces during solidification of pure metals and alloys is proposed. The finite difference method and a rectangular undeformed grid are used for computation. The SL interface is described through the points of intersection with the grid lines. Its motion is determined by the thermal and solute gradients at each particular point. Changes of the interface temperature because of capillarity or solute redistribution as well as any perturbation of the thermal and solute field produced by the presence of non-metallic inclusions can be computed. To validate the model, the dynamics of the interaction between a gas pore and a solidification front in metal alloys was observed using a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope. The experiments included observation of the distortion of the SL interface near a pore, real-time measurements of the growth rate and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with an advancing SL interface in pure Al and Al-0.25 wt% Au alloy. In addition, porosity induced solute segregation patterns surrounding a pore were also quantified.

  1. Interaction of Porosity with a Planar Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu; Kaukler, William F.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, an investigation of the interaction between gas porosity and a planar solid/liquid (SL) interface is reported. A two-dimensional numerical model able to accurately track sharp SL interfaces during solidification of pure metals and alloys is proposed. The finite-difference method and a rectangular undeformed grid are used for computation. The SL interface is described through the points of intersection with the grid lines. Its motion is determined by the thermal and solute gradients at each particular point. Changes of the interface temperature because of capillarity or solute redistribution as well as any perturbation of the thermal and solute field produced by the presence of non-metallic inclusions can be computed. To validate the model, the dynamics of the interaction between a gas pore and a solidification front in metal alloys was observed using a state of the art X-ray transmission microscope (XTM). The experiments included observation of the distortion of the SL interface near a pore, real-time measurements of the growth rate, and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with the SL interface in pure Al and Al-0.25 wt pct Au alloy. In addition, porosity-induced solute segregation patterns surrounding a pore were also quantified.

  2. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, Dvora, Dr.; Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary Stephen, Dr.

    2008-08-01

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  3. Active colloids at liquid-liquid interfaces: dynamic self-assembly and functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium in order to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Colloids of interacting particles suspended at liquid-liquid interfaces and maintained out of equilibrium by external alternating electromagnetic fields develop nontrivial collective dynamics and self-assembly. We use ferromagnetic colloidal micro-particles (so the magnetic moment is fixed in each particle and interactions between colloids is highly anisotropic and directional) suspended over an interface of two immiscible liquids and energized by vertical alternating magnetic fields to demonstrate novel dynamic and active self-assembled structures (``asters'') which are not accessible through thermodynamic assembly. Structures are attributed to the interplay between surface waves, generated at the liquid/liquid interface by the collective response of magnetic microparticles to the alternating magnetic field, and hydrodynamic fields induced in the boundary layers of both liquids forming the interface. Two types of magnetic order are reported. We demonstrate that asters develop self-propulsion in the presence of a small in-plane dc magnetic field. We show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles.

  4. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S

    2008-12-18

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  5. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer having liquid/wedge and gas/wedge interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic liquid densitometer that uses a material wedge having two sections, one with a liquid/wedge interface and another with a gas/wedge interface. It is preferred that the wedge have an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the liquid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the liquid. Ultrasonic signals are internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a liquid is determined by immersing the wedge into the liquid and measuring reflections of ultrasound at the liquid/wedge interface and at the gas/wedge interface.

  6. Rheology and microrheology of materials at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Robert Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    The study of materials at the air-water interface is an important area of research in soft condensed matter physics. Films at the air-water interface have been a system of interest to physics, chemistry and biology for the last 20 years. The unique properties of these surface films provide ideal models for 2-d films, surface chemistry and provide a platform for creating 2 dimensional analogue materials to cellular membranes. Measurements of the surface rheology of cross-linked F-actin networks associated with a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface of a Langmuir monolayer have been performed. The rheological measurements are made using a Couette cell. These data demonstrate that the network has a finite elastic modulus that grows as a function of the cross-linking concentration. We also note that under steady-state flow the system behaves as a power law fluid in which the effective viscosity decreases with imposed shear. A Langmuir monolayer trough that is equipped for simultaneous microrheology and standard rheology measurements has been constructed. The central elements are the trough itself with a full range of optical tools accessing the air-water interface from below the trough and a portable knife-edge torsion pendulum that can access the interface from above. The ability to simultaneously measure the mechanical response of Langmuir monolayers on very different length scales is an important step for our understanding of the mechanical response of two-dimensional viscoelastic networks. The optical tweezer microrheometer is used to study the micromechanical properties of Langmuir monolayers. Microrheology measurements are made a variety of surface pressures that correspond to different ordered phases of the monolayer. The complex shear modulus shows an order of magnitude increase for the liquid condensed phase of DPPC compared to the liquid expanded phase.

  7. Nonspherical liquid droplet falling in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Meenu; Premlata, A. R.; Tripathi, Manoj Kumar; Karri, Badarinath; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of an initially nonspherical liquid droplet falling in air under the action of gravity is investigated via three-dimensional numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations in the inertial regime. The surface tension is considered to be high enough so that a droplet does not undergo breakup. Vertically symmetric oscillations which decay with time are observed for low inertia. The amplitude of these oscillations increases for high Gallilei numbers and the shape asymmetry in the vertical direction becomes prominent. The reason for this asymmetry has been attributed to the higher aerodynamic inertia. Moreover, even for large inertia, no path deviations or oscillations are observed.

  8. Adsorption of nanoparticles at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Thorsten; Paulus, Michael; Schroer, Martin A; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Sternemann, Christian; Möller, Johannes; Tolan, Metin; Degen, Patrick; Rehage, Heinz

    2012-05-15

    The adsorption of differently charged nanoparticles at liquid-solid interfaces was investigated by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The layer formation of positively charged maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles at the aqueous solution-SiO(2) interface was observed while negatively charged gold nanoparticles show no adsorption at this interface. Thus, the electrostatic interaction between the particles and the charged surface was determined as the driving force for the adsorption process. The data analysis shows that a logarithmic particle size distribution describes the density profile of the thin adsorbed maghemite layer. The size distribution in the nanoparticle solution determined by small angle X-ray scattering shows an average particle size which is similar to that found for the adsorbed film. The formed magehemite film exhibits a rather high stability.

  9. Boundary conditions on the vapor liquid interface at strong condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A. P.; Levashov, V. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The problem of the formulation of boundary conditions on the vapor-liquid interface is considered. The different approaches to this problem and their difficulties are discussed. Usually, a quasi-equilibrium scheme is used. At sufficiently large deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium, a molecular kinetics approach should be used for the description of the vapor flow at condensation. The formulation of the boundary conditions at the vapor liquid interface to solve the Boltzmann kinetic equation for the distribution of molecules by velocity is a sophisticated problem. It appears that molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) can be used to provide this solution at the interface. The specific problems occur in the realization of MDS on large time and space scales. Some of these problems, and a hierarchy of continuum, kinetic and molecular dynamic time scales, are discussed in the paper. A description of strong condensation at the kinetic level is presented for the steady one-dimensional problem. A formula is provided for the calculation of the limiting condensation coefficient. It is shown that as the condensation coefficient approaches the limiting value, the vapor pressure rises significantly. The results of the corresponding calculations for the Mach number and temperature at different vapor flows are demonstrated. As a result of the application of the molecular kinetics method and molecular dynamics simulation to the problem of the determination of argon condensation coefficients in the range of temperatures of vapor and liquid ratio 1.0-4.0, it is concluded that the condensation coefficient is close to unity.

  10. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  11. Manipulation of liquid-liquid interfaces for tunable optics on a chip in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kam Yan Sindy

    This thesis describes the design and development of optofluidics: a new class of optical components based on dynamic liquid-liquid interfaces between liquids possessing different optical properties in microfluidic systems. Devices with optical interfaces formed by liquids possess characteristics that are quite different from solid-gas and solid-liquid systems commonly used in conventional optics. Advantages of optofluidic systems include the simplicity to reconfigure optical properties and functions in real time. Examples of devices include liquid waveguides, lenses, and multi-color droplet dye laser. Potential applications include biochemical characterization and optical spectroscopy in micro-total analytical systems. Chapter 1 describers the motivation, general configuration and characteristics of devices with optical interfaces formed by liquids in microchannels. Chapter 2 describes the soft lithographic techniques used to make optofluidic devices. Chapter 3 describes the use of co-fabrication to design and fabricate multiple functional components in microfluidic systems in a single step. Chapters 4 to 6 describe the design and operation of three optofluidic devices: waveguides, lenses, and dye lasers.

  12. Floating and sinking of self-assembled spheres on liquid-liquid interfaces: Rafts versus stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Steven G.; Abbasi, Niki; Ahuja, Abhinav; Truong, Vivian; Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2015-07-01

    The floating and sinking of objects on fluid-fluid interfaces occurs in nature and has many important implications in technology. Here, we study the stability of floating self-assembled spheres on an oil-water interface, and how the sphere deposition geometry affects the size limits of the assemblies before they collapse and sink through the interface. Specifically, we compare the critical size of particle rafts to particle stacks. We show that, on liquid-liquid interfaces, monolayer rafts and stacked spheres exhibit different scaling of the critical number of spheres to the Bond number—the dimensionless ratio of buoyancy to interfacial tension effects. Our results indicate that particle stacks will sink with a lower threshold number of particles than particle rafts. This finding may have important implications to engineering applications where interfacial assemblies are not monolayers.

  13. Mixing and transient interface condensation of a liquid hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Nyland, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of axial jet-induced mixing on the pressure reduction of a thermally stratified liquid hydrogen tank. The tank was nearly cylindrical, having a volume of about 0.144 cu m with 0.559 m in diameter and 0.711 m length. A mixer/pump unit, which had a jet nozzle outlet of 0.0221 m in diameter was located 0.178 m from the tank bottom and was installed inside the tank to generate the axial jet mixing and tank fluid circulation. Mixing tests began with the tank pressures at which the thermal stratification results in 4.9-6.2 K liquid subcooling. The mixing time and transient vapor condensation rate at the liquid-vapor interface are determined. Two mixing time correlations, based on the thermal equilibrium and pressure equilibrium, are developed and expressed as functions of system and buoyancy parameters. The limited liquid hydrogen data of the present study shows that the modified steady state condensation rate correlation may be used to predict the transient condensation rate in a mixing process if the instantaneous values of jet sub cooling and turbulence intensity at the interface are employed.

  14. Thermocapillary Convection at the Interface of Two Liquids --

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hook, Stephen J.; Andre, Carrie; McCormick, W. D.; Swift, J. B.; Swinney, Harry L.

    1997-11-01

    While convection due to surface tension (thermocapillary) effects at a liquid-gas interface has received much theoretical and experiment attention (S. J. Van Hook et al.), to appear in J. Fluid Mech.; A. A. Golovin, A. A. Nepomnyashchy, & L. M. Pismen, Phys. Fluids 6, 34--48 (1994); D. A. Goussis & R. E. Kelly, Int. J. Heat Mass Trans. 33, 2237--2245 (1990); S. Davis, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 19, 403--435 (1987)., the problem of two-layer (liquid-liquid) surface-tension-driven convection has been relatively ignored. Stability theory predicts a wide range of instabilities---short- and long-wavelength, stationary and oscillatory---for heating the system from above or below. We examine the conditions under which these different instabilities can be observed in real fluid systems. While the short wavelength instabilities are analogous to convection in buoyancy-driven convection, the long-wavelength instabilities are exclusively a feature of thermocapillary flow.

  15. Resolving amorphous solid-liquid interfaces by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Gura, Leonard; Kell, Burkhard; Büchner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian L.; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Recent advancements in liquid atomic force microscopy make it an ideal technique for probing the structure of solid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present a structural study of a two-dimensional amorphous silica bilayer immersed in an aqueous solution utilizing liquid atomic force microscopy with sub-nanometer resolution. Structures show good agreement with atomically resolved ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy images obtained on the same sample system, owing to the structural stability of the silica bilayer and the imaging clarity from the two-dimensional sample system. Pair distance histograms of ring center positions are utilized to develop quantitative metrics for structural comparison, and the physical origin of pair distance histogram peaks is addressed by direct assessment of real space structures.

  16. Methods and systems for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G [Gettysburg, PA; Clark, Roger F [Frederick, MD

    2011-10-04

    Methods and systems are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface, including providing a vessel configured to contain an at least partially melted material; detecting radiation reflected from a surface of a liquid portion of the at least partially melted material; providing sound energy to the surface; measuring a disturbance on the surface; calculating at least one frequency associated with the disturbance; and determining a thickness of the liquid portion based on the at least one frequency, wherein the thickness is calculated based on L=(2m-1)v.sub.s/4f, where f is the frequency where the disturbance has an amplitude maximum, v.sub.s is the speed of sound in the material, and m is a positive integer (1, 2, 3, . . . ).

  17. Capillary freezing of ionic liquids confined between metallic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comtet, Jean; Niguès, Antoine; Kaiser, Vojtech; Bocquet, Lydéric; Siria, Alessandro

    2016-11-01

    Using a quartz tuning fork based AFM, we investigate the behavior of ionic liquids under confinement. Using nanorheological measurements, we show that nanometric confinements can lead to solidification and capillary freezing of the ionic liquid. We find that the critical confinement at which the liquid-solid transition occurs depends strongly on the bulk electronic properties of the confining substrate, with stronger effects observed for more metallic surfaces. This behavior is rationalized on the basis of a Gibbs-Thompson framework for the shift of the freezing transition, taking into account surface energies with the imperfect metal at the level of a Thomas-Fermi model. Finally, we show that capillary freezing can also be tuned by electrifying the confining interfaces.

  18. Electrical control of Faraday rotation at a liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Monica; Kornyshev, Alexei A; Flatté, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    A theory is developed for the Faraday rotation of light from a monolayer of charged magnetic nanoparticles at an electrified liquid-liquid interface. The polarization fields of neighboring nanoparticles enhance the Faraday rotation. At such interfaces, and for realistic sizes and charges of nanoparticles, their adsorption-desorption can be controlled with a voltage variation<1 V, providing electrovariable Faraday rotation. A calculation based on the Maxwell-Garnett theory predicts that the corresponding redistribution of 40 nm nanoparticles of yttrium iron garnet can switch a cavity with a quality factor larger than 10(4) for light of wavelength 500 nm at normal incidence.

  19. Surface vibrational structure at alkane liquid/vapor interfaces.

    PubMed

    Esenturk, Okan; Walker, Robert A

    2006-11-07

    Broadband vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) has been used to examine the surface structure of alkane liquid/vapor interfaces. The alkanes range in length from n-nonane (C(9)H(20)) to n-heptadecane (C(17)H(36)), and all liquids except heptadecane are studied at temperatures well above their bulk (and surface) freezing temperatures. Intensities of vibrational bands in the CH stretching region acquired under different polarization conditions show systematic, chain length dependent changes. Data provide clear evidence of methyl group segregation at the liquid/vapor interface, but two different models of alkane chain structure can predict chain length dependent changes in band intensities. Each model leads to a different interpretation of the extent to which different chain segments contribute to the anisotropic interfacial region. One model postulates that changes in vibrational band intensities arise solely from a reduced surface coverage of methyl groups as alkane chain length increases. The additional methylene groups at the surface must be randomly distributed and make no net contribution to the observed VSF spectra. The second model considers a simple statistical distribution of methyl and methylene groups populating a three dimensional, interfacial lattice. This statistical picture implies that the VSF signal arises from a region extending several functional groups into the bulk liquid, and that the growing fraction of methylene groups in longer chain alkanes bears responsibility for the observed spectral changes. The data and resulting interpretations provide clear benchmarks for emerging theories of molecular structure and organization at liquid surfaces, especially for liquids lacking strong polar ordering.

  20. Crystallization of Polymers at liquid/liquid interface templated by single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda; Li, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Nanosized single-walled carbon nanotube rings were fabricated by using a Pickering emulsion-based method. By tuning a water/oil/SWNT miniemulsion system, SWNT rings with a diameter of ˜200 nm can be readily achieved. The formation mechanism is attributed to the bending force induced by the curved liquid/liquid interface. Crystallization of polyethylene homo- and copolymers using this unique SWNT rings as the nucleation agent was conducted at the curved liquid/liquid interface. Crystal structure, hybrid morphology and crystallization kinetics were systematically studied. The structure of controlled alternating patterns on SWNT rings has great potential in various applications in large-scale integrated circuits and single-electron devices.

  1. Electric double layer at the interface of ionic liquid-dielectric liquid under electric field.

    PubMed

    Lee, D W; Im, D J; Kang, I S

    2013-02-12

    The structure of the electric double layer (EDL) is analyzed in order to understand the electromechanical behavior of the interface of ionic liquid-dielectric liquid. The modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation proposed by Bazant et al. is solved to see the crowding and the overscreening effects that are the characteristics of an ionic liquid (Bazant, M. Z.; Storey, B. D.; Kornyshev, A. A. Double layer in ionic liquids: Overscreening versus crowding. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2011, 106, 046102.). From the simple one-dimensional (1-D) analysis, it is found that the changes of the composition and the material properties in the EDL are negligible except under some extreme conditions such as strong electric field over O(10(8)) V/m. From the electromechanical view points, an ionic liquid behaves like a pure conductor at the interface with a dielectric liquid. Based on these findings, three specific application problems are considered. In the first, a new method is suggested for measuring the interfacial tension of an ionic liquid-dielectric liquid system. The deformation of a charged ionic liquid droplet translating between two electrodes is used for this measurement. The second is for the Taylor cone problem, which includes an extreme electric field condition near the tip. The size of the critical region, where the EDL effect should be considered, is estimated by using the 1-D analysis result. Numerical computation is also performed to see the profiles of electric potential and the electric stress along the interface of the Taylor cone. Lastly, the electrowetting problem of the ionic liquid is considered. The discrepancies in the results of previous workers are interpreted by using the results of the present work. It is shown that all the results might be consistent if the leaking of the dielectric layer and/or the adsorption of ions is considered.

  2. Non-capillary binding of colloidal particles to liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaz, David; McGorty, Ryan; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2012-02-01

    We observe colloidal polystyrene particles binding reversibly to an oil-water interface through the combination of a repulsive electrostatic force and an attractive van der Waals force. Previously studied interactions of an aqueous colloidal particle and a liquid interface have generally fallen into two categories: 1) electrostatic repulsion indicated by the dependence on salt and 2) capillary adsorption where surface tension brings the particle in contact with both phases and is indicated by practically irreversible binding. With our technique of pushing individual colloidal particles towards a planar oil-water interface and observing their motion in three-dimensions with holographic microscopy we have observed both interactions. However, our observations indicate that under certain conditions the electrostatic repulsion, which is due to repulsive image charges, is weak enough for a particle to experience a van der Waals attraction while strong enough to prevent a particle from penetrating the interface and becoming bound through capillary action. We observe individual particles transition between repulsive and attractive interactions with the interface suggesting that these colloidal particles have a heterogeneous surface charge.

  3. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, G.E.; Edwards, W.F.

    1987-06-18

    A vacuum-to-air interface is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve, from which extends a vacuum-tight duct, that terminates in an aperture. Means are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip across the aperture at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band urges foil strip, when stationary, against and into the aperture. Gas pressure means periodically lift off and separate foil strip from aperture, so that it may be readily advanced. 5 figs.

  4. Space Shuttle Main Engine Liquid Air Insulation Redesign Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell; Carroll, Paul; Head, Kenneth; Fasheh, John; Stuart, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine Liquid Air Insulation redesign was required to prevent the reoccurance of the STS-111 High Pressure Speed Sensor In-Flight Anomaly. The STS-111 In-Flight Anomaly Failure Investigation Team's initial redesign of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Pump End Ball Bearing Liquid Air Insulation failed the certification test by producing Liquid Air. The certification test failure indicated not only the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Liquid Air Insulation, but all other Space Shuttle Main Engine Liquid Air Insulation. This paper will document the original Space Shuttle Main Engine Liquid Air STS-111 In-Flight Anomaly investigation, the heritage Space Shuttle Main Engine Insulation certification testing faults, the techniques and instrumentation used to accurately test the Liquid Air Insulation systems on the Stennis Space Center SSME test stand, the analysis techniques used to identify the Liquid Air Insulation problem areas and the analytical verification of the redesign before entering certification testing, Trade study down selected to three potential design solutions, the results of the development testing which down selected the final Liquid Air Redesign are also documented within this paper.

  5. Mechanism of vibrational energy dissipation of free OH groups at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cho-Shuen; Campen, R Kramer; Okuno, Masanari; Backus, Ellen H G; Nagata, Yuki; Bonn, Mischa

    2013-11-19

    Interfaces of liquid water play a critical role in a wide variety of processes that occur in biology, a variety of technologies, and the environment. Many macroscopic observations clarify that the properties of liquid water interfaces significantly differ from those of the bulk liquid. In addition to interfacial molecular structure, knowledge of the rates and mechanisms of the relaxation of excess vibrational energy is indispensable to fully understand physical and chemical processes of water and aqueous solutions, such as chemical reaction rates and pathways, proton transfer, and hydrogen bond dynamics. Here we elucidate the rate and mechanism of vibrational energy dissipation of water molecules at the air-water interface using femtosecond two-color IR-pump/vibrational sum-frequency probe spectroscopy. Vibrational relaxation of nonhydrogen-bonded OH groups occurs at a subpicosecond timescale in a manner fundamentally different from hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk, through two competing mechanisms: intramolecular energy transfer and ultrafast reorientational motion that leads to free OH groups becoming hydrogen bonded. Both pathways effectively lead to the transfer of the excited vibrational modes from free to hydrogen-bonded OH groups, from which relaxation readily occurs. Of the overall relaxation rate of interfacial free OH groups at the air-H2O interface, two-thirds are accounted for by intramolecular energy transfer, whereas the remaining one-third is dominated by the reorientational motion. These findings not only shed light on vibrational energy dynamics of interfacial water, but also contribute to our understanding of the impact of structural and vibrational dynamics on the vibrational sum-frequency line shapes of aqueous interfaces.

  6. 71. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE LIQUID AIR BUILDING, LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE LIQUID AIR BUILDING, LOOKING AT A BANK OF AIR COMPRESSORS. JANUARY 29, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  7. Production of Self-Assembled Fullerene (C60) Nanocrystals at Liquid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Abe, Masahiko; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2015-03-01

    Here we present self-assembled nanostructure of functional molecule fullerene (C60) at liquid-liquid interface. The nanostructured nanocrystals were grown at liquid-liquid interface of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and C60 solution in butylbenzene under ambient condition of temperature and pressure, and characterized by Raman scattering, power X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystal formation mechanism is driven by supersaturation related to the low solubility of C60 in IPA. A slow diffusion of IPA towards the C60 solution causes unsaturation of C60 at the liquid-liquid interface and consequently small clusters of C60 is formed at the interface, which acts as the nucleation site. Further diffusion of IPA supplies the C60 molecules from bulk to the interface promoting the crystal growth. Based on SEM and TEM observation, the average size of the individual hexagonal bipyramid nanocrystal is found to be ca. 1.4 µm and the average size of their assembly is found to be approximately 2 µm. XRD measurements have shown that these materials are crystalline with mixed face-centered cubic (cell dimension: a = 1.352 nm, and V = 2.475 nm3) and hexagonal (cell dimension: a = 1.452 nm, c = 1.207 nm, c/a = 0.831, and V = 2.475 nm3) structures. Raman scattering measurements showed two Ag and six Hg vibration bands, which are similar to those obtained in the pristine C60.

  8. Probing Hydrophilic Interface of Solid/Liquid-Water by Nanoultrasonics

    PubMed Central

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Wen, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Szu-Chi; Huang, Yu-Ru; -Ju Chen, I.; Chen, Yun-Wen; Gusev, Vitalyi; Chen, Miin-Jang; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the numerous devoted studies, water at solid interfaces remains puzzling. An ongoing debate concerns the nature of interfacial water at a hydrophilic surface, whether it is more solid-like, ice-like, or liquid-like. To answer this question, a complete picture of the distribution of the water molecule structure and molecular interactions has to be obtained in a non-invasive way and on an ultrafast time scale. We developed a new experimental technique that extends the classical acoustic technique to the molecular level. Using nanoacoustic waves with a femtosecond pulsewidth and an ångström resolution to noninvasively diagnose the hydration structure distribution at ambient solid/water interface, we performed a complete mapping of the viscoelastic properties and of the density in the whole interfacial water region at hydrophilic surfaces. Our results suggest that water in the interfacial region possesses mixed properties and that the different pictures obtained up to now can be unified. Moreover, we discuss the effect of the interfacial water structure on the abnormal thermal transport properties of solid/liquid interfaces. PMID:25176017

  9. Attachment of composite porous supra-particles to air-water and oil-water interfaces: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Paunov, Vesselin N; Al-Shehri, Hamza; Horozov, Tommy S

    2016-09-29

    We developed and tested a theoretical model for the attachment of fluid-infused porous supra-particles to a fluid-liquid interface. We considered the wetting behaviour of agglomerated clusters of particles, typical of powdered materials dispersed in a liquid, as well as of the adsorption of liquid-infused colloidosomes at the liquid-fluid interface. The free energy of attachment of a composite spherical porous supra-particle made from much smaller aggregated spherical particles to the oil-water interface was calculated. Two cases were considered: (i) a water-filled porous supra-particle adsorbed at the oil-water interface from the water phase, and, (ii) an oil-filled porous supra-particle adsorbed at the oil-water interface from the oil-phase. We derived equations relating the three-phase contact angle of the smaller "building block" particles and the contact angle of the liquid-infused porous supra-particles. The theory predicts that the porous supra-particle contact angle attached at the liquid interface strongly depends on the type of fluid infused in the particle pores and the fluid phase from which it approaches the liquid interface. We tested the theory by using millimetre-sized porous supra-particles fabricated by evaporation of droplets of polystyrene latex suspension on a pre-heated super-hydrophobic surface, followed by thermal annealing at the glass transition temperature. Such porous particles were initially infused with water or oil and approached to the oil-water interface from the infusing phase. The experiment showed that when attaching at the hexadecane-water interface, the porous supra-particles behaved as hydrophilic when they were pre-filled with water and hydrophobic when they were pre-filled with hexadecane. The results agree with the theoretically predicted contact angles for the porous composite supra-particles based on the values of the contact angles of their building block latex particles measured with the Gel Trapping Technique. The

  10. Mixing and transient interface condensation of a liquid hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Nyland, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of axial jet-induced mixing on the pressure reduction of a thermally stratified liquid hydrogen tank. The tank was nearly cylindrical, having a volume of about 0.144 cu m with 0.559 m in diameter and 0.711 m long. A mixer/pump unit, which had a jet nozzle outlet of 0.0221 m in diameter was located 0.178 m from the tank bottom and was installed inside the tank to generate the axial jet mixing and tank fluid circulation. The liquid fill and jet flow rate ranged from 42 to 85 percent (by volume) and 0.409 to 2.43 cu m/hr, respectively. Mixing tests began with the tank pressure ranging from 187.5 to 238.5 kPa at which the thermal stratification results in 4.9 to 6.2 K liquid sub cooling. The mixing time and transient vapor condensation rate at the liquid-vapor interface are determined. Two mixing time correlations, based on the thermal equilibrium and pressure equilibrium, are developed. Both mixing time correlations are expressed as functions of system and buoyancy parameters and compared well with other experimental data. The steady state condensation rate correlation of Sonin et al. based on steam-water data is modified and expressed as a function of jet subcooling. The limited liquid hydrogen data of the present study shows that the modified steady state condensation rate correlation may be used to predict the transient condensation rate in a mixing process if the instantaneous values of jet sub cooling and turbulence intensity at the interface are employed.

  11. Resistance of β-casein at the air-water interface to enzymatic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Min; Ang, Joo Chuan; White, J W

    2010-12-21

    X-ray reflectivity from an air-buffer interfacial β-casein monomolecular film placed on a solution of chymosin (renin) showed unexpectedly slow proteolytic cleavage. To understand this, the separate structures of β-casein and chymosin, the presentation of each molecule to the other at the air/liquid interface, and that of their mixtures is reported. At the air/solution interface, the hydrophobicity of the protein molecules causes orientation and some deformation of the conformation. When β-casein was presented to a chymosin monomolecular interfacial film, the chymosin was largely displaced from the surface, which was accounted for by the different surfactancy of the two molecules at 25 °C. There was no observable proteolysis. In the reverse experiment, a significant enzymatic degradation and the signature of hydrophobic fragments was observed but only at and above an enzyme concentration of 0.015 mg/mL in the substrate. For comparison, the air/solution interface of premixed β-casein with chymosin in phosphate buffer showed that the film was composed of β-casein proteolytic fragments and chymosin.

  12. Self-instability of finite sized solid-liquid interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L.K.; Xu, B.; Li, Q.L.; Liu, W.

    2015-01-01

    In solid-liquid systems, macroscopic solids lose their equilibrium and melt in a manner that results in overall movement of the solid-liquid interface. This phenomenon occurs when they are subjected to temperature gradients or external stress, for example. However, many experiments suggest that the melting of nano- and micro-sized metallic nuclei follows a different process not described by traditional melting theory. In this paper, we demonstrate through simulation that the melting of solid nuclei of these sizes occurs via random breaches at the interfaces. Moreover, this breaching process occurs at the exact solid-liquid equilibrium temperature and in the absence of any external disturbance, which suggests the name “self-instability” for this melting process. We attribute this spontaneous instability to the curvature of the samples; based on the relationship between the sample’s instability and its curvature, we propose a destabilizing model for small systems. This model fits well with experimental results and leads to new insights into the instability behavior of small-sized systems; these insights have broad implications for research topics ranging from dendrite self-fragmentation to nanoparticle instability. PMID:26685800

  13. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. M.; Festersen, S.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation.

  14. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  15. Solvent Extraction: Structure of the Liquid-Liquid Interface Containing a Diamide Ligand.

    PubMed

    Scoppola, Ernesto; Watkins, Erik B; Campbell, Richard A; Konovalov, Oleg; Girard, Luc; Dufrêche, Jean-Francois; Ferru, Geoffroy; Fragneto, Giovanna; Diat, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of the (supra)molecular structure of an interface that contains amphiphilic ligand molecules is necessary for a full understanding of ion transfer during solvent extraction. Even if molecular dynamics already yield some insight in the molecular configurations in solution, hardly any experimental data giving access to distributions of both extractant molecules and ions at the liquid-liquid interface exist. Here, the combined application of X-ray and neutron reflectivity measurements represents a key milestone in the deduction of the interfacial structure and potential with respect to two different lipophilic ligands. Indeed, we show for the first time that hard trivalent cations can be repelled or attracted by the extractant-enriched interface according to the nature of the ligand.

  16. [The physics of pattern formation of liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Energy consumption in fabrication of materials for all applications is process dependent. Improvements in the ability to process materials are of great importance to the DOE mission. This project addresses basic science questions related to the processing of materials and is aimed at understanding growth of interfaces and evolution of patterns on interfaces, both macroscopic and microscopic. Three laboratory experiments are proposed: A study of the changes in patterns available to the growth of a macroscopic interface when that interface is grown over one of a variety of ``microscopic`` lattices; a study of reversible aggregation of colloidal particles in a mixed solvent, and of the interactions and relaxations of both solvent and suspended particles when thermodynamic conditions are changed for a liquid matrix with suspended particles or fibres; and, an investigation of the sedimentation of particles in a quasi-two-dimensional viscous fluid, with attention both to the dynamics of the flow and to the roughness of the resulting surface of settled particles.

  17. [The physics of pattern formation of liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Energy consumption in fabrication of materials for all applications is process dependent. Improvements in the ability to process materials are of great importance to the DOE mission. This project addresses basic science questions related to the processing of materials and is aimed at understanding growth of interfaces and evolution of patterns on interfaces, both macroscopic and microscopic. Three laboratory experiments are proposed: A study of the changes in patterns available to the growth of a macroscopic interface when that interface is grown over one of a variety of microscopic'' lattices; a study of reversible aggregation of colloidal particles in a mixed solvent, and of the interactions and relaxations of both solvent and suspended particles when thermodynamic conditions are changed for a liquid matrix with suspended particles or fibres; and, an investigation of the sedimentation of particles in a quasi-two-dimensional viscous fluid, with attention both to the dynamics of the flow and to the roughness of the resulting surface of settled particles.

  18. Interface Superconductivity in Cuprates Defies Fermi-Liquid Description

    SciTech Connect

    Radović, Zoran; Vanević, Mihajlo; Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T.; Božović, Ivan

    2016-07-26

    La2-xSrxCuO4/La2CuO4 bilayers show interface superconductivity that originates from accumulation and depletion of mobile charge carriers across the interface. Surprisingly, the doping level can be varied broadly (within the interval 0.15 < x < 0.47) without affecting the transition temperature, which stays essentially constant and equal to that in optimally doped material, Tc ≈ 40 K. Here we argue that this finding implies that doping up to the optimum level does not shift the chemical potential, unlike in ordinary Fermi liquids. Lastly, we discuss possible physical scenarios that can give doping-independent chemical potential in the pseudogap regime: electronic phase separation, formation of charge-density waves, strong Coulomb interactions, or self-trapping of mobile charge carriers.

  19. Interface Superconductivity in Cuprates Defies Fermi-Liquid Description

    DOE PAGES

    Radović, Zoran; Vanević, Mihajlo; Wu, Jie; ...

    2016-07-26

    La2-xSrxCuO4/La2CuO4 bilayers show interface superconductivity that originates from accumulation and depletion of mobile charge carriers across the interface. Surprisingly, the doping level can be varied broadly (within the interval 0.15 < x < 0.47) without affecting the transition temperature, which stays essentially constant and equal to that in optimally doped material, Tc ≈ 40 K. Here we argue that this finding implies that doping up to the optimum level does not shift the chemical potential, unlike in ordinary Fermi liquids. Lastly, we discuss possible physical scenarios that can give doping-independent chemical potential in the pseudogap regime: electronic phase separation, formationmore » of charge-density waves, strong Coulomb interactions, or self-trapping of mobile charge carriers.« less

  20. Low-reflection-coefficient liquid interfaces for system characterization.

    PubMed

    Hall, T J; Madsen, E L; Dong, F; Medina, I R; Frank, G R

    2001-07-01

    The use of liquid brominated hydrocarbons to form a planar reflecting interface with water is described. Gravity-based planar reflecting surfaces with known reflection coefficients can be used in system characterization for quantitative ultrasonics, and a set of surfaces with a range of reflection coefficients allows calibration of the output power and receiver gain of ultrasonic imaging systems. The substances reported here are immiscible in water and form interfaces with water, resulting in a broad range of acoustic reflection coefficients. Reflection coefficients were measured at temperatures from 18-24 degrees C for "pure" substances and for mixtures of two brominated hydrocarbons. Results show that reflection coefficients are weakly dependent on temperature and that, at a specific temperature, a significant range of arbitrarily small reflection coefficients is available, in the case of the mixtures, by the appropriate choice of weight-percents of the two brominated hydrocarbons.

  1. High temperature interaction behavior at liquid metal-ceramic interfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.; Chemical Engineering; Integrated Thermal Sciences, Inc.

    2002-08-01

    Liquid metal/ceramic interaction experiments were undertaken at elevated temperatures with the purpose of developing reusable crucibles for melting reactive metals. The metals used in this work included zirconium (Zr), Zr-8 wt.% stainless steel, and stainless steel containing 15 wt.% Zr. The ceramic substrates include yttria, Zr carbide, and hafnium (Hf) carbide. The metal-ceramic samples were placed on top of a tungsten (W) dish. These experiments were conducted with the temperature increasing at a controlled rate until reaching set points above 2000 C; the systems were held at the peak temperature for about five min and then cooled. The atmosphere in the furnace was argon (Ar). An outside video recording system was used to monitor the changes on heating up and cooling down. All samples underwent a post-test metallurgical examination. Pure Zr was found to react with yttria, resulting in oxygen (O) evolution at the liquid metal-ceramic interface. In addition, dissolved O was observed in the as-cooled Zr metal. Yttrium (Y) was also present in the Zr metal, but it had segregated to the grain boundaries on cooling. Despite the normal expectations for reactive wetting, no transition interface was developed, but the Zr metal was tightly bound to yttria ceramic. Similar reactions occurred between the yttria and the Zr-stainless steel alloys. Two other ceramic samples were Zr carbide and Hf carbide; both carbide substrates were wetted readily by the molten Zr, which flowed easily to the sides of the substrates. The molten Zr caused a very limited dissolution of the Zr carbide, and it reacted more strongly with the Hf carbide. These reactive wetting results are relevant to the design of interfaces and the development of reactive filler metals for the fabrication of high temperature components through metal-ceramic joining. Parameters that have a marked impact on this interface reaction include the thermodynamic stability of the substrate, the properties of the modified

  2. Temperature and Depth Dependence of Order in Liquid Crystal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Miranda,L.; Hu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the depth dependence and temperature behavior of the ordering of smectic-A films close to the smectic A-nematic transition, deposited on grated glass. X-ray grazing incidence geometry in reflection mode through the glass substrate was used to characterize the samples. Our results indicate the presence of a structure similar to the helical twist grain boundary phase. The structure has two maxima, one close to the glass-liquid crystal interface and another about 8 {mu}m above the surface. The structure at 8 {mu}m is the one that dominates at higher temperatures. In addition, we find that order is preserved to temperatures close to the nematic-isotropic transition temperature for the deeper gratings. We find also a dependence of the orientation of the structure with the depth of the grating and the elastic constant of the liquid crystal.

  3. Cationic Gemini surfactant at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Qibin, Chen; Xiaodong, Liang; Shaolei, Wang; Shouhong, Xu; Honglai, Liu; Ying, Hu

    2007-10-15

    The surface properties and structures of a cationic Gemini surfactant with a rigid spacer, p-xylyl-bis(dimethyloctadecylammonium bromide) ([C(18)H(37)(CH(3))(2)N(+)CH(2)C(6)H(4)CH(2)N(+)(CH(3))(2)C(18)H(37)],2Br(-), abbreviated as 18-Ar-18,2Br(-1)), at the air/water interface were investigated. It is found that the surface pressure-molecular area isotherms observed at different temperatures do not exhibit a plateau region but display an unusual "kink" before collapse. The range of the corresponding minimum compressibility and maximum compressibility modulus indicates that the monolayer is in the liquid-expanded state. The monolayers were transferred onto mica and quartz plates by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The structures of monolayers at various surface pressures were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively. AFM measurements show that at lower surface pressures, unlike the structures of complex or hybrid films formed by Gemini amphiphiles with DNA, dye, or inorganic materials or the Langmuir film formed by the nonionic Gemini surfactant, in this case network-like labyrinthine interconnected ridges are formed. The formation of the structures can be interpreted in terms of the spinodal decomposition mechanism. With the increase of the surface pressure up to 35 mN/m, surface micelles dispersed in the network-like ridges gradually appear which might be caused by both the spinodal decomposition and dewetting. The UV-vis adsorption shows that over the whole range of surface pressures, the molecules form a J-aggregate in LB films, which implies that the spacers construct a pi-pi aromatic stacking. This pi-pi interaction between spacers and the van der Waals interaction between hydrophobic chains lead to the formation of both networks and micelles. The labyrinthine interconnected ridges are formed first because of the rapid evaporation of solvent during the spreading processes; with increasing surface pressure, some of the

  4. Snowflake Impact on the Air-Sea Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David

    2016-11-01

    The air-sea interface is the site of globally important exchanges of mass, momentum, and heat between the sea and atmosphere. These climate-driving exchanges occur through small-scale processes such as bubble entrainment and bursting, raindrop impact, and wind-wave creation. The physics of snowflakes falling on the sea surface has not been previously considered. High speed imaging of natural snowflakes of characteristic size up to 6.5 mm falling at a mean speed of 1 m/s into an aquarium of chilled seawater reveals a complex multiphase flow. Snowflakes impacting and crossing the air-seawater interface appear to entrain a thin air film which forms micro-bubbles as the snowflake melts. Large, morphologically complex snowflakes may entrain hundreds of micro-bubbles which are up to 0.15 mm in diameter. Large snowflakes melt milliseconds after entry and subsequently form a downward-moving vortex ring of freshwater, evident from the motion of the bubbles it contains, which may penetrate up to 16 mm below the surface. Buoyant freshwater and bubbles then rise, with larger bubbles escaping from the downward flow more quickly than the smaller bubbles. The dissolution and popping of these bubbles represent previously unrecognized sources of air-sea gas transfer and marine aerosol droplet creation, respectively.

  5. Non-lamellar lipid liquid crystalline structures at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Debby P; Barauskas, Justas; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Wadsäter, Maria; Tiberg, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy

    2015-08-01

    The self-assembly of lipids leads to the formation of a rich variety of nano-structures, not only restricted to lipid bilayers, but also encompassing non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures, such as cubic, hexagonal, and sponge phases. These non-lamellar phases have been increasingly recognized as important for living systems, both in terms of providing compartmentalization and as regulators of biological activity. Consequently, they are of great interest for their potential as delivery systems in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. The compartmentalizing nature of these phases features mono- or bicontinuous networks of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. To utilize these non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures in biomedical devices for analyses and drug delivery, it is crucial to understand how they interact with and respond to different types of interfaces. Such non-lamellar interfacial layers can be used to entrap functional biomolecules that respond to lipid curvature as well as the confinement. It is also important to understand the structural changes of deposited lipid in relation to the corresponding bulk dispersions. They can be controlled by changing the lipid composition or by introducing components that can alter the curvature or by deposition on nano-structured surface, e.g. vertical nano-wire arrays. Progress in the area of liquid crystalline lipid based nanoparticles opens up new possibilities for the preparation of well-defined surface films with well-defined nano-structures. This review will focus on recent progress in the formation of non-lamellar dispersions and their interfacial properties at the solid/liquid and biologically relevant interfaces.

  6. Development of prototype air/liquid solar collector subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Testing of the evacuated tubular air collector in conjunction with air/liquid heat exchange and liquid storage elements was completed. Test results emphasize matching of heat exchanger and collector characteristics with specific attention to the dynamic response of each of the elements.

  7. PREFACE: Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2012-03-01

    energy electron diffraction (LEED), He atom scattering (HAS) and STM, to investigate the organization of water on metal, namely Pd(111) and Pt(111). Direct measurements of hyperpolarizabilities for non-linear spectroscopy can be made through hyper-Rayleigh scattering experiments, which are presented here by the group of P F Brevet on gold and silver nanoparticles. From the point of view of molecular dynamics simulations of interfaces, complementary levels of calculations are presented in this special section. The groups of K Leung, M-P Gaigeot, M Sulpizi and M Sprik provide theoretical investigations with DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. Leung et al and Gaigeot et al address the hot topic issue of the reactivity of oxides surface sites and especially reliable methods to calculate pKas of these sites, with simulations taking into account both the solid and the liquid explicitly, and at the same first principles level of theory. Gaigeot, Sprik and Sulpizi furthermore combine the information on the structural organization of liquid water at the interface with quartz and alumina via pKa calculations and vibrational features (and their microscopic assignments). Mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics (QM/MM) simulations are presented by Ishiyama and Morita for the investigation of another topical interface, i.e. the liquid-air interface. They provide the theoretical VSFG spectrum of the water-vapor interface and some understanding at the microscopic level of the experimental vibrational features. Molecular dynamics simulations based on empirical force fields have been applied to investigate hydrophobic interfaces by the groups of B Space and P Carloni. Carloni et al address salt effects at water-hydrophobic interfaces, investigating how the salts affect the structural organization of water at these interfaces. Space et al provide theoretical approximations to VSFG calculations in the special case of the carbon tetrachloride-water interface and the assignments of

  8. Liquid over-feeding air conditioning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.

    1993-01-01

    A refrigeration air conditioning system utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation is described. A liquid refrigerant accumulator-heat exchanger is placed in the system to provide a heat exchange relationship between hot liquid refrigerant discharged from condenser and a relatively cool mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant discharged from the evaporator. This heat exchange relationship substantially sub-cools the hot liquid refrigerant which undergoes little or no evaporation across the expansion device and provides a liquid over-feeding operation through the evaporator for effectively using 100 percent of evaporator for cooling purposes and for providing the aforementioned mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant.

  9. Liquid over-feeding air conditioning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.

    1993-09-21

    A refrigeration air conditioning system utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation is described. A liquid refrigerant accumulator-heat exchanger is placed in the system to provide a heat exchange relationship between hot liquid refrigerant discharged from condenser and a relatively cool mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant discharged from the evaporator. This heat exchange relationship substantially sub-cools the hot liquid refrigerant which undergoes little or no evaporation across the expansion device and provides a liquid over-feeding operation through the evaporator for effectively using 100 percent of evaporator for cooling purposes and for providing the aforementioned mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant. 1 figure.

  10. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  11. Thermoelectric energy recovery at ionic-liquid/electrode interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Marco; Nakamae, Sawako; Huang, Bo Tao; Salez, Thomas J.; Wiertel-Gasquet, Cécile; Roger, Michel

    2015-06-01

    A thermally chargeable capacitor containing a binary solution of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide in acetonitrile is electrically charged by applying a temperature gradient to two ideally polarisable electrodes. The corresponding thermoelectric coefficient is -1.7 mV/K for platinum foil electrodes and -0.3 mV/K for nanoporous carbon electrodes. Stored electrical energy is extracted by discharging the capacitor through a resistor. The measured capacitance of the electrode/ionic-liquid interface is 5 μF for each platinum electrode while it becomes four orders of magnitude larger, ≈36 mF, for a single nanoporous carbon electrode. Reproducibility of the effect through repeated charging-discharging cycles under a steady-state temperature gradient demonstrates the robustness of the electrical charging process at the liquid/electrode interface. The acceleration of the charging by convective flows is also observed. This offers the possibility to convert waste-heat into electric energy without exchanging electrons between ions and electrodes, in contrast to what occurs in most thermogalvanic cells.

  12. Universal electrode interface for electrocatalytic oxidation of liquid fuels.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hualing; Qiu, Zhipeng; Wan, Qijin; Wang, Zhijie; Liu, Yi; Yang, Nianjun

    2014-10-22

    Electrocatalytic oxidations of liquid fuels from alcohols, carboxylic acids, and aldehydes were realized on a universal electrode interface. Such an interface was fabricated using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the catalyst support and palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) as the electrocatalysts. The Pd NPs/CNTs nanocomposite was synthesized using the ethylene glycol reduction method. It was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, voltammetry, and impedance. On the Pd NPs/CNTs nanocomposite coated electrode, the oxidations of those liquid fuels occur similarly in two steps: the oxidations of freshly chemisorbed species in the forward (positive-potential) scan and then, in the reverse scan (negative-potential), the oxidations of the incompletely oxidized carbonaceous species formed during the forward scan. The oxidation charges were adopted to study their oxidation mechanisms and oxidation efficiencies. The oxidation efficiency follows the order of aldehyde (formaldehyde) > carboxylic acid (formic acid) > alcohols (ethanol > methanol > glycol > propanol). Such a Pd NPs/CNTs nanocomposite coated electrode is thus promising to be applied as the anode for the facilitation of direct fuel cells.

  13. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  14. Thermoelectric energy recovery at ionic-liquid/electrode interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Marco; Nakamae, Sawako; Huang, Bo Tao; Wiertel-Gasquet, Cécile; Roger, Michel; Salez, Thomas J.

    2015-06-28

    A thermally chargeable capacitor containing a binary solution of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide in acetonitrile is electrically charged by applying a temperature gradient to two ideally polarisable electrodes. The corresponding thermoelectric coefficient is −1.7 mV/K for platinum foil electrodes and −0.3 mV/K for nanoporous carbon electrodes. Stored electrical energy is extracted by discharging the capacitor through a resistor. The measured capacitance of the electrode/ionic-liquid interface is 5 μF for each platinum electrode while it becomes four orders of magnitude larger, ≈36 mF, for a single nanoporous carbon electrode. Reproducibility of the effect through repeated charging-discharging cycles under a steady-state temperature gradient demonstrates the robustness of the electrical charging process at the liquid/electrode interface. The acceleration of the charging by convective flows is also observed. This offers the possibility to convert waste-heat into electric energy without exchanging electrons between ions and electrodes, in contrast to what occurs in most thermogalvanic cells.

  15. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOEpatents

    Masquelier, Donald A.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Willeke, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  16. Computer simulation of liquid/liquid interfaces. I. Theory and application to octane/water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Feller, Scott E.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Pastor, Richard W.

    1995-12-01

    Statistical ensembles for simulating liquid interfaces at constant pressure and/or surface tension are examined, and equations of motion for molecular dynamics are obtained by various extensions of the Andersen extended system approach. Valid ensembles include: constant normal pressure and surface area; constant tangential pressure and length normal to the interface; constant volume and surface tension; and constant normal pressure and surface tension. Simulations at 293 K and 1 atm normal pressure show consistent results with each other and with a simulation carried out at constant volume and energy. Calculated surface tensions for octane/water (61.5 dyn/cm), octane/vacuum (20.4 dyn/cm) and water/vacuum (70.2 dyn/cm) are in very good agreement with experiment (51.6, 21.7, and 72.8 dyn/cm, respectively). The practical consequences of simulating with two other approaches commonly used for isotropic systems are demonstrated on octane/water: applying equal normal and tangential pressures leads to an instability; and applying a constant isotropic pressure of 1 atm leads to a large positive normal pressure. Both results are expected for a system of nonzero surface tension. Mass density and water polarization profiles in the liquid/liquid and liquid/vapor interfaces are also compared.

  17. Nematic liquid crystals at rough and fluctuating interfaces.

    PubMed

    Elgeti, J; Schmid, F

    2005-12-01

    Nematic liquid crystals at rough and fluctuating interfaces are analyzed within the Frank elastic theory and the Landau-de Gennes theory. We study specifically interfaces that locally favor planar anchoring. In the first part we reconsider the phenomenon of Berreman anchoring on fixed rough surfaces, and derive new simple expressions for the corresponding azimuthal anchoring energy. Surprisingly, we find that for strongly aligning surfaces, it depends only on the geometrical surface anisotropy and the bulk elastic constants, and not on the precise values of the chemical surface parameters. In the second part, we calculate the capillary waves at nematic-isotropic interfaces. If one neglects elastic interactions, the capillary wave spectrum is characterized by an anisotropic interfacial tension. With elastic interactions, the interfacial tension, i.e., the coefficient of the leading q(2) term of the capillary wave spectrum, becomes isotropic. However, the elastic interactions introduce a strongly anisotropic cubic q(3) term. The amplitudes of capillary waves are largest in the direction perpendicular to the director. These results are in agreement with previous molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Advanced Technology Development: Solid-Liquid Interface Characterization Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the solid-liquid interface during directional solidification is key to understanding and improving material properties. The goal of this Advanced Technology Development (ATD) has been to develop hardware, which will enable real-time characterization of practical materials, such as aluminum (Al) alloys, to unprecedented levels. Required measurements include furnace and sample temperature gradients, undercooling at the growing interface, interface shape, or morphology, and furnace translation and sample growth rates (related). These and other parameters are correlated with each other and time. A major challenge was to design and develop all of the necessary hardware to measure the characteristics, nearly simultaneously, in a smaller integral furnace compatible with existing X-ray Transmission Microscopes, XTMs. Most of the desired goals have been accomplished through three generations of Seebeck furnace brassboards, several varieties of film thermocouple arrays, heaters, thermal modeling of the furnaces, and data acquisition and control (DAC) software. Presentations and publications have resulted from these activities, and proposals to use this hardware for further materials studies have been submitted as sequels to this last year of the ATD.

  19. Nano- and microstructure of air/oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, Duncan J; Mata, Jitendra P; White, John W; Zank, Johann

    2009-04-07

    We report the creation of air/oil/water interfaces with variable-thickness oil films using polyisobutylene-based (PIB) surfactants cospread with long-chain paraffinic alkanes on clean water surfaces. The resultant stable oil layers are readily measurable with simple surface techniques, exhibit physical densities the same as expected for bulk oils, and are up to approximately 100 A thick above the water surface as determined using X-ray reflectometry. This provides a ready system for studying the competition of surfactants at the oil/water interface. Results from the competition of a nonionic polyamide surfactant or an anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate with the PIB surfactant are reported. However, this smooth oil layer does not account for the total volume of spread oil nor is the increase in thickness proportional to the film compression. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) reveals surfactant and oil structures on the scale of 1 to 10 microm at the interface. At low surface pressure (pi < 24 mN m(-1)) large, approximately 10 microm inhomogeneities are observed. Beyond a phase transition observed at pi approximately = 24 mN m(-1), a structure with a spongy appearance and a microscale texture develops. These structures have implications for understanding the microstructure at the oil/water interface in emulsions.

  20. Powder wettability at a static air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Dupas, Julien; Forny, Laurent; Ramaioli, Marco

    2015-06-15

    The reconstitution of a beverage from a dehydrated powder involves several physical mechanisms that determine the practical difficulty to obtain a homogeneous drink in a convenient way and within an acceptable time for the preparation of a beverage. When pouring powder onto static water, the first hurdle to overcome is the air-water interface. We propose a model to predict the percentage of powder crossing the interface in 45 s, namely the duration relevant for this application. We highlight theoretically the determinant role of the contact angle and of the particle size distribution. We validate experimentally the model for single spheres and use it to predict the wettability performance of commercial food powders for different contact angles and particles sizes. A good agreement is obtained when comparing the predictions and the wettability of the tested powders.

  1. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, Gilbert E.; Edwards, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A vacuum-to-air interface (10) is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve (18), from which extends a vacuum-tight duct (26), that termintes in an aperture (28). Means (32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48) are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip (30) across the aperture (28) at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band (62) urges foil strip (30), when stationary, against and into the aperture (28). Gas pressure means (68, 70) periodically lift off and separate foil strip (30) from aperture (28), so that it may be readily advanced.

  2. Giant Deformations of a Liquid-Liquid Interface Induced by the Optical Radiation Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Casner, Alexis; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2001-07-30

    Because of the small momentum of photons, very intense fields are generally required to bend a liquid interface with the optical radiation pressure. We explore this issue in a near-critical phase-separated liquid mixture to vary continuously the meniscus softness by tuning the temperature. Low power continuous laser waves become sufficient to induce huge stationary bulges. Using the beam size to build an ''optical'' Bond number, Bo , we investigate the crossover from low to large Bo . The whole set of data collapses onto a single master curve which illustrates the universality of the phenomenon.

  3. Mechanistic Insights on the Photosensitized Chemistry of a Fatty Acid at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment and many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol, and cloud formation are, at one stage or another, strongly impacted by physical and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Here, the photoinduced chemistry of an air/water interface coated with nonanoic acid—a fatty acid surfactant we use as a proxy for chemically complex natural aqueous surface microlayers—was investigated as a source of volatile and semivolatile reactive organic species. The carboxylic acid coating significantly increased the propensity of photosensitizers, chosen to mimic those observed in real environmental waters, to partition to the interface and enhance reactivity there. Photochemical formation of functionalized and unsaturated compounds was systematically observed upon irradiation of these coated surfaces. The role of a coated interface appears to be critical in providing a concentrated medium allowing radical–radical reactions to occur in parallel with molecular oxygen additions. Mechanistic insights are provided from extensive analysis of products observed in both gas and aqueous phases by online switchable reagent ion-time of flight-mass spectrometry and by off-line ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to a Q Exactive high resolution mass spectrometer through heated electrospray ionization, respectively. PMID:27611489

  4. Air and water stable ionic liquids in physical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Endres, Frank; Zein El Abedin, Sherif

    2006-05-14

    Ionic liquids are defined today as liquids which solely consist of cations and anions and which by definition must have a melting point of 100 degrees C or below. Originating from electrochemistry in AlCl(3) based liquids an enormous progress was made during the recent 10 years to synthesize ionic liquids that can be handled under ambient conditions, and today about 300 ionic liquids are already commercially available. Whereas the main interest is still focussed on organic and technical chemistry, various aspects of physical chemistry in ionic liquids are discussed now in literature. In this review article we give a short overview on physicochemical aspects of ionic liquids, such as physical properties of ionic liquids, nanoparticles, nanotubes, batteries, spectroscopy, thermodynamics and catalysis of/in ionic liquids. The focus is set on air and water stable ionic liquids as they will presumably dominate various fields of chemistry in future.

  5. A general strategy for self-assembly of nanosized building blocks on liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Shao-Yi; Qi, Hao; Wen, Wu-Cheng; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-08-06

    A family of water/oil interfaces is introduced to provide effective platforms for rapid fabrication of large-area self-assembled nanofilms composed of various nanosized building blocks, including nanoparticles (NPs), nanocubes (NC), nanowires (NWs), and nanosheets, at room temperature. As a general interfacial assembly method, NWs and NPs are co-assembled at the liquid/liquid interface. The as-prepared co-assembled Ag NW and Ag NC films show high surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) intensity, the SERS performance being strongly dependent on the number ratio of the two kinds of nanosized building blocks. The results demonstrate that this interfacial system provides a general method for the assembly of various nanosized building blocks with different shapes and dimensionalities, and thus paves an alternative pathway for further applications of macroscopic assemblies with different functionalities.

  6. Advanced Crew Interface Designs for Safer Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced crew interface designs to improve performance for safe air travel. NASA's goal is to provide enabling technologies that will increase aviation safety by a factor of five within 10 years, and by a factor of ten within 25 years. This research is part of NASA's Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (ASTT) Enterprise's strategy to sustain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space. The Enterprise has set bold goals that are grouped into Three Pillars: Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps and Access to Space.

  7. Electrostatic Assembly of Polymers and Nanoparticles at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, David

    The electrostatic attraction between charged solutes on opposite sides of the interface between immiscible liquids offers an efficient route to the self-assembly of two-dimensional films. As implemented by us, a hydrophobic polymer with amine end(s) or block(s) is presented in an oil phase, and a negatively charged nanoparticle is presented in an aqueous phase; both solutes are insoluble in the opposite phase but efficiently driven to the liquid-liquid interface by mutual electrostatically attraction to the solute in the opposite phase. Depending on experimental conditions (salt concentration, pH, solute concentrations, etc.), a continuous, nanoscopically thin composite film builds at the oil-water interface over the timescale of minutes, often accompanied by a dramatic reduction of interfacial tension akin to that observed for a surfactant. Film formation and properties by the new route will be discussed, as principally probed through pendant drop interfacial tensiometry and pendant drop interfacial rheometry. Components of model system are toluene-dissolved amine end-capped polystyrene and water-dispersed acid-treated carbon nanotubes or citrate-treated gold nanospheres. Film structures are complicated, as are crucial electrostatic interactions near the interface. With amine end-capped polystyrene partnered with acid-treated carbon nanotubes, high pH (above 5) and high polystyrene molecular weight (above 5000 g/mol) strongly hinder film formation. These films, which are liquid-like, show two viscoelastic relaxations, a fast relaxation (about 10 s) associated with polystyrene chain rearrangements (slightly impacted by carbon nanotube association) and a slow relaxation (about 20 min) associated with polystyrene adsorption/desorption; at intermediate times (or frequencies), the two-dimensional storage and loss moduli follow approximately the same power law dependences. Support by NSF through the Univ. of Massachusetts MRSEC.

  8. Emulsions stabilised by food colloid particles: role of particle adsorption and wettability at the liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Paunov, Vesselin N; Cayre, Olivier J; Noble, Paul F; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Velikov, Krassimir P; Golding, Matt

    2007-08-15

    We study the effect of the particle wettability on the preferred type of emulsion stabilised solely by food colloid particles. We present results obtained with the recently developed gel trapping technique (GTT) for characterisation of wettability and surface structuring of individual food colloid particles adsorbed at air-water and oil-water interfaces. This method allows us to replicate a particle monolayer onto the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) without altering the position of the particles. By observing the polymer surface with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we are able to determine the contact angle of the individual particles at the initial liquid interface. We demonstrate that the GTT can be applied to fat crystal particles, calcium carbonate particles coated with stearic acid and spray-dried soy protein/calcium phosphate particles at air-water and oil-water interfaces. Subsequently, we prepare emulsions of decane and water stabilised by the same food colloid particles and correlate the wettability data obtained for these particles to the preferred type of emulsions they stabilise.

  9. Solvent Extraction: Structure of the Liquid-Liquid Interface Containing a Diamide Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Scoppola, Ernesto; Campbell, Richard A.; Konovalov, Oleg; Girard, Luc; Fragneto, Giovanna; Diat, Olivier

    2016-06-20

    Knowledge of the (supra)molecular structure of an interface that contains amphiphilic ligand molecules is necessary for a full understanding of ion transfer during solvent extraction. Even if molecular dynamics already yield some insight in the molecular configurations in solution, hardly any experimental data giving access to distributions of both extractant molecules and ions at the liquid–liquid interface exist. Here, the combined application of X-ray and neutron reflectivity measurements represents a key milestone in the deduction of the interfacial structure and potential with respect to two different lipophilic ligands. Indeed, we show for the first time that hard trivalent cations can be repelled or attracted by the extractant-enriched interface according to the nature of the ligand.

  10. Anisotropic Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Polymers and Plasmonic Nanoparticles at the Liquid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Armao Iv, Joseph J; Nyrkova, Irina; Fuks, Gad; Osypenko, Artem; Maaloum, Mounir; Moulin, Emilie; Arenal, Raul; Gavat, Odile; Semenov, Alexander; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2017-02-15

    The study of supramolecular polymers in the bulk, in diluted solution, and at the solid-liquid interface has recently become a major topic of interest, going from fundamental aspects to applications in materials science. However, examples of supramolecular polymers at the liquid-liquid interface are mostly unexplored. Here, we describe the supramolecular polymerization of triarylamine molecules and their light-triggered organization at a chloroform-water interface. The resulting interfacial nematic layer of these 1D supramolecular polymers is further used as a template for the precise alignment of spherical gold nanoparticles coming from the water phase. These hybrid thin films are spontaneously formed in a single process, without chemical prefunctionalization of the metallic nanoparticles, and their ordering is improved by centrifugation. The resulting polymer chains and strings of nanoparticles can be co-aligned with high anisotropy over very large distances. By using a combination of experimental and theoretical investigations, we decipher the full sequence of this oriented self-assembly process. In such a highly anisotropic configuration, electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals that the self-assembled nanoparticles behave as plasmonic waveguides.

  11. Foam fractionation as a tool to study the air-water interface structure-function relationship of wheat gluten hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Arno G B; Rombouts, Ine; Schoebrechts, Nele; Fierens, Ellen; Brijs, Kristof; Blecker, Christophe; Delcour, Jan A

    2017-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat gluten protein improves its solubility and produces hydrolysates with foaming properties which may find applications in food products. First, we here investigated whether foam-liquid fractionation can concentrate wheat gluten peptides with foaming properties. Foam and liquid fractions had high and very low foam stability (FS), respectively. In addition, foam fractions were able to decrease surface tension more pronouncedly than un-fractionated samples and liquid fractions, suggesting they are able to arrange themselves more efficiently at an interface. As a second objective, foam fractionation served as a tool to study the structural properties of the peptides, causing these differences in air-water interfacial behavior. Zeta potential and surface hydrophobicity measurements did not fully explain these differences but suggested that hydrophobic interactions at the air-water interface are more important than electrostatic interactions. RP-HPLC showed a large overlap between foam and liquid fractions. However, a small fraction of very hydrophobic peptides with relatively high average molecular mass was clearly enriched in the foam fraction. These peptides were also more concentrated in un-fractionated DH 2 hydrolysates, which had high FS, than in DH 6 hydrolysates, which had low FS. These peptides most likely play a key role in stabilizing the air-water interface.

  12. Dynamics and Interactions in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids, Surfaces and Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0067 Dynamics and Interactions in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids, Surfaces and Interfaces Michael Fayer LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dynamics and Interactions in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids, Surfaces and Interfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...were performed. Room temperature ionic liquids were also investigated. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) are intrinsically interesting because

  13. Thermodynamics and intrinsic structure of the Al-Pb liquid-liquid interface: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Laird, Brian B

    2014-07-17

    We examine the thermodynamics and intrinsic structure of the Al-Pb liquid-liquid interface using molecular dynamics simulation and embedded atom method potentials. The instantaneous interfacial positions, from which the intrinsic structure and the capillary fluctuation spectrum are determined, are calculated using a grid-based method. The interfacial free energy extracted from the capillary fluctuation spectrum is shown to be in excellent agreement with that calculated mechanically by integrating the stress profile. The intrinsic liquid-liquid interfacial density profile shows structural oscillations in the liquid phases in the interfacial region that are shown to be quantitatively similar to the radial distribution functions of the bulk liquid, consistent with theoretical predictions from classical density functional theory and with earlier simulations on liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor interfaces. In addition, we show the mean interfacial density profile for this system is well described as a convolution of the intrinsic density profile and the probability distribution of interfacial position.

  14. [Virus adsorption from batch experiments as influenced by air-water interface].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Bing-zi; Zhang, Jia-bao; Zhang, Cong-zhi; Wang, Qiu-ying; Chen, Ji

    2007-12-01

    The presence of air-water interface in batch sorption experiments may result in inaccurate estimation of virus adsorption onto various soils. A batch sorption experiment was conducted to compare the adsorption results of MS2 in different soils under presence/absence of air-water interface. Soils with sterilization/nonterilization treatment were used. Virus recovery efficiency in a blank experiment (no soil) was also evaluated as affected by different amount of air-water interface. The presence of air-water interface altered the results of virus adsorption in different soils with different extent, with Sandy fluvo-aquic soil being the most considerably affected, followed by Red loam soil, and the least being Red clay soil, probably because of different soil properties associated with virus adsorption/inactivation. Soil sterilization resulted in more significant difference of virus adsorption onto the Sandy fluvo-aquic soil between the presence and absence of air-water interface, while a reduced difference was observed in the Red loam soil. The presence of air-water interface significantly decreased virus recovery efficiency, with the values being decreased with increase in the amount of air-water interface. Soil particles likely prohibit viruses from reaching the air-water interface or alter the forces at the solid-water-air interface so that the results from the blank experiment did not truly represent results from control blank, which probably resulted in adsorption difference between presence and absence of the air-water interface.

  15. Solid-Liquid Interface Characterization Hardware: Advanced Technology Development (ATD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, R. C.; Sen, S.; Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, Peter A.; Wang, F. C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This ATD has the goal of enabling the integration of three separate measurement techniques to characterize the solid-liquid interface of directionally solidified materials in real-time. Arrays of film-based metal thermocouple elements are under development along with compact Seebeck furnaces suitable for interfacing with separately developed X-ray Transmission Microscopes. Results of applying film arrays to furnace profiling are shown, demonstrating their ability to identify a previously undetected hardware flaw in the development of a second-generation compact furnace. Results of real-time furnace profiling also confirmed that the compact furnace design effectively isolates the temperature profiles in two halves of the furnace, a necessary feature. This isolation had only been inferred previously from the characteristics of Seebeck data reported. Results from a 24-thermocouple array successfully monitoring heating and isothermal cooling of a tin sample are shown. The importance of non-intrusion by the arrays, as well as furnace design, on the profiling of temperature gradients is illustrated with example measurements. Further developments underway for effectively combining all three measurements are assessed in terms of improved x-ray transmission, increased magnification, integral arrays with minimum intrusion, integral scales for velocity measurements and other features being incorporated into the third generation Seebeck furnace under construction.

  16. Liquid-gated interface superconductivity on an atomically flat film.

    PubMed

    Ye, J T; Inoue, S; Kobayashi, K; Kasahara, Y; Yuan, H T; Shimotani, H; Iwasa, Y

    2010-02-01

    Liquid/solid interfaces are attracting growing interest not only for applications in catalytic activities and energy storage, but also for their new electronic functions in electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs) exemplified by high-performance organic electronics, field-induced electronic phase transitions, as well as superconductivity in SrTiO(3) (ref. 12). Broadening EDLTs to induce superconductivity within other materials is highly demanded for enriching the materials science of superconductors. However, it is severely hampered by inadequate choice of materials and processing techniques. Here we introduce an easy method using ionic liquids as gate dielectrics, mechanical micro-cleavage techniques for surface preparation, and report the observation of field-induced superconductivity showing a transition temperature T(c)=15.2 K on an atomically flat film of layered nitride compound, ZrNCl. The present result reveals that the EDLT is an extremely versatile tool to induce electronic phase transitions by electrostatic charge accumulation and provides new routes in the search for superconductors beyond those synthesized by traditional chemical methods.

  17. Fluctuation Analysis of Liquid/Liquid and Gel/Liquid Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-17

    gel/water interface were determined by using cyclic voltammetry and zero current potentiometric methods in a four-electrode system. It has been...interface is due to the difference of the diffusion coefficients in the gel-nitrobenzene as opposed to pure nitrobenzene. In the present study an...and the real part of the diffusional impedance is calculated ; its absolute values can be obtained by multiplying the numbers in the Table by 12 e

  18. Behavior of solute adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface during solvent extraction with porous-membrane phase separators

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, G.; Xiu-min, T.; Cantwell, F.F.

    1987-01-01

    Porous membranes are used effectively as phase separators in analytical solvent extraction. When the solute involved can be adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface, it is found that more vigorous agitation of the mixture causes a decrease in concentration of solute in the liquid flowing through the porous membrane. It is shown experimentally for the interfacially adsorbed component methylene blue perchlorate that the distribution isotherm between chloroform and water is the same in stirred and unstirred mixtures. This suggests that the interfacially adsorbed solute remains at the interface and does not enter the bulk liquid phases during the membrane-induced coalescence and phase separation. Hydrodynamic and diffusion rate calculations confirm this conclusion by showing that the residence time of the solute deposited at the liquid-liquid interface near the membrane (0.1 s) is too short for solute to diffuse through the stagnant Nernst diffusion layer.

  19. Adsorption kinetics of surfactants at liquid-solid and liquid-vapor interfaces from atomic-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya K.; Patnaik, Soumya S.

    2012-02-01

    Nucleate pool boiling of pure liquid is a complex process involving different size- and time-scale phenomena. The appearance of the first nanobubble in the liquid at the bottom of a hot pan, the detachment of the bubble from the solid surface, its subsequent coalescence with other bubbles, all represent complex multiscale phenomena. Surfactants added to water increase the complexity of the process by contributing to the dynamic surface tension at the liquid-vapor and liquid-solid interfaces and thus affecting the heat and mass transfer at those interfaces. We apply molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption kinetics of anionic, cationic, and non-ionic surfactants at liquid/solid and liquid/vapor interfaces. The all-atom vs. united-atom approaches for the solid and surfactants are surveyed in view of their applicability at near boiling temperatures and a range of model water potentials is assessed for reproducing the thermal properties of water at boiling conditions.

  20. Effect of Surfactants on Drop Coalescence at Liquid/liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weheliye, Weheliye Hashii; Dong, Teng; Angeli, Panagiota

    2016-11-01

    In this paper the coalescence of a drop with a liquid-liquid interface was investigated experimentally using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Initially the drop rest on the interface was studied. It was found that during drop rest the interface deformed before rupture, and the deformation increased with increasing surfactant concentration. The results from PIV showed that two counter-rotating vortices formed inside the droplet during the rupture process which moved from the bottom to the top of the drop. The evolutions of vortices for three surfactant concentrations will be presented. The vortices moved faster in lower surfactant concentrations compared to the higher ones. The intensities of the vortices in different concentrations were also calculated. After the rupture, for low surfactant concentrations, the intensities increased with time and reached a maximum while at later times they decreased. At high surfactant concentrations, the increase and subsequent decrease in intensity was not as pronounced. The work is support by the MEMPHIS program and the University College London. The author Teng Dong would like to thank the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) for providing funds for his overseas research.

  1. Evolution of the Inner Liquid-Solid Interface During Metal Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. G.; Fuksov, V. M.; Gerasimov, S. F.; Pokhodun, A. I.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the inner interface initiation method on the interface shape (formation of the planar interface or the interface with the dendrites growing into the liquid metal) was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The results of numerical simulation of the process of heat removal from the metal, corresponding to different initiation methods, revealed the existence of different species of the inner interface. The interface modification during freezing arises from the inequality of temperature gradients on opposite sides of the interface, i.e., from imbalance of heat fluxes on the interphase boundary (Stefan problem). For indium point, the results of numerical simulation were confirmed experimentally.

  2. Liquid-vapor interface of the Stockmayer fluid in a uniform external field.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stan G; Stevens, Mark J; Grest, Gary S

    2015-02-01

    The effect of a uniform (nonspatially varying) external field on the liquid-vapor interface of the Stockmayer fluid (Lennard-Jones particles embedded with a point dipole) has been investigated by molecular-dynamics simulations. The long-ranged parts of both the dipole and Lennard-Jones interactions are treated using an Ewald summation, which removes the effects of the cutoff. The direction of the field shifts the critical point and interfacial properties in different directions. For an external field parallel to the interface, the critical temperature increases, while for a field applied perpendicular to the interface, it decreases. The effects of the field on surface tension and interfacial width are also investigated. For zero field, dipoles near the liquid-vapor interface show a weak orientation parallel to the interface. For fields parallel to the interface, ordering in the liquid phase is greater than the vapor, while for fields perpendicular to the interface, the opposite is true.

  3. Ion-transfer voltammetric determination of folic acid at meso-liquid-liquid interface arrays.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuheng; Gao, Kui; Hu, Daopan; Wang, Huanhuan; Bian, Shujuan; Chen, Yong

    2015-04-21

    Voltammetric studies on the simple ion transfer (IT) behaviors of an important water-soluble B-vitamin, folic acid (FA), at the liquid-liquid (L-L) interface were firstly performed and then applied as a novel detection method for FA under physiological conditions. Meso-water-1,6-dichlorohexane (W-DCH) and meso-water-organogel interface arrays were built by using a hybrid mesoporous silica membrane (HMSM) with a unique structure of pores-in-pores and employed as the new platforms for the IT voltammetric study. In view of the unique structure of the HMSM, the impact of the ionic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), self-assembled within the silica nanochannels of the HMSM, was investigated. In particular, its effect on the IT voltammetric behavior and detection of FA at meso-L-L interface arrays was systematically examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and differential pulse stripping voltammetry (DPSV). It was found that all the voltammetric responses of CV, DPV, and DPSV and the corresponding detection limit of FA at such meso-L-L interface arrays are closely related to the CTAB in the HMSM. Significantly, the calculated detection limit of FA could be improved to 80 nM after the combination of the DPSV technique with the additional preconcentration of FA in the silica-CTAB nanochannels, achieved through an anion-exchange process between FA(-) and the bromide of CTAB in HMSM. This provides a new and attractive strategy for the detection of those biological anions.

  4. Reduced graphene oxide based silver sulfide hybrid films formed at a liquid/liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bramhaiah, K. John, Neena S.

    2014-04-24

    Free-standing, ultra-thin films of silver sulfide and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based silver sulfide hybrids are prepared at a liquid/liquid interface employing in situ chemical reaction strategy. Ag{sub 2}S and RGO−Ag{sub 2}S hybrid films are characterized by various techniques such as UV-visible and photo luminescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The morphology of hybrid films consists of Ag{sub 2}S nanocrystals on RGO surface while Ag{sub 2}S films contains branched network of dendritic structures. RGO−Ag{sub 2}S exhibit interesting optical and electrical properties. The hybrid films absorb in the region 500–650 nm and show emission in the red region. A higher conductance is observed for the hybrid films arising from the RGO component. This simple low cost method can be extended to prepare other RGO based metal sulfides.

  5. Copper phthalocyanine films deposited by liquid-liquid interface recrystallization technique (LLIRCT).

    PubMed

    Patil, K R; Sathaye, S D; Hawaldar, R; Sathe, B R; Mandale, A B; Mitra, A

    2007-11-15

    The simple recrystallization process is innovatively used to obtain the nanoparticles of copper phthalocyanine by a simple method. Liquid-liquid interface recrystallization technique (LLIRCT) has been employed successfully to produce small sized copper phthalocyanine nanoparticles with diameter between 3-5 nm. The TEM-SAED studies revealed the formation of 3-5 nm sized with beta-phase dominated mixture of alpha and beta copper phthalocyanine nanoparticles. The XRD, SEM, and the UV-vis studies were further carried out to confirm the formation of copper phthalocyanine thin films. The cyclic voltametry (CV) studies conclude that redox reaction is totally reversible one electron transfer process. The process is attributed to Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox reaction.

  6. Computational Studies of Structures and Dynamics of 1, 3-Dimethylimidazolim Salt Liquid and their Interfaces Using Polarizable Potential Models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tsun-Mei; Dang, Liem X.

    2009-03-12

    The structures, thermodynamics, dynamical properties of bulk and air/liquid interfaces of three ionic liquids, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium [dmim]+, Cl-, Br-, and I- are studied using molecular dynamics techniques. In bulk melts, the radial distribution functions reveal a significant long-range structural correlation in these ionic liquids. From the angular distribution analysis, the imidazolium rings are found to lie parallel to each other at short distances, consistent with the structures observed in the crystal state. The single-ion dynamics are studied via mean-square-displacements, velocity and orientational correlation functions. The diffusion coefficients and reorientational times are found to be much smaller than H2O. We also observe that anion size plays an important role in the dynamics of ionic liquids. The computed density profiles of the ionic liquid/vapor interface exhibit oscillatory behavior, indicative of surface layering at the interface. Further analysis reveals that the [dmim]+ ions show preferred orientation at the interface with the ring parallel to the surface and methyl group attached to the ring pointing into the vapor phase. The computed surface tensions indicated small differences between these ionic liquids and are inline with recent experimental measurements. The calculated potential drops of these ionic liquids are found to be small and negative. These results could imply that the cation dipoles are likely to orient in the plane that parallel to the surface normal axis. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  7. Ion spatial distributions at the liquid-vapor interface of aqueous potassium fluoride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M A; D'Auria, R; Kuo, I W; Krisch, M J; Starr, D E; Bluhm, H; Tobias, D J; Hemminger, J C

    2008-04-23

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy operating under ambient pressure conditions is used to probe ion distributions throughout the interfacial region of a free-flowing aqueous liquid micro-jet of 6 M potassium fluoride. Varying the energy of the ejected photoelectrons by carrying out experiments as a function of x-ray wavelength measures the composition of the aqueous-vapor interfacial region at various depths. The F{sup -} to K{sup +} atomic ratio is equal to unity throughout the interfacial region to a depth of 2 nm. The experimental ion profiles are compared with the results of a classical molecular dynamics simulation of a 6 M aqueous KF solution employing polarizable potentials. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the simulations when integrated over an exponentially decaying probe depth characteristic of an APPES experiment. First principles molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate the potential of mean force for moving a fluoride anion across the air-water interface. The results show that the fluoride anion is repelled from the interface, and this is consistent with the depletion of F{sup -} at the interface revealed by the APPES experiment and polarizable force field-based molecular dynamics simulation. Together, the APPES and MD simulation data provide a detailed description of the aqueous-vapor interface of alkali fluoride systems. This work offers the first direct observation of the ion distribution at a potassium fluoride aqueous solution interface. The current experimental results are compared to those previously obtained for saturated solutions of KBr and KI to underscore the strong difference in surface propensity between soft/large and hard/small halide ions in aqueous solution.

  8. Ion spatial distributions at the liquid-vapor interface of aqueous potassium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew A; D'Auria, Raffaella; Kuo, I-F William; Krisch, Maria J; Starr, David E; Bluhm, Hendrik; Tobias, Douglas J; Hemminger, John C

    2008-08-28

    X-Ray photoemission spectroscopy operating under ambient pressure conditions is used to probe ion distributions throughout the interfacial region of a free-flowing aqueous liquid micro-jet of 6 M potassium fluoride. Varying the energy of the ejected photoelectrons by carrying out experiments as a function of X-ray wavelength measures the composition of the aqueous-vapor interfacial region at various depths. The F(-) to K(+) atomic ratio is equal to unity throughout the interfacial region to a depth of 2 nm. The experimental ion profiles are compared with the results of a classical molecular dynamics simulation of a 6 M aqueous KF solution employing polarizable potentials. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the simulations when integrated over an exponentially decaying probe depth characteristic of an APPES experiment. First principles molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate the potential of mean force for moving a fluoride anion across the air-water interface. The results show that the fluoride anion is repelled from the interface, consistent with the depletion of F(-) at the interface revealed by the APPES experiment and polarizable force field-based molecular dynamics simulation. Together, the APPES and MD simulation data provide a detailed description of the aqueous-vapor interface of alkali fluoride systems. This work offers the first direct observation of the ion distribution at an aqueous potassium fluoride solution interface. The current experimental results are compared to those previously obtained for saturated solutions of KBr and KI to underscore the strong difference in surface propensity between soft/large and hard/small halide ions in aqueous solution.

  9. Solid-liquid interface free energy in binary systems: theory and atomistic calculations for the (110) Cu-Ag interface.

    PubMed

    Frolov, T; Mishin, Y

    2009-08-07

    We analyze thermodynamics of solid-liquid interfaces in binary systems when the solid is in a nonhydrostatic state of stress. The difficulty lies in the fact that chemical potential of at least one of the chemical components in a nonhydrostatic solid is an undefined quantity. We show, nevertheless, that the interface free energy gamma can be defined as excess of an appropriate thermodynamic potential that depends on the chemical potentials in the liquid phase. We derive different forms of the adsorption equation for solid-liquid interfaces, with differential coefficients representing excesses of extensive properties. This leads, in particular, to the formulation of interface stress tau(ij) as an appropriate excess over nonhydrostatic bulk stresses. The interface stress is not unique unless the solid is in a hydrostatic state of stress. We also derive Gibbs-Helmholtz type equations that can be applied for thermodynamic integration of gamma. All thermodynamic relations derived here are presented in forms suitable for atomistic simulations. In particular, the excess quantities can be computed without constructing interface profiles. As an application, we perform semigrand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the (110) solid-liquid interface in the Cu-Ag system. We show that gamma computed by thermodynamic integration along a coexistence path decreases with increasing composition difference between the phases. At the same time, tau(ij) remains negative (i.e., the interface is in a state of compression), drastically increases in magnitude, and becomes highly anisotropic. Some of the interface excess properties are computed by different methods and demonstrate accurate agreement with each other, confirming the correctness of our analysis.

  10. Nonlinear laser-induced deformations of liquid-liquid interfaces: An optical fiber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkeland, Ole Jakob; Brevik, Iver

    2008-12-01

    Experimentally, it turns out that radiation forces from a cw laser on a liquid-liquid interface are able to produce giant deformations (up to about 100μm ), if the system is close to the critical point where the surface tension becomes small. We present a model for such a fingerlike deformation, implying that the system is described as an optical fiber. One reason for introducing such a model is that the refractive index difference in modern experiments, such as those of the Bordeaux group, is small, of the same order as in practical fibers in optics. It is natural therefore to adopt the hybrid HE11 mode, known from fiber theory as the fundamental mode for the liquid system. We show how the balance between hydrodynamical and radiation forces leads to a stable equilibrium point for the liquid column. Also, we calculate the narrowing of the column radius as the depth increases. Comparison with experimental results of the Bordeaux group yields quite satisfactory agreement as regards the column width.

  11. Langmuir Films of Flexible Polymers Transferred to Aqueous/Liquid Crystal Interfaces Induce Uniform Azimuthal Alignment of the Liquid Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Kinsinger, Michael I.; Buck, Maren E.; Meli, Maria-Victoria; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Lynn, David M.

    2009-01-01

    We reported recently that amphiphilic polymers can be assembled at interfaces created between aqueous phases and thermotropic liquid crystals (LCs) in ways that (i) couple the organization of the polymer to the order of the LC and (ii) respond to changes in the properties of aqueous phases that can be characterized as changes in the optical appearance of the LC. This investigation sought to characterize the behavior of aqueous-LC interfaces decorated with uniaxially compressed thin films of polymers transferred by Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) transfer. Here, we report physicochemical characterization of interfaces created between aqueous phases and the thermotropic LC 4-cyano-4’-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) decorated with Langmuir films of a novel amphiphilic polymer (polymer 1), synthesized by the addition of hydrophobic and hydrophilic side chains to poly(2-vinyl-4,4’-dimethylazlactone). Initial characterization of this system resulted in the unexpected observation of uniform azimuthal alignment of 5CB after LS transfer of the polymer films to aqueous-5CB interfaces. This paper describes characterization of Langmuir films of polymer 1 hosted at aqueous-5CB interfaces as well as the results of our investigations into the origins of the uniform ordering of the LC observed upon LS transfer. Our results, when combined, support the conclusion that uniform azimuthal alignment of 5CB is the result of long-range ordering of polymer chains in the Langmuir films (in a preferred direction orthogonal to the direction of compression) that is generated during uniaxial compression of the films prior to LS transfer. Although past studies of Langmuir films of polymers at aqueous-air interfaces have demonstrated that in-plane alignment of polymer backbones can be induced by uniaxial compression, these past reports have generally made use of polymers with rigid backbones. One important outcome of this current study is thus the observation of anisotropy and long-range order in Langmuir films

  12. Pyroelectric energy harvesting using liquid-based switchable thermal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, G; Ju, YS

    2013-01-15

    The pyroelectric effect offers an intriguing solid-state approach for harvesting ambient thermal energy to power distributed networks of sensors and actuators that are remotely located or otherwise difficult to access. There have been, however, few device-level demonstrations due to challenges in converting spatial temperature gradients into temporal temperature oscillations necessary for pyroelectric energy harvesting. We demonstrate the feasibility of a device concept that uses liquid-based thermal interfaces for rapid switching of the thermal conductance between a pyroelectric material and a heat source/sink and can thereby deliver high output power density. Using a thin film of a pyroelectric co-polymer together with a macroscale mechanical actuator, we operate pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting cycles at frequencies close to 1 Hz. Film-level power densities as high as 110 mW/cm(3) were achieved, limited by slow heat diffusion across a glass substrate. When combined with a laterally interdigitated electrode array and a MEMS actuator, the present design offers an attractive option for compact high-power density thermal energy harvesters. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Liquid-film assisted formation of alumina/niobium interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sugar, Joshua D.; McKeown, Joseph T.; Marks, Robert A.; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2002-06-16

    Alumina has been joined at 1400 degrees C using niobium-based interlayers. Two different joining approaches were compared: solid-state diffusion bonding using a niobium foil as an interlayer, and liquid-film assisted bonding using a multilayer copper/niobium/copper interlayer. In both cases, a 127-(mu)m thick niobium foil was used; =1.4-(mu)m or =3-(mu)m thick copper films flanked the niobium. Room-temperature four-point bend tests showed that the introduction of a copper film had a significant beneficial effect on the average strength and the strength distribution. Experiments using sapphire substrates indicated that during bonding the initially continuous copper film evolved into isolated copper-rich droplets/particles at the sapphire/interlayer interface, and extensive regions of direct bonding between sapphire and niobium. Film breakup appeared to initiate at either niobium grain boundary ridges, or at asperities or irregularities on the niobium surface that caused localized contact with the sapphire.

  14. Long DNA Molecules at Liquid-Solid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuilov, Vladimir; Li, B.; Sokolov, J.; Rafailovich, M.; Chu, B.

    2006-03-01

    The electrophoresis of long DNA molecules was studied using a newly developed method of electrophoresis on flat surfaces [1] in the regime of strong electrostatic interaction. The mobility of lambda- DNA molecules on this surface was found to scale as the square root of the persistent length with the ionic strength at high buffer. This experimental result indicates that at high buffer concentration the separation mechanism of solid-liquid interface electrophoresis is expected to be due to surface friction rather than biased reptation [2-4]. At low buffer concentrations the DNA chains are stretched .The electric double layer is responsible for a velocity profile of the electroosmotic flow. The net electrophoretic mobility of longer DNA, being trapped closer to the surface as found to be higher then for the shorter ones in the electric field. [1]. N. Pernodet, V. Samuilov, K. Shin, et al. Physical Review Letters, 85 (2000) 5651-5654. [2] Y.-S. Seo, V.A. Samuilov, J. Sokolov, et al. Electrophoresis, 23 (2002) 2618-2625. [3] Y.-S. Seo, H.. Luo, V. A. Samuilov, et al. DNA Electrophoresis on nanopatterned surfaces, Nano Letters, 4, 2004, 659-664.

  15. Numerical simulation of drop impact on a liquid-liquid interface with a multiple marker front-capturing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyajee, Emil; Boersma, Bendiks Jan

    2009-07-01

    The gravity-driven motion of a droplet impacting on a liquid-liquid interface is studied. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved on a fixed, uniform grid using a finite difference/front-capturing method. For the representation of fluid-fluid interfaces, a coupled Level-Set/Volume-Of-Fluid method [M. Sussman, E.G. Puckett, A coupled Level-Set and Volume-of-Fluid method for computing 3D and axisymmetric incompressible two-phase flows, J. Comp. Phys. 162 (2000) 301-337] is used, in which we introduce the novel approach of describing separate interfaces with different marker functions. As a consequence, we prevent numerical coalescence of the droplet and the liquid-liquid interface without excessive (local) grid refinement. To validate our method, numerical simulations of the drop impact event are compared with experiments [Z. Mohamed-Kassim, E.K. Longmire, Drop impact on a liquid-liquid interface, Phys. Fluids 15 (2003) 3263-3273]. Furthermore, a comparison is made with the numerical results of [A. Esmaeeli, G. Tryggvason, Direct numerical simulations of bubbly flows. Part 2. Moderate Reynolds number arrays, J. Fluid Mech. 385 (1999) 325-358] for an array of rising bubbles. The investigation shows that the multiple marker approach successfully prevents numerical coalescence of interfaces and adequately captures the effect of surface tension.

  16. Galaxy-like organization of floaters at the air-water interface of Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón, Héctor; Périnet, Nicolas; Gutiérrez, Pablo; Gordillo, Leonardo; Mujica, Nicolás

    2016-11-01

    The fluid properties mismatch across an air-liquid interface allows to trap particles at it. These particles are called floaters and appear in nature at different scales: plankton, organic residues, and garbage, all relevant for the oceanic ecosystem. In static systems they tend to attract or repel each other, depending on their wetting properties and buoyancy. When they are subjected to a flow, such as surface waves, they may drift and form structures at the interface. In a recent work using PIV on Faraday waves, we have measured a streaming flow that emerges inside the bulk, leading to a slow circulation of fluid particles across the liquid. The flow is mainly generated by the viscous shearing at the walls of the container. Our new experiments show that this flow has a remarkable effect on the drift of small hydrophilic particles (floaters), which leads to a rare arrangement of the floaters that resemble rotating galaxies. The forcing amplitude determines the galaxy shape, controlling the number and the length of its arms as well as its rotation velocity. Thanks to FONDECYT POSTDOCTORADO N°3160341, N°3140522, N°3140550.

  17. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy of surfactants and phospholipid monolayers at liquid-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, Beth L.; Walker, R. A.; Gragson, D. E.; Hannon, T. E.; Richmond, Geraldine L.

    1998-04-01

    Work from our laboratory on vibrational sum frequency spectroscopic investigations of molecular ordering at the carbon tetrachloride-water interface is reviewed. Simple charged surfactants adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface are seen to induce alignment of interfacial water molecules to a degree which is dependent on the induced surface potential. Saturation of water molecule alignment occurs at a surfactant surface concentration corresponding to a calculated surface potential of approximately 160 mV. In complementary studies, the relative degree of hydrocarbon chain ordering within monolayers of symmetric phosphatidylcholines of different chain lengths is inferred by the relative signal contributions of the methyl and methylene symmetric stretch modes. The degree of hydrocarbon chain disorder observed depends strongly on the method of monolayer preparation. By one method, a decrease in hydrocarbon chain order is seen with increasing chain length. Another method of monolayer formation yielded very well ordered hydrocarbon chains for the longest chain phosphatidylcholine studied, and showed much greater disorder in shorter chain species which was comparable to the other preparation method. These studies are a foundation for further work with this technique geared towards understanding molecular-level structural features in membrane-like assemblies and surface biochemical interactions of relevance to biomedical research.

  18. Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, A.; Slayzak, S.; Kozubal, E.

    2006-07-01

    A novel liquid-desiccant air conditioner that dries and cools building supply air will transform the use of direct-contact liquid-desiccant systems in HVAC applications, improving comfort, air quality, and providing energy-efficient humidity control.

  19. Development of a liquid-junction/low-flow interface for phosphate buffer capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Fu-An; Huang, Ju-Li; Shen, Shang-Yu; Wang, Che-Wei; Her, Guor-Rong

    2009-04-01

    To alleviate ion suppression from phosphate buffer and to preserve separation integrity, a new capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) interface was developed. The interface consisted of a low-flow interface and a liquid junction. In this design, both the inlet reservoir and the liquid-junction reservoir were filled with phosphate running buffer. Because the phosphate anions in the column migrated toward the inlet reservoir (away from the electrospray ionization (ESI) source) the problem of ion suppression in ESI was avoided. The liquid junction was incorporated to eliminate issues of degraded separation observed when sheath liquid interfaces use different buffers for separation and MS analysis attributed to differences in anion velocity. The utility of the interface was demonstrated by the analysis of antihistamines at pH 3.5 and the analysis of perfluorocarboxylic acid at pH 9.5.

  20. Dynamic single-interface hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction of Cr(VI) using ionic liquid containing supported liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Pimparu, Rungaroon; Nitiyanontakit, Sira; Miró, Manuel; Varanusupakul, Pakorn

    2016-12-01

    The concept of dynamic single-interface hollow fiber membrane liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME), where the target analyte was extracted on-line and eluted inside the lumen of the HF membrane, was explored. An ionic liquid containing supported liquid membrane was used for the trace determination of Cr(VI) as a model compound. Since the extraction took place on-line inside the hollow fiber membrane, the mass transfer behavior was described and discussed in comparison with the conventional HF-LPME. The extraction efficiency was improved by a recirculation configuration of the sample solution at relatively high sampling flow rates as a result of the increased effective contact area. The positive pressure observed to be built up during extraction was overcome by a flow-balancing pressure design. The dynamic single-interface HF-LPME method with an enrichment factor of 41, a detection limit of 1.2µgL(-1) and determination limit of 4.0µgL(-1) was successfully applied to the reliable determination of Cr(VI) from environmental water samples. The quantification limit is below the maximum contaminant level in drinking water, set at 10µgL(-1) of hexavalent chromium by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

  1. Interaction of a sodium ion with the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Molecular dynamics results are presented for the density profile of a sodium ion near the water liquid-vapor interface at 320 K. These results are compared with the predictions of a simple dielectric model for the interaction of a monovalent ion with this interface. The interfacial region described by the model profile is too narrow and the profile decreases too abruptly near the solution interface. Thus, the simple model does not provide a satisfactory description of the molecular dynamics results for ion positions within two molecular diameters from the solution interface where appreciable ion concentrations are observed. These results suggest that surfaces associated with dielectric models of ionic processes at aqueous solution interfaces should be located at least two molecular diameters inside the liquid phase. A free energy expense of about 2 kcal/mol is required to move the ion within two molecular layers of the free water liquid-vapor interface.

  2. Nematic liquid crystals confined in microcapillaries for imaging phenomena at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shenghong; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2015-09-21

    Here, we report the development of an experimental system based on liquid crystals (LCs) confined in microcapillaries for imaging interfacial phenomena. The inner surfaces of the microcapillaries were modified with octadecyltrichlorosilane to promote an escaped-radial configuration of LCs. We checked the optical appearance of the capillary-confined LCs under a crossed polarizing microscope and determined their arrangement based on side and top views. We then placed the capillary-confined LCs in contact with non-surfactant and surfactant solutions, producing characteristic textures of two bright lines and a four-petal shape, respectively. We also evaluated the sensitivity, stability, and reusability of the system. Our imaging system was more sensitive than previously reported LC thin film systems. The textures formed in microcapillaries were stable for more than 120 h and the capillaries could be reused at least 10 times. Finally, we successfully applied our system to image the interactions of phospholipids and bivalent metal ions. In summary, we developed a simple, small, portable, sensitive, stable, and reusable experimental system that can be broadly applied to monitor liquid-liquid interfacial phenomena. These results provide valuable information for designs using confined LCs as chemoresponsive materials in optical sensors.

  3. Temperature dependence of local solubility of hydrophobic molecules in the liquid-vapor interface of water.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kiharu; Sumi, Tomonari; Koga, Kenichiro

    2014-11-14

    One important aspect of the hydrophobic effect is that solubility of small, nonpolar molecules in liquid water decreases with increasing temperature. We investigate here how the characteristic temperature dependence in liquid water persists or changes in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interface. From the molecular dynamics simulation and the test-particle insertion method, the local solubility Σ of methane in the liquid-vapor interface of water as well as Σ of nonpolar solutes in the interface of simple liquids are calculated as a function of the distance z from the interface. We then examine the temperature dependence of Σ under two conditions: variation of Σ at fixed position z and that at fixed local solvent density around the solute molecule. It is found that the temperature dependence of Σ at fixed z depends on the position z and the system, whereas Σ at fixed local density decreases with increasing temperature for all the model solutions at any fixed density between vapor and liquid phases. The monotonic decrease of Σ under the fixed-density condition in the liquid-vapor interface is in accord with what we know for the solubility of nonpolar molecules in bulk liquid water under the fixed-volume condition but it is much robust since the solvent density to be fixed can be anything between the coexisting vapor and liquid phases. A unique feature found in the water interface is that there is a minimum in the local solubility profile Σ(z) on the liquid side of the interface. We find that with decreasing temperature the minimum of Σ grows and at the same time the first peak in the oscillatory density profile of water develops. It is likely that the minimum of Σ is due to the layering structure of the free interface of water.

  4. Total internal reflection resonance light scattering at solid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao-Ji; Chen, Ying; Yao, Min-Na; Li, Yao-Qun

    2008-08-05

    Total internal reflection (TIR) technique is an interface-specific tool and resonance light scattering (RLS) is of high sensitivity. The combination of both approaches is introduced into the solid/liquid interface for the first time. The behaviors of mixture of TPPS and BSA at the interface have been studied with total internal reflection resonance light scattering (TIR-RLS). The preliminary experimental results indicate that TIR-RLS is a good approach to study the interaction and distinguish the states of macromolecules at the solid/liquid interface.

  5. Green-Kubo relation for friction at liquid-solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a Green-Kubo relation that enables accurate calculations of friction at solid-liquid interfaces directly from equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and that provides a pathway to bypass the time-scale limitations of typical nonequilibrium MD simulations. The theory has been validated for a number of different interfaces and it is demonstrated that the liquid-solid slip is an intrinsic property of an interface. Because of the high numerical efficiency of our method, it can be used in the design of interfaces for applications in aqueous environments, such as nano- and microfluidics.

  6. Two-dimensional crystallization of phthalocyanine pigments at the air/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, B.W.; Vaknin, D.; Gray, J.D.; Cotton, T.M.; Struve, W.S. |; Ocko, B.M.

    1999-01-21

    Two-dimensional crystallization of highly planar phthalocyanine (Pc) pigments underneath the headgroups of a lipid Langmuir monolayer was observed and characterized by synchrotron X-ray diffraction at grazing angles of incidence (GID). The crystallization was achieved through spontaneous adsorption of positively charged, water-soluble Pc`s to a spread dihexadecyl phosphate (DHDP) monolayer at the air/water interface. Analysis of the GID and rod profiles show that the lipid, pigment, and counterions form a complex in which the pigment plane is tilted with respect to the liquid surface; this is consistent with previous independent X-ray reflectivity investigations. In addition, the two-dimensional crystalline order of DHDP monolayers on pure H{sub 2}O has been determined and an analysis of its structure both before and after complexation is presented.

  7. Partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds to the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, James F.

    Partition coefficients ( Kia, m 3m -2) for sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes at the air/water interface were estimated by extrapolating quartz/gas sorption data to relative humidity (RH) values of 100%. For each compound class, the log Kia values were found to be well correlated with log pLo where pLo (Torr) is the vapor pressure of the pure subcooled liquid. For the PAHs, correlation equation is log Kia = -1.20 log pLo - 5.82 ( R2 = 0.98). For the n-alkanes, the correlation equation is log Kia = -0.93 log pLo - 4.42 ( R2 = 0.95).

  8. The Importance of Moving Air-Water Interfaces for Colloid Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the vadose zone, or in unsaturated porous media in general, transport of colloids is usually less pronounced than in groundwater. An important retention mechanism for colloids in unsaturated porous media is attachment to air-water interfaces. However, air-water interfaces can also lead to colloid mobilization and enhanced transport if air-water interfaces are moving, such as during infiltration, imbibition, and drainage. Colloid attachment to air-water interfaces is caused by surface tension forces, and these forces usually exceed other interactions forces; therefore, surface tension forces play a dominant role for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media. In this presentation, experimental and theoretical evidence of surface tension forces acting on colloids will be presented, and the role of moving air-water interfaces will be discussed.

  9. π(+)-π(+) stacking of imidazolium cations enhances molecular layering of room temperature ionic liquids at their interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fujie; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Taisuke; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2017-01-25

    The interfacial structure of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) controls many of the unique properties of RTILs, such as the high capacitance of RTILs and the efficiency of charge transport between RTILs and electrodes. RTILs have been experimentally shown to exhibit interfacial molecular layering structures over a 10 Å length scale. However, the driving force behind the formation of these layered structures has not been resolved. Here, we report ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of imidazolium RTIL/air and RTIL/graphene interfaces along with force field molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the π(+)-π(+) interaction of imidazolium cations enhances the layering structure of RTILs, despite the electrostatic repulsion. The length scales of the molecular layering at the RTIL/air and RTIL/graphene interfaces are very similar, manifesting the limited effect of the substrate on the interfacial organization of RTILs.

  10. Isolating Reactions at the Picoliter Scale: Parallel Control of Reaction Kinetics at the Liquid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Phan-Quang, Gia Chuong; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Ling, Xing Yi

    2016-07-11

    Miniaturized liquid-liquid interfacial reactors offer enhanced surface area and rapid confinement of compounds of opposite solubility, yet they are unable to provide in situ reaction monitoring at a molecular level at the interface. A picoreactor operative at the liquid-liquid interface is described, comprising plasmonic colloidosomes containing Ag octahedra strategically assembled at the water-in-decane emulsion interface. The plasmonic colloidosomes isolate ultrasmall amounts of solutions (<200 pL), allowing parallel monitoring of multiple reactions simultaneously. Using the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique, in situ monitoring of the interfacial protonation of dimethyl yellow (p-dimethylaminoazobenzene (DY)) is performed, revealing an apparent rate constant of 0.09 min(-1) for the first-order reaction. The presence of isomeric products with similar physical properties is resolved, which would otherwise be indiscernible by other analytical methods.

  11. Engineering the Electrode-Electrolyte Interface: From Electrode Architecture to Zinc Redox in Ionic Liquid Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, Erika

    2011-12-01

    The electrode-electrolyte interface in electrochemical environments involves the understanding of complex processes relevant for all electrochemical applications. Some of these processes include electronic structure, charge storage, charge transfer, solvent dynamics and structure and surface adsorption. In order to engineer electrochemical systems, no matter the function, requires fundamental intuition of all the processes at the interface. The following work presents different systems in which the electrode-electrolyte interface is highly important. The first is a charge storage electrode utilizing percolation theory to develop an electrode architecture producing high capacities. This is followed by Zn deposition in an ionic liquid in which the deposition morphology is highly dependant on the charge transfer and surface adsorption at the interface. Electrode Architecture: A three-dimensional manganese oxide supercapacitor electrode architecture is synthesized by leveraging percolation theory to develop a hierarchically designed tri-continuous percolated network. The three percolated phases include a faradaically-active material, electrically conductive material and pore-former templated void space. The micropores create pathways for ionic conductivity, while the nanoscale electrically conducting phase provides both bulk conductivity and local electron transfer with the electrochemically active phase. Zn Electrodeposition: Zn redox in air and water stable N-ethyl-N-methylmorpholinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [C2nmm][NTf2] is presented. Under various conditions, characterization of overpotential, kinetics and diffusion of Zn species and morphological evolution as a function of overpotential and Zn concentration are analyzed. The surface stress evolution during Zn deposition is examined where grain size and texturing play significant rolls in compressive stress generation. Morphological repeatability in the ILs led to a novel study of purity in ionic

  12. Liquid metal reactor air cooling baffle

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein

    1994-01-01

    A baffle is provided between a relatively hot containment vessel and a relatively cold silo for enhancing air cooling performance. The baffle includes a perforate inner wall positionable outside the containment vessel to define an inner flow riser therebetween, and an imperforate outer wall positionable outside the inner wall to define an outer flow riser therebetween. Apertures in the inner wall allow thermal radiation to pass laterally therethrough to the outer wall, with cooling air flowing upwardly through the inner and outer risers for removing heat.

  13. Liquid metal reactor air cooling baffle

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, A.

    1994-08-16

    A baffle is provided between a relatively hot containment vessel and a relatively cold silo for enhancing air cooling performance. The baffle includes a perforate inner wall positionable outside the containment vessel to define an inner flow riser therebetween, and an imperforate outer wall positionable outside the inner wall to define an outer flow riser therebetween. Apertures in the inner wall allow thermal radiation to pass laterally therethrough to the outer wall, with cooling air flowing upwardly through the inner and outer risers for removing heat. 3 figs.

  14. Segregation of ions at the interface: molecular dynamics studies of the bulk and liquid-vapor interface structure of equimolar binary mixtures of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Palchowdhury, Sourav; Bhargava, B L

    2015-08-14

    The structures of three different equimolar binary ionic liquid mixtures and their liquid-vapor interface have been studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Two of these binary mixtures were composed of a common cation 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium and varying anions (chloride and hexafluorophosphate in one of the mixtures and chloride and trifluoromethanesulfonate in the other) and the third binary mixture was composed of a common anion, trifluoromethanesulfonate and two imidazolium cations with ethyl and octyl side chains. Binary mixtures with common cations are found to be homogeneous. The anions are preferentially located near the ring hydrogen atoms due to H-bonding interactions. Segregation of ions is observed at the interface with an enrichment of the liquid-vapor interface layer by longer alkyl chains and bigger anions with a distributed charge. The surface composition is drastically different from that of the bulk composition, with the longer alkyl tail groups and bigger anions populating the outermost layer of the interface. The longer alkyl chains of the cations and trifluoromethanesulfonate anions with a smaller charge density show orientational ordering at the liquid-vapor interface.

  15. Local Environment and Interactions of Liquid and Solid Interfaces Revealed by Spectral Line Shape of Surface Selective Nonlinear Vibrational Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Chase, Zizwe A.; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-11-10

    Vibrational spectral lineshape contains important detailed information of molecular vibration and reports its specific interactions and couplings to its local environment. In this work, recently developed sub-1 cm-1 high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) was used to measure the -C≡N stretch vibration in the 4-n-octyl-4’-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir or Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer as a unique vibrational probe, and the spectral lineshape analysis revealed the local environment and interactions at the air/water, air/glass, air/calcium fluoride and air/-quartz interfaces for the first time. The 8CB Langmuir or LB film is uniform and the vibrational spectral lineshape of its -C≡N group has been well characterized, making it a good choice as the surface vibrational probe. Lineshape analysis of the 8CB -C≡N stretch SFG vibrational spectra suggests the coherent vibrational dynamics and the structural and dynamic inhomogeneity of the -C≡N group at each interface are uniquely different. In addition, it is also found that there are significantly different roles for water molecules in the LB films on different substrate surfaces. These results demonstrated the novel capabilities of the surface nonlinear spectroscopy in characterization and in understanding the specific structures and chemical interactions at the liquid and solid interfaces in general.

  16. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air.

    PubMed

    Men, Yongjun; Ambrogi, Martina; Han, Baohang; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-04-08

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m²/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection.

  17. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yongjun; Ambrogi, Martina; Han, Baohang; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m2/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection. PMID:27070588

  18. Nematicons across interfaces: anomalous refraction and reflection of solitons in liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Peccianti, Marco; Assanto, Gaetano

    2007-06-25

    The robustness of nematicons, i. e. spatial solitons in nematic liquid crystals, can be exploited to implement counter-intuitive negative reflection and refraction schemes for optical signal manipulation at interfaces.

  19. Redistribution of fluorescent molecules at the solid/liquid interface with total internal reflection illumination.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin; Ye, Zhongju; Luo, Wenjuan; Chen, Bo; Xiao, Lehui

    2016-08-01

    Many intriguing physical and chemical processes commonly take place at the solid/liquid interface. Total internal reflection illumination, together with single molecule spectroscopy, provides a robust platform for the selective exploration of kinetic processes close the interface. With these techniques, it was observed that the distribution of Rhodamine B molecules close to a solid/liquid interface could be regulated in a photo-induced route. The laser-induced repulsion force at this interface is enough to compromise the Brownian diffusion of single molecules in a range of several hundred nanometers normal to the solid/liquid interface. This observation is fundamentally and practically interesting because moderate laser intensity is enough to initiate this repulsion effect. Therefore, it might display extensive applications in the development of photo-modulation technique with high throughput capability.

  20. Quantitative Contact Resonance Force Microscopy for Viscoelastic Measurement of Soft Materials at the Solid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Churnside, Allison B; Tung, Ryan C; Killgore, Jason P

    2015-10-13

    Viscoelastic property measurements made at the solid-liquid interface are key to characterizing materials for a variety of biological and industrial applications. Further, nanostructured materials require nanoscale measurements. Here, material loss tangents (tan δ) were extracted from confounding liquid effects in nanoscale contact resonance force microscopy (CR-FM), an atomic force microscope based technique for observing mechanical properties of surfaces. Obtaining reliable CR-FM viscoelastic measurements in liquid is complicated by two effects. First, in liquid, spurious signals arise during cantilever excitation. Second, it is challenging to separate changes to cantilever behavior due to the sample from changes due to environmental damping and added mass effects. We overcame these challenges by applying photothermal cantilever excitation in multiple resonance modes and a predictive model for the hydrodynamic effects. We demonstrated quantitative, nanoscale viscoelastic CR-FM measurements of polymers at the solid-liquid interface. The technique is demonstrated on a point-by-point basis on polymer samples and while imaging in contact mode on a fixed plant cell wall. Values of tan δ for measurements made in water agreed with the values for measurements in air for some experimental conditions on polystyrene and for all examined conditions on polypropylene.

  1. Dynamic Mass Transfer of Hemoglobin at the Aqueous/Ionic-Liquid Interface Monitored with Liquid Core Optical Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuwei; Yang, Xu; Zeng, Wanying; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-08-04

    Protein transfer from aqueous medium into ionic liquid is an important approach for the isolation of proteins of interest from complex biological samples. We hereby report a solid-cladding/liquid-core/liquid-cladding sandwich optical waveguide system for the purpose of monitoring the dynamic mass-transfer behaviors of hemoglobin (Hb) at the aqueous/ionic liquid interface. The optical waveguide system is fabricated by using a hydrophobic IL (1,3-dibutylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, BBimPF6) as the core, and protein solution as one of the cladding layer. UV-vis spectra are recorded with a CCD spectrophotometer via optical fibers. The recorded spectra suggest that the mass transfer of Hb molecules between the aqueous and ionic liquid media involve accumulation of Hb on the aqueous/IL interface followed by dynamic extraction/transfer of Hb into the ionic liquid phase. A part of Hb molecules remain at the interface even after the accomplishment of the extraction/transfer process. Further investigations indicate that the mass transfer of Hb from aqueous medium into the ionic liquid phase is mainly driven by the coordination interaction between heme group of Hb and the cationic moiety of ionic liquid, for example, imidazolium cation in this particular case. In addition, hydrophobic interactions also contribute to the transfer of Hb.

  2. Electric Field Effect on Phospholipid Monolayers at an Aqueous-Organic Liquid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Yzeiri, Irena; Hou, Binyang; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Bu, Wei; Vanysek, Petr; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Binhua; Král, Petr; Schlossman, Mark L

    2015-07-23

    The electric potential difference across cell membranes, known as the membrane potential, plays an important role in the activation of many biological processes. To investigate the effect of the membrane potential on the molecular ordering of lipids within a biomimetic membrane, a self-assembled monolayer of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) lipids at an electrified 1,2-dichloroethane/water interface is studied with X-ray reflectivity and interfacial tension. Measurements over a range of electric potential differences, -150 to +130 mV, that encompass the range of typical biomembrane potentials demonstrate a nearly constant and stable structure whose lipid interfacial density is comparable to that found in other biomimetic membrane systems. Measurements at higher positive potentials, up to 330 mV, illustrate a monotonic decrease in the lipid interfacial density and accompanying variations in the interfacial configuration of the lipid. Molecular dynamics simulations, designed to mimic the experimental conditions, show that the measured changes in lipid configuration are due primarily to the variation in area per lipid with increasing applied electric field. Rotation of the SOPC dipole moment by the torque from the applied electric field appears to be negligible, except at the highest measured potentials. The simulations confirm in atomistic detail the measured potential-dependent characteristics of SOPC monolayers. Our hybrid study sheds light on phospholipid monolayer stability under different membrane potentials, which is important for understanding membrane processes. This study also illustrates the use of X-ray surface scattering to probe the ordering of surfactant monolayers at an electrified aqueous-organic liquid-liquid interface.

  3. Chiral induction and amplification in supramolecular systems at the liquid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Ghijsens, Elke; George, Subi J; Wolffs, Martin; Tomović, Željko; Schenning, Albertus P H J; De Feyter, Steven

    2013-06-03

    Chiral induction and amplification in surface-confined supramolecular monolayers are investigated at the liquid-solid interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) proves that achiral molecules can self-assemble into globally chiral patterns through a variety of approaches, including induction by chiral solvents or by a novel chiral amplification method. Our study demonstrates the aptness of both approaches, which have already been applied to (supramolecular) polymers in solution, to create chiral supramolecular monolayers at the liquid-solid interface.

  4. Air plasma treatment of liquid covered tissue: long timescale chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietz, Amanda M.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for the treatment of wounds and cancerous tumors. In these applications, the sample is usually covered by a thin layer of a biological liquid. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by the plasma activate and are processed by the liquid before the plasma produced activation reaches the tissue. The synergy between the plasma and the liquid, including evaporation and the solvation of ions and neutrals, is critical to understanding the outcome of plasma treatment. The atmospheric pressure plasma sources used in these procedures are typically repetitively pulsed. The processes activated by the plasma sources have multiple timescales—from a few ns during the discharge pulse to many minutes for reactions in the liquid. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of plasma-liquid interactions and liquid phase chemistry using a global model with the goal of addressing this large dynamic range in timescales. In modeling air plasmas produced by a dielectric barrier discharge over liquid covered tissue, 5000 voltage pulses were simulated, followed by 5 min of afterglow. Due to the accumulation of long-lived species such as ozone and N x O y , the gas phase dynamics of the 5000th discharge pulse are different from those of the first pulse, particularly with regards to the negative ions. The consequences of applied voltage, gas flow, pulse repetition frequency, and the presence of organic molecules in the liquid on the gas and liquid reactive species are discussed.

  5. Effect of thermal convection on the shape of a solid-liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennetrier, C.; Chopra, M. A.; De Groh, H. C., III

    1991-01-01

    The effect of thermal convection on the shape of solid-liquid interface was investigated in experiments conducted in a transparent Bridgman-type directional solidification furnace. The relationship was numerically modeled using a standard 2D finite-difference approach, with the solid-liquid deformable interface approximated by a blocking-off technique. The directional solidification furnace was used with pure succinonitrile (which is also transparent) contained in a long square ampoule made of borosilicate glass. With the furnace in the vertical configuration, a flat interface was observed, in agreement with the model. On the other hand, a highly distorted interface was obtained in the horizontal configuration; the numerical results showed a strong recirculating cell in front of the interface due to natural thermal convection. The results indicate that thermal convection is responsible for the interface distortion.

  6. Electrochemical behaviour and voltammetric sensitivity at arrays of nanoscale interfaces between immiscible liquids.

    PubMed

    Rimboud, Mickaël; Hart, Robert D; Becker, Thomas; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2011-11-21

    Arrays of nanoscale interfaces between immiscible electrolyte solutions were formed using silicon nitride nanopore array membranes. Nanopores in the range from 75 nm radius down to 17 nm radius were used to form the nano-interfaces. It was found that the liquid organic phase electrolyte solution filled the pores so that inlaid nano-interfaces were formed with the aqueous phase. Cyclic voltammetry at these nano-interface arrays demonstrated steady-state behaviour at the larger interfaces but the voltammetric wave-shape became progressively worse as the interface size decreased. It was found that the ion transfer currents were ca. 50% of those expected based on theoretical calculations, which is attributed to overlap of diffusion zones at adjacent nano-interfaces. Here, the separation between adjacent nano-interfaces was 20-times the interface radius. The analytical sensitivity for ion transfer from the aqueous to the 1,6-dichlorohexane organic phase was estimated from calibration plots of current density versus concentration of aqueous tetraethylammonium cation. The sensitivity was in the range of 65 μA cm(-2) μM(-1) (at 75 nm radius interfaces) to 265 μA cm(-2) μM(-1) (at 17 nm radius interfaces). The sensitivity depended directly on the inverse of the nano-interface radius, implying that smaller interfaces will provide better sensitivity, due to the enhanced flux of analyte arising from convergent diffusion to smaller electrochemical interfaces.

  7. Fast Responsive and Controllable Liquid Transport on a Magnetic Fluid/Nanoarray Composite Interface.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dongliang; Zhang, Na; Zheng, Xi; Hou, Guanglei; Tian, Ye; Du, Yi; Jiang, Lei; Dou, Shi Xue

    2016-06-28

    Controllable liquid transport on surface is expected to occur by manipulating the gradient of surface tension/Laplace pressure and external stimuli, which has been intensively studied on solid or liquid interface. However, it still faces challenges of slow response rate, and uncontrollable transport speed and direction. Here, we demonstrate fast responsive and controllable liquid transport on a smart magnetic fluid/nanoarray interface, i.e., a composite interface, via modulation of an external magnetic field. The wettability of the composite interface to water instantaneously responds to gradient magnetic field due to the magnetically driven composite interface gradient roughness transition that takes place within a millisecond, which is at least 1 order of magnitude faster than that of other responsive surfaces. A water droplet can follow the motion of the gradient composite interface structure as it responds to the gradient magnetic field motion. Moreover, the water droplet transport direction can be controlled by modulating the motion direction of the gradient magnetic field. The composite interface can be used as a pump for the transport of immiscible liquids and other objects in the microchannel, which suggests a way to design smart interface materials and microfluidic devices.

  8. The molecular structure of the interface between water and a hydrophobic substrate is liquid-vapor like.

    PubMed

    Willard, Adam P; Chandler, David

    2014-11-14

    With molecular simulation for water and a tunable hydrophobic substrate, we apply the instantaneous interface construction [A. P. Willard and D. Chandler, "Instantaneous liquid interfaces," J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954-1958 (2010)] to examine the similarity between a water-vapor interface and a water-hydrophobic surface interface. We show that attractive interactions between a hydrophobic surface and water affect capillary wave fluctuations of the instantaneous liquid interface, but these attractive interactions have essentially no effect on the intrinsic interface. The intrinsic interface refers to molecular structure in terms of distances from the instantaneous interface. Further, the intrinsic interface of liquid water and a hydrophobic substrate differs little from that of water and its vapor. The same is not true, we show, for an interface between water and a hydrophilic substrate. In that case, strong directional substrate-water interactions disrupt the liquid-vapor-like interfacial hydrogen bonding network.

  9. METHOD FOR MEASURING AIR-IMMISCIBLE LIQUID PARTITION COEFFICIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of this work was to measure nonaqueous phase liquid-air partition coefficients for various gas tracer compounds. Known amounts of trichloroethene (TCE) and tracer, as neat compounds, were introduced into glass vials and allowed to equilibrate. The TCE and ...

  10. Interaction of Charged Colloidal Particles at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-07-07

    We study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the interaction between charged colloidal particles confined to the air-water interface. The dependence of force on ionic strength and counterion valence is explored. For 1:1 electrolyte, we find that the electrostatic interaction at the interface is very close to the one observed in the bulk. On the other hand, for salts with multivalent counterions, an interface produces an enhanced attraction between like charged colloids. Finally, we explore the effect of induced surface charge at the air-water interface on the interaction between colloidal particles.

  11. Water Tank with Capillary Air/Liquid Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Smith, Frederick; Edeen, Gregg; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A bladderless water tank (see figure) has been developed that contains capillary devices that allow it to be filled and emptied, as needed, in microgravity. When filled with water, the tank shields human occupants of a spacecraft against cosmic radiation. A membrane that is permeable by air but is hydrophobic (neither wettable nor permeable by liquid water) covers one inside surface of the tank. Grooves between the surface and the membrane allow air to flow through vent holes in the surface as the tank is filled or drained. A margin of wettable surface surrounds the edges of the membrane, and all the other inside tank surfaces are also wettable. A fill/drain port is located in one corner of the tank and is covered with a hydrophilic membrane. As filling begins, water runs from the hydrophilic membrane into the corner fillets of the tank walls. Continued filling in the absence of gravity will result in a single contiguous air bubble that will be vented through the hydrophobic membrane. The bubble will be reduced in size until it becomes spherical and smaller than the tank thickness. Draining the tank reverses the process. Air is introduced through the hydrophobic membrane, and liquid continuity is maintained with the fill/drain port through the corner fillets. Even after the tank is emptied, as long as the suction pressure on the hydrophilic membrane does not exceed its bubble point, no air will be drawn into the liquid line.

  12. Synthetic Polymers at Interfaces: Monodisperse Emulsions Multiple Emulsions and Liquid Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guanqing

    discussion of emulsion stabilization and preparation. A historical review of multiple emulsions is presented subsequently and the stability mechanism is discussed in details with regard to the transportation kinetics of small molecules through the separating membrane of double emulsions. The principle, property and applications of liquid marbles are then summarized. Secondly, the preparation of monodisperse Pickering emulsions stabilized by soft PNIPAM-co-MAA microgels through SPG membrane emulsification is described. The influence of the membrane pore size, pH of the particle dispersion, particle size and the operating parameters of the membrane emulsification device on the size of the emulsion droplets was investigated systematically. The improvement in monodispersity of the emulsion droplets allows us to measure the release profiles of a small molecular dye and a larger nanoparticle through the colloidosomes. It is further demonstrated that the preparation of monodisperse emulsions stabilized by other types of soft particles allows us control the stability of the emulsion with a pH trigger and improved biocompatibility. Thirdly, the preparation of multiple emulsions stabilized by a special designed PEG-b-PS diblock copolymer with desired hydrophobicity by one-step method was presented. The ultra-stability of the as-obtained multiple emulsions was ascribed to the effective steric stabilization of the two interfaces with different polymer configurations at the interfaces. A series of diblock copolymer with increasing PS chain length was then synthesized to investigate the influence of asymmetry ratio on the type of emulsions prepared. It is found that the diblock copolymers with the asymmetry ratio of approximately 1 had the highest power to stabilize multiple emulsions. The multiple emulsions were demonstrated to be a promising platform for controlled release. In the end, particle-stabilized water-in-air liquid marbles were investigated. PSco-MAA nanoparticles synthesized

  13. Thermodynamic and kinetic solid-liquid interface properties from transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şopu, Daniel; Rogal, Jutta; Drautz, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    We perform transition path sampling simulations to determine two of the key quantities in solidification, the solid-liquid interface energy and velocity, in a Lennard-Jones system. Our approach is applicable to a wide range of temperature and pressure conditions, at the melting temperature and out-of-equilibrium. We show that small system sizes are sufficient for good values of interface energies and velocities. The transition path sampling method thus offers an attractive and robust alternative for the evaluation of solid-liquid interface properties.

  14. A Microscopic Model for the Liquid Metal - Ionic Solution Interface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-10

    Chemistry 1. Laboratoire de Physique des Liquides et Electrochimie , Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 752?0 PARIS CEDEX 05, FRANCE...Laboratoire de Physique des Liquides et Electrochimie , Universita Pie=re at Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75230 PARIS CEDEX 05, FRANCE. F. VERICAI 0

  15. Nonequilibrium kinetic boundary condition at the vapor-liquid interface of argon.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Fujikawa, Shigeo; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2013-10-01

    A boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation (kinetic boundary condition, KBC) at the vapor-liquid interface of argon is constructed with the help of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The KBC is examined at a constant liquid temperature of 85 K in a wide range of nonequilibrium states of vapor. The present investigation is an extension of a previous one by Ishiyama, Yano, and Fujikawa [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 084504 (2005)] and provides a more complete form of the KBC. The present KBC includes a thermal accommodation coefficient in addition to evaporation and condensation coefficients, and these coefficients are determined in MD simulations uniquely. The thermal accommodation coefficient shows an anisotropic behavior at the interface for molecular velocities normal versus tangential to the interface. It is also found that the evaporation and condensation coefficients are almost constant in a fairly wide range of nonequilibrium states. The thermal accommodation coefficient of the normal velocity component is almost unity, while that of the tangential component shows a decreasing function of the density of vapor incident on the interface, indicating that the tangential velocity distribution of molecules leaving the interface into the vapor phase may deviate from the tangential parts of the Maxwell velocity distribution at the liquid temperature. A mechanism for the deviation of the KBC from the isotropic Maxwell KBC at the liquid temperature is discussed in terms of anisotropic energy relaxation at the interface. The liquid-temperature dependence of the present KBC is also discussed.

  16. Mobile Interfaces: Liquids as a Perfect Structural Material for Multifunctional, Antifouling Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grinthal, A; Aizenberg, J

    2014-01-14

    Life creates some of its most robust, extreme surface materials not from solids but from liquids: a purely liquid interface, stabilized by underlying nanotexture, makes carnivorous plant leaves ultraslippery, the eye optically perfect and dirt-resistant, our knees lubricated and pressure-tolerant, and insect feet reversibly adhesive and shape-adaptive. Novel liquid surfaces based on this idea have recently been shown to display unprecedented omniphobic, self-healing, anti-ice, antifouling, optical, and adaptive properties. In this Perspective, we present a framework and a path forward for developing and designing such liquid surfaces into sophisticated, versatile multifunctional materials. Drawing on concepts from solid materials design and fluid dynamics, we outline how the continuous dynamics, responsiveness, and multiscale patternability of a liquid surface layer can be harnessed to create a wide range of unique, active interfacial functions able to operate in harsh, changing environments not achievable with static solids. We discuss how, in partnership with the underlying substrate, the liquid surface can be programmed to adaptively and reversibly reconfigure from a defect-free, molecularly smooth, transparent interface through a range of finely tuned liquid topographies in response to environmental stimuli. With nearly unlimited design possibilities and unmatched interfacial properties, liquid materials as long-term stable interfaces yet in their fully liquid state may potentially transform surface design everywhere from medicine to architecture to energy infrastructure.

  17. Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for multifunctional, antifouling surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grinthal, Alison; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-10-14

    Life creates some of its most robust, extreme surface materials not from solids but from liquids: a purely liquid interface, stabilized by underlying nanotexture, makes carnivorous plant leaves ultraslippery, the eye optically perfect and dirt-resistant, our knees lubricated and pressure-tolerant, and insect feet reversibly adhesive and shape-adaptive. Novel liquid surfaces based on this idea have recently been shown to display unprecedented omniphobic, self-healing, anti-ice, antifouling, optical, and adaptive properties. In this Perspective, we present a framework and a path forward for developing and designing such liquid surfaces into sophisticated, versatile multifunctional materials. Drawing on concepts from solid materials design and fluid dynamics, we outline how the continuous dynamics, responsiveness, and multiscale patternability of a liquid surface layer can be harnessed to create a wide range of unique, active interfacial functions-able to operate in harsh, changing environments-not achievable with static solids. We discuss how, in partnership with the underlying substrate, the liquid surface can be programmed to adaptively and reversibly reconfigure from a defect-free, molecularly smooth, transparent interface through a range of finely tuned liquid topographies in response to environmental stimuli. In conclusion, with nearly unlimited design possibilities and unmatched interfacial properties, liquid materials-as long-term stable interfaces yet in their fully liquid state-may potentially transform surface design everywhere from medicine to architecture to energy infrastructure.

  18. Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for multifunctional, antifouling surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Grinthal, Alison; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-10-14

    Life creates some of its most robust, extreme surface materials not from solids but from liquids: a purely liquid interface, stabilized by underlying nanotexture, makes carnivorous plant leaves ultraslippery, the eye optically perfect and dirt-resistant, our knees lubricated and pressure-tolerant, and insect feet reversibly adhesive and shape-adaptive. Novel liquid surfaces based on this idea have recently been shown to display unprecedented omniphobic, self-healing, anti-ice, antifouling, optical, and adaptive properties. In this Perspective, we present a framework and a path forward for developing and designing such liquid surfaces into sophisticated, versatile multifunctional materials. Drawing on concepts from solid materials design andmore » fluid dynamics, we outline how the continuous dynamics, responsiveness, and multiscale patternability of a liquid surface layer can be harnessed to create a wide range of unique, active interfacial functions-able to operate in harsh, changing environments-not achievable with static solids. We discuss how, in partnership with the underlying substrate, the liquid surface can be programmed to adaptively and reversibly reconfigure from a defect-free, molecularly smooth, transparent interface through a range of finely tuned liquid topographies in response to environmental stimuli. In conclusion, with nearly unlimited design possibilities and unmatched interfacial properties, liquid materials-as long-term stable interfaces yet in their fully liquid state-may potentially transform surface design everywhere from medicine to architecture to energy infrastructure.« less

  19. Liquid-vapor interface locations in a spheroidal container under low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    As a part of the general study of liquid behavior in low gravity environments, an experimental investigation was conducted to determine if there are equilibrium liquid-vapor interface configurations that can exist at more than one location in oblate spheroidal containers under reduced gravity conditions. Static contact angles of the test liquids on the spheroid surface were restricted to near 0 deg. The experiments were conducted in a low gravity environment. An oblate spheroidal tank was tested with an eccentricity of 0.68 and a semimajor axis of 2.0 cm. Both quantitative and qualitative data were obtained on the liquid-vapor interface configuration and position inside the container. The results of these data, and their impat on previous work in this area, are discussed. Of particular interest are those equilibrium interface configurations that can exist at multiple locations in the container.

  20. Scale effect of slip boundary condition at solid–liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Matsumoto, Takenori; Fukushima, Kohei; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2017-03-01

    Rapid advances in microelectromechanical systems have stimulated the development of compact devices, which require effective cooling technologies (e.g., microchannel cooling). However, the inconsistencies between experimental and classical theoretical predictions for the liquid flow in microchannel remain unclarified. Given the larger surface/volume ratio of microchannel, the surface effects increase as channel scale decreases. Here we show the scale effect of the boundary condition at the solid–liquid interface on single-phase convective heat transfer characteristics in microchannels. We demonstrate that the deviation from classical theory with a reduction in hydraulic diameters is due to the breakdown of the continuum solid–liquid boundary condition. The forced convective heat transfer characteristics of single-phase laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel are investigated. Using the theoretical Poiseuille and Nusselt numbers derived under the slip boundary condition at the solid–liquid interface, we estimate the slip length and thermal slip length at the interface.

  1. Scale effect of slip boundary condition at solid–liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Matsumoto, Takenori; Fukushima, Kohei; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2017-01-01

    Rapid advances in microelectromechanical systems have stimulated the development of compact devices, which require effective cooling technologies (e.g., microchannel cooling). However, the inconsistencies between experimental and classical theoretical predictions for the liquid flow in microchannel remain unclarified. Given the larger surface/volume ratio of microchannel, the surface effects increase as channel scale decreases. Here we show the scale effect of the boundary condition at the solid–liquid interface on single-phase convective heat transfer characteristics in microchannels. We demonstrate that the deviation from classical theory with a reduction in hydraulic diameters is due to the breakdown of the continuum solid–liquid boundary condition. The forced convective heat transfer characteristics of single-phase laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel are investigated. Using the theoretical Poiseuille and Nusselt numbers derived under the slip boundary condition at the solid–liquid interface, we estimate the slip length and thermal slip length at the interface. PMID:28256536

  2. Universal adsorption at the vapor-liquid interface near the consolute point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, James W.

    1990-01-01

    The ellipticity of the vapor-liquid interface above mixtures of methylcyclohexane (C7H14) and perfluoromethylcyclohexane (C7F14) has been measured near the consolute point T(c) = 318.6 K. The data are consistent with a model of the interface that combines a short-ranged density-vs height profile in the vapor phase with a much longer-ranged composition-versus-height profile in the liquid. The value of the free parameter produced by fitting the model to the data is consistent with results from two other simple mixtures and a mixture of a polymer and solvent. This experiment combines precision ellipsometry of the vapor-liquid interface with in situ measurements of refractive indices of the liquid phases, and it precisely locates the consolute point.

  3. Scale effect of slip boundary condition at solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Matsumoto, Takenori; Fukushima, Kohei; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2017-03-03

    Rapid advances in microelectromechanical systems have stimulated the development of compact devices, which require effective cooling technologies (e.g., microchannel cooling). However, the inconsistencies between experimental and classical theoretical predictions for the liquid flow in microchannel remain unclarified. Given the larger surface/volume ratio of microchannel, the surface effects increase as channel scale decreases. Here we show the scale effect of the boundary condition at the solid-liquid interface on single-phase convective heat transfer characteristics in microchannels. We demonstrate that the deviation from classical theory with a reduction in hydraulic diameters is due to the breakdown of the continuum solid-liquid boundary condition. The forced convective heat transfer characteristics of single-phase laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel are investigated. Using the theoretical Poiseuille and Nusselt numbers derived under the slip boundary condition at the solid-liquid interface, we estimate the slip length and thermal slip length at the interface.

  4. Preparation of a smooth GaN-Gallium solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, A. E. F.; Vonk, V.; Ruat, M.; Boćkowski, M.; Kamler, G.; Grzegory, I.; Honkimäki, V.; Vlieg, E.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the preparation of an atomically flat solid-liquid interface between solid gallium nitride and liquid gallium using in situ surface X-ray diffraction to probe the interface roughness. For the creation of this interface it is necessary to start the experiment with liquid gallium which first etches into the solid at a temperature of 823 K in a nitrogen free ambient. After this rigorous cleaning procedure there is perfect wetting between solid and liquid. The roughness created due to the fast etching of the solid has to be repaired at a nitrogen pressure of 10-20 bar and a temperature around 1150 K. The (2,1) crystal truncation rod data are excellently described by a surface model having 0±0.1 Å roughness, which indicates a successful repair. The lateral length scale on which the roughness is determined has a lower limit of 750±50 Å.

  5. Adsorption Kinetics at Silica Gel/Ionic Liquid Solution Interface.

    PubMed

    Flieger, Jolanta; Tatarczak-Michalewska, Małgorzata; Groszek, Anna; Blicharska, Eliza; Kocjan, Ryszard

    2015-12-10

    A series of imidazolium and pyridinium ionic liquids with different anions (Cl(-), Br(-), BF₄(-), PF₆(-)) has been evaluated for their adsorption activity on silica gel. Quantification of the ionic liquids has been performed by the use of RP-HPLC with organic-aqueous eluents containing an acidic buffer and a chaotropic salt. Pseudo-second order kinetic models were applied to the experimental data in order to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption process. The experimental data showed good fitting with this model, confirmed by considerably high correlation coefficients. The adsorption kinetic parameters were determined and analyzed. The relative error between the calculated and experimental amount of ionic liquid adsorbed at equilibrium was within 7%. The effect of various factors such as initial ionic liquid concentration, temperature, kind of solvent, kind of ionic liquid anion and cation on adsorption efficiency were all examined in a lab-scale study. Consequently, silica gel showed better adsorptive characteristics for imidazolium-based ionic liquids with chaotropic anions from aqueous solutions in comparison to pyridinium ionic liquids. The adsorption was found to decrease with the addition of organic solvents (methanol, acetonitrile) but it was not sensitive to the change of temperature in the range of 5-40 °C.

  6. Physical ageing of the contact line on colloidal particles at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaz, David M; McGorty, Ryan; Mani, Madhav; Brenner, Michael P; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2011-12-04

    Young's law predicts that a colloidal sphere in equilibrium with a liquid interface will straddle the two fluids, its height above the interface defined by an equilibrium contact angle. This has been used to explain why colloids often bind to liquid interfaces, and has been exploited in emulsification, water purification, mineral recovery, encapsulation and the making of nanostructured materials. However, little is known about the dynamics of binding. Here we show that the adsorption of polystyrene microspheres to a water/oil interface is characterized by a sudden breach and an unexpectedly slow relaxation. The relaxation appears logarithmic in time, indicating that complete equilibration may take months. Surprisingly, viscous dissipation appears to play little role. Instead, the observed dynamics, which bear strong resemblance to ageing in glassy systems, agree well with a model describing activated hopping of the contact line over nanoscale surface heterogeneities. These results may provide clues to longstanding questions on colloidal interactions at an interface.

  7. Atomic Resolution Images of Solid-Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giambattista, Brian; McNairy, W. W.; Slough, C. G.; Johnson, A.; Bell, L. D.; Coleman, R. V.; Schneir, J.; Sonnenfeld, R.; Drake, B.; Hansma, P. K.

    1987-07-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) can provide atomic-resolution images of solids covered with a variety of liquids, including cryogenic fluids, both polar and nonpolar solvents, conductive aqueous solutions, oils, and even greases. This short overview includes images of solids covered with liquid nitrogen, liquid helium, paraffin oil, silicone oil, microscope immersion oil, silicone vacuum grease, fluorocarbon grease, glycerol, and salt water. These images show atoms, charge-density waves, grains in an evaporated metal film, and even corrosion processes as they occur in real time. The future includes not only basic research in surface science but also applied research in lithography, lubrication, catalysis, corrosion, electrochemistry, and perhaps even biology.

  8. Air entrainment by a plunging liquid jet on a liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liñan, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    1999-11-01

    When a liquid jet impinges on liquid pool, with a velocity higher than a critical velocity, a thin air film is entrained by the jet. The thickness ha of the air film, and thus the air mass entrained by the jet, is a function of its radius a and velocity U. This function, for the realistic small values of the capillary number ɛ = μa U/σ << 1 (based on the air viscosity μa and surface tension σ) turns out to be of the form h_a/a = F(a/a_c, ɛ), where a_c=√ σ/ρl g is the capillary length (based on the acceleration of gravity and liquid density ρ_l). An analysis similar to the analysis of Levish and Landau, for the entrainment of liquid by a plate moving out of a liquid pool, shows that the dependence of h_a/a on ɛ is of the form h_a/a = ɛ^2/3f(a/a_c), where f is of order unity for a/ac << 1 and f ≈ a_c/a for large values of a_c/a

  9. Relative Order of Sulfuric Acid, Bisulfate, Hydronium, and Cations at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2015-11-04

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), bisulfate (HSO4(-)), and sulfate (SO4(2-)) are among the most abundant species in tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols due to high levels of atmospheric SO2 emitted from biomass burning and volcanic eruptions. The air/aqueous interfaces of sulfuric acid and bisulfate solutions play key roles in heterogeneous reactions, acid rain, radiative balance, and polar stratospheric cloud nucleation. Molecular-level knowledge about the interfacial distribution of these inorganic species and their perturbation of water organization facilitates a better understanding of the reactivity and growth of atmospheric aerosols and of the aerosol surface charge, thus shedding light on topics of air pollution, climate change, and thundercloud electrification. Here, the air/aqueous interface of NaHSO4, NH4HSO4, and Mg(HSO4)2 salt solutions as well as H2SO4 and HCl acid solutions are investigated by means of vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected (HD) VSFG spectroscopy. VSFG spectra of all acid solutions show higher SFG response in the OH-bonded region relative to neat water, with 1.1 M H2SO4 being more enhanced than 1.1 M HCl. In addition, VSFG spectra of bisulfate salt solutions highly resemble that of the dilute H2SO4 solution (0.26 M) at a comparable pH. HD-VSFG (Im χ((2))) spectra of acid and bisulfate salt solutions further reveal that hydrogen-bonded water molecules are oriented preferentially toward the bulk liquid phase. General agreement between Im χ((2)) spectra of 1.1 M H2SO4 and 1.1 M HCl acid solutions indicate that HSO4(-) ions have a similar surface preference as that of chloride (Cl(-)) ions. By comparing the direction and magnitude of the electric fields arising from the interfacial ion distributions and the concentration of each species, the most reasonable relative surface preference that can be deduced from a simplified model follows the order H3O(+) > HSO4(-) > Na(+), NH4(+), Mg(2+) > SO4(2-). Interestingly

  10. Interaction of monovalent ions with the water liquid-vapor interface - A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics calculations are presented for a series of ions at infinite dilution near the water liquid-vapor interface. The free energies of ion transfer from the bulk to the interface are discussed, as are the accompanying changes of water structure at the surface and ion mobilities as a function of their proximity to the interface. It is shown that simple dielectric models do not provide an accurate description of ions at the water surface. The results of the study should be useful in the development of better models incorporating the shape and molecular structure of the interface.

  11. Study on Orbital Liquid Transport and Interface Behavior in Vane Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Qi; Rui, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Liquid propellant tank is used to supply gas free liquid for spacecraft as an important part of propulsion system. The liquid behavior dominated by surface tension in microgravity is obviously different with that on the ground, which put forward a new challenge to the liquid transport and relocation. The experiments which are investigated at drop tower in National Microgravity Lab have concentrated on liquid relocation following thruster firing. Considered that the liquid located at the bottom in the direction of the acceleration vector, a sphere scale vane tank is used to study the liquid-gas interface behaviors with different acceleration vector and different filling independently and we obtain a series of stable equilibrium interface and relocation time. We find that there is an obvious sedimentation in the direction of acceleration vector when fill rate greater than 2% fill. Suggestions have been put forward that outer vanes transferring liquid to the outlet should be fixed and small holes should be dogged at the vane close to the center post to improve the liquid flow between different vanes when B0 is greater than 2.5. The research about liquid transport alone ribbon vanes is simulated though software Flow3D. The simulation process is verified by comparing the liquid lip and vapor-liquid interface obtained from drop tower experiment and simulation result when fill rate is 15%. Then the influence of fill rate, numbers of vanes and the gap between vane and wall is studied through the same simulate process. Vanes' configurations are also changed to study the effect on the lip and liquid volume below some section. Some suggestions are put forward for the design of vanes.

  12. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  13. Microbes at Surface-Air Interfaces: The Metabolic Harnessing of Relative Humidity, Surface Hygroscopicity, and Oligotrophy for Resilience.

    PubMed

    Stone, Wendy; Kroukamp, Otini; Korber, Darren R; McKelvie, Jennifer; Wolfaardt, Gideon M

    2016-01-01

    The human environment is predominantly not aqueous, and microbes are ubiquitous at the surface-air interfaces with which we interact. Yet microbial studies at surface-air interfaces are largely survival-oriented, whilst microbial metabolism has overwhelmingly been investigated from the perspective of liquid saturation. This study explored microbial survival and metabolism under desiccation, particularly the influence of relative humidity (RH), surface hygroscopicity, and nutrient availability on the interchange between these two phenomena. The combination of a hygroscopic matrix (i.e., clay or 4,000 MW polyethylene glycol) and high RH resulted in persistent measurable microbial metabolism during desiccation. In contrast, no microbial metabolism was detected at (a) hygroscopic interfaces at low RH, and (b) less hygroscopic interfaces (i.e., sand and plastic/glass) at high or low RH. Cell survival was conversely inhibited at high RH and promoted at low RH, irrespective of surface hygroscopicity. Based on this demonstration of metabolic persistence and survival inhibition at high RH, it was proposed that biofilm metabolic rates might inversely influence whole-biofilm resilience, with 'resilience' defined in this study as a biofilm's capacity to recover from desiccation. The concept of whole-biofilm resilience being promoted by oligotrophy was supported in desiccation-tolerant Arthrobacter spp. biofilms, but not in desiccation-sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The ability of microbes to interact with surfaces to harness water vapor during desiccation was demonstrated, and potentially to harness oligotrophy (the most ubiquitous natural condition facing microbes) for adaptation to desiccation.

  14. The Solubility of Nitrogen and Air in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battino, Rubin; Rettich, Timothy R.; Tominaga, Toshihiro

    1984-04-01

    This review covers the solubility of nitrogen and air in liquids as a function of temperature and pressure. Solubility data for individual systems were critically evaluated. Recommended or tentative values are presented as smoothing equations and/or in tabular form. Trends in homologous series or related solvents are discussed. Data for the n-alkanes were smoothed with respect to temperature, pressure, and carbon number. Liquids include: water; heavy water; seawater; aqueous salt solutions; mixed solvents; hydrocarbons; organic compounds containing oxygen, halogen, sulfur, nitrogen, or silicon; olive oil; various biological fluids; H2S; SO2; NH3; CO2; nitrogen oxides; and several halogen and boron containing inorganic solvents.

  15. Temporally Anticorrelated Motion of Nanoparticles at a Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Hu, Renfeng; Skaug, Michael J; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-01-02

    Quantum dots at the hexane-glycerol interface exhibited unexpected behavior including highly dynamic adsorption/desorption, where the lateral nanoparticle motion was anomalously fast immediately after adsorption and prior to desorption. At the interface, particles exhibited pseudo-Brownian lateral motion, in which the instantaneous diffusion coefficient was temporally anticorrelated, in agreement with our simulations involving fractional Brownian motion in the surface-normal direction. These phenomena suggest that, in contrast to the conventional picture for colloidal particles, nanoparticles explore a landscape of metastable interfacial positions, with different exposures to the two adjacent phases.

  16. Using silicon diodes for detecting the liquid-vapor interface in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Fabik, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed using commercially available silicon diode temperature sensors to detect the location of the liquid-vapor interface in hydrogen during ground test programs. Results show that by increasing the current into the sensor, silicon diodes can be used as liquid level point sensors. After cycling the sensors from liquid to vapor several times, it was found that with a 30 mA (milliamps) input current, the sensors respond within 2 seconds by measuring a large voltage difference when transitioning from liquid to vapor across the interface. Nearly instantaneous response resulted during a transition form vapor to liquid. Detailed here are test procedures, experimental results, and guidelines for applying this information to other test facilities.

  17. Using silicon diodes for detecting the liquid-vapor interface in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Fabik, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed using commercially available silicon diode temperature sensors to detect the location of the liquid-vapor interface in hydrogen during ground test programs. Results show that by increasing the current into the sensor, silicon diodes can be used as liquid level point sensors. After cycling the sensors from liquid to vapor several times, it was found that with a 30 mA (milliamps) input current, the sensors respond within 2 seconds by measuring a large voltage difference when transitioning from liquid to vapor across the interface. Nearly instantaneous response resulted during a transition from vapor to liquid. Detailed here are test procedures, experimental results, and guidelines for applying this information to other test facilities.

  18. Synthesis of pure iron nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interface using pulsed plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelgenbaeva, Zhazgul; Omurzak, Emil; Takebe, Shintaro; Sulaimankulova, Saadat; Abdullaeva, Zhypargul; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    2014-09-01

    Pure α-Fe nanoparticles with ≤10 nm size were synthesized using a simple method—pulsed plasma in liquid. This is the first time that pure metallic nanoparticles were prepared by arc discharge method using water-toluene interface as a medium. Several experiments made evident that toluene-water ratio in emulsion influences the purity and size of Fe nanoparticles. The purity of the nanoparticles gradually increased from 48 to 98 %, while particle size decreased from 21 to 9.5 nm with smaller toluene volume fraction (from 40 to 5 %) in the microemulsions. Finally, toluene:water with 95:5 (%) ratio was found to be the most appropriate medium for pure Fe nanoparticle formation. Lattice parameters of the obtained Fe samples calculated from XRD found to be larger ( a = 0.2927 nm) than those previously reported Fe ( a (BCC-Fe) = 0.2866 nm). HRTEM showed spherical-shaped Fe nanoparticles with partial aggregation. Vibrating sample magnetometer indicated superparamagnetic properties of particles with high-saturation magnetization ( M s = 125 emu g-1) at room temperature.

  19. Capillary forces between sediment particles and an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Lapin, Sergey; Flury, Markus

    2012-04-17

    In the vadose zone, air-water interfaces play an important role in particle fate and transport, as particles can attach to the air-water interfaces by action of capillary forces. This attachment can either retard or enhance the movement of particles, depending on whether the air-water interfaces are stationary or mobile. Here we use three standard PTFE particles (sphere, circular cylinder, and tent) and seven natural mineral particles (basalt, granite, hematite, magnetite, mica, milky quartz, and clear quartz) to quantify the capillary forces between an air-water interface and the different particles. Capillary forces were determined experimentally using tensiometry, and theoretically assuming volume-equivalent spherical, ellipsoidal, and circular cylinder shapes. We experimentally distinguished between the maximum capillary force and the snap-off force when the air-water interface detaches from the particle. Theoretical and experimental values of capillary forces were of similar order of magnitude. The sphere gave the smallest theoretical capillary force, and the circular cylinder had the largest force due to pinning of the air-water interface. Pinning was less pronounced for natural particles when compared to the circular cylinder. Ellipsoids gave the best agreement with measured forces, suggesting that this shape can provide a reasonable estimation of capillary forces for many natural particles.

  20. Pressurized nano-liquid-junction interface for coupling capillary electrochromatography and nano-liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Giovanni; Fanali, Salvatore

    2013-11-22

    A new nano-liquid-junction interface for coupling both capillary electrochromatography (CEC) or nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC) with mass spectrometry (MS) was studied. The interface was a small T piece of polymeric material where capillary column and tip capillary were positioned at 180° while the third exit (at 90°) was occupied by a capillary delivering a liquid-assisting spray ionization for CEC experiments or by the electrode for the high voltage spray for nano-LC. Experiments were carried out analyzing mixtures of some organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) or anti-inflammatory and related acidic drugs with MS detection in positive or negative ion mode, respectively. Analyzed OPPs compounds were baseline resolved utilizing the novel interface in both nano-LC and CEC obtaining good sensitivity and repeatability. For CEC-MS, the limits of detection ranged between 0.03 and 6.80 μg/mL and the intra-day repeatability was RSD <3.8% and <13% for the retention times and peak areas, respectively. The interface was easy to handle and good reproducibility, between 2.5 and 3.5% for the retention time and <10% for the efficiencies, was obtained when the interface was installed by two different analysts. Furthermore, it could be used for both CEC and nano-LC.

  1. Influence of process parameters to composite interface organization and performance of liquid/solid bimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, S. F.; Zhu, Y. C.; Wu, Y. H.; Yang, P. H.; Duan, X. L.; Zhou, H. T.

    2015-12-01

    The liquid-solid composite technique was used to prepare the high carbon high chromium steel (HCHCS) and low alloy steel (LCS) bimetal composite materials by means of insert casting method. The influence of some process parameters such as liquid-solid ratio, preheat temperature, pouring temperature on the interface microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. Interface microstructure and element distribution were analyzed. The results show that the interface microstructure becomes better, and bonding area becomes thicker with the increase of the volume of liquid to solid ratio, preheating temperature and pouring temperature. When the liquid-solid ratio is 8:1, the preheating temperature is 300 °C and the pouring temperature is 1565 °C, a good metallurgical bonding area without any hole can be obtained with the interface combination of diffusion and fusion. The composite interface structure was composed of a core material diffusion layer, a cooling solidification layer, a direction growth layer and some cell particles. The elements of C, Cr and Mn diffuse from the HCHCS side to the alloy steel side. The microhardness increased in the gradient from the LCS side to the HCHCS. The microhardness of the interface is significantly higher than that of LCS.

  2. Electrohydrodynamic Displacement of Polarizable Liquid Interfaces in an Alternating Current Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Zachary

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we investigate Maxwell-Wagner polarization at electrically polarizable liquid interfaces. An AC electric field is applied across a liquid electrical interface created between two co-flowing microfluidic fluid streams with different electrical properties. When potentials as low as 2 volts are applied, we observe a frequency dependent interfacial displacement that is dependent on the relative differences in the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant between the two liquids. At low frequency this deflection is dependent on electrical conductivity, and only depends on dielectric constant at high frequency. At intermediate frequencies, we observe a crossover that is independent of applied voltage, sensitive to both fluid electrical properties, and where no displacement is observed. An analytical polarization model is presented that predicts the liquid interfacial crossover frequency, the dependence of interfacial displacement on liquid electrical conductivity and dielectric constant, and accurately scales the interface displacement measurements. The results show that liquid interfaces are capable of polarizing under AC electric fields and being precisely deflected in a direction and magnitude that is dependent on the applied electric field frequency.

  3. Modeling the Interface Instability and Mixing Flow During the Process of Liquid Explosion Dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Xu, S. L.; Ren, Y. J.; Liu, G. R.; Ren, X. B.; Xie, W. J.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, Z. L.

    The liquid flow during the process of liquid explosion dissemination is a typical complex high-speed unsteady motion with multi-scale in space and time. The motion of liquid flow may be partitioned to several stages. The first is initial liquid expansion by the action of shock wave and explosive gaseous products. The second is breakup of liquid annulus and turbulent mixing, which is called near-field flow. The third is two-phase mixing flow of gas and liquid drops, which is called far-field flow. To first stage, a compressible inviscid liquid model was used, while an elastic and plastic model was used to depict the expansion of solid shell. Numerical study in two dimensional has been made by using the Arbitrary Euler-Lagrange (ALE) methods. In near-field, the unstable flow of liquid annulus is dominated by many factors. (1) The shock action of gaseous expansive products. (2) The geometric structure of wave system in liquid. (3) The local bubble and cavitating flow in annulus, induce much of local unstable interface, tear up interfaces, and enhance the instability and breakup of liquid annulus. In this paper, some postulations are proposed that the cavitations in liquid annulus are induced by shock wave and the flow of liquid annulus is a two phase flow (liquid and a discrete bubble groups). Some experimental results will be presented that the breakup of interface and turbulent mixing is visualized qualitatively and measured quantitatively by using shadow photography method. The primary results are some flow patten of interfaces and some transient flow parameters by which the nonlinear character will be obtained, and provide an experiential support for modeling to unstable interface flow and turbulent mixing. The two-phase mixing flow between liquid drops and gas in far-field can be studied by numerical methods where the turbulent motion of gas phase is represented with k-ɛ model in Euler system, the motion of particle phase is represented with particle stochastic

  4. Liquid-liquid interfaces as potentiometric ion-sensors-I The n-butanol-water interface as indicating sensor for the potentiometric titration of some acids and bases.

    PubMed

    Liteanu, C; Mioşcu, M

    1972-07-01

    The property that liquid-liquid interfaces modify their electrical charge as a function of the composition of the two phases in contact has been used to detect the end-points in a series of acid-base titrations in the aqueous phase. Although the titration curves are not classical in shape, the equivalence points can be located if the solutions are not too dilute. Good results for concentrations down to 10(-3)N have been obtained. The electrode has a fast response. The influence of surface-active substances on the titration has also been investigated.

  5. Does colloid shape affect detachment of colloids by a moving air-water interface?

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L; Davis, Howard P

    2013-05-14

    Air-water interfaces interact strongly with colloidal particles by capillary forces. The magnitude of the interaction force depends on, among other things, the particle shape. Here, we investigate the effects of particle shape on colloid detachment by a moving air-water interface. We used hydrophilic polystyrene colloids with four different shapes (spheres, barrels, rods, and oblong disks), but otherwise identical surface properties. The nonspherical shapes were created by stretching spherical microspheres on a film of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The colloids were then deposited onto the inner surface of a glass channel. An air bubble was introduced into the channel and passed through, thereby generating a receding followed by an advancing air-water interface. The detachment of colloids by the air-water interfaces was visualized with a confocal microscope, quantified by image analysis, and analyzed statistically to determine significant differences. For all colloid shapes, the advancing air-water interface caused pronounced colloid detachment (>63%), whereas the receding interface was ineffective in colloid detachment (<1.5%). Among the different colloid shapes, the barrels were most readily removed (94%) by the advancing interface, followed by the spheres and oblong disks (80%) and the rods (63%). Colloid detachment was significantly affected by colloid shape. The presence of an edge, as it occurs in a barrel-shaped colloid, promoted colloid detachment because the air-water interface is being pinned at the edge of the colloid. This suggests that the magnitude of colloid mobilization and transport in porous media is underestimated for edged particles and overestimated for rodlike particles when a sphere is used as a model colloid.

  6. IES. Air Emission, Liquid Effluent Inventory and Reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, T.

    1996-10-01

    The IES maintains an inventory of radiological air and liquid effluents released to the atmosphere. The IES utilizes the official stack numbers. Data may be entered by generators for any monitoring time period. Waste volumes released as well as their radiological constituents are tracked. The IES provides data to produce a report for NESHAPS as well as several administrative action/anomaly reports. These reports flag unusual occurences (releases) that are above normal range releases.

  7. Solvation Dynamics of CO₂(g) by Monoethanolamine at the Gas-Liquid Interface: A Molecular Mechanics Approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, I-Shou; Li, Jia-Jen; Tsai, Ming-Kang

    2016-12-23

    A classical force field approach was used to characterize the solvation dynamics of high-density CO₂(g) by monoethanolamine (MEA) at the air-liquid interface. Intra- and intermolecular CO₂ and MEA potentials were parameterized according to the energetics calculated at the MP2 and BLYP-D2 levels of theory. The thermodynamic properties of CO₂ and MEA, such as heat capacity and melting point, were consistently predicted using this classical potential. An approximate interfacial simulation for CO₂(g)/MEA(l) was performed to monitor the depletion of the CO₂(g) phase, which was influenced by amino and hydroxyl groups of MEA. There are more intramolecular hydrogen bond interactions notably identified in the interfacial simulation than the case of bulk MEA(l) simulation. The hydroxyl group of MEA was found to more actively approach CO₂ and overpower the amino group to interact with CO₂ at the air-liquid interface. With artificially reducing the dipole moment of the hydroxyl group, CO₂-amino group interaction was enhanced and suppressed CO₂(g) depletion. The hydroxyl group of MEA was concluded to play dual but contradictory roles for CO₂ capture.

  8. It's Alive!: Students Observe Air-Water Interface Samples Rich with Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This article describes an experiment, designed by Cindy Henk, manager of the Socolofsky Microscopy Center at Louisiana State University (LSU), that involved collecting and viewing microorganisms in the air-water interface. The experiment was participated by Leesville High School microbiology students. The students found that the air-water…

  9. Potentiostat for Characterizing Microstructures at Ionic Liquid/Electrode Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-10

    systems via simultaneous electrochemical and spectroscopic studies. These data are pertinent to understanding the microscopic (molecular and ionic...characterize ionic liquid-based (IL-based) electrolyte systems via simultaneous electrochemical and spectroscopic studies. These data are pertinent to...spectrometer to perform surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy with electrochemical control. The multichannel instrument has also

  10. Understanding the lateral movement of particles adsorbed at a solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Savaji, Kunal; Li, Xue; Couzis, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the phenomenon of lateral movement of particles that are electrostatically adsorbed at a solid-liquid interface. The experimental system involves negatively charged silica particles of two different sizes (65 nm and 90 nm) that are exposed to the positively charged solid surface (silane coated silicon wafer) in sequential steps. The particle-adsorbed wafers are analyzed under a scanning electron microscope and the images are processed to determine the pair-correlation function for the particles adsorbed in the first step. From the pair correlation data and the particle surface coverage data we show that the adsorbed particles are mobile at the solid-liquid interface. In specific, we show that the adsorbed particles are mobile at the solid-liquid interface when there is a driving force for the adsorbed particles to move. The driving force in the scheme of experiments discussed in this paper is the reduction in the free energy of the system.

  11. Influence of Melt Convection on Solid-Liquid Interface Under Terrestrial and Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Solidification and crystal growth processes involve thermal and solutal gradients within a molten phase. In the presence of gravity, such gradients result in convective flows which interact with diffusion fields at the solid-liquid interface. Dendritic growth kinetics was studied in transparent model systems which freeze similarily to most metals. Succinonitrile shows a strong influence of convection at supercoolings below about 1K. Fluid flows adjacent to solid-liquid interfaces and the behavior of shear flows in vertical annular geometries are studied. Novel low-frequency eigenstates were discovered and classified as coupled modes, for their involvement with interfacial deformation coupled to the fluid flow, and are unknown in systems without deformable interfaces. The dependence of coupled convection modes on interfacial geometry, gravity, fluid properties, and transformation characteristics studied for several annual flow arrangements with nominally pure solid-liquid systems.

  12. Interface reorientation of cryogenic liquids under non-isothermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulev, Nikolai; Basting, Steffen; Bänsch, Eberhard; Dreyer, Michael

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the capillary driven oscillations of the liquid-vapor interface in cryogenic systems under non-isothermal boundary conditions. The oscillations took place in a partly filled cylinder during the interface reorientation from its 1 g equilibrium position to the microgravity equilibrium position after a step reduction of gravity. The latter was achieved by dropping the experimental device in the drop tower of Bremen, providing 4.7 s of microgravity. Liquid argon (Tsat=87.3 K at 1013 hPa) and liquid methane (Tsat=111.7 K at 1013 hPa) were used as experimental liquids. Axial wall temperature gradients, corresponding to a linear increase of the wall temperature, were applied above the interface position prior to the experiments with values varying between 0.2 K/mm and 2.9 K/mm. Both liquids showed a qualitatively similar reorientation behavior. The reorientation characteristics were found to depend on the value of the applied gradient and on the material properties of the experimental liquids. Numerical simulation showed a good qualitative agreement with a previous experiment with 1.34 K/mm using liquid argon, demonstrating main characteristic features of the experiment.

  13. Self-healing gold mirrors and filters at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Evgeny; Peljo, Pekka; Scanlon, Micheál D; Gumy, Frederic; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-04-14

    The optical and morphological properties of lustrous metal self-healing liquid-like nanofilms were systematically studied for different applications (e.g., optical mirrors or filters). These nanofilms were formed by a one-step self-assembly methodology of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at immiscible water-oil interfaces, previously reported by our group. We investigated a host of experimental variables and herein report their influence on the optical properties of nanofilms: AuNP mean diameter, interfacial AuNP surface coverage, nature of the organic solvent, and nature of the lipophilic organic molecule that caps the AuNPs in the interfacial nanofilm. To probe the interfacial gold nanofilms we used in situ (UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy) as well as ex situ (SEM and TEM of interfacial gold nanofilms transferred to silicon substrates) techniques. The interfacial AuNP surface coverage strongly influenced the morphology of the interfacial nanofilms, and in turn their maximum reflectance and absorbance. We observed three distinct morphological regimes; (i) smooth 2D monolayers of "floating islands" of AuNPs at low surface coverages, (ii) a mixed 2D/3D regime with the beginnings of 3D nanostructures consisting of small piles of adsorbed AuNPs even under sub-full-monolayer conditions and, finally, (iii) a 3D regime characterised by the 2D full-monolayer being covered in significant piles of adsorbed AuNPs. A maximal value of reflectance reached 58% in comparison with a solid gold mirror, when 38 nm mean diameter AuNPs were used at a water-nitrobenzene interface. Meanwhile, interfacial gold nanofilms prepared with 12 nm mean diameter AuNPs exhibited the highest extinction intensities at ca. 690 nm and absorbance around 90% of the incident light, making them an attractive candidate for filtering applications. Furthermore, the interparticle spacing, and resulting interparticle plasmon coupling derived optical properties, varied significantly on replacing

  14. Spectral mapping of heat transfer mechanisms at liquid-solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sääskilahti, K.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J.; Volz, S.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal transport through liquid-solid interfaces plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes, and better understanding of liquid-solid energy transfer is expected to enable improving the efficiency of thermally driven applications. We determine the spectral distribution of thermal current at liquid-solid interfaces from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics, delivering a detailed picture of the contributions of different vibrational modes to liquid-solid energy transfer. Our results show that surface modes located at the Brillouin zone edge and polarized along the liquid-solid surface normal play a crucial role in liquid-solid energy transfer. Strong liquid-solid adhesion allows also for the coupling of in-plane polarized modes in the solid with the liquid, enhancing the heat-transfer rate and enabling efficient energy transfer up to the cutoff frequency of the solid. Our results provide fundamental understanding of the energy-transfer mechanisms in liquid-solid systems and enable detailed investigations of energy transfer between, e.g., water and organic molecules.

  15. Effect of particle shape on capillary forces acting on particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Flury, Markus

    2013-06-25

    The capillary forces exerted by moving air-water interfaces can dislodge particles from stationary surfaces. The magnitude of the capillary forces depends on particle shape, orientation, and surface properties, such as contact angle and roughness. The objective was to quantify, both experimentally and theoretically, capillary force variations as an air-water interface moves over the particles. We measured capillary forces as a function of position, i.e., force-position curves, on particles of different shape by using force tensiometry. The particles (5 mm nominal size) were made of polyacrylate and were fabricated using a 3D printer. Experimental measurements were compared with theoretical calculations. We found that force-position curves could be classified into in three categories according to particle shapes: (1) curves for particles with round cross sections, such as spheroidal particles, (2) curves for particles with fixed cross sections, such cylindrical or cubical particles, and (3) curves for particles with tapering cross sections, such as prismatic or tetrahedral particles. Spheroidal particles showed a continuously varying capillary force. Cylindrical or cubical particles showed pronounced pinning of the air-water interface line at edges. The pinning led to an increased capillary force, which was relaxed when the interface snapped off from the edges. Particles with tapering cross section did not show pinning and showed reduced capillary forces as the air-water interface line perimeter and displacement cross section continuously decrease when the air-water interface moved over the particles.

  16. Carbon Dioxide and Ionic Liquid Refrigerants: Compact, Efficient Air Conditioning with Ionic Liquid-Based Refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: Notre Dame is developing an air-conditioning system with a new ionic liquid and CO2 as the working fluid. Synthetic refrigerants used in air conditioning and refrigeration systems are potent GHGs and can trap 1,000 times more heat in the atmosphere than CO2 alone—making CO2 an attractive alternative for synthetic refrigerants in cooling systems. However, operating cooling systems with pure CO2 requires prohibitively high pressures and expensive hardware. Notre Dame is creating a new fluid made of CO2 and ionic liquid that enables the use of CO2 at low pressures and requires minimal changes to existing hardware and production lines. This new fluid also produces no harmful emissions and can improve the efficiency of air conditioning systems— enabling new use of CO2 as a refrigerant in cooling systems.

  17. Surfactant-Triggered Nanoarchitectonics of Fullerene C60 Crystals at a Liquid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Hill, Jonathan P; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Ji, Qingmin; Nishimura, Toshiyuki; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-29

    Here, we report the structural and morphological modulation of fullerene C60 crystals induced by nonionic surfactants diglycerol monolaurate (C12G2) and monomyristate (C14G2). C60 crystals synthesized at a liquid-liquid interface comprising isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and a saturated solution of C60 in ethylbenzene (EB) exhibited a one-dimensional (1D) morphology with well-defined faceted structure. Average length and diameter of the faceted rods were ca. 4.8 μm and 747 nm, respectively. Powder X-ray diffraction pattern (pXRD) confirmed a hexagonal-close packed (hcp) structure with cell dimensions ca. a = 2.394 nm and c = 1.388 nm. The 1D rod morphology of C60 crystals was transformed into "Konpeito candy-like" crystals (average diameter ca. 1.2 μm) when the C60 crystals were grown in the presence of C12G2 or C14G2 surfactant (1%) in EB. The pXRD spectra of "Konpeito-like" crystals could be assigned to the face-centered cubic (fcc) phase with cell dimensions ca. a = 1.4309 nm (for C12G2) and a = 1.4318 nm (for C14G2). However, clusters or aggregates of C60 lacking a uniform morphology were observed at lower surfactant concentrations (0.1%), although these crystals exhibited an fcc crystal structure. The self-assembled 1D faceted C60 crystals and "Konpeito-like" C60 crystals exhibited intense photoluminescence (PL) (∼35 times greater than pC60) and a blue-shifted PL intensity maximum (∼15 nm) compared to those of pC60, demonstrating the potential use of this method for the control of the optoelectronic properties of fullerene nanostructures. The "Konpeito-like" crystals were transformed into high surface area nanoporous carbon with a graphitic microstructure upon heat-treatment at 2000 °C. The heat-treated samples showed enhanced electrochemical supercapacitance performance (specific capacitance is ca. 175 F g(-1), which is about 20 times greater than pC60) with long cyclic stability demonstrating the potential of the materials in supercapacitor device

  18. Observations of the liquid/solid interface in low-gravity melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G. H.; Lacy, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Time-lapsed photography of the liquid/solid interface of a melting ice cylinder was taken on Skylab 3 over a period of three hours. The same experiment was simulated on earth such that morphological and thermodynamic differences could be noted. A study of the returned color film clearly shows the dominance of surface tension effects in low-gravity melting. In the Skylab experiment, the ends of the ice cylinder melted first with the water being driven by surface tension onto the cylindrical surfaces. At any time, the principle of minimum surface area governs the overall appearance of the water-ice globule which changed from a cylindrical to a spherical shape. The latent heat of melting in low-gravity is supplied only by radiation (81%) and conduction (19%); whereas in one-g, the convective (55%) and radiative (38%) mode of heat transfer dominates over the conductive portion (7%). Information is also provided on containerless melting and heat transfer in space in the absence of convective air currents.

  19. Structure of phospholipid monolayers containing poly(ethylene glycol) lipids at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, J.; Smith, G.S.; Kuhl, T.L.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Gerstenberg, M.C.

    1997-04-17

    The density distribution of a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface mixed with varying amounts of lipid with poly(ethylene glycol)polymer headgroups (polymer-lipid or PEG-lipid) was measured using neutron reflectometry. The structure of the monolayer at the interface was greatly perturbed by the presence of the bulky polymer-lipid headgroups resulting in a large increase in the thickness of the headgroup region normal to the interface and a systematic roughening of the interface with increasing polymer-lipid content. These results show how bulky hydrophilic moieties cause significant deformations and out-of-place protrusions of phospholipid monolayers and presumably bilayers, vesicles and biological membranes. In terms of polymer physics, very short polymer chains tethered to the air-water interface follow scaling behavior with a mushroom to brush transition with increasing polymer grafting density. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Femtosecond-laser-induced shockwaves in water generated at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Strycker, B D; Springer, M M; Traverso, A J; Kolomenskii, A A; Kattawar, G W; Sokolov, A V

    2013-10-07

    We report generation of femtosecond-laser-induced shockwaves at an air-water interface by millijoule femtosecond laser pulses. We document and discuss the main processes accompanying this phenomenon, including light emission, development of the ablation plume in the air, formation of an ablation cavity, and, subsequently, a bubble developing in water. We also discuss the possibility of remotely controlling the characteristics of laser-induced sound waves in water through linear acoustic superposition of sound waves that results from millijoule femtosecond laser-pulse interaction with an air-water interface, thus opening up the possibility of remote acoustic applications in oceanic and riverine environments.

  1. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creating a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.

  2. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creatingmore » a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.« less

  3. Molecular dynamics study on condensation/evaporation coefficients of chain molecules at liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Takematsu, Masaki; Mizuguchi, Hirotaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2015-07-01

    The structure and thermodynamic properties of the liquid-vapor interface are of fundamental interest for numerous technological implications. For simple molecules, e.g., argon and water, the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior depends strongly on their translational motion and the system temperature. Existing molecular dynamics (MD) results are consistent with the theoretical predictions based on the assumption that the liquid and vapor states in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interface are isotropic. Additionally, similar molecular condensation/evaporation characteristics have been found for long-chain molecules, e.g., dodecane. It is unclear, however, whether the isotropic assumption is valid and whether the molecular orientation or the chain length of the molecules affects the condensation/evaporation behavior at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, MD simulations were performed to study the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior of the straight-chain alkanes, i.e., butane, octane, and dodecane, at the liquid-vapor interface, and the effects of the molecular orientation and chain length were investigated in equilibrium systems. The results showed that the condensation/evaporation behavior of chain molecules primarily depends on the molecular translational energy and the surface temperature and is independent of the molecular chain length. Furthermore, the orientation at the liquid-vapor interface was disordered when the surface temperature was sufficiently higher than the triple point and had no significant effect on the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior. The validity of the isotropic assumption was confirmed, and we conclude that the condensation/evaporation coefficients can be predicted by the liquid-to-vapor translational length ratio, even for chain molecules.

  4. Molecular dynamics study on condensation/evaporation coefficients of chain molecules at liquid-vapor interface.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Takematsu, Masaki; Mizuguchi, Hirotaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2015-07-07

    The structure and thermodynamic properties of the liquid-vapor interface are of fundamental interest for numerous technological implications. For simple molecules, e.g., argon and water, the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior depends strongly on their translational motion and the system temperature. Existing molecular dynamics (MD) results are consistent with the theoretical predictions based on the assumption that the liquid and vapor states in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interface are isotropic. Additionally, similar molecular condensation/evaporation characteristics have been found for long-chain molecules, e.g., dodecane. It is unclear, however, whether the isotropic assumption is valid and whether the molecular orientation or the chain length of the molecules affects the condensation/evaporation behavior at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, MD simulations were performed to study the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior of the straight-chain alkanes, i.e., butane, octane, and dodecane, at the liquid-vapor interface, and the effects of the molecular orientation and chain length were investigated in equilibrium systems. The results showed that the condensation/evaporation behavior of chain molecules primarily depends on the molecular translational energy and the surface temperature and is independent of the molecular chain length. Furthermore, the orientation at the liquid-vapor interface was disordered when the surface temperature was sufficiently higher than the triple point and had no significant effect on the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior. The validity of the isotropic assumption was confirmed, and we conclude that the condensation/evaporation coefficients can be predicted by the liquid-to-vapor translational length ratio, even for chain molecules.

  5. Dynamic Evolution of the Evaporating Liquid-Vapor Interface in Micropillar Arrays.

    PubMed

    Antao, Dion S; Adera, Solomon; Zhu, Yangying; Farias, Edgardo; Raj, Rishi; Wang, Evelyn N

    2016-01-19

    Capillary assisted passively pumped thermal management devices have gained importance due to their simple design and reduction in energy consumption. The performance of these devices is strongly dependent on the shape of the curved interface between the liquid and vapor phases. We developed a transient laser interferometry technique to investigate the evolution of the shape of the liquid-vapor interface in micropillar arrays during evaporation heat transfer. Controlled cylindrical micropillar arrays were fabricated on the front side of a silicon wafer, while thin-film heaters were deposited on the reverse side to emulate a heat source. The shape of the meniscus was determined using the fringe patterns resulting from interference of a monochromatic beam incident on the thin liquid layer. We studied the evolution of the shape of the meniscus on these surfaces under various operating conditions including varying the micropillar geometry and the applied heating power. By monitoring the transient behavior of the evaporating liquid-vapor interface, we accurately measured the absolute location and shape of the meniscus and calculated the contact angle and the maximum capillary pressure. We demonstrated that the receding contact angle which determines the capillary pumping limit is independent of the microstructure geometry and the rate of evaporation (i.e., the applied heating power). The results of this study provide fundamental insights into the dynamic behavior of the liquid-vapor interface in wick structures during phase-change heat transfer.

  6. Anharmonicity, solvation forces, and resolution in atomic force microscopy at the solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2013-08-01

    Solid-liquid interfaces are central to nanoscale science and technology and control processes as diverse as self-assembly, heterogeneous catalysis, wetting, electrochemistry, or protein function. Experimentally, measuring the structure and dynamics of solid-liquid interfaces with molecular resolution remains a challenge. This task can, in principle, be achieved with atomic force microscopy (AFM), which functions locally, and with nanometer precision. When operated dynamically and at small amplitudes, AFM can provide molecular-level images of the liquid solvation layers at the interfaces. At larger amplitudes, results in the field of multifrequency AFM have shown that anharmonicities in the tip motion can provide quantitative information about the solid's mechanical properties. The two approaches probe opposite aspects of the interface and are generally seen as distinct. Here it is shown that, for amplitudes Aliquid, and subnanometer resolution can be achieved through solvation forces. For A>d, the tip trajectory becomes rapidly anharmonic due to the tip tapping the solid, and the resolution decreases. A nonlinear transition between the two regimes occurs for A˜d and can be quantified with the second harmonic of the tip oscillation. These results, confirmed by computer simulations, remain valid in most experimental conditions. Significantly, they provide an objective criterion to enhance resolution and to decide whether the results are dominated by the properties of the solid or of the liquid.

  7. Self-healing gold mirrors and filters at liquid-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Evgeny; Peljo, Pekka; Scanlon, Micheál D.; Gumy, Frederic; Girault, Hubert H.

    2016-03-01

    The optical and morphological properties of lustrous metal self-healing liquid-like nanofilms were systematically studied for different applications (e.g., optical mirrors or filters). These nanofilms were formed by a one-step self-assembly methodology of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at immiscible water-oil interfaces, previously reported by our group. We investigated a host of experimental variables and herein report their influence on the optical properties of nanofilms: AuNP mean diameter, interfacial AuNP surface coverage, nature of the organic solvent, and nature of the lipophilic organic molecule that caps the AuNPs in the interfacial nanofilm. To probe the interfacial gold nanofilms we used in situ (UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy) as well as ex situ (SEM and TEM of interfacial gold nanofilms transferred to silicon substrates) techniques. The interfacial AuNP surface coverage strongly influenced the morphology of the interfacial nanofilms, and in turn their maximum reflectance and absorbance. We observed three distinct morphological regimes; (i) smooth 2D monolayers of ``floating islands'' of AuNPs at low surface coverages, (ii) a mixed 2D/3D regime with the beginnings of 3D nanostructures consisting of small piles of adsorbed AuNPs even under sub-full-monolayer conditions and, finally, (iii) a 3D regime characterised by the 2D full-monolayer being covered in significant piles of adsorbed AuNPs. A maximal value of reflectance reached 58% in comparison with a solid gold mirror, when 38 nm mean diameter AuNPs were used at a water-nitrobenzene interface. Meanwhile, interfacial gold nanofilms prepared with 12 nm mean diameter AuNPs exhibited the highest extinction intensities at ca. 690 nm and absorbance around 90% of the incident light, making them an attractive candidate for filtering applications. Furthermore, the interparticle spacing, and resulting interparticle plasmon coupling derived optical properties, varied significantly on replacing

  8. Acoustic radiation forces at liquid interfaces impact the performance of acoustophoresis.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sameer; Brzozka, Zbigniew; Laurell, Thomas; Augustsson, Per

    2014-09-07

    Acoustophoresis is a method well suited for cell and microbead separation or concentration for downstream analysis in microfluidic settings. One of the main limitations that acoustophoresis share with other microfluidic techniques is that the separation efficiency is poor for particle-rich suspensions. We report that flow laminated liquids can be relocated in a microchannel when exposed to a resonant acoustic field. Differences in acoustic impedance between two liquids cause migration of the high-impedance liquid towards an acoustic pressure node. In a set of experiments we charted this phenomenon and show herein that it can be used to either relocate liquids with respect to each other, or to stabilize the interface between them. This resulted in decreased medium carry-over when transferring microbeads (4% by volume) between suspending liquids using acoustophoresis. Furthermore we demonstrate that acoustic relocation of liquids occurs for impedance differences as low as 0.1%.

  9. Synergistic effect of dicarbollide anions in liquid-liquid extraction: a molecular dynamics study at the octanol-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chevrot, G; Schurhammer, R; Wipff, G

    2007-04-28

    We report a molecular dynamics study of chlorinated cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anions [(B(9)C(2)H(8)Cl(3))(2)Co](-)"CCD(-)" in octanol and at the octanol-water interface, with the main aim to understand why these hydrophobic species act as strong synergists in assisted liquid-liquid cation extraction. Neat octanol is quite heterogeneous and is found to display dual solvation properties, allowing to well solubilize CCD(-), Cs(+) salts in the form of diluted pairs or oligomers, without displaying aggregation. At the aqueous interface, octanol behaves as an amphiphile, forming either monolayers or bilayers, depending on the initial state and confinement conditions. In biphasic octanol-water systems, CCD(-) anions are found to mainly partition to the organic phase, thus attracting Cs(+) or even more hydrophilic counterions like Eu(3+) into that phase. The remaining CCD(-) anions adsorb at the interface, but are less surface active than at the chloroform interface. Finally, we compare the interfacial behavior of the Eu(BTP)(3)(3+) complex in the absence and in the presence of CCD(-) anions and extractant molecules. It is found that when the CCD(-)'s are concentrated enough, the complex is extracted to the octanol phase. Otherwise, it is trapped at the interface, attracted by water. These results are compared to those obtained with chloroform as organic phase and discussed in the context of synergistic effect of CCD(-) in liquid-liquid extraction, pointing to the importance of dual solvation properties of octanol and of the hydrophobic character of CCD(-) for synergistic extraction of cations.

  10. The physics of pattern formation at liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, J.V.

    1992-06-01

    During the past year we have submitted six papers for publication, three related to the dynamics of macroscopic interfaces, and ultimately all related to solidification, and three related to the internal structure of disorderly materials, with possible applications to the processing of composite materials. In addition to completing all these projects during the past year, we have begun two new projects, one on pattern formation and one on aggregation within a composite system. A brief description is given of this research in this paper.

  11. Note: Sample cells to investigate solid/liquid interfaces with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rennie, Adrian R. Hellsing, Maja S.; Lindholm, Eric; Olsson, Anders

    2015-01-15

    The design of sample cells to study solid/liquid interfaces by neutron reflection is presented. Use of standardized components and a modular design has allowed a wide range of experiments that include grazing incidence scattering and conventional small-angle scattering. Features that reduce background scattering are emphasized. Various flow arrangements to fill and replenish the liquid in the cell as well as continuous stirring are described.

  12. Liquid-liquid extraction assisted by a carbon nanoparticles interface. Electrophoretic determination of atrazine in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Caballero-Díaz, Encarnación; Simonet, Bartolomé; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2013-10-21

    A novel method for the determination of atrazine, using liquid-liquid extraction assisted by a nanoparticles film formed in situ and composed of organic solvent stabilized-carbon nanoparticles, is described. The presence of nanoparticles located at the liquid-liquid interface reinforced the extraction of analyte from matrix prior to capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis. Some influential experimental variables were optimized in order to enhance the extraction efficiency. The developed procedure confirmed that carbon nanoparticles, especially multi-walled carbon nanotubes, are suitable to be used in sample treatment processes introducing new mechanisms of interaction with the analyte. The application of the proposed preconcentration method followed by CE detection enabled the determination of atrazine in spiked river water providing acceptable RSD values (11.6%) and good recoveries (about 87.0-92.0%). Additionally, a similar extraction scheme was tested in soil matrices with a view to further applications in real soil samples.

  13. Reduction in the surface energy of liquid interfaces at short length scales

    PubMed

    Fradin; Braslau; Luzet; Smilgies; Alba; Boudet; Mecke; Daillant

    2000-02-24

    Liquid-vapour interfaces, particularly those involving water, are common in both natural and artificial environments. They were first described as regions of continuous variation of density, caused by density fluctuations within the bulk phases. In contrast, the more recent capillary-wave models assumes a step-like local density profile across the liquid-vapour interface, whose width is the result of the propagation of thermally excited capillary waves. The model has been validated for length scales of tenths of micrometres and larger, but the structure of liquid surfaces on submicrometre length scales--where the capillary theory is expected to break down--remains poorly understood. Here we report grazing-incidence X-ray scattering experiments that allow for a complete determination of the free surface structure and surface energy for water and a range of organic liquids. We observe a large decrease of up to 75% in the surface energy of submicrometre waves that cannot be explained by capillary theory, but is in accord with the effects arising from the non-locality of attractive intermolecule interactions as predicted by a recent density functional theory. Our data, and the results of comparable measurements on liquid solutions, metallic alloys, surfactants, lipids and wetting films should thus provide a stringent test for any new theories that attempt to describe the structure of liquid interfaces with nanometre-scale resolution.

  14. Appropriate Formulations for Velocity and Pressure Calculations at Gas-liquid Interface with Collocated Variable Arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kei; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    A high-precision simulation algorithm for gas-liquid two-phase flows on unstructured meshes has been developed to simulate gas entrainment phenomenon in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. In this study, it became clear that unphysical behaviors near gas-liquid interfaces were caused by conventional algorithms. Then, physics-basis considerations were conducted for mechanical balances at gas-liquid interfaces to derive appropriate formulations. By defining momentum and velocity independently and developing the momentum transport equations for both gas and liquid phases, the physically appropriate formulation of momentum transport was derived, which eliminated the unphysical pressure distribution caused by the conventional formulation. In addition, the physically appropriate formulation was derived for the pressure gradient to satisfy the mechanical balances between pressure and surface tension at gas-liquid interfaces. As the validation test, the rising gas bubble in liquid was simulated by the developed simulation algorithm with the physically appropriate formulations, and the simulated terminal bubble shapes on the structured and highly-distorted unstructured meshes coincided with the experimental data under each simulation condition determined by the Morton and Eötvös numbers.

  15. Instructional Review: An Introduction to Optical Methods for Characterizing Liquid Crystals at Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel S.; Carlton, Rebecca J.; Mushenheim, Peter C.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2013-01-01

    This Instructional Review describes methods and underlying principles that can be used to characterize both the orientations assumed spontaneously by liquid crystals (LCs) at interfaces and the strength with which the LCs are held in those orientations (so-called anchoring energies). The application of these methods to several different classes of LC interfaces is described, including solid and aqueous interfaces as well as planar and non-planar interfaces (such as those that define a LC-in-water emulsion droplet). These methods, which enable fundamental studies of the ordering of LCs at polymeric, chemically-functionalized and biomolecular interfaces, are described in this article at a level that can be easily understood by a non-expert reader such as an undergraduate or graduate student. We focus on optical methods because they are based on instrumentation that is found widely in research and teaching laboratories. PMID:23347378

  16. Morphological stability of a solid-liquid interface growing in a cylindrical mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The morphological stability of the planar interface of dilute alloys solidifying in a cylindrical mold is analyzed based on the perturbation model presented by Mullins and Sekerka under the assumption that the interface crosses the mold wall at right angles, to examine the effect of the inside diameter of the mold. When the interface grows in a mold of a larger inside diameter, the stability-instability criterion of the planar interface is coincident with the MS criterion. On the other hand, in a mold of a smaller diameter, the rippled interface is permitted to take a frequency of discrete values (the permitted frequency), and the planar interface grows stably under thermal conditions slightly exceeding the MS criterion. Also, there exists a minimum permitted frequency ωmin, and the critical inside diameter dc is derived from ωmin. When the alloy solidifies in a mold of an inside diameter less than dc, the interface grows stably under thermal conditions in which the MS model predicts unstable growth of the interface. Moreover, there is a lower limit dG in dc, and when the alloy solidifies in a mold of an inside diameter less than dG, the interface grows stably even at a zero temperature gradient in the liquid.

  17. Physicochemical Study of Viral Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torres-Salgado, Jose F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Villagrana-Escareño, Maria V; Durán-Meza, Ana L; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Cadena-Nava, Ruben D

    2016-07-07

    The assembly of most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses into icosahedral nucleocapsids is a spontaneous process driven by protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. The precise nature of these interactions results in the assembly of extremely monodisperse and structurally indistinguishable nucleocapsids. In this work, by using a ssRNA plant virus (cowpea chlorotic mottle virus [CCMV]) as a charged nanoparticle we show that the diffusion of these nanoparticles from the bulk solution to the air/water interface is an irreversible adsorption process. By using the Langmuir technique, we measured the diffusion and adsorption of viral nucleocapsids at the air/water interface at different pH conditions. The pH changes, and therefore in the net surface charge of the virions, have a great influence in the diffusion rate from the bulk solution to the air/water interface. Moreover, assembly of mesoscopic and microscopic viral aggregates at this interface depends on the net surface charge of the virions and the surface pressure. By using Brewster's angle microscopy we characterized these structures at the interface. Most common structures observed were clusters of virions and soap-frothlike micron-size structures. Furthermore, the CCMV films were compressed to form monolayers and multilayers from moderate to high surface pressures, respectively. After transferring the films from the air/water interface onto mica by using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, their morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy. These viral monolayers showed closed-packing nano- and microscopic arrangements.

  18. Possible fossil H2O liquid-ice interfaces in the Martian crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, L. A.; Wenner, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    The extensive chaotic and fretted terrains in the equatorial regions of Mars are explained on the basis of the vertical distribution of H2O liquid and ice which once existed in the crust. This account assumes that below the permafrost containing water ice, there was a second zone in which liquid water resided for at least a time. Diagenetic alteration and cementation characterized the material in the subpermafrost zone; above, pristine fragmented material with various ice concentrations was found. Later, the ice-laden zone was stripped away by a number of erosional processes, exposing the former ice-liquid water interface.

  19. Coarse-Graining the Liquid-Liquid Interfaces with the MARTINI Force Field: How Is the Interfacial Tension Reproduced?

    PubMed

    Ndao, Makha; Devémy, Julien; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2015-08-11

    We report two-phase coarse-grained (CG) simulations of organic-water liquid-liquid interfaces with the MARTINI force field. We discuss the ability of the CG force field to predict quantitatively the interfacial tension of alkanes-water, benzene-water, chloroform-water, and alcohol-water systems. The performance of the prediction of the interfacial tension is evaluated through its dependence on temperature and alkane length. This study contributes to the challenging discussion about the robustness and the transferability of the MARTINI force field to interfacial properties. We have also used the distributions of the molecules along the direction normal to the interface to investigate the composition of the interfacial region and to compare the simulated densities of the coexisting phases with experiments.

  20. Pattern formation at liquid interfaces II. The KI/chloral hydrate/starch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cliff Zeh-Wen; Knobler, Charles M.

    1992-02-01

    Measurements are reported of pattern formation at a liquid interface produced by a photochemical reaction involving the system KI/chloral hydrate/ starch. The dependence of the wavelength on the concentrations of the reactants, the viscosity, and the height of the sample has been examined. It is concluded that the pattern is produced by a hydrodynamic mechanism.

  1. Thermocapillary Interaction between a Solid Particle and a Liquid-Gas Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, A. A.; Leshansky, A. M.; Nir, A.

    1996-11-01

    Interaction between solid particles and a free liquid-gas interface is very important for flotation processes and for various processes involving multiphase flows. In the present contribution, interaction between a hot solid particle submerged into an ambient fluid, and a free liquid-gas interface is considered. A non-uniform temperature field around the solid particle produces surface tension gradients at the liquid-gas interface which generate a thermocapillary flow in the surrounding fluid. This flow yields the motion of the solid particle itself. Three cases are considered: (i) interaction between a solid particle and a spherical gas bubble at a finite separation distance; (ii) thermocapillary motion of a solid particle and an attached gas bubble; (iii) interaction between a solid particle and a plane undeformable liquid-gas interface. In all cases the velocity of the thermocapillarity induced motion of the solid particle is calculated in the approximation of the Stokes flow and a low Peclet number as a function of the separation distance and the bubble-to-particle radii ratio. Some preliminary results of the present work have been published in (A.A.Golovin, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21), 715 (1995)..

  2. Monitoring the solid-liquid interface in tanks using profiling sonar and 3D visualization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Nitin; Zhang, Jinsong; Roelant, David; Srivastava, Rajiv

    2005-03-01

    Visualization of the interface between settled solids and the optically opaque liquid above is necessary to facilitate efficient retrieval of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks. A profiling sonar was used to generate 2-D slices across the settled solids at the bottom of the tank. By incrementally rotating the sonar about its centerline, slices of the solid-liquid interface can be imaged and a 3-D image of the settled solids interface generated. To demonstrate the efficacy of the sonar in real-time solid-liquid interface monitoring systems inside HLW tanks, two sets of experiments were performed. First, various solid objects and kaolin clay (10 μm dia) were successfully imaged while agitating with 30% solids (by weight) entrained in the liquid. Second, a solid with a density similar to that of the immersed fluid density was successfully imaged. Two dimensional (2-D) sonar images and the accuracy and limitations of the in-tank imaging will be presented for these two experiments. In addition, a brief review of how to utilize a 2-D sonar image to generate a 3-D surface of the settled layer within a tank will be discussed.

  3. Mean-Field Approximation to the Hydrophobic Hydration in the Liquid-Vapor Interface of Water.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kiharu; Sumi, Tomonari; Koga, Kenichiro

    2016-03-03

    A mean-field approximation to the solvation of nonpolar solutes in the liquid-vapor interface of aqueous solutions is proposed. It is first remarked with a numerical illustration that the solvation of a methane-like solute in bulk liquid water is accurately described by the mean-field theory of liquids, the main idea of which is that the probability (Pcav) of finding a cavity in the solvent that can accommodate the solute molecule and the attractive interaction energy (uatt) that the solute would feel if it is inserted in such a cavity are both functions of the solvent density alone. It is then assumed that the basic idea is still valid in the liquid-vapor interface, but Pcav and uatt are separately functions of different coarse-grained local densities, not functions of a common local density. Validity of the assumptions is confirmed for the solvation of the methane-like particle in the interface of model water at temperatures between 253 and 613 K. With the mean-field approximation extended to the inhomogeneous system the local solubility profiles across the interface at various temperatures are calculated from Pcav and uatt obtained at a single temperature. The predicted profiles are in excellent agreement with those obtained by the direct calculation of the excess chemical potential over an interfacial region where the solvent local density varies most rapidly.

  4. Molecular dynamics of phenol at the liquid-vapor interface of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Benjamin, Ilan

    1991-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics calculations on phenol at the water liquid-vapor interface are presented. The density profile of the center of mass of phenol exhibits a maximum 1 A from the Gibbs surface toward the vapor phase, indicating that the molecule is surface-active. Changes in the profile caused by the interface extend 6 A from the Gibbs surface into the liquid, significantly more than change in the density profile of water. The most probable orientation of the solute at the surface is such that its symmetry axis is perpendicular to the interface with the OH substituent pointing toward the liquid. An additional simulation with benzene shows that this molecule at the surface most often adopts orientations parallel to the interface. Deeper in the liquid all the solutes are preferentially ordered perpendicular to the surface. In the interfacial region the orientational preferences of the solute are primarily determined by cavity formation needed to accommodate the hydrophobic portion of the dissolved molecule.

  5. The Assembly of DNA Amphiphiles at Liquid Crystal-Aqueous Interface

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingsheng; Dong, Yuanchen; Zhang, Yiyang; Liu, Dongsheng; Yang, Zhongqiang

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we synthesized a type of DNA amphiphiles (called DNA-lipids) and systematically studied its assembly behavior at the liquid crystal (LC)—aqueous interface. It turned out that the pure DNA-lipids at various concentrations cannot trigger the optical transition of liquid crystals from planar anchoring to homeotropic anchoring at the liquid crystal—aqueous interface. The co-assembly of DNA-lipid and l-dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (l-DLPC) indicated that the DLPC assembled all over the LC-aqueous interface, and DNA-lipids prefer to couple with LC in certain areas, particularly in polarized and fluorescent image, forming micron sized net-like structures. The addition of DNA complementary to DNA-lipids forming double stranded DNA-lipids caused de-assembly of DNA-lipids from LC-aqueous interface, resulting in the disappearance of net-like structures, which can be visualized through polarized microscope. The optical changes combined with DNA unique designable property and specific interaction with wide range of target molecules, the DNA-lipids decorated LC-aqueous interface would provide a new platform for biological sensing and diagnosis.

  6. Capillary-driven interface oscillations of cryogenic liquids under non-isothermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulev, Nikolai; Dreyer, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Experiments were conducted in the Drop Tower in Bremen for 4.7 s under conditions, similar to the end of thrust in a rocket tank when the cold propellant flows along the warmer tank wall driven by capillary forces. The interface oscillations of liquid argon and liquid methane were investigated in a partly filled cylinder. The oscillations take place during the interface reorientation from its normal gravity (1g) position towards a new position upon step transition to microgravity (10-6g). Axial wall temperature gradients of 0.15 K/mm - 1.93 K/mm were applied above the 1g interface position. The contact line motion changed from aperiodic to oscillatory and the dynamic contact angle increased with the increasing value of the wall temperature gradient. The frequency of the interface center point oscillation increased too. The vapor pressure evolution followed the contact line motion, presumably due to relation of the evaporation to the contact line motion. The vapor temperature above the interface decreased (up to 3.5 K), apparently because of the enhanced evaporation by the contact line motion. The wall temperature in the region of the contact line motion decreased too (up to 8.5 K), hinting to an increased heat transfer by the evaporation between liquid and wall. The funding by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) through the German Aerospace Center (DLR) under grant number 50 RL 0921 is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Formative evaluation of a mobile liquid portion size estimation interface for people with varying literacy skills

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Kay; Siek, Katie A.; Welch, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Chronically ill people, especially those with low literacy skills, often have difficulty estimating portion sizes of liquids to help them stay within their recommended fluid limits. There is a plethora of mobile applications that can help people monitor their nutritional intake but unfortunately these applications require the user to have high literacy and numeracy skills for portion size recording. In this paper, we present two studies in which the low- and the high-fidelity versions of a portion size estimation interface, designed using the cognitive strategies adults employ for portion size estimation during diet recall studies, was evaluated by a chronically ill population with varying literacy skills. The low fidelity interface was evaluated by ten patients who were all able to accurately estimate portion sizes of various liquids with the interface. Eighteen participants did an in situ evaluation of the high-fidelity version incorporated in a diet and fluid monitoring mobile application for 6 weeks. Although the accuracy of the estimation cannot be confirmed in the second study but the participants who actively interacted with the interface showed better health outcomes by the end of the study. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for designing the next iteration of an accurate and low literacy-accessible liquid portion size estimation mobile interface. PMID:24443659

  8. Vortex and air assisted liquid-liquid microextraction as a sample preparation method for high-performed liquid chromatography determinations.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad; Heydari, Rouhollah; Alimoradi, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    A novel, simple and sensitive method based on vortex and air assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VAALLME) technique coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for quantitative analysis of β-naphthol, naphthalene and anthracene as model analytes. Unlike the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), dispersive solvent and centrifuging step were eliminated in proposed technique. In this technique, extraction solvent was dispersed into the aqueous sample solution by using vortex. Phase separation was achieved via motion of air bubbles from the bottom to top of the extraction tube, which promoted the analytes transfer into the supernatant organic phase. Influential parameters on the extraction efficiency such as type and volume of extraction solvent, salt type and its concentration, vortex and aeration times, and sample pH were evaluated and optimized. The calibration curves showed good linearity (r(2)>0.9947) and precision (RSD<5.0%) in the working concentration ranges. The limit of detection (LOD) for β-naphthol, naphthalene and anthracene were 10, 5.0 and 0.5 ng mL(-1), respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 97.0-102.0% with RSD values ranging from 2.2 to 5.2%.

  9. Using Si Diodes To Detect H2 Liquid/Vapor Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula Jean; Fabik, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Commercially available silicon-diode temperature sensors used to detect interfaces between hydrogen liquid and hydrogen vapor at steady-state saturation conditions. Sensors mounted at short intervals along rod to form rake-like array. Array inserted in tank with rod oriented vertically, where it senses level of liquid hydrogen to resolution equal to interval between sensors. Basic idea to measure voltage across sensor while supplying small electric current that heats sensor. Because vapor cools sensor less effectively than liquid does, sensor's steady-state temperature greater when sensor surrounded by vapor than when immersed in liquid. Voltage output decreases as temperature increases for silicon diodes. Thus, temperature (voltage) reading used to determine whether liquid level above or below sensor.

  10. Gradual improvements of charge carrier mobility at ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Hara, Hisaya; Morino, Yusuke; Bando, Ken-ichi; Ono, Sakurako; Imanishi, Akihito; Okada, Yugo; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Takafumi; Takeya, Jun; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    We report evolution of electric characteristics of an electric double layer field-effect transistor based on the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces. In contrast to usual devices, the field effect mobility was found to gradually increase with time for a day, followed by minor long-term fluctuations. Although the details of the evolution were somewhat device dependent, the final values of the mobility turned out to be 3-4 times larger irrespective of the initial values. These observations are explained by the evolution of the flat interface by defect-induced spontaneous dissolution of rubrene molecules at the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces, revealed by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

  11. Reversible Photoresponsive Molecular Alignment of Liquid Crystals at Fluid Interfaces with Persistent Stability.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tongtong; Hu, Qiongzheng; Wang, Yi; Gao, Yanan; Yu, Li

    2016-04-25

    This work demonstrates a noninvasive approach to control alignment of liquid crystals persistently and reversibly at fluid interfaces by using a photoresponsive azobenzene-based surfactant dissolved in an ionic liquid (IL), ethylammonium nitrate (EAN). As the first report on the orientational behavior of LCs at the IL/LC interface, our study also expands current understanding of alignment control of LCs at the aqueous/LC interface by adding electrolytes into aqueous solutions. The threshold concentration for switching the optical responses of LCs can be changed just by simply manipulating the ratio of EAN to H2 O. This work will inspire fundamental studies and novel applications of using the LC-based imaging technique to investigate various chemical and biological events in ILs.

  12. Surface behavior of malonic acid adsorption at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Blower, Patrick G; Shamay, Eric; Kringle, Loni; Ota, Stephanie T; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-03-28

    The presence of organic materials adsorbed to the surfaces of aerosol particles has been demonstrated to be a determining factor in relevant atmospheric processes. Malonic acid is a small, water-soluble organic acid that is common in aerosols and is surface-active. A comprehensive investigation of the adsorption of malonic acid to the air/water interface was accomplished using vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) and surface tension measurements as functions of concentration and pH. Malonic acid was found to be weakly solvated at the air/water interface, and its orientation as a function of concentration was explored through different VSFS polarization schemes. pH-dependent experiments revealed that the surface-active species is the fully protonated species. Computational analyses were used to obtain depth-specific geometries of malonic acid at the air/water interface that confirm and enrich the experimental results.

  13. Study of surface charge density on solid/liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Hyuk Kyu; Moon, Jong Kyun

    2014-11-01

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid/liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid/liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a DC bias voltage across the plates, an AC electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage difference between the plates as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid/liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. This work was supported by Center for Soft and Living Matter through IBS program in Korea.

  14. Thermal-hydraulic behaviors of vapor-liquid interface due to arrival of a pressure wave

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo

    1995-09-01

    In the vapor explosion, a pressure wave (shock wave) plays a fundamental role for triggering, propagation and enhancement of the explosion. Energy of the explosion is related to the magnitude of heat transfer rate from hot liquid to cold volatile one. This is related to an increasing rate of interface area and to an amount of transient heat flux between the liquids. In this study, the characteristics of transient heat transfer and behaviors of vapor film both on the platinum tube and on the hot melt tin drop, under same boundary conditions have been investigated. It is considered that there exists a fundamental mechanism of the explosion in the initial expansion process of the hot liquid drop immediately after arrival of pressure wave. The growth rate of the vapor film is much faster on the hot liquid than that on the solid surface. Two kinds of roughness were observed, one due to the Taylor instability, by rapid growth of the explosion bubble, and another, nucleation sites were observed at the vapor-liquid interface. Based on detailed observation of early stage interface behaviors after arrival of a pressure wave, the thermal fragmentation mechanism is proposed.

  15. Numerical studies of the effects of jet-induced mixing on liquid-vapor interface condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions of jet-induced mixing in a partially full cryogenic tank are presented. An axisymmetric laminar jet is discharged from the central part of the tank bottom toward the liquid-vapor interface. Liquid is withdrawn at the same volume flow rate from the outer part of the tank. The jet is at a temperature lower than the interface, which is maintained at a certain saturation temperature. The interface is assumed to be flat and shear-free and the condensation-induced velocity is assumed to be negligibly small compared with radial interface velocity. Finite-difference method is used to solve the nondimensional form of steady state continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Calculations are conducted for jet Reynolds numbers ranging from 150 to 600 and Prandtl numbers ranging from 0.85 to 2.65. The effects of above stated parameters on the condensation Nusselt and Stanton numbers which characterize the steady-state interface condensation process are investigated. Detailed analysis to gain a better understanding of the fundamentals of fluid mixing and interface condensation is performed.

  16. Delivery of minimally dispersed liquid interfaces for sequential surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ostromohov, N; Bercovici, M; Kaigala, G V

    2016-08-02

    We present a method for sequential delivery of reagents to a reaction site with minimal dispersion of their interfaces. Using segmented flow to encapsulate the reagents as droplets, the dispersion between reagent plugs remains confined in a limited volume, while being transmitted to the reaction surface. In close proximity to the target surface, we use a passive array of microstructures for removal of the oil phase such that the original reagent sequence is reconstructed, and only the aqueous phase reaches the reaction surface. We provide a detailed analysis of the conditions under which the method can be applied and demonstrate maintaining a transition time of 560 ms between reagents transported to a reaction site over a distance of 60 cm. We implemented the method using a vertical microfluidic probe on an open surface, allowing contact-free interaction with biological samples, and demonstrated two examples of assays implemented using the method: measurements of receptor-ligand reaction kinetics and of the fluorescence response of immobilized GFP to local variations in pH. We believe that the method can be useful for studying the dynamic response of cells and proteins to various stimuli, as well as for highly automated multi-step assays.

  17. Density functional theory for crystal-liquid interfaces of Lennard-Jones fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Mi, Jianguo; Zhong, Chongli

    2013-04-28

    A density functional approach is presented to describe the crystal-liquid interfaces and crystal nucleations of Lennard-Jones fluid. Within the theoretical framework, the modified fundamental measure theory is applied to describe the free energy functional of hard sphere repulsion, and the weighted density method based on first order mean spherical approximation is used to describe the free energy contribution arising from the attractive interaction. The liquid-solid equilibria, density profiles within crystal cells and at liquid-solid interfaces, interfacial tensions, nucleation free energy barriers, and critical cluster sizes are calculated for face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic nucleus. Some results are in good agreement with available simulation data, indicating that the present model is quantitatively reliable in describing nucleation thermodynamics of Lennard-Jones fluid.

  18. Effect of asymmetric gravity jitter excited slosh waves at liquid-vapor interface under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Pan, H. L.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids affected by the asymmetric gravity jitter oscillations, in particular the effect of surface tension on partially-filled rotating fluids (cryogenic liquid helium and helium vapor) in a sub-scale Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft propellant dewar tank imposed by time-dependent various directions of background gravity environment have been investigated. Results show that lower frequency gravity jitter imposed on the time-dependent variations of the direction of background gravity induced a greater amplitude of oscillations and a stronger degree of asymmetry in liquid-vapor interface geometry than that made by the higher frequency gravity jitter. Furthermore, the greater the components of background gravity in radial and circumferential directions will provide a greater contribution in driving more to the increasing amplitude and degrees of symmetry of liquid-vapor interface profiles which, in turn, modify the disturbance of moment of inertia and angular momentum of spacecraft.

  19. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paumel, K.; Moysan, J.; Chatain, D.; Corneloup, G.; Baqué, F.

    2011-08-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  20. Liquid Desiccant in Air Conditioners: Nano-Engineered Porous Hollow Fiber Membrane-Based Air Conditioning System

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-02

    BEETIT Project: UTRC is developing an air conditioning system that is optimized for use in warm and humid climates. UTRC’s air conditioning system integrates a liquid drying agent or desiccant and a traditional vapor compression system found in 90% of air conditioners. The drying agent reduces the humidity in the air before it is cooled, using less energy. The technology uses a membrane as a barrier between the air and the liquid salt stream allowing only water vapor to pass through and not the salt molecules. This solves an inherent problem with traditional liquid desiccant systems—carryover of the liquid drying agent into the conditioned air stream—which eliminates corrosion and health issues

  1. Hydrophobic organic compound partitioning from bulk water to the water/air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Örjan; Gschwend, Philip M.

    Partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds to the interface between water and air may significantly affect the distribution and transfer of many xenobiotic chemicals between vapor and aqueous phases. The fluorescent probe, 1-methylperylene, was used to investigate the affinity of hydrophobic compounds for the water-air interface by varying the ratio of interfacial surface area to water volume in a fused-quartz cuvette. We found that the water-air/water interface partitioning coefficient [ Kw-awi =1.2 mol cm -2awi/(mol ml -1w)] for this polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) was quantitatively consistent with partitioning to the same interface but from the airside, recently reported in the literature for less hydrophobic PAHs. Our results demonstrate significant partitioning from bulk water to the water/air interface for a hydrophobicity range relevant to many xenobiotic compounds. Anticipated implications of this process for the environmental chemistry of hydrophobic compounds include retarded gas-phase transport in unsaturated soils, bubble-mediated transport in water, droplet-mediated transport in the atmosphere, and photochemical reactions.

  2. Molecular Adsorption Steers Bacterial Swimming at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Maxey, Martin R.; Tang, Jay X.

    2013-01-01

    Microbes inhabiting Earth have adapted to diverse environments of water, air, soil, and often at the interfaces of multiple media. In this study, we focus on the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at the air/water interface. Forward swimming C. crescentus swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at the surface when swimming in nutrient-rich growth medium but not in minimal salt motility medium. Trapped cells move in tight, clockwise circles when viewed from the air with slightly reduced speed. Trace amounts of Triton X100, a nonionic surfactant, release the trapped cells from these circular trajectories. We show, by tracing the motion of positively charged colloidal beads near the interface that organic molecules in the growth medium adsorb at the interface, creating a high viscosity film. Consequently, the air/water interface no longer acts as a free surface and forward swimming cells become hydrodynamically trapped. Added surfactants efficiently partition to the surface, replacing the viscous layer of molecules and reestablishing free surface behavior. These findings help explain recent similar studies on Escherichia coli, showing trajectories of variable handedness depending on media chemistry. The consistent behavior of these two distinct microbial species provides insights on how microbes have evolved to cope with challenging interfacial environments. PMID:23823220

  3. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.

  4. Molecular adsorption steers bacterial swimming at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Maxey, Martin R; Tang, Jay X

    2013-07-02

    Microbes inhabiting Earth have adapted to diverse environments of water, air, soil, and often at the interfaces of multiple media. In this study, we focus on the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at the air/water interface. Forward swimming C. crescentus swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at the surface when swimming in nutrient-rich growth medium but not in minimal salt motility medium. Trapped cells move in tight, clockwise circles when viewed from the air with slightly reduced speed. Trace amounts of Triton X100, a nonionic surfactant, release the trapped cells from these circular trajectories. We show, by tracing the motion of positively charged colloidal beads near the interface that organic molecules in the growth medium adsorb at the interface, creating a high viscosity film. Consequently, the air/water interface no longer acts as a free surface and forward swimming cells become hydrodynamically trapped. Added surfactants efficiently partition to the surface, replacing the viscous layer of molecules and reestablishing free surface behavior. These findings help explain recent similar studies on Escherichia coli, showing trajectories of variable handedness depending on media chemistry. The consistent behavior of these two distinct microbial species provides insights on how microbes have evolved to cope with challenging interfacial environments.

  5. Surface pressure affects B-hordein network formation at the air-water interface in relation to gastric digestibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingqi; Huang, Jun; Zeng, Hongbo; Chen, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    Protein interfacial network formation under mechanical pressure and its influence on degradation was investigated at molecular level using Langmuir-Blodgett B-hordein monolayer as a 2D model. Surface properties, such as surface pressure, dilatational and shear rheology and the surface pressure--area (π-A) isotherm, of B-hordein at air-water interface were analyzed by tensiometer, rheometer and a Langmuir-Blodgett trough respectively. B-Hordein conformation and orientation under different surface pressures were determined by polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). The interfacial network morphology was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). B-Hordein could reduce the air-water surface tension rapidly to ∼ 45 mN/m and form a solid-like network with high rheological elasticity and compressibility at interface, which could be a result of interactions developed by intermolecular β-sheets. The results also revealed that B-hordein interfacial network switched from an expanded liquid phase to a solid-like film with increasing compression pressure. The orientation of B-hordein was parallel to the surface when in expended liquid phase, whereas upon compression, the hydrophobic repetitive region tilted away from water phase. When compressed to 30 mN/m, a strong elastic network was formed at the interface, and it was resistant to a harsh gastric-like environment of low pH and pepsin. This work generated fundamental knowledge, which suggested the potential to design B-hordein stabilized emulsions and encapsulations with controllable digestibility for small intestine targeted delivery of bioactive compounds.

  6. SWAN: An expert system with natural language interface for tactical air capability assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    SWAN is an expert system and natural language interface for assessing the war fighting capability of Air Force units in Europe. The expert system is an object oriented knowledge based simulation with an alternate worlds facility for performing what-if excursions. Responses from the system take the form of generated text, tables, or graphs. The natural language interface is an expert system in its own right, with a knowledge base and rules which understand how to access external databases, models, or expert systems. The distinguishing feature of the Air Force expert system is its use of meta-knowledge to generate explanations in the frame and procedure based environment.

  7. Ions at the air-water interface: an end to a hundred-year-old mystery?

    PubMed

    Levin, Yan; dos Santos, Alexandre P; Diehl, Alexandre

    2009-12-18

    Availability of highly reactive halogen ions at the surface of aerosols has tremendous implications for the atmospheric chemistry. Yet neither simulations, experiments, nor existing theories are able to provide a fully consistent description of the electrolyte-air interface. In this Letter a new theory is proposed which allows us to explicitly calculate the ionic density profiles, the surface tension, and the electrostatic potential difference across the solution-air interface. Predictions of the theory are compared to experiments and are found to be in excellent agreement. The theory also sheds new light on one of the oldest puzzles of physical chemistry--the Hofmeister effect.

  8. Dipole Moment of a Charged Particle Trapped at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Bohinc, Klemen; Brown, Matthew A; May, Sylvio

    2016-07-07

    The interaction between two charged particles (such as nanoparticles or colloids) trapped at the air-water interface becomes dipolar at large separations. The corresponding dipole moment can be modeled by considering a single point charge located exactly at the interface, but this model fails to correctly predict the dipole moment's dependence on the salt concentration in the aqueous medium. We extend the single point charge model to two point charges that are separated by a fixed distance and are located at the air-water interface, with one charge being immersed in air and the other in the solvent. The two point charges represent the surface charges at the air-exposed and water-exposed regions of an interface-trapped particle. The two point charges also account for the spatial extension of the particle. On the basis of the Debye-Hückel model, we derive mathematical expressions for the interaction between two pairs of charges and discuss the salt concentration dependence of the dipolar moment at large separations. Our results reveal a residual dipole moment in the limit of large salt content that originates from the charge attached to the air-exposed region of the particle. We discuss nonlinear screening effects and compare the predicted dipolar moments with recent experimental results.

  9. Water distribution at solid/liquid interfaces visualized by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial phenomena at solid/water interfaces play an important role in a wide range of industrial technologies and biological processes. However, it has been a great challenge to directly probe the molecular-scale behavior of water at solid/water interfaces. Recently, there have been tremendous advancements in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM), enabling its operation in liquids with atomic resolution. The high spatial and force resolutions of FM-AFM have enabled the visualization of one-dimensional (1D) profiles of the hydration force, two-dimensional (2D) images of hydration layers and three-dimensional (3D) images of the water distribution at solid/water interfaces. Here I present an overview of the recent advances in FM-AFM instrumentation and its applications to the study of solid/water interfaces. PMID:27877337

  10. Fast Interconversion of Hydrogen Bonding at the Hematite (001)–Liquid Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    von Rudorff, Guido Falk; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen

    2016-04-07

    The interface between transition-metal oxides and aqueous solutions plays an important role in biogeochemistry and photoelectrochemistry, but the atomistic structure is often elusive. Here we report on the surface geometry, solvation structure, and thermal fluctuations of the hydrogen bonding network at the hematite (001)–water interface as obtained from hybrid density functional theory-based molecular dynamics. We find that the protons terminating the surface form binary patterns by either pointing in-plane or out-of-plane. The patterns exist for about 1 ps and spontaneously interconvert in an ultrafast, solvent-driven process within 50 fs. This results in only about half of the terminating protons pointing toward the solvent and being acidic. The lifetimes of all hydrogen bonds formed at the interface are shorter than those in pure liquid water. The solvation structure reported herein forms the basis for a better fundamental understanding of electron transfer coupled to proton transfer reactions at this important interface.

  11. Electrochemical Investigation of Adsorption of Single‐Wall Carbon Nanotubes at a Liquid/Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Rabiu, Aminu K.; Toth, Peter S.; Rodgers, Andrew N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is much interest in understanding the interfacial properties of carbon nanotubes, particularly at water/oil interfaces. Here, the adsorption of single‐wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at the water/1,2‐dichloroethane (DCE) interface, and the subsequent investigation of the influence of the adsorbed nanotube layer on interfacial ion transfer, is studied by using the voltammetric transfer of tetramethylammonium (TMA+) and hexafluorophosphate (PF6 −) as probe ions. The presence of the interfacial SWCNT layer significantly suppresses the transfer of both ions across the interface, with a greater degree of selectivity towards the PF6 − ion. This effect was attributed both to the partial blocking of the interface by the SWCNTs and to the potential dependant adsorption of background electrolyte ions on the surface of the SWCNTs, as confirmed by X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is caused by an electrostatic interaction between the interfacial SWCNTs and the transferring ion. PMID:28168151

  12. Electrochemical Investigation of Adsorption of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes at a Liquid/Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Rabiu, Aminu K; Toth, Peter S; Rodgers, Andrew N J; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2017-02-01

    There is much interest in understanding the interfacial properties of carbon nanotubes, particularly at water/oil interfaces. Here, the adsorption of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at the water/1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) interface, and the subsequent investigation of the influence of the adsorbed nanotube layer on interfacial ion transfer, is studied by using the voltammetric transfer of tetramethylammonium (TMA(+)) and hexafluorophosphate (PF6(-)) as probe ions. The presence of the interfacial SWCNT layer significantly suppresses the transfer of both ions across the interface, with a greater degree of selectivity towards the PF6(-) ion. This effect was attributed both to the partial blocking of the interface by the SWCNTs and to the potential dependant adsorption of background electrolyte ions on the surface of the SWCNTs, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is caused by an electrostatic interaction between the interfacial SWCNTs and the transferring ion.

  13. Fluorescence light microscopy of pulmonary surfactant at the air-water interface of an air bubble of adjustable size.

    PubMed

    Knebel, D; Sieber, M; Reichelt, R; Galla, H-J; Amrein, M

    2002-07-01

    The structural dynamics of pulmonary surfactant was studied by epifluorescence light microscopy at the air-water interface of a bubble as a model close to nature for an alveolus. Small unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol, a small amount of a fluorescent dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-analog, and surfactant-associated protein C were injected into the buffer solution. They aggregated to large clusters in the presence of Ca(2+) and adsorbed from these units to the interface. This gave rise to an interfacial film that eventually became fully condensed with dark, polygonal domains in a fluorescent matrix. When now the bubble size was increased or decreased, respectively, the film expanded or contracted. Upon expansion of the bubble, the dark areas became larger to the debit of the bright matrix and reversed upon contraction. We were able to observe single domains during the whole process. The film remained condensed, even when the interface was increased to twice its original size. From comparison with scanning force microscopy directly at the air-water interface, the fluorescent areas proved to be lipid bilayers associated with the (dark) monolayer. In the lung, such multilayer phase acts as a reservoir that guarantees a full molecular coverage of the alveolar interface during the breathing cycle and provides mechanical stability to the film.

  14. Goos-Hänchen shifts of reflected terahertz wave on a COC-air interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingmei; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Jingling

    2013-03-11

    Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts of terahertz wave reflected on the Cyclo-Olefin Copolymer (COC)-air interface was investigated in simulation and experiment. The relationship between the GH shifts with the incident angle and the frequency of incident wave were calculated to get a reference for the simulation and experiment. The reflected GH shift was measured on the COC-air interface when a terahertz wave with the frequency of 0.206 THz was incident to a COC double-prism. By changing the thickness of the air layer we find experimentally and simulatively that the GH shift and the energy of the reflected wave increases with the increase of the air layer thickness. The study of GH shift can provide useful information for applications of THz waves in sensor and power delivery systems.

  15. The air-liquid flow in a microfluidic airway tree.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Baudoin, Michael; Manneville, Paul; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidic techniques are employed to investigate air-liquid flows in the lung. A network of microchannels with five generations is made and used as a simplified model of a section of the pulmonary airway tree. Liquid plugs are injected into the network and pushed by a flow of air; they divide at every bifurcation until they reach the exits of the network. A resistance, associated with the presence of one plug in a given generation, is defined to establish a linear relation between the driving pressure and the total flow rate in the network. Based on this resistance, good predictions are obtained for the flow of two successive plugs in different generations. The total flow rate of a two-plug flow is found to depend not only on the driving pressure and lengths of the plugs, but also the initial distance between them. Furthermore, long range interactions between daughters of a dividing plug are observed and discussed, particularly when the plugs are flowing through the bifurcations. These interactions lead to different flow patterns for different forcing conditions: the flow develops symmetrically when subjected to constant pressure or high flow rate forcing, while a low flow rate driving yields an asymmetric flow.

  16. Optimization of an air–liquid interface exposure system for assessing toxicity of airborne nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Latvala, Siiri; Hedberg, Jonas; Möller, Lennart; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Karlsson, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of refined toxicological methods is currently needed for characterizing the risks of airborne nanoparticles (NPs) to human health. To mimic pulmonary exposure, we have developed an air–liquid interface (ALI) exposure system for direct deposition of airborne NPs on to lung cell cultures. Compared to traditional submerged systems, this allows more realistic exposure conditions for characterizing toxicological effects induced by airborne NPs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the deposition of silver NPs (AgNPs) is affected by different conditions of the ALI system. Additionally, the viability and metabolic activity of A549 cells was studied following AgNP exposure. Particle deposition increased markedly with increasing aerosol flow rate and electrostatic field strength. The highest amount of deposited particles (2.2 μg cm–2) at cell‐free conditions following 2 h exposure was observed for the highest flow rate (390 ml min–1) and the strongest electrostatic field (±2 kV). This was estimated corresponding to deposition efficiency of 94%. Cell viability was not affected after 2 h exposure to clean air in the ALI system. Cells exposed to AgNPs (0.45 and 0.74 μg cm–2) showed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced metabolic activities (64 and 46%, respectively). Our study shows that the ALI exposure system can be used for generating conditions that were more realistic for in vitro exposures, which enables improved mechanistic and toxicological studies of NPs in contact with human lung cells.Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26935862

  17. Adsorption, folding, and packing of an amphiphilic peptide at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Engin, Ozge; Sayar, Mehmet

    2012-02-23

    Peptide oligomers play an essential role as model compounds for identifying key motifs in protein structure formation and protein aggregation. Here, we present our results, based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations, on adsorption, folding, and packing within a surface monolayer of an amphiphilic peptide at the air/water interface. Experimental results suggest that these molecules spontaneously form ordered monolayers at the interface, adopting a β-hairpin-like structure within the surface layer. Our results reveal that the β-hairpin structure can be observed both in bulk and at the air/water interface. However, the presence of an interface leads to ideal partitioning of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues, and therefore reduces the conformational space for the molecule and increases the stability of the hairpin structure. We obtained the adsorption free energy of a single β-hairpin at the air/water interface, and analyzed the enthalpic and entropic contributions. The adsorption process is favored by two main factors: (1) Free-energy reduction due to desolvation of the hydrophobic side chains of the peptide and release of the water molecules which form a cage around these hydrophobic groups in bulk water. (2) Reduction of the total air/water contact area at the interface upon adsorption of the peptide amphiphile. By performing mutations on the original molecule, we demonstrated the relative role of key design features of the peptide. Finally, by analyzing the potential of mean force among two peptides at the interface, we investigated possible packing mechanisms for these molecules within the surface monolayer.

  18. Dynamic microscopy of nanoscale cluster growth at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Williamson, M J; Tromp, R M; Vereecken, P M; Hull, R; Ross, F M

    2003-08-01

    Dynamic processes at the solid-liquid interface are of key importance across broad areas of science and technology. Electrochemical deposition of copper, for example, is used for metallization in integrated circuits, and a detailed understanding of nucleation, growth and coalescence is essential in optimizing the final microstructure. Our understanding of processes at the solid-vapour interface has advanced tremendously over the past decade due to the routine availability of real-time, high-resolution imaging techniques yielding data that can be compared quantitatively with theory. However, the difficulty of studying the solid-liquid interface leaves our understanding of processes there less complete. Here we analyse dynamic observations--recorded in situ using a novel transmission electron microscopy technique--of the nucleation and growth of nanoscale copper clusters during electrodeposition. We follow in real time the evolution of individual clusters, and compare their development with simulations incorporating the basic physics of electrodeposition during the early stages of growth. The experimental technique developed here is applicable to a broad range of dynamic phenomena at the solid-liquid interface.

  19. Sample cells for probing solid/liquid interfaces with broadband sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreault, Dominique; Kurz, Volker; Howell, Caitlin; Koelsch, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Two sample cells designed specifically for sum-frequency-generation (SFG) measurements at the solid/liquid interface were developed: one thin-layer analysis cell allowing measurement of films on reflective metallic surfaces through a micrometer layer of solution and one spectroelectrochemical cell allowing investigation of processes at the indium tin oxide/solution interface. Both sample cells are described in detail and data illustrating the capabilities of each are shown. To further improve measurements at solid/liquid interfaces, the broadband SFG system was modified to include a reference beam which can be measured simultaneously with the sample signal, permitting background correction of SFG spectra in real time. Sensitivity tests of this system yielded a signal-to-noise ratio of 100 at a surface coverage of 0.2 molecules/nm2. Details on data analysis routines, pulse shaping methods of the visible beam, as well as the design of a purging chamber and sample stage setup are presented. These descriptions will be useful to those planning to set up a SFG spectrometer or seeking to optimize their own SFG systems for measurements of solid/liquid interfaces.

  20. Interaction between a disclination and a uniaxial-isotropic phase interface in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Shklyaev, Oleg E; Fried, Eliot

    2008-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a disclination line of strength +/-1/2 and an interface between the uniaxial and isotropic phases of a nematic liquid crystal. We apply a recently developed set of interface conditions including a configurational force balance which generalizes the Gibbs-Thomson equation to account for the curvature elasticity of the uniaxial phase and the orientation dependence of the interfacial free-energy density. We consider a rectangular vessel containing both phases and a disclination. We formulate a relevant free-boundary problem and use numerical methods to determine equilibrium shapes of the interface. When the interfacial free-energy is constant, the shape of the interface is insensitive to whether the strength of the defect is +1/2 or -1/2 and to rotations of the director field consistent with the boundary conditions. Accounting for the dependence of the interfacial free-energy density on the angle between the interfacial unit normal field and the director field eliminates these degeneracies. In particular, when such dependence is taken into account, different solution branches are found, indicating the presence of a bifurcation. We find also that, depending on the magnitude of the anisotropic contribution to the interfacial free-energy density, the interaction between the disclination and the interface may be repulsive or attractive. When the interaction is repulsive, the disclination line positions itself at an energetically optimal distance adjacent to the interface. Otherwise, the uniaxial phase expels the disclination to the interface where a cusp forms.

  1. Fabrication of composite polymer foam films at the liquid/liquid interface through emulsion-directed assembly and adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yuanyuan; Liu, Mei; Tong, Kun; Xu, Jian; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hao, Jingcheng; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2014-03-04

    The foam films of polystyrene-b-poly(acrylic acid)-b-polystyrene (PS-b-PAA-b-PS) doped with Cd(II) or Pb(II) species were fabricated at the planar liquid/liquid interfaces between a DMF/chloroform (v/v: 1/1) solution of the polymer and aqueous solutions containing cadmium acetate or lead acetate at ambient temperature. Optical microscopic observation shows the thin film is uniform on a larger length scale. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) investigations reveal that the foam films are made up of microcapsules with the size of several hundreds of nanometers to micrometers. The walls of the microcapsules have a layered structure decorating with nanofibers and hollow nanospheres, where numerous inorganic fine nanoparticles are dispersed homogeneously. The film formation is a result of emulsion droplet-templated assembly and adsorption of the formed microcapsules at the planar liquid/liquid interface. Because of the miscibility of DMF with chloroform and water, DMF migrates to the aqueous phase while water migrates to the organic phase across the interface, resulting in the formation of a W/O emulsion, as revealed by optical microscopic observation, freeze fracture transmission electron microscopic (FF-TEM) observation, and dynamic laser scattering (DLS) investigation. The triblock copolymer molecules and the inorganic species adsorb and self-assemble around the emulsion drops, leading to the formation of the composite microcapsules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and FTIR spectroscopic results indicate that two kinds of Cd(II) or Pb(II) species, metal oxide or hydroxide, resulting from the hydrolysis of the metal ions and the coordinated metal ions to the carboxyl groups coexist in the formed thin films, which transform to metal sulfide completely after treating with hydrogen sulfide to get metal sulfide nanoparticle-doped polymer thin films.

  2. Microbes at Surface-Air Interfaces: The Metabolic Harnessing of Relative Humidity, Surface Hygroscopicity, and Oligotrophy for Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Wendy; Kroukamp, Otini; Korber, Darren R.; McKelvie, Jennifer; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.

    2016-01-01

    The human environment is predominantly not aqueous, and microbes are ubiquitous at the surface-air interfaces with which we interact. Yet microbial studies at surface-air interfaces are largely survival-oriented, whilst microbial metabolism has overwhelmingly been investigated from the perspective of liquid saturation. This study explored microbial survival and metabolism under desiccation, particularly the influence of relative humidity (RH), surface hygroscopicity, and nutrient availability on the interchange between these two phenomena. The combination of a hygroscopic matrix (i.e., clay or 4,000 MW polyethylene glycol) and high RH resulted in persistent measurable microbial metabolism during desiccation. In contrast, no microbial metabolism was detected at (a) hygroscopic interfaces at low RH, and (b) less hygroscopic interfaces (i.e., sand and plastic/glass) at high or low RH. Cell survival was conversely inhibited at high RH and promoted at low RH, irrespective of surface hygroscopicity. Based on this demonstration of metabolic persistence and survival inhibition at high RH, it was proposed that biofilm metabolic rates might inversely influence whole-biofilm resilience, with ‘resilience’ defined in this study as a biofilm’s capacity to recover from desiccation. The concept of whole-biofilm resilience being promoted by oligotrophy was supported in desiccation-tolerant Arthrobacter spp. biofilms, but not in desiccation-sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The ability of microbes to interact with surfaces to harness water vapor during desiccation was demonstrated, and potentially to harness oligotrophy (the most ubiquitous natural condition facing microbes) for adaptation to desiccation. PMID:27746774

  3. An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    Plunging Liquid Jet - The Air Entrainment Process". It is intended that this paper will be finalized and...the fifth quarterly report for ONR grant N00014-91-J-1271, "An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion" (Lahey...Drew - CoPI). rhis report period has been concerned with performing an analysis of the air entrainment process associated with a plunging liquid

  4. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  5. Interaction of Porosity with an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: a Real-Time Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W.; Catalina, A.; Stefanescu, D.; Curreri, P.

    1999-01-01

    Problems associated with formation of porosity during solidification continue to have a daily impact on the metal forming industry. Several past investigations have dealt with the nucleation and growth aspects of porosity. However, investigations related to the interaction of porosity with that of a solidification front has been limited mostly to organic analogues. In this paper we report on real time experimental observations of such interactions in metal alloys. Using a state of the art X-Ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) we have been able to observe and record the dynamics of the interaction. This includes distortion of the solid/liquid interface near a poro.sity, solute segr,egation patterns surrounding a porosity and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with an advancing solid/liquid interface. Results will be presented for different Al alloys and growth conditions. The experimental data will be compared to theory using a recently developed 2D numerical model. The model employs a finite difference approach where the solid/liquid interface is defined through the points at which the interface intersects the grid lines. The transport variables are calculated at these points and the motion of the solidification front is determined by the magnitude of the transport variables. The model accounts for the interplay of the thermal and solutal field and the influence of capilarity to predict the shape of the solid/liquid interface with time in the vicinity of porosity. One can further calculate the perturbation of the solutal field by the presence of porosity in the melt.

  6. Instability of the Liquid Metal-Pattern Interface in the Lost Foam Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, W. D.; Ainsworth, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    The nature of the liquid metal-pattern interface during mold filling in the Lost Foam casting of aluminum alloys was investigated using real-time X-ray radiography for both normal expanded polystyrene, and brominated polystyrene foam patterns. Filling the pattern under the action of gravity from above or below had little effect on properties, both cases resulting in a large scatter of tensile strength values, (quantified by their Weibull Modulus). Countergravity filling at different velocities demonstrated that the least scatter of tensile strength values (highest Weibull Modulus) was associated with the slowest filling, when a planar liquid metal-pattern interface occurred. Real-time X-ray radiography showed that the advancing liquid metal front became unstable above a certain critical velocity, leading to the entrainment of the degrading pattern material and associated defects. It has been suggested that the transition of the advancing liquid metal-pattern interface into an unstable regime may be a result of Saffman-Taylor Instability.

  7. Marangoni instability at a contaminated liquid-vapor interface of a burning thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armendáriz, Javier; Matalon, Moshe

    2003-05-01

    We consider the evaporation and subsequent burning of thin films of liquid fuels on which a nonsoluble surface active agent (surfactant) is present. This work complements a previous study where we have considered the same problem but in the absence of surfactant. Surfactant may result from impurities of the liquid fuel or from backward diffusion of unoxidized combustion intermediaries and heavy soot precursors. When burning occurs in a quiescent ambient, the mathematical problem can be systematically reduced to a pair of nonlinear evolution equations for the film's thickness and surfactant's concentration. These equations contain, in particular, the temperature and mass flux at the liquid-vapor interface as additional parameters, determined from full consideration of the gas-phase processes. We show that in the absence of combustion or, when the heat released by the chemical reactions is relatively small, thermo-capillary effects tend to destabilize a nominally planar interface. The presence of surfactant brings about a slower growth and can possibly stabilize the film. Combustion generally acts to reverse these trends: When the heat release is large, thermo-capillary effects stabilize the liquid-vapor interface while the presence of surfactant leads to destabilization.

  8. Heat flow at solid-liquid interfaces: confrontation between experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David

    2007-03-01

    Heat transport in nanostructures and nanostructured materials provides a novel paradigm for direct comparisons between the results of experiment and simulation. Time-resolved, pump-probe optical techniques enable measurements of the evolution of temperature on time scales from ps to ns. Our pump-probe experiments take two basic forms: measurements of heat transport across planar interfaces using time-domain thermoreflectance and measurements of heat flow from a metal or semiconductor nanostructure into its surroundings using transient absorption. The systems that we are studying are directly accessible to simulation by classical molecular dynamics on the same time and length scales that are encountered in the experiments. Working with our collaborators, P. Keblinski and his colleagues at RPI, we have made quantitative comparisons between experiment and simulation for heat transport from carbon nanotubes and fullerene molecules into a surrounding fluid; and heat transport across hydrophilic and hydrophobic interfaces with water. Any such comparison must take into account i) non-idealities in the experiments; ii) uncertainties in the potentials and atomic geometries in the computational model; and iii) the fact that classical simulations may include high frequency vibrational modes that are not thermally excited in the experiments. Despite the fact that transport at solid-liquid interfaces is more difficult to measure than more commonly studied solid-solid interfaces, we argue that solid-liquid interfaces provide a more reliable system for quantitative comparisons between experiment and simulation.

  9. Interface for the rapid analysis of liquid samples by accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Turteltaub, Kenneth; Ognibene, Ted; Thomas, Avi; Daley, Paul F; Salazar Quintero, Gary A; Bench, Graham

    2014-02-04

    An interface for the analysis of liquid sample having carbon content by an accelerator mass spectrometer including a wire, defects on the wire, a system for moving the wire, a droplet maker for producing droplets of the liquid sample and placing the droplets of the liquid sample on the wire in the defects, a system that converts the carbon content of the droplets of the liquid sample to carbon dioxide gas in a helium stream, and a gas-accepting ion source connected to the accelerator mass spectrometer that receives the carbon dioxide gas of the sample in a helium stream and introduces the carbon dioxide gas of the sample into the accelerator mass spectrometer.

  10. Detection of different oxidation states of individual manganese porphyrins during their reaction with oxygen at a solid/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    den Boer, Duncan; Li, Min; Habets, Thomas; Iavicoli, Patrizia; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M; Speller, Sylvia; Amabilino, David B; De Feyter, Steven; Elemans, Johannes A A W

    2013-07-01

    Manganese porphyrins have been extensively investigated as model systems for the natural enzyme cytochrome P450 and as synthetic oxidation catalysts. Here, we report single-molecule studies of the multistep reaction of manganese porphyrins with molecular oxygen at a solid/liquid interface, using a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) under environmental control. The high lateral resolution of the STM, in combination with its sensitivity to subtle differences in the electronic properties of molecules, allowed the detection of at least four distinct reaction species. Real-space and real-time imaging of reaction dynamics enabled the observation of active sites, immobile on the experimental timescale. Conversions between the different species could be tuned by the composition of the atmosphere (argon, air or oxygen) and the surface bias voltage. By means of extensive comparison of the results to those obtained by analogous solution-based chemistry, we assigned the observed species to the starting compound, reaction intermediates and products.

  11. Detection of different oxidation states of individual manganese porphyrins during their reaction with oxygen at a solid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boer, Duncan; Li, Min; Habets, Thomas; Iavicoli, Patrizia; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Speller, Sylvia; Amabilino, David B.; de Feyter, Steven; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.

    2013-07-01

    Manganese porphyrins have been extensively investigated as model systems for the natural enzyme cytochrome P450 and as synthetic oxidation catalysts. Here, we report single-molecule studies of the multistep reaction of manganese porphyrins with molecular oxygen at a solid/liquid interface, using a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) under environmental control. The high lateral resolution of the STM, in combination with its sensitivity to subtle differences in the electronic properties of molecules, allowed the detection of at least four distinct reaction species. Real-space and real-time imaging of reaction dynamics enabled the observation of active sites, immobile on the experimental timescale. Conversions between the different species could be tuned by the composition of the atmosphere (argon, air or oxygen) and the surface bias voltage. By means of extensive comparison of the results to those obtained by analogous solution-based chemistry, we assigned the observed species to the starting compound, reaction intermediates and products.

  12. Mechanically Enhanced Liquid Interfaces at Human Body Temperature Using Thermosensitive Methylated Nanocrystalline Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Scheuble, N; Geue, T; Kuster, S; Adamcik, J; Mezzenga, R; Windhab, E J; Fischer, P

    2016-02-09

    The mechanical performance of materials at oil/water interfaces after consumption is a key factor affecting hydrophobic drug release. In this study, we methylated the surface of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) by mercerization and dimethyl sulfate exposure to produce thermosensitive biopolymers. These methylated NCC (metNCC) were used to investigate interfacial thermogelation at air/water and medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)/water interfaces at body temperature. In contrast to bulk fluid dynamics, elastic layers were formed at room temperature, and elasticity increased significantly at body temperature, which was measured by interfacial shear and dilatational rheology in situ. This unique phenomenon depends on solvent quality, temperature, and polymer concentration at interfaces. Thus, by adjusting the degree of hydrophobicity of metNCC, the interfacial elasticity and thermogelation of the interfaces could be varied. In general, these new materials (metNCC) formed more brittle interfacial layers compared to commercial methylcellulose (MC A15). Thermogelation of methylcellulose promotes attractive intermolecular forces, which were reflected in a change in self-assembly of metNCC at the interface. As a consequence, layer thickness and density increased as a function of temperature. These effects were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the displaced interface and confirmed by neutron reflection. The substantial structural and mechanical change of methylcellulose interfaces at body temperature represents a controllable encapsulation parameter allowing optimization of lipid-based drug formulations.

  13. In situ X-ray studies of adlayer-induced crystal nucleation at the liquid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Elsen, Annika; Festersen, Sven; Runge, Benjamin; Koops, Christian T.; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Deutsch, Moshe; Seeck, Oliver H.; Murphy, Bridget M.; Magnussen, Olaf M.

    2013-05-29

    Crystal nucleation and growth at a liquid–liquid interface is studied on the atomic scale by in situ Å-resolution X-ray scattering methods for the case of liquid Hg and an electrochemical dilute electrolyte containing Pb2+, F-, and Br- ions. In the regime negative of the Pb amalgamation potential Φrp = -0.70 V, no change is observed from the surface-layered structure of pure Hg. Upon potential-induced release of Pb2+ from the Hg bulk at Graphic, the formation of an intriguing interface structure is observed, comprising a well-defined 7.6-Å–thick adlayer, decorated with structurally related 3D crystallites. Both are identified by their diffraction peaks as PbFBr, preferentially aligned with their Graphic axis along the interface normal. X-ray reflectivity shows the adlayer to consist of a stack of five ionic layers, forming a single-unit-cell–thick crystalline PbFBr precursor film, which acts as a template for the subsequent quasiepitaxial 3D crystal growth. This growth behavior is assigned to the combined action of electrostatic and short-range chemical interactions.

  14. Shear turbulence, Langmuir circulation and scalar transfer at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsi, Amine; Tejada-Martinez, Andres; Veron, Fabrice

    2016-11-01

    DNS of an initially quiescent coupled air-water interface driven by an air-flow with free stream speed of 5 m/s generates gravity-capillary waves and small-scale (centimeter-scale) Langmuir circulation (LC) beneath the interface. In addition to LC, the waterside turbulence is characterized by shear turbulence with structures similar to classical "wall streaks" in wall-bounded flow. These streaks, denoted here as "shear streaks", consist of downwind-elongated vortices alternating in sign in the crosswind direction. The presence of interfacial waves causes interaction between these vortices giving rise to bigger vortices, namely LC. LES with momentum equation augmented with the Craik-Leibovich (C-L) vortex force is used to understand the roles of the shear streaks (i.e. the shear turbulence) and the LC in determining scalar flux from the airside to the waterside and vertical scalar transport beneath. The C-L force consists of the cross product between the Stokes drift velocity (induced by the interface waves) and the flow vorticity. It is observed that Stokes drift shear intensifies the shear streaks (with respect to flow without wave effects) leading to enhanced scalar flux at the air-water interface. LC leads to increased vertical scalar transport at depths below the interface.

  15. A first attempt to enhance the 2-D single-crystal growth of a protein at an air/water interface from hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drazek, L.; Legrand, J.-F.; Davoust, L.

    2005-02-01

    An alternative technique to grow a 2-D crystal of protein at a functionalized air/water interface is proposed. The first part of this paper briefly reviews 2-D crystal growth at a fluid interface and deals with our first experiments on streptavidin whose 2-D (poly)crystallization ability is well known. In the experiments, the involved air/water interface is functionalized with a mixed lipidic monolayer made of DOPC and biotinylated lipids. The second part of the paper relates to an alternative strategy we propose in order to enhance the 2-D single-crystal growth of a protein at a liquid interface. The idea is to get benefit from an axisymmetric swirling flow driven in a water sub-phase confined within an annular channel. The swirl is expected to control the distribution of the proteins at the air/water interface and to promote the growth of a 2-D single crystal from the smallest to the largest radii (radial segregation). An analytical modelling based on a low Reynolds number asymptotic development demonstrates how two control parameters, the mean channel curvature and the Reynolds number of the shear flow, can be helpful in tuning the magnitude of the swirl and therefore the crystal growth.

  16. Molecular electrocatalysis for oxygen reduction by cobalt porphyrins adsorbed at liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Hatay, Imren; Trojánek, Antonín; Samec, Zdenek; Khoury, Tony; Gros, Claude P; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Daina, Antoine; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Girault, Hubert H

    2010-03-03

    Molecular electrocatalysis for oxygen reduction at a polarized water/1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) interface was studied, involving aqueous protons, ferrocene (Fc) in DCE and amphiphilic cobalt porphyrin catalysts adsorbed at the interface. The catalyst, (2,8,13,17-tetraethyl-3,7,12,18-tetramethyl-5-p-amino-phenylporphyrin) cobalt(II) (CoAP), functions like conventional cobalt porphyrins, activating O(2) via coordination by the formation of a superoxide structure. Furthermore, due to the hydrophilic nature of the aminophenyl group, CoAP has a strong affinity for the water/DCE interface as evidenced by lipophilicity mapping calculations and surface tension measurements, facilitating the protonation of the CoAP-O(2) complex and its reduction by ferrocene. The reaction is electrocatalytic as its rate depends on the applied Galvani potential difference between the two phases.

  17. Atomically Abrupt Liquid-Oxide Interface Stabilized by Self-Regulated Interfacial Defects: The Case of Al/Al2O3 Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, J.; Zhu, J. Y.; Curtis, C.; Blake, D.; Glatzmaier, G.; Kim, Y. H.; Wei, S. H.

    2012-06-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of the liquid Al/(0001) {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces are investigated by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Surprisingly, the formed liquid-solid interface is always atomically abrupt and is characterized by a transitional Al layer that contains a fixed concentration of Al vacancies ({approx}10 at.%). We find that the self-regulation of the defect density in the metal layer is due to the fact that the formation energy of the Al vacancies is readjusted in a way that opposes changes in the defect density. The negative-feedback effect stabilizes the defected transitional layer and maintains the atomic abruptness at the interface. The proposed mechanism is generally applicable to other liquid-metal/metal-oxide systems, and thus of significant importance in understanding the interface structures at high temperature.

  18. Understanding the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface from molecular level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhipei; Ren, Tao; Wu, Pan; Shen, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xinping

    2014-11-25

    Understanding the behavior of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is crucial for many applications, such as lubricants, paints, cosmetics, and fire-fighting foams. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the microscopic properties of non-ionic fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface. Several properties, including the distribution of head groups, the distribution probability of the tilt angle between hydrophobic tails with respect to the xy plane, and the order parameter of surfactants, were computed to probe the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface. The effects of the monomer structure on interfacial phenomena of non-ionic surfactants were investigated as well. It is observed that the structure of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is more ordered than that of hydrocarbons, which is dominated by the van der Waals interaction between surfactants and water molecules. However, replacing one or two CF2 with one or two CH2 group does not significantly influence the interfacial structure, suggesting that hydrocarbons may be promising alternatives to perfluorinated surfactants.

  19. Hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish; Singh, Dhiraj; Singh, Ravi; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when placed at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface due to Marangoni forces. This steady camphor influx from tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the camphor outflux due to evaporation. When spontaneous fluctuations in evaporation break the axial symmetry of Marangoni force acting radially outwards, the camphor tablet is propelled like a boat along the water surface. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at air-water interfaces. We observe three different modes of motion, namely continuous, harmonic and periodic, due to the volatile nature of camphor. We explain these modes in terms of ratio of two time-scales: the time-scale over which viscous forces are dominant over the Marangoni forces (τη) and the time-scale over which Marangoni forces are dominant over the viscous forces (τσ). The continuous, harmonic and periodic motions are observed when τη /τσ ~ 1 , τη /τσ >= 1 and τη /τσ >> 1 respectively. Experimentally, the ratio of the time scales is varied by changing the interfacial tension of the air-water interface using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  20. Understanding Charge Transfer Reactions at the Interface of Plasmas in Contact with Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, David

    2015-09-01

    Plasmas in and in contact with liquids offer a very rich physical and chemical environment where a multitude of species (electrons, ions, neutrals) and physical phenomena (light, electric fields) intersect. With emerging applications in medicine, environmental remediation, and materials synthesis, it has become paramount to understand the many processes occurring at the interface in order to design and optimize new technologies. Perhaps the most important plasma species is the electron, and it thus reasonable to assume it can play a critical role when plasmas are brought in contact with liquids as well. Over the past several years, our group has focused on deciphering the nature of electron transfer from a plasma to liquid and the subsequent chemistry the electrons induce. Our experimental configuration is the plasma equivalent of an electrochemical or electrolytic cell, where the cathode and anode are submerged in an electrolyte solution and current is carried by reduction reactions at the cathode and oxidation reactions at the anode. When the cathode is replaced by a plasma, the circuit is explicitly completed by the injection of plasma electrons into the solution where they stably solvate before inducing reduction reactions. Recently, we have demonstrated the first direct detection of these stably solvated electrons using a novel total internal reflection absorption spectroscopy experiment, resulting in the first measurement of the optical absorption spectrum for plasma-solvated electrons. Further, we have shown that the lifetime of these electrons can be significantly reduced if suitable solution- and plasma-phase scavengers are used to react quickly with these electrons. These results highlight the complexity of the plasma-liquid interface and how charge-transfer processes often compete with other chemistry that occurs at the plasma-liquid interface, such as the dissolution of plasma species into the liquid. This work was supported by the U.S. Army Research

  1. Proton-coupled oxygen reduction at liquid-liquid interfaces catalyzed by cobalt porphine.

    PubMed

    Hatay, Imren; Su, Bin; Li, Fei; Méndez, Manuel Alejandro; Khoury, Tony; Gros, Claude P; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Ersoz, Mustafa; Samec, Zdenek; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-09-23

    Cobalt porphine (CoP) dissolved in the organic phase of a biphasic system is used to catalyze O(2) reduction by an electron donor, ferrocene (Fc). Using voltammetry at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES), it is possible to drive this catalytic reduction at the interface as a function of the applied potential difference, where aqueous protons and organic electron donors combine to reduce O(2). The current signal observed corresponds to a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction, as no current and no reaction can be observed in the absence of either the aqueous acid, CoP, Fc, or O(2).

  2. Interaction of L-Phenylalanine with a Phospholipid Monolayer at the Water-Air Interface.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Elizabeth C; Perkins, Russell J; Telesford, Dana-Marie; Adams, Ellen M; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Allen, Heather C; Roeselová, Martina; Vaida, Veronica

    2015-07-23

    The interaction of L-phenylalanine with a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayer at the air-water interface was explored using a combination of experimental techniques and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By means of Langmuir trough methods and Brewster angle microscopy, L-phenylalanine was shown to significantly alter the interfacial tension and the surface domain morphology of the DPPC film. In addition, confocal microscopy was used to explore the aggregation state of L-phenylalanine in the bulk aqueous phase. Finally, MD simulations were performed to gain molecular-level information on the interactions of L-phenylalanine and DPPC at the interface. Taken together, these results show that L-phenylalanine intercalates into a DPPC film at the air-water interface, thereby affecting the surface tension, phase morphology, and ordering of the DPPC film. The results are discussed in the context of biological systems and the mechanism of diseases such as phenylketonuria.

  3. Mueller matrix imaging of targets under an air-sea interface.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng-Wang; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2009-01-10

    The Mueller matrix imaging method is a powerful tool for target detection. In this study, the effect of the air-sea interface on the detection of underwater objects is studied. A backward Monte Carlo code has been developed to study this effect. The main result is that the reflection of the diffuse sky light by the interface reduces the Mueller image contrast. If the air-sea interface is ruffled by wind, the distinction between different regions of the underwater target is smoothed out. The effect of the finite size of an active light source is also studied. The image contrast is found to be relatively insensitive to the size of the light source. The volume scattering function plays an important role on the underwater object detection. Generally, a smaller asymmetry parameter decreases the contrast of the polarimetry images.

  4. Behavior of pH-sensitive core shell particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mark D'Souza; Manga, Mohamed S; Hunter, Timothy N; Cayre, Olivier J; Biggs, Simon

    2012-03-20

    In this article, the adsorption of latex core-responsive polymer-shell nanoparticles at the air-water interface is investigated using a Langmuir trough. Phase transition isotherms are used to explore their responsive behavior at the interface as a function of changes in the pH of the subphase. By adjusting the pH of the water prior to particle deposition, we probe the effect of the stabilizing polymer wetting by the water subphase on the stability of these particles at the air-water interface. In addition, by initially compressing a stable film of adsorbed particles and then subsequently changing the pH of the subphase we study desorption of these particles into the water phase.

  5. Effect of surfactants on bubble collisions with an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyan; Guo, Tianqi; Dabiri, Sadegh; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2016-11-01

    Collisions of bubbles on an air-water interface are frequently observed in natural environments and industrial applications. We study the coefficient of restitution of a bubble colliding on an air-water interface in the presence of surfactants through a combination of experimental and numerical approaches. In a high concentration surfactant solution, bubbles experience perfectly inelastic collisions, and bubbles are arrested by the interface after the collision. As the surfactant concentration decreases, collisions are altered to partially inelastic, and eventually, elastic collisions occur in the pure water. In a high concentration surfactant solution, the reduced bouncing is attributed to the Marangoni stress. We identify the Langmuir number, the ratio between absorption and desorption rates, as the fundamental parameter to quantify the Marangoni effect on collision processes in surfactant solutions. The effect of Marangoni stress on the bubble's coefficient of restitution is non-monotonic, where the coefficient of restitution first decreases with Langmuir number, and then increases.

  6. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-20

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.