Science.gov

Sample records for air mass characteristics

  1. Influence of drying air parameters on mass transfer characteristics of apple slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    To efficiently design both new drying process and equipment and/or to improve the existing systems, accurate values of mass transfer characteristics are necessary. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of drying air parameters (i.e. temperature, velocity and relative humidity) on effective diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient of apple slices. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the mass transfer characteristics. The obtained Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the apple slices was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient values obtained to be in the ranges of 7.13 × 10-11-7.66 × 10-10 and 1.46 × 10-7-3.39 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively and the both of them increased with increasing drying air temperature and velocity, and decreasing relative humidity. The validation of the model showed that the model predicted the experimental drying curves of the samples with a good accuracy.

  2. Mass transfer characteristics of bisporus mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) slices during convective hot air drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Davoud; Baraani Dastjerdi, Mojtaba; Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    An accurate understanding of moisture transfer parameters, including moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient, is essential for efficient mass transfer analysis and to design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments. The main objective of the present study was to carry out an experimental and theoretical investigation of mushroom slices drying and determine the mass transfer characteristics of the samples dried under different conditions. The mushroom slices with two thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm were dried at air temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C and air flow rates of 1 and 1.5 m s-1. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the moisture transfer parameters and predict the drying curves. It was observed that the entire drying process took place in the falling drying rate period. The obtained lag factor and Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the samples was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective moisture diffusivity and the moisture transfer coefficient increased with increasing air temperature, air flow rate and samples thickness and varied in the ranges of 6.5175 × 10-10 to 1.6726 × 10-9 m2 s-1 and 2.7715 × 10-7 to 3.5512 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively. The validation of the Dincer and Dost model indicated a good capability of the model to describe the drying curves of the mushroom slices.

  3. DNAPL REMOVAL MECHANISMS AND MASS TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS DURING COSOLVENT-AIR FLOODING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent injection of cosolvent and air, a cosolvent-air (CA) flood was recently suggested for a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) remediation technology. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the DNAPL removal mechanisms of the CA flood and to quantify mass t...

  4. An Air Mass Based Approach to the Establishment of Spring Season Synoptic Characteristics in the Northeast United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, R.; Messina, A.; Godek, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    The spring season is indicative of marked meteorological, ecological, and biological changes across the Northeast United States. The onset of spring coincides with distinct meteorological phenomena including an increase in severe weather events and snow meltwaters that can cause localized flooding and other costly damages. Increasing and variable springtime temperatures also influence Northeast tourist operations and agricultural productivity. Even with the vested interest of industry in the season and public awareness of the dynamic characteristics of spring, the definition of spring remains somewhat arbitrary. The primary goal of this research is to obtain a synoptic meteorological definition of the spring season through an assessment of air mass frequency over the past 60 years. A secondary goal examines the validity of recent speculations that the onset and termination of spring has changed in recent decades, particularly since 1975. The Spatial Synoptic Classification is utilized to define daily air masses over the region. Annual and seasonal baseline frequencies are identified and their differences are acquired to characterize the season. Seasonal frequency departures of the early and late segments of the period of record around 1975 are calculated and examined for practical and statistical significance. The daily boundaries of early and late spring are then isolated and frequencies are obtained for these periods. Boundary frequencies are assessed across the period of record to identify important changes in the season's initiation and termination through time. Results indicate that the Northeast spring season is dominated by dry air masses, mainly the Dry Moderate and Dry Polar types. Significant differences in seasonal air mass frequency are also observed through time. Prior to 1975, higher frequencies of polar air mass types are detected while after 1975 there is an increase in the frequencies of both moderate and tropical types. This finding is also

  5. Characteristics of tyre dust in polluted air: Studies by single particle mass spectrometry (ATOFMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, David C. S.; Gietl, Johanna K.; Olatunbosun, Oluremi A.; Yang, Xiaoguang; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-09-01

    There is a paucity of quantitative knowledge on the contributions of non-exhaust (abrasion and re-suspension) sources to traffic emissions. Abrasive emissions can be broadly categorised as tyre wear, brake wear and road dust/road surface wear. Current research often considers road dust and tyre dust as externally mixed particles, the former mainly composed of mineral matter and the latter solely composed of mainly organic matter and some trace elements. The aim of this work was to characterise tyre wear from both laboratory and field studies by using Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS). Real-time single particle chemical composition was obtained from a set of rubber tyres rotating on a metal surface. Bimodal particle number size distributions peaking at 35 nm and 85 nm were obtained from SMPS/APS measurements over the range 6-20,000 nm. ATOFMS mass spectra of tyre wear in the particle size range 200-3000 nm diameter show peaks due to exo-sulphur compounds, nitrate, Zn and ions of high molecular weight (m/z > 100) attributed to organic polymers. Two large ATOFMS datasets collected from a number of outdoor studies were examined. The former was constituted of 48 road dust samples collected on the roads of London. The latter consisted of ATOFMS ambient air field studies from Europe, overall composed of more than 2,000,000 single particle mass spectra. The majority (95%) of tyre wear particles present in the road dust samples and atmospheric samples are internally mixed with metals (Li, Na, Ca, Fe, Ti), as well as phosphate. It is concluded that the interaction of tyres with the road surface creates particles internally mixed from two sources: tyre rubber and road surface materials. Measurements of the tyre rubber component alone may underestimate the contribution of tyre wear to concentrations of airborne particulate matter. The results presented are especially relevant for urban aerosol source apportionment and PM2.5 exposure assessment.

  6. Simulation of solid oxide iron-air battery: Effects of heat and mass transfer on charge/discharge characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Hiroko; Iwai, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    A time-dependent 2-D numerical simulation was performed on a solid oxide iron-air battery (SOIAB) to reveal the fundamental characteristics of this new system. The SOIAB is a rechargeable battery consisting of a solid oxide electrochemical cell (SOEC) and iron as a redox metal. A simple battery configuration was employed assuming a system with a small capacity. A simulation model for a unit element was developed considering heat and mass transfer in the system, taking both electrochemical and redox reactions into account. The numerical results showed the spatial and temporal changes in the temperature field in the charge and discharge operations, which were due to the combined effects of heat generation/absorption by the electrochemical and redox reactions and heat exchange with the air supplied through convective heat transfer. As the reaction rates are functions of the local temperature, the predicted results show the importance of considering the heat transfer phenomena in this system. It was also found that the active reaction region in the redox metal evolves with time. The nonuniform distribution of iron utilization is affected by the effective gas diffusion coefficients in the porous redox metal, and consequently the change in the current density distribution in the SOEC.

  7. Air Superiority Fighter Characteristics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-05

    many a dispute could have been deflated into a single paragraph if the disputants had just dared to define their terms.7 Aristotle ...meaningful. This section will expand on some key ideology concepts. The phrase "air superiority fighter" may bring to mind visions of fighter... biographies are useful in garnering airpower advocate theories as well as identifying key characteristics. Air campaign results, starting with World

  8. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with changes in air mass origin at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesch, J.-M.; Drewnick, F.; Zorn, S. R.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Martinez, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of the ambient aerosol were performed at the Southern coast of Spain, within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) project. The field campaign took place from 20 November until 9 December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" (37°5'47.76" N, 6°44'6.94" W). As the monitoring station is located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville) and the Atlantic Ocean, a variety of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols and gas phase could be characterized in dependency on the origin of air masses. Backwards trajectories were examined and compared with local meteorology to classify characteristic air mass types for several source regions. Aerosol number and mass as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distributions were registered covering a size range from 7 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase analyzers monitored various trace gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, CO2) and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Lowest average submicron particle mass and number concentrations were found in air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean with values around 2 μg m-3 and 1000 cm-3. These mass concentrations were about two to four times lower than the values recorded in air masses of continental and urban origins. For some species PM1-fractions in marine air were significantly larger than in air masses originating from Huelva, a closely located city with extensive industrial activities. The largest fraction of sulfate (54%) was detected in marine air masses and was to a high degree not neutralized. In addition, small concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA), a product of biogenic dimethyl sulfate (DMS) emissions, could be identified in the particle phase

  9. Large-Scale Air Mass Characteristics Observed Over the Remote Tropical Pacific Ocean During March-April 1999: Results from PEM-Tropics B Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Fenn, Marta A.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grant, William B.; Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Kooi, Susan A.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Clayton, Marian B.; Avery, Melody A.

    2001-01-01

    Eighteen long-range flights over the Pacific Ocean between 38 S to 20 N and 166 E to 90 W were made by the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the NASA Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM) Tropics B conducted from March 6 to April 18, 1999. Two lidar systems were flown on the DC-8 to remotely measure vertical profiles of ozone (O3), water vapor (H2O), aerosols, and clouds from near the surface to the upper troposphere along their flight track. In situ measurements of a wide range of gases and aerosols were made on the DC-8 for comprehensive characterization of the air and for correlation with the lidar remote measurements. The transition from northeasterly flow of Northern Hemispheric (NH) air on the northern side of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to generally easterly flow of Southern Hemispheric (SH) air south of the ITCZ was accompanied by a significant decrease in O3, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and aerosols and an increase in H2O. Trajectory analyses indicate that air north of the ITCZ came from Asia and/or the United States, while the air south of the ITCZ had a long residence time over the Pacific, perhaps originating over South America several weeks earlier. Air south of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) came rapidly from the west originating over Australia or Africa. This air had enhanced O3 and aerosols and an associated decrease in H2O. Average latitudinal and longitudinal distributions of O3 and H2O were constructed from the remote and in situ O3 and H2O data, and these distributions are compared with results from PEM-Tropics A conducted in August-October 1996. During PEM-Tropics B, low O3 air was found in the SH across the entire Pacific Basin at low latitudes. This was in strong contrast to the photochemically enhanced O3 levels found across the central and eastern Pacific low latitudes during PEM-Tropics A. Nine air mass types were identified for PEM-Tropics B based on their O3, aerosols, clouds, and potential vorticity characteristics. The

  10. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with continental, urban and marine air masses at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesch, J.-M.; Drewnick, F.; Zorn, S. R.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Martinez, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of the ambient aerosol were performed at the Southern coast of Spain, within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) project. The field campaign took place from 20 November until 9 December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" (37°5'47.76" N, 6°44'6.94" W). As the monitoring station is located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville) and the Atlantic Ocean a variety of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols and gas phase could be characterized in dependency on the origin of air masses. Backwards trajectories were examined and compared with local meteorology to classify characteristic air mass types for several source regions. Aerosol number and mass as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distributions were registered covering a size range from 7 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase analyzers monitored various trace gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, CO2) and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Lowest average submicron particle mass and number concentrations were found in air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean with values around 2 μg m-3 and 1000 cm-3. These mass concentrations were about two to four times lower than the values recorded in air masses of continental and urban origins. For some species PM1-fractions in marine air were significantly larger than in air masses originating from Huelva, a closely located city with extensive industrial activities. The largest fraction of sulfate (54%) was detected in marine air masses and was to a high degree not neutralized. In addition small concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA), a product of biogenic dimethyl sulfate (DMS) emissions could be identified in the particle phase. In all

  11. Characteristics of particle number and mass emissions during heavy-duty diesel truck parked active DPF regeneration in an ambient air dilution tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungju; Quiros, David C.; Dwyer, Harry A.; Collins, John F.; Burnitzki, Mark; Chernich, Donald; Herner, Jorn D.

    2015-12-01

    Diesel particle number and mass emissions were measured during parked active regeneration of diesel particulate filters (DPF) in two heavy-duty diesel trucks: one equipped with a DPF and one equipped with a DPF + SCR (selective catalytic reduction), and compliant with the 2007 and 2010 emission standards, respectively. The emission measurements were conducted using an ambient air dilution tunnel. During parked active regeneration, particulate matter (PM) mass emissions measured from a 2007 technology truck were significantly higher than the emissions from a 2010 technology truck. Particle number emissions from both trucks were dominated by nucleation mode particles having a diameter less than 50 nm; nucleation mode particles were orders of magnitude higher than accumulation mode particles having a diameter greater than 50 nm. Accumulation mode particles contributed 77.8 %-95.8 % of the 2007 truck PM mass, but only 7.3 %-28.2 % of the 2010 truck PM mass.

  12. Characteristics of coal mine ventilation air flows.

    PubMed

    Su, Shi; Chen, Hongwei; Teakle, Philip; Xue, Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a greenhouse gas but also a wasted energy resource if not utilised. Underground coal mining is by far the most important source of fugitive methane emissions, and approximately 70% of all coal mining related methane is emitted to the atmosphere through mine ventilation air. Therefore, research and development on mine methane mitigation and utilisation now focuses on methane emitted from underground coal mines, in particular ventilation air methane (VAM) capture and utilisation. To date, most work has focused on the oxidation of very low concentration methane. These processes may be classified based on their combustion kinetic mechanisms into thermal oxidation and catalytic oxidation. VAM mitigation/utilisation technologies are generally divided into two basic categories: ancillary uses and principal uses. However, it is possible that the characteristics of ventilation air flows, for example the variations in methane concentration and the presence of certain compounds, which have not been reported so far, could make some potential VAM mitigation and utilisation technologies unfeasible if they cannot cope with the characteristics of mine site ventilation air flows. Therefore, it is important to understand the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows. Moreover, dust, hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide, and other possible compounds emitted through mine ventilation air into the atmosphere are also pollutants. Therefore, this paper presents mine-site experimental results on the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows, including methane concentration and its variations, dust loadings, particle size, mineral matter of the dust, and other compounds in the ventilation air flows. The paper also discusses possible correlations between ventilation air characteristics and underground mining activities.

  13. The Effective Mass of a Ball in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messer, J.; Pantaleone, J.

    2010-01-01

    The air surrounding a projectile affects the projectile's motion in three very different ways: the drag force, the buoyant force, and the added mass. The added mass is an increase in the projectile's inertia from the motion of the air around it. Here we experimentally measure the added mass of a spherical projectile in air. The results agree well…

  14. Evolution of Southern Hemisphere spring air masses observed by HALOE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, R. Bradley; Grose, William L.; Russell, James M., III; Tuck, Adrian F.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of Southern Hemisphere air masses observed by the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) during September 21 through October 15, 1992, is investigated using isentropic trajectories computed from United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) assimilated winds and temperatures. Maps of constituent concentrations are obtained by accumulation of air masses from previous HALOE occultations. Lagged correlations between initial and subsequent HALOE observations of the same air mass are used to validate the air mass trajectories. High correlations are found for lag times as large as 10 days. Frequency distributions of the air mass constituent concentrations are used to examine constituent distributions in and around the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex.

  15. Mass-balance characteristics of arctic glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, Roger J.

    A survey of available mass-balance data shows that glaciers on arctic islands, i.e. mountain glaciers and ice caps in northern Canada, Greenland, Svalbard and the Eurasian islands, share mass-balance characteristics of low annual amplitude and small interannual variability. By contrast, glaciers around the Arctic (e.g. in Alaska, Iceland, mainland Scandinavia and northern Eurasia) can have exceptionally large annual amplitude and interannual variability but otherwise share characteristics with glaciers in lower latitudes. The arctic island glaciers occur in areas with low annual precipitation and high annual temperature variability, i.e. in dry-cold or continental regions. Most glaciers surrounding the Arctic (Alaska, Iceland and Scandinavia) occur in areas with high annual precipitation and low annual temperature variability, i.e. in wet-warm or maritime regions. Earlier mass-balance modelling showed that arctic island glaciers have low sensitivity to temperature changes consistent with their low mass-balance amplitude. However, very large changes in mass balance could occur on arctic island glaciers if the sea ice surrounding the arctic islands were reduced so that the climate of the arctic islands becomes more maritime.

  16. Isentropic analysis of polar cold air mass streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiki; Kanno, Yuki

    2015-04-01

    1. Introduction A diagnostic method is presented of polar cold air mass streams defined below a threshold potential temperature. The isentropic threshold facilitates a Lagrangian view of the cold air mass streams from diabatic generation to disappearance. 2. Mass-weighted isentropic zonal mean (MIM) cold air streams In winter hemispheres, MIM's mass stream functions show a distinct extratropical direct (ETD) cell in addition to the Hadley cell. The mass stream functions have local maxima at around (280K, 45N) for NH winter and, around (280K, 50S) for SH winter. Thus, =280K may be appropriate to a threshold of the polar cold air mass for both hemispheres. The high-latitude downward motion indicates the diabatic generation of cold air mass, whereas the mid-latitude equatorward flow does its outbreak. The strength of equatorward flow is under significant control of wave-mean flow interactions. 3. Geographical distribution of the cold air mass streams in the NH winter In the NH winter, the polar cold air mass flux has two distinct mainstreams, hereafter called as East Asian (EA) stream and the North American (NA) stream. The former grows over the northern part of the Eurasian continent, turns down southeastward toward East Asia and disappears over the western North Pacific Ocean. The latter grows over the Arctic Ocean, flows toward the East Coast of North America and disappears over the western North Atlantic Ocean. These coincide well with main routes of cold surges. 4. Comparison between NH and SH winter streams The cold air mass streams in NH winter are more asymmetric than those in SH winter. The NH total cold air mass below =280K is about 1.5 times greater than the SH one. These come mainly from the topography and land-sea distribution. The mid-latitude mountains steer the cold air mass streams on the northern sides and enhance the residence time over its genesis region.

  17. An objective definition of air mass types affecting Athens, Greece; the corresponding atmospheric pressure patterns and air pollution levels.

    PubMed

    Sindosi, O A; Katsoulis, B D; Bartzokas, A

    2003-08-01

    This work aims at defining characteristic air mass types that dominate in the region of Athens, Greece during the cold (November-March) and the warm (May-September) period of the year and also at evaluating the corresponding concentration levels of the main air pollutants. For each air mass type, the mean atmospheric pressure distribution (composite maps) over Europe and the Mediterranean is estimated in order to reveal the association of atmospheric circulation with air pollution levels in Athens. The data basis for this work consists of daily values of thirteen meteorological and six pollutant parameters covering the period 1993-97. The definition of the characteristic air mass types is attempted objectively by using the methods of Factor Analysis and Cluster Analysis. The results show that during the cold period of the year there are six prevailing air mass types (at least 3% of the total number of days) and six infrequent ones. The examination of the corresponding air pollution concentration levels shows that the primary air pollutants appear with increased concentrations when light or southerly winds prevail. This is usually the case when a high pressure system is located over the central Mediterranean or a low pressure system lays over south Italy, respectively. Low levels of the primary pollutants are recorded under northeasterly winds, mainly caused by a high pressure system over Ukraine. During the warm period of the year, the southwestern Asia thermal low and the subtropical anticyclone of the Atlantic Ocean affect Greece. Though these synoptic systems cause almost stagnant conditions, four main air mass types are dominant and ten others, associated with extreme weather, are infrequent. Despite the large amounts of total solar radiation characterizing this period, ozone concentrations remain at low levels in central Athens because of its destruction by nitric oxide.

  18. A Comparison of the Red Green Blue Air Mass Imagery and Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Folmer, Michael; Dunion, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass imagery is derived from multiple channels or paired channel differences. Multiple channel products typically provide additional information than a single channel can provide alone. The RGB Air Mass imagery simplifies the interpretation of temperature and moisture characteristics of air masses surrounding synoptic and mesoscale features. Despite the ease of interpretation of multiple channel products, the combination of channels and channel differences means the resulting product does not represent a quantity or physical parameter such as brightness temperature in conventional single channel satellite imagery. Without a specific quantity to reference, forecasters are often confused as to what RGB products represent. Hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles of temperature, moisture, and ozone can provide insight about the air mass represented on the RGB Air Mass product and provide confidence in the product and representation of air masses despite the lack of a quantity to reference for interpretation. This study focuses on RGB Air Mass analysis of Hurricane Sandy as it moved north along the U.S. East Coast, while transitioning to a hybrid extratropical storm. Soundings and total column ozone retrievals were analyzed using data from the Cross-track Infrared and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder Suite (CrIMSS) on the Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership satellite and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aqua satellite along with dropsondes that were collected from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Air Force research aircraft. By comparing these datasets to the RGB Air Mass, it is possible to capture quantitative information that could help in analyzing the synoptic environment enough to diagnose the onset of extratropical transition. This was done by identifying any stratospheric air intrusions (SAIs) that existed in the vicinity of Sandy as the wind

  19. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  20. Elemental composition of different air masses over Jeju Island, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jeongwon; Choi, Man-Sik; Yi, Hi-Il; Jeong, Kap-Sik; Chae, Jung-Sun; Cheong, Chang-Sik

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the characteristics (concentrations and compositional changes) of atmospheric elements in total suspended particulates through source-receptor relationships using cluster analyses to classify air mass back-trajectories arriving at Gosan, Jeju Island, South Korea, from October 2003 to December 2008. Five trajectory clusters were chosen to explain the transport regimes. Continental outflows of natural and anthropogenic aerosols from Asian dust source regions and eastern China during the colder period could increase element concentrations at Gosan. Elemental levels at Gosan decreased in air masses that passed over marine regions (East China Sea, Pacific Ocean/southern side of Kyushu Island in Japan, and East Sea/southern side of South Korea) during the warmer rainy period due to lower source intensity and dilution by the marine air mass. Anthropogenic pollutants were often major components in air masses passing over marine regions. Air mass characterization by elemental concentration and composition revealed that enrichment by non-sea-salt sulfur in the air mass originated from eastern China, indicative of the main sulfur emitter in northeast Asia. The apportionment of V and Ni by principal component analysis as a marker of heavy oil combustion suggested different residence times and deposition rates from other anthropogenic components in the air. Regionally intermediate concentrations of pollutants were found in the atmosphere over the Korean peninsula.

  1. The Use of Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass Imagery to Investigate the Role of Stratospheric Air in a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Molthan, Andrew; Jedlovec, Gary

    2013-01-01

    AIRS ozone and model PV analysis confirm the stratospheric air in RGB Air Mass imagery. Trajectories confirm winds south of the low were distinct from CCB driven winds. Cross sections connect the tropopause fold, downward motion, and high nearsurface winds. Comparison to conceptual models show Shapiro-Keyser features and sting jet characteristics were observed in a storm that impacted the U.S. East Coast. RGB Air Mass imagery can be used to identify stratospheric air and regions susceptible to tropopause folding and attendant non-convective winds.

  2. Ions in oceanic and continental air masses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D.J.; Eisele, F.L. )

    1991-01-20

    Measurements of tropospheric ions and several trace atmospheric neutral species have been performed at Cheeka Peak Research Station and at Mauna Loa Observatory. Two new positive ion species at masses 114 and 102 have been identified as protonated caprolactam and a saturated 6-carbon primary amine, respectively. In the negative ion spectrum, methane sulfonic acid (MSA) has been identified as the parent species responsible for an ion commonly observed at mass 95 during these two studies. The diurnal variations of gas phase H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and MSA were also measured at Cheeka Peak and have typically been found to be present in the sub-ppt range. Ion assisted measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory of pyridine and ammonia indicate concentrations of 2.5 and 70 ppt, respectively, with at least a factor of 2 uncertainty. Interesting variations and potential sources of several of the observed ions are also discussed.

  3. Relationships between submicrometer particulate air pollution and air mass history in Beijing, China, 2004 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, B.; Birmili, W.; Ditas, F.; Wu, Z.; Hu, M.; Liu, X.; Mao, J.; Sugimoto, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2008-10-01

    The Chinese capital Beijing is one of the global megacities where the effects of rapid economic growth have led to complex air pollution problems that are not well understood. In this study, ambient particle number size distributions in Beijing between 2004 and 2006 are analysed as a function of regional meteorological transport. An essential result is that the particle size distribution in Beijing depends to large extent on the history of the synoptic scale air masses. A first approach based on manual back trajectory classification yielded differences in particulate matter mass concentration by a factor of two between four different air mass categories, including three main wind directions plus the case of stagnant air masses. A back trajectory cluster analysis refined these results, yielding a total of six trajectory clusters. Besides the large scale wind direction, the transportation speed of an air mass was found to play an essential role on the PM concentrations in Beijing. Slow-moving air masses were shown to be associated with an effective accumulation of surface-based anthropogenic emissions due to both, an increased residence time over densely populated land, and their higher degree of vertical stability. For the six back trajectory clusters, differences in PM1 mass concentrations by a factor of 3.5, in the mean air mass speed by a factor of 6, and in atmospheric visibility by a factor of 4 were found. The main conclusion is that the air quality in Beijing is not only degraded by anthropogenic aerosol sources from within the megacity, but also by sources across the entire Northwest China plain depending on the meteorological situation.

  4. Relationships between submicrometer particulate air pollution and air mass history in Beijing, China, 2004-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, B.; Birmili, W.; Ditas, F.; Wu, Z.; Hu, M.; Liu, X.; Mao, J.; Sugimoto, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2008-06-01

    The Chinese capital Beijing is one of the global megacities where the effects of rapid economic growth have led to complex air pollution problems that are not well understood. In this study, ambient particle number size distributions in Beijing between 2004 and 2006 are analysed as a function of regional meteorological transport. An essential result is that the particle size distribution in Beijing depends to large extent on the history of the synoptic scale air masses. A first approach based on manual back trajectory classification yielded differences in particulate matter mass concentration (PM1 and PM10) by a factor of two between four different air mass categories, including three main wind directions plus the case of stagnant air masses. A back trajectory cluster analysis refined these results, yielding a total of six trajectory clusters. Besides the large scale wind direction, the transportation speed of an air mass was found to play an essential role on the PM concentrations in Beijing. Slow-moving air masses were shown to be associated with an effective accumulation of surface-based anthropogenic emissions due to both, an increased residence time over densely populated land, and their higher degree of vertical stability. For the six back trajectory clusters, differences in PM1 mass concentrations by a factor of 3.5, in the mean air mass speed by a factor of 6, and in atmospheric visibility by a factor of 4 were found. The main conclusion is that the air quality in Beijing is not only degraded by anthropogenic aerosol sources from within the megacity, but also by sources across the entire Northwest China plain depending on the meteorological situation.

  5. Characteristics of vertical air motion in isolated convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; French, Jeffrey R.

    2016-08-01

    The vertical velocity and air mass flux in isolated convective clouds are statistically analyzed using aircraft in situ data collected from three field campaigns: High-Plains Cumulus (HiCu) conducted over the midlatitude High Plains, COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) conducted in a midlatitude coastal area, and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) conducted over a tropical ocean. The results show that small-scale updrafts and downdrafts (< 500 m in diameter) are frequently observed in the three field campaigns, and they make important contributions to the total air mass flux. The probability density functions (PDFs) and profiles of the observed vertical velocity are provided. The PDFs are exponentially distributed. The updrafts generally strengthen with height. Relatively strong updrafts (> 20 m s-1) were sampled in COPE and ICE-T. The observed downdrafts are stronger in HiCu and COPE than in ICE-T. The PDFs of the air mass flux are exponentially distributed as well. The observed maximum air mass flux in updrafts is of the order 104 kg m-1 s-1. The observed air mass flux in the downdrafts is typically a few times smaller in magnitude than that in the updrafts. Since this study only deals with isolated convective clouds, and there are many limitations and sampling issues in aircraft in situ measurements, more observations are needed to better explore the vertical air motion in convective clouds.

  6. Altitude characteristics of selected air quality analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. H.; Strong, R.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of altitude (pressure) on the operation and sensitivity of various air quality analyzers frequently flown on aircraft were analyzed. Two ozone analyzers were studied at altitudes from 600 to 7500 m and a nitrogen oxides chemiluminescence detector and a sulfur dioxide flame photometric detector were studied at altitudes from 600 to 3000 m. Calibration curves for altitude corrections to the sensitivity of the instruments are presented along with discussion of observed instrument behavior.

  7. Working Characteristics of Variable Intake Valve in Compressed Air Engine

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qihui; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine. PMID:25379536

  8. Working characteristics of variable intake valve in compressed air engine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qihui; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine.

  9. Stochastic modeling of uncertain mass characteristics in rigid body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Lanae A.; Mignolet, Marc P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper focuses on the formulation, assessment, and application of a modeling strategy of uncertainty on the mass characteristics of rigid bodies, i.e. mass, position of center of mass, and inertia tensor. These characteristics are regrouped into a 4×4 matrix the elements of which are represented as random variables with joint probability density function derived following the maximum entropy framework. This stochastic model is first shown to satisfy all properties expected of the mass and tensor of inertia of rigid bodies. Its usefulness and computational efficiency are next demonstrated on the behavior of a rigid body in pure rotation exhibiting significant uncertainty in mass distribution.

  10. Mass Loading Characteristics of Crystal Clock Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, Janel; Morris, V. R.; Thorpe, A. N.

    1997-01-01

    The 10-MHz piezoelectric quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) has been used extensively for stratospheric aerosol sampling. We have undertaken laboratory studies of the QCM response to mass loading by trace gases. However, this device requires dual oscillator circuitry and the mass sensitivity can often be affected by the electronics. The coatings on the quartz crystals are sometimes difficult to remove after they have reacted with a particular gas and a disposable crystal system would be desirable. The cost of the dual oscillator-based QCM makes this a prohibitive option. Since our goal is to develop a cost-effective microbalance system with stable electronics we have begun testing of crystal clock oscillators, which are assembled with their own circuitry. We have been using chemically specific coatings for ozone to determine if the sensitivity and mass-frequency ratios are comparable to that of the 10-MHz QCM.

  11. Effects of mass on aircraft sidearm controller characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    When designing a flight simulator, providing a set of low mass variable-characteristic pilot controls can be very difficult. Thus, a strong incentive exists to identify the highest possible mass that will not degrade the validity of a simulation. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has conducted a brief flight program to determine the maximum acceptable mass (system inertia) of an aircraft sidearm controller as a function of force gradient. This information is useful for control system design in aircraft as well as development of suitable flight simulator controls. A modified Learjet with a variable-characteristic sidearm controller was used to obtain data. A boundary was defined between mass considered acceptable and mass considered unacceptable to the pilot. This boundary is defined as a function of force gradient over a range of natural frequencies. This investigation is limited to a study of mass-frequency characteristics only. Results of this investigation are presented in this paper.

  12. Where do the air masses between double tropopauses come from?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parracho, A. C.; Marques, C. A. F.; Castanheira, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the origin of air masses that end up between double tropopauses (DT) in the subtropics and midlatitudes is presented. The double tropopauses were diagnosed in the ERA-Interim reanalysis (1979-2010), and the origin of air masses was analysed using the Lagrangian model FLEXPART. Different processes for the formation of double tropopauses (DT) have been suggested in the literature. Some studies have suggested that double tropopauses may occur as a response to the vertical profile of adiabatic heating, due to the residual meridional circulation, while others have put forward contradicting explanations. Whereas some studies have suggested that double tropopauses result from poleward excursions of the tropical tropopause over the extratropical one, others have argued that DTs develop in baroclinic unstable processes involving transport of air from high latitudes. In some regions, the DT structure has a semipermanent character which cannot be explained by excursions of the tropical tropopause alone. However, the results presented in this paper confirm that processes involving excursions of the tropical tropopause over the extratropical tropopause, which are therefore accompanied by intrusions of air from the tropical troposphere into the lower extratropical stratosphere, make a significant contribution for the occurrence of DTs in the subtropics and midlatitudes. Specifically, it is shown that the air between double tropopauses comes from equatorward regions, and has a higher percentage of tropospheric particles and a lower mean potential vorticity.

  13. Investigation of Aerodynamic and Icing Characteristics of a Flush Alternate Inlet Induction System Air Scoop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James P.

    1953-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the NACA Lewis icing research tunnel to determine the aerodynamic and icing characteristics of a full-scale induction-system air-scoop assembly incorporating a flush alternate inlet. The flush inlet was located immediately downstream of the offset ram inlet and included a 180 deg reversal and a 90 deg elbow in the ducting between inlet and carburetor top deck. The model also had a preheat-air inlet. The investigation was made over a range of mass-air- flow ratios of 0 to 0.8, angles of attack of 0 and 4 deg airspeeds of 150 to 270 miles per hour, air temperatures of 0 and 25 F various liquid-water contents, and droplet sizes. The ram inlet gave good pressure recovery in both clear air and icing but rapid blockage of the top-deck screen occurred during icing. The flush alternate inlet had poor pressure recovery in both clear air and icing. The greatest decreases in the alternate-inlet pressure recovery were obtained at icing conditions of low air temperature and high liquid-water content. No serious screen icing was observed with the alternate inlet. Pressure and temperature distributions on the carburetor top deck were determined using the preheat-air supply with the preheat- and alternate-inlet doors in various positions. No screen icing occurred when the preheat-air system was operated in combination with alternate-inlet air flow.

  14. Characteristics of vertical air motion in isolated convective clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; ...

    2016-08-11

    The vertical velocity and air mass flux in isolated convective clouds are statistically analyzed using aircraft in situ data collected from three field campaigns: High-Plains Cumulus (HiCu) conducted over the midlatitude High Plains, COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) conducted in a midlatitude coastal area, and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) conducted over a tropical ocean. The results show that small-scale updrafts and downdrafts (<  500 m in diameter) are frequently observed in the three field campaigns, and they make important contributions to the total air mass flux. The probability density functions (PDFs) and profiles of the observed vertical velocity are provided. The PDFsmore » are exponentially distributed. The updrafts generally strengthen with height. Relatively strong updrafts (>  20 m s−1) were sampled in COPE and ICE-T. The observed downdrafts are stronger in HiCu and COPE than in ICE-T. The PDFs of the air mass flux are exponentially distributed as well. The observed maximum air mass flux in updrafts is of the order 104 kg m−1 s−1. The observed air mass flux in the downdrafts is typically a few times smaller in magnitude than that in the updrafts. Since this study only deals with isolated convective clouds, and there are many limitations and sampling issues in aircraft in situ measurements, more observations are needed to better explore the vertical air motion in convective clouds.« less

  15. Role of Surface Characteristics in Urban Meteorology and Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailor, David Jean

    Urbanization results in a landscape with significantly modified surface characteristics. The lower values of reflectivity to solar radiation, surface moisture availability, and vegetative cover, along with the higher values of anthropogenic heat release and surface roughness combine to result in higher air temperatures in urban areas relative to their rural counterparts. Through their role in the surface energy balance and surface exchange processes, these surface characteristics are capable of modifying the local meteorology. The impacts on wind speeds, air temperatures, and mixing heights are of particular importance, as they have significant implications in terms of urban energy use and air quality. This research presents several major improvements to the meteorological modeling methodology for highly heterogeneous terrain. A land-use data base is implemented to provide accurate specification of surface characteristic variability in simulations of the Los Angeles Basin. Several vegetation parameterizations are developed and implemented, and a method for including anthropogenic heat release into the model physics is presented. These modeling advancements are then used in a series of three-dimensional simulations which were developed to investigate the potential meteorological impact of several mitigation strategies. Results indicate that application of moderate tree-planting and urban-lightening programs in Los Angeles may produce summertime air temperature reductions on the order of 4^circ C with a concomitant reduction in air pollution. The analysis also reveals several mechanisms whereby the application of these mitigation strategies may potentially increase pollutant concentrations. The pollution and energy use consequences are discussed in detail.

  16. Role of surface characteristics in urban meteorology and air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, David Jean

    1993-08-01

    Urbanization results in a landscape with significantly modified surface characteristics. The lower values of reflectivity to solar radiation, surface moisture availability, and vegetative cover, along with the higher values of anthropogenic heat release and surface roughness combine to result higher air temperatures in urban areas relative to their rural counterparts. Through their role in the surface energy balance and surface exchange processes, these surface characteristics are capable of modifying the local meteorology. The impacts on wind speeds, air temperatures, and mixing heights are of particular importance, as they have significant implications in terms of urban energy use and air quality. This research presents several major improvements to the meteorological modeling methodology for highly heterogeneous terrain. A land-use data-base is implemented to provide accurate specification of surface characteristic variability in simulations of the Los Angeles Basin. Several vegetation parameterizations are developed and implemented, and a method for including anthropogenic heat release into the model physics is presented. These modeling advancements are then used in a series of three-dimensional simulations which were developed to investigate the potential meteorological impact of several mitigation strategies. Results indicate that application of moderate tree-planting and urban-lightening programs in Los Angeles may produce summertime air temperature reductions on the order of 4°C with a concomitant reduction in air pollution. The analysis also reveals several mechanisms whereby the application of these mitigation strategies may potentially increase pollutant concentrations. The pollution and energy use consequences are discussed in detail.

  17. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  18. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schaller, Emily L

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  19. Spatial variability of hailfalls in France: an analysis of air mass retro-trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermida, Lucía; Merino, Andrés; Sánchez, José Luis; Berthet, Claude; Dessens, Jean; López, Laura; Fernández-González, Sergio; Gascón, Estíbaliz; García-Ortega, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Hail is the main meteorological risk in south-west France, with the strongest hailfalls being concentrated in just a few days. Specifically, this phenomenon occurs most often and with the greatest severity in the Midi-Pyrénées area. Previous studies have revealed the high spatial variability of hailfall in this part of France, even leading to different characteristics being recorded on hailpads that were relatively close together. For this reason, an analysis of the air mass trajectories was carried out at ground level and at altitude, which subsequently led to the formation of the hail recorded by these hailpads. It is already known that in the study zone, the trajectories of the storms usually stretch for long distances and are oriented towards the east, leading to hailstones with diameters in excess of 3 cm, and without any change in direction above 3 km. We analysed different days with hail precipitation where there was at least one stone with a diameter of 3 cm or larger. Using the simulations from these days, an analysis of the backward trajectories of the air masses was carried out. We used the HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) to determine the origin of the air masses, and tracked them toward each of the hailpads that were hit during the day studied. The height of the final points was the height of the impacted hailpads. Similarly, the backward trajectories for different heights were also established. Finally, the results show how storms that affect neighbouring hailpads come from very different air masses; and provide a deeper understanding of the high variability that affects the characteristics of hailfalls. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the Regional Government of Castile-León for its financial support through the project LE220A11-2. This study was supported by the following grants: GRANIMETRO (CGL2010-15930); MICROMETEO (IPT-310000-2010-22).

  20. Modelling heat and mass transfer in a membrane-based air-to-air enthalpy exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugaria, S.; Moro, L.; Del, D., Col

    2015-11-01

    The diffusion of total energy recovery systems could lead to a significant reduction in the energy demand for building air-conditioning. With these devices, sensible heat and humidity can be recovered in winter from the exhaust airstream, while, in summer, the incoming air stream can be cooled and dehumidified by transferring the excess heat and moisture to the exhaust air stream. Membrane based enthalpy exchangers are composed by different channels separated by semi-permeable membranes. The membrane allows moisture transfer under vapour pressure difference, or water concentration difference, between the two sides and, at the same time, it is ideally impermeable to air and other contaminants present in exhaust air. Heat transfer between the airstreams occurs through the membrane due to the temperature gradient. The aim of this work is to develop a detailed model of the coupled heat and mass transfer mechanisms through the membrane between the two airstreams. After a review of the most relevant models published in the scientific literature, the governing equations are presented and some simplifying assumptions are analysed and discussed. As a result, a steady-state, two-dimensional finite difference numerical model is setup. The developed model is able to predict temperature and humidity evolution inside the channels. Sensible and latent heat transfer rate, as well as moisture transfer rate, are determined. A sensitive analysis is conducted in order to determine the more influential parameters on the thermal and vapour transfer.

  1. Characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental program to study the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling flows to obtain detailed and accurate data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport modeling for combustor flows is discussed. The work was also motivated by the need to investigate and quantify the influence of confinement and swirl on the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets. The flow facility was constructed in a simple way which allows easy interchange of different swirlers and the freedom to vary the jet Reynolds number. The velocity measurements were taken with a one color, one component DISA Model 55L laser-Doppler anemometer employing the forward scatter mode. Standard statistical methods are used to evaluate the various moments of the signals to give the flow characteristics. The present work was directed at the understanding of the velocity field. Therefore, only velocity and turbulence data of the axial and circumferential components are reported for inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows.

  2. The Dynamic Characteristic and Hysteresis Effect of an Air Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löcken, F.; Welsch, M.

    2015-02-01

    In many applications of vibration technology, especially in chassis, air springs present a common alternative to steel spring concepts. A design-independent and therefore universal approach is presented to describe the dynamic characteristic of such springs. Differential and constitutive equations based on energy balances of the enclosed volume and the mountings are given to describe the nonlinear and dynamic characteristics. Therefore all parameters can be estimated directly from physical and geometrical properties, without parameter fitting. The numerically solved equations fit very well to measurements of a passenger car air spring. In a second step a simplification of this model leads to a pure mechanical equation. While in principle the same parameters are used, just an empirical correction of the effective heat transfer coefficient is needed to handle some simplification on this topic. Finally, a linearization of this equation leads to an analogous mechanical model that can be assembled from two common spring- and one dashpot elements in a specific arrangement. This transfer into "mechanical language" enables a system description with a simple force-displacement law and a consideration of the nonobvious hysteresis and stiffness increase of an air spring from a mechanical point of view.

  3. High-Altitude Air Mass Zero Calibration of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Snyder, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Air mass zero calibration of solar cells has been carried out for several years by NASA Glenn Research Center using a Lear-25 aircraft and Langley plots. The calibration flights are carried out during early fall and late winter when the tropopause is at the lowest altitude. Measurements are made starting at about 50,000 feet and continue down to the tropopause. A joint NASA/Wayne State University program called Suntracker is underway to explore the use of weather balloon and communication technologies to characterize solar cells at elevations up to about 100 kft. The balloon flights are low-cost and can be carried out any time of the year. AMO solar cell characterization employing the mountaintop, aircraft and balloon methods are reviewed. Results of cell characterization with the Suntracker are reported and compared with the NASA Glenn Research Center aircraft method.

  4. Characteristics associated with sexual assaults at mass gatherings

    PubMed Central

    Sampsel, Kari; Godbout, Justin; Leach, Tara; Taljaard, Monica; Calder, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sexual assault is disturbingly common, yet little is known about those occurring at mass gatherings, defined as a group of people congregated for a common purpose. Our objectives were to examine patterns of variation in sexual assault associated with mass gatherings and to determine factors associated with assaults occurring at mass gatherings. Methods We performed a case series analysis from January to December, 2013. We included all patients >16 years presenting within 30 days of their sexual assault to the Ottawa Hospital Sexual Assault and Partner Abuse Care Program (SAPACP). Cases were stratified by whether or not they occurred at mass gatherings. We abstracted from the SAPACP records: patient and sexual assault characteristics, alcohol or drug consumption and medical and forensic care accepted. We performed descriptive analyses and multiple logistical regression to identify factors associated with mass gathering assaults. Results We found 204 cases of sexual assault, of which 53 (26%) occurred at mass gatherings. Relative frequencies of mass gathering sexual assaults peaked during New Year's Eve, Canada Day, university frosh week and Halloween. We found the following factors were statistically significantly associated with sexual assault at mass gatherings: younger age (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.99); voluntary consumption of drugs and alcohol (3.88, 95% CI 1.34 to 11.23); assault occurring on a holiday (2.37, 95% CI 1.00 to 5.64) and the assailant unknown to the victim (2.43, 95% CI 1.15 to 5). Interpretation This study is the first to describe patterns of variation in sexual assault incidents associated with occurrence of mass gatherings as well as factors associated with such assaults. We will disseminate these results to key stakeholders in order to develop prevention-minded policies for future mass gatherings. PMID:26315648

  5. Detonation characteristics of dimethyl ether and ethanol-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakow, P.; Cross, M.; Ciccarelli, G.

    2015-05-01

    The detonation cell structure in dimethyl ether vapor and ethanol vapor-air mixtures was measured at atmospheric pressure and initial temperatures in the range of 293-373 K. Tests were carried out in a 6.2-m-long, 10-cm inner diameter tube. For more reactive mixtures, a series of orifice plates were used to promote deflagration-to-detonation transition in the first half of the tube. For less reactive mixtures prompt detonation initiation was achieved with an acetylene-oxygen driver. The soot foil technique was used to capture the detonation cell structure. The measured cell size was compared to the calculated one-dimensional detonation reaction zone length. For fuel-rich dimethyl ether mixtures the calculated reaction zone is highlighted by a temperature gradient profile with two maxima, i.e., double heat release. The detonation cell structure was interpreted as having two characteristic sizes over the full range of mixture compositions. For mixtures at the detonation propagation limits the large cellular structure approached a single-head spin, and the smaller cells approached the size of the tube diameter. There is little evidence to support the idea that the two cell sizes observed on the foils are related to the double heat release predicted for the rich mixtures. There was very little influence of initial temperature on the cell size over the temperature range investigated. A double heat release zone was not predicted for ethanol-air detonations. The detonation cell size for stoichiometric ethanol-air was found to be similar to the size of the small cells for dimethyl ether. The measured cell size for ethanol-air did not vary much with composition in the range of 30-40 mm. For mixtures near stoichiometric it was difficult to discern multiple cell sizes. However, near the detonation limits there was strong evidence of a larger cell structure similar to that observed in dimethyl ether air mixtures.

  6. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  7. Air Mass Frequency during Precipitation Events in the United States Northern Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, D. M.; Sharr, N. J.; Baum, A.; Contract, J. S.; DePasquale, R.; Godek, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Since 1980, numerous billion-dollar disasters have affected the Northern Plains of the United States, including nine droughts and four floods. Given the region's large agricultural sector, the ability to accurately forecast the frequency and quantity of precipitation events here is imperative as it has a major impact on the economy of states in the region. The atmospheric environment present during precipitation events can largely be described by the presiding air mass conditions since air masses characterize a multitude of meteorological variables at one time over a large region. Therefore, understanding the relationship between air masses and rainfall episodes can contribute to improved precipitation forecasts. The goal of this research is to add knowledge to current understandings of the factors responsible for precipitation in the Northern Plains through an assessment of synoptic air mass conditions. The Spatial Synoptic Classification is used to categorize 30 years of daily air mass types across the region and daily precipitation is acquired from the United States Historical Climatological Network at stations in close proximity. Air mass frequencies are then analyzed for all regional precipitation events and rainfall categories are developed based on precipitation quantity. Both annual and seasonal air mass frequencies are assessed at the time of precipitation events. Additionally, air mass frequencies are obtained for positive and negative phases of the Pacific/North American Pattern to examine the influence of a teleconnection forcing factor on the air mass types responsible for producing precipitation quantities. Results indicate that the Transitional (TR) air mass, associated with changing air mass conditions commonly related to passing fronts, is not the leading producer of rainfall in the region. The TR is generally responsible for only 10-20% of regional precipitation, which often is classed in a heavy rainfall category. All moist air mass varieties are

  8. Spatial and temporal characteristics of air quality and air pollutants in 2013 in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shujun; Cao, Hui; Chen, Ying; Wu, Chengzhen; Hong, Tao; Fan, Hailan

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution has become an ever more critical issue in Beijing in more recent years. In this study, we use the air quality index (AQI), corresponding primary pollutant types and meteorological data which are collected at 16 monitoring stations in Beijing between January 2013 and December, 2013 studying the spatial and temporal variations of air quality and air pollutants. The results show that PM2.5 was the most serious pollutant, followed by O3. The average PM2.5 mass concentration was 119.5 ± 13.8 μg m(-3) in Beijing. In addition, the air quality varies across different seasons. More specifically, winter season showed the worst air quality. Moreover, while particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) concentrations were relatively higher in the spring and winter seasons, gaseous pollutants (O3 and NO2) were more serious in the summer and autumn. In terms of spatial heterogeneity, the findings showed that AQI and PM2.5 concentrations were higher in south and lower in the north of the city, and the O3 showed exactly a pattern with the opposite direction-higher in the north and lower in the south. NO2 was found to have a greater impact on the central region compared with that in other regions. Furthermore, PM2.5 was found to be positively correlated with the relative humidity, but negatively correlated with wind speed and atmospheric pressure (P < 0.01). However, the dominant meteorological factors that influence the PM2.5 concentrations varied in different seasons. The results in this paper provide additional information for the effective control of the air pollution in Beijing.

  9. A determination of character and frequency changes in air masses using a spatial synoptic classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkstein, Laurence S.; Sheridan, Scott C.; Graybeal, Daniel Y.

    1998-09-01

    Of the numerous climate change studies which have been performed, few of these have analyzed recent trends using an air mass-based approach. The air mass approach is superior to simple trend analysis, as it can identify patterns which may be too subtle to influence the entire climate record. The recently-developed spatial synoptic classification (SSC) is thus used to identify trends over the contiguous United States for summer and winter seasons from 1948 to 1993. Both trends in air mass frequency and character have been assessed.The most noteworthy trend in frequency is a decline in air mass transitional days (TR) during both seasons. In winter, decreases of up to 1% per decade are noted in parts of the central U.S. Other notable trends include a decrease in moist tropical (MT) air in winter, and an increase in MT in summer over the southeastern states.Numerous national and local air mass character changes have been uncovered. A large overall upward trend in cloudiness is noted in summer. All air masses feature an overnight increase, yet afternoon cloudiness increases are generally limited to the three dry air masses. Also in summer, a significant warming and increase in dew point of MT air has occurred at many locales. The most profound winter trend is a large decrease in dew point (up to 1.5°C per decade) in the dry polar (DP) air mass over much of the eastern states.

  10. Determining the full halo coronal mass ejection characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we determined the parameters of 45 full halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) for various modifications of their cone forms (“ice cream cone models”). We show that the CME determined characteristics depend significantly on the CME chosen form. We show that, regardless of the CME chosen form, the trajectory of practically all the considered HCMEs deviate from the radial direction to the Sun-to-Earth axis at the initial stage of their movement.

  11. Chemical characteristics of water masses in the Rockall Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Triona; Nolan, Glenn; McGovern, Evin

    2012-03-01

    Direct observations of physical and chemical data in the Rockall Trough during February of 2008, 2009 and 2010 are presented. Results are compared to a similar WOCE transect, AR24, completed in November/December 1996. Temperature and salinity data have been used to identify the water masses present in the Trough, and have been combined with nutrient (nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, silicate) and oxygen data to produce a table outlining the chemical characteristics of each of the water masses. Eastern North Atlantic Water (ENAW) moving north through the Trough gains nutrients from a branch of the North Atlantic Current (NAC). Mediterranean Water (MW) was identified as a warm saline core, with characteristically low oxygen and low preformed nutrients along the Irish continental shelf break near 53°N. Found at a similar density level at the southern entrance to the Trough, Sub Arctic Intermediate Water (SAIW) has relatively high oxygen and preformed nutrients, likely entrained from the subpolar gyre when it was formed. LSW was identified as a prominent water mass between 1500 and 2000 m deep, with characteristically high oxygen content. Lower silicate, and to a lesser extent preformed nitrate, in 2009 coincide with a freshening of Labrador Sea Water (LSW) relative to other years, and could indicate a stronger influence from the Labrador Current when it was formed. Finally, traces of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) were found as far north as 53°N, indicated by a sharp increase in nutrient concentrations, particularly silicate in the deepest parts of the Trough.

  12. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (<0.05 °C) through the use of a heat exchanger. The temperature and total dissolved gas of the water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  13. Microbial air quality in mass transport buses and work-related illness among bus drivers of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority.

    PubMed

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Sundhiyodhin, Viboonsri; Luksamijarulkul, Soavalug; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan

    2004-06-01

    The air quality in mass transport buses, especially air-conditioned buses may affect bus drivers who work full time. Bus numbers 16, 63, 67 and 166 of the Seventh Bus Zone of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority were randomly selected to investigate for microbial air quality. Nine air-conditioned buses and 2-4 open-air buses for each number of the bus (36 air-conditioned buses and 12 open-air buses) were included. Five points of in-bus air samples in each studied bus were collected by using the Millipore A ir Tester Totally, 180 and 60 air samples collected from air-conditioned buses and open-air buses were cultured for bacterial and fungal counts. The bus drivers who drove the studied buses were interviewed towards histories of work-related illness while working. The results revealed that the mean +/- SD of bacterial counts in the studied open-air buses ranged from 358.50 +/- 146.66 CFU/m3 to 506 +/- 137.62 CFU/m3; bus number 16 had the highest level. As well as the mean +/- SD of fungal counts which ranged from 93.33 +/- 44.83 CFU/m3 to 302 +/- 294.65 CFU/m3; bus number 166 had the highest level. Whereas, the mean +/- SD of bacterial counts in the studied air-conditioned buses ranged from 115.24 +/- 136.01 CFU/m3 to 244.69 +/- 234.85 CFU/m3; bus numbers 16 and 67 had the highest level. As well as the mean +/- SD of fungal counts which rangedfrom 18.84 +/- 39.42 CFU/m3 to 96.13 +/- 234.76 CFU/m3; bus number 166 had the highest level. When 180 and 60 studied air samples were analyzed in detail, it was found that 33.33% of the air samples from open-air buses and 6.11% of air samples from air-conditioned buses had a high level of bacterial counts (> 500 CFU/m3) while 6.67% of air samples from open-air buses and 2.78% of air samples from air-conditioned buses had a high level of fungal counts (> 500 CFU/m3). Data from the history of work-related illnesses among the studied bus drivers showed that 91.67% of open-air bus drivers and 57.28% of air-conditioned bus drivers had

  14. The Use of Red Green Blue Air Mass Imagery to Investigate the Role of Stratospheric Air in a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Moltham, A. L.; Folmer, M. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of non-convective winds associated with passing extratropical cyclones and the formation of the sting jet in North Atlantic cyclones that impact Europe has been gaining interest. Sting jet research has been limited to North Atlantic cyclones that impact Europe because it is known to occur in Shapiro-Keyser cyclones and theory suggests it does not occur in Norwegian type cyclones. The global distribution of sting jet cyclones is unknown and questions remain as to whether cyclones with Shapiro-Keyser characteristics that impact the United States develop features similar to the sting jet. Therefore unique National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) products were used to analyze an event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass imagery and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) ozone data were used in conjunction with NASA's global Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis and higher-resolution regional 13-km Rapid Refresh (RAP) data to analyze the role of stratospheric air in producing high winds. The RGB Air Mass imagery and a new AIRS ozone anomaly product were used to confirm the presence of stratospheric air. Plan view and cross sectional plots of wind, potential vorticity, relative humidity, omega, and frontogenesis were used to analyze the relationship between stratospheric air and high surface winds during the event. Additionally, the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to plot trajectories to determine the role of the conveyor belts in producing the high winds. Analyses of new satellite products, such as the RGB Air Mass imagery, show the utility of future GOES-R products in forecasting non-convective wind events.

  15. Spontaneous ignition delay characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Freeman, W. G.; Cowell, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of pressure on the autoignition characteristics of homogeneous mixtures of hydrocarbon fuels in air is examined. Autoignition delay times are measured for propane, ethylene, methane, and acetylene in a continuous flow apparatus featuring a multi-point fuel injector. Results are presented for mixture temperatures from 670K to 1020K, pressures from 1 to 10 atmospheres, equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 0.7, and velocities from 5 to 30 m/s. Delay time is related to pressure, temperature, and fuel concentration by global reaction theory. The results show variations in global activation energy from 25 to 38 kcal/kg-mol, pressure exponents from 0.66 to 1.21, and fuel concentration exponents from 0.19 to 0.75 for the fuels studied. These results are generally in good agreement with previous studies carried out under similar conditions.

  16. Design and operational characteristics of a cast steel mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Ramos, Henry J.; Wada, Motoi

    2004-09-01

    A cast steel magnetic sector mass analyzer is developed for studies of hydrogen and helium ion beams generated by a gas discharge compact ion source. The optimum induced magnetic flux density of 3500 G made it possible to scan the whole spectrum of hydrogen and helium ion species. Analysis of beam characteristics shows that the mass spectrometer sensitivity, and resolving power are approximately inversely proportional. The resolution is enhanced at higher pressures and lower current discharges. In contrast, the instrument sensitivity increased at higher current discharges and decreased at higher pressures. Calculations of the ultimate resolving power with reference to analyzer dimensions yield a numerical value of 30. System anomaly in the form of spherical aberrations was also analyzed using the paraxial beam envelope equation. Beam divergence is most significant at high discharge conditions where angular spread reaches an upper limit of 8.6 deg.

  17. Mathematical modeling of heat exchange between mine air and rock mass during fire

    SciTech Connect

    A.E. Krasnoshtein; B.P. Kazakov; A.V. Shalimov

    2006-05-15

    Solution of problems on heat exchange between ventilating air and rock mass and on gas admixture propagation in mine workings serve as a base for considering changes in heat-gas-air state at a mine after inflammation. The presented mathematical relations allow calculation of a varied velocity and movement direction of air flows, their temperatures and smoking conditions during fire.

  18. Evidence for widespread tropospheric Cl chemistry in free tropospheric air masses from the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Angela K.; Sauvage, Carina; Thorenz, Ute R.; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Oram, David E.; van Velthoven, Peter; Zahn, Andreas; Williams, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    While the primary global atmospheric oxidant is the hydroxyl radical (OH), under certain circumstances chlorine radicals (Cl) can compete with OH and perturb the oxidative cycles of the troposphere. During flights between Bangkok, Thailand and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia conducted over two fall/winter seasons (November 2012 - March 2013 and November 2013 - January 2014) the IAGOS-CARIBIC (www.caribic-atmospheric.com) observatory consistently encountered free tropospheric air masses (9-11 km) originating over the South China Sea which had non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) signatures characteristic of processing by Cl. These signatures were observed in November and December of both years, but were not seen in other months, suggesting that oxidation by Cl is a persistent seasonal feature in this region. These Cl signatures were observed over a range of ~1500 km indicating a large-scale phenomenon. In this region, where transport patterns facilitate global redistribution of pollutants and persistent deep convection creates a fast-track for cross-tropopause transport, there exists the potential for regional chemistry to have impacts further afield. Here we use observed relationships between NMHCs to estimate the significance and magnitude of Cl oxidation in this region. From the relative depletions of NMHCs in these air masses we infer OH to Cl ratios of 83±28 to 139±40 [OH]/[Cl], which we believe represents an upper limit, based on the technique employed. At a predicted average [OH] of 1.5×106 OH cm-3 this corresponds to an average (minimum) [Cl] exposure of 1-2×104 Cl cm-3 during air mass transport. Lastly, in addition to estimating Cl abundances we have used IAGOS-CARIBIC observations to elucidate whether the origin of this Cl is predominantly natural or anthropogenic.

  19. Study of the Tropospheric Aerosol Structure Under Changing of the Air Mass Type from Lidar Observations in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilova, S. V.; Balin, Yu. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Penner, I. É.

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol optical characteristics in the main tropospheric layers are investigated based on joint interpretation of data of multi-frequency lidar sensing (110 sessions) and results of modeling of back air mass trajectories. Methodical problems for separating layers with different scattering properties and estimating their vertical boundaries are considered. Three optical criteria are simultaneously used to distinguish aerosol layers from cloud formations, including the gradient of the backscattering coefficient, optical depth, and the depolarization ratio. High values of the lidar ratio (66 sr) and of the Angstrom exponent (1.62) in the shortwavelength spectral range are observed in the boundary layer for Arctic transport. At the same time, low values of these optical parameters are characteristic for Asian transport: the lidar ratio is 54 sr and the Angstrom exponent is 1.1, which is explained by different relative contributions of the coarse and fine aerosol fractions to the air mass.

  20. Precipitation chemistry and corresponding transport patterns of influencing air masses at Huangshan Mountain in East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, ChunE; Deng, Xueliang; Yang, Yuanjian; Huang, Xiangrong; Wu, Biwen

    2014-09-01

    One hundred and ten samples of rainwater were collected for chemical analysis at the summit of Huangshan Mountain, a high-altitude site in East China, from July 2010 to June 2011. The volume-weighted-mean (VWM) pH for the whole sampling period was 5.03. SO{4/2-} and Ca2+ were the most abundant anion and cation, respectively. The ionic concentrations varied monthly with the highest concentrations in winter/spring and the lowest in summer. Evident inter-correlations were found among most ions, indicating the common sources for some species and fully mixing characteristics of the alpine precipitation chemistry. The VWM ratio of [SO{4/2-}]/[NO{3/-}] was 2.54, suggesting the acidity of rainwater comes from both nitric and sulfuric acids. Compared with contemporary observations at other alpine continental sites in China, the precipitation at Huangshan Mountain was the least polluted, with the lowest ionic concentrations. Trajectories to Huangshan Mountain on rainy days could be classified into six groups. The rainwater with influencing air masses originating in Mongolia was the most polluted with limited effect. The emissions of Jiangxi, Anhui, Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces had a strong influence on the overall rain chemistry at Huangshan Mountain. The rainwater with influencing air masses from Inner Mongolia was heavily polluted by anthropogenic pollutants.

  1. Air Mass Origin in the Arctic and its Response to Future Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orbe, Clara; Newman, Paul A.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Holzer, Mark; Oman, Luke; Polvani, Lorenzo M.; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    We present the first climatology of air mass origin in the Arctic in terms of rigorously defined air mass fractions that partition air according to where it last contacted the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Results from a present-day climate integration of the GEOSCCM general circulation model reveal that the Arctic lower troposphere below 700 mb is dominated year round by air whose last PBL contact occurred poleward of 60degN, (Arctic air, or air of Arctic origin). By comparison, approx. 63% of the Arctic troposphere above 700 mb originates in the NH midlatitude PBL, (midlatitude air). Although seasonal changes in the total fraction of midlatitude air are small, there are dramatic changes in where that air last contacted the PBL, especially above 700 mb. Specifically, during winter air in the Arctic originates preferentially over the oceans, approx. 26% in the East Pacific, and approx. 20% in the Atlantic PBL. By comparison, during summer air in the Arctic last contacted the midlatitude PBL primarily over land, overwhelmingly so in Asia (approx. 40 %) and, to a lesser extent, in North America (approx. 24%). Seasonal changes in air-mass origin are interpreted in terms of seasonal variations in the large-scale ventilation of the midlatitude boundary layer and lower troposphere, namely changes in the midlatitude tropospheric jet and associated transient eddies during winter and large scale convective motions over midlatitudes during summer.

  2. Section 17: Air Pathway- Waste Characteristics and Targets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    HRS Training. the air migration pathway evaluates the likelihood of release of hazardous substances into the atmosphere and how many people and sensitive environments could be exposed to hazardous substances carried in the air, including gases

  3. Influence of air composition during egg storage on egg characteristics, embryonic development, hatchability, and chick quality.

    PubMed

    Reijrink, I A M; van Duijvendijk, L A G; Meijerhof, R; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2010-09-01

    Egg storage beyond 7 d is associated with an increase in incubation duration and a decrease in hatchability and chick quality. Negative effects of prolonged egg storage may be caused by changes in the embryo, by changes in egg characteristics, or by both. An adjustment in storage air composition may reduce negative effects of prolonged egg storage because it may prevent changes in the embryo and in egg characteristics. An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of high CO(2) concentrations or a low O(2) concentration in the storage air on egg characteristics, embryonic development, hatchability, and chick quality. Eggs were stored for 14 d in 4 different storage air compositions: normal air (control; 20.9% O(2), 0.05% CO(2), 78.1% N(2)), 0.74% CO(2) treatment (20.8% O(2), 0.74% CO(2), 77.5% N(2)), 1.5% CO(2) treatment (20.6% O(2), 1.5% CO(2), 77.0% N(2))(,) or 3.0% O(2) treatment (3.0% O(2), 0.04% CO(2), 96.0% N(2)). The storage temperature was 16 degrees C and the RH was 75%. Results showed that the change in albumen pH and albumen height between oviposition and the end of storage was less in the 0.74 and 1.5% CO(2) treatments than in the control and 3.0% O(2) treatments (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). None of the treatments affected the stage of embryonic development on d 4 of incubation, hatchability, or chick quality on the day of hatch in terms of BW, chick length, and yolk-free body mass. Although high CO(2) concentrations in the storage air had a positive effect on albumen height and albumen pH, it is concluded that the storage air compositions, studied in the current study, do not affect embryonic development, hatchability, or chick quality when eggs are stored for 14 d at a storage temperature of 16 degrees C.

  4. Mass-conserving method of characteristics for streamflow modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sikonia, W.G.

    1989-01-01

    A robust numerical model is presented for the computation of unsteady streamflow on steep river slopes. The one-dimensional model uses the method of characteristics on a specified space-time grid to solve the Saint-Venant equations. An additional continuity equation requirement on each space-time element provides greatly improved conservation of mass over traditional implementations of the method of characteristics on a fixed grid. The space-time geometry of the problem is described in a finite element setting. Hermite interpolation of channel parameters is used to avoid numerical difficulties that may occur with steep slopes due to discontinuities in the derivatives of data such as channel top width. Manning 's equation for friction slope can be modified by a factor to make the slope more appropriate for steep rivers. The standard Manning 's friction slope can also be used, if preferred. The computer model is not restricted to steep slopes, and applies as well to gently sloping streams. Two numerical examples support the mathematical approach and computational algorithm. (USGS)

  5. Mass-conserving method of characteristics for streamflow modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sikonia, William G.

    1992-01-01

    A robust numerical model is presented for the computation of unsteady streamflow on steep river slopes. The one-dimensional model uses the method of characteristics on a specified space-time grid to solve the Saint-Venant equations. An additional continuity equation requirement on each space-time element provides greatly improved conservation of mass over traditional implementations of the method of characteristics on a fixed grid. The space-time geometry of the problem is described in a finite element setting. Hermite interpolation of channel parameters is used to avoid numerical difficulties that may occur with steep slopes due to discontinuities in the derivatives of data such as channel top width. Manning's equation for friction slope can be modified by a factor to make the slope more appropriate for steep rivers. The standard Manning's friction slope can also be used, if preferred. The computer model is not restricted to steep slopes, and applies as well to gently sloping streams. Two numerical examples support the mathematical approach and computational algorithm.

  6. The Analysis of PPM Levels of Gases in Air by Photoionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, John N.; Warneck, Peter

    1973-01-01

    Discusses analysis of trace gases in air by photoionization mass spectrometer. It is shown that the necessary sensitivity can be obtained by eliminating the UV monochromator and using direct ionization with a hydrogen light source. (JP)

  7. On the evaluation of air mass factors for atmospheric near-ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perliski, Lori M.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The interpretation of UV-visible twilight absorption measurements of atmospheric chemical constituents is dependent on how well the optical path, or air mass factor, of light collected by the spectrometer is understood. A simple single scattering model and a Monte Carlo radiative transfer scheme have been developed to study the effects of multiple scattering, aerosol scattering, surface albedo and refraction on air mass factors for scattered light observations. At fairly short visible wavelengths (less than about 450 nm), stratospheric air mass factors are found to be relatively insensitive to multiple scattering, surface albedo and refraction, as well as aerosol scattering by background aerosols. Longer wavelengths display greater sensitivity to refraction and aerosol scattering. Tropospheric air mass factors are found to be highly dependent on aerosol scattering, surface albedo and, at long visible wavelengths (about 650 nm), refraction. Absorption measurements of NO2 and O4 are shown to support these conclusions.

  8. Experimental Determination of the Mass of Air Molecules from the Law of Atmospheres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Galvin, Vincent, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A gas pressure gauge has been constructed for use in a student experiment involving the law of atmospheres. From pressure data obtained at selected elevations the average mass of air molecules is determined and compared to that calculated from the molecular weights and percentages of constituents to the air. (Author/BB)

  9. Aerosol properties and radiative forcing for three air masses transported in Summer 2011 to Sopot, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozwadowska, Anna; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Makuch, P.; Markowicz, K. M.; Petelski, T.; Strzałkowska, A.; Zieliński, T.

    2013-05-01

    Properties of atmospheric aerosols and solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface were measured during Summer 2011 in Sopot, Poland. Three cloudless days, characterized by different directions of incoming air-flows, which are typical transport pathways to Sopot, were used to estimate a radiative forcing due to aerosols present in each air mass.

  10. Improving microbial air quality in air-conditioned mass transport buses by opening the bus exhaust ventilation fans.

    PubMed

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Arunchai, Nongphon; Luksamijarulkul, Soavalug; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan

    2005-07-01

    The air quality in air-conditioned mass transport buses may affect bus drivers' health. In-bus air quality improvement with the voluntary participation of bus drivers by opening the exhaust ventilation fans in the bus was implemented in the Seventh Bus Zone of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority. Four bus numbers, including bus numbers 16, 63, 67 and 166, were randomly selected to investigate microbial air quality and to observe the effect of opening the exhaust ventilation fans in the bus. With each bus number, 9 to 10 air-conditioned buses (total, 39 air-conditioned buses) were included. In-bus air samples were collected at 5 points in each studied bus using the Millipore Air Tester. A total of 195 air samples were cultured for bacterial and fungal counts. The results reveal that the exhaust ventilation fans of 17 air-conditioned buses (43.6%) were opened to ventilate in-bus air during the cycle of the bus route. The means +/- SD of bacterial counts and fungal counts in the studied buses with opened exhaust ventilation fans (83.8 +/- 70.7 and 38.0 +/- 42.8 cfu/m3) were significantly lower than those in the studied buses without opened exhaust ventilation fans (199.6 +/- 138.8 and 294.1 +/- 178.7 cfu/m3), p < 0.0005. All the air samples collected from the studied buses with opened exhaust ventilation fans were at acceptable levels (< 500 cfu/m3) compared with 4.6% of the air samples collected from the studied buses without opened exhaust ventilation fans, which had high levels (> 500 cfu/m3). Of the studied buses with opened exhaust ventilation fans (17 buses), the bacterial and fungal counts after opening the exhaust ventilation fans (68.3 +/- 33.8 and 28.3 +/- 19.3 cfu/m3) were significantly lower than those before opening the exhaust ventilation fans (158.3 +/- 116.9 and 85.3 +/- 71.2 cfu/m3), p < 0.005.

  11. Erroneous mass transit system and its tended relationship with motor vehicular air pollution (An integrated approach for reduction of urban air pollution in Lahore).

    PubMed

    Aziz, Amer; Bajwa, Ihsan Ullah

    2008-02-01

    Air pollution is threat to the lives of people living in big cities of Pakistan. In Lahore 1,250 people die annually because of air pollution. Mass transit system that can be put forth as solution to urban air pollution is contingent with right choice of system and its affiliation with motorized vehicles and nature of urban air pollution. Existing mass transit system in Lahore due to untrue operation causes surfeit discharge of motor vehicular carbon monoxide. Tended relationships of mass transit system with motorized vehicles and urban air pollution are quite noteworthy. The growing motor vehicles (a consequence of flawed public mass transit system) are potential source of urban air pollution. This paper attempts to highlight correlations and regression curves of existing mass transit system. Further it recommends a two facet approach for reduction of motor vehicular air pollution in Lahore.

  12. Determining the Full Halo Coronal Mass Ejection Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.

    2010-11-01

    Observing halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) in the coronagraph field of view allows one to only determine the apparent parameters in the plane of the sky. Recently, several methods have been proposed allowing one to find some true geometrical and kinematical parameters of HCMEs. In most cases, a simple cone model was used to describe the CME shape. Observations show that various modifications of the cone model ("ice cream models") are most appropriate for describing the shapes of individual CMEs. This paper uses the method of determining full HCME parameters proposed by the author earlier, for determining the parameters of 45 full HCMEs, with various modifications of their shapes. I show that the determined CME characteristics depend significantly on the chosen CME shape. I conclude that the absence of criteria for a preliminary evaluation of the CME shape is a major source of error in determining the true parameters of a full HCME with any of the known methods. I show that, regardless of the chosen CME form, the trajectory of practically all the HCMEs in question deviate from the radial direction towards the Sun-Earth axis at the initial stage of their movement, and their angular size, on average, significantly exceeds that of all the observable CMEs.

  13. Comparison of characteristics of aerosol during rainy weather and cold air-dust weather in Guangzhou in late March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huizhong; Wu, Dui; Yu, Jianzhen

    2016-04-01

    Using the data on aerosol observed hourly by Marga ADI 2080 and Grimm 180, we compared the characteristics of aerosol during rainy weather and cold air-dust weather in Guangzhou in late March 2012. The mass concentration of aerosol appeared distinct between the two weather processes. During rainy weather, the mass concentration of PM and total water-soluble components decreased obviously. During cold air-dust weather, the cleaning effect of cold air occurred much more suddenly and about a half day earlier than the dust effect. As a result, the mass concentration of PM and total water-soluble components first dropped dramatically to a below-normal level and then rose gradually to an above-normal level. The ratio of PM2.5/PM10 and PM1/PM10 decreased, suggesting that dust-storm weather mainly brought in coarse particles. The proportion of Ca2+ in the total water-soluble components significantly increased to as high as 50 % because of the effect of dust weather. We further analysed the ionic equilibrium during rainy and cold air-dust weather, and compared it with that during hazy weather during the same period. The aerosol during rainy weather was slightly acidic, whereas that during hazy weather and cold air-dust weather was obviously alkaline, with that during cold air-dust weather being significantly more alkaline. Most of the anions, including SO4 2- and NO3 -, were neutralised by NH4 + during rainy and hazy weather, and by Ca2+ during cold air-dust weather.

  14. Monolithic mass sensor fabricated using a conventional technology with attogram resolution in air conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verd, J.; Uranga, A.; Abadal, G.; Teva, J.; Torres, F.; Pérez-Murano, F.; Fraxedas, J.; Esteve, J.; Barniol, N.

    2007-07-01

    Monolithic mass sensors for ultrasensitive mass detection in air conditions have been fabricated using a conventional 0.35μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. The mass sensors are based on electrostatically excited submicrometer scale cantilevers integrated with CMOS electronics. The devices have been calibrated obtaining an experimental sensitivity of 6×10-11g/cm2Hz equivalent to 0.9ag/Hz for locally deposited mass. Results from time-resolved mass measurements are also presented. An evaluation of the mass resolution have been performed obtaining a value of 2.4×10-17g in air conditions, resulting in an improvement of these devices from previous works in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and fabrication process complexity.

  15. Peroxy radicals and ozone photochemistry in air masses undergoing long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. E.; Monks, P. S.; Jacob, M. J.; Penkett, S. A.; Lewis, A. C.; Stewart, D. J.; Whalley, L. K.; Methven, J.; Stohl, A.

    2009-09-01

    Concentrations of peroxy radicals (HO2+ΣiRiO2) in addition to other trace gases were measured onboard the UK Meteorological Office/Natural Environment Research Council British Aerospace 146-300 atmospheric research aircraft during the Intercontinental Transport of Ozone and Precursors (ITOP) campaign based at Horta Airport, Faial, Azores (38.58° N, 28.72° W) in July/August 2004. The overall peroxy radical altitude profile displays an increase with altitude that is likely to have been impacted by the effects of long-range transport. The peroxy radical altitude profile for air classified as of marine origin shows no discernable altitude profile. A range of air-masses were intercepted with varying source signatures, including those with aged American and Asian signatures, air-masses of biomass burning origin, and those that originated from the east coast of the United States. Enhanced peroxy radical concentrations have been observed within this range of air-masses indicating that long-range transported air-masses traversing the Atlantic show significant photochemical activity. The net ozone production at clear sky limit is in general negative, and as such the summer mid-Atlantic troposphere is at limit net ozone destructive. However, there is clear evidence of positive ozone production even at clear sky limit within air masses undergoing long-range transport, and during ITOP especially between 5 and 5.5 km, which in the main corresponds to a flight that extensively sampled air with a biomass burning signature. Ozone production was NOx limited throughout ITOP, as evidenced by a good correlation (r2=0.72) between P(O3) and NO. Strong positive net ozone production has also been seen in varying source signature air-masses undergoing long-range transport, including but not limited to low-level export events, and export from the east coast of the United States.

  16. The dispersion characteristics of air pollution from world's megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, M.; Stohl, A.; Eckhardt, S.

    2012-10-01

    Megacities are extreme examples of the continuously growing urbanization of human population that pose (new) challenges to the environment and human health at a local scale. However, because of their size megacities also have larger-scale effects and more research is needed to quantify their regional and global scale impacts. We performed a study of the characteristics of plumes dispersing from a group of thirty-six of world's megacities using the Lagrangian particle model FLEXPART and focusing on black carbon (BC) emissions during the years 2003-2005. BC was selected since it is representative of combustion-related emissions and it has a significant role as a short-lived climate forcer. Based on the BC emissions two tracers were modeled; a purely passive tracer and one subject to wet and dry deposition. These tracers allowed us to investigate the role of deposition processes in determining the impact of megacities' pollutant plumes. The particles composing the plumes have been sampled in space and time. The time sampling allowed us to investigate the evolution of the plume from its release up to 48 days after emission and to generalize our results for any substance decaying with a time scale sufficiently shorter than the time window of 48 days. The physical characteristics of the time averaged plume have been investigated and this showed that although local conditions are important, overall the latitude of the city is the main factor influencing both the local and the regional-to-global dispersion of the megacities' plumes. We also repeated the calculations of some of the regional-pollution-potential metrics previously proposed by Lawrence et al. (2007), thus extending their results to a depositing scalar and retaining the evolution in time for all the plumes. Noteworthy our results agreed well with the previous results despite being obtained using a totally different modeling framework. For the environmental impact on a global scale we focused on the export of

  17. The dispersion characteristics of air pollution from the world's megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, M.; Stohl, A.; Eckhardt, S.

    2013-10-01

    Megacities are extreme examples of the continuously growing urbanization of the human population that pose (new) challenges to the environment and human health at a local scale. However, because of their size megacities also have larger-scale effects, and more research is needed to quantify their regional- and global-scale impacts. We performed a study of the characteristics of pollution plumes dispersing from a group of 36 of the world's megacities using the Lagrangian particle model FLEXPART and focusing on black carbon (BC) emissions during the years 2003-2005. BC was selected since it is representative of combustion-related emissions and has a significant role as a short-lived climate forcer. Based on the BC emissions two artificial tracers were modeled: a purely passive tracer and one subject to wet and dry deposition more closely resembling the behavior of a true aerosol. These tracers allowed us to investigate the role of deposition processes in determining the impact of megacities' pollutant plumes. The particles composing the plumes have been sampled in space and time. The time sampling allowed us to investigate the evolution of the plume from its release up to 48 days after emission and to generalize our results for any substance decaying with a timescale sufficiently shorter than the time window of 48 days. The physical characteristics of the time-averaged plume have been investigated, and this showed that, although local conditions are important, overall a city's latitude is the main factor influencing both the local and the regional-to-global dispersion of its pollution. We also repeated the calculations of some of the regional-pollution-potential metrics previously proposed by Lawrence et al. (2007), thus extending their results to a depositing scalar and retaining the evolution in time for all the plumes. Our results agreed well with their previous results despite being obtained using a totally different modeling framework. For the environmental

  18. A Synoptic Air Mass Approach to Defining Southwest U.S. Summer Duration and Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, C.; Wachtel, C. J.; Godek, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    As the past decade was the warmest in the 110-year active record, and future Southwest warming is expected to be most intense in the summer season, it is important to have an updated atmospheric definition of what constitutes a Southwest summer. This is particularly true given the intensity of current drought conditions and that summers may be changing. Using weather-type data from the Spatial Synoptic Classification, this research aims to synoptically define the summer season in the Southwest since 1950. The Southwest is spatially described here by sub-region and 28 air mass stations within are chosen for air mass analysis. Daily air mass frequencies are examined to determine the dominant and less prevalent types annually and seasonally, from May to September. Then, frequencies in the middle of summer are compared to those in the seasonal fringe months to explore the possibility of a synoptic shift in the timing of the region's summer season. Finally, to further scrutinize how regional air mass frequencies have changed with time, the data are subdivided and evaluated for the 'Early record' (years prior to 1975) and 'Modern record' (post 1975). Frequency departures are tested for practical and statistical significance to characterize the strength of summer season variability. Results indicate that Dry Moderate air masses are the most common annually and in summer. Moist and transitional air masses tend to less frequent throughout the Southwest; however, frequencies vary greatly by sub-region. Wet and dry conditions are observed in accordance with the monsoon in some sub-regions, but not throughout the region. Significant changes in sub-regional air mass tendencies are identified that show the Early record experienced cooler air mass conditions (fewer tropical types and more moderate and cool types) than the Modern record. From a long-term synoptic air mass perspective, typical Southwest summers likely last from May to August. However, in the Modern record May

  19. [Variation characteristics and influencing factors of air pollution index in China].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Wang, Sheng-Jie; Zhao, Ai-Fang; Ma, Qian

    2012-06-01

    Based on the daily air pollution index (API), primary pollutant, air quality level and status of 42 cities in China during 2001-2010, the characteristics of air quality were analyzed. The results showed that the atmosphere was significantly influenced by consumption of coal. The primary pollutant was PM10, and the air quality status was excellent (0 < API < 50), good (50 < API <100) and slightly polluted (100 < API < 150) in the majority. The air pollution status varied seasonally, which was the most serious in winter, and slightest in summer. The air quality was better and better in the observed period generally; The spatial distribution of urban air environment displayed a worsening trend from the south to the north and from the coasts to the inland; The local emission and natural dust transmission from the Northwest China was the main sources of urban air pollution; The air pollutants were impacted by the meteorological elements, and the air pollution index correlated linearly with precipitation, wind speed and temperature inversion; The distribution of weather conditions, which was affected by the terrain, also could influence the air quality; In addition, the human activities had both positive and negative functions on the urban air quality.

  20. Optical characteristics of red sprites produced by runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimuk, V.; Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Symbalisty, E.M.; Taranenko, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The results of numerical calculations of intensity and spectra of optical emissions from red sprites produced by runaway air breakdown in the atmosphere are presented. It is shown that the optical emissions from red sprites consist of two components: (1) short-term (t{approx}0.3{endash}2thinspms) emissions produced as a result of dissipation of an energetic electron beam in air; (2) long-term (t{approx}2{endash}10thinspms) emissions produced by a population of low-energy electrons in an electric field. The long-term optical emissions are calculated for all low-energy electrons, including the secondary low-energy electrons produced by the relativistic electron beam, ambient background electrons, and electrons produced as a result of regular breakdown. The theoretical results are compared with observational data. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  1. Distribution Characteristics of Air-Bone Gaps – Evidence of Bias in Manual Audiometry

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard H.; Popelka, Gerald R.; Eikelboom, Robert H.; Swanepoel, De Wet; Saly, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Five databases were mined to examine distributions of air-bone gaps obtained by automated and manual audiometry. Differences in distribution characteristics were examined for evidence of influences unrelated to the audibility of test signals. Design The databases provided air- and bone-conduction thresholds that permitted examination of air-bone gap distributions that were free of ceiling and floor effects. Cases with conductive hearing loss were eliminated based on air-bone gaps, tympanometry, and otoscopy, when available. The analysis is based on 2,378,921 threshold determinations from 721,831 subjects from five databases. Results Automated audiometry produced air-bone gaps that were normally distributed suggesting that air- and bone-conduction thresholds are normally distributed. Manual audiometry produced air-bone gaps that were not normally distributed and show evidence of biasing effects of assumptions of expected results. In one database, the form of the distributions showed evidence of inclusion of conductive hearing losses. Conclusions Thresholds obtained by manual audiometry show tester bias effects from assumptions of the patient’s hearing loss characteristics. Tester bias artificially reduces the variance of bone-conduction thresholds and the resulting air-bone gaps. Because the automated method is free of bias from assumptions of expected results, these distributions are hypothesized to reflect the true variability of air- and bone-conduction thresholds and the resulting air-bone gaps. PMID:26627469

  2. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  3. Interaction of mid-latitude air masses with the polar dome area during RACEPAC and NETCARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter; Koellner, Franziska; Kunkel, Daniel; Schneider, Johannes; Schulz, Christiane; Herber, Andreas; Borrmann, Stephan; Wendisch, Manfred; Ehrlich, Andre; Leaitch, Richard; Willis, Megan; Burkart, Julia; Thomas, Jennie; Abbatt, Jon

    2016-04-01

    We present aircraft based trace gas measurements in the Arctic during RACEPAC (2014) and NETCARE (2014 and 2015) with the Polar 6 aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) covering an area from 134°W to 17°W and 68°N to 83°N. We focus on cloud, aerosol and general transport processes of polluted air masses into the high Arctic. Based on CO and CO2 measurements and kinematic 10-day back trajectories as well as Flexpart particle dispersion modeling we analyze the transport regimes of mid-latitude air masses traveling to the high Arctic prevalent during spring (RACEPAC 2014, NETCARE 2015) and summer (NETCARE 2014). In general more northern parts of the high Arctic (Lat > 75°N) were relatively unaffected from mid-latitude air masses. In contrast, regions further south are influenced by air masses from Asia and Russia (eastern part of Canadian Arctic and European Arctic) as well as from North America (central and western parts of Canadian Arctic). The transition between the mostly isolated high Arctic and more southern regions indicated by tracer gradients is remarkably sharp. This allows for a chemical definition of the Polar dome based on the variability of CO and CO2 as a marker. Isentropic surfaces that slope from the surface to higher altitudes in the high Arctic form the polar dome that represents a transport barrier for mid-latitude air masses to enter the lower troposphere in the high Arctic. Synoptic-scale weather systems frequently disturb this transport barrier and foster the exchange between air masses from the mid-latitudes and polar regions. This can finally lead to enhanced pollution levels in the lower polar troposphere. Mid-latitude pollution plumes from biomass burning or flaring entering the polar dome area lead to an enhancement of 30% of the observed CO mixing ratio within the polar dome area.

  4. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence — a tool to obtain information about different air masses and air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Martina

    2001-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are solid particles dissolved in air and change their chemical composition frequently depending on various parameters. In order to identify regional air circulation atmospheric aerosol filter samples were taken at Loyola University Chicago's Lake Shore Campus during the months of July and August 2000 with sampling times ranging between 1 and 2 h. The samples were digested in a microwave oven and analyzed by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry. One diurnal variation comprising five consecutive sampling events was selected and discussed as well as 4 days experiencing different meteorology were compared to exemplify the variation in trace elemental concentration according to air mass movements and highlight the capability of total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis. It was found that due to changes in meteorological conditions particularly wind direction and wind speed, trace elemental compositions varied rapidly and could be used to distinguish between 'Lake Michigan air' and 'metropolitan Chicago air' on such short-term time scale like one hour. Back trajectory analysis was applied to support and corroborate the results. The outcome of this study clearly shows that total-reflection X-ray fluorescence is an optimal tool for analysis of atmospheric aerosols.

  5. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. STATISTICS AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SOURCE REGION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Muhr, N.; Kienreich, I.; Utz, D.

    2011-09-10

    We use high time cadence images acquired by the STEREO EUVI and COR instruments to study the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from their initiation through impulsive acceleration to the propagation phase. For a set of 95 CMEs we derived detailed height, velocity, and acceleration profiles and statistically analyzed characteristic CME parameters: peak acceleration, peak velocity, acceleration duration, initiation height, height at peak velocity, height at peak acceleration, and size of the CME source region. The CME peak accelerations we derived range from 20 to 6800 m s{sup -2} and are inversely correlated with the acceleration duration and the height at peak acceleration. Seventy-four percent of the events reach their peak acceleration at heights below 0.5 R{sub sun}. CMEs that originate from compact sources low in the corona are more impulsive and reach higher peak accelerations at smaller heights. These findings can be explained by the Lorentz force, which drives the CME accelerations and decreases with height and CME size.

  6. Predicting flow characteristics of a lixiviant in a fractured crystalline rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.C.

    1993-01-01

    In situ metals research to characterize the hydrology of a fractured crystalline rock mass in underground mine stopes is discussed. The objective of this study was to find the potential direction, velocity, and concentrations of a lixiviant plume, should leaching solvents (lixiviants) escape from a test slope. The study was conducted by the US Bureau of Mines at the Colorado School of Mines Experimental Mine in Idaho Springs, CO. Since this was a method evaluation site, the lixiviant was simulated using water and acceptable tracers. The site is located in moderately fractured Precambrian migmatite-biotite gneisses of the Idaho Springs Formation. The data required for the characterization were obtained from geologic maps and reports, core logs, and air and water permeability tests. The acquired data were analyzed and applied to a computer model that calculated the characteristics of a lixiviant plume originating at the slope. A sensitivity analysis showed that dispersivity, ground water velocity, fracture porosity, and fracture spacing had notable effects on the concentration of the plume. Assuming a saturated rock mass, the lixiviant plume would disperse to undetectable levels in a very short time because of a high fracture density at the mine site.

  7. Air Dispersion Characteristics and Thermal Comparison of Traditional and Fabric Ductwork using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreopoulou, Areti

    This thesis research compares the air dispersion and thermal comfort characteristics of conventional diffuser and fabric-based ductwork systems. Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings produce and regulate airflow traveling through ductwork. The performance characteristics of conventional ductwork are compared with recent advancements in fabric-based ductwork. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, thermal and air distribution flow patterns are compared between the two types of ductwork and preliminary thermal comfort and efficiency conclusions are drawn. Results of the Air Distribution Performance Index (ADPI) for both ducting systems reflect that, under the given test conditions, the fabric duct system is approximately 23% more comfortable than the traditional diffuser system in terms of air speed flow uniformity into the space, while staying within the Effective Draft Temperature comfort zone of -3 to +2°F.

  8. New air Cherenkov light detectors to study mass composition of cosmic rays with energies above knee region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Katsuya, Ryoichi; Mitsumori, Yu; Nakayama, Keisuke; Kakimoto, Fumio; Tokuno, Hisao; Tajima, Norio; Miranda, Pedro; Salinas, Juan; Tavera, Wilfredo

    2014-11-01

    We have installed a hybrid detection system for air showers generated by cosmic rays with energies greater than 3 ×1015 eV at Mount Chacaltaya (5200 m above the sea level), in order to study the mass composition of cosmic rays above the knee region. This detection system comprises an air shower array with 49 scintillation counters in an area of 500 m×650 m, and seven new Cherenkov light detectors installed in a radial direction from the center of the air shower array with a separation of 50 m. It is known that the longitudinal development of a particle cascade in the atmosphere strongly depends on the type of the primary nucleus, and an air shower initiated by a heavier nucleus develops faster than that by a lighter primary of the same energy, because of the differences in the interaction cross-section and the energy per nucleon. This can be measured by detecting the Cherenkov radiation emitted from charged particles in air showers at higher altitudes. In this paper we describe the design and performance of our new non-imaging Cherenkov light detectors at Mount Chacaltaya that are operated in conjunction with the air shower array. The arrival directions and energies of air showers are determined by the shower array, and information about the primary masses is obtained from the Cherenkov light data including the time profiles and lateral distributions. The detector consists of photomultiplier tube (PMT), high-speed ADCs, other control modules, and data storage device. The Cherenkov light signals from an air shower are typically 10-100 ns long, and the waveforms are digitized with a sampling frequency of 1 GHz and recorded in situ without long-distance analog signal transfers. All the Cherenkov light detectors record their time-series data by receiving a triggering signal transmitted from the trigger module of the air shower array, which is fired by a coincidence of shower signals in four neighboring scintillation counters. The optical characteristics of the

  9. Understanding temporal patterns and characteristics of air quality in Beijing: A local and regional perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ziyue; Xu, Bing; Cai, Jun; Gao, Bingbo

    2016-02-01

    Sources, characteristics and seasonal variation of airborne pollutants in China, especially in Beijing, have been massively examined. However, most studies analyze local air quality from an isolated perspective and interactions between local and regional air quality have not been fully considered. This research attempts to evaluate Beijing air quality at the local and regional scale. The weighted cross correlogram spectral matching (CCSM) and convergent cross mapping (CCM) method are employed for similarity and causality analysis respectively. At the local scale, the air quality in Beijing experiences frequent and sudden change, yet changes smoothly across a day's time. At the regional scale, the air quality in Beijing and four neighboring cities is compared. The result suggests that although air quality in Beijing and neighboring cities is of some differences, strong bidirectional coupling exists between the local and regional air quality. The research indicates that air quality in Beijing is better than the general situation in this region, and Tianjin should be a good comparative site for monitoring and evaluating air quality in Beijing. This research provides a feasible methodology for comprehensive analysis of local air quality at multiple scales, which may shed some lights on the forthcoming implementation of local air quality evaluation.

  10. Technical note: Air compared to nitrogen as nebulizing and drying gases for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, P; Silberring, J; Smoluch, M

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we tested the application of compressed air instead of pure nitrogen as the nebulizing and drying gas, and its influence on the quality of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectra. The intensities of the signals corresponding to protonated molecules were significantly (twice) higher when air was used. Inspection of signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios revealed that, in both cases, sensitivity was comparable. A higher ion abundance after the application of compressed air was followed by a higher background. Another potential risk of using air in the ESI source is the possibility for sample oxidation due to the presence of oxygen. To test this, we selected five easily oxidizing compounds to verify their susceptibility to oxidation. In particular, the presence of methionine was of interest. For all the compounds studied, no oxidation was observed. Amodiaquine oxidizes spontaneously in water solutions and its oxidized form can be detected a few hours after preparation. Direct comparison of the spectra where nitrogen was used with the corresponding spectra obtained when air was applied did not show significant differences. The only distinction was slightly different patterns of adducts when air was used. The difference concerns acetonitrile, which forms higher signals when air is the nebulizing gas. It is also important that the replacement of nitrogen with air does not affect quantitative data. The prepared calibration curves also visualize an intensity twice as high (independent of concentration within tested range) of the signal where air was applied. We have used our system continuously for three months with air as the nebulizing and drying gas and have not noticed any unexpected signal deterioration caused by additional source contamination from the air. Moreover, compressed air is much cheaper and easily available using oil-free compressors or pumps.

  11. Remote mass spectrometric sampling of electrospray- and desorption electrospray-generated ions using an air ejector.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Bereman, Michael S; Muddiman, David C; Hawkridge, Adam M

    2007-10-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data are presented.

  12. Experimental investigation on the combustion characteristics of aluminum in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yunchao; Xia, Zhixun; Huang, Liya; Yan, Xiaoting

    2016-12-01

    With the aim of revealing the detailed process of aluminum combustion in air, this paper reports an experimental study on the combustion of aluminum droplets. In this work, the aluminum wires were exposed and heated by a CO2 laser to produce aluminum droplets, and then these droplets were ignited and burnt in air. The changing processes of aluminum wires, droplets and flames were directly recorded by a high-speed camera, which was equipped with a high magnification zoom lens. Meanwhile, the spectrum distribution of the flame was also registered by an optical spectrometer. Besides, burning residuals were collected and analyzed by the methods of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS). Experimental results show that, during combustion, the aluminum droplet is covered by a spherical vapor-phase flame, and the diameter of this flame is about 1.4 times of the droplet diameter, statistically. In the later stages of combustion, the molten aluminum and condensed oxide products can react to generate gaseous Al and Al2O spontaneously. Little holes are found on the surface of residuals, which are the transport channels of gaseous products, namely the gaseous Al and Al2O. The combustion residuals are consisted by lots of aluminum oxide particles with diameters less than 1 μm.

  13. Spontaneous Ignition Characteristics of Hydrocarbon Fuel-air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Freeman, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Although the subject of spontaneous ignition of liquid fuels has received considerable attention in the past, the role of fuel evaporation in the overall spontaneous ignition process is still unclear. A main purpose of this research is to carry out measurements of ignition delay times, using fuels of current and anticipated future aeronautical interest, at test conditions that are representative of those encountered in modern gas turbine engines. Attention is focused on the fuel injection process, in particlar the measurement and control of man fuel drop size and fuel-air spatial distribution. The experiments are designed to provide accurate information on the role of fuel evaporation processes in determining the overall ignition delay time. The second objective is to examine in detail the theoretical aspects of spontaneous ignition in order to improve upon current knowledge and understanding of the basic processes involved, so that the results of the investigation can find general and widespead application.

  14. Phonatory air flow characteristics of adductor spasmodic dysphonia and muscle tension dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Higgins, M B; Chait, D H; Schulte, L

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if phonatory air flow characteristics differed among women with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), and normal phonation. Phonatory air flow signals were gathered during [pa] syllable repetitions. Mean phonatory air flow, coefficients of variation, and the presence of large air flow perturbations (75 ml/s or more) were examined for the three groups of speakers. There was no significant difference in mean phonatory air flow across groups, and very large intersubject variation in mean phonatory air flow occurred for both the AdSD and MTD groups. Coefficients of variation were similar for the groups of women with MTD and normal phonation but were significantly larger for the group with AdSD. Air flow perturbations were common with AdSD and rare with MTD. Relatively large coefficients of variation and air flow perturbations of at least 75 ml/s did occur for some women with normal voices who were 70 years of age or older. It appears that intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow may aid in the differentiation of AdSD and MTD when used in conjunction with other elements of a thorough voice evaluation. However, the potential contribution of aging to increased intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow must be considered when interpreting findings.

  15. Detection of Hydrazine in Air Using Electron Transfer Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-15

    is in tI qualitative agreement with American Petroleum Institute (API) 6 data. Unequivocal identification and monitoring of N2H4 fuels at the launch...N2H4 in air. At even lower concentrations, the delay time 61ndex of Mass Spectral Data, American Petroleum Institute , Research Project 44, NBS

  16. Toward a better understanding of the impact of mass transit air pollutants on human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern mass transit systems, based on roads, rail, water, and air, generate toxic airborne pollutants throughout the developed world. This has become one of the leading concerns about the use of modern transportation, particularly in densely-populated urban areas where their use is enormous and inc...

  17. Operational procedure for computer program for design point characteristics of a compressed-air generator with through-flow combustor for V/STOL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    The computer program described in this report calculates the design-point characteristics of a compressed-air generator for use in V/STOL applications such as systems with a tip-turbine-driven lift fan. The program computes the dimensions and mass, as well as the thermodynamic performance of a model air generator configuration which involves a straight through-flow combustor. Physical and thermodynamic characteristics of the air generator components are also given. The program was written in FORTRAN IV language. Provision has been made so that the program will accept input values in either SI units or U.S. customary units. Each air generator design-point calculation requires about 1.5 seconds of 7094 computer time for execution.

  18. Low-CCN concentration air masses over the eastern North Atlantic: Seasonality, meteorology, and drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Robert; Stemmler, Jayson D.; Rémillard, Jasmine; Jefferson, Anne

    2017-01-01

    A 20 month cloud condensation nucleus concentration (NCCN) data set from Graciosa Island (39°N, 28°W) in the remote North Atlantic is used to characterize air masses with low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. Low-CCN events are defined as 6 h periods with mean NCCN<20 cm-3 (0.1% supersaturation). A total of 47 low-CCN events are identified. Surface, satellite, and reanalysis data are used to explore the meteorological and cloud context for low-CCN air masses. Low-CCN events occur in all seasons, but their frequency was 3 times higher in December-May than during June-November. Composites show that many of the low-CCN events had a common meteorological basis that involves southerly low-level flow and rather low wind speeds at Graciosa. Anomalously low pressure is situated to the west of Graciosa during these events, but back trajectories and lagged SLP composites indicate that low-CCN air masses often originate as cold air outbreaks to the north and west of Graciosa. Low-CCN events were associated with low cloud droplet concentrations (Nd) at Graciosa, but liquid water path (LWP) during low-CCN events was not systematically different from that at other times. Satellite Nd and LWP estimates from MODIS collocated with Lagrangian back trajectories show systematically lower Nd and higher LWP several days prior to arrival at Graciosa, consistent with the hypothesis that observed low-CCN air masses are often formed by coalescence scavenging in thick warm clouds, often in cold air outbreaks.

  19. Observed characteristics of dust storm events over the western United States using meteorological, satellite, and air quality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, H.; Wang, J. X. L.

    2014-08-01

    To improve dust storm identification over the western United States, historical dust events measured by air quality and satellite observations are analyzed based on their characteristics in data sets of regular meteorology, satellite-based aerosol optical depth (AOD), and air quality measurements. Based on the prevailing weather conditions associated with dust emission, dust storm events are classified into the following four typical types: (1) The key feature of cold front-induced dust storms is their rapid process with strong dust emissions. (2) Events caused by meso- to small-scale weather systems have the highest levels of emissions. (3) Dust storms caused by tropical disturbances show a stronger air concentration of dust and last longer than those in (1) and (2). (4) Dust storms triggered by cyclogenesis last the longest. In this paper, sample events of each type are selected and examined to explore characteristics observed from in situ and remote-sensing measurements. These characteristics include the lasting period, surface wind speeds, areas affected, average loading on ground-based optical and/or air quality measurements, peak loading on ground-based optical and/or air quality measurements, and loading on satellite-based aerosol optical depth. Based on these analyses, we compare the characteristics of the same dust events captured in different data sets in order to define the dust identification criteria. The analyses show that the variability in mass concentrations captured by in situ measurements is consistent with the variability in AOD from stationary and satellite observations. Our analyses also find that different data sets are capable of identifying certain common characteristics, while each data set also provides specific information about a dust storm event. For example, the meteorological data are good at identifying the lasting period and area impacted by a dust event; the ground-based air quality and optical measurements can capture the peak

  20. Airborne mass spectrometers: four decades of atmospheric and space research at the Air Force research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A A; Hunton, D E

    1999-11-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile research tool that has proved to be extremely useful for exploring the fundamental nature of the earth's atmosphere and ionosphere and in helping to solve operational problems facing the Air Force and the Department of Defense. In the past 40 years, our research group at the Air Force Research Laboratory has flown quadrupole mass spectrometers of many designs on nearly 100 sounding rockets, nine satellites, three Space Shuttles and many missions of high-altitude research aircraft and balloons. We have also used our instruments in ground-based investigations of rocket and jet engine exhaust, combustion chemistry and microwave breakdown chemistry. This paper is a review of the instrumentation and techniques needed for space research, a summary of the results from many of the experiments, and an introduction to the broad field of atmospheric and space mass spectrometry in general.

  1. Turbulent heat and mass transfers across a thermally stratified air-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitrakis, Y. A.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.; Wu, J.

    1986-01-01

    Rates of heat and mass transfer across an air-water interface were measured in a wind-wave research facility, under various wind and thermal stability conditions (unless otherwise noted, mass refers to water vapor). Heat fluxes were obtained from both the eddy correlation and the profile method, under unstable, neutral, and stable conditions. Mass fluxes were obtained only under unstable stratification from the profile and global method. Under unstable conditions the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers remain fairly constant and equal to 0.74, whereas the rate of mass transfer varies linearly with bulk Richardson number. Under stable conditions the turbulent Prandtl number rises steadily to a value of 1.4 for a bulk Richardson number of about 0.016. Results of heat and mass transfer, expressed in the form of bulk aerodynamic coefficients with friction velocity as a parameter, are also compared with field data.

  2. Measuring Air-water Interfacial Area for Soils Using the Mass Balance Surfactant-tracer Method

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Juliana B.; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention. PMID:25950136

  3. Effect of Chord Size on Weight and Cooling Characteristics of Air-Cooled Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esgar, Jack B; Schum, Eugene F; Curren, Arthur N

    1958-01-01

    An analysis has been made to determine the effect of chord size on the weight and cooling characteristics of shell-supported, air-cooled gas-turbine blades. In uncooled turbines with solid blades, the general practice has been to design turbines with high aspect ratio (small blade chord) to achieve substantial turbine weight reduction. With air-cooled blades, this study shows that turbine blade weight is affected to a much smaller degree by the size of the blade chord.

  4. Continental Land Mass Air Traffic Control (COLM ATC). [using three artificial satellite configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecar, J. A.; Henrich, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The application of various satellite systems and techniques relative to providing air traffic control services for the continental United States was studied. Three satellite configurations were reviewed. The characteristics and capabilities of the satellites are described. The study includes consideration for the various ranging waveforms, multiple access alternatives, and the power and bandwidth required as a function of the number of users.

  5. Establishing Lagrangian Connections between Observations within Air Masses Crossing the Atlantic during the ICARTT Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Methven, J.; Arnold, S. R.; Stohl, A.; Evans, M. J.; Avery, M.; Law, K.; Lewis, A. C.; Monks, P. S.; Parrish, D.; Reeves, C.; Schlager, H.; Atlas, E.; Blake, D.; Coe, H.; Cohen, R. C.; Crosier, J.; Flocke, F.; Holloway, J. S.; Hopkins, J. R.; Huber, G.; McQuaid, J.; Purvis, R.; Rappengluck, B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sachse, G. W.

    2006-01-01

    The International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT)-Lagrangian experiment was conceived with an aim to quantify the effects of photochemistry and mixing on the transformation of air masses in the free troposphere away from emissions. To this end attempts were made to intercept and sample air masses several times during their journey across the North Atlantic using four aircraft based in New Hampshire (USA), Faial (Azores) and Creil (France). This article begins by describing forecasts using two Lagrangian models that were used to direct the aircraft into target air masses. A novel technique is then used to identify Lagrangian matches between flight segments. Two independent searches are conducted: for Lagrangian model matches and for pairs of whole air samples with matching hydrocarbon fingerprints. The information is filtered further by searching for matching hydrocarbon samples that are linked by matching trajectories. The quality of these coincident matches is assessed using temperature, humidity and tracer observations. The technique pulls out five clear Lagrangian cases covering a variety of situations and these are examined in detail. The matching trajectories and hydrocarbon fingerprints are shown and the downwind minus upwind differences in tracers are discussed.

  6. MISR Aerosol Air Mass Type Mapping over Mega-City: Validation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Most aerosol air-quality monitoring in mega-city environments is done from scattered ground stations having detailed chemical and optical sampling capabilities. Satellite instruments such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) can retrieve total-column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), along with some information about particle microphysical properties. Although the particle property information from MISR is much less detailed than that obtained from the ground sampling stations, the coverage is extensive, making it possible to put individual surface observations into the context of regional aerosol air mass types. This paper presents an analysis of MISR aerosol observations made coincident with aircraft and ground-based instruments during the INTEX-B field campaign. These detailed comparisons of satellite aerosol property retrievals against dedicated field measurements provide the opportunity to validate the retrievals quantitatively at a regional level, and help to improve aerosol representation in retrieval algorithms. Validation of MISR retrieved AOD and other aerosol properties over the INTEX-B study region in and around Mexico City will be presented. MISR’s ability to distinguish among aerosol air mass types will be discussed. The goal of this effort is to use the MISR aerosol property retrievals for mapping both aerosol air mass type and AOD gradients in mega-city environments over the decade-plus that MISR has made global observations.

  7. Characteristics and performance of several mass spectrometer residual gas analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultzman, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The operation and properties of various mass-spectrometer residual gas analyzers for use in vacuum measurements were analyzed in terms of efficiencies of ion extraction, ion separation and transmission, and ion collection. Types of instruments studied were magnetic sector, omegatron, quadrupole, and monopole. Experimental results presented include absolute sensitivity to argon, relative sensitivity to 10 gases, and cracking patterns for these gases. It is shown that the properties are strongly dependent on instrument range, resolution, and the particular voltages, currents, or field intensities used to control the instrument.

  8. Characteristics of short dc glow microdischarges in atmospheric pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly

    2013-09-01

    The main reason that high pressure current-carrying plasmas tend to be unstable is various instability (primarily thermal) of the positive column (PC). So a promising approach is to use short (without PC) discharges that have growing voltage-current characteristic (VAC). These discharges are ignited near the minimum of the Paschen breakdown curve Lmin and it usually have a gap pL <10-20 cm Torr when a distinct PC is absent. In this report the most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded (or thin rod) anode, which located to a distance less than Lmin when the microdischarge ``choose'' their length itself, so that to match the stable work near Lmin by changing their binding on the anode. For simulations we used 2D hybrid model. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region, in which the electric field is distributed no uniformly and plasma is nonlocal. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. Work supported by FZP and SPbSU.

  9. Stable isotope composition of waters in the Great Basin, United States 1. Air-mass trajectories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Harris, J.M.; Smith, G.I.; Johnson, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Isentropic trajectories, calculated using the NOAA/Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory's isentropic transport model, were used to determine air-parcel origins and the influence of air mass trajectories on the isotopic composition of precipitation events that occurred between October 1991 and September 1993 at Cedar City, Utah, and Winnemucca, Nevada. Examination of trajectories that trace the position of air parcels backward in time for 10 days indicated five distinct regions of water vapor origin: (1) Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific, (2) central Pacific, (3) tropical Pacific, (4) Gulf of Mexico, and (5) continental land mass. Deuterium (??D) and oxygen-18 (??18O) analyses were made of precipitation representing 99% of all Cedar City events. Similar analyses were made on precipitation representing 66% of the precipitation falling at Winnemucca during the same period. The average isotopic composition of precipitation derived from each water vapor source was determined. More than half of the precipitation that fell at both sites during the study period originated in the tropical Pacific and traveled northeast to the Great Basin; only a small proportion traversed the Sierra Nevada. The isotopic composition of precipitation is determined by air-mass origin and its track to the collection station, mechanism of droplet formation, reequilibration within clouds, and evaporation during its passage from cloud to ground. The Rayleigh distillation model can explain the changes in isotopic composition of precipitation as an air mass is cooled pseudo-adiabatically during uplift. However, the complicated processes that take place in the rapidly convecting environment of cumulonimbus and other clouds that are common in the Great Basin, especially in summer, require modification of this model because raindrops that form in the lower portion of those clouds undergo isotopic change as they are elevated to upper levels of the clouds from where they eventually drop to the

  10. Source areas and trajectories of nucleating air masses within and near the Carpathian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Z.; Salma, I.

    2014-04-01

    Particle number size distributions were measured by differential mobility particle sizer in the diameter range of 6-1000 nm in the near-city background and city centre of Budapest continuously for two years. The city is situated in the middle part of the Carpathian Basin, which is a topographically discrete unit in the southeast Central Europe. Yearly mean nucleation frequencies and uncertainties for the near-city background and city centre were (28+6/-4) % and (27+9/-4) %, respectively. Total numbers of days with continuous and uninterrupted growth process were 43 and 31, respectively. These events and their properties were utilised to investigate if there are any specific tracks and/or separable source regions for the nucleating air masses within or near the basin. Local wind speed and direction data indicated that there seem to be differences between the nucleation and growth intervals and non-nucleation days. For further analysis, backward trajectories were generated by a simple air parcel trajectory model. Start and end time parameters of the nucleation, and end time parameter of the particle growth were derived by a standardized procedure based on examining the channel contents of the contour plots. These parameters were used to specify a segment on each air mass trajectory that is associated with the track of the nucleating air mass. The results indicated that the nucleation events happened in the continental boundary layer mostly within the Carpathian Basin but the most distant trajectories originated outside of the basin. The tracks of the nucleating air masses were predominantly associated with NW and SE geographical fields, while the source areas that could be separated were frequently situated in the NW and NE quarters. Many of them were within or close to large forested territories. The results also emphasize that the new particle formation and growth phenomenon that occurs in the region influences larger territories than the Carpathian Basin.

  11. Seasonal air and water mass redistribution effects on LAGEOS and Starlette

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roberto; Wilson, Clark R.

    1987-01-01

    Zonal geopotential coefficients have been computed from average seasonal variations in global air and water mass distribution. These coefficients are used to predict the seasonal variations of LAGEOS' and Starlette's orbital node, the node residual, and the seasonal variation in the 3rd degree zonal coefficient for Starlette. A comparison of these predictions with the observed values indicates that air pressure and, to a lesser extent, water storage may be responsible for a large portion of the currently unmodeled variation in the earth's gravity field.

  12. Improving Hydrological Models by Applying Air Mass Boundary Identification in a Precipitation Phase Determination Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiccabrino, James; Lundberg, Angela; Sandström, Nils

    2013-04-01

    Many hydrological models determine precipitation phase using surface weather station data. However, there are a declining number of augmented weather stations reporting manually observed precipitation phases, and a large number of automated observing systems (AOS) which do not report precipitation phase. Automated precipitation phase determination suffers from low accuracy in the precipitation phase transition zone (PPTZ), i.e. temperature range -1° C to 5° C where rain, snow and mixed precipitation is possible. Therefore, it is valuable to revisit surface based precipitation phase determination schemes (PPDS) while manual verification is still widely available. Hydrological and meteorological approaches to PPDS are vastly different. Most hydrological models apply surface meteorological data into one of two main PPDS approaches. The first is a single rain/snow threshold temperature (TRS), the second uses a formula to describe how mixed precipitation phase changes between the threshold temperatures TS (below this temperature all precipitation is considered snow) and TR (above this temperature all precipitation is considered rain). However, both approaches ignore the effect of lower tropospheric conditions on surface precipitation phase. An alternative could be to apply a meteorological approach in a hydrological model. Many meteorological approaches rely on weather balloon data to determine initial precipitation phase, and latent heat transfer for the melting or freezing of precipitation falling through the lower troposphere. These approaches can improve hydrological PPDS, but would require additional input data. Therefore, it would be beneficial to link expected lower tropospheric conditions to AOS data already used by the model. In a single air mass, rising air can be assumed to cool at a steady rate due to a decrease in atmospheric pressure. When two air masses meet, warm air is forced to ascend the more dense cold air. This causes a thin sharp warming (frontal

  13. Facility monitoring of chemical warfare agent simulants in air using an automated, field-deployable, miniature mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonell N; Noll, Robert J; Cooks, R Graham

    2011-05-30

    Vapors of four chemical warfare agent (CWA) stimulants, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), diethyl malonate (DEM), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), and methyl salicylate (MeS), were detected, identified, and quantitated using a fully automated, field-deployable, miniature mass spectrometer. Samples were ionized using a glow discharge electron ionization (GDEI) source, and ions were mass analyzed with a cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer. A dual-tube thermal desorption system was used to trap compounds on 50:50 Tenax TA/Carboxen 569 sorbent before their thermal release. The sample concentrations ranged from low parts per billion [ppb] to two parts per million [ppm]. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.26 to 5.0 ppb. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are presented for each analyte. A sample of CEES at low ppb concentration was combined separately with two interferents, bleach (saturated vapor) and diesel fuel exhaust (1%), as a way to explore the capability of detecting the simulant in an environmental matrix. Also investigated was a mixture of the four CWA simulants (at concentrations in air ranging from 270 to 380 ppb). Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectral data were used to identify and quantify the individual components.

  14. Characteristics of indoor radon and its progeny in a Japanese dwelling while using air appliances.

    PubMed

    Pornnumpa, C; Tokonami, S; Sorimachi, A; Kranrod, C

    2015-11-01

    Characteristics of radon and its progeny were investigated in different air conditions by turning four types of indoor air appliances on and off in a two-story concrete Japanese dwelling. The four appliances were air conditioner, air cleaner, gas heater and cooker hood. The measurements were done using two devices: (1) a Si-based semiconductor detector for continuous measurement of indoor radon concentration and (2) a ZnS(Ag) scintillation counting system for equilibrium-equivalent radon concentration. Throughout the entire experiment, the cooker hood was the most effective in decreasing indoor radon concentration over a long period of time and the less effective was the air conditioner, while the air cleaner and gas heater did not affect the concentration of radon. However, the results measured in each air condition will differ according to the lifestyles and activities of the inhabitants. In this study, indoor radon and its progeny in a Japanese dwelling will be characterised by the different air conditions.

  15. Mixing characteristics of pulsed air-assist liquid jet into an internal subsonic cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inchul; Kang, Youngsu; Koo, Jaye

    2010-04-01

    Penetration depth, spray dispersion angle, droplet sizes in breakup processes and atomization processes are very important parameters in combustor of air-breathing engine. These processes will enhance air/fuel mixing inside the combustor. Experimental results from the pulsed air-assist liquid jet injected into a cross-flow are investigated. And experiments were conducted to a range of cross-flow velocities from 42˜136 m/s. Air is injected with 0˜300kPa, with air-assist pulsation frequency of 0˜20Hz. Pulsation frequency was modulated by solenoid valve. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer(PDPA) was utilized to quantitatively measuring droplet characteristics. High-speed CCD camera was used to obtain injected spray structure. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will offer rapid mixing and good liquid jet penetration. Air-assist makes a very fine droplet which generated mist-like spray. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will introduce additional supplementary turbulent mixing and control of penetration depth into a cross-flow field. The results show that pulsation frequency has an effect on penetration, transverse velocities and droplet sizes. The experimental data generated in these studies are used for a development of active control strategies to optimize the liquid jet penetration in subsonic cross-flow conditions and predict combustion low frequency instability.

  16. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  17. Mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air-masses detected with CRISTA-NF during AMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, K.; Guenther, G.; Hoffmann, L.; Konopka, P.; Riese, M.

    2009-04-01

    CRISTA-NF (CRyogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere - New Frontiers) is an infrared limb sounding instrument installed onbord the high-flying research aircraft M55-Geophysica and took part in the AMMA-SCOUT measurement campaign in Summer 2006. During the test flight on 29th of July 2006, CRISTA-NF detected a sharp boundary between ozone rich air over northernItaly and ozone poor air over southern Italy and the Mediterranean Sea. The structure is also clearly visible in the HNO3 distribution. The air mass boundary extends from about 10km altitude to the thermal tropopause at about 16km altitude with indication for mixing in the lower part of this altitude range. This is supported by enhanced values of PAN and water vapour found. The observed structure is also visible in the CLaMS (Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere) ozone distribution but hardly resolved in ECMWF forecast data. Backward trajectories show that the ozone rich air is originated westwards, between 40 and 60oN while the ozone poor air is coming from the south-east, at about 0-20oN and has a younger age of air. In the presentation details of the CRISTA-NF measurements and retrieval procedures as well as the origin of the trace gas structures will be discussed.

  18. Quantitative comparison of a flared and a standard heated metal capillary inlet with a voltage-assisted air amplifier on an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Muddiman, David C

    2007-01-01

    The performance characteristics (i.e., ion abundance and electrospray ion current) of a flared and blunt-ended heated metal capillary were evaluated with a voltage-assisted air amplifier on a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ-MS). The results demonstrated that a standard capillary afforded higher ion abundance than a flared capillary, thus further work is necessary to investigate conditions for which significant benefits with the flared capillary will be observed. The compatibility of a voltage-assisted air amplifier is explored for both types of capillaries and in all cases resulted in improved ion abundance and spray current.

  19. Overview of aerosol properties associated with air masses sampled by the ATR-42 during the EUCAARI campaign (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumeyrolle, S.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Burkhart, J. F.; Stohl, A.; Gomes, L.; Quennehen, B.; Roberts, G.; Weigel, R.; Roger, J. C.; Villani, P.; Pichon, J. M.; Bourrianne, T.; Laj, P.

    2012-04-01

    Within the frame of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) project the Météo-France aircraft ATR-42 performed 22 research flights, over central Europe and the North Sea during the intensive observation period in May 2008. For the campaign, the ATR-42 was equipped in order to study aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, as well as cloud microphysics. During the campaign, continental air masses from Eastern and Western Europe were encountered, along with polar and Scandinavian air masses. For the 22 research flights, retroplume analyses along the flight tracks were performed with FLEXPART in order to classify air masses into five sectors of origin which allows for a qualitative evaluation of emission influence on the respective air parcel. In the polluted boundary layer (BL), typical concentrations of particles with diameters larger than 10 nm (N10) are of the order of 5000-6000 cm-3, whereas N10 concentrations of clean air masses were lower than 1300 cm-3. The detection of the largest particle number concentrations occurred in air masses coming from Polar and Scandinavian regions for which an elevated number of nucleation mode (25-28 nm) particles was observed and attributed to new particle formation over open sea. In the free troposphere (FT), typical observed N10 are of the order of 900 cm-3 in polluted air masses and 400-600 cm-3 in clean air masses, respectively. In both layers, the chemical composition of submicron aerosol particles is dominated by organic matter and nitrate in polluted air masses, while, sulphate and ammonium followed by organics dominate the submicron aerosols in clean air masses. The highest CCN/CN ratios were observed within the polar air masses while the CCN concentration values are the highest within the polluted air masses. Within the five air mass sectors defined and the two layers (BL and FT), observations have been distinguished into anticyclonic (first half of May 2008) and cyclonic

  20. Enhancement of acidic gases in biomass burning impacted air masses over Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefer, B. L.; Talbot, R. W.; Harriss, R. C.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Olson, J. O.; Sachse, G. W.; Collins, J.; Shipham, M. A.; Blake, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Biomass-burning impacted air masses sampled over central and eastern Canada during the summer of 1990 as part of ABLE 3B contained enhanced mixing ratios of gaseous HNO3, HCOOH, CH3COOH, and what appears to be (COOH)2. These aircraft-based samples were collected from a variety of fresh burning plumes and more aged haze layers from different source regions. Values of the enhancement factor, delta X/delta CO, where X represents an acidic gas, for combustion-impacted air masses sampled both near and farther away from the fires, were relatively uniform. However, comparison of carboxylic acid emission ratios measured in laboratory fires to field plume enhancement factors indicates significant in-plume production of HCOOH. Biomass-burning appears to be an important source of HNO3, HCOOH, and CH3COOH to the troposphere over subarctic Canada.

  1. Ozone and Trace Gas Trends in the UK and Links to Changing Air Mass Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Z.; Monks, P. S.; Reeves, C.; Bohnenstengel, S.

    2014-12-01

    Trace gas measurements from UK measurement sites on the North Sea coast and in central London reveal a complicated relationship between NO2, CO, hydrocarbons and ozone. Due to the location of the sites, they receive air masses from the UK, Europe, the North sea, Scandinavia and the Arctic and Atlantic Seas and any seasonality is hard to discern. The transport pathway of air masses that can change on an hourly timescale clearly influences the trace gas levels. Investigations into how the transport pathways have changed over the years, using the NAME dispersion model try to elucidate whether it is the 'where' (transport pathway) or the 'what' (trace gas emissions) that is leading to the ozone trends recorded over the past few years.

  2. Cold energy release characteristics of an ice/air direct contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Akiyoshi; Yanadori, Michio; Iwabuchi, Kunihiko; Kimura, Toshikatsu; Tsubota, Yuji

    1998-12-31

    This paper deals with the cold energy release characteristics of an ice/air direct contact heat exchanger in a refined cold energy conveyance system. Characteristics of the outlet temperature, the humidity, and time history of released heat are examined when the initial height of the ice-cube-packed bed in the heat exchanger is changed. The following are the results obtained in these experiments: (1) Inlet air of 30 C is lowered to about 0 C by passing the air through the heat exchanger, and absolute humidity of the outlet air is reduced to about a quarter of that of the inlet air. (2) There is an optimum height of the ice-cube-packed bed for maximizing the amount of cold energy released. (3) This heat exchange method can supply about twice the amount of cold energy released by an ordinary fin-tube-type heat exchanger even if the air velocity in the heat exchanger is reduced to about 0.38 times that of the fin-tube-type heat exchanger.

  3. Toward a better understanding of the impact of mass transit air pollutants on human health.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kumar, Pawan; Szulejko, Jan E; Adelodun, Adedeji A; Junaid, Muhammad Faisal; Uchimiya, Minori; Chambers, Scott

    2017-05-01

    Globally, modern mass transport systems whether by road, rail, water, or air generate airborne pollutants in both developing and developed nations. Air pollution is the primary human health concern originating from modern transportation, particularly in densely-populated urban areas. This review will specifically focus on the origin and the health impacts of carbonaceous traffic-related air pollutants (TRAP), including particulate matter (PM), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and elemental carbon (EC). We conclude that the greatest current challenge regarding urban TRAP is understanding and evaluating the human health impacts well enough to set appropriate pollution control measures. Furthermore, we provide a detailed discussion regarding the effects of TRAP on local environments and pedestrian health in low and high traffic-density environments.

  4. Estimation of whole lemon mass transfer parameters during hot air drying using different modelling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi; Ghanbarian, Davoud; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2015-08-01

    To design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments, accurate values of mass transfer parameters is of great importance. In this study, an experimental and theoretical investigation of drying whole lemons was carried out. The whole lemons were dried in a convective hot air dryer at different air temperatures (50, 60 and 75 °C) and a constant air velocity (1 m s-1). In theoretical consideration, three moisture transfer models including Dincer and Dost model, Bi- G correlation approach and conventional solution of Fick's second law of diffusion were used to determine moisture transfer parameters and predict dimensionless moisture content curves. The predicted results were then compared with the experimental data and the higher degree of prediction accuracy was achieved by the Dincer and Dost model.

  5. Pump hump characteristic research based on mass transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. M.; Zhao, Y. Z.; Liu, X. B.; Ma, Y.; Wang, W. F.

    2015-01-01

    The current development of modern pumped storage plants aims towards a higher flexibility in operation, an extended operation range of the hydraulic machine (especially in the pumping mode), and a higher reliability. The pumping requirements are the crucial design drivers, since, even if the turbine mode performance is very sound, the success of a project depends also on the pump turbine delivering the required maximum pump head and starting reliably in pump mode. Pump hump (pump instability working points at highest head) which is an instability source to the pump-turbine vibration is a serious damage to the pump operation on high head. So the pump hump and cavitation number based on the numerical simulation and experiment results are shown in this paper. The pump hump is sensitive affected by the cavitation number. With the cavitation number decreasing, the hump on flow characteristic curve (e.g. head-flow rate curve, H-Q curve) is gradually decreasing until vanished. Predicting cavitating flows with multi-phase CFD computations is still a very challenging task. Some results of ongoing work in this field are presented. The hump on H-Q curve with cavitation number is discussed in this paper.

  6. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B; Monje, O; Tanner, B

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  7. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  8. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. X.; Liu, Z. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, A. J.; Li, D.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2016-04-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H+, nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2- and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios.

  9. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D. X.; Liu, Z. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, A. J.; Li, D.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H+, nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2− and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios. PMID:27033381

  10. The mass murderer history: modern classifications, sociodemographic and psychopathological characteristics, suicidal dimensions, and media contagion of mass murders.

    PubMed

    Auxemery, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Multicide and other mass killings are sufficiently dramatic to excite great interest from clinicians, criminologists and behavioral scientists. This paper revisits the history of the mass murderer, an entity that has progressively distinguished itself from the serial killer. The functional difference between mass and serial homicide is quite obvious, particularly in setting, time, victim status and modus operandi. Classification of these acts requires a number of parameters. The causes of mass murders are multiple and complex: although they rarely seem to be related to psychotic mental pathologies, they are always an expression of suffering that manifests itself in a psychological crisis that is both homicidal and suicidal. Several research teams have studied the sociodemographic and etiopathogenic characteristics of mass murderers and, in particular, the perpetrators of school killings. In addition to prevalent personality traits, these actions often jointly include suicides and homicides, which are brought together in the same psychic crisis. In keeping with the theory of little identity support, previous crimes influenced some mass murderers. Suicides and mass-murders are likely to be imitated. The media appears to play a crucial role in preventing the occurrence of imitation or copycat tragedies. The WHO recommendation regarding how to transcribe suicide and by extension, homicide, in the media is necessary.

  11. Characteristics of micro air plasma produced by double femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Wu, Zehua; Xu, Kuanhong; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2012-01-30

    Dynamic characteristics of air plasma generated by focused double collinear femtosecond laser pulses with a time interval of 10 ns are experimentally investigated. The air plasma emission changes significantly when altering the energy ratio between the two laser pulses. Time-resolved shadowgraphic measurements reveal that a small volume of transient vacuum is formed inside the air shock wave produced by the first laser pulse, which causes the second laser pulse induced ionization zone to present as two separate sections in space. Also recorded is strong scattering of the second laser pulse by the ionized air just behind the ionization front of the first laser pulse produced shock wave. Due to the high intensity of the scattered light, coherent Thomson scattering enhanced by plasma instabilities is believed to be the main scattering mechanism in this case.

  12. Correlation analysis of transient heat transfer characteristics for air precooling aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chaohong; Zeng, Miao; Lu, Fei; Tang, Dawei; Guan, Wei; Li, Li; Fu, Tingwu

    2017-04-01

    In dam works, air precooling of aggregate is a common and effective method to avoid temperature cracks in concrete structure. In order to offer a reliable design theory for the air precooling process to avoid unreasonable energy consumption, the transient heat transfer characteristics of the aggregate are intensively analyzed. The combined structure of the aggregate and the interstitial space in the hopper is treated as a porous structure, and the space-average method is used to simulate the transient heat transfer process. Simulation results show that size of the hopper and the average air velocity in the cross section have great influence on the transient heat transfer process of the aggregate, while the porosity in the range of 0.4‒0.5 has little influence. Nomograms are abstracted from simulation results, and then correlations of the compared excess temperature are precisely fitted to predict the air precooling transient heat transfer process of the aggregate.

  13. Influence of humidity on the characteristics of negative corona discharge in air

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Pengfei Zhang, Bo He, Jinliang Chen, Shuiming

    2015-09-15

    Detailed negative corona discharge characteristics, such as the pulse amplitude, repetition frequency, average corona current, rise time, and half-wave time, are systematically studied under various air humidities with a single artificial defect electrode. The experimental result reveals that the pulse amplitude increases with the increase of air humidity; meanwhile, the repetition frequency deceases as the air humidity increases. Empirical formulae are first established for the pulse amplitude and repetition frequency with the humidity factor taken into consideration. The effective ionization integral is calculated and a positive correlation is found between the integral and the pulse amplitude. Furthermore, a simplified negative-ion cloud model is built up to investigate the mechanism of the humidity's influence on negative corona discharge. Based on the theoretical analyses, the correlation between pulse amplitude, repetition frequency, and air humidity is well explained.

  14. Mass Spectrometric Characteristics of Prenylated Indole Derivatives from Marine-Derived Penicillium sp. NH-SL.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2017-03-22

    Two prenylated indole alkaloids were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of a marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. NH-SL and one of them exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells. In order to detect other bioactive analogs, we used liquid chromatogram tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to analyze the mass spectrometric characteristics of the isolated compounds as well as the crude extracts. As a result, three other analogs were detected, and their structures were deduced according to the similar fragmentation patterns. This is the first systematic report on the mass spectrometric characteristics of prenylated indole derivatives.

  15. Mass Spectrometric Characteristics of Prenylated Indole Derivatives from Marine-Derived Penicillium sp. NH-SL

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2017-01-01

    Two prenylated indole alkaloids were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of a marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. NH-SL and one of them exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells. In order to detect other bioactive analogs, we used liquid chromatogram tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to analyze the mass spectrometric characteristics of the isolated compounds as well as the crude extracts. As a result, three other analogs were detected, and their structures were deduced according to the similar fragmentation patterns. This is the first systematic report on the mass spectrometric characteristics of prenylated indole derivatives. PMID:28327529

  16. Characteristics of Gaseous Diffusion Flames with High Temperature Combustion Air in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaderi, M.; Gupta, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of gaseous diffusion flames have been obtained using high temperature combustion air under microgravity conditions. The time resolved flame images under free fall microgravity conditions were obtained from the video images obtained. The tests results reported here were conducted using propane as the fuel and about 1000 C combustion air. The burner included a 0.686 mm diameter central fuel jet injected into the surrounding high temperature combustion air. The fuel jet exit Reynolds number was 63. Several measurements were taken at different air preheats and fuel jet exit Reynolds number. The resulting hybrid color flame was found to be blue at the base of the flame followed by a yellow color flame. The length and width of flame during the entire free fall conditions has been examined. Also the relative flame length and width for blue and yellow portion of the flame has been examined under microgravity conditions. The results show that the flame length decreases and width increases with high air preheats in microgravity condition. In microgravity conditions the flame length is larger with normal temperature combustion air than high temperature air.

  17. Characterization of key aerosol, trace gas and meteorological properties and particle formation and growth processes dependent on air mass origins in coastal Southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesch, J.; Drewnick, F.; Sinha, V.; Williams, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical composition and concentration of aerosols at a certain site can vary depending on season, the air mass source region and distance from sources. Regardless of the environment, new particle formation (NPF) events are one of the major sources for ultrafine particles which are potentially hazardous to human health. Grown particles are optically active and efficient CCN resulting in important implications for visibility and climate (Zhang et al., 2004). The study presented here is intended to provide information about various aspects of continental, urban and marine air masses reflected by wind patterns of the air arriving at the measurement site. Additionally we will be focusing on NPF events associated with different types of air masses affecting their emergence and temporal evolution. Measurements of the ambient aerosol, various trace gases and meteorological parameters were performed within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) project. The field campaign took place from mid-November to mid-December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville) and the Atlantic Ocean. Number and mass as well as PAH and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distribution instruments covered the size range 6 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). In order to evaluate the characteristics of different air masses linking local and regional sources as well as NPF processes, characteristic air mass types were classified dependent on backwards trajectory pathways and local meteorology. Large nuclei mode concentrations in the number size distribution were found within continental and urban influenced air mass types due to frequently occurring NPF events. Exploring individual production and sink variables, sulfuric

  18. Small-size mass spectrometer for determining gases and volatile compounds in air during breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, V. T.; Kozlenok, A. V.; Chichagov, Yu. V.; Antonov, A. S.; Lebedev, D. S.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Moroshkin, V. S.; Berezina, A. V.; Viktorova-Leclerc, O. S.; Vlasov, S. A.; Tubol'tsev, Yu. V.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an automated mass spectrometer for diagnostics of deceases from the composition of exhaled air. It includes a capillary system, which performs a rapid direct feeding of the sample to the instrument without changing substantially its composition and serves for studying the dynamics of variation of the ratio between various components of exhaled air. The membrane system for introducing the sample is intended for determining low concentrations of volatile organic compounds which are biomarkers of pathologies. It is characterized by selective transmittance and ensures the detection limits of target compounds at the parts per million-parts per billion (ppm-ppb) level. A static mass analyzer operating on permanent magnets possesses advantages important for mobile devices as compared to its dynamic analogs: it is more reliable in operation, has a larger dynamic range, and can be used for determining the concentration of components in the mixture one-by-one or simultaneously. The curvilinear output boundary of the magnetic lens of the mass analyzer makes it possible to reduce its weight and size by 2.5 times without deteriorating the mass resolution. We report on the results of testing of the instrument and consider the possibility of its application for early detection of deceases of respiratory and blood circulation system, gastrointestinal tract, and endocrine system.

  19. Analytical Modeling of Operating Characteristics of Premixing-prevaporizing Fuel-air Mixing Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1983-01-01

    A model for predicting the distribution of liquid fuel droplets and fuel vapor in premixing-prevaporizing fuel-air mixing passages of the direct injection type is described. This model consists of three computer programs: a calculation of the two dimensional or axisymmetric air flow field neglecting the effects of fuel; a calculation of the three dimensional fuel droplet trajectories and evaporation rates in a known, moving air flow; and a calculation of fuel vapor diffusing into a moving three dimensional air flow with source terms dependent on the droplet evaporation rates. The air flow calculation can treat compressible swirling flows in arbitrary ducts with arbitrary distributions of temperature and velocity as initial conditions. The fuel droplets are treated as initial conditions. The fuel droplets are treated as individual particle classes each satisfying Newton's law, a heat transfer, and a mass transfer equation. The vapor diffusion calculation treats three dimensional, gas phase, turbulent diffusion processes with the turbulence level determined by the air flow calculations and the source terms determined by the droplet evaporation rates.

  20. Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics of aeroassist flight experiment configuration in air and CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.; Wells, William L.

    1993-01-01

    Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics measured on a 60 deg half-angle elliptical cone, which was raked at an angle of 73 deg from the cone centerline and with an ellipsoid nose (ellipticity equal to 2.0 in the symmetry plane), are presented for angles of attack from -10 to 10 deg. The high normal-shock density ratio of a real gas was simulated by tests at a Mach number of 6 in air and CF4 (density ratio equal to 5.25 and 12.0, respectively). Tests were conducted in air at Mach 6 and 10 and in CF4 at Mach 6 to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and normal-shock density ratio. Changes in Mach number from 6 to 10 in air or in Reynolds number by a factor of 4 at Mach 6 had a negligible effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Variations in normal-shock density ratio had a measurable effect on lateral and directional aerodynamic coefficients, but no significant effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Tests in air and CF4 indicated that the configuration was laterally and directionally stable through the test range of angle of attack.

  1. Morphology and characteristics of laser-induced aluminum plasma in argon and in air: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xueshi; Cao, Fan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Yanping; Yu, Jin

    2015-11-01

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), ablation takes place in general in an ambient gas of the atmospheric pressure, often in air but also in noble gas such as argon or helium. The use of noble gas is known to significantly improve the performance of the technique. We investigate in this work the morphology and the characteristics of induced plasma in argon and in air. The purpose is to understand the mechanism of the analytical performance improvement by the use of argon ambient with respective to air ambient and the dependence on the other experimental parameters such as the laser fluence. The observation of plasma morphology in different ambient gases provides also information for better design of the detection system which optimizes the signal collection according to the used ambient gases. More specifically, the expansion of the plasma induced on an aluminum target with nanosecond infrared (1064 nm) laser pulse in two ambient gases, argon and the atmospheric air, has been studied with spectroscopic imaging at short delays and with emission spectroscopy at longer delays. With relatively low ablation laser fluence (65 J/cm2), similar morphologies have been observed in argon and in air over the early stage of plasma expansion, while diagnostics at longer delay shows stronger emission, higher electron density and temperature for plasma induced in argon. With higher ablation laser fluence (160 J/cm2) however, different expansion behaviors have been observed, with a stagnating aluminum vapor near the target surface in air while a propagating plume away from the target in argon. The craters left on the target surface show as well corresponding difference: in air, the crater is very shallow with a target surface chaotically affected by the laser pulse, indicating an effective re-deposition of the ablated material back to the crater; while in Ar a deeper crater is observed, indicating an efficient mass removal by laser ablation. At longer delays, a brighter

  2. An explanation of the relationship between mass, metabolic rate and characteristic length for placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Mass, Metabolism and Length Explanation (MMLE) was advanced in 1984 to explain the relationship between metabolic rate and body mass for birds and mammals. This paper reports on a modernized version of MMLE. MMLE deterministically computes the absolute value of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and body mass for individual animals. MMLE is thus distinct from other examinations of these topics that use species-averaged data to estimate the parameters in a statistically best fit power law relationship such as BMR = a(bodymass)b. Beginning with the proposition that BMR is proportional to the number of mitochondria in an animal, two primary equations are derived that compute BMR and body mass as functions of an individual animal’s characteristic length and sturdiness factor. The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal’s means of propulsion. The sturdiness factor expresses how sturdy or gracile an animal is. Eight other parameters occur in the equations that vary little among animals in the same phylogenetic group. The present paper modernizes MMLE by explicitly treating Froude and Strouhal dynamic similarity of mammals’ skeletal musculature, revising the treatment of BMR and using new data to estimate numerical values for the parameters that occur in the equations. A mass and length data set with 575 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Proboscidea is used. A BMR and mass data set with 436 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla and Carnivora is also used. With the estimated parameter values MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every BMR and mass datum from the BMR and mass data set can be computed exactly. Furthermore MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every body mass and length datum from the mass and length data set can be computed exactly. Whether or not MMLE can

  3. Thermal Characteristics of Air in the Problem of Hypersonic Motion of Bodies in the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhussan, K.; Morozov, D. O.; Stankevich, Yu. A.; Stanchits, L. K.; Stepanov, K. L.

    2014-07-01

    The thermal properties of hot air needed for describing the hypersonic motion of bodies in the Earth's atmosphere have been considered. Such motion, as is known, is accompanied by the propagation of strong shock waves analogous to waves generated by powerful explosions. Calculations have been made and data banks have been created for the equations of state and thermal characteristics of air in the temperature and density ranges corresponding to velocities of motion of bodies of up to 10 km/s at altitudes of 0-100 km. The formulation of the problem of hypersonic motion in the absence of thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed.

  4. Chemical characteristics of atmospheric PM2.5 loads during air pollution episodes in Giza, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Salwa K.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.

    2017-02-01

    Several types of pollution episodes, including dust storm (DSs), haze dust (HDs), straw rice combustions (SRCs) are common phenomena and represent severe environmental hazard in Egypt. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of the chemical characteristics of aerosol during air pollution episodes at an urban area in Giza, Egypt. PM2.5 samples during various PM episodes during 2013-2014 were collected and analyzed. Results indicate that the highest PM2.5 mass concentrations were found during DSs (250 μg/m3), followed by HDs (130 μg/m3) and SRCs (103 μg/m3). Average PM2.5 mass concentrations were 1.91, 3.68 and 1.68 times higher than on normal days (NDs) during HDs, DSs and SRCs, respectively. The highest total water-soluble ions concentration was 61.1 μg/m3 during HDs, followed by SRCs (41.9 μg/m3) and DSs (35.2 μg/m3). SO42- is the most abundant chemical components on the three PM episodes. Secondary inorganic ions (NO3-, SO42-, and NH4+) were enriched during HDs. The total secondary inorganic ions concentrations were 3.17, 1.39 and 1.75 times higher than NDs during HDs days, DSs days and SRCs days, respectively. PM from SRCs showed high K+ and Cl-. SO42-/K+, NO3-/SO42- and Cl-/K+ ratios proved effective as indicators for different pollution episodes. A Ca2+/Al ratio indicates that soil dust was dominant during DSs. Ion balance calculations indicated that PM2.5 from HDs was acidic, while the DSs and SRCs particles were alkaline and the NDs particle's was nearly neutral. The total crustal and anthropogenic metals concentrations were higher in DSs than other PM episodes and normal days. The enrichment factors values in PM episodes and normal days indicate that Fe and Mn in NDs, HDs, DSs and SRCs as well as Cr and Ni in DSs come mainly from crustal sources, whereas Cr, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd in PM episodes and NDs are anthropogenic.

  5. The Spatial-Temporal Characteristics of Air Pollution in China from 2001-2014.

    PubMed

    Bao, Junzhe; Yang, Xiping; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Wang, Zhenkun; Yu, Chuanhua; Li, Xudong

    2015-12-15

    To provide some useful information about the control of air pollution in China, we studied the spatial-temporal characteristics of air pollution in China from 2001-2014. First, we drew several line charts and histograms of the Air Pollution Index (API) and Air Quality Index (AQI) of 31 capital cities and municipalities to research the distribution across different times and cities; then, we researched the spatial clustering of API and AQI; finally, we examined the shift of the gravity center of API and AQI in different years and months. The API values had a decreasing trend: the high values had a clustering trend in some northern cities, and the low values had a clustering trend in some southern cities. The AQI values were relatively low, from 15:00-17:00 during the day. The gravity center of API had a trend of moving south from 2001-2003, then fluctuated in an unordered pattern and moved north in the winter. The AQI gravity center did not have a regular shift during different months. In conclusion, the government should take action to mitigate air pollution in some typical cities, as well as air pollution during the winter.

  6. On the origin and destination of atmospheric moisture and air mass over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Xu, Xiang-De; Yang, Shuai; Zhang, Wei

    2012-12-01

    The Tibet Plateau (TP) is a key region that imposes profound impacts on the atmospheric water cycle and energy budget of Asia, even the global climate. In this work, we develop a climatology of origin (destination) of air mass and moisture transported to (from) the TP using a Lagrangian moisture diagnosis combined with the forward and backward atmospheric tracking schemes. The climatology is derived from 6-h particle positions based on 5-year (2005-2009) seasonal summer trajectory dataset from the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART using NCEP/GFS data as input, where the regional model atmosphere was globally filled with particles. The results show that (1) the dominant origin of the moisture supplied to the TP is a narrow tropical-subtropical band in the extended Arabian Sea covering a long distance from the Indian subcontinent to the Southern Hemisphere. Two additional moisture sources are located in the northwestern part of TP and the Bay of Bengal and play a secondary role. This result indicates that the moisture transporting to the TP more depends on the Indian summer monsoon controlled by large-scale circulation. (2) The moisture departing from the TP can be transported rapidly to East Asia, including East China, Korea, Japan, and even East Pacific. The qualitative similarity between the regions of diagnosed moisture loss and the pattern of the observed precipitation highlights the robustness of the role of the TP on precipitation over East Asia. (3) In contrast to the moisture origin confined in the low level, the origin and fate of whole column air mass over the TP is largely controlled by a strong high-level Asian anticyclone. The results show that the TP is a crossroad of air mass where air enters mainly from the northwest and northeast and continues in two separate streams: one goes southwestwards over the Indian Ocean and the other southeastwards through western North Pacific. Both of them partly enter the trade wind zone, which manifests the

  7. Influence of air mass origin on aerosol properties at a remote Michigan forest site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanReken, T. M.; Mwaniki, G. R.; Wallace, H. W.; Pressley, S. N.; Erickson, M. H.; Jobson, B. T.; Lamb, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    The northern Great Lakes region of North America is a large, relatively pristine area. To date, there has only been limited study of the atmospheric aerosol in this region. During summer 2009, a detailed characterization of the atmospheric aerosol was conducted at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) as part of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX). Measurements included particle size distribution, water-soluble composition, and CCN activity. Aerosol properties were strongly dependent on the origin of the air masses reaching the site. For ∼60% of the study period, air was transported from sparsely populated regions to the northwest. During these times aerosol loadings were low, with mean number and volume concentrations of 1630 cm-3 and 1.91 μm3 cm-3, respectively. The aerosol during clean periods was dominated by organics, and exhibited low hygroscopicities (mean κ = 0.18 at s = 0.3%). When air was from more populated regions to the east and south (∼29% of the time), aerosol properties reflected a stronger anthropogenic influence, with 85% greater particle number concentrations, 2.5 times greater aerosol volume, six times more sulfate mass, and increased hygroscopicity (mean k = 0.24 at s = 0.3%). These trends are have the potential to influence forest-atmosphere interactions and should be targeted for future study.

  8. Optimization of solar cells for air mass zero operation and a study of solar cells at high temperatures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, H.; Woodall, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal growth procedures, fabrication techniques, and theoretical analysis were developed in order to make GaAlAs-GaAs solar cell structures which exhibit high performance at air mass 0 illumination and high temperature conditions.

  9. Determination of the effect of transfer between vacuum and air on mass standards of platinum-iridium and stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    This paper reports work undertaken to assess the change in the mass values of stainless steel and platinum-iridium weights transferred between air and vacuum and to determine the repeatability of this change. Sets of kilogram transfer standards, manufactured from stainless steel and platinum-iridium and with different surface areas, were used to determine the effect of transfer between air and vacuum on the values of the mass standards. The SI unit of mass is the only unit of the seven base SI quantities which is still defined in terms of an artefact rather than by relation to a fundamental physical constant. Work is underway to identify a means of deriving the SI unit of mass from fundamental constants and at present the two principal approaches are the International Avogadro Coordination and the watt balance projects. Both of these approaches involve realizing a kilogram in vacuum and therefore the traceability from a kilogram realized in vacuum to mass standards in air is crucial to the effective dissemination of the mass scale. The work reported here characterizes the changes in mass values of standards on transfer between air and vacuum and thus will enable traceability to be established for an in-air mass scale based on a definition of the unit in vacuum.

  10. Effect of the relative optical air mass and the clearness index on solar erythemal UV irradiance.

    PubMed

    Moreno, J C; Serrano, M A; Cañada, J; Gurrea, G; Utrillas, M P

    2014-09-05

    This paper analyses the effects of the clearness index (Kt) and the relative optical air mass (mr) on erythemal UV irradiance (UVER). The UVER measurements were made in Valencia (Spain) from 6:00 am to 6:00 pm between June 2003 and December 2012 and (140,000 data points). Firstly, two models were used to calculate values for the erythemal ultraviolet irradiance clearness index (KtUVER) as a function of the global irradiance clearness index (Kt). Secondly, a potential regression model to measure the KtUVER as a function of the relative optical air mass was studied. The coefficients of this regression were evaluated for clear and cloudy days, as well as for days with high and low ozone levels. Thirdly, an analysis was made of the relationship between the two effects in the experimental database, with it being found that the highest degree of agreement, or the joint highest frequencies, are located in the optical mass range mr∈[1.0, 1.2] and the clearness index range of Kt∈[0.8, 1.0]. This is useful for establishing the ranges of parameters where models are more efficient. Simple equations have been tested that can provide additional information for the engineering projects concerning thermal installations. Fourthly, a high dispersion of radiation data was observed for intermediate values of the clearness for UV and UVER.

  11. Visual Steering and Verification of Mass Spectrometry Data Factorization in Air Quality Research.

    PubMed

    Engel, D; Greff, K; Garth, C; Bein, K; Wexler, A; Hamann, B; Hagen, H

    2012-12-01

    The study of aerosol composition for air quality research involves the analysis of high-dimensional single particle mass spectrometry data. We describe, apply, and evaluate a novel interactive visual framework for dimensionality reduction of such data. Our framework is based on non-negative matrix factorization with specifically defined regularization terms that aid in resolving mass spectrum ambiguity. Thereby, visualization assumes a key role in providing insight into and allowing to actively control a heretofore elusive data processing step, and thus enabling rapid analysis meaningful to domain scientists. In extending existing black box schemes, we explore design choices for visualizing, interacting with, and steering the factorization process to produce physically meaningful results. A domain-expert evaluation of our system performed by the air quality research experts involved in this effort has shown that our method and prototype admits the finding of unambiguous and physically correct lower-dimensional basis transformations of mass spectrometry data at significantly increased speed and a higher degree of ease.

  12. Transport Regimes of Air Masses Affecting the Tropospheric Composition of the Canadian and European Arctic During RACEPAC 2014 and NETCARE 2014/2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozem, H.; Hoor, P. M.; Koellner, F.; Kunkel, D.; Schneider, J.; Schulz, C.; Herber, A. B.; Borrmann, S.; Wendisch, M.; Ehrlich, A.; Leaitch, W. R.; Willis, M. D.; Burkart, J.; Thomas, J. L.; Abbatt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic is warming much faster than any other place in the world and undergoes a rapid change dominated by a changing climate in this region. The impact of polluted air masses traveling to the Arctic from various remote sources significantly contributes to the observed climate change, in contrast there are additional local emission sources contributing to the level of pollutants (trace gases and aerosol). Processes affecting the emission and transport of these pollutants are not well understood and need to be further investigated. We present aircraft based trace gas measurements in the Arctic during RACEPAC (2014) and NETCARE (2014 and 2015) with the Polar 6 aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) covering an area from 134°W to 17°W and 68°N to 83°N. We focus on cloud, aerosol and general transport processes of polluted air masses into the high Arctic. Based on CO and CO2 measurements and kinematic 10-day back trajectories we analyze the transport regimes prevalent during spring (RACEPAC 2014 and NETCARE 2015) and summer (NETCARE 2014) in the observed region. Whereas the eastern part of the Canadian Arctic is affected by air masses with their origin in Asia, in the central and western parts of the Canadian and European Arctic air masses from North America are predominant at the time of the measurement. In general the more northern parts of the Arctic were relatively unaffected by pollution from mid-latitudes since air masses mostly travel within the polar dome, being quite isolated. Associated mixing ratios of CO and CO2 fit into the seasonal cycle observed at NOAA ground stations throughout the Arctic, but show a more mid-latitudinal characteristic at higher altitudes. The transition is remarkably sharp and allows for a chemical definition of the polar dome. At low altitudes, synoptic disturbances transport polluted air masses from mid-latitudes into regions of the polar dome. These air masses contribute to the Arctic pollution background, but also

  13. Air-mass flux measurement system using Doppler-shifted filtered Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, John A.; Winter, Michael

    1993-01-01

    An optical system has been investigated to measure mass flux distributions in the inlet of a high speed air-breathing propulsion system. Rayleigh scattered light from air is proportional to the number density of molecules and hence can be used to ascertain the gas density in a calibrated system. Velocity field measurements are achieved by spectrally filtering the elastically-scattered Doppler-shifted light with an absorbing molecular filter. A novel anamorphic optical collection system is used which allows optical rays from different scattering angles, that have different Doppler shifts, to be recorded separately. This is shown to obviate the need to tune the laser through the absorption to determine velocities, while retaining the ability to make spatially-resolved measurements along a line. By properly selecting the laser tuning and filter parameters, simultaneous density measurements can be made. These properties are discussed in the paper and experiments demonstrating the velocimetry capability are described.

  14. Characteristics and verification of a car-borne survey system for dose rates in air: KURAMA-II.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Yoshida, T; Tsutsumi, M; Saito, K

    2015-01-01

    The car-borne survey system KURAMA-II, developed by the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, has been used for air dose rate mapping after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. KURAMA-II consists of a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector, a GPS device, and a control device for data processing. The dose rates monitored by KURAMA-II are based on the G(E) function (spectrum-dose conversion operator), which can precisely calculate dose rates from measured pulse-height distribution even if the energy spectrum changes significantly. The characteristics of KURAMA-II have been investigated with particular consideration to the reliability of the calculated G(E) function, dose rate dependence, statistical fluctuation, angular dependence, and energy dependence. The results indicate that 100 units of KURAMA-II systems have acceptable quality for mass monitoring of dose rates in the environment.

  15. The Thermal Performance and Air Leakage Characteristics of Six Log Homes in Idaho.

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Carolyn; Eklund, Ken; Baylon, David

    1993-08-01

    The thermal performance and air leakage characteristics of four electrically heated log houses located in Idaho are summarized. The air leakage and construction characteristics of two additional log homes are also examined. The energy consumption of the four homes was submetered at weekly reporting intervals for up to 16 months. Blower door tests and site audits were performed. In addition, conditions at two of these homes, including heat flux through the log walls, indoor and outdoor temperatures, solar flux and envelope tightness, were measured in detail over several days during winter conditions. The energy use and thermal performance of these two homes were then modeled using SUNCODE-PC, an hourly thermal simulation program employing a finite difference technique.

  16. Current-voltage characteristics of dc corona discharges in air between coaxial cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yuesheng; Zhang, Bo He, Jinliang

    2015-02-15

    This paper presents the experimental measurement and numerical analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of dc corona discharges in air between coaxial cylinders. The current-voltage characteristics for both positive and negative corona discharges were measured within a specially designed corona cage. Then the measured results were fitted by different empirical formulae and analyzed by the fluid model. The current-voltage characteristics between coaxial cylinders can be expressed as I = C(U − U{sub 0}){sup m}, where m is within the range 1.5–2.0, which is similar to the point-plane electrode system. The ionization region has no significant effect on the current-voltage characteristic under a low corona current, while it will affect the distribution for the negative corona under a high corona current. The surface onset fields and ion mobilities were emphatically discussed.

  17. Current-voltage characteristics of dc corona discharges in air between coaxial cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuesheng; Zhang, Bo; He, Jinliang

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the experimental measurement and numerical analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of dc corona discharges in air between coaxial cylinders. The current-voltage characteristics for both positive and negative corona discharges were measured within a specially designed corona cage. Then the measured results were fitted by different empirical formulae and analyzed by the fluid model. The current-voltage characteristics between coaxial cylinders can be expressed as I = C(U - U0)m, where m is within the range 1.5-2.0, which is similar to the point-plane electrode system. The ionization region has no significant effect on the current-voltage characteristic under a low corona current, while it will affect the distribution for the negative corona under a high corona current. The surface onset fields and ion mobilities were emphatically discussed.

  18. Ozone Modulation/Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Hydrocarbon Pollutants in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. B.

    2001-12-01

    Modulation of volatile hydrocarbons in two-component mixtures is demonstrated using an ozonolysis pretreatment with membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS). The MIMS technique allows selective introduction of volatile and semivolatile analytes into a mass spectrometer via processes known collectively as pervaporation [Kotiaho and Cooks, 1992]. A semipermeable polymer membrane acts as an interface between the sample (vapor or solution) and the vacuum of the mass spectrometer. This technique has been demonstrated to allow for sensitive analysis of hydrocarbons and other non-polar volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) in air samples[Cisper et al., 1995] . The methodology has the advantages of no sample pretreatment and short analysis time, which are promising for online monitoring applications but the chief disadvantage of lack of a separation step for the different analytes in a mixture. Several approaches have been investigated to overcome this problem including use of selective chemical ionization [Bier and Cooks, 1987] and multivariate calibration techniques[Ketola et al., 1999] . A new approach is reported for the quantitative measurement of VOCs in complex matrices. The method seeks to reduce the complexity of mass spectra observed in hydrocarbon mixture analysis by selective pretreatment of the analyte mixture. In the current investigation, the rapid reaction of ozone with alkenes is used, producing oxygenated compounds which are suppressed by the MIMS system. This has the effect of removing signals due to unsaturated analytes from the compound mass spectra, and comparison of the spectra before and after the ozone treatment reveals the nature of the parent compounds. In preliminary investigations, ozone reacted completely with cyclohexene from a mixture of cylohexene and cyclohexane, and with β -pinene from a mixture of toluene and β -pinene, suppressing the ion signals from the olefins. A slight attenuation of the cyclohexane and toluene in those

  19. Numerical study on air-structure coupling dynamic characteristics of the axial fan blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Xie, B.; Li, F.; Gu, W. G.

    2013-12-01

    In order to understand the dynamic characteristics of the axial-flow fan blade due to the effect of rotating stress and the action of unsteady aerodynamic forces caused by the airflow, a numerical simulation method for air-structure coupling in an axial-flow fan with fixed rear guide blades was performed. The dynamic characteristics of an axial-flow fan rotating blade were studied by using the two-way air-structure coupling method. Based on the standard k-ε turbulence model, and using weak coupling method, the preceding six orders modal parameters of the rotating blade were obtained, and the distributions of stress and strain on the rotating blade were presented. The results show that the modal frequency from the first to the sixth order is 3Hz higher than the modal frequency without considering air-structure coupling interaction; the maximum stress and the maximum strain are all occurred in the vicinity of root area of the blade no matter the air-structure coupling is considered or not, thus, the blade root is the dangerous location subjected to fatigue break; the position of maximum deformation is at the blade tip, so the vibration of the blade tip is significant. This study can provide theoretical references for the further study on the strength analysis and mechanical optimal design.

  20. Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with Canted Multiple Air Bag Load Alleviation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Investigation of the Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle Having a Canted Multiple Air Bag Load Alleviation System. An investigation was made to determine the landing-impact characteristics of a reentry vehicle having a multiple-air-bag load-alleviation system. A 1/16-scale dynamic model having four canted air bags was tested at flight-path angles of 90 degrees (vertical), 45 degrees, and 27 degrees for a parachute or paraglider vertical letdown velocity of 30 feet per second (full scale). Landings were made on concrete at attitudes ranging from -l5 degrees to 20 degrees. The friction coefficient between the model heat shield and the concrete was approximately 0.4. An aluminum diaphragm, designed to rupture at 10.8 pounds per square inch gage, was used to maintain initial pressure in the air bags for a short time period. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030986. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  1. Heat transfer characteristics of a single circular air jet impinging on a concave hemispherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the local and average heat-transfer characteristics of a single turbulent air jet impinging on the concave surface of a hemisphere. Correlations were developed for expressing the effects of a number of dimensionless variables on the local and average Nusselt numbers. Results of the present study are compared with those from a similar study concerning a concave surface of a semicylindrical shell.

  2. Coupled electrochemical and heat/mass transport characteristics in passive direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong

    This thesis presents both experimental and theoretical investigations of coupled heat/mass transfer and electrochemical characteristics in the passive DMFC. Unlike active fuel cells, which can be operated under stabilized operating conditions, the discharging behavior of the passive DMFC usually varies with time, as the methanol concentration in the fuel reservoir decreases with time. This poses a difficulty in characterizing the performance of the passive DMFC under relatively stable operating conditions. In this work, we found that the performance of the passive DMFC became relatively stable as the cell operating temperature rose to a relatively stable value. This finding indicates that the performance of the passive DMFC can be characterized by collecting polarization data at the instance when the cell operating temperature under the open-circuit condition rises to a relatively stable value. With this proposed standard of passive DMFC performance characterization, the effects of two important parameters, including methanol concentration and cell orientation, on the passive DMFC performance were then investigated. It is found that the cell performance increased with methanol concentration. Unlike previous studies that attributed the improved performance as a result of increasing methanol concentration to the reduced anode mass transport polarization, our experimental results revealed that the improved cell performance was primarily due to the increased cell operating temperature as a result of the increased rate of methanol crossover with high methanol concentration operation. We also found that the performance was sensitive to the cell orientation. The vertical operation always yielded better performance than did the horizontal operation. This can be attributed to the increased operating temperature as a result of a higher rate of methanol crossover, which resulted from the stronger natural convection in the vertical orientation. These parametric studies

  3. Mass-energy metabolic characteristics of algae. [for spacecraft life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, I. V.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical analysis is given for the mass energy characteristics of photosynthesizing algae. An engineering-biological approach to this allows for a detailed analysis of the characteristics for a broad spectrum of environmental situations in which such algae are used as a component of a life support system. Models of such systems are constructed and are employed to demonstrate actual and hypothetical situations. Computers are employed for this purpose.

  4. Hot air drying of apple slices: dehydration characteristics and quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2016-08-01

    The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the drying characteristics and quality attributes of apple slices. The samples were dried at different air temperature levels (50, 60 and 70 °C) and a constant air velocity (1.5 m s-1). It was observed that the drying air temperature affected the dehydration rate significantly. The usefulness of eight different mathematical models to simulate the experimental drying curves was evaluated and the Midilli model provided the best simulation of the samples drying kinetics. The effective moisture diffusivity was determined to be 7.03 × 10-10, 8.48 × 10-10 and 1.08 × 10-9 m2 s-1 for drying air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70 °C, respectively. The shrinkage values of the dried samples at air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70 °C were 74.70, 82.35 and 80.78 %, respectively. The maximum value of rehydration ratio (4.527) and also the minimum value of ∆E (11.27) were obtained for the slices dried at 70 °C.

  5. VOC Composition of Air Masses Transported from Asia to the U.S. West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, B.; Parrish, D.; Holloway, J.; Huebler, G.; Fehsenfeld, F.

    2002-12-01

    Airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were performed using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) operated onboard a NOAA WP-3 aircraft during the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) experiment in 2002. Enhancements of acetone (CH3COCH3), methanol (CH3OH), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and in some cases benzene were observed in air masses that were impacted by outflow from Asia. The enhancement ratios with respect to carbon monoxide are compared to emission factors for fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, which gives some insight into the sources responsible for the pollution. The observed mixing ratios for acetone, methanol and in particular acetonitrile were generally reduced in the marine boundary layer, suggesting the presence of an ocean uptake sink. The ocean uptake of acetonitrile was found to be particularly efficient in a zone with upwelling water off of the U.S. west coast. Reduced mixing ratios of acetone and methanol were observed in a stratospheric intrusion. This observation gives some information about the lifetime of these VOCs in the stratosphere. Enhanced concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were observed in air masses that were impacted by urban sources in California. The ratio between the concentrations of benzene, toluene and higher aromatics indicated the degree of photochemical oxidation. PTR-MS only gives information about the mass of the ions produced by proton-transfer reactions between H3O+ and VOCs in the instrument. The identification of VOCs was confirmed by coupling a gas-chromatographic (GC) column to the instrument and post-flight GC-PTR-MS analyses of canister samples collected during the flights.

  6. Effects of maternal characteristics and climatic variation on birth masses of Alaskan caribou

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence birth mass of mammals provides insights to nutritional trade-offs made by females to optimize their reproduction, growth, and survival. I evaluated variation in birth mass of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in central Alaska relative to maternal characteristics (age, body mass, cohort, and nutritional condition as influenced by winter severity) during 11 years with substantial variation in winter snowfall. Snowfall during gestation was the predominant factor explaining variation in birth masses, influencing birth mass inversely and through interactions with maternal age and lactation status. Maternal age effects were noted for females ??? 5 years old, declining in magnitude with each successive age class. Birth mass as a proportion of autumn maternal mass was inversely related to winter snowfall, even though there was no decrease in masses of adult females in late winter associated with severe winters. I found no evidence of a hypothesized intergenerational effect of lower birth masses for offspring of females born after severe winters. Caribou produce relatively small offspring but provide exceptional lactation support for those that survive. Conservative maternal investment before parturition may represent an optimal reproductive strategy given that caribou experience stochastic variation in winter severity during gestation, uncertainty of environmental conditions surrounding the birth season, and intense predation on neonates. ?? 2005 American Society of Mammalogists.

  7. Air mass characterization during the DAURE field campaign by PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Axel; Schallhart, Simon; Müller, Markus; Hansel, Armin

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere from a wide variety of biogenic and anthropogenic sources. Although some of the sources are well characterized, many uncertainties remain about the fate of these compounds in the atmosphere and their role in organic aerosol formation. Here we present measurements using Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight (PTR-TOF) Mass Spectrometry during the DAURE field campaign ("Determination of the sources of atmospheric Aerosols in Urban and Rural Environments in the western Mediterranean") obtained during February and March 2009. Measurements were performed at a rural mountain site located in the Montseny Natural Park 40 km to the NNE of the city of Barcelona, and 25 km from the Mediterranean coast. Volatile organic compounds where identified and quantified using PTR-TOF with 1 minute time resolution. The instruments mass resolving power of 4000 - 5000 and a mass accuracy of 5 ppm allows for the unambiguous sum-formula identification of e.g. hydrocarbons (HCs) or oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs). The high time resolution allows separating out on site pollution events. Air masses impacted by biomass-burning, urban, marine and vegetation emissions are characterized using tracers like acetonitrile, aromatics, dimethyl sulfide or biogenic compounds (terpenoids) and the degree of photochemical processing is inferred from the data.

  8. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future.

  9. Air mass distribution and the heterogeneity of the climate change signal in the Hudson Bay/Foxe Basin region, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Andrew; Gough, William

    2016-08-01

    The linkage between changes in air mass distribution and temperature trends from 1971 to 2010 is explored in the Hudson Bay/Foxe Basin region. Statistically significant temperature increases were found of varying spatial and temporal magnitude. Concurrent statistically significant changes in air mass frequency at the same locations were also detected, particularly in the declining frequency of dry polar (DP) air. These two sets of changes were found to be linked, and we thus conclude that the heterogeneity of the climatic warming signal in the region is at least partially the result of a fundamental shift in the concurrent air mass frequency in addition to global and regional changes in radiative forcing due to increases in long-lived greenhouse gases.

  10. Mixture model-based atmospheric air mass classification: a probabilistic view of thermodynamic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernin, Jérôme; Vrac, Mathieu; Crevoisier, Cyril; Chédin, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Air mass classification has become an important area in synoptic climatology, simplifying the complexity of the atmosphere by dividing the atmosphere into discrete similar thermodynamic patterns. However, the constant growth of atmospheric databases in both size and complexity implies the need to develop new adaptive classifications. Here, we propose a robust unsupervised and supervised classification methodology of a large thermodynamic dataset, on a global scale and over several years, into discrete air mass groups homogeneous in both temperature and humidity that also provides underlying probability laws. Temperature and humidity at different pressure levels are aggregated into a set of cumulative distribution function (CDF) values instead of classical ones. The method is based on a Gaussian mixture model and uses the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to estimate the parameters of the mixture. Spatially gridded thermodynamic profiles come from ECMWF reanalyses spanning the period 2000-2009. Different aspects are investigated, such as the sensitivity of the classification process to both temporal and spatial samplings of the training dataset. Comparisons of the classifications made either by the EM algorithm or by the widely used k-means algorithm show that the former can be viewed as a generalization of the latter. Moreover, the EM algorithm delivers, for each observation, the probabilities of belonging to each class, as well as the associated uncertainty. Finally, a decision tree is proposed as a tool for interpreting the different classes, highlighting the relative importance of temperature and humidity in the classification process.

  11. Impact of maritime air mass trajectories on the Western European coast urban aerosol.

    PubMed

    Almeida, S M; Silva, A I; Freitas, M C; Dzung, H M; Caseiro, A; Pio, C A

    2013-01-01

    Lisbon is the largest urban area in the Western European coast. Due to this geographical position the Atlantic Ocean serves as an important source of particles and plays an important role in many atmospheric processes. The main objectives of this study were to (1) perform a chemical characterization of particulate matter (PM2.5) sampled in Lisbon, (2) identify the main sources of particles, (3) determine PM contribution to this urban area, and (4) assess the impact of maritime air mass trajectories on concentration and composition of respirable PM sampled in Lisbon. During 2007, PM2.5 was collected on a daily basis in the center of Lisbon with a Partisol sampler. The exposed Teflon filters were measured by gravimetry and cut into two parts: one for analysis by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and the other by ion chromatography (IC). Principal component analysis (PCA) and multilinear regression analysis (MLRA) were used to identify possible sources of PM2.5 and determine mass contribution. Five main groups of sources were identified: secondary aerosols, traffic, calcium, soil, and sea. Four-day backtracking trajectories ending in Lisbon at the starting sampling time were calculated using the HYSPLIT model. Results showed that maritime transport scenarios were frequent. These episodes were characterized by a significant decrease of anthropogenic aerosol concentrations and exerted a significant role on air quality in this urban area.

  12. The impact of air mass advection on aerosol optical properties over Gotland (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdun, Agnieszka; Rozwadowska, Anna; Kratzer, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper, measurements of aerosol optical properties from the Gotland station of the AERONET network, combined with a two-stage cluster analysis of back trajectories of air masses moving over Gotland, were used to identify the main paths of air mass advection to the Baltic Sea and to relate them to aerosol optical properties, i.e. the aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength λ = 500 nm, AOT (500) and the Ångström exponent for the spectral range from 440 to 870 nm, α(440,870). One- to six-day long back trajectories ending at 300, 500 and 3000 m above the station were computed using the HYSPLIT model. The study shows that in the Gotland region, variability in aerosol optical thickness AOT(500) is more strongly related to advections in the boundary layer than to those in the free troposphere. The observed variability in AOT(500) was best explained by the advection speeds and directions given by clustering of 4-day backward trajectories of air arriving in the boundary layer at 500 m above the station. 17 clusters of 4-day trajectories arriving at altitude 500 m above the Gotland station (sea level) derived using two-stage cluster analysis differ from each other with respect to trajectory length, the speed of air mass movement and the direction of advection. They also show different cluster means of AOT(500) and α(440,870). The cluster mean AOT(500) ranges from 0.342 ± 0.012 for the continental clusters M2 (east-southeast advection with moderate speed) and 0.294 ± 0.025 for S5 (slow south-southeast advection) to 0.064 ± 0.002 and 0.069 ± 0.002 for the respective marine clusters L3 (fast west-northwest advection) and M3 (north-northwest advection with moderate speed). The cluster mean α(440,870) varies from 1.65-1.70 for the short-trajectory clusters to 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.06 ± 0.03 for the Arctic marine cluster L4 (fast inflow from the north) and marine cluster L5 (fast inflow from the west) respectively.

  13. The characteristic black hole mass resulting from direct collapse in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Black holes of a billion solar masses are observed in the infant Universe a few hundred million years after the big bang. The direct collapse of protogalactic gas clouds in primordial haloes with Tvir ≥ 104 K provides the most promising way to assemble massive black holes. In this study, we aim to determine the characteristic mass scale of seed black holes and the time evolution of the accretion rates resulting from the direct collapse model. We explore the formation of supermassive black holes via cosmological large eddy simulations (LES) by employing sink particles and following their evolution for 20 000 yr after the formation of the first sink. As the resulting protostars were shown to have cool atmospheres in the presence of strong accretion, we assume here that UV feedback is negligible during this calculation. We confirm this result in a comparison run without sinks. Our findings show that black hole seeds with characteristic mass of 105 M⊙ are formed in the presence of strong Lyman-Werner flux which leads to an isothermal collapse. The characteristic mass is about two times higher in LES compared to the implicit large eddy simulations. The accretion rates increase with time and reach a maximum value of 10 M⊙ yr-1 after 104 yr. Our results show that the direct collapse model is clearly feasible as it provides the expected mass of the seed black holes.

  14. A study on the characteristic behavior of mass inclusions added to a poro-elastic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrisi, Kamal; Johnson, Marty E.; Theurich, Daniel; Carneal, James P.

    2010-09-01

    Heterogeneous (HG) blankets consist of a layer of poro-elastic media with small embedded masses that replicate the behavior of a distributed mass-spring-damper system. The concept of an HG blanket used to control the sound transmission through an aircraft double-panel system has already been developed and cited in the present literature. However, deficiencies in methodical property control exist; therefore, the prime objective of this research is to provide a simple method to predict and control material properties of the heterogeneous blankets through alteration of mass and stiffness parameters. Mass inclusion size, shape, and placement were varied. If optimized heterogeneous (HG) blankets targeted to specific applications are to be successfully developed, control of these parameters is necessary. This research offers a detailed analysis of the behavior of the mass inclusions, highlighting controlled stiffness variation of the mass-spring-damper systems inside the HG blanket. Characteristic parameters of the HG blanket like the "footprint," "effective area," and the "mass interaction distance" are defined and confirmed through mathematical calculations and experimental results. A novel, empirical approach to predict the natural frequency of different mass shapes embedded in porous media was derived and experimentally verified for many different types of porous media, including melamine foam, polyurethane, and polyamide. A maximum error of 8% existed for all the predictions made in this document.

  15. Use of stable lead isotopes and trace metals to characterize air mass sources into the eastern North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VéRon, Alain J.; Church, Thomas M.

    1997-12-01

    Stable lead isotopes (204Pb, 206Pb, 207Pb, 208Pb) and trace metals (Mn, Al, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb) have been analyzed in aerosol collected during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment-Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange (ASTEX-MAGE) cruise that transited between Miami and the Azores from May to July 1992. Our goal was to define the continental signatures of the air masses encountered between the Azores and the subtropical regions. The combination of air mass trajectories, trace metal concentrations and stable lead isotopes allowed us to characterize the anthropogenic character of encountered air masses. The average 206Pb/207Pb ratio was 1.148±0.021 and corresponded to a mixing between well defined European (such as Great Britain with 1.115<206Pb/207Pb<1.125 and France with 206Pb/207Pb=1.141±0.000) and North American sources (with 206Pb/207Pb=1.184±0.000). On the basis of air mass trajectories and trace metal concentrations, the background isotopic signature associated with the trade winds (206Pb/207Pb=1.161±0.004) is consistent with previous reports by Church et al. [1990] such as 206Pb/207Pb=1.154±0.004 in 1988, (Véron et al., 1993), 206Pb/207Pb=1.155±0.004 in 1989, and Hamelin et al. [1996] (206Pb/207Pb=1.158±0.006) in 1991. Short-term variations of continental air mass sources was particularly investigated by considering the anthropogenic character of aerosols collected during two Lagrangian experiments conducted as part of the ASTEX-MAGE cruise. We demonstrated the utility of stable lead isotopes to assign a "continental source signature" (or mixture thereof) to air masses beyond that normally possible by conventional air mass trajectory analysis in remote oceanic regions.

  16. Trends and sources vs air mass origins in a major city in South-western Europe: Implications for air quality management.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Camacho, R; de la Rosa, J D; Sánchez de la Campa, A M

    2016-05-15

    This study presents a 17-years air quality database comprised of different parameters corresponding to the largest city in the south of Spain (Seville) where atmospheric pollution is frequently attributed to traffic emissions and is directly affected by Saharan dust outbreaks. We identify the PM10 contributions from both natural and anthropogenic sources in this area associated to different air mass origins. Hourly, daily and seasonal variation of PM10 and gaseous pollutant concentrations (CO, NO2 and SO2), all of them showing negative trends during the study period, point to the traffic as one of the main sources of air pollution in Seville. Mineral dust, secondary inorganic compounds (SIC) and trace elements showed higher concentrations under North African (NAF) air mass origins than under Atlantic. We observe a decreasing trend in all chemical components of PM10 under both types of air masses, NAF and Atlantic. Principal component analysis using more frequent air masses in the area allows the identification of five PM10 sources: crustal, regional, marine, traffic and industrial. Natural sources play a more relevant role during NAF events (20.6 μg · m(-3)) than in Atlantic episodes (13.8 μg · m(-3)). The contribution of the anthropogenic sources under NAF doubles the one under Atlantic conditions (33.6 μg · m(-3) and 15.8 μg · m(-3), respectively). During Saharan dust outbreaks the frequent accumulation of local anthropogenic pollutants in the lower atmosphere results in poor air quality and an increased risk of mortality. The results are relevant when analysing the impact of anthropogenic emissions on the exposed population in large cities. The increase in potentially toxic elements during Saharan dust outbreaks should also be taken into account when discounting the number of exceedances attributable to non-anthropogenic or natural origins.

  17. Characteristics of atmospheric visibility and its relationship with air pollution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Young; Jo, Wan-Kuen; Chun, Ho-Hwan

    2014-09-01

    Although analysis of long-term data is necessary to obtain reliable information on characteristics of atmospheric visibility and its relationship with air pollution, it has rarely been performed. Therefore, a long-term evaluation of atmospheric visibility in characteristically different Korean cities, as well as a remote island, during 2001 to 2009, was performed in this study. In general, visibility decreased in the studied areas during the 9-yr study period. In addition, all areas displayed a distinct seasonal trend, with high visibility in the cold season relative to the warm season. Weekday visibility, however, did not significantly differ from weekend visibility. Similarly, the number of days per year for both low (<10 km) and high visibility (>19 km) fluctuated during the study period. Busan (a coastal city) exhibited the highest visibility, with an overall average of 17.6 km, followed by Daegu (a basin city), Ulsan (with concentrated petrochemical industries), Ullungdo (a remote island), and Seoul (the capital of Korea). Visibility was found to be significantly correlated with target air pollutants, except for ozone, for all metropolitan cities, whereas it was significantly correlated only with particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 μm (PM10) and ozone on the remote island (Ullungdo). Among the metropolitan cities, Seoul exhibited the lowest visibility for both the PM10 standard exceedance and non-exceedance days, followed by Ulsan, Daegu, and Busan. The results of this study can be used to establish effective strategies for improving urban visibility and air quality.

  18. Aerosols in polluted versus nonpolluted air masses Long-range transport and effects on clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Van Valin, C. C.; Castillo, R. C.; Kadlecek, J. A.; Ganor, E.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on the physics and chemistry of clouds in the northeastern United States, aerosol and cloud-drop size distributions, elemental composition of aerosols as a function of size, and ionic content of cloud water were measured on Whiteface Mountain, NY, during the summers of 1981 and 1982. In several case studies, the data were cross-correlated with different air mass types - background continental, polluted continental, and maritime - that were advected to the sampling site. The results are the following: (1) Anthropogenic sources hundreds of kilometers upwind cause the small-particle (accumulation) mode number to increase from hundreds of thousands per cubic centimeter and the mass loading to increase from a few to several tens of micrograms per cubic meter, mostly in the form of sulfur aerosols. (2) A significant fraction of anthropogenic sulfur appears to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to affect the cloud drop concentration. (3) Clouds in Atlantic maritime air masses have cloud drop spectra that are markedly different from those measured in continental clouds. The drop concentration is significantly lower, and the drop size spectra are heavily skewed toward large drops. (4) Effects of anthropogenic pollutants on cloud water ionic composition are an increase of nitrate by a factor of 50, an increase of sulfate by more than one order of magnitude, and an increase of ammonium ion by a factor of 7. The net effect of the changes in ionic concentrations is an increase in cloud water acidity. An anion deficit even in maritime clouds suggests an unknown, possibly biogenic, source that could be responsible for a pH below neutral, which is frequently observed in nonpolluted clouds.

  19. TECNAIRE winter field campaign: turbulent characteristics and their influence on air quality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagüe, Carlos; Román Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Arrillaga, Jon A.; Artíñano, Begoña; Diaz-Ramiro, Elías; Gómez-Moreno, Francisco J.; Borge, Rafael; Narros, Adolfo; Pérez, Javier

    2016-04-01

    An urban field campaign was conducted at an air pollution hot spot in Madrid city (Spain) during winter 2015 (from 16th February to 2nd March). The zone selected for the study is a square (Plaza Fernández Ladreda) located in the southern part of the city. This area is an important intersection of several principal routes, and therefore a significant impact in the air quality of the area is found due to the high traffic density. Meteorological data (wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation and global solar radiation) were daily recorded as well as micrometeorological measurements obtained from two sonic anemometers. To characterize this urban atmospheric boundary layer (uABL), micrometeorological parameters (turbulent kinetic energy -TKE-, friction velocity -u∗- and sensible heat flux -H-) are calculated, considering 5-minute average for variance and covariance evaluations. Furthermore, synoptic atmospheric features were analyzed. As a whole, a predominant influence of high pressure systems was found over the Atlantic Ocean and western Spain, affecting Madrid, but during a couple of days (17th and 21st February) some atmospheric instability played a role. The influence of the synoptic situation and specially the evolution of the micrometeorological conditions along the day on air quality characteristics (Particulate Matter concentrations: PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, and NOx concentrations) are analyzed and shown in detail. This work has been financed by Madrid Regional Research Plan through TECNAIRE (P2013/MAE-2972).

  20. The potential of biomonitoring of air quality using leaf characteristics of white willow (Salix alba L.).

    PubMed

    Wuytack, Tatiana; Verheyen, Kris; Wuyts, Karen; Kardel, Fatemeh; Adriaenssens, Sandy; Samson, Roeland

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we assess the potential of white willow (Salix alba L.) as bioindicator for monitoring of air quality. Therefore, shoot biomass, specific leaf area, stomatal density, stomatal pore surface, and stomatal resistance were assessed from leaves of stem cuttings. The stem cuttings were introduced in two regions in Belgium with a relatively high and a relatively low level of air pollution, i.e., Antwerp city and Zoersel, respectively. In each of these regions, nine sampling points were selected. At each sampling point, three stem cuttings of white willow were planted in potting soil. Shoot biomass and specific leaf area were not significantly different between Antwerp city and Zoersel. Microclimatic differences between the sampling points may have been more important to plant growth than differences in air quality. However, stomatal pore surface and stomatal resistance of white willow were significantly different between Zoersel and Antwerp city. Stomatal pore surface was 20% lower in Antwerp city due to a significant reduction in both stomatal length (-11%) and stomatal width (-14%). Stomatal resistance at the adaxial leaf surface was 17% higher in Antwerp city because of the reduction in stomatal pore surface. Based on these results, we conclude that stomatal characteristics of white willow are potentially useful indicators for air quality.

  1. An effective indicator of continental scale cold air outbreaks in northern winter: the intensity variation of the meridional mass circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, R.; Yu, Y.; Cai, M.

    2015-12-01

    This study reports that the intensity variation of the meridional mass circulation can be an effective leading indicator of cold air outbreaks (CAOs) over midlatitudes in northern winter. It is found that continental-scale coldness by cold air outbreaks (CAOs) tend to preferentially occur within a week after stronger mass circulation events defined as the peak time when the net mass transport across 60°N in the upper warm or the lower cold air branch exceeds ~88×109 kg s-1. During weaker mass circulation events when the net mass transport across 60°N is below ~71.6×109 kg s-1, most areas of the mid-latitudes are generally in mild condition except the northern part of Western Europe. Composite pattern of circulation anomalies during stronger mass circulation events greatly resemble that of the winter-mean, with the two main routes of anomalous cold air outbreaks being along the climatological routes of polar cold air, namely, via East Asia and North America. The Siberian High shifts westward during stronger mass circulation events, opening up a third route of cold air outbreaks through Eastern Europe. The relationship of CAOs with Arctic Oscillation (AO) is less robust because temporal changes of AO are resulted from a small imbalance between the poleward and equatorward branches of the mass circulation. Only when the poleward branch leads the equatorward branch (44% of all cases), CAOs tend to take place within a week after a negative phase of AO. The daily ERA-Interim reanalysis data set for the 32 winters in 1979-2011 were used in this study.

  2. Fullerene Soot in Eastern China Air: Results from Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Ge, X.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, H.; Sun, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; Collier, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present for the first time, the observation and quantification of fullerenes in ambient airborne particulate using an Aerodyne Soot Particle - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) deployed during 2015 winter in suburban Nanjing, a megacity in eastern China. The laser desorption and electron impact ionization techniques employed by the SP-AMS allow us to differentiate various fullerenes from other aerosol components. Mass spectrum of the identified fullerene soot is consisted by a series of high molecular weight carbon clusters (up to m/z of 2000 in this study), almost identical to the spectral features of commercially available fullerene soot, both with C70 and C60 clusters as the first and second most abundant species. This type of soot was observed throughout the entire study period, with an average mass loading of 0.18 μg/m3, accounting for 6.4% of the black carbon mass, 1.2% of the total organic mass. Temporal variation and diurnal pattern of fullerene soot are overall similar to those of black carbon, but are clearly different in some periods. Combining the positive matrix factorization, back-trajectory and analyses of the meteorological parameters, we identified the petrochemical industrial plants situating upwind from the sampling site, as the major source of fullerene soot. In this regard, our findings imply the ubiquitous presence of fullerene soot in ambient air of industry-influenced area, especially the oil and gas production regions. This study also offers new insights into the characterization of fullerenes from other environmental samples via the advanced SP-AMS technique.

  3. Influence of Impactor Mass on the Damage Characteristics and Failure Strength of Laminated Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Kemmerly, Heather L.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the effect of impactor mass on the low-speed impact response of laminated flat composite plates is presented. Dropped weight impact response, damage characteristics, and residual strengths of quasi-isotropic flat plates are presented for a range of energy levels by systematically varying the mass of the impactor. Measured contact forces and damage areas are also presented. The results indicate that the contact force and damage area are nonlinear functions of the impactor mass and vary considerably over the entire range of energy levels considered. The different damage levels induced in a plate specimen when impacted at a given energy level with impactors of different masses significantly influence its compressive residual strength. The results provide clear and consistent trends in contact force, damage area, and compression-after-impact strength when the data are expressed as a function of the impactor momentum.

  4. Hydrodynamic characteristics of a novel annular spouted bed with multiple air nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, X.W.; Hu, G.X.; Li, Y.H.

    2006-06-21

    A novel spouted bed, namely, an annular spouted bed with multiple air nozzles, has been proposed for drying, pyrolysis, and gasification of coal particulates. It consists of two homocentric upright cylinders with some annularly located spouting air nozzles between inner and outer cylinders. Experiments have been performed to study hydrodynamic characteristics of this device. The test materials studied are ash particle, soy bean, and black bean. Three distinct spouting stages have been examined and outlined with the hold-ups increase. In the fully developed spouting stage, three flow behaviors of particles have been observed and delimited. The effects of nozzle mode and spouting velocity on the maximum spouting height of the dense-phase region, spoutable static bed height, and spouting pressure drop in the bed have been investigated experimentally.

  5. Air mass modification over Europe: EARLINET aerosol observations from Wales to Belarus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Mattis, Ina; Tesche, Matthias; Ansmann, Albert; BöSenberg, Jens; Chaikovski, Anatoly; Freudenthaler, Volker; Komguem, Leonce; Linné, Holger; Matthias, Volker; Pelon, Jacques; Sauvage, Laurent; Sobolewski, Piotr; Vaughan, Geraint; Wiegner, Matthias

    2004-12-01

    For the first time, the vertically resolved aerosol optical properties of western and central/eastern European haze are investigated as a function of air mass transport. Special emphasis is put on clean maritime air masses that cross the European continent from the west and become increasingly polluted on their way into the continent. The study is based on observations at seven lidar stations (Aberystwyth, Paris, Hamburg, Munich, Leipzig, Belsk, and Minsk) of the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) and on backward trajectory analysis. For the first time, a lidar network monitored continent-scale haze air masses for several years (since 2000). Height profiles of the particle backscatter coefficient and the particle optical depth of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) at 355-nm wavelength are analyzed for the period from May 2000 to November 2002. From the observations at Aberystwyth, Wales, the aerosol reference profile for air entering Europe from pristine environments was determined. A mean 355-nm optical depth of 0.05 and a mean PBL height of 1.5 km was found for clean maritime summer conditions. The particle optical depth and PBL height increased with increasing distance from the North Atlantic. Mean summer PBL heights were 1.9-2.8 km at the continental sites of Leipzig, Belsk, and Minsk. Winter mean PBL heights were mostly between 0.7 and 1.3 km over the seven EARLINET sites. Summer mean 355-nm optical depths increased from 0.17 (Hamburg, northwesterly airflow from the North Sea) and 0.21 (Paris, westerly flow from the Atlantic) over 0.33 (Hamburg, westerly flow) and 0.35 (Leipzig, westerly flow) to 0.59 (Belsk, westerly flow), and decreased again to 0.37 (westerly flow) at Minsk. Winter mean optical depths were, on average, 10-30% lower than the respective summer values. PBL-mean extinction coefficients were of the order of 200 Mm-1 at 355 nm at Hamburg and Leipzig, Germany, and close to 600 Mm-1 at Belsk, Poland, in winter for westerly flows

  6. AUTOMATED DECONVOLUTION OF COMPOSITE MASS SPECTRA OBTAINED WITH AN OPEN-AIR IONIZATIONS SOURCE BASED ON EXACT MASSES AND RELATIVE ISOTIPIC ABUNDANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemicals dispersed by accidental, deliberate, or weather-related events must be rapidly identified to assess health risks. Mass spectra from high levels of analytes obtained using rapid, open-air ionization by a Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART®) ion source often contain

  7. Experimental study of the operating characteristics of premixing-prevaporizing fuel/air mixing passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohy, D. A.; Meier, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel spray and air flow characteristics were determined using nonintrusive (optical) measurement techniques in a fuel preparation duct. A very detailed data set was obtained at high pressures (to 10 atm) and temperatures (to 750 K). The data will be used to calibrate an analytical model which will facilitate the design of a lean premixed prevaporized combustor. This combustor has potential for achieving low pollutant emissions and low levels of flame radiation and pattern factors conductive to improved durability and performance for a variety of fuels.

  8. [Hygienic characteristics of the air and air microflora in the weaving mill of the wool textile industry].

    PubMed

    Garas'ko, E V; Zhuravleva, L T; Sedova, E A; Milovanova, M A

    1990-01-01

    Modern wool textile factories are characterized by hygienically inadequate labour conditions which include exceeding dust and microbe contamination of the air in the working zone and poor microclimate conditions in some shops. Basing on the studies of the air contamination sources, the contributors propose recommendations for health-related improvement of the air conditions.

  9. A survey of mass analyzers. [characteristics and features of various instruments and techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. W., Jr.; Tashbar, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    With the increasing applications of mass spectrometry technology to diverse services areas, a need has developed for a consolidated survey of the essential characteristics and features of the various instruments and techniques. This report is one approach to satisfying this need. Information has been collected and consolidated into a format which includes for each approach: (1) a general technique description, (2) instrument features information, and (3) a summary of pertinent advantages and disadvantages. With this information, the potential mass spectrometer user should be able to more efficiently select the most appropriate instrument.

  10. Effect of municipal solid waste incinerator types on characteristics of ashes from different air pollution control devices.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chien-Hsing; Chuang, Kui-Hao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of fly and bottom ashes sampled from both fluidized bed (FB) and mass-burning (MB) municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs), respectively. Fly ashes from different locations at FB and MB MSWIs equipped with a cyclone, a semi-dry scrubber, and a bag filter as air pollution control devices were examined to provide the baseline information between physicochemical properties and leaching ability. Experimental results of leachability indicated that the bag filter fly ash (FB-FA(B)) from the FB incinerator meets Taiwan regulatory standards set through the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. X-ray diffraction results revealed the presence of Cr5O12 and Pb2O3 in the cyclone fly ash (MB-FA(C)) and bag filter fly ash (MB-FA(B)), respectively, from the MB incinerator. To observe lead incorporation mechanism, mixture of simulate lead-laden waste with bed material were fired between 600 °C and 900 °C in a laboratory scale FB reactor. The results clearly demonstrate a substantial decrease in lead leaching ratio for products with an appropriate temperature. The concentration of Pb in the MB-FA(B) was 250 times that in the FB-FA(B), suggesting that incineration of MSW in FB is a good strategy for stabilizing hazardous metals.

  11. Progress Toward a Global, EOS-Era Aerosol Air Mass Type Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    The MISR and MODIS instruments aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra Satellite have been collecting data containing information about the state of Earth's atmosphere and surface for over eleven years. Data from these instruments have been used to develop a global, monthly climatology of aerosol amount that is widely used as a constraint on climate models, including those used for the 2007 IPCC assessment report. The next frontier in assessing aerosol radiative forcing of climate is aerosol type, and in particular, the absorption properties of major aerosol air masses. This presentation will focus on the prospects for constraining aerosol type globally, and the steps we are taking to apply a combination of satellite and suborbital data to this challenge.

  12. Composition of air masses in Fuerteventura (Canary Islands) according to their origins

    SciTech Connect

    Patier, R.F.; Diez Hernandez, P.; Diaz Ramiro, E.; Ballesteros, J.S.; Santos-Alves, S.G. dos

    1994-12-31

    The Centro Nacional de Sanidad Ambiental has among their duties the background atmospheric pollution monitoring in Spain. To do so, the laboratory has set up 6 field stations in the Iberian Peninsula. In these stations, both gaseous and particulate pollutants are currently analyzed. However, there is a lack of data about the atmospheric pollution in the Canary, where they are a very strong influence of natural emissions from sea and the Saharan desert, mixed with anthropogenic ones. Therefore, during the ASTEX/MAGE project the CNSA established a station in Fuerteventura island, characterized by the nonexistence of man-made emissions, to measure some atmospheric pollutants, in order to foresee their origins. In this study, the authors analyzed some pollutants that are used to obtain a clue about the sources of air masses such as gaseous ozone and metallic compounds (vanadium, iron and manganese) in the atmospheric aerosol fractionated by size.

  13. Birthdate, mass and survival in mountain goat kids: effects of maternal characteristics and forage quality.

    PubMed

    Côté, S D; Festa-Bianchet, M

    2001-04-01

    In temperate environments, early-born ungulates may enjoy a longer growth period before winter, and so attain a higher body mass and an increased probability of survival compared to late-born ones. We assessed the effects of maternal characteristics, forage quality and population density on kid birthdate, mass and survival in a population of marked mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) in Alberta. The duration and timing of the birth season were similar in all years. Births were highly synchronised: 80% of kids were born within 2 weeks of the first birth. Maternal age, maternal social rank and density did not affect kid birthdate or mass. Previous breeding experience was not related to kid birthdate, but kids born to pluriparous mothers were heavier during summer than kids born to primiparous mothers. Male and female kids had similar mass and accumulated mass linearly during summer. Early-born kids were heavier than late-born kids. Faecal crude protein (FCP) in late spring and maternal mass were positively related to kid mass. Survival to weaning appeared higher for males (90%) than for females (78%), but survival to 1 year was 65% for both sexes. FCP in late spring, density, birthdate and mass did not affect kid survival to weaning in either sex. Survival to 1 year increased with FCP in late spring for females, but not for males. Survival to 1 year was independent of birthdate for both sexes, but heavy females survived better than light ones. Multiple logistic regression revealed a positive effect of mass on survival to 1 year when the sexes were pooled. Our results suggest that mountain goats are constrained to give birth in a short birth season synchronised with forage productivity.

  14. The influence of polarization on box air mass factors for UV/vis nadir satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilboll, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric abundances of pollutant trace gases like, e.g., NO2, are often derived by applying the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method to space-borne measurements of back-scattered and reflected solar radiation. The resulting quantity, the slant column density (SCD), subsequently has to be converted to more easily interpretable vertical column densities by means of the so-called box air mass factor (BAMF). The BAMF describes the ratio of SCD and VCD within one atmospheric layer and is calculated by a radiative transfer model. Current operational and scientific data products of satellite-derived trace gas VCDs do not include the effect of polarization in their radiative transfer models. However, the various scattering processes in the atmosphere do lead to a distinctive polarization pattern of the observed Earthshine spectra. This study investigates the influence of these polarization patterns on box air mass factors for satellite nadir DOAS measurements of NO2 in the UV/vis wavelength region. NO2 BAMFs have been simulated for a multitude of viewing geometries, surface albedos, and surface altitudes, using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. The results show a potentially large influence of polarization on the BAMF, which can reach 10% and more close to the surface. A simple correction for this effect seems not to be feasible, as it strongly depends on the specific measurement scenario and can lead to both high and low biases of the resulting NO2 VCD. We therefore conclude that all data products of NO2 VCDs derived from space-borne DOAS measurements should include polarization effects in their radiative transfer model calculations, or at least include the errors introduced by using linear models in their uncertainty estimates.

  15. Experimental investigation on plasma-assisted combustion characteristics of premixed propane/air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingjian; He, Liming; Yu, Jinlu; Zeng, Hao; Jin, Tao

    2015-06-01

    A detailed study on the plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) characteristics of premixed propane/air mixture is presented. The PAC is measured electrically, as well as optically with a multichannel spectrometer. The characteristics are demonstrated by stable combustion temperature and combustion stability limits, and the results are compared with conventional combustion (CC). Stable combustion temperature measurements show that the introduction of PAC into combustion system can increase the stable combustion temperature, and the increment is more notable with an increase of discharge voltage. Besides, the rich and weak limits of combustion stability are both enlarged when plasma is applied into the combustion process and the increase of discharge voltage results in the expansion of combustion stability limits as well. The measurements of temperature head and emission spectrum illustrate that the kinetic enhancement caused by reactive species in plasma is the main enhancement pathway for current combustion system.

  16. Bioaccumulation Potential Of Air Contaminants: Combining Biological Allometry, Chemical Equilibrium And Mass-Balances To Predict Accumulation Of Air Pollutants In Various Mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Veltman, Karin; McKone, Thomas E.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Hendriks, A. Jan

    2009-03-01

    In the present study we develop and test a uniform model intended for single compartment analysis in the context of human and environmental risk assessment of airborne contaminants. The new aspects of the model are the integration of biological allometry with fugacity-based mass-balance theory to describe exchange of contaminants with air. The developed model is applicable to various mammalian species and a range of chemicals, while requiring few and typically well-known input parameters, such as the adult mass and composition of the species, and the octanol-water and air-water partition coefficient of the chemical. Accumulation of organic chemicals is typically considered to be a function of the chemical affinity forlipid components in tissues. Here, we use a generic description of chemical affinity for neutral and polar lipids and proteins to estimate blood-air partition coefficients (Kba) and tissue-air partition coefficients (Kta) for various mammals. This provides a more accurate prediction of blood-air partition coefficients, as proteins make up a large fraction of total blood components. The results show that 75percent of the modeled inhalation and exhalation rate constants are within a factor of 2 from independent empirical values for humans, rats and mice, and 87percent of the predicted blood-air partition coefficients are within a factor of 5 from empirical data. At steady-state, the bioaccumulation potential of air pollutants is shown to be mainly a function of the tissue-air partition coefficient and the biotransformation capacity of the species and depends weakly on the ventilation rate and the cardiac output of mammals.

  17. Characteristics and transport of organochlorine pesticides in urban environment: air, dust, rain, canopy throughfall, and runoff.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ye, Youbin; Hu, Dan; Ou, Langbo; Wang, Xuejun

    2010-11-01

    Characteristics and transport of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in urban multiple environments, including air, dust, rain, canopy throughfall, and runoff water, are explored in this study. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) dominated in both air and rain water, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) related substances showed a higher affinity to dust. Relatively high concentrations of DDT and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) in air, rain and dust imply that technical DDT in the environment has been degrading, and there may be unknown local or regional emission sources that contain DDTs in the study area. Source identification showed that DDTs in Beijing urban environments with a fresh signature may originate from the atmospheric transport from remote areas. The ratio of α-/γ-HCH in dust, rain, canopy throughfall and runoff were close to 1, indicating the possible use of lindane. OCPs in runoff were transported from various sources including rain, dust, and canopy throughfall. In runoff, DDTs and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were mainly transported from dust, and HCHs were mainly from rain and canopy throughfall.

  18. Housing characteristics and indoor air quality in households of Alaska Native children with chronic lung conditions.

    PubMed

    Singleton, R; Salkoski, A J; Bulkow, L; Fish, C; Dobson, J; Albertson, L; Skarada, J; Kovesi, T; McDonald, C; Hennessy, T W; Ritter, T

    2017-03-01

    Alaska Native children experience high rates of respiratory infections and conditions. Household crowding, indoor smoke, lack of piped water, and poverty have been associated with respiratory infections. We describe the baseline household characteristics of children with severe or chronic lung disease participating in a 2012-2015 indoor air study. We monitored indoor PM2.5, CO2 , relative humidity %, temperature, and VOCs and interviewed caregivers about children's respiratory symptoms. We evaluated the association between reported children's respiratory symptoms and indoor air quality indicators using multiple logistic regression analysis. Compared with general US households, study households were more likely overcrowded 73% (62%-82%) vs 3.2% (3.1%-3.3%); had higher woodstove use as primary heat source 16% (9%-25%) vs 2.1% (2.0%-2.2%); and higher proportion of children in a household with a smoker 49% (38%-60%) vs 26.2% (25.5%-26.8%). Median PM2.5 was 33 μg/m(3) . Median CO2 was 1401 ppm. VOCs were detectable in all homes. VOCs, smoker, primary wood heat, and PM2.5>25 μg/m(3) were associated with higher risk for cough between colds; VOCs were associated with higher risk for wheeze between colds and asthma diagnosis. High indoor air pollutant levels were associated with respiratory symptoms in household children, likely related to overcrowding, poor ventilation, woodstove use, and tobacco smoke.

  19. Characteristics of indoor air pollution in rural mountainous and rural coastal communities in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huboyo, Haryono S.; Tohno, Susumu; Lestari, Puji; Mizohata, Akira; Okumura, Motonori

    2014-01-01

    The increased use of biomass fuel use among rural Indonesian households for years despite national program on subsidized LPG fuel distribution pose threat of indoor air pollution for the householders. Indoor air pollution levels of PM2.5 and CO in the kitchen of 40 households using the fuelwood as the main cooking fuel were measured in the same season in mountainous and coastal areas in Indonesia. The temporal variations of PM2.5 and its size distributions were simultaneously measured using photoelectric UCB monitor and personal cascade impactor, respectively. While carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations were measured using USB-CO monitors. Household indoor air pollution in the mountainous area was generally higher than that in the coastal area. This is because the households in coastal area have higher kitchen volume (about three times), smaller ventilation area (about 1.7 times) and shorter cooking duration with wood fuel (0.6 times) than those in mountainous area. Yet, during cooking with fuelwood, the indoor PM2.5 concentrations at the cook site showed almost comparable results for both sites. The wood stove burning in coastal area tended to be in flaming combustion than in mountainous area. This can be indicated by a higher fraction of finest particles in PM2.5, a higher fraction of EC in PM2.5 and a higher fraction of K+ and Cl- ions in PM2.5 mass concentrations. The time-averaged CO concentrations for 22-h measurements at the mountainous area were higher than those in coastal area. The mountainous area showed higher positive correlation relationship between the measured concentrations of CO and PM2.5 than those in the coastal area. The use of cleaner fuel, e.g., subsidized LPG fuel in rural area should be promoted and managed intensively in mountainous area than in coastal area to avoid people exposure of health damaging indoor air pollutants.

  20. Evolution of In-Cylinder Diesel Engine Soot and Emission Characteristics Investigated with Online Aerosol Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malmborg, V B; Eriksson, A C; Shen, M; Nilsson, P; Gallo, Y; Waldheim, B; Martinsson, J; Andersson, Ö; Pagels, J

    2017-02-07

    To design diesel engines with low environmental impact, it is important to link health and climate-relevant soot (black carbon) emission characteristics to specific combustion conditions. The in-cylinder evolution of soot properties over the combustion cycle and as a function of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was investigated in a modern heavy-duty diesel engine. A novel combination of a fast gas-sampling valve and a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) enabled online measurements of the in-cylinder soot chemistry. The results show that EGR reduced the soot formation rate. However, the late cycle soot oxidation rate (soot removal) was reduced even more, and the net effect was increased soot emissions. EGR resulted in an accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during combustion, and led to increased PAH emissions. We show that mass spectral and optical signatures of the in-cylinder soot and associated low volatility organics change dramatically from the soot formation dominated phase to the soot oxidation dominated phase. These signatures include a class of fullerene carbon clusters that we hypothesize represent less graphitized, C5-containing fullerenic (high tortuosity or curved) soot nanostructures arising from decreased combustion temperatures and increased premixing of air and fuel with EGR. Altered soot properties are of key importance when designing emission control strategies such as diesel particulate filters and when introducing novel biofuels.

  1. A Comparison of Two Methods for Initiating Air Mass Back Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, A.; Posmentier, E. S.; Faiia, A. M.; Sonder, L. J.; Feng, X.

    2014-12-01

    Lagrangian air mass tracking programs in back cast mode are a powerful tool for estimating the water vapor source of precipitation events. The altitudes above the precipitation site where particle's back trajectories begin influences the source estimation. We assume that precipitation comes from water vapor in condensing regions of the air column, so particles are placed in proportion to an estimated condensation profile. We compare two methods for estimating where condensation occurs and the resulting evaporation sites for 63 events at Barrow, AK. The first method (M1) uses measurements from a 35 GHz vertically resolved cloud radar (MMCR), and algorithms developed by Zhao and Garrett1 to calculate precipitation rate. The second method (M2) uses the Global Data Assimilation System reanalysis data in a lofting model. We assess how accurately M2, developed for global coverage, will perform in absence of direct cloud observations. Results from the two methods are statistically similar. The mean particle height estimated by M2 is, on average, 695 m (s.d. = 1800 m) higher than M1. The corresponding average vapor source estimated by M2 is 1.5⁰ (s.d. = 5.4⁰) south of M1. In addition, vapor sources for M2 relative to M1 have ocean surface temperatures averaging 1.1⁰C (s.d. = 3.5⁰C) warmer, and reported ocean surface relative humidities 0.31% (s.d. = 6.1%) drier. All biases except the latter are statistically significant (p = 0.02 for each). Results were skewed by events where M2 estimated very high altitudes of condensation. When M2 produced an average particle height less than 5000 m (89% of events), M2 estimated mean particle heights 76 m (s.d. = 741 m) higher than M1, corresponding to a vapor source 0.54⁰ (s.d. = 4.2⁰) south of M1. The ocean surface at the vapor source was an average of 0.35⁰C (s.d. = 2.35⁰C) warmer and ocean surface relative humidities were 0.02% (s.d. = 5.5%) wetter. None of the biases was statistically significant. If the vapor source

  2. Air quality resolution for health impact assessment: influence of regional characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.; Saari, R. K.; Selin, N. E.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate how regional characteristics of population and background pollution might impact the selection of optimal air quality model resolution when calculating the human health impacts of changes to air quality. Using an approach consistent with air quality policy evaluation, we use a regional chemical transport model (CAMx) and a health benefit mapping program (BenMAP) to calculate the human health impacts associated with changes in ozone and fine particulate matter resulting from an emission reduction scenario. We evaluate this same scenario at 36, 12 and 4 km resolution for nine regions in the eastern US representing varied characteristics. We find that the human health benefits associated with changes in ozone concentrations are sensitive to resolution. This finding is especially strong in urban areas where we estimate that benefits calculated using coarse resolution results are on average two times greater than benefits calculated using finer scale results. In three urban areas we analyzed, results calculated using 36 km resolution modeling fell outside the uncertainty range of results calculated using finer scale modeling. In rural areas the influence of resolution is less pronounced with only an 8% increase in the estimated health impacts when using 36 km resolution over finer scales. In contrast, health benefits associated with changes in PM2.5 concentrations were not sensitive to resolution and did not follow a pattern based on any regional characteristics evaluated. The largest difference between the health impacts estimated using 36 km modeling results and either 12 or 4 km results was at most ±10% in any region. Several regions showed increases in estimated benefits as resolution increased (opposite the impact seen with ozone modeling), while some regions showed decreases in estimated benefits as resolution increased. In both cases, the dominant contribution was from secondary PM. Additionally, we found that the health impacts calculated using

  3. Experimental comparison of adsorption characteristics of silica gel and zeolite in moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, F.; Yuan, Z. X.; Wang, W. C.; Du, C. X.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the macro adsorption characteristic of water vapor by the allochroic silica gel and the zeolite 5A and ZSM-5 were investigated experimentally. BET analysis method presented the difference of the porosity, the micro pore volume, and the specific surface area of the material. The dynamic and the equilibrium characteristics of the sample were measured thermo-gravimetrically in the moist air. In general, the ZSM-5 zeolite showed an inferior feature of the adsorption speed and the equilibrium concentration to the others. By comparison to the result of SAPO-34 zeolite in the open literature, the 5A zeolite showed some superiorities of the adsorption. The equilibrium concentration of the ZSM-5 zeolite was higher than that of the SAPO-34 calcined in the nitrogen, whereas it was lower than that calcined in the air. The adsorption isotherm was correlated and the relation of the isotherm to the microstructure of the material was discussed. With more mesopore volume involved, the zeolite presented an S-shaped isotherm in contrast to the exponential isotherm of the silica gel. In addition, the significance of the S-shaped isotherm for the application in adsorption heat pump has also been addressed.

  4. Effect of Reynolds number on flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Ikarashi, Yuya; Yamagata, Takayuki; Taguchi, Syoichi

    2016-11-01

    The flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow was studied experimentally by using the mass transfer measurement by plaster dissolution method, the surface flow visualization by oil film method and stereo PIV measurement. The experiments are carried out in a water tunnel of a circular pipe of 56mm in diameter with a working fluid of water. The Reynolds number was varied from 30000 to 200000. The experimental result indicated the change of the mass transfer coefficient distribution in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds number. This phenomenon is further examined by the surface flow visualization and measurement of secondary flow pattern in the elbow, and the results showed the suggested change of the secondary flow pattern in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds numbers.

  5. Study Case of Air-Mass Modification over Poland and Romania Observed by the Means of Multiwavelength Raman Depolarization Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Surós, Montserrat; Janicka, Lucja; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Nemuc, Anca; Talianu, Camelia; Heese, Birgit; Engelmann, Ronny

    2016-06-01

    An air-mass modification, on its way from Poland to Romania, observed between 19-21 July 2014 is discussed. The air-mass was investigated using data of two multi-wavelength lidars capable of performing regular elastic, depolarization and Raman measurements in Warsaw, Poland, and in Magurele, Romania. The analysis was focused on evaluating optical properties of aerosol in order to search for similarities and differences in the vertical profiles describing the atmospheric layers above the two stations within given period.

  6. Identification of water-soluble polar organics in air and vehicular emitted particulate matter using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry and Capillary electrophoresis - mass spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Yassine, M.; Gebefugi, I.; Hertkorn, N.; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, E.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on human health, atmospheric chemistry, and climate are among the central topics in current environmental health research. Detailed and accurate measurements of the chemical composition of air particulate matter (PM) represent a challenging analytical task. Minute sample amounts are usually composed of several main constituents and hundreds of minor and trace constituents. Moreover, the composition of individual particles can be fairly uniform or very different (internally or externally mixed aerosols), depending on their origin and atmospheric aging processes (coagulation, condensation / evaporation, chemical reaction). The aim of the presentation was the characterization of the organic matter (OM) fraction of environmental aerosols which is not accessible by GC-methods, either because of their high molecular weight, their polarity or due to thermal instability. We also describe the main chemical characteristics of complexe oligomeric organic fraction extracted from different aerosols collected in urban and rural area in Germany and Canada. Mass spectrometry (MS) became an essential tool used by many prominent leaders of the biological research community and the importance of MS to the future of biological research is now clearly evident as in the fields of Proteomics and Metabolomics. Especially Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) is an ultrahigh resolution MS that allows new approach in the analysis of complex mixtures. The mass resolution (< 200 ppb) allowed assigning the elemental composition (C, H, O, N, S…) to each of the obtained mass peaks and thus already a description of the mixture in terms of molecular composition. This possibility is used by the authors together with a high resolution separation method of charged compounds: capillary electrophoresis. A CE-ESI-MS method using an ammonium acetate based background electrolyte (pH 4.7) was developed for the determination of isomeric benzoic acids in

  7. Large-scale transport of a CO-enhanced air mass from Europe to the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, V. S.; Miles, T.; Reichle, H. G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    On November 14, 1981, the shuttle-borne Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) experiment observed a carbon monoxide (CO) enhanced air mass in the middle troposphere over the Middle East. The primary source of this polluted air was estimated by constructing adiabatic isentropic trajectories backwards from the MAPS measurement location over a 36 h period. The isentropic diagnostics indicate that CO-enhanced air was transported southeastward over the Mediterranean from an organized synoptic-scale weather regime, albeit of moderate intensity, influencing central Europe on November 12. Examination of the evolving synoptic scale vertical velocity and precipitation patterns during this period, in conjuction with Meteosat visible, infrared, and water vapor imagery, suggests that the presence of this disturbed weather system over Europe may have created upward transport of CO-enhanced air between the boundary-layer and midtropospheric levels, and subsequent entrainment in the large-scale northwesterly jet stream flow over Europe and the Mediterranean.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Air Mass Modification Over the East China Sea during the Winter Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wu-Ron

    Air mass modification over the East China Sea during cold air outbreaks in the winter season was simulated by utilizing a high-resolution numerical model. The model includes most of the major physical processes, such as, surface exchange of heat and moisture between water and air; condensation and evaporation; and vertical turbulent transfer of heat, moisture, and momentum. The simulated convective boundary layer (CBL) consists of a surface layer, a subcloud layer, and a cloud layer. It is capped by an inversion with strong temperature and moisture gradients. Mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) embedded within the convective layer moves along with the mean wind. The average aspect ratio of the cells is 17.5, which agrees with observed aspect ratios for convective cells over the East China Sea. The upward convective motion correlates very well with the appearance of clouds, higher temperature, and higher moisture content in the CBL. The effects of diabatic heating were found to be very important in driving the thermal convection. Without the release of latent heat, the convective layer would be very shallow, and the convective motion would be greatly suppressed. Even though the formulation and dissipation of a cloud is associated with the movement of the resolvable scale MCC, the vertical transport of heat and moisture is achieved mainly by the unresolvable turbulent eddies. The distribution of specific humidity during the passage of the surface front reveals the moisture being pushed upward along the frontal surface as observed. The cold and dry air behind the cold front is quickly modified by strong convection over the warm water surface, especially over the Kuroshio Current. A cloud-free region exists near the coast where the CBL is too shallow for clouds to develop. A layer of stratocumulus forms downstream from the cloud-free region. The depth of the CBL increases toward the Kuroshio Current due to strong heat and moisture fluxes from the water surface. The CBL

  9. [Situation and Characteristics of Air Pollutants Emission from Crematories in Beijing, China].

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi-feng; Yan, Jing; Tian, He-zhong; Xiong, Cheng-cheng; Li, Jing-dong; Wu, Xiao-ing; Wang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) such as exhaust particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NOx), mercury (Hg) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans ( PCDD/Fs) are emitted by the process of cremation and the burning of oblation. Risks to health posed by emissions of hazardous air pollutants from crematories are emerging concerns. Through field investigation and data collection, we obtained the related activity levels and monitored the concentrations of air pollutants from typical cremators, so as to better understand the current pollutants emission levels for crematory. Using the emission factor method, we calculated the emission inventory of HAPs for crematory of Beijing in 2012 and quantified the range of uncertainty. Using atmospheric diffusion model ADMS, we evaluated the influence of crematories on the surrounding environment, and identified the characteristics of air pollution. The results showed that: for the cremators installed with flue gas purification system, the emission concentration of exhaust PM was rather low, and the CO emission concentration fluctuated greatly. However, relative high emission concentrations of PCDD/Fs were detected mainly due to insufficient combustion. Exhaust PM, CO, SO2, NOx, Hg and PCDD/Fs emitted by crematory of Beijing in 2012 were estimated at about 11. 5 tons, 41.25 tons, 2.34 tons, 7.65 tons, 13.76 kg and 0.88 g, respectively; According to the results of dispersion model simulation, the concentration contributions of exhaust PM, CO, SO2, NOx, Hg, PCDD/Fs from crematories were 0.05947 microg x m(-3), 0.2009 microg x m(-3) and 0.0126 microg x m(-3), 0.03667 microg x m(-3) and 0.06247 microg x m(-3), 0.004213 microg x m(-3), respectively.

  10. Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1983-07-01

    Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

  11. Heat and mass transfer characteristics of absorption of R134a into DMAC in a horizontal tube absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikrishnan, L.; Maiya, M. P.; Tiwari, S.; Wohlfeil, A.; Ziegler, F.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper the heat and mass transfer characteristics of a horizontal tube absorber for the mixture R134a/DMAC in terms of experimentally gained heat and mass transfer coefficients are presented. The heat transfer coefficient is mainly dependent on the solution’s mass flow rate. The mass transfer coefficient is strongly related to the subcooling of the solution. The data are compared to experimental absorption characteristics of water into aqueous lithium bromide in an absorption chiller. The mass transfer coefficients are of similar size whereas the heat transfer coefficients are about one order of magnitude smaller for R134a-DMAC.

  12. Observation of the transport of polluted air masses from the northeastern United States to Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia, Canada, during the 1993 NARE summer intensive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, K. G.; Balsley, B. B.; Jensen, M. L.; Hanson, H. P.; Birks, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    Vertical profiles of ozone, temperature, pressure, and water vapor mass mixing ratio obtained using a parafoil kite platform during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) 1993 summer intensive at Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia, Canada, demonstrate the of use of kite platforms for the collection of vertically and temporally resolved data over a fixed location. During the period August 8-28, 1993, 39 profiles of the lower atmosphere were collected. Data collected as part of this field campaign illustrate the complex vertical stratification and temporal variability of pollutants transported into the Maritime Provinces of Canada. Transport phenomena resulted in pollution events in which ozone at the ground level remained in the 20-40 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) range, while mixing ratios of 90-130 ppbv were observed above ˜300 m. Back trajectories indicate that these highly elevated levels of ozone are attributable to source regions in the heavily industrialized northeastern United States. Vertical stratification of the lower atmosphere was also present during transport of Canadian air to the sampling site, with layers of both elevated and diminished ozone observed, while marine air did not exhibit layering characteristic of air masses originating from continental source regions.

  13. Flight-determined characteristics of an air intake system on an F-111A airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.; Johnson, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Flow phenomena of the F-111A air intake system were investigated over a large range of Mach number, altitude, and angle of attack. Boundary-layer variations are shown for the fuselage splitter plate and inlet entrance stations. Inlet performance is shown in terms of pressure recovery, airflow, mass-flow ratio, turbulence factor, distortion factor, and power spectral density. The fuselage boundary layer was found to be not completely removed from the upper portion of the splitter plate at all Mach numbers investigated. Inlet boundary-layer ingestion started at approximately Mach 1.6 near the translating spike and cone. Pressure-recovery distribution at the compressor face showed increasing distortion with increasing angle of attack and increasing Mach number. The time-averaged distortion-factor value approached 1300, which is near the distortion tolerance of the engine at Mach numbers above 2.1.

  14. Optimization of solar cells for air mass zero operation and a study of solar cells at high temperatures, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, A. E.; Hovel, H. J.; Woodall, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The etch-back epitaxy process is described for producing thin, graded composition GaAlAs layers. The palladium-aluminum contact system is discussed along with its associated problems. Recent solar cell results under simulated air mass zero light and at elevated temperatures are reported and the growth of thin polycrystalline GaAs films on foreign substrates is developed.

  15. On the association between daily mortality and air mass types in Athens, Greece during winter and summer.

    PubMed

    Kassomenos, Pavlos A; Gryparis, Alexandros; Katsouyanni, Klea

    2007-03-01

    In this study, we examined the short-term effects of air mass types on mortality in Athens, Greece. An objective air mass types classification was used, based on meteorological parameters measured at the surface. Mortality data were treated with generalized additive models (GAM) and extending Poisson regression, using a LOESS smoother to control for the confounding effects of seasonal patterns, adjusting also for temperature, long-term trends, day of the week, and ambient particle concentrations. The introduced air mass classification explains the daily variation of mortality to a statistically significant degree. The highest daily mortality was observed on days characterized by southerly flow conditions for both the cold (increase in relative risk for mortality 9%; with a 95% confidence interval: 3-14%), and the warm period (7%; with a 95% confidence interval: 2-13%) of the year. The northeasterly flow is associated with the lowest mortality. Effects on mortality, independent of temperature, are observed mainly for lag 0 during the cold period, but persist longer during the warm period. Not adjusting for temperature and/or ambient particle levels slightly alters the results, which then reflect the known temperature and particle effects, already reported in the literature. In conclusion, we find that air mass types have independent effects on mortality for both the cold and warm season and may be used to predict weather-related adverse health effects.

  16. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-06

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  17. Chemical characteristics of air from differing source regions during the Pacific Exploratory Mission-Tropics A (PEM-Tropics A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Board, Ashley S.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Heikes, Brian G.; Schultz, Martin G.; Blake, Donald R.; Dibb, Jack E.; Sandholm, Scott T.; Talbot, Robert W.

    1999-07-01

    Ten-day backward trajectories are used to determine the origins of air parcels arriving at airborne DC-8 chemical measurement sites during NASA's Pacific Exploratory Mission-Tropics A (PEM-T) that was conducted during August-October 1996. Those sites at which the air had a common geographical origin and transport history are grouped together, and statistical measures of chemical characteristics are computed. Temporal changes in potential temperature are used to determine whether trajectories experience a significant convective influence during the 10-day period. Those trajectories that do not experience a significant convective influence are divided into four geographical categories depending on their origins and paths. Air parcels originating over Africa and South America are characterized by enhanced mixing ratios of O3, CO, HNO3, and PAN. The backward trajectories travel at high altitudes (˜10-11 km), covering long distances due to strong upper-tropospheric westerly winds. The observed enhancement of combustion-related species is attributed to biomass burning from distant sources to the west, extending even to South America. The relatively large value of Be-7 probably is due either to less efficient removal of aerosols from upper tropospheric air or to small stratospheric contributions. Aged marine parcels are found to have relatively small concentrations of burning-related species. Although these trajectories arrive at a wide range of aircraft altitudes, they do not pass over a land mass during the preceding 10-day period. Air passing over Australia but no other land mass exhibits a combustion signature; however, photochemical product species such as O3 and PAN are less enhanced than in the long-range transport category. These trajectories travel shorter distances and are at lower altitudes (˜5-8 km) than those reaching Africa and/or South America. The combustion influence on these parcels is attributed to biomass burning emissions injected over Australia

  18. Visibility characteristics and the impacts of air pollutants and meteorological conditions over Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dan; Li, Chengfan; Liu, Qian

    2015-06-01

    In China, visibility condition has become an important issue that concerns both society and the scientific community. In order to study visibility characteristics and its influencing factors, visibility data, air pollutants, and meteorological data during the year 2013 were obtained over Shanghai. The temporal variation of atmospheric visibility was analyzed. The mean value of daily visibility of Shanghai was 19.1 km. Visibility exhibited an obvious seasonal cycle. The maximum and minimum visibility occurred in September and December with the values of 27.5 and 7.7 km, respectively. The relationships between the visibility and air pollutant data were calculated. The visibility had negative correlation with NO2, CO, PM2.5, PM10, and SO2 and weak positive correlation with O3. Meteorological data were clustered into four groups to reveal the joint contribution of meteorological variables to the daily average visibility. Usually, under the meteorological condition of high temperature and wind speed, the visibility of Shanghai reached about 25 km, while visibility decreased to 16 km under the weather type of low wind speed and temperature and high relative humid. Principle component analysis was also applied to identify the main cause of visibility variance. The results showed that the low visibility over Shanghai was mainly due to the high air pollution concentrations associated with low wind speed, which explained the total variance of 44.99 %. These results provide new knowledge for better understanding the variations of visibility and have direct implications to supply sound policy on visibility improvement in Shanghai.

  19. Aerodynamic characteristics of the ventilated design for flapping wing micro air vehicle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G Q; Yu, S C M

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by superior flight performance of natural flight masters like birds and insects and based on the ventilating flaps that can be opened and closed by the changing air pressure around the wing, a new flapping wing type has been proposed. It is known that the net lift force generated by a solid wing in a flapping cycle is nearly zero. However, for the case of the ventilated wing, results for the net lift force are positive which is due to the effect created by the "ventilation" in reducing negative lift force during the upstroke. The presence of moving flaps can serve as the variable in which, through careful control of the areas, a correlation with the decrease in negative lift can be generated. The corresponding aerodynamic characteristics have been investigated numerically by using different flapping frequencies and forward flight speeds.

  20. Aerodynamic Characteristics of the Ventilated Design for Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G. Q.; Yu, S. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by superior flight performance of natural flight masters like birds and insects and based on the ventilating flaps that can be opened and closed by the changing air pressure around the wing, a new flapping wing type has been proposed. It is known that the net lift force generated by a solid wing in a flapping cycle is nearly zero. However, for the case of the ventilated wing, results for the net lift force are positive which is due to the effect created by the “ventilation” in reducing negative lift force during the upstroke. The presence of moving flaps can serve as the variable in which, through careful control of the areas, a correlation with the decrease in negative lift can be generated. The corresponding aerodynamic characteristics have been investigated numerically by using different flapping frequencies and forward flight speeds. PMID:24683339

  1. Dynamic Stiffness and Damping Characteristics of a High-Temperature Air Foil Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Heshmat, Hooshang

    2001-01-01

    Using a high-temperature optically based displacement measurement system, a foil air bearing's stiffness and damping characteristics were experimentally determined. Results were obtained over a range of modified Sommerfeld Number from 1.5E6 to 1.5E7, and at temperatures from 25 to 538 C. An Experimental procedure was developed comparing the error in two curve fitting functions to reveal different modes of physical behavior throughout the operating domain. The maximum change in dimensionless stiffness was 3.0E-2 to 6.5E-2 over the Sommerfeld Number range tested. Stiffness decreased with temperature by as much as a factor of two from 25 to 538 C. Dimensionless damping was a stronger function of Sommerfeld Number ranging from 20 to 300. The temperature effect on damping being more qualitative, showed the damping mechanism shifted from viscous type damping to frictional type as temperature increased.

  2. Influence of propane additives on the detonation characteristics of H2-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanbing; Bauer, Pascal; Zitoun, Ratiba

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen is more and more considered as a potential fuel for propulsion applications. However, due to its low ignition energy and wide flammability limits, H2-air mixtures raise a concern in terms of safety. This aspect can be partly solved by adding an alkane to these mixtures, which plays the role of an inhibitor. The present paper provides data on such binary fuel-air mixtures where various amounts of propane are added to hydrogen. The behavior of the corresponding mixtures, in terms of detonation characteristics and other fundamental properties, such as the cell size of the detonation front and induction delay, are presented and discussed for a series of equivalence ratios and propane addition. The experimental detonation velocity is in good agreement with calculated theoretical Chapman-Jouguet values. Based on soot tracks records, the cell size λ is measured, whereas the induction length L i is derived from data using a GRI-Mech kinetic mechanism. These data allow providing a value of the coefficient K = λ/L i .

  3. Drying kinetics, rehydration and colour characteristics of convective hot-air drying of carrot slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doymaz, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    The effects of air drying temperature, slice thickness and pre-treatment application on the drying kinetics of carrot slices during convective drying in the range 50-70 °C were investigated. Results indicated that drying time, rehydration ratio and colour characteristics of carrot slices were more affected by drying air temperature, followed by pre-treatment applications. Five thin-layer drying models were applied to describe the drying kinetics. Midilli et al. model was the best model to characterize the drying kinetics of carrot slices. The moisture effective diffusivity calculated from the second Fick's law of diffusion ranged from 3.46 × 10-10 to 1.02 × 10-9 m2/s. The values of activation energy determined from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, ln( D eff ) versus 1/(T + 273.15), were 35.53, 43.42, and 37.75 kJ/mol for blanch, potas and control samples, respectively.

  4. Biofilm Formation Derived from Ambient Air and the Characteristics of Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, H.; Kougo, H.; Kuroda, D.; Itho, H.; Ogino, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Biofilm is a kind of thin film on solidified matters, being derived from bacteria. Generally, planktonic bacteria float in aqueous environments, soil or air, most of which can be regarded as oligotrophic environments. Since they have to survive by instinct, they seek for nutrients that would exist on materials surfaces as organic matters. Therefore, bacteria attach materials surfaces reversibly. The attachment and detachment repeat for a while and finally, they attach on them irreversibly and the number of bacteria on them increases. At a threshold number, bacteria produce polymeric matters at the same time by quorum sensing mechanism and the biofilm produces on material surfaces. The biofilm produced in that way generally contains water (more than 80%), EPS (Exopolymeric Substance) and bacteria themselves. And they might bring about many industrial problems, fouling, corrosion etc. Therefore, it is very important for us to control and prevent the biofilm formation properly. However, it is generally very hard to produce biofilm experimentally and constantly in ambient atmosphere on labo scale. The authors invented an apparatus where biofilm could form on specimen's surfaces from house germs in the ambient air. In this experiment, we investigated the basic characteristics of the apparatus, reproducibility, the change of biofilm with experimental time, the quality change of water for biofilm formation and their significance for biofilm research.

  5. Influence mechanism on flow and heat transfer characteristics for air-cooled steam condenser cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei Feng; Dai, Yi Ping; Li, Mao Qing; Ma, Qing Zhong

    2012-09-01

    Air-cooled steam condensers (ACSCs) have been extensively utilized to reject waste heat in power industry to save water resources. However, ACSC performance is so sensitive to ambient wind that almost all the air-cooled power plants in China are less efficient compared to design conditions. It is shown from previous research that the influence of ambient wind on the cell performance differs from its location in the condenser. As a result, a numerical model including two identical ACSC cells are established, and the different influence on the performance of the cells is demonstrated and analyzed through the computational fluid dynamics method. Despite the great influence from the wind speeds, similar cell performance is obtained for the two cells under both windless and wind speed conditions when the wind parallels to the steam duct. Fan volumetric effectiveness which characterizes the fan performance, as well as the exchanger heat transfer rate, drops obviously with the increasing wind speed, and performance difference between the exchanger pair in the same A-frame also rises continuously. Furthermore, different flow and heat transfer characteristics of the windward and leeward cell are obtained at different wind angles, and ambient wind enhances the performance of the leeward cell, while that of the windward one changes little.

  6. Study of the expansion characteristics of a pulsed plasma jet in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuewei, ZHAO; Yonggang, YU; Shanshan, MANG; Xiaochun, XUE

    2017-04-01

    In the background of electrothermal-chemical (ETC) emission, an investigation has been conducted on the characteristics of a freely expanding pulsed plasma jet in air. The evolutionary process of the plasma jet is experimentally investigated using a piezoelectric pressure sensor and a digital high-speed video system. The variation relation in the extended volume, axial displacement and radial displacement of the pulsed plasma jet in atmosphere with time under different discharge voltages and jet breaking pressures is obtained. Based on experiments, a two-dimensional axisymmetric unsteady model is established to analyze the characteristics of the two-phase interface and the variation of flow-field parameters resulting from a pulsed plasma jet into air at a pressure of 1.5–3.5 MPa under three nozzle diameters (3 mm, 4 mm and 5 mm, respectively). The images of the plasma jet reveal a changing shape process, from a quasi-ellipsoid to a conical head and an elongated cylindrical tail. The axial displacement of the jet is always larger than that along the radial direction. The extended volume reveals a single peak distribution with time. Compared to the experiment, the numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental data. The parameters of the jet field mutate at the nozzle exit with a decrease in the parameter pulse near the nozzle, and become more and more gradual and close to environmental parameters. Increasing the injection pressure and nozzle diameter can increase the parameters of the flow field such as the expansion volume of the pulsed plasma jet, the size of the Mach disk and the pressure. In addition, the turbulent mixing in the expansion process is also enhanced.

  7. Hepatitis B virus in Buenos Aires, Argentina: genotypes, virological characteristics and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pezzano, S C; Torres, C; Fainboim, H A; Bouzas, M B; Schroder, T; Giuliano, S F; Paz, S; Alvarez, E; Campos, R H; Mbayed, V A

    2011-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is classified into eight major genotypes, A-H, which are geographically distributed worldwide. The aim of this work was to describe the clinical characteristics associated with the HBV genotypes circulating in Buenos Aires city. The study included 139 patients infected with HBV, whose clinical courses were classified as acute symptomatic self-limiting hepatitis, inactive carrier state and chronic active hepatitis (HBV e-antigen (HBeAg)-positive and HBeAg-negative). The HBV genotypes were determined in 128 patients by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis. Biochemical, virological, clinical and histological features were analysed. A differential distribution of genotypes between acute symptomatic and chronic infections was found. Among the acute cases, genotype F was predominant (65.2%, 30/46) and genotype D was rare (4.3%, 2/46), whereas among the chronic infections, a homogeneous distribution of genotypes A (26.8%, 22/82), D (31.7%, 26/82) and F (36.6%, 30/82), with an unusual presence of genotypes B (1.2%, 1/82) and C (3.7%, 3/82), was observed. Regarding the liver histology of chronically infected patients, genotype F tended to display higher histological activity indexes. Mutations related to HBV surface antigen immunoreactivity, antiviral resistance and HBeAg-negative status were studied. This work constitutes, to our knowledge, the first description of the clinical characteristics related to HBV genotypes in Argentina, where the distribution of genotypes in patients with acute infection has not been reported previously. Finally, it was established that genotype F is the prevalent genotype among the acute symptomatic infections in Buenos Aires city, and that it shows a tendency to cause an adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases.

  8. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  9. Combustion characteristics and air pollutant formation during oxy-fuel co-combustion of microalgae and lignite.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Dou, Jinxiao; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels is seen as one of the key technologies for carbon capture to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion characteristics of lignite coal, Chlorella vulgaris microalgae, and their blends under O2/N2 and O2/CO2 conditions were studied using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (TG-MS). During co-combustion of blends, three distinct peaks were observed and were attributed to C. vulgaris volatiles combustion, combustion of lignite, and combustion of microalgae char. Activation energy during combustion was calculated using iso-conventional method. Increasing the microalgae content in the blend resulted in an increase in activation energy for the blends combustion. The emissions of S- and N-species during blend fuel combustion were also investigated. The addition of microalgae to lignite during air combustion resulted in lower CO2, CO, and NO2 yields but enhanced NO, COS, and SO2 formation. During oxy-fuel co-combustion, the addition of microalgae to lignite enhanced the formation of gaseous species.

  10. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  11. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of bacteriochlorophylls from Chlorobiaceae: characteristic fragmentations.

    PubMed

    Airs, Ruth L; Keely, Brendan J

    2002-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (APCI-LC/MS/MS) has been applied to the study of bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e of phototrophic prokaryotes. Cultures of Chlorobiaceae containing bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e were examined using a high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and APCI-LC/MS/MS employing post-column addition of formic acid. The results reveal complex distributions of bacteriochlorophyll homologues, with some closely eluting species giving isobaric protonated molecules. On-line LC/MS/MS studies reveal characteristic fragment ions for bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e. Fragmentations involving loss of the extended alkyl substituents that are unique to bacteriochlorophylls c, d and e and their derivatives have been rationalised by studying the phaeophorbides and the results applied to the direct study of the bacteriochlorophylls.

  12. Background NO/sub x/ mixing ratios in air masses over the North Atlantic ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Helas, G.; Warneck, P.

    1981-08-20

    A chemiluminescence analyzer was used to measure NO/sub x/ mixing ratios at the west coast of Ireland. Two measurement modes allowed the determination of NO and NO/sub x/ = NO+NO/sub 2/. In a third mode using a molybdenum converter, higher signals were observed than was in the second mode indicating that nitrogen compounds other than NO+NO/sub 2/ are registered. They are denoted 'excess NO/sub x/'. The average NO/sub 2/ mixing ratio for a week period was 101 +- 87 pptv. In pure marine air masses identified by means of trajectory calculations, the NO/sub 2/ mixing ratios were lower and exhibited in addition a diurnal variation with nighttime values of 37 +- 6 pptv and average values of 87 +- 47 pptv. Possible origins of the diurnal variation are discussed. For such conditions, the NO mixing ratio generally was unmeasurably small, certainly less than 10 pptv. The excess NO/sub x/ is also higher during the day compared with nighttime values of about 70 pptv. Further studies are required to identify the compounds involved.

  13. Northern East Asian Monsoon Precipitation Revealed by Air Mass Variability and Its Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J. H.; Seo, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    This work provides a new perspective on the major factors controlling the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) in July, and a promising physical-statistical forecasting of the EASM ahead of summer. Dominant modes of the EASM are revealed from the variability of large-scale air masses discerned by equivalent potential temperature, and are found to be dynamically connected with the anomalous sea surface temperatures (SSTs) over the three major oceans of the world and their counterparts of prevailing atmospheric oscillation or teleconnection patterns. Precipitation over Northeast Asia (NEA) during July is enhanced by the tropical central Indian Ocean warming and central Pacific El Niño-related SST warming, the northwestern Pacific cooling off the coast of NEA, and the North Atlantic Ocean warming. Using these factors and data from the preceding spring seasons, the authors build a multiple linear regression model for seasonal forecasting. The cross-validated correlation skill predicted for the period 1994 to 2012 is up to 0.84, which far exceeds the skill level of contemporary climate models.

  14. Inverse Estimation of SO2 Emissions over China with Local Air Mass Factor Applied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Xu, X.; Henze, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) has significant impacts on human health as it forms sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere. Widespread uncertainty in the magnitude of SO2 emissions hinders efforts to address this issue. In this work we use Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) slant column SO2 observations as constraints to conduct inversion of SO2 emissions over China for April 2008. Local air mass factors are formulated as the integral of the relative vertical distribution of SO2 simulated from GEOS-Chem, weighted by scattering weights computed from VLIDORT. They are applied to convert slant column to vertical column GEOS-Chem SO2. After data assimilation SO2 emissions decrease in Sichuan Basin, South China, and most areas of North China. The posterior SO2 emissions are evaluated with in situ SO2 observation. Besides, we apply the posterior SO2 emissions of April 2008 to April 2009, and it leads to improved agreement of modeled SO2 to the OMI observations. This offers potential to update SO2 emissions in real time.

  15. Variations of the glacio-marine air mass front in West Greenland through water vapor isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    While the isotopic distribution of precipitation has been widely used for research in hydrology, paleoclimatology, and ecology for decades, intensive isotopic studies of atmospheric water vapor has only recently been made possible by spectral-based technology. New instrumentation based on this technology opens up many opportunities to investigate short-term atmospheric dynamics involving the water cycle and moisture transport. We deployed a Los Gatos Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA) at Kangerlussuaq, Greenland from July 21 to August 15, and measured the water vapor concentration and its isotopic ratios continuously at 10s intervals. A Danish Meteorological Institute site is located about 1 km from the site of the deployment, and meteorological data is collected at 30 min intervals. During the observation period, the vapor concentration of the ambient air ranges from 5608.4 to 11189.4 ppm; dD and d18O range from -254.5 to -177.7 ‰ and -34.2 to -23.2 ‰, respectively. The vapor content (dew point) and the isotopic ratios are both strongly controlled by the wind direction. The easterly winds are associated with dry, isotopically depleted air masses formed over the glacier, while westerly winds are associated with moist and isotopically enriched air masses from the marine/fjord surface. This region typically experiences katabatic winds off of the ice sheet to the east. However, during some afternoons, the wind shifts 180 degrees, blowing off the fjord to the west. This wind switch marks the onset of a sea breeze, and significant isotopic enrichment results. Enrichment in deuterium is up to 60 ‰ with a mean of 15‰, and oxygen-18 is enriched by 3‰ on average and up to 8 ‰. Other afternoons have no change in wind, and only small changes in humidity and vapor isotopic ratios. The humidity and isotopic variations suggest the local atmosphere circulation is dominated by relatively high-pressure systems above the cold glaciers and cool sea surface, and diurnal

  16. Associations of various family characteristics and time use with children's body mass index.

    PubMed

    Forshee, Richard A; Anderson, Patricia A; Storey, Maureen L

    2009-04-01

    This study used multiple regression models to estimate associations of various family characteristics and time use with the body mass index (BMI) z-scores of 734 boys and 725 girls aged 5-18y from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics Child Development Supplement 2003. The strongest relationship in the data was between the BMI of the head of household and a child's BMI z-score (p < 0.001). Time spent sleeping, performing sedentary behaviors, and participating in physical activities was not associated with a child's BMI z-score. This suggests that a family-oriented approach to prevent and treat childhood and adolescent overweight is required.

  17. Spiking structure of amplitude characteristics for ion trajectories in hyperboloidal mass spectrometers: the theory.

    PubMed

    Sheretov, Ernst P; Philippov, Igor V; Karnav, Tatiana B; Kolotilin, Boris I; Ivanov, Vladimir W

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory that describes a 'spiking' structure of the amplitude characteristics for trajectories of ions within a hyperboloidal mass spectrometer (HMS) discovered and reported recently. This effect, as well as modulation parametric resonance, relates directly to a fine structure of the stability diagram for a HMS. A method of extremum characteristic solutions of the Hill equation (developed in our laboratory earlier) has been used in this work. Simple expressions determined the shape of narrow dips (or reversed peaks) in the amplitude of ion oscillation versus stability parameter curves and conditions of their appearance are presented. The results that were calculated from analytical expressions are compared with those obtained from direct computations of ion trajectories in a HMS. This effect with respect to a nature of 'black holes' or 'black canyons' observed earlier in investigations of trapping efficiency and ion trapping within ion traps is discussed.

  18. System Being Developed to Measure the Rotordynamic Characteristics of Air Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the many possible advantages of oil-free engine operation, interest in using air lubricated foil-bearing technology in advanced oil-free engine concepts has recently increased. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has partially driven this recent push for oil-free technology. The program's goal of developing an innovative, practical, oil-free gas turbine engine for aeropropulsion began with the development of NASA's high-temperature solid-lubricant coating, PS304. This coating virtually eliminates the life-limiting wear that occurs during the startup and shutdown of the bearings. With practically unlimited life, foil air bearings are now very attractive to rotating machinery designers for use in turbomachinery. Unfortunately, the current knowledge base of these types of bearings is limited. In particular, the understanding of how these types of bearings contribute to the rotordynamic stability of turbomachinery is insufficient for designers to design with confidence. Recent work in oil-free turbomachinery has concentrated on advancing the understanding of foil bearings. A high-temperature fiber-optic displacement probe system and measurement method were developed to study the effects of speed, load, temperature, and other environmental issues on the stiffness characteristics of air foil bearings. Since high temperature data are to be collected in future testing, the testing method was intentionally simplified to minimize the need for expensive test hardware. The method measures the displacement induced upon a bearing in response to an applied perturbation load. The early results of these studies, which are shown in the accompanying figure, indicate trends in steady state stiffness that suggest stiffness increases with load and decreases with speed. It can be seen, even from these data, that stiffness is not expected to change by orders of magnitude over the normal operating range of most turbomachinery; a

  19. Seated Occupant Apparent Mass Characteristics Under Automotive Postures and Vertical Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RAKHEJA, S.; HARU, I.; BOILEAU, P.-É.

    2002-05-01

    The biodynamic apparent mass response characteristics of 24 human subjects (12 males and 12 females) seated under representative automotive postures with hands-in-lap (passengers) and hands-on-steering wheel (drivers) are reported. The measurements were carried out under white noise vertical excitations of 0·25, 0·5 and 1·0m/s2r.m.s. acceleration magnitudes in the 0·5-40Hz frequency range and a track measured input (1·07m/s2). The measured data have been analyzed to study the effects of hands position, body mass, magnitude and type of vibration excitation, and feet position, on the biodynamic response expressed in terms of apparent mass. A comparison of the measured response of subjects assuming typical automotive postures involving inclined cushion, inclined backrest and full use of backrest support with data determined under different postural conditions and excitation levels revealed considerable differences. The biodynamic response of automobile occupants seated with hands in lap, peaks in the 6·5-8·6Hz frequency range, which is considerably higher than the reported range of fundamental frequencies (4·5-5Hz) in most other studies involving different experimental conditions. The peak magnitude tends to decrease considerably for the driving posture with hands-on-steering wheel, while a second peak in the 8-12 Hz range becomes more apparent for this posture. The results suggest that biodynamic response of occupants seated in automotive seats and subject to vertical vibration need to be characterized, as a minimum, by two distinct functions for passenger and driving postures. A higher body mass, in general, yields higher peak magnitude response and lower corresponding frequency for both postures. The strong dependence of the response on the body mass is further demonstrated by grouping the measured data into four different mass ranges: less than 60 kg, between 60·5 and 70 kg, between 70·5 and 80 kg, and above 80 kg. From the results, it is concluded that

  20. Air quality resolution for health impacts assessment: influence of regional characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.; Saari, R. K.; Selin, N. E.

    2013-05-01

    We evaluate how regional characteristics of weather, population, and background pollution might impact the selection of optimal model resolution when calculating the human health impacts of changes to air quality. Using an approach consistent with air quality policy evaluation, we use a regional chemical transport model (CAMx) and a health benefits mapping program (BenMAP) to calculate the human health impacts associated with changes in ozone and fine particulate matter resulting from an emissions reduction scenario. We evaluate this same scenario at 36, 12 and 4 km resolution for nine regions in the Eastern US representing varied characteristics. We find that the human health benefits associated with changes in ozone concentrations are sensitive to resolution, especially in urban areas where we estimate that benefits calculated using coarse resolution results are on average two times greater than benefits calculated using finer scale results. In three urban areas we analyzed, results calculated using 36 km resolution modeling fell outside the uncertainty range of results calculated using finer scale modeling. In rural areas the influence of resolution is less pronounced with only an 8% increase in the estimated health impacts when using 36 km resolution over finer scales. In contrast, health benefits associated with changes in PM2.5 concentrations were not sensitive to resolution and did not follow a pattern based on any regional characteristics evaluated. The largest difference between the health impacts estimated using 36 km modeling results and either 12 or 4 km results was at most ±10% in any region. Several regions showed increases in estimated benefits as resolution increased (opposite the impact seen with ozone modeling) due to a higher contribution of primary PM in those regions, while some regions showed decreases in estimated benefits as resolution increased due to a higher contribution of secondary PM. Given that changes in PM2.5 dominate the human

  1. Contrasting the Effects of Maternal and Behavioral Characteristics on Fawn Birth Mass in White-Tailed Deer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Maternal care influences offspring quality and can improve a mother’s inclusive fitness. However, improved fitness may only occur when offspring quality (i.e., offspring birth mass) persists throughout life and enhances survival and/or reproductive success. Although maternal body mass, age, and social rank have been shown to influence offspring birth mass, the inter-dependence among these variables makes identifying causation problematic. We established that fawn birth mass was related to adult body mass for captive male and female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), thus maternal care should improve offspring fitness. We then used path analysis to identify which maternal characteristic(s) most influenced fawn birth mass of captive female white-tailed deer. Maternal age, body mass and social rank had varying effects on fawn birth mass. Maternal body mass displayed the strongest direct effect on fawn birth mass, followed by maternal age and social rank. Maternal body mass had a greater effect on social rank than age. The direct path between social rank and fawn birth mass may indicate dominance as an underlying mechanism. Our results suggest that heavier mothers could use dominance to improve access to resources, resulting in increased fitness through production of heavier offspring. PMID:26288141

  2. Contrasting the Effects of Maternal and Behavioral Characteristics on Fawn Birth Mass in White-Tailed Deer.

    PubMed

    Michel, Eric S; Demarais, Stephen; Strickland, Bronson K; Belant, Jerrold L

    2015-01-01

    Maternal care influences offspring quality and can improve a mother's inclusive fitness. However, improved fitness may only occur when offspring quality (i.e., offspring birth mass) persists throughout life and enhances survival and/or reproductive success. Although maternal body mass, age, and social rank have been shown to influence offspring birth mass, the inter-dependence among these variables makes identifying causation problematic. We established that fawn birth mass was related to adult body mass for captive male and female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), thus maternal care should improve offspring fitness. We then used path analysis to identify which maternal characteristic(s) most influenced fawn birth mass of captive female white-tailed deer. Maternal age, body mass and social rank had varying effects on fawn birth mass. Maternal body mass displayed the strongest direct effect on fawn birth mass, followed by maternal age and social rank. Maternal body mass had a greater effect on social rank than age. The direct path between social rank and fawn birth mass may indicate dominance as an underlying mechanism. Our results suggest that heavier mothers could use dominance to improve access to resources, resulting in increased fitness through production of heavier offspring.

  3. Imaging characteristics of local recurrences after stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer: Evaluation of mass-like fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinya; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in terms of radiation-induced changes and computed tomography (CT) features of local recurrence by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET). Methods From January 2006 to December 2012, 81 patients with NSCLC received SBRT. Follow-up consisted of non-contrast enhanced CT scans performed before and every four months after SBRT. In addition, 18F-FDG-PET/CT was conducted before SBRT for each patient, and one year later for each case suspected of recurrence. The CT findings were classified into two categories: mass-like fibrosis and others. The mass-like fibrosis category was subdivided into two patterns: mass-like consolidation (with air bronchogram) and mass-like opacity. Results Six patients had histologically confirmed local recurrence, including 83% (5/6) with mass-like opacity pattern and one case of modified conventional pattern (P = 0.02). In contrast, the non-recurrent group exhibited only 7% (5/75) with mass-like opacity and 13% (10/75) with mass-like consolidation pattern. Five patients with local recurrence presented with the mass-like opacity pattern, compared with 33% of patients (5/15) from the non-recurrent group (P = 0.01) and showed an increase in maximum diameter at ≥12 months after SBRT. The recurrent group also had a significantly higher standardized uptake value (SUVmax) than the non-recurrent group (P < 0.001), with all values >5 (range: 5.7–25.4). Conclusion The following characteristics of mass-like fibrosis should be considered indicators of local recurrence after SBRT: opacity pattern, increasing maximum diameter, and SUVmax > 5. PMID:26273357

  4. Background aerosol over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau: observed characteristics of aerosol mass loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Cong, Zhiyuan; Wang, Yuesi; Xin, Jinyuan; Wan, Xin; Pan, Yuepeng; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Guoshuai; Wang, Zhongyan; Wang, Yongjie; Kang, Shichang

    2017-01-01

    barren to forest, in inverse relation to the PM2.5 ratios. The seasonality of aerosol mass parameters was land-cover dependent. Over forest and grassland areas, TSP mass, PM2.5 mass, MISR-AOD and fine-mode AOD were higher in spring and summer, followed by relatively lower values in autumn and winter. At the barren site (the QOMS station), there were inconsistent seasonal patterns between surface TSP mass (PM2.5 mass) and atmospheric column AOD (fine-mode AOD). Our findings implicate that HTP aerosol masses (especially their regional characteristics and fine-particle emissions) need to be treated sensitively in relation to assessments of their climatic effect and potential role as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei.

  5. Changes in spring-mass model characteristics during repeated running sprints.

    PubMed

    Girard, Olivier; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Millet, Grégoire P

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated fatigue-induced changes in spring-mass model characteristics during repeated running sprints. Sixteen active subjects performed 12 × 40 m sprints interspersed with 30 s of passive recovery. Vertical and anterior-posterior ground reaction forces were measured at 5-10 m and 30-35 m and used to determine spring-mass model characteristics. Contact (P < 0.001), flight (P < 0.05) and swing times (P < 0.001) together with braking, push-off and total stride durations (P < 0.001) lengthened across repetitions. Stride frequency (P < 0.001) and push-off forces (P < 0.05) decreased with fatigue, whereas stride length (P = 0.06), braking (P = 0.08) and peak vertical forces (P = 0.17) changes approached significance. Center of mass vertical displacement (P < 0.001) but not leg compression (P > 0.05) increased with time. As a result, vertical stiffness decreased (P < 0.001) from the first to the last repetition, whereas leg stiffness changes across sprint trials were not significant (P > 0.05). Changes in vertical stiffness were correlated (r > 0.7; P < 0.001) with changes in stride frequency. When compared to 5-10 m, most of ground reaction force-related parameters were higher (P < 0.05) at 30-35 m, whereas contact time, stride frequency, vertical and leg stiffness were lower (P < 0.05). Vertical stiffness deteriorates when 40 m run-based sprints are repeated, which alters impact parameters. Maintaining faster stride frequencies through retaining higher vertical stiffness is a prerequisite to improve performance during repeated sprinting.

  6. Characteristics and source distribution of air pollution in winter in Qingdao, eastern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingyu; Yan, Dongyun; Xu, Shaohui; Huang, Mingli; Wang, Xiaoxia; Xie, Shaodong

    2017-05-01

    To characterize air pollution and determine its source distribution in Qingdao, Shandong Province, we analyzed hourly national air quality monitoring network data of normal pollutants at nine sites from 1 November 2015 to 31 January 2016. The average hourly concentrations of particulate matter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) and <10 μm (PM10), SO2, NO2, 8-h O3, and CO in Qingdao were 83, 129, 39, 41, and 41 μg m(-3), and 1.243 mg m(-3), respectively. During the polluted period, 19-26 December 2015, 29 December 2015 to 4 January 2016, and 14-17 January 2016, the mean 24-h PM2.5 concentration was 168 μg m(-3) with maximum of 311 μg m(-3). PM2.5 was the main pollutant to contribute to the pollution during the above time. Heavier pollution and higher contributions of secondary formation to PM2.5 concentration were observed in December and January. Pollution pathways and source distribution were investigated using the HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model and potential source contribution function (PSCF) and concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) analyses. A cluster from the west, originating in Shanxi, southern Hebei, and west Shandong Provinces, accounted for 44.1% of the total air masses, had a mean PM2.5 concentration of 134.9 μg m(-3) and 73.9% trajectories polluted. This area contributed the most to PM2.5 and PM10 levels, >160 and 300 μg m(-3), respectively. In addition, primary crustal aerosols from desert of Inner Mongolia, and coarse and fine marine aerosols from the Yellow Sea contributed to ambient PM. The ambient pollutant concentrations in Qingdao in winter could be attributed to local primary emissions (e.g., coal combustion, vehicular, domestic and industrial emissions), secondary formation, and long distance transmission of emissions.

  7. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Glenn Charles

    1999-12-01

    -7, 10-5, and 10-5 respectively. To understand how internal surface area influences the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet, a model of ozone diffusion into and reaction with internal carpet components was developed. This was then used to predict apparent reaction probabilities for carpet. He combines this with a modified model of turbulent mass transfer developed by Liu, et al. to predict deposition rates and indoor ozone concentrations. The model predicts that carpet should have an equivalent reaction probability of about 10-5, matching laboratory measurements of the reaction probability. For both carpet and duct materials, surfaces become progressively quenched (aging), losing the ability to react or otherwise take up ozone. He evaluated the functional form of aging and find that the reaction probability follows a power function with respect to the cumulative uptake of ozone. To understand ozone aging of surfaces, he developed several mathematical descriptions of aging based on two different mechanisms. The observed functional form of aging is mimicked by a model which describes ozone diffusion with internal reaction in a solid. He shows that the fleecy nature of carpet materials in combination with the model of ozone diffusion below a fiber surface and internal reaction may explain the functional form and the magnitude of power function parameters observed due to ozone interactions with carpet. The ozone induced aldehyde emissions, measured from duct materials, were combined with an indoor air quality model to show that concentrations of aldehydes indoors may approach odorous levels. He shows that ducts are unlikely to be a significant sink for ozone due to the low reaction probability in combination with the short residence time of air in ducts.

  8. Building characteristics, indoor air quality and recurrent wheezing in very young children (BAMSE).

    PubMed

    Emenius, G; Svartengren, M; Korsgaard, J; Nordvall, L; Pershagen, G; Wickman, M

    2004-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine the impact of building characteristics and indoor air quality on recurrent wheezing in infants. We followed a birth cohort (BAMSE) comprising 4089 children, born in predefined areas of Stockholm, during their first 2 years of life. Information on exposures was obtained from parental questionnaires when the children were 2 months and on symptoms and diseases when the children were 1 and 2 years old. Children with recurrent wheezing, and two age-matched controls per case, were identified and enrolled in a nested case-control study. The homes were investigated and ventilation rate, humidity, temperature and NO2 measured. We found that living in an apartment erected after 1939, or in a private home with crawl space/concrete slab foundation were associated with an increased risk of recurrent wheezing, odds ratio (OR) 2.5 (1.3-4.8) and 2.5 (1.1-5.4), respectively. The same was true for living in homes with absolute indoor humidity >5.8 g/kg, OR 1.7 (1.0-2.9) and in homes where windowpane condensation was consistently reported over several years, OR 2.2 (1.1-4.5). However, air change rate and type of ventilation system did not seem to affect the risk. In conclusion, relatively new apartment buildings, single-family homes with crawl space/concrete slab foundation, elevated indoor humidity, and reported wintertime windowpane condensation were associated with recurrent wheezing in infants. Thus, improvements of the building quality may have potential to prevent infant wheezing.

  9. Dynamic Characteristics of Positive Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharge for Ozone Generation in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Linsheng; Peng, Bangfa; Li, Ming; Zhang, Yafang; Hu, Zhaoji

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive dynamic model consisting of 66 reactions and 24 species is developed to investigate the dynamic characteristics of ozone generation by positive pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) using parallel-plate reactor in air. The electron energy conservation equation is coupled to the electron continuity equation, the heavy species continuity equation, and Poisson's equation for a better description. The reliability of the model is experimentally confirmed. The model can be used to predict the temporal and spatial evolution of species, as well as streamer propagation. The simulation results show that electron density increases nearly exponentially in the direction to the anode at the electron avalanche. Streamer propagation velocity is about 5.26 × 104 m/s from anode to cathode in the simulated condition. The primary positive ion, negative ion, and excited species are O2+, O3- and O2(1Δg) in pulsed DBD in air, respectively. N2O has the largest density among nitrogen oxides. e and N2+ densities in the streamer head increase gradually to maximum values with the development of the streamer. Meanwhile, the O2+, O, O3, N2(A3Σ) and N2O densities reach maximum values in the vicinity of the anode. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51366012 and 11105067), Jiangxi Province Young Scientists (Jinggang Star) Cultivation Plan of China (No. 20133BCB23008), Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi, China (No. 20151BAB206047) and Jiangxi Province Higher School Science and Technology Landing Plan of China (No. KJLD-14015)

  10. Heat transfer characteristics of laminar methane/air flame impinging normal to a cylindrical surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, Subhash; Ray, Anjan

    2007-11-15

    An experimental study has been conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of methane/air laminar flames impinging normal to a cylindrical surface. Effects of variations in the values of Reynolds number (Re = 600-1300), equivalence ratio ({phi} = 0.8-1.3), dimensionless separation distance (H/d = 1-5), and burner diameter to cylinder diameter ratio (d/D = 0.0538-0.1076) have been investigated. Three important configurations, viz., flame inner reaction zone far away, just touching and intercepted by the impingement surface, were examined in detail. High stagnation point heat fluxes were obtained when tip of the flame inner reaction zone just touched the target surface. Stagnation point heat fluxes were either zero or negative when the inner reaction zone was intercepted by the impingement surface. An off-stagnation peak in heat flux was obtained at moderate separation distances above the flame tip. Both stagnation point and peak heat fluxes increased with Re when the inner reaction zone length was less than the separation distance. Heat fluxes in the wall-jet region were high at high Re. Maximum heat fluxes were obtained for initially fuel-rich mixture conditions due to entrainment of the surrounding air. Smaller burner diameters produced high heat flux at the stagnation region for fixed Reynolds number and opposite trends were seen in the wall-jet region. A secondary rise in stagnation point heat flux was obtained at larger separation distances. This secondary rise in heat flux was quite significant for larger burner diameters and at low flow rates. Correlations were developed for stagnation point heat flux. Results were also compared with flat plate under identical operating conditions. (author)

  11. Effect of osmotic pretreatment on air drying characteristics and colour of pepper (Capsicum spp) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Falade, Kolawole Olumuyiwa; Oyedele, Olaniyi O

    2010-10-01

    Air-drying characteristics of fresh and osmotically pretreated (40°B, 50°B and 60°B sucrose solutions for 9 h) four pepper cultivars namely, Rodo (Capsicum annuum), Shombo (Capsicum frutescens), Bawa (Capsicum frutenscens) and Tatashe (Capsicum annuum), and CIE L*a*b* parameters of air-dried (50, 60, 70 and 80 °C) peppers were investigated. Moisture diffusivity and activation energy (Ea) were calculated from Fick's law and analogous Arrhenius equation, respectively. Colour difference, chroma and hue angle of fresh- and osmo-oven dried peppers were evaluated. Drying rates occurred predominantly in the falling rate. Moisture diffusivity varied from 8.071 × 10(-10)-1.048 × 10(-8), 7.710 × 10(-11)-1.018 × 10(-9), 9.807 × 10(-9)-1.746 × 10(-8) and 8.748 × 10(-10)-1.464 × 10(-9) m(2)/s for Bawa, Rodo, Shombo, and Tatashe, respectively. Ea for moisture diffusion during drying of peppers varied from 53.86 to 84.86 kJ/mol and was affected by cultivars and osmotic pretreatment concentration. Osmotic pretreatment and drying temperature had significant effect (p < 0.05) on a*, b*, chroma and hue angle values of dried peppers.

  12. Change of microbial communities in glaciers along a transition of air masses in western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shu-Rong; Chen, Yong; Shang, Tian-Cui; Jing, Ze-Fan; Wu, Guangjian

    2010-12-01

    Microbial community dynamics across glaciers in different climatic zones provide important information about the sources, transportation pathways, and deposition of microorganisms. To better understand the possible driving forces of microbial community shifts in glacier ice at a large spatial scale, 16S rRNA gene amplification was used to establish clone libraries containing 95 bacterial sequences from three different habitats in the Qiangyong Gacier in 2005. The libraries were used in phylogenetic comparison with 149 previously reported sequences from the surface samples collected from the Kuytun 51, and East Rongbuk glaciers in the same year. The results showed the presence of cosmopolitan and endemic species, and displayed a tendency of zonal distribution of bacterial communities at genera and community levels, corresponding to the geographic placement of the three glaciers. Data also showed a significant difference in the proportion of dominant phylogenetic groups in the three glaciers. Comamonadaceae/Polaromonas (Betaproteobacteria) and Flexibacteraceae (Bacteroidetes) were dominant in the Qiangyong Glacier, Cyanobacteria, Comamonadaceae/Polaromonas, and Rhodoferax (Betaproteobacteria) were dominant in the Kuytun 51 Glacier, and Acinetobacteria (Gammaproteobacteria) were dominant in the Rongbuk Glacier. In conclusion, the current study provides evidence of microbial biogeography in glacier ice at both the fine lineage and whole community levels. The biogeographical patterns were generally associated with the hydrological transition over the glaciers in the northern periphery and southern part of the Tibetan plateau. This supports our hypothesis of air mass behavior being one of the main drivers determining the zonal distribution of microbial communities across the mountain glaciers in western China.

  13. Climatology of wintertime long-distance transport of surface-layer air masses arriving urban Beijing in 2001-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Xiang-De, XU

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the FLEXPART-WRF coupled modeling system is used to conduct 12-year Lagrangian modeling over Beijing, China, for the winters of 2001-2012. Based on large trajectory tracking ensembles, the long-range air transport properties, in terms of geographic source regions within the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) and large-scale ventilation, and its association with air quality levels were quantified from a climatological perspective. The results show the following: (1) The air masses residing in the near-surface layer over Beijing potentially originate from broader atmospheric boundary-layer regions, which cover vast areas with the backward tracking time elapsed. However, atmospheric transport from northeastern China and, to a lesser extent, from the surrounding regions of Beijing is important. (2) The evolution of air quality over Beijing is negatively correlated with large-scale ventilation conditions, particularly at a synoptic timescale. Thus, the simple but robust backward-trajectory ventilation (BV) index defined in this study could facilitate operational forecasting of severe air pollution events. (3) By comparison, the relatively short-range transport occurring over transport timescales of less than 3 days from southern and southeastern Beijing and its surrounding areas plays a vital role in the formation of severe air pollution events during the wintertime. (4) Additionally, an interannual trend analysis suggests that the geographic sources and ventilation conditions also changed, at least over the last decade, corresponding to the strength variability of the winter East Asian monsoon.

  14. Associations between substance use and body mass index: moderating effects of sociodemographic characteristics among Taiwanese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tai-Ling; Yen, Ju-Yu; Ko, Chih-Hung; Huang, Mei-Feng; Wang, Peng-Wei; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between substance use and body mass index (BMI) among adolescents in Southern Taiwan. A total of 10,259 adolescent students aged 11-19 years were selected by stratified random sampling for proportional representation of districts, schools and grades in Southern Taiwan, and completed the questionnaires. The body weight, body height, experience of substance use and sociodemographic characteristics including sex, age, residential background and paternal/maternal educational levels were collected. The association between substance use and BMI, and the moderating effects of sociodemographic characteristics were examined. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, BMI was higher for adolescents who smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol than for those who do not regularly smoke or drink. Chewing betel nuts and using illicit drugs were not significantly associated with BMI. Paternal education level had a moderating effect on the association between smoking and BMI. Smoking, alcohol drinking, and low paternal education level were associated with higher BMI among adolescents. Thus, healthcare professionals should pay more attention to the weight-related problems among these adolescents.

  15. Influence of pregnancy on body weight, ruminal characteristics, and visceral organ mass in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Scheaffer, A N; Caton, J S; Bauer, M L; Reynolds, L P

    2001-09-01

    Crossbred heifers (initially 24 mo, approximate age and 378 +/- 32.1 kg BW) were used to evaluate the influence of pregnancy and advancing gestation on DMI, BW, carcass weight, ruminal characteristics, and visceral organ mass. Heifers (naturally serviced (n = 22; nonpregnant controls, n = 17), were grouped in common pens. Heifers were provided corn silage and hay-based diets formulated to provide 0.45 kg of ADG. Treatments were pregnancy and nonpregnancy; pregnant and nonpregnant heifers were slaughtered on d 40, 120, 200, and 270. Live weight at slaughter and BW change throughout the trial were not influenced by pregnancy (P > 0.1). Carcass weight per unit of BW was decreased due to pregnancy (P < 0.05) and an interaction was found in eviscerated BW (EvBW; P < 0.1), with the pregnant heifers having greater live weights, carcass weights, and EvBW at the d-200 slaughter period. Ruminal fluid fill and total fill (g/kg BW) declined as slaughter period advanced, resulting in the pregnant heifers having less fill at d 270 (P< 0.07). However, ME intake was not different between pregnant and nonpregnant heifers (P > 0.1) at any of the slaughter periods. Heart mass responded differently when nonpregnant and pregnant were analyzed over time and an interaction was detected as slaughter period advanced (P < 0.1). Liver, duodenum, jejunum, and large intestinal mass were not responsive to pregnancy (P > 0.1). Data indicate that ruminal fill is altered by pregnancy but visceral organ mass is not greatly changed by treatment.

  16. Landing Characteristics of a Reentry Capsule with a Torus-Shaped Air Bag for Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGehee, John R.; Hathaway, Melvin E.

    1960-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made to determine the landing characteristics of a conical-shaped reentry capsule by using torus-shaped air bags for impact-load alleviation. An impact bag was attached below the large end of the capsule to absorb initial impact loads and a second bag was attached around the canister to absorb loads resulting from impact on the canister when the capsule overturned. A 1/6-scale dynamic model of the configuration was tested for nominal flight paths of 60 deg. and 90 deg. (vertical), a range of contact attitudes from -25 deg. to 30 deg., and a vertical contact velocity of 12.25 feet per second. Accelerations were measured along the X-axis (roll) and Z-axis (yaw) by accelerometers rigidly installed at the center of gravity of the model. Actual flight path, contact attitudes, and motions were determined from high-speed motion pictures. Landings were made on concrete and on water. The peak accelerations along the X-axis for landings on concrete were in the order of 3Og for a 0 deg. contact attitude. A horizontal velocity of 7 feet per second, corresponding to a flight path of 60 deg., had very little effect upon the peak accelerations obtained for landings on concrete. For contact attitudes of -25 deg. and 30 deg. the peak accelerations along the Z-axis were about +/- l5g, respectively. The peak accelerations measured for the water landings were about one-third lower than the peak accelerations measured for the landings on concrete. Assuming a rigid body, computations were made by using Newton's second law of motion and the force-stroke characteristics of the air bag to determine accelerations for a flight path of 90 deg. (vertical) and a contact attitude of 0 deg. The computed and experimental peak accelerations and strokes at peak acceleration were in good agreement for the model. The special scaling appears to be applicable for predicting full-scale time and stroke at peak acceleration for a landing on concrete from a 90 deg

  17. Quantification of VX vapor in ambient air by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometric analysis of glass bead filled sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald A; Smith, Wendy L; Nguyen, Nam-Phuong; Crouse, Kathy L; Crouse, Charles L; Norman, Steven D; Jakubowski, E Michael

    2011-02-15

    An analysis method has been developed for determining low parts-per-quadrillion by volume (ppqv) concentrations of nerve agent VX vapor actively sampled from ambient air. The method utilizes glass bead filled depot area air monitoring system (DAAMS) sampling tubes with isopropyl alcohol extraction and isotope dilution using liquid chromatography coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS) with positive ion electrospray ionization for quantitation. The dynamic range was from one-tenth of the worker population limit (WPL) to the short-term exposure limit (STEL) for a 24 L air sample taken over a 1 h period. The precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated using liquid-spiked tubes, and the collection characteristics of the DAAMS tubes were assessed by collecting trace level vapor generated in a 1000 L continuous flow chamber. The method described here has significant improvements over currently employed thermal desorption techniques that utilize a silver fluoride pad during sampling to convert VX to a higher volatility G-analogue for gas chromatographic analysis. The benefits of this method are the ability to directly analyze VX with improved selectivity and sensitivity, the injection of a fraction of the extract, quantitation using an isotopically labeled internal standard, and a short instrument cycle time.

  18. Average heat-transfer characteristics of a row of circular air jets impinging on a concave surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the average heat-transfer characteristics of air jets impinging on the concave side of a right-circular semicylinder is reported. Results from existing correlating are compared with each other and with experimental heat-transfer data for a row of circular jets. Two correlations available in the literature are recommended for use in designing cooled turbine vanes and blades.

  19. Air Quality in Lanzhou, a Major Industrial City in China: Characteristics of Air Pollution and Review of Existing Evidence from Air Pollution and Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaqun; Li, Min; Bravo, Mercedes A.; Jin, Lan; Nori-Sarma, Amruta; Xu, Yanwen; Guan, Donghong; Wang, Chengyuan; Chen, Mingxia; Wang, Xiao; Tao, Wei; Qiu, Weitao; Zhang, Yawei

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution contributes substantially to global health burdens; however, less is known about pollution patterns in China and whether they differ from those elsewhere. We evaluated temporal and spatial heterogeneity of air pollution in Lanzhou, an urban Chinese city (April 2009–December 2012), and conducted a systematic review of literature on air pollution and health in Lanzhou. Average levels were 141.5, 42.3, and 47.2 µg/m3 for particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 µm (PM10), NO2, and SO2, respectively. Findings suggest some seasonality, particularly for SO2, with higher concentrations during colder months relative to warmer months, although a longer time frame of data is needed to evaluate seasonality fully. Correlation coefficients generally declined with distance between monitors, while coefficients of divergence increased with distance. However, these trends were not statistically significant. PM10 levels exceeded Chinese and other health-based standards and guidelines. The review identified 13 studies on outdoor air pollution and health. Although limited, the studies indicate that air pollution is associated with increased risk of health outcomes in Lanzhou. These studies and the high air pollution levels suggest potentially serious health consequences. Findings can provide guidance to future epidemiological studies, monitor placement programs, and air quality policies. PMID:25838615

  20. Air Quality in Lanzhou, a Major Industrial City in China: Characteristics of Air Pollution and Review of Existing Evidence from Air Pollution and Health Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaqun; Li, Min; Bravo, Mercedes A; Jin, Lan; Nori-Sarma, Amruta; Xu, Yanwen; Guan, Donghong; Wang, Chengyuan; Chen, Mingxia; Wang, Xiao; Tao, Wei; Qiu, Weitao; Zhang, Yawei; Bell, Michelle L

    2014-10-01

    Air pollution contributes substantially to global health burdens; however, less is known about pollution patterns in China and whether they differ from those elsewhere. We evaluated temporal and spatial heterogeneity of air pollution in Lanzhou, an urban Chinese city (April 2009-December 2012), and conducted a systematic review of literature on air pollution and health in Lanzhou. Average levels were 141.5, 42.3, and 47.2 µg/m(3) for particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 µm (PM10), NO2, and SO2, respectively. Findings suggest some seasonality, particularly for SO2, with higher concentrations during colder months relative to warmer months, although a longer time frame of data is needed to evaluate seasonality fully. Correlation coefficients generally declined with distance between monitors, while coefficients of divergence increased with distance. However, these trends were not statistically significant. PM10 levels exceeded Chinese and other health-based standards and guidelines. The review identified 13 studies on outdoor air pollution and health. Although limited, the studies indicate that air pollution is associated with increased risk of health outcomes in Lanzhou. These studies and the high air pollution levels suggest potentially serious health consequences. Findings can provide guidance to future epidemiological studies, monitor placement programs, and air quality policies.

  1. Simultaneous determination of aliphatic and aromatic amines in ambient air and airborne particulate matters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyüz, Mehmet

    2008-05-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method has been proposed for the simultaneous determination of aliphatic and aromatic amines in ambient air and airborne particulate matters (PMs). The method includes collection of the particulate matters (PM2.5 and PM10) using dichotomous Partisol 2025 sampler followed by extraction of the compounds into acidic solution, and pre-concentration of the compounds by percolating the air samples through the acidic solution, then ion-pair extraction of amines with bis-2-ethylhexylphosphate and derivatisation with isobutyl chloroformate prior to their GC-MS analysis in both electron impact and positive and negative ion chemical ionisation mode as their isobutyloxycarbonyl (isoBOC) derivatives. In the present study, ambient air and airborne particulate samples collected in Zonguldak province during summer and winter times of 2006-2007 were analysed for aliphatic and aromatic amines by the proposed method and the method was shown to be suitable for the simultaneous determination of these compounds at the levels of pg m-3 in air and airborne particulate samples. The seasonal distributions of bioactive amines in concentrations in ambient air and airborne PMs were evaluated as they are significant for the estimation of their effects on the environment and human health. The concentration levels of water soluble amines fluctuate significantly within a year with higher means and peak concentrations, probably due to the increased emissions from coal-fired domestic and central heating, in the winter times compared to the summer times. The results indicated that the relative amine content in particulates modulates with molecular mass and time of the year and the relative amine content especially in fine fractions of inhalable airborne particulates increases with the molecular mass of species but decreases with temperature.

  2. Calculations of relative optical air masses for various aerosol types and minor gases in Arctic and Antarctic atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Petkov, Boyan H.

    2014-02-01

    The dependence functions of relative optical air mass on apparent solar zenith angle θ have been calculated over the θ < 87° range for the vertical profiles of wet-air molecular number density in the Arctic and Antarctic atmospheres, extinction coefficients of different aerosol types, and molecular number density of water vapor, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and oxygen dimer. The calculations were made using as weight functions the seasonal average vertical profiles of (i) pressure and temperature derived from multiyear sets of radiosounding measurements performed at Ny-Ålesund, Alert, Mario Zucchelli, and Neumayer stations; (ii) volume extinction coefficients of background summer aerosol, Arctic haze, and Kasatochi and Pinatubo volcanic aerosol measured with lidars or balloon-borne samplings; and (iii) molecular number concentrations of the above minor gases, derived from radiosonde, ozonesonde, and satellite-based observations. The air mass values were determined using a formula based on a realistic atmospheric air-refraction model. They were systematically checked by comparing their mutual differences with the uncertainties arising from the seasonal and daily variations in pressure and temperature conditions within the various ranges, where aerosol and gases attenuate the solar radiation most efficiently. The results provide evidence that secant-approximated and midlatitude air mass values are inappropriate for analyzing the Sun photometer measurements performed at polar sites. They indicate that the present evaluations can be reliably used to estimate the aerosol optical depth from the Arctic and Antarctic measurements of total optical depth, after appropriate corrections for the Rayleigh scattering and gaseous absorption optical depths.

  3. Screening for sarin in air and water by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J F; Boparai, A S; Reed, L L

    2001-10-01

    A method of screening air and water samples for the chemical-warfare agent Sarin is developed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). The SPME field kit sampler is ideal for collecting air and water samples in the field and transporting samples safely to the laboratory. The sampler also allows the sample to be introduced into the GC-MS system without further sample preparation. Results of the tests with Sarin using the SPME technique indicate that a sample collection time of 5 min is sufficient to detect 100 ng/L of Sarin in air. For water samples, Sarin is detected at a concentration of 12 microg/mL or higher. This method is ideal for screening samples for quick response situations.

  4. Screening for sarin in air and water by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J. F.; Boparai, A. S.; Reed, L. L.

    2001-10-01

    A method of screening air and water samples for the chemical-warfare agent Sarin is developed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). The SPME field kit sampler is ideal for collecting air and water samples in the field and transporting samples safely to the laboratory. The sampler also allows the sample to be introduced into the GC-MS system without further sample preparation. Results of the tests with Sarin using the SPME technique indicate that a sample collection time of 5 min is sufficient to detect 100 ng/L of Sarin in air. For water samples, Sarin is detected at a concentration of 12 {mu}g/mL or higher. This method is ideal for screening samples for quick response situations.

  5. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  6. On the relationship between Arctic ice clouds and polluted air masses over the north slope of Alaska in April 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouan, C.; Pelon, J.; Girard, E.; Ancellet, G.; Blanchet, J. P.; Delanoë, J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, two Types of Ice Clouds (TICs) properties have been characterized using ISDAC airborne measurements (Alaska, April 2008). TIC-2B were characterized by fewer (<10 L-1) and larger (>110 μm) ice crystals, a larger ice supersaturation (>15%) and a fewer ice nuclei (IN) concentration (<2 order of magnitude) when compared to TIC-1/2A. It has been hypothesized that emissions of SO2 may reduce the ice nucleating properties of IN through acidification, resulting to a smaller concentration of larger ice crystals and leading to precipitation (e.g. cloud regime TIC-2B) because of the reduced competition for the same available moisture. Here, the origin of air masses forming the ISDAC TIC-1/2A (1 April 2008) and TIC-2B (15 April 2008) is investigated using trajectory tools and satellite data. Results show that the synoptic conditions favor air masses transport from the three potentials SO2 emission areas to Alaska: eastern China and Siberia where anthropogenic and biomass burning emission respectively are produced and the volcanic region from the Kamchatka/Aleutians. Weather conditions allow the accumulation of pollutants from eastern China/Siberia over Alaska, most probably with the contribution of acid volcanic aerosol during the TIC-2B period. OMI observations reveal that SO2 concentrations in air masses forming the TIC-2B were larger than in air masses forming the TIC-1/2A. Airborne measurements show high acidity near the TIC-2B flight where humidity was low. These results strongly support the hypothesis that acidic coating on IN are at the origin of the formation of TIC-2B.

  7. On the relationship between Arctic ice clouds and polluted air masses over the North Slope of Alaska in April 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouan, C.; Pelon, J.; Girard, E.; Ancellet, G.; Blanchet, J. P.; Delanoë, J.

    2014-02-01

    Recently, two types of ice clouds (TICs) properties have been characterized using the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) airborne measurements (Alaska, April 2008). TIC-2B were characterized by fewer (< 10 L-1) and larger (> 110 μm) ice crystals, and a larger ice supersaturation (> 15%) compared to TIC-1/2A. It has been hypothesized that emissions of SO2 may reduce the ice nucleating properties of ice nuclei (IN) through acidification, resulting in a smaller concentration of larger ice crystals and leading to precipitation (e.g., cloud regime TIC-2B). Here, the origin of air masses forming the ISDAC TIC-1/2A (1 April 2008) and TIC-2B (15 April 2008) is investigated using trajectory tools and satellite data. Results show that the synoptic conditions favor air masses transport from three potential SO2 emission sources into Alaska: eastern China and Siberia where anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, are produced, and the volcanic region of the Kamchatka/Aleutians. Weather conditions allow the accumulation of pollutants from eastern China and Siberia over Alaska, most probably with the contribution of acidic volcanic aerosol during the TIC-2B period. Observation Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite observations reveal that SO2 concentrations in air masses forming the TIC-2B were larger than in air masses forming the TIC-1/2A. Airborne measurements show high acidity near the TIC-2B flight where humidity was low. These results support the hypothesis that acidic coating on IN could be at the origin of the formation of TIC-2B.

  8. [Analysis on Regional Characteristics of Air Quality Index and Weather Situation in Beijing and Its Surrounding Cities During the APEC].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing-xian; Lu, Jun-rong; Wang, Ning; Li, Wen-tao; Gao, Wen-kang; Su, Bu-da

    2015-11-01

    Analysis on the revolution and regional characteristics of air quality by hourly monitored readings from 1 to 15 November 2014 released by Environmental Monitoring Station of China and research of the impacts of weather situation and meteorological elements released by China Meteorological Administration towards air quality of Beijing and its surrounding cities during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) indicated that: (1) The air quality was good because of the implementation of mitigation measures, while the Air Quality Index (AQI) increased along with the termination of mitigation measures. Thus it can be seen that mitigation measures made a great contribution to the improvement of air quality of Beijing and its surrounding cities. (2) Affected by thermal inversion layer, AQI of Beijing and its surrounding cities increased quickly during the initial of the implemental of reducing measures which proved that pollutants would accumulate in the context of unfavourable weather, hence the influence of weather situation towards air quality could not be ignored. (3) Although affected by thermal inversion layer, the concentration of pollutants of Beijing was not accumulated to a high degree at the end period of reducing measures, while Tianjin, Tangshan, Baoding and Xingtai suffered from moderate and severe pollution at the same time which further illustrated that the implementation of mitigation measures have made a great contribution to the improvement of air quality in Beijing during APEC.

  9. Influence of air pressure on the detailed characteristics of corona current pulse due to positive corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuebao; Cui, Xiang; Lu, Tiebing; Li, Dayong; Chen, Bo; Fu, Yuke

    2016-12-01

    Air pressure is one of the main factors affecting the corona discharge and influence of air pressure should be carefully investigated. In order to obtain the influence of air pressure on the detailed characteristics of corona current pulse, such as pulse amplitude, rise time, pulse width, duration time, and pulse repetition frequency, a systematic investigation is carried out though a coaxial conductor-cylinder electrode structure with a corona point on the conductor. The electrodes are put into a pressure chamber for adjusting the air pressure. The results show that pulse amplitude increases with the increase of air pressure, while rise time, pulse width, duration time, and pulse repetition frequency decrease significantly at the same ratio between applied voltage and onset voltage (U/U0). Empirical formulas for the pulse amplitude, rise time, pulse width, and duration time varying with air pressure are first established. On the basis of the development of positive corona discharge, the influence of air pressure on the typical time intervals and experimental results are qualitatively explained.

  10. Features of air masses associated with the deposition of Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea by rain and snowfall

    PubMed Central

    Monteil, Caroline L; Bardin, Marc; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-01-01

    Clarifying the role of precipitation in microbial dissemination is essential for elucidating the processes involved in disease emergence and spread. The ecology of Pseudomonas syringae and its presence throughout the water cycle makes it an excellent model to address this issue. In this study, 90 samples of freshly fallen rain and snow collected from 2005–2011 in France were analyzed for microbiological composition. The conditions favorable for dissemination of P. syringae by this precipitation were investigated by (i) estimating the physical properties and backward trajectories of the air masses associated with each precipitation event and by (ii) characterizing precipitation chemistry, and genetic and phenotypic structures of populations. A parallel study with the fungus Botrytis cinerea was also performed for comparison. Results showed that (i) the relationship of P. syringae to precipitation as a dissemination vector is not the same for snowfall and rainfall, whereas it is the same for B. cinerea and (ii) the occurrence of P. syringae in precipitation can be linked to electrical conductivity and pH of water, the trajectory of the air mass associated with the precipitation and certain physical conditions of the air mass (i.e. temperature, solar radiation exposure, distance traveled), whereas these predictions are different for B. cinerea. These results are pertinent to understanding microbial survival, emission sources and atmospheric processes and how they influence microbial dissemination. PMID:24722630

  11. Features of air masses associated with the deposition of Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea by rain and snowfall.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Bardin, Marc; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-11-01

    Clarifying the role of precipitation in microbial dissemination is essential for elucidating the processes involved in disease emergence and spread. The ecology of Pseudomonas syringae and its presence throughout the water cycle makes it an excellent model to address this issue. In this study, 90 samples of freshly fallen rain and snow collected from 2005-2011 in France were analyzed for microbiological composition. The conditions favorable for dissemination of P. syringae by this precipitation were investigated by (i) estimating the physical properties and backward trajectories of the air masses associated with each precipitation event and by (ii) characterizing precipitation chemistry, and genetic and phenotypic structures of populations. A parallel study with the fungus Botrytis cinerea was also performed for comparison. Results showed that (i) the relationship of P. syringae to precipitation as a dissemination vector is not the same for snowfall and rainfall, whereas it is the same for B. cinerea and (ii) the occurrence of P. syringae in precipitation can be linked to electrical conductivity and pH of water, the trajectory of the air mass associated with the precipitation and certain physical conditions of the air mass (i.e. temperature, solar radiation exposure, distance traveled), whereas these predictions are different for B. cinerea. These results are pertinent to understanding microbial survival, emission sources and atmospheric processes and how they influence microbial dissemination.

  12. Performance characteristics of a turbo expander substituted for expansion valve on air-conditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Soo-Yong; Cho, Chong-Hyun; Kim, Chaesil

    2008-09-15

    An experimental study is conducted on a small turbo expander which could be applied to the expansion process in place of expansion valves in refrigerator or air-conditioner to improve the cycle efficiency by recovering energy from the throttling process. The operating gas is HFC134a and the maximum cooling capacity of experiment apparatus is 32.7 kW. Four different turbo expanders are tested to find the performance characteristics of the turbo expander when they operate at a low partial admission rate. The partial admission rate is 1.70% or 2.37, and expanders are operated in the supersonic flow. In the experiment, pressure and temperature are measured at 10 different locations in the experimental apparatus. In addition to these measurements, output power at the turbo expander is measured through a generator installed on a rotor shaft with the rotational speed. Performance data of the turbo expander are obtained at many part load operations by adjusting the output power of the generator. A maximum of 15.8% total-to-static efficiency is obtained when the pressure ratio and the partial admission ratio are 2.37 and 1.70%, respectively. Experimental results show that the optimal velocity ratio decreases when the pressure ratio is decreased, and peak efficiencies, which are obtained at locally maximized efficiency depending on the operating condition, vary linearly against the subcooling temperature or the pressure ratio. (author)

  13. Simulation and Experimental Analysis of Arc Motion Characteristics in Air Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chunping; Ding, Juwen; Wu, Yi; Yang, Fei; Dong, Delong; Fan, Xingyu; Rong, Mingzhe

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, to simulate the arc motion in an air circuit breaker (ACB), a three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model is developed, considering the influence of thermal radiation, the change of physical parameters of arc plasma and the nonlinear characteristic of ferromagnetic material. The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of arc plasma in the arc region are calculated. The simulation results show some phenomena which discourage arc interruption, such as back commutation and arc burning at the back of the splitter plate. To verify the simulation model, the arc motion is studied experimentally. The influences of the material and position of the innermost barrier plate are analyzed mainly. It proved that the model developed in this paper can efficiently simulate the arc motion. The results indicate that the insulation barrier plate close to the top of the splitter plate is conducive to the arc splitting, which leads to the significant increase of the arc voltage, so it is better for arc interruption. The research can provide methods and references to the optimization of ACB design. supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (Nos. 2015CB251002, 6132620303), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51221005, 51377128, 51577144), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China

  14. Constraining aerosol optical models using ground-based, collocated particle size and mass measurements in variable air mass regimes during the 7-SEAS/Dongsha experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Shaun W.; Hansell, Richard A.; Chow, Judith C.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Lin, Neng-Huei; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Ji, Qiang; Li, Can; Watson, John G.; Khlystov, Andrey

    2013-10-01

    During the spring of 2010, NASA Goddard's COMMIT ground-based mobile laboratory was stationed on Dongsha Island off the southwest coast of Taiwan, in preparation for the upcoming 2012 7-SEAS field campaign. The measurement period offered a unique opportunity for conducting detailed investigations of the optical properties of aerosols associated with different air mass regimes including background maritime and those contaminated by anthropogenic air pollution and mineral dust. What appears to be the first time for this region, a shortwave optical closure experiment (λ = 550 nm) for both scattering and absorption was attempted over a 12-day period during which aerosols exhibited the most change. Constraints to the optical model included combined SMPS and APS number concentration data for a continuum of fine and coarse-mode particle sizes up to PM2.5. We also take advantage of an IMPROVE chemical sampler to help constrain aerosol composition and mass partitioning of key elemental species including sea-salt, particulate organic matter, soil, non sea-salt sulfate, nitrate, and elemental carbon. Achieving full optical closure is hampered by limitations in accounting for the role of water vapor in the system, uncertainties in the instruments and the need for further knowledge in the source apportionment of the model's major chemical components. Nonetheless, our results demonstrate that the observed aerosol scattering and absorption for these diverse air masses are reasonably captured by the model, where peak aerosol events and transitions between key aerosols types are evident. Signatures of heavy polluted aerosol composed mostly of ammonium and non sea-salt sulfate mixed with some dust with transitions to background sea-salt conditions are apparent in the absorption data, which is particularly reassuring owing to the large variability in the imaginary component of the refractive indices. Consistency between the measured and modeled optical parameters serves as an

  15. Constraining Aerosol Optical Models Using Ground-Based, Collocated Particle Size and Mass Measurements in Variable Air Mass Regimes During the 7-SEAS/Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Shaun W.; Hansell, Richard A.; Chow, Judith C.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Ji, Qiang; Li, Can; Watson, John G.; Khlystov, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    During the spring of 2010, NASA Goddard's COMMIT ground-based mobile laboratory was stationed on Dongsha Island off the southwest coast of Taiwan, in preparation for the upcoming 2012 7-SEAS field campaign. The measurement period offered a unique opportunity for conducting detailed investigations of the optical properties of aerosols associated with different air mass regimes including background maritime and those contaminated by anthropogenic air pollution and mineral dust. What appears to be the first time for this region, a shortwave optical closure experiment for both scattering and absorption was attempted over a 12-day period during which aerosols exhibited the most change. Constraints to the optical model included combined SMPS and APS number concentration data for a continuum of fine and coarse-mode particle sizes up to PM2.5. We also take advantage of an IMPROVE chemical sampler to help constrain aerosol composition and mass partitioning of key elemental species including sea-salt, particulate organic matter, soil, non sea-salt sulphate, nitrate, and elemental carbon. Our results demonstrate that the observed aerosol scattering and absorption for these diverse air masses are reasonably captured by the model, where peak aerosol events and transitions between key aerosols types are evident. Signatures of heavy polluted aerosol composed mostly of ammonium and non sea-salt sulphate mixed with some dust with transitions to background sea-salt conditions are apparent in the absorption data, which is particularly reassuring owing to the large variability in the imaginary component of the refractive indices. Extinctive features at significantly smaller time scales than the one-day sample period of IMPROVE are more difficult to reproduce, as this requires further knowledge concerning the source apportionment of major chemical components in the model. Consistency between the measured and modeled optical parameters serves as an important link for advancing remote

  16. Solar cycle variation of some mass dependent characteristics of upflowing beams of terrestrial ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collin, H. L.; Peterson, W. K.; Shelley, E. G.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of the S3-3 and DE ion composition data spread over a solar cycle indicates that some characteristics of energetic upflowing terrestrial ion beams above the auroral zone show dependence on solar cycle. At solar maximum the different ion beam mass components have comparable mean energies, and O(+) dominates the beam composition. The ion energies are consistent with having been acquired from the potential drop below the satellite inferred from the electron loss cone distributions. At solar minimum the beam composition is dominated by H(+), but the O(+) has a higher mean energy and is hotter than the H(+) component. Also, the O(+) has more energy than it could itself have acquired from the potential drop. These observations are qualitatively consistent with the ion beams having acquired their energies from a parallel electric field and being partially thermalized through the two-stream instability between the two ion species, with this effect being modulated by the beam composition.

  17. Decay Characteristics of Surface Mounds with Contrasting Interlayer Mass Transport Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Maozhi; Wendelken, J. F.; Liu, Bang-Gui; Wang, E. G.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2001-03-12

    The decay characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) islands formed on surfaces are investigated theoretically considering two types of interlayer mass transport mechanisms. If an adatom on a given layer can easily descend from any site along the periphery of the layer, an optimal island slope and a constant terrace width will be selected during the decay. In contrast, if the adatom can descend primarily through selective (such as kinked) sites, the decay will be accompanied by a gradual increase in the island slope. These generic conclusions provide the basis for a microscopic understanding of the decay of nanostructures in fcc(111) and fcc(100) metal homoepitaxy and are applicable to other systems as well.

  18. Decay characteristics of surface mounds with contrasting interlayer mass transport channels.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Wendelken, J F; Liu, B G; Wang, E G; Zhang, Z

    2001-03-12

    The decay characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) islands formed on surfaces are investigated theoretically considering two types of interlayer mass transport mechanisms. If an adatom on a given layer can easily descend from any site along the periphery of the layer, an optimal island slope and a constant terrace width will be selected during the decay. In contrast, if the adatom can descend primarily through selective (such as kinked) sites, the decay will be accompanied by a gradual increase in the island slope. These generic conclusions provide the basis for a microscopic understanding of the decay of nanostructures in fcc(111) and fcc(100) metal homoepitaxy and are applicable to other systems as well.

  19. Characteristics of individual particles in the atmosphere of Guangzhou by single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guohua; Han, Bingxue; Bi, Xinhui; Dai, Shouhui; Huang, Wei; Chen, Duohong; Wang, Xinming; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Zhou, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    Continuous ambient measurement of atmospheric aerosols was performed with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) in Guangzhou during summer of 2012. The aerosols mainly consisted of carbonaceous particles as major compositions in submicrometer range, including K-rich (29.8%), internally mixed organics and elemental carbon (ECOC, 13.5%), organic carbon-rich (OC, 18.5%), elemental carbon (EC, 12.3%) and high molecular OC (HMOC, 3.2%), and inorganic types (e.g., Na-rich Na-K, Fe-rich, V-rich, and Cu-rich) as major ones in supermicrometer range. Results show that carbonaceous particles were commonly internally mixed with sulfate and nitrate through atmospheric processing, in particular, with sulfate; inorganic types were dominantly internally mixed with nitrate rather than sulfate, indicative of different evolution processes for carbonaceous and inorganic particles in the atmosphere. It was observed that variations of these particle types were significantly influenced by air mass back trajectories (BTs). Under the influence of continental BTs, carbonaceous types were prevalent, while Na-K and Na-rich types considerably increased when the BTs originated from south marine regions. Number fraction of carbonaceous types exhibited obvious diurnal variation throughout the sampling period, which reflects their relatively stable emission and atmospheric processes. Two EC particle types LC-EC and NaK-EC showed different diurnal distributions, suggesting their different origins. The obtained information on the mixing state and the temporal variation of particle types is essential for developing an understanding on the origin and evolution processes of atmospheric aerosols.

  20. Structural and interpersonal characteristics of family meals: associations with adolescent body mass index and dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Berge, Jerica M; Jin, Seok Won; Hannan, Peter; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2013-06-01

    The last decade of research has suggested that family meals play an important role in promoting healthful dietary intake in youth. However, little is known about the structural characteristics and interpersonal dynamics of family meals that might help to inform why family meals are protective for youth. The current mixed methods, cross-sectional study conducted in 2010-2011 includes adolescents and parents who participated in two linked population-based studies. Participants included 40 parents (91.5% female) and adolescents (57.5% female) from the Minneapolis/St Paul, MN, area participating in EAT (Eating and Activity Among Teens) 2010 and F-EAT (Families and Eating and Activity Among Teens). The structural (eg, length of the meal, types of foods served) and interpersonal characteristics (eg, communication, emotion/affect management) of family meals were described, and associations between interpersonal dynamics at family meals and adolescent body mass index and dietary intake were examined via direct observational methods. Families were videorecorded during two mealtimes in their homes. Results indicated that family meals were approximately 20 minutes in length, included multiple family members, were typically served family style (70%), and occurred in the kitchen 62% of the time and 38% of the time in another room (eg, family room, office). In addition, significant associations were found between positive interpersonal dynamics (ie, communication, affect management, interpersonal involvement, overall family functioning) at family meals and lower adolescent body mass index and higher vegetable intake. These findings add to the growing body of literature on family meals by providing a better understanding of what is happening at family meals in order to inform obesity-prevention studies and recommendations for providers working with families of youth.

  1. Combustion and gasification characteristics of pulverized coal using high-temperature air

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaoka, R.; Nakamura, M.; Kiga, T.; Kosaka, H.; Iwahashi, T.; Yoshikawa, K.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, K.; Mochida, S.

    1998-07-01

    In order to confirm performance of high-temperature-air combusting of pulverized coal, laboratory-scale combustion and gasification tests of coal were conducted changing air temperature and oxygen concentration in the air. Theses were conducted in a drop tube furnace of 200mm in inside diameter and 2,000mm in length. The furnace was heated by ceramic heater up to 1,300 C. A high-temperature air preheater utilizing the HRS (High Cycle Regenerative Combustion System) was used to obtain high-temperature combustion air. As the results, NOx emission was reduced when pulverized coal was fired with high-temperature-air. On the other hand, by lower oxygen concentration in combustion air diluted by nitrogen, NOx emission slightly decreased while became higher under staging condition.

  2. Characteristics of flares producing metric type II bursts and coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.; Michels, D. J.; Koomen, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to study the origin of coronal shocks by comparing several flare characteristics for two groups of flares: those with associated metric type II bursts and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and those with associated metric type II bursts but no CMEs. CMEs accompany about 60 percent of all flares with type II bursts for solar longitudes greater than 30 deg, where CMEs are well observed with the NRL Solwind coronagraph. H-alpha flare areas, 1-8 A X-ray fluxes, and impulsive 3-cm fluxes are all statistically smaller for events with no CMEs than for events with CMEs. It appears that both compact and large mass ejection flares are associated with type II bursts. The events with no CMEs imply that at least many type II shocks are not piston-driven, but the large number of events of both groups with small 3 cm bursts does not support the usual assumption that type II shocks are produced by large energy releases in flare impulsive phases. The poor correlation between 3 cm burst fluxes and the occurrence of type II bursts may be due to large variations in the coronal Alfven velocity.

  3. Nutrient characteristics of the water masses and their seasonal variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sardessai, S; Shetye, Suhas; Maya, M V; Mangala, K R; Prasanna Kumar, S

    2010-01-01

    Nutrient characteristics of four water masses in the light of their thermohaline properties are examined in the eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean during winter, spring and summer monsoon. The presence of low salinity water mass with "Surface enrichments" of inorganic nutrients was observed relative to 20 m in the mixed layer. Lowest oxygen levels of 19 microM at 3 degrees N in the euphotic zone indicate mixing of low oxygen high salinity Arabian Sea waters with the equatorial Indian Ocean. The seasonal variability of nutrients was regulated by seasonally varying physical processes like thermocline elevation, meridional and zonal transport, the equatorial undercurrent and biological processes of uptake and remineralization. Circulation of Arabian Sea high salinity waters with nitrate deficit could also be seen from low N/P ratio with a minimum of 8.9 in spring and a maximum of 13.6 in winter. This large deviation from Redfield N/P ratio indicates the presence of denitrified high salinity waters with a seasonal nitrate deficit ranging from -4.85 to 1.52 in the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean.

  4. Linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in air by concurrent solvent recondensation-large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Companioni-Damas, E Y; Santos, F J; Galceran, M T

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, a simple and fast method for the analysis of linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in ambient air based on active sampling combined with gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. The retention efficiency of five sampling sorbents (activated coconut charcoal, Carbopack B, Cromosorb 102, Cromosorb 106 and Isolute ENV+) was evaluated and Isolute ENV+ was found to be the most effective. A volume of 2700 L of air can be sampled without significant losses of the most volatile methylsiloxanes. To improve the sensitivity of the GC-MS method, concurrent solvent recondensation - large volume injection (CSR-LVI), using volumes up to 30 µl of sample extract, is proposed and limits of quantification down to 0.03-0.45 ng m(-3), good linearity (r>0.999) and precision (RSD %<9%) were obtained. The developed method was applied to the analysis of ambient air. Concentrations of linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in indoor air ranging from 3.9 to 319 ng m(-3) and between 48 and 292668 ng m(-3), were obtained, respectively, while levels from 6 to 22 ng m(-3) for linear and between 2.2 and 439 ng m(-3) for cyclic methylsiloxanes in outdoor air from Barcelona (Spain), were found.

  5. OMI tropospheric NO2 air mass factors over South America: effects of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; Torres, O.; de Haan, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning is an important and uncertain source of aerosols and NOx (NO + NO2) to the atmosphere. OMI observations of tropospheric NO2 are essential for characterizing this emissions source, but inaccuracies in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric columns due to the radiative effects of aerosols, especially light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, are not well understood. It has been shown that the O2-O2 effective cloud fraction and pressure retrieval is sensitive to aerosol optical and physical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosols implicitly influence the tropospheric air mass factor (AMF) calculations used in the NO2 retrieval through the effective cloud parameters used in the independent pixel approximation. In this work, we explicitly account for the effects of biomass burning aerosols in the tropospheric NO2 AMF calculation by including collocated aerosol extinction vertical profile observations from the CALIOP instrument, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) in the DISAMAR radiative transfer model for cloud-free scenes. Tropospheric AMFs calculated with DISAMAR were benchmarked against AMFs reported in the Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) retrieval; the mean and standard deviation (SD) of the difference was 0.6 ± 8%. Averaged over three successive South American biomass burning seasons (2006-2008), the spatial correlation in the 500 nm AOD retrieved by OMI and the 532 nm AOD retrieved by CALIOP was 0.6, and 72% of the daily OMAERUV AOD observations were within 0.3 of the CALIOP observations. Overall, tropospheric AMFs calculated with observed aerosol parameters were on average 10% higher than AMFs calculated with effective cloud parameters. For effective cloud radiance fractions less than 30%, or effective cloud pressures greater than 800 hPa, the difference between tropospheric AMFs based on implicit and explicit aerosol parameters is on average 6 and 3

  6. Structural uncertainty in air mass factor calculation for NO2 and HCHO satellite retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, Alba; Folkert Boersma, K.; Yu, Huan; Dörner, Steffen; Hilboll, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Liu, Mengyao; Lamsal, Lok N.; Barkley, Michael; De Smedt, Isabelle; Van Roozendael, Michel; Wang, Yang; Wagner, Thomas; Beirle, Steffen; Lin, Jin-Tai; Krotkov, Nickolay; Stammes, Piet; Wang, Ping; Eskes, Henk J.; Krol, Maarten

    2017-03-01

    Air mass factor (AMF) calculation is the largest source of uncertainty in NO2 and HCHO satellite retrievals in situations with enhanced trace gas concentrations in the lower troposphere. Structural uncertainty arises when different retrieval methodologies are applied within the scientific community to the same satellite observations. Here, we address the issue of AMF structural uncertainty via a detailed comparison of AMF calculation methods that are structurally different between seven retrieval groups for measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). We estimate the escalation of structural uncertainty in every sub-step of the AMF calculation process. This goes beyond the algorithm uncertainty estimates provided in state-of-the-art retrievals, which address the theoretical propagation of uncertainties for one particular retrieval algorithm only. We find that top-of-atmosphere reflectances simulated by four radiative transfer models (RTMs) (DAK, McArtim, SCIATRAN and VLIDORT) agree within 1.5 %. We find that different retrieval groups agree well in the calculations of altitude resolved AMFs from different RTMs (to within 3 %), and in the tropospheric AMFs (to within 6 %) as long as identical ancillary data (surface albedo, terrain height, cloud parameters and trace gas profile) and cloud and aerosol correction procedures are being used. Structural uncertainty increases sharply when retrieval groups use their preference for ancillary data, cloud and aerosol correction. On average, we estimate the AMF structural uncertainty to be 42 % over polluted regions and 31 % over unpolluted regions, mostly driven by substantial differences in the a priori trace gas profiles, surface albedo and cloud parameters. Sensitivity studies for one particular algorithm indicate that different cloud correction approaches result in substantial AMF differences in polluted conditions (5 to 40 % depending on cloud fraction and cloud pressure, and 11 % on average) even for low

  7. International system of units traceable results of Hg mass concentration at saturation in air from a newly developed measurement procedure.

    PubMed

    Quétel, Christophe R; Zampella, Mariavittoria; Brown, Richard J C; Ent, Hugo; Horvat, Milena; Paredes, Eduardo; Tunc, Murat

    2014-08-05

    Data most commonly used at present to calibrate measurements of mercury vapor concentrations in air come from a relationship known as the "Dumarey equation". It uses a fitting relationship to experimental results obtained nearly 30 years ago. The way these results relate to the international system of units (SI) is not known. This has caused difficulties for the specification and enforcement of limit values for mercury concentrations in air and in emissions to air as part of national or international legislation. Furthermore, there is a significant discrepancy (around 7% at room temperature) between the Dumarey data and data calculated from results of mercury vapor pressure measurements in the presence of only liquid mercury. As an attempt to solve some of these problems, a new measurement procedure is described for SI traceable results of gaseous Hg concentrations at saturation in milliliter samples of air. The aim was to propose a scheme as immune as possible to analytical biases. It was based on isotope dilution (ID) in the liquid phase with the (202)Hg enriched certified reference material ERM-AE640 and measurements of the mercury isotope ratios in ID blends, subsequent to a cold vapor generation step, by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The process developed involved a combination of interconnected valves and syringes operated by computer controlled pumps and ensured continuity under closed circuit conditions from the air sampling stage onward. Quantitative trapping of the gaseous mercury in the liquid phase was achieved with 11.5 μM KMnO4 in 2% HNO3. Mass concentrations at saturation found from five measurements under room temperature conditions were significantly higher (5.8% on average) than data calculated from the Dumarey equation, but in agreement (-1.2% lower on average) with data based on mercury vapor pressure measurement results. Relative expanded combined uncertainties were estimated following a model based approach. They ranged from 2

  8. Stability of reference masses: VII. Cleaning methods in air and vacuum applied to a platinum mass standard similar to the international and national kilogram prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Sano, Naoko; Barlow, Anders J.; Portoles, Jose F.

    2013-10-01

    Mercury contamination and the build-up of carbonaceous contamination are two contributing factors to the instability observed in kilogram prototype masses. The kilogram prototypes that lie at the core of the dissemination of the SI base unit were manufactured in the late 19th century, and have polished surfaces. In papers IV and V of this series we developed a method for cleaning noble metal mass standards in air to remove carbonaceous contamination. At the core of this ‘UVOPS’ protocol is the application of UV light and ozone gas generated in situ in air. The precise nature of the carbonaceous contamination that builds up on such surfaces is difficult to mimic demonstrably or quickly on new test surfaces, yet data from such tests are needed to provide the final confidence to allow UVOPS to be applied to a real 19th century kilogram prototype. Therefore, in the present work we have applied the UVOPS method to clean a platinum avoirdupois pound mass standard, ‘RS2’, manufactured in the mid-19th century. This is thought to have been polished in a similar manner to the kilogram prototypes. To our knowledge this platinum surface has not previously been cleaned by any method. We used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to identify organic contamination, and weighing to quantify the mass lost at each application of the UVOPS procedure. The UVOPS procedure is shown to be very effective. It is likely that the redefinition of the kilogram will require mass comparisons in vacuum in the years to come. Therefore, in addition to UVOPS a cleaning method for use in vacuum will also be needed. We introduce and evaluate gas cluster ion-beam (GCIB) treatment as a potential method for cleaning reference masses in vacuum. Again, application of this GCIB cleaning to a real artefact, RS2, allows us to make a realistic evaluation of its performance. While it has some attractive features, we cannot recommend it for cleaning mass standards in its present form.

  9. Mass transfer characteristics in structured packing for CO{sub 2} emission reduction processes

    SciTech Connect

    van Loo, S.; van Elk, E.P.; Raynal, L.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2007-05-15

    Acid gas treating and CO{sub 2} capture from flue gas by absorption have gained wide importance over the past few decades. With the implementation of more stringent environmental regulations and the awareness of the greenhouse effect, the need for efficient removal of acid gases such as CO{sub 2} (carbon dioxide) has increased significantly. Therefore, additional effort for research in this field is inevitable. For flue gas processes the ratio of absorption solvent to gas throughput is very different compared to acid gas treating processes owing to the atmospheric pressures and the dilution effect of combustion air. Moreover, in flue gas applications pressure drop is a very important process parameter. Packing types are required that allow for low pressure drop in combination with high interfacial areas at low liquid loading per square meter. An extended absorption model is required to determine the conditions at which the interfacial area can be measured without detailed knowledge of the values of the liquid-side mass transfer coefficient, k{sub 1}, beforehand.

  10. Inter-annual variability of air mass and acidified pollutants transboundary exchange in the north-eastern part of the EANET region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Sergey A.; Trifonova-Yakovleva, Alisa; Gromov, Sergey S.

    2016-04-01

    ]. This dataset provides comprehensive monthly statistics on the wind meteorological regime at the stations of interest in a given range of altitudes. Based on long-term source observational data, the dataset is assumed being representative up to date, which allowed us to estimate monthly pollutant fluxes for the years 2006-2008 over segments of the Russian border and its whole [4]. In the current phase of our study, we calculate the inter-annual variations in the transboundary pollutant fluxes for 2000-2012 using longer-term EANET data and transient changes in air mass fluxes derived from the meteorological wind fields from ERA INTERIM re-analysis [5]. We gauge similar average air transport terms and dynamics from the statistical and reanalysis data, which bolsters our earlier findings. The reanalysis data, being naturally more variable, convolutes the variations in net air fluxes and pollutant concentrations into several episodes we emphasise, in addition to the integral pollutant transfer terms we estimate. At last, we discuss on the possibility of climate change effect on the flux strength and dynamics together with regional air quality tendencies in North-East Asia countries. References: Izrael, Yu.A., et al.: Monitoring of the Transboundary Air Pollution Transport. Gidrometeoizdat, Leningrad, 303 p., 187 (in Russian). Akimoto H., et al.: Periodic Report of the State of Acid Deposition in East Asia. Part I: Regional Assessment. EANET-UNEP/RRC.AP-ADORC, 258 p., 2006. Brukhan, F.F.: Aeroclimatic Characteristics of the Mean Winds over USSR (ed. Ignatjushina E.N.). Gidrometeoizdat, Moscow, 54 p., 1984 (in Russian). Gromov S.A., et al.: First-order evaluation of transboundary pollution fluxes in areas of EANET stations in Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East. EANET Science Bulletin, vol. 3, pp. 195-203, 2013. Dee, D. P., et al.: The ERA-Interim reanalysis: configuration and performance of the data assimilation system, Quart. J. Royal Met. Soc., 137, 553-597, doi: 10

  11. Waste burning and heat recovery characteristics of a mass burn incineration system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsin

    2003-02-01

    An experimental investigation on waste combustion characteristics of a mass burn incinerator is conducted in this study. Three different charging modes, including operator manipulation, periodic feeding, and temperature control, are taken into consideration. The results indicate that the burning characteristics in the combustion chambers are closely related to the operating modes. For the operator manipulation where the wastes are sent into the incinerator in two short periods, the entire temperature distribution of the primary combustion chamber can be partitioned into two parts, thereby yielding waste group combustion. Temperature oscillations in both the primary and secondary combustion chambers are characterized for the periodic feeding. However, because of the shorter charging period and smaller amount of waste, the burning interaction between the two chambers is initially weak and becomes notable in the final stage. When temperature control is performed, the burning oscillation of the primary combustion chamber is further amplified so the combustion interaction is drastic. These exhibitions are mainly caused by the competition between endothermic and exothermic reactions. The instantaneous heat exchange efficiency of the cyclone heat recovery system (CHRS) installed in the incineration system is also evaluated to obtain details of energy recovery behaviors. As a result, the efficiency tends to decrease linearly with increasing temperature of hot flue gas. This arises from the fact that heat loss from the gas to the environment is increased when the temperature of the former is higher, even though the temperature gradient across the cyclone is enlarged.

  12. Numerical study of the propagation characteristics of coronal mass ejections in a structured ambient solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufen; Feng, Xueshang

    2017-02-01

    Using a three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, we analyze and study the propagation characteristics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched at different positions in a realistic structured ambient solar wind. Here the ambient solar wind structure during the Carrington rotation 2095 is selected, which is the characteristics of activity rising phase. CMEs with a simple spherical plasmoid structure are initiated at different solar latitudes with respect to the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) and the Earth in the same ambient solar wind. Then, we numerically obtained the evolution process of the CMEs from the Sun to the interplanetary space. When the Earth and the CME launch position are located on the same side of the HCS, the arrival time of the shock at the Earth is faster than that when the Earth and the CME launch position are located on the opposite side of the HCS. The disturbance amplitudes for the same side event are also larger than those for the opposite side event. This may be due to the fact that the HCS between the CME and the Earth for the opposite side event hinders its propagation and weaken it. The CMEs tend to deflect toward the HCS in the latitudinal direction near the corona and then propagate almost parallel to the HCS in the interplanetary space. This deflecting tendency may be caused by the dynamic action of near-Sun magnetic pressure gradient force on the ejected coronal plasma.

  13. Electrical characteristics of single-component ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and effects of air exposure on them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakanoue, Tomo; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Takimiya, Kazuo; Toshimitsu, Akio

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the electrical characteristics of single-component ambipolar organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by controlling the device structure and preparation and the measurement conditions. Six organic semiconductor materials (copper-phthalocyanine, tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3), alpha-sexithiophene, 4-4'-bis-styrylphenyl, 2,7-diphenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene, or a photopolymerized polydiacethylene derivative (PDA) were used as the active layer, and all were found to transport both holes and electrons. The PDA-based FETs had the highest hole and electron mobilities (0.12 and 0.025 cm2/V s, respectively). We also investigated the effect of air exposure on the OFETs. The hole mobility was barely affected by the exposure while the electron mobility was significantly affected. The threshold voltage for p-channel operation was shifted by the exposure while that for n-channel operation was not, indicating that the hole density in the active layer is increased by air exposure whereas the electron density is independent of air exposure. Furthermore, we prepared an Alq3-based p-channel OFET and investigated the effect of air exposure on it. While its operation was stable in vacuum, air exposure degraded its characteristics. These behaviors indicate that irreversible chemical reactions occur between cationic Alq3 species and oxygen or water molecules.

  14. Changes in Ultrastructure and Sensory Characteristics on Electro-magnetic and Air Blast Freezing of Beef during Frozen Storage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ultrastructure in the beef muscle of the electro-magnetic resonance and air blast freezing during the frozen storage, and the changes in the quality characteristics after thawing were evaluated. The size of ice crystal was small and evenly formed in the initial freezing period, and it showed that the size was increased as the storage period was elapsed (p<0.05). The beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing showed the size of ice crystal with a lower rate of increase than the air blast freezing during the frozen storage. The thawing loss of beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing was significantly lower than the air blast freezing during frozen storage (p<0.05), and it showed that the thawing loss of the round was higher than the loin. Water holding capacity decreased as the storage period became longer while the electro-magnetic resonance freezing was higher than the air blast on 8 month (p<0.05). As a result of sensory evaluation, the beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing did not show the difference until 4 months, and it showed higher acceptability in comparison with the beef stored by the air blast freezing. Thus, it is considered that the freezing method has an effect on the change in the ultrastructure and quality characteristics of the beef. PMID:26761797

  15. Changes in Ultrastructure and Sensory Characteristics on Electro-magnetic and Air Blast Freezing of Beef during Frozen Storage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Ku, Su-Kyung; Jeong, Ji-Yun; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Kim, Young-Boong

    2015-01-01

    The ultrastructure in the beef muscle of the electro-magnetic resonance and air blast freezing during the frozen storage, and the changes in the quality characteristics after thawing were evaluated. The size of ice crystal was small and evenly formed in the initial freezing period, and it showed that the size was increased as the storage period was elapsed (p<0.05). The beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing showed the size of ice crystal with a lower rate of increase than the air blast freezing during the frozen storage. The thawing loss of beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing was significantly lower than the air blast freezing during frozen storage (p<0.05), and it showed that the thawing loss of the round was higher than the loin. Water holding capacity decreased as the storage period became longer while the electro-magnetic resonance freezing was higher than the air blast on 8 month (p<0.05). As a result of sensory evaluation, the beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing did not show the difference until 4 months, and it showed higher acceptability in comparison with the beef stored by the air blast freezing. Thus, it is considered that the freezing method has an effect on the change in the ultrastructure and quality characteristics of the beef.

  16. A Comparison of the Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass Imagery and Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles and NOAA G-IV Dropsondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Folmer, Michael; Dunion, Jason

    2014-01-01

    RGB air mass imagery is derived from multiple channels or paired channel differences. The combination of channels and channel differences means the resulting imagery does not represent a quantity or physical parameter such as brightness temperature in conventional single channel imagery. Without a specific quantity to reference, forecasters are often confused as to what RGB products represent. Hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles and NOAA G-IV dropsondes provide insight about the vertical structure of the air mass represented on the RGB air mass imagery and are a first step to validating the imagery.

  17. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  18. Influence of the overfire air ratio on the NO(x) emission and combustion characteristics of a down-fired 300-MW(e) utility boiler.

    PubMed

    Ren, Feng; Li, Zhengqi; Chen, Zhichao; Fan, Subo; Liu, Guangkui

    2010-08-15

    Down-fired boilers used to burn low-volatile coals have high NO(x) emissions. To find a way of solving this problem, an overfire air (OFA) system was introduced on a 300 MW(e) down-fired boiler. Full-scale experiments were performed on this retrofitted boiler to explore the influence of the OFA ratio (the mass flux ratio of OFA to the total combustion air) on the combustion and NO(x) emission characteristics in the furnace. Measurements were taken of gas temperature distributions along the primary air and coal mixture flows, average gas temperatures along the furnace height, concentrations of gases such as O(2), CO, and NO(x) in the near-wall region and carbon content in the fly ash. Data were compared for five different OFA ratios. The results show that as the OFA ratio increases from 12% to 35%, the NO(x) emission decreases from 1308 to 966 mg/Nm(3) (at 6% O(2) dry) and the carbon content in the fly ash increases from 6.53% to 15.86%. Considering both the environmental and economic effect, 25% was chosen as the optimized OFA ratio.

  19. Effect of humidity and particle hygroscopicity on the mass loading capacity of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Biswas, P. ); Monson, P.R. ); Novick, V.J. )

    1993-07-01

    The effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity, and size on the mass loading capacity of glass fiber high efficiency particulate air filters was studied. Above the deliquescent point, the pressure drop across the filter increased nonlinearly with areal loading density (mass collected/filtration area) of a NaCl aerosol, thus significantly reducing the mass loading capacity of the filter compared to dry hygroscopic or nonhygroscopic particle mass loadings. The specific cake resistance K[sub 2] was computed for different test conditions and used as a measure of the mass loading capacity. K[sub 2] was found to decrease with increasing humidity for nonhygroscopic aluminum oxide particles and for hygroscopic NaCl particles (at humidities below the deliquescent point). It is postulated that an increase in humidity leads to the formation of a more open particulate cake which lowers the pressure drop for a given mass loading. A formula for predicting K[sub 2] for lognormally distributed aerosols (parameters obtained from impactor data) was derived. The resistance factor, R, calculated using this formula was compared to the theoretical R calculated using the Rudnick-Happel expression. For the nonhygroscopic aluminum oxide, the agreement was good but for the hygroscopic sodium chloride, due to large variation in the cake porosity estimates, the agreement was poor. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Air Superiority at Red Flag: Mass, Technology, and Winning the Next War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    improved their estimate. In The Art of Wargaming, Peter Perla suggests that adding exercise analysis could help. He recommends a “continuous cycle...Survey, 44. 45. Ibid., 27–28. 46. “Desert Shield Tactical Air Force Combat Losses, Damage, and Muni- tions Consumption.” 47. Ibid. 48. Perla , Art of...Williamson. Strategy for Defeat: The Luftwaffe, 1933– 1945, 1983. Reprint. Maxwell AFB, AL: Air University Press, 2007. Perla , Peter P. The Art of Wargaming

  1. Flame front surface characteristics in turbulent premixed propane/air combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Guelder, O.L.; Smallwood, G.J.; Wong, R.; Snelling, D.R.; Smith, R.; Deschamps, B.M.; Sautet, J.C.

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of the flame front surfaces in turbulent premixed propane/air flames were investigated. Flame front images were obtained using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of OH and Mie scattering on two Bunsen-type burners of 11.2-mm and 22.4-mm diameters. Nondimensional turbulence intensity, u{prime}/S{sub L}, was varied from 0.9 to 15, and the Reynolds number, based on the integral length scale, varied from 40 to 467. Approximately 100 images were recorded for each experimental condition. Fractal parameters (fractal dimension, inner and outer cutoffs) and corresponding standard deviations were determined by analysis of the flame front images using the caliper technique. The fractal dimensions derived from OH and Mie scattering images are almost identical. However, inner and outer cutoffs from OH images are consistently higher than those obtained from Mie scattering. The self-similar region of the flame front wrinkling is about a decade for all flames studied. In the nondimensional turbulence intensity range from 1 to 15, it was found that the mean fractal dimension is about 2.2 and it does not show any dependence on turbulence intensity. This contradicts the findings of the previous studies that showed that the fractal dimension asymptotically reaches to 2.35--2.37 when the nondimensional turbulence intensity u{prime}/S{sub L} exceeds 3. It is shown that the reason for this discrepancy is the image analysis method used in the previous studies. Examples are given to show the inadequacy of the circle method used in previous studies for extraction of fractal parameters from flame front images. The fractal parameters obtained so far, in this and previous studies, are not capable of correctly predicting the turbulent burning velocity using the available fractal area closure model.

  2. Spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of a gliding arc discharge in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Larsson, Anders; Kusano, Yukihiro; Li, Zhongshan

    2017-01-01

    A gliding arc discharge was generated in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) electric power. The spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of the gliding arc discharge, including glow-type discharges, spark-type discharges, short-cutting events and transitions among the different types of discharges, were investigated using simultaneously optical and electrical diagnostics. The glow-type discharge shows sinusoidal-like voltage and current waveforms with a peak current of hundreds of milliamperes. The frequency of the emission intensity variation of the glow-type discharge is the same as that of the electronic power dissipated in the plasma column. The glow-type discharge can transfer into a spark discharge characterized by a sharp peak current of several amperes and a sudden increase of the brightness in the plasma column. Transitions can also be found to take place from spark-type discharges to glow-type discharges. Short-cutting events were often observed as the intermediate states formed during the spark-glow transition. Three different types of short-cutting events have been observed to generate new current paths between two plasma channel segments, and between two electrodes, as well as between the channel segment and the electrodes, respectively. The short-cut upper part of the plasma column that was found to have no current passing through can be detected several hundreds of microseconds after the short-cutting event. The voltage recovery rate, the period of AC voltage-driving signal, the flow rates and the rated input powers were found to play an important role in affecting the transitions among the different types of discharges.

  3. Effect of lens tilt on SCE and filamentation characteristics of femtosecond pulses in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, S.; Prashant, T. Shuvan; Leela, Ch.; Kumar, V. Rakesh; Tewari, Surya P.; Venugopal Rao, S.; Kiran, P. Prem

    2012-06-01

    We present the evolution of SCE associated with filaments due to the tilt of focusing lens under tight focusing geometries. Transform limited femtosecond (fs) pulses (800 nm, 45 fs, 1 kHz repetition rate) were focused in ambient air using three different focusing geometries f/#6, f/#7.5, and f/#12 corresponding to numerical apertures (NA) of 0.08, 0.06, and 0.04, respectively. The focusing lens was tilted from zero up to 20 degrees. The filaments decayed into two shorter parts through tilting of the lens and the separation between shorter filaments increased with increasing lens tilt, in tune with earlier reports [Kamali et al., Opt. Commun. 282, 950-954 (2009)]. The separation between the filaments matched well with the predicted distances due to astigmatism induced in loose focusing geometries. However the deviation increased as we moved to the tighter focusing geometries. The SCE spectrum demonstrated an anomalous behaviour. The SCE spectrum was suppressed at larger tilt angles of 12 - 20°. However at lower tilt angles, up to 8°, the SCE was observed to be same to that measured without any tilt of the focusing lens. This behaviour is predominant with tighter focusing geometries of f/#6 and f/#7.5, wherein the SCE was observed to be higher at 4° and 8° in comparison with that observed at an angle of 0°. Systematic study of the focusing lens tilt on anomalous SCE spectra and filament characteristics in the tight focusing geometry are presented.

  4. High methane natural gas/air explosion characteristics in confined vessel.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chenglong; Zhang, Shuang; Si, Zhanbo; Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Kongming; Jin, Zebing

    2014-08-15

    The explosion characteristics of high methane fraction natural gas were investigated in a constant volume combustion vessel at different initial conditions. Results show that with the increase of initial pressure, the peak explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise increase due to a higher amount (mass) of flammable mixture, which delivers an increased amount of heat. The increased total flame duration and flame development time result as a consequence of the higher amount of flammable mixture. With the increase of the initial temperature, the peak explosion pressures decrease, but the pressure increase during combustion is accelerated, which indicates a faster flame speed and heat release rate. The maximum value of the explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the minimum total combustion duration and the minimum flame development time is observed when the equivalence ratio of the mixture is 1.1. Additionally, for higher methane fraction natural gas, the explosion pressure and the maximum rate of pressure rise are slightly decreased, while the combustion duration is postponed. The combustion phasing is empirically correlated with the experimental parameters with good fitting performance. Furthermore, the addition of dilute gas significantly reduces the explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise and postpones the flame development and this flame retarding effect of carbon dioxide is stronger than that of nitrogen.

  5. EPA Air Method, Toxic Organics - 15 (TO-15): Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Air Collected in Specially-Prepared Canisters and Analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Method T)-15 describes procedures for for preparation and analysis of air samples containing volatile organic compounds collected in specially-prepared canisters, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  6. Air mass origin and its influence on radionuclide activities ( 7Be and 210Pb) in aerosol particles at a coastal site in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueñas, C.; Orza, J. A. G.; Cabello, M.; Fernández, M. C.; Cañete, S.; Pérez, M.; Gordo, E.

    2011-07-01

    Studies of radionuclide activities in aerosol particles provide a means for evaluating the integrated effects of transport and meteorology on the atmospheric loadings of substances with different sources. Measurements of aerosol mass concentration and specific activities of 7Be and 210Pb in aerosols at Málaga (36° 43' 40″ N; 4° 28' 8″ W) for the period 2000-2006 were used to obtain the relationships between radionuclide activities and airflow patterns by comparing the data grouped by air mass trajectory clusters. The average concentration values of 7Be and 210Pb over the 7 year period have been found to be 4.6 and 0.58 mBq m -3, respectively, with mean aerosol mass concentration of 53.6 μg m -3. The identified air flow types arriving at Málaga reflect the transitional location of the Iberian Peninsula and show significant differences in radionuclide activities. Air concentrations of both nuclides and the aerosol mass concentration are controlled predominantly by the synoptic scenarios leading to the entrance of dust-laden continental flows from northern Africa and the arrival of polar maritime air masses, as implied by the strong correlations found between the monthly frequencies of the different air masses and the specific activities of both radionuclides. Correlations between activity concentrations and precipitation are significant though lower than with air masses.

  7. Influence of trans-boundary biomass burning impacted air masses on submicron particle number concentrations and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betha, Raghu; Zhang, Zhe; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2014-08-01

    Submicron particle number concentration (PNC) and particle size distribution (PSD) in the size range of 5.6-560 nm were investigated in Singapore from 27 June 2009 through 6 September 2009. Slightly hazy conditions lasted in Singapore from 6 to 10 August. Backward air trajectories indicated that the haze was due to the transport of biomass burning impacted air masses originating from wild forest and peat fires in Sumatra, Indonesia. Three distinct peaks in the morning (08:00-10:00), afternoon (13:00-15:00) and evening (16:00-20:00) were observed on a typical normal day. However, during the haze period no distinct morning and afternoon peaks were observed and the PNC (39,775 ± 3741 cm-3) increased by 1.5 times when compared to that during non-haze periods (26,462 ± 6017). The morning and afternoon peaks on the normal day were associated with the local rush hour traffic while the afternoon peak was induced by new particle formation (NPF). Diurnal profiles of PNCs and PSDs showed that primary particle peak diameters were large during the haze (60 nm) period when compared to that during the non-haze period (45.3 nm). NPF events observed in the afternoon period on normal days were suppressed during the haze periods due to heavy particle loading in atmosphere caused by biomass burning impacted air masses.

  8. Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to determine phthalate and organophosphate esters from air samples.

    PubMed

    Aragón, M; Borrull, F; Marcé, R M

    2013-08-16

    A method based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed to determine four organophosphate esters, seven phthalate esters, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate in the gas phase from harbour and urban air samples. The method involves the sampling of 1.5L of air in a Tenax TA sorbent tube followed by thermal desorption (using a Tenax TA cryogenic trap) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The repeatability of the method expressed as %RSD (n=3) is less than 15% and the MQLs are between 0.007μgm(-3) (DMP, TBP, BBP, TPP and DnOP) and 6.7μgm(-3) (DEHP). The method was successfully applied in two areas (urban and harbour) testing two and three points in each one, respectively. Some of these compounds were found in both urban and harbour samples. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was the most abundant compound found in both areas at concentration levels between 6.7μgm(-3) and 136.4μgm(-3). This study demonstrates that thermal desorption is an efficient method for the determination of these semi-volatile compounds in the gas phase fraction of air samples.

  9. Origin of atmospheric aerosols at the Pierre Auger Observatory using studies of air mass trajectories in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bardenet, R.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Foerster, N.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Preda, T.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Thao, N. T.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Curci, G.

    2014-11-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is making significant contributions towards understanding the nature and origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. One of its main challenges is the monitoring of the atmosphere, both in terms of its state variables and its optical properties. The aim of this work is to analyse aerosol optical depth τa(z) values measured from 2004 to 2012 at the observatory, which is located in a remote and relatively unstudied area of Pampa Amarilla, Argentina. The aerosol optical depth is in average quite low - annual mean τa(3.5 km) ∼ 0.04 - and shows a seasonal trend with a winter minimum - τa(3.5 km) ∼ 0.03 -, and a summer maximum - τa(3.5 km) ∼ 0.06 -, and an unexpected increase from August to September - τa(3.5 km) ∼ 0.055. We computed backward trajectories for the years 2005 to 2012 to interpret the air mass origin. Winter nights with low aerosol concentrations show air masses originating from the Pacific Ocean. Average concentrations are affected by continental sources (wind-blown dust and urban pollution), whilst the peak observed in September and October could be linked to biomass burning in the northern part of Argentina or air pollution coming from surrounding urban areas.

  10. Flow characteristics of an inclined air-curtain range hood in a draft

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Jia-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The inclined air-curtain technology was applied to build an inclined air-curtain range hood. A draft generator was applied to affect the inclined air-curtain range hood in three directions: lateral (θ=0°), oblique (θ=45°), and front (θ=90°). The three suction flow rates provided by the inclined air-curtain range hood were 10.1, 10.9, and 12.6 m3/min. The laser-assisted flow visualization technique and the tracer-gas test method were used to investigate the performance of the range hood under the influence of a draft. The results show that the inclined air-curtain range hood has a strong ability to resist the negative effect of a front draft until the draft velocity is greater than 0.5 m/s. The oblique draft affected the containment ability of the inclined air-curtain range hood when the draft velocity was larger than 0.3 m/s. When the lateral draft effect was applied, the capture efficiency of the inclined air-curtain range hood decreased quickly in the draft velocity from 0.2 m/s to 0.3 m/s. However, the capture efficiencies of the inclined air-curtain range hood under the influence of the front draft were higher than those under the influence of the oblique draft from 0.3 m/s to 0.5 m/s. PMID:25810445

  11. OMI tropospheric NO2 air mass factors over South America: effects of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; Torres, O.; de Haan, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    Biomass burning is an important and uncertain source of aerosols and NOx (NO + NO2) to the atmosphere. Satellite observations of tropospheric NO2 are essential for characterizing this emissions source, but inaccuracies in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric columns due to the radiative effects of aerosols, especially light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, are not well understood. It has been shown that the O2-O2 effective cloud fraction and pressure retrieval is sensitive to aerosol optical and physical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosols implicitly influence the tropospheric air mass factor (AMF) calculations used in the NO2 retrieval through the effective cloud parameters used in the independent pixel approximation. In this work, we explicitly account for the effects of biomass burning aerosols in the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) tropospheric NO2 AMF calculation for cloud-free scenes. We do so by including collocated aerosol extinction vertical profile observations from the CALIOP instrument, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) in the DISAMAR radiative transfer model. Tropospheric AMFs calculated with DISAMAR were benchmarked against AMFs reported in the Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) retrieval; the mean and standard deviation of the difference was 0.6 ± 8 %. Averaged over three successive South American biomass burning seasons (2006-2008), the spatial correlation in the 500 nm AOD retrieved by OMI and the 532 nm AOD retrieved by CALIOP was 0.6, and 68 % of the daily OMAERUV AOD observations were within 30 % of the CALIOP observations. Overall, tropospheric AMFs calculated with observed aerosol parameters were on average 10 % higher than AMFs calculated with effective cloud parameters. For effective cloud radiance fractions less than 30 %, or effective cloud pressures greater than 800 hPa, the difference between tropospheric AMFs based on implicit and

  12. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air.

  13. Numerical study of coupled transfer of heat and mass between air and water inside a geothermal water cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassem, Mohamed Mehdi; Bourouni, Karim; Thameur Chaibi, Mohamed

    2006-11-01

    In the south of Tunisia, geothermal water is used to irrigate cultures. Since its temperature is very high (70 C), geothermal water is cooled by cooling towers. These towers are sized empirically and present many operating problems such as excessive energy consumption, big loss of vapour and low cooling efficiency. The aim of our work is modelling the coupled heat and mass transfer between air and water inside the cooling tower. The most important results obtained are that the evaporative potential is dominating the convective one in the cooling process. That's why the cooling is more efficient in summer than in hibernal period when humidity of ambient air reaches high values. In other hand, the negative convective phenomenon is illustrated. In fact, at the bottom of the tower, water temperature reaches the air one; the two fluids begin to cooling simultaneously. Air is cooled by convection and water by evaporation. We demonstrate also that there is no point in putting fans in working during cold weather. We studied also the effect of the variation of heat transfer coefficient on the efficiency of cooling.

  14. Petroleum mass removal from low permeability sediment using air sparging/soil vapor extraction: impact of continuous or pulsed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, Brian C.; Aelion, C. Marjorie

    2000-02-01

    Air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) are innovative remediation techniques that utilize volatilization and microbial degradation to remediate petroleum spills from soils and groundwater. This in situ study investigated the use of AS/SVE to remediate a gasoline spill from a leaking underground storage tank (UST) in the low permeability, clayey soil of the Appalachian Piedmont. The objectives of this study were to evaluate AS/SVE in low permeability soils by quantifying petroleum mass removal rates, monitoring vadose zone contaminant levels, and comparing the mass extraction rates of continuous AS/SVE to 8 and 24 h pulsed operation. The objectives were met by collecting AS/SVE exhaust gas samples and vadose zone air from multi-depth soil vapor probes. Samples were analyzed for O 2, CO 2, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), and total combustible hydrocarbon (TCH) concentrations using portable hand meters and gas chromatography. Continuous AS/SVE was effective in removing 608 kg of petroleum hydrocarbons from low permeability soil in 44 days (14.3 kg day -1). Mass removal rates ranged from 2.6 times higher to 5.1 times lower than other AS/SVE studies performed in sandy sediments. BTEX levels in the vadose zone were reduced from about 5 ppm to 1 ppm. Ten pulsed AS/SVE tests removed 78 kg in 23 days and the mean mass removal rate (17.6 kg day -1) was significantly higher than the last 15 days of continuous extraction. Pulsed operation may be preferable to continuous operation because of increased mass removal and decreased energy consumption.

  15. Social Network Characteristics and Body Mass Index in an Elderly Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Joon; Rhee, Yumie; Park, Yeong-Ran; Chu, Sang Hui; Kim, Hyeon Chang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Research has shown that obesity appears to spread through social ties. However, the association between other characteristics of social networks and obesity is unclear. This study aimed to identify the association between social network characteristics and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) in an elderly Korean population. Methods This cross-sectional study analyzed data from 657 Koreans (273 men, 384 women) aged 60 years or older who participated in the Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Network size is a count of the number of friends. Density of communication network is the number of connections in the social network reported as a fraction of the total links possible in the personal (ego-centric) network. Average frequency of communication (or meeting) measures how often network members communicate (or meet) each other. The association of each social network measure with BMI was investigated by multiple linear regression analysis. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, the men with lower density (<0.71) and higher network size (4-6) had the higher BMI (β=1.089, p=0.037) compared to the men with higher density (>0.83) and lower size (1-2), but not in the women (p=0.393). The lowest tertile of communication frequency was associated with higher BMI in the women (β=0.885, p=0.049), but not in the men (p=0.140). Conclusions Our study suggests that social network structure (network size and density) and activation (communication frequency and meeting frequency) are associated with obesity among the elderly. There may also be gender differences in this association. PMID:24349655

  16. Analytical modeling of operating characteristics of premixing-prevaporizing fuel-air mixing passages. Volume 1: Analysis and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Chiappetta, L. M.; Edwards, D. E.; Mcvey, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A model for predicting the distribution of liquid fuel droplets and fuel vapor in premixing-prevaporizing fuel-air mixing passages of the direct injection type is reported. This model consists of three computer programs; a calculation of the two dimensional or axisymmetric air flow field neglecting the effects of fuel; a calculation of the three dimensional fuel droplet trajectories and evaporation rates in a known, moving air flow; a calculation of fuel vapor diffusing into a moving three dimensional air flow with source terms dependent on the droplet evaporation rates. The fuel droplets are treated as individual particle classes each satisfying Newton's law, a heat transfer, and a mass transfer equation. This fuel droplet model treats multicomponent fuels and incorporates the physics required for the treatment of elastic droplet collisions, droplet shattering, droplet coalescence and droplet wall interactions. The vapor diffusion calculation treats three dimensional, gas phase, turbulent diffusion processes. The analysis includes a model for the autoignition of the fuel air mixture based upon the rate of formation of an important intermediate chemical species during the preignition period.

  17. Cosmic ray air shower characteristics in the framework of the parton-based Gribov-Regge model NEXUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossard, G.; Drescher, H. J.; Kalmykov, N. N.; Ostapchenko, S.; Pavlov, A. I.; Pierog, T.; Vishnevskaya, E. A.; Werner, K.

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: first we want to introduce a new type of hadronic interaction model (NEXUS), which has a much more solid theoretical basis than, for example, presently used models such as QGSJET and VENUS, and ensures therefore a much more reliable extrapolation towards high energies. Secondly, we want to promote an extensive air shower (EAS) calculation scheme, based on cascade equations rather than explicit Monte Carlo simulations, which is very accurate in calculations of main EAS characteristics and extremely fast concerning computing time. We employ the NEXUS model to provide the necessary data on particle production in hadron-air collisions and present the average EAS characteristics for energies 1014-1017 eV. The experimental data of the CASA-BLANCA group are analyzed in the framework of the new model.

  18. Theoretical Study on Dynamic Characteristics of Energy Efficiency Standard Value of Ground Water Heat Pump Air-conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yi; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zhonghe; Cao, Wei; Li, Peng

    The energy efficiency standard value of the ground water heat pump air-conditioning system is the benchmar parameter for energy saving operation and control of the system. According to each loop's process energy consumption of the system, the control equation of energy efficiency standard value of the water source side loop, heat pump unit and user side loop is established respectively. The dynamic characteristics of the standard value variation with the air-conditioning hourly heating and cooling load is revealed, and the energy efficiency standard value of each loop can be also obtained, and the qualitative sensitivity analysis of the dynamic characteristics in each subsystem is carried out. For system energy saving operation and control, the basic data and theoretical guidance can be provided.

  19. Mass Transport Deposits in the Santaren Channel: Distribution, Characteristics, and Potential Triggering Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnyder, J.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine slope failures are a likely cause for tsunami generation along the East U.S. coast. A possible source are the large slope failures along western Great Bahama Bank (GBB). Numerical models simulate tsunami generation and propagation through the Straits of Florida, caused by these Pleistocene mass wasting events. In order to estimate the likelihood and extent of future landslides, distribution, characteristics, and possible triggering mechanisms of previous failures and their associated mass transport deposits (MTD) have to be investigated. In 2013, the University of Hamburg acquired 2D high-resolution multichannel seismic data, multibeam data, and subbottom profiles inside the Santaren Channel, along the slopes of western GBB and Cay Sal Bank (CSB). The two platforms are different in two ways. CSB is part of the Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt while GBB is situated in a tectonically quiet zone. In addition, the slopes of western GBB are on the leeward side of the bank, while the eastern slopes of CSB are in a windward position. Differences in nature and size of mass wasting events between the Cay Sal side and the western GBB side of the dataset show how influential the tectonically active Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt is to the generation of large MTDs in this area. In the study area, the slope failures can be divided in two categories; small-scale in situ failures with high frequencies on the slopes, dominant on the western GBB side, and large landslides with a lower frequency, but higher volumes and transport distances on the toe of the slope and in the basin, dominant on the Cay Sal side. The distribution of in situ failures, such as slump and debris flow alternation, shows the interplay between high and low inner strength of the sediment, respectively. On the other hand, large MTDs caused by submarine landslides suggest movement in an unconfined manner. Internal sediment preconditions derived from sea level oscillations are suggested as triggering mechanisms

  20. Ambient air analyses using nonspecific flame ionization and electron capture detection compared to specific detection by mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pleil, J.D.; Oliver, K.D.; McClenny, W.A.

    1988-08-01

    Ambient air samples from various studies were analyzed for a specific set of trace-level volatile organic compounds by using a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) in parallel with an electron capture detector (ECD). The samples were then reanalyzed on a second GC system equipped with a mass selective detector (MSD). GC-FID/ECD data were compared to the nominally correct GC-MSD data to determine the accuracy of the nonspecific detectors, which often do not differentiate the targeted compound from interfering compounds. Qualitative accuracy (capability for correctly identifying compounds on the basis of retention time only) and quantitative accuracy (capability for correctly measuring the concentration of an identified compound on the basis of peak area) were evaluated. Data are presented on a per-compound basis to provide the combined typical results from air samples collected in three geographic regions: Kanawha Valley, WV; Los Angeles, CA, area; and Houston, TX.

  1. Modeling 3D conjugate heat and mass transfer for turbulent air drying of Chilean papaya in a direct contact dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto A.; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Zambra, Carlos E.; Moraga, Nelson O.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D model considering heat and mass transfer for food dehydration inside a direct contact dryer is studied. The k- ɛ model is used to describe turbulent air flow. The samples thermophysical properties as density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary non-linearly with temperature. FVM, SIMPLE algorithm based on a FORTRAN code are used. Results unsteady velocity, temperature, moisture, kinetic energy and dissipation rate for the air flow are presented, whilst temperature and moisture values for the food also are presented. The validation procedure includes a comparison with experimental and numerical temperature and moisture content results obtained from experimental data, reaching a deviation 7-10 %. In addition, this turbulent k- ɛ model provided a better understanding of the transport phenomenon inside the dryer and sample.

  2. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  3. Aeorodynamic characteristics of an air-exchanger system for the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.; Schmidt, G. I.; Meyn, L. A.; Ortner, K. R.; Holmes, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A 1/50-scale model of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center was used to study various air-exchange configurations. System components were tested throughout a range of parameters, and approximate analytical relationships were derived to explain the observed characteristics. It is found that the efficiency of the air exchanger could be increased (1) by adding a shaped wall to smoothly turn the incoming air downstream, (2) by changing to a contoured door at the inlet to control the flow rate, and (3) by increasing the size of the exhaust opening. The static pressures inside the circuit then remain within the design limits at the higher tunnel speeds if the air-exchange rate is about 5% or more. Since the model is much smaller than the full-scale facility, it is not possible to completely duplicate the tunnel, and it will be necessary to measure such characteristics as flow rate and tunnel pressures during implementation of the remodeled facility. The aerodynamic loads estimated for the inlet door and for nearby walls are also presented.

  4. Analysis of effect of flameholder characteristics on lean, premixed, partially vaporized fuel-air mixtures quality and nitrogen oxides emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the effect of flameholding devices on the precombustion fuel-air characteristics and on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for combustion of premixed partially vaporized mixtures. The analysis includes the interrelationships of flameholder droplet collection efficiency, reatomization efficiency and blockage, and the initial droplet size distribution and accounts for the contribution of droplet combustion in partially vaporized mixtures to NOx emissions. Application of the analytical procedures is illustrated and parametric predictions of NOx emissions are presented.

  5. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particle event characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Athanasios; Sandberg, Ingmar; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Kouloumvakos, Athanasios; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Tziotziou, Kostas; Tsiropoula, Georgia; Jiggens, Piers; Hilgers, Alain

    2016-12-01

    A new catalogue of 314 solar energetic particle (SEP) events extending over a large time span from 1984 to 2013 has been compiled. The properties as well as the associations of these SEP events with their parent solar sources have been thoroughly examined. The properties of the events include the proton peak integral flux and the fluence for energies above 10, 30, 60 and 100 MeV. The associated solar events were parametrized by solar flare (SF) and coronal mass ejection (CME) characteristics, as well as related radio emissions. In particular, for SFs: the soft X-ray (SXR) peak flux, the SXR fluence, the heliographic location, the rise time and the duration were exploited; for CMEs the plane-of-sky velocity as well as the angular width were utilized. For radio emissions, type III, II and IV radio bursts were identified. Furthermore, we utilized element abundances of Fe and O. We found evidence that most of the SEP events in our catalogue do not conform to a simple two-class paradigm, with the 73% of them exhibiting both type III and type II radio bursts, and that a continuum of event properties is present. Although, the so-called hybrid or mixed events are found to be present in our catalogue, it was not possible to attribute each SEP event to a mixed/hybrid sub-category. Moreover, it appears that the start of the type III burst most often precedes the maximum of the SF and thus falls within the impulsive phase of the associated SF. At the same time, type III bursts take place within ≈5.22 min, on average, in advance from the time of maximum of the derivative of the SXR flux (Neupert effect). We further performed a statistical analysis and a mapping of the logarithm of the proton peak flux at E > 10 MeV, on different pairs of the parent solar source characteristics. This revealed correlations in 3-D space and demonstrated that the gradual SEP events that stem from the central part of the visible solar disk constitute a significant radiation risk. The velocity of

  6. Identifying tropospheric baseline air masses at Mauna Loa Observatory between 2004 and 2010 using Radon-222 and back trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Scott D.; Zahorowski, Wlodek; Williams, Alastair G.; Crawford, Jagoda; Griffiths, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    We use 7 years of hourly radon observations at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), together with 10-day back trajectories, to identify baseline air masses at the station. The amplitude of the annual MLO radon cycle, based on monthly means, was 98 mBq m-3 (39 -137 mBq m-3), with maximum values in February (90th percentile 330 mBq m-3) and minimum values in August (10th percentile 8.1 mBq m-3). The composite diurnal radon cycle (amplitude 49 mBq m-3) is discussed with reference to the influences of local flow features affecting the site, and a 3-hour diurnal sampling window (0730-1030 HST) is proposed for observing the least terrestrially influenced tropospheric air masses. A set of 763 baseline events is selected, using the proposed sampling window together with trajectory information, and presented along with measured radon concentrations as a supplement. This data set represents a resource for the selection of baseline events at MLO for use with a range of trace species. A reduced set of 196 "deep baseline" events occurring in the July-September window is also presented and discussed. The distribution (10th/50th/90th percentile) of radon in deep-baseline events (8.7/29.2/66.1 mBq m-3) was considerably lower than that for the overall set of 763 baseline events (12.3/40.8/104.1 mBq m-3). Results from a simple budget calculation, using sonde-derived mixing depths and literature-based estimates of oceanic radon flux and radon concentrations in the marine boundary layer, indicate that the main source of residual radon in the lower troposphere under baseline conditions at MLO is downward mixing from aged terrestrial air masses in the upper troposphere.

  7. Phase characteristic analysis of continuous depth air-gun source wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lei; Liu, Huaishan; Zheng, Xilai; Liu, Xueqin; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Linfei; Zou, Zhihui; Xu, Yiming

    2016-10-01

    Air guns are important sources for marine seismic exploration. Far-field wavelet of air gun arrays, as a necessary parameter for pre-stack processing and source models, plays an important role during marine seismic data processing and interpretation. When an air gun fires, it generates a series of air bubbles. Similar to onshore seismic exploration, the water forms a plastic fluid near the bubble; the farther the air gun is located from the measurement, the more steady and more accurately represented the wavelet will be. In practice, hydrophones should be placed more than 100 m from the air gun; however, traditional seismic cables cannot meet this requirement. On the other hand, vertical cables provide a viable solution to this problem. This study uses a vertical cable to receive wavelets from 38 air guns and data are collected offshore Southeast Qiong, where the water depth is over 1000 m. In this study, the wavelets measured using this technique coincide very well with the simulated wavelets and can therefore represent the real shape of the wavelets. This experiment fills a technology gap in China.

  8. Propagation Characteristics of Two Coronal Mass Ejections from the Sun Far into Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Rui

    2017-03-01

    Propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun far into interplanetary space is not well understood, due to limited observations. In this study we examine the propagation characteristics of two geo-effective CMEs, which occurred on 2005 May 6 and 13, respectively. Significant heliospheric consequences associated with the two CMEs are observed, including interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) at the Earth and Ulysses, interplanetary shocks, a long-duration type II radio burst, and intense geomagnetic storms. We use coronagraph observations from SOHO/LASCO, frequency drift of the long-duration type II burst, in situ measurements at the Earth and Ulysses, and magnetohydrodynamic propagation of the observed solar wind disturbances at 1 au to track the CMEs from the Sun far into interplanetary space. We find that both of the CMEs underwent a major deceleration within 1 au and thereafter a gradual deceleration when they propagated from the Earth to deep interplanetary space, due to interactions with the ambient solar wind. The results also reveal that the two CMEs interacted with each other in the distant interplanetary space even though their launch times on the Sun were well separated. The intense geomagnetic storm for each case was caused by the southward magnetic fields ahead of the CME, stressing the critical role of the sheath region in geomagnetic storm generation, although for the first case there is a corotating interaction region involved.

  9. Characteristics of coronal mass ejection associated with DH type II radio bursts (All and Limb events)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappa Kalaivani, P.; Umapathy, S.; Shanmugaraju, A.; Prakash, O.

    2010-12-01

    We have studied the characteristics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with Deca-Hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts (1-14 MHz) in the interplanetary medium during the year 1997-2005. The DH CMEs are divided into two parts: (i) DH CMEs (All) and (ii) DH CMEs (Limb). We found that 65% (177/273) of all events have the speed >900 km s-1 and the remaining 35% (96/273) events have the speed below 900 km s-1. The average speed of all and limb DH CMEs are 1230 and 1288 km s-1, respectively, which is nearly three times the average speed of general population of CMEs (473 km s-1). The average widths of all and limb DH CMEs are 105° and 106°, respectively, which is twice the average width (52°) of the general population of CMEs. We found a better correlation between the speed and width of limb DH CMEs ( R=-0.61) than all DH CMEs ( R=-0.53). Only 28% (177/637) of fast >900 km s-1 general population of CMEs are reported with DH type II bursts counterpart. The above results gives that the relation between the CME properties is better for limb events.

  10. Seasonal to interannual variability of water mass characteristics and currents on the Namibian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Tim; Mohrholz, Volker; Siegfried, Lydia; van der Plas, Anja

    2017-01-01

    We present long-term current meter records from the Benguela system together with salinity and temperature observations gathered by a mooring on the Namibian shelf across 13 years (2002-2015). From this unique data set a climatological mean state is estimated enabling us to investigate seasonal to interannual variations of these variables on the Namibian shelf. The present study highlights the importance of the alongshore advection for the water mass characteristics in the Benguela system on a seasonal time scale. The annual cycle of the alongshore transport is characterized by a biannual flow reversal. Poleward directed currents dominate from October to April, and from May to September equatorward currents prevail. In addition, we present observational evidence for a biannual intrusion of tropical waters into the Benguela system with maxima in October and February. Based on the in situ temperature data, several anomalous events are described that affect the whole water column. During the outstanding warm event in austral fall 2011 the monthly temperature anomaly exceeds one Kelvin for five consecutive months peaking in March (2.4 K) in the upper layer of the water column. Our study suggests, that the occurrence of such extreme temperature events in the Benguela upwelling system is closely related to the strength of the alongshore advection in austral summer.

  11. Characteristic magnetic field and speed properties of interplanetary coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, M. J.; Cargill, P. J.; Pagel, C.; Siscoe, G. L.; Crooker, N. U.

    2005-01-01

    Prediction of the solar wind conditions in near-Earth space, arising from both quasi-steady and transient structures, is essential for space weather forecasting. To achieve forecast lead times of a day or more, such predictions must be made on the basis of remote solar observations. A number of empirical prediction schemes have been proposed to forecast the transit time and speed of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at 1 AU. However, the current lack of magnetic field measurements in the corona severely limits our ability to forecast the 1 AU magnetic field strengths resulting from interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). In this study we investigate the relation between the characteristic magnetic field strengths and speeds of both magnetic cloud and noncloud ICMEs at 1 AU. Correlation between field and speed is found to be significant only in the sheath region ahead of magnetic clouds, not within the clouds themselves. The lack of such a relation in the sheaths ahead of noncloud ICMEs is consistent with such ICMEs being skimming encounters of magnetic clouds, though other explanations are also put forward. Linear fits to the radial speed profiles of ejecta reveal that faster-traveling ICMEs are also expanding more at 1 AU. We combine these empirical relations to form a prediction scheme for the magnetic field strength in the sheaths ahead of magnetic clouds and also suggest a method for predicting the radial speed profile through an ICME on the basis of upstream measurements.

  12. [Characteristics and influencing factors of air pollution in and out of the highway toll gates].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Jun; Chen, Ke-Liang; Zhang, Lan-Jun; Leng, Guang-Yi

    2007-08-01

    During June and July 2003, CO, NO2, THC and PM10 were sampled at the four highway toll gates in Chongqing. Air temperature, air pressure, wind velocity and traffic flow were also monitored simultaneously. The relation between air pollution parameters and influencing factors was analyzed by applying the methods of bivariate correlation and partial correlation. As shown in the monitoring result, the outdoor average concentrations of CO and PM10 exceed indoor ones, but NO2 and THC are reverse. The average concentrations of CO and NO2 at the toll gates don't exceed the indoor and outdoor air quality standards except for the toll gate in Chongqing and Chayuan. One-hour average concentrations of outdoor and indoor THC are 7.728 mg/m3 and 7.216 mg/m3 respectively, and exceed ten times of the indoor air quality standard. One-hour average concentrations of indoor and outdoor PM10 change acutely respectively, and the their maximum concentrations are 0.631 mg/m3 and 0.217 mg/m3 which exceed indoor air quality standard and the second class of ambient air quality standard. Polluting state of Chongqing toll is the worst among the four sampled tolls, and three indexes are bigger than others. Indoor and outdoor air pollutants have correlativity. Correlations of CO, PM10 and NO2 are significant at the 0.01 level respectively, and correlations between indoor and outdoor THC are significant at the 0.05 level. In the influencing factors analysis, traffic flow is significantly correlative with NO2, THC and PM10 (p < 0.01 or 0.01 < p < 0.05), and not significantly correlative with CO (p > 0.01). Air pressure and ambient temperature are predominating factors which influencing the concentration variation, and wind speed is a minor meteorological factor influencing the fluctuations of the data.

  13. Characteristics of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of multi air jets within scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Fallah, Keivan; Pourmirzaagha, H.

    2017-03-01

    In this article, three-dimensional simulation is performed to investigate the effects of micro air jets on mixing performances of cascaded hydrogen jets within a scramjet combustor. In order to compare the efficiency of this technique, constant total fuel rate is injected through one, four, eight and sixteen arrays of portholes in a Mach 4.0 crossflow with a fuel global equivalence ratio of 0.5. In this method, micro air jets are released within fuel portholes to augment the penetration in upward direction. Extensive studies were performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Numerical studies on various air and fuel arrangements are done and the mixing rate and penetration are comprehensively investigated. Also, the flow feature of the fuel and air jets for different configuration is revealed. According to the obtained results, the influence of the micro air jets is significant and the presence of micro air jets increases the mixing rate about 116%, 77%, 56% and 41% for single, 4, 8 and 16 multi fuel jets, respectively. The maximum mixing rate of the hydrogen jet is obtained when the air jets are injected within the sixteen multi fuel jets. According to the circulation analysis of the flow for different air and fuel arrangements, it was found that the effects of air jets on flow structure are varied in various conditions and the presence of the micro jet highly intensifies the circulation in the case of 8 and 16 multi fuel jets.

  14. Analysis of short-term ozone and PM2.5 measurements: Characteristics and relationships for air sensor messaging.

    PubMed

    Mannshardt, Elizabeth; Benedict, Kristen; Jenkins, Scott; Keating, Martha; Mintz, David; Stone, Susan; Wayland, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Air quality sensors are becoming increasingly available to the general public, providing individuals and communities with information on fine-scale, local air quality in increments as short as 1 min. Current health studies do not support linking 1-min exposures to adverse health effects; therefore, the potential health implications of such ambient exposures are unclear. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) establishes the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and Air Quality Index (AQI) on the best science available, which typically uses longer averaging periods (e.g., 8 hr; 24 hr). Another consideration for interpreting sensor data is the variable relationship between pollutant concentrations measured by sensors, which are short-term (1 min to 1 hr), and the longer term averages used in the NAAQS and AQI. In addition, sensors often do not meet federal performance or quality assurance requirements, which introduces uncertainty in the accuracy and interpretation of these readings. This article describes a statistical analysis of data from regulatory monitors and new real-time technology from Village Green benches to inform the interpretation and communication of short-term air sensor data. We investigate the characteristics of this novel data set and the temporal relationships of short-term concentrations to 8-hr average (ozone) and 24-hr average (PM2.5) concentrations to examine how sensor readings may relate to the NAAQS and AQI categories, and ultimately to inform breakpoints for sensor messages. We consider the empirical distributions of the maximum 8-hr averages (ozone) and 24-hr averages (PM2.5) given the corresponding short-term concentrations, and provide a probabilistic assessment. The result is a robust, empirical comparison that includes events of interest for air quality exceedances and public health communication. Concentration breakpoints are developed for short-term sensor readings such that, to the extent possible, the related air

  15. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McJimpsey, E L; Steele, P T; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M; Tobias, H J; Lebrilla, C

    2006-03-16

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described.

  16. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Fang; Wang, De-Yu; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model including boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  17. Effects of an elastic mass on frequency response characteristics of an ultra-thin piezoelectric micro-acoustic actuator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Woo Seok; No, Kwangsoo

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents an optimized method to improve the sound quality of ultra-thin piezoelectric micro-acoustic actuators. To achieve flat and smooth frequency response characteristics of the piezoelectric acoustic actuators, we have proposed an elastic mass attached to the acoustic diaphragm. The effects of the elastic mass on frequency response characteristics of the piezoelectric acoustic actuator were investigated by finite element analysis simulation and laser scanning vibrometer measurement. Based on the modal and vibrational characteristics, it was found that the fabricated piezoelectric acoustic actuator has a significant dip of 1.32 kHz and peak of 2.24 kHz, which correspond respectively to the (1,3) and (3,1) resonant modes of the acoustic diaphragm. However, by attaching an elastic mass to the acoustic diaphragm with a shape similar to the (3,1) mode, the resonant frequencies corresponding to the (1,3) and (3,1) modes shifted to higher frequencies and the vibrational displacements at each mode were dramatically reduced by about 40%. As a result, the dip at (1,3) mode was greatly improved by 13 dB and total harmonic distortion was dramatically reduced from 80.83% to 8.71%. This paper shows that the optimized elastic mass can allow flat and smooth frequency response characteristics by improving the significant peak and dip.

  18. Plasma flame for mass purification of contaminated air with chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Shin, Dong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2006-09-18

    An elimination of airborne simulated chemical and biological warfare agents was carried out by making use of a plasma flame made of atmospheric plasma and a fuel-burning flame, which can purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces such as buildings, public transportation systems, and military vehicles. The plasma flame generator consists of a microwave plasma torch connected in series to a fuel injector and a reaction chamber. For example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22 cm diameter and 30 cm length, purifies an airflow rate of 5000 lpm contaminated with toluene (the simulated chemical agent) and soot from a diesel engine (the simulated aerosol for biological agents). Large volumes of purification by the plasma flame will free mankind from the threat of airborne warfare agents. The plasma flame may also effectively purify air that is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, in addition to eliminating soot from diesel engines as an environmental application.

  19. Plasma flame for mass purification of contaminated air with chemical and biological warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Shin, Dong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2006-09-01

    An elimination of airborne simulated chemical and biological warfare agents was carried out by making use of a plasma flame made of atmospheric plasma and a fuel-burning flame, which can purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces such as buildings, public transportation systems, and military vehicles. The plasma flame generator consists of a microwave plasma torch connected in series to a fuel injector and a reaction chamber. For example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22cm diameter and 30cm length, purifies an airflow rate of 5000lpm contaminated with toluene (the simulated chemical agent) and soot from a diesel engine (the simulated aerosol for biological agents). Large volumes of purification by the plasma flame will free mankind from the threat of airborne warfare agents. The plasma flame may also effectively purify air that is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, in addition to eliminating soot from diesel engines as an environmental application.

  20. Identification of European Air Masses Using an Interactive Computer Technique for Separating Mixed Normal Distributions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    classifying a maritime surface, he refers to the Pacific, Atlantic, or Gulf of Mexico using the general term "maritime" only when the exact origin is...portions of North Atlantic NPA PA air modified over warm North Atlantic TC Southern U.S. and Northern Mexico TG Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean NTG TG...Bergeron, T., 1928: " Uber Die Dreidimensional Verknupfende Wetteranalyse, Teil I." Geofys. Pub!., Vol. 5, No. 6. Berggren, R., 1953: "On Temperature

  1. Properties of individual aerosol particles and their relation to air mass origins in a south China coastal city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zongbo; He, Kebin; Xue, Zhigang; Yang, Fumo; Chen, Yanju; Ma, Yongliang; Luo, Jiaojiao

    2009-05-01

    Atmospheric particles in urban and rural areas in Shenzhen city were collected in summer and winter 2004. The particles were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The fine particles (<1 μm) were categorized into chain-like, elongated, rounded, and others on the basis of their morphology. Chain-like particles were likely soot aggregates. In summer and winter, chain-like particles accounted for 43% and 42% of total particles in the urban area, and 22% and 43% in the rural area, respectively. The elongated particles were mixtures of aged sea salts and ammonium sulfate, suggesting an aqueous phase reaction mechanism, i.e., in-cloud sulfate formation. Such particles occupied 12% of total particles in the urban area in the summer and were rarely observed in the wintertime samples. The rounded particles were mainly composed of sulfate and/or carbon. Their number concentration in the urban area was more than three times higher in the winter. In addition, we found that air masses from northern inland contained much higher concentrations of particles than those from the ocean. This was particularly evident in the rural area, where concentrations of chain-like and rounded particles were eight times higher in the continental air masses. These results suggest the strong influence of regional pollution on the particle number concentrations in the coastal city.

  2. Persistent organic contaminants in Saharan dust air masses in West Africa, Cape Verde and the eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Garrison, V H; Majewski, M S; Foreman, W T; Genualdi, S A; Mohammed, A; Massey Simonich, S L

    2014-01-15

    Anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) that persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, are toxic at low concentrations, and undergo long-range atmospheric transport (LRT) were identified and quantified in the atmosphere of a Saharan dust source region (Mali) and during Saharan dust incursions at downwind sites in the eastern Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago) and Cape Verde. More organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in the Saharan dust region than at downwind sites. Seven of the 13 OCPPs detected occurred at all sites: chlordanes, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, endosulfans, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trifluralin. Total SOCs ranged from 1.9-126 ng/m(3) (mean = 25 ± 34) at source and 0.05-0.71 ng/m(3) (mean = 0.24 ± 0.18) at downwind sites during dust conditions. Most SOC concentrations were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher in source than downwind sites. A Saharan source was confirmed for sampled air masses at downwind sites based on dust particle elemental composition and rare earth ratios, atmospheric back trajectory models, and field observations. SOC concentrations were considerably below existing occupational and/or regulatory limits; however, few regulatory limits exist for these persistent organic compounds. Long-term effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of SOCs are unknown, as are possible additive or synergistic effects of mixtures of SOCs, biologically active trace metals, and mineral dust particles transported together in Saharan dust air masses.

  3. An improved, automated whole air sampler and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis system for volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Brian M.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Goldan, Paul D.; Graus, Martin; Hendershot, Roger; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel A.; Koss, Abigail; Kuster, William C.; Lueb, Richard A.; McLaughlin, Richard J.; Peischl, Jeff; Sueper, Donna; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Tokarek, Travis W.; Warneke, Carsten; Yuan, Bin; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds were quantified during two aircraft-based field campaigns using highly automated, whole air samplers with expedited post-flight analysis via a new custom-built, field-deployable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry instrument. During flight, air samples were pressurized with a stainless steel bellows compressor into electropolished stainless steel canisters. The air samples were analyzed using a novel gas chromatograph system designed specifically for field use which eliminates the need for liquid nitrogen. Instead, a Stirling cooler is used for cryogenic sample pre-concentration at temperatures as low as -165 °C. The analysis system was fully automated on a 20 min cycle to allow for unattended processing of an entire flight of 72 sample canisters within 30 h, thereby reducing typical sample residence times in the canisters to less than 3 days. The new analytical system is capable of quantifying a wide suite of C2 to C10 organic compounds at part-per-trillion sensitivity. This paper describes the sampling and analysis systems, along with the data analysis procedures which include a new peak-fitting software package for rapid chromatographic data reduction. Instrument sensitivities, uncertainties and system artifacts are presented for 35 trace gas species in canister samples. Comparisons of reported mixing ratios from each field campaign with measurements from other instruments are also presented.

  4. Intraparticle heat and mass transfer characteristics of silica-gel/water vapor adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Eri; Watanabe, Fujio; Hasatani, Masanobu

    1999-07-01

    Recently, highly efficient energy utilization systems which extensively employ adsorption phenomena such as pressure swing adsorption, heat storage, adsorption heat pump, etc. are being regarded as one of the countermeasures for environmental issues such as green house effect and ozone layer destruction. An Adsorption Heat Pump (AHP) has been investigated as one of the important techniques via which cold heat energy is obtained from waste thermal energy below 373K without using electricity and CFCs. An AHP normally consists of an adsorber and an evaporator/condenser and cold heat energy is generated by latent heat of evaporation during adsorption process. For realizing the AHP technology, it has been pointed out that the development of an adsorber with optimum heat and mass transfer characteristics is essentially important. In this study, experimental studies were carried out which was based on the data of temperature inside the adsorbent particle and adsorptivity profiles at the adsorption/desorption process by volumetric method. To clarify adsorption mechanism relatively large silica-gel particle (7 mm f) was used. Temperature distribution in the particle is determined at the center, at one half radius in the radial direction and at the surface by using very thin (30 mm f) thermocouples. The temperatures at these points simultaneously increase/decrease as soon as the adsorption/desorption started, reached their respective maximum/minimum values and then return to initial temperature. The temperature profiles for the adsorption process show that the temperature at the surface is initially slightly higher than the other two points. All three points reached their respective maximum temperature at the same time with the temperature at the center point the highest and at the surface the lowest. The temperature profiles during the desorptive process are almost exactly the opposite to that of the adsorption process. This shows that the adsorption phenomena can take

  5. Temporal trends and spatial variation characteristics of primary air pollutants emissions from coal-fired industrial boilers in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yifeng; Tian, Hezhong; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Junling; Nie, Lei; Pan, Tao; Zhou, Junrui; Hua, Shenbing; Wang, Yong; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2016-06-01

    Coal-fired combustion is recognized as a significant anthropogenic source of atmospheric compounds in Beijing, causing heavy air pollution events and associated deterioration in visibility. Obtaining an accurate understanding of the temporal trends and spatial variation characteristics of emissions from coal-fired industrial combustion is essential for predicting air quality changes and evaluating the effectiveness of current control measures. In this study, an integrated emission inventory of primary air pollutants emitted from coal-fired industrial boilers in Beijing is developed for the period of 2007-2013 using a technology-based approach. Future emission trends are projected through 2030 based on current energy-related and emission control policies. Our analysis shows that there is a general downward trend in primary air pollutants emissions because of the implementation of stricter local emission standards and the promotion by the Beijing municipal government of converting from coal-fired industrial boilers to gas-fired boilers. However, the ratio of coal consumed by industrial boilers to total coal consumption has been increasing, raising concerns about the further improvement of air quality in Beijing. Our estimates indicate that the total emissions of PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NOx, CO and VOCs from coal-fired industrial boilers in Beijing in 2013 are approximately 19,242 t, 13,345 t, 26,615 t, 22,965 t, 63,779 t and 1406 t, respectively. Under the current environmental policies and relevant energy savings and emission control plans, it may be possible to reduce NOx and other air pollutant emissions by 94% and 90% by 2030, respectively, if advanced flue gas purification technologies are implemented and coal is replaced with natural gas in the majority of existing boilers.

  6. Characteristics of nitrogen balance in open-air and greenhouse vegetable cropping systems of China.

    PubMed

    Ti, Chaopu; Luo, Yongxia; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) loss from vegetable cropping systems has become a significant environmental issue in China. In this study, estimation of N balances in both open-air and greenhouse vegetable cropping systems in China was established. Results showed that the total N input in open-air and greenhouse vegetable cropping systems in 2010 was 5.44 and 2.60 Tg, respectively. Chemical fertilizer N input in the two cropping systems was 201 kg N ha(-1) per season (open-air) and 478 kg N ha(-1) per season (greenhouse). The N use efficiency (NUE) was 25.9 ± 13.3 and 19.7 ± 9.4% for open-air and greenhouse vegetable cropping systems, respectively, significantly lower than that of maize, wheat, and rice. Approximately 30.6% of total N input was accumulated in soils and 0.8% was lost by ammonia volatilization in greenhouse vegetable system, while N accumulation and ammonia volatilization accounted for 19.1 and 11.1%, respectively, of total N input in open-air vegetable systems.

  7. A catheter-type flow sensor for measurement of aspirated- and inspired-air characteristics in the bronchial region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikida, M.; Naito, J.; Yokota, T.; Kawabe, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Sato, K.

    2009-10-01

    We developed a novel catheter-type flow sensor for measuring the aspirated- and inspired-air characteristics trans-bronchially. An on-wall in-tube thermal flow sensor is mounted inside the tube, and it is used as a measurement tool in a bronchoscope. The external diameter of the tube is less than a few mm, and therefore, it can evaluate the flow characteristics in the small bronchial region. We newly developed a fabrication process to miniaturize it to less than 2.0 mm in the external diameter by using a heat shrinkable tube. A film sensor fabricated by photolithography was inserted into the tube by hand. By applying a heat shrinking process, the film was automatically mounted on the inner wall surface, and the outer size of the tube was miniaturized to almost half its original size. The final inner and outer diameters of the tube were 1.0 mm and 1.8 mm, respectively. The relationship between the input power of the sensor and the flow rate obeyed King's equation in both forward and reverse flow conditions. The sensor output dependence on ambient temperature was also studied, and the curve obtained at 39.2 °C was used as the calibration curve in animal experiments. The sensor characteristics under reciprocating flow were studied by using a ventilator, and we confirmed that the sensor was able to measure the reciprocating flow at 2.0 Hz. Finally, we successfully measured the aspirated- and inspired-air characteristics in the air passage of a rat.

  8. Comparison of the regulated air pollutant emission characteristics of real-world driving cycle and ECE cycle for motorcycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hung-Lung; Huang, Pei-Hsiu; Lai, Yen-Ming; Lee, Ting-Yi

    2014-04-01

    Motorcycles are an important means of transportation, and their numbers have increased significantly in recent years. However, motorcycles can emit significant amounts of air pollutants; therefore, the emission characteristics and driving patterns of motorcycles are necessary baseline information for the implementation of control measures for motorcycles in urban areas. The selected motorcycles were equipped with global positioning systems (GPS) to obtain speed-time data for determination of the characteristics of real-world driving parameters, and an on-board exhaust gas analyser with data logger was employed to determine the instantaneous concentration of regulated air pollutants from motorcycle exhaust. Results indicated that the time proportions of acceleration, cruising, and deceleration are different from those of the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) driving cycle, and the time percentages of acceleration and deceleration of the ECE cycle are much less than those in Taichung city. In general, the emission factors of the Taichung motorcycle driving cycle (TMDC) were higher HC and lower NOx emission than those of the ECE cycle. The average fuel consumption of tested motorcycles on three roads during workdays was 5% higher than that on weekends. The fuel consumption in the real-world motorcycle driving cycle was also about 7% higher than that of the ECE cycle, which again indicates that the ECE cycle is unsuitable for measuring fuel consumption in the Taichung metropolitan area. Therefore, understanding the local driving cycle is necessary for developing accurate emission data for air pollution control measures for urban areas.

  9. Effect of air-pressure on room temperature hydrogen sensing characteristics of nanocrystalline doped tin oxide MEMS-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Satyajit; Ludwig, Lawrence; Cho, Hyoung J; Duarte, Julian; Seal, Sudipta

    2005-11-01

    Nanocrystalline indium oxide (In2O3)-doped tin oxide (SnO2) thin film sensor has been sol-gel dip-coated on a microelectrochemical system (MEMS) device using a sol-gel dip-coating technique. Hydrogen (H2) at ppm-level has been successfully detected at room temperature using the present MEMS-based sensor. The room temperature H2 sensing characteristics (sensitivity, response and recovery time, and recovery rate) of the present MEMS-based sensor has been investigated as a function of air-pressure (50-600 Torr) with and without the ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure. It has been demonstrated that, the concentration of the surface-adsorbed oxygen-ions (which is related to the sensor-resistance in air), the ppm-level H2, and the oxygen (O2) partial pressure are the three major factors, which determine the variation in the room temperature H2 sensing characteristics of the present MEMS-based sensor as a function of air-pressure.

  10. Shear characteristics, miscibility, and topography of sodium caseinate-monoglyceride mixed films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Patino, Juan M; Carrera Sánchez, Cecilio

    2004-01-01

    In this contribution, we are concerned with the study of structure, topography, and surface rheological characteristics (under shear conditions) of mixed sodium caseinate and monoglycerides (monopalmitin and monoolein) at the air/water interface. Combined surface chemistry (surface film balance and surface shear rheometry) and microscopy (Brewster angle microscopy, BAM) techniques have been applied in this study to mixtures of insoluble lipids and sodium caseinate spread at the air-water interface. At a macroscopic level, sodium caseinate and monoglycerides form an heterogeneous and practically immiscible monolayer at the air-water interface. The images from BAM show segregated protein and monoglyceride domains that have different topography. At surface pressures higher than that for the sodium caseinate collapse, this protein is displaced from the interface by monoglycerides. These results and those derived from interfacial shear rheology (at a macroscopic level) appear to support the idea that immiscibility and heterogeneity of these emulsifiers at the interface have important repercussions on the shear characteristics of the mixed films, with the alternating flow of segregated monoglyceride domains (of low surface shear viscosity, etas) and protein domains (of high etas) across the canal.

  11. Aerosol properties associated with air masses arriving into the North East Atlantic during the 2008 Mace Head EUCAARI intensive observing period: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Ceburnis, D.; Martucci, G.; Bialek, J.; Dupuy, R.; Jennings, S. G.; Berresheim, H.; Wenger, J. C.; Sodeau, J. R.; Healy, R. M.; Facchini, M. C.; Rinaldi, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Finessi, E.; Worsnop, D.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    As part of the EUCAARI Intensive Observing Period, a 4-week campaign to measure aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, atmospheric structure, and cloud microphysics was conducted from mid-May to mid-June 2008 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, located at the interface of Western Europe and the NE Atlantic and centered on the west Irish coastline. During the campaign, continental air masses comprising both young and aged continental plumes were encountered, along with polar, Arctic and tropical air masses. Polluted-continental aerosol concentrations were of the order of 3000 cm-3, while background marine air aerosol concentrations were between 400-600 cm-3. The highest marine air concentrations occurred in polar air masses in which a 15 nm nucleation mode, with concentration of 1100 cm-3, was observed and attributed to open ocean particle formation. Black carbon concentrations in polluted air were between 300-400 ng m-3, and in clean marine air were less than 50 ng m-3. Continental air submicron chemical composition (excluding refractory sea salt) was dominated by organic matter, closely followed by sulphate mass. Although the concentrations and size distribution spectral shape were almost identical for the young and aged continental cases, hygroscopic growth factors (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to total condensation nuclei (CN) concentration ratios were significantly less in the younger pollution plume, indicating a more oxidized organic component to the aged continental plume. The difference in chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factor appear to result in a 40-50% impact on aerosol scattering coefficients and Aerosol Optical Depth, despite almost identical aerosol microphysical properties in both cases, with the higher values been recorded for the more aged case. For the CCN/CN ratio, the highest ratios were seen in the more age plume. In marine air, sulphate mass dominated the sub-micron component, followed by water

  12. Influence of air abrasion tips and operation modes on enamel-cutting characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Peruchi, Cláudia; Santos-Pinto, Ary; Dias, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Ana Carolina Mascarenhas; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of air abrasion tips and system operation modes on enamel cutting. Methods: Forty bovine teeth were abraded with the air abrasion system Mach 4.1 for 10 and 15 seconds, employing conventional and sonic tips of 0.45-mm inner diameter and a 90° angle, and 27.5-μm aluminum oxide at 5.51 bar air pressure in continuous and pulsed modes. The width and depth of the resulting cuts were measured in SEM. Results: The multivariate analysis of variances revealed that, compared to the sonic tip, the conventional tip produced shallower cuts independent of the operation mode and the application period. Conclusions: The cutting patterns observed in this study suggest that the pulsed mode produced deeper cuts when both the conventional and sonic tips were used, and that the sonic tip cut more dental tissue than the conventional one. PMID:23408157

  13. Operating characteristics of an air-cooling PEMFC for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Young-Jun; Park, Gu-Gon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Yoon, Young-Gi; Lee, Won-Yong; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kim, Chang-Soo

    Optimal design and proper operation is important to get designed output power of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. The air-cooling fuel cell stack is widely used in sub kW PEMFC systems. The purpose of this study is to analyze the operating conditions affecting the performance of an air-cooling PEMFC which is designed for portable applications. It is difficult to maintain well balanced operating conditions. These parameters are the relative humidity, the temperature of the stack, the utility ratio of the reactant gas and so on. In this study a 500 W rate air-cooling PEMFC was fabricated and tested to evaluate the design performance and to determine optimal operating conditions. Moreover, basic modeling also is carried out. These results can be used as design criteria and optimal operating conditions for portable PEMFCs.

  14. Associations between air pollution and socioeconomic characteristics, ethnicity and age profile of neighbourhoods in England and the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Fecht, Daniela; Fischer, Paul; Fortunato, Léa; Hoek, Gerard; de Hoogh, Kees; Marra, Marten; Kruize, Hanneke; Vienneau, Danielle; Beelen, Rob; Hansell, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Air pollution levels are generally believed to be higher in deprived areas but associations are complex especially between sensitive population subgroups. We explore air pollution inequalities at national, regional and city level in England and the Netherlands comparing particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations and publicly available population characteristics (deprivation, ethnicity, proportion of children and elderly). We saw higher concentrations in the most deprived 20% of neighbourhoods in England (1.5 μg/m(3) higher PM10 and 4.4 μg/m(3) NO2). Concentrations in both countries were higher in neighbourhoods with >20% non-White (England: 3.0 μg/m(3) higher PM10 and 10.1 μg/m(3) NO2; the Netherlands: 1.1 μg/m(3) higher PM10 and 4.5 μg/m(3) NO2) after adjustment for urbanisation and other variables. Associations for some areas differed from the national results. Air pollution inequalities were mainly an urban problem suggesting measures to reduce environmental air pollution inequality should include a focus on city transport.

  15. Cost characteristics of tilt-rotor, conventional air and high speed rail short-haul intercity passenger service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoendorfer, David L.; Morlok, Edward K.

    1985-01-01

    The cost analysis done to support an assessment of the potential for a small tilt-rotor aircraft to operate in short-haul intercity passenger service is described in detail. Anticipated costs of tilt-rotor air service were compared to the costs of two alternatives: conventional air and high speed rail (HSR). Costs were developed for corridor service, varying key market characteristics including distance, passenger volumes, and minimum frequency standards. The resulting cost vs output information can then be used to compare modal costs for essentially identical service quality and passenger volume or for different service levels and volumes for each mode, as appropriate. Extensive sensitivity analyses are performed. The cost-output features of these technologies are compared. Tilt-rotor is very attractive compared to HSR in terms of costs over the entire range of volume. It also has costs not dramatically different from conventional air, but tilt-rotor costs are generally higher. Thus some of its other advantages, such as the VTOL capability, must offset the cost disadvantage for it to be a preferred or competitive mode in any given market. These issues are addressed in the companion report which considers strategies for tilt-rotor development in commercial air service.

  16. Air pollution and mortality: effect modification by personal characteristics and specific cause of death in a case-only study.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hong; Tian, Linwei; Ho, Kin-Fai; Pun, Vivian C; Wang, Xiaorong; Yu, Ignatius T S

    2015-04-01

    Short-term effects of air pollution on mortality have been well documented in the literature worldwide. Less is known about which subpopulations are more vulnerable to air pollution. We conducted a case-only study in Hong Kong to examine the potential effect modification by personal characteristics and specific causes of death. Individual information of 402,184 deaths of non-external causes and daily mean concentrations of air pollution were collected from 2001 to 2011. For a 10 μg/m(3) increase of pollution concentration, people aged ≥ ∇65 years (compared with younger ages) had a 0.9-1.8% additional increase in mortality related to PM, NO2, and SO2. People dying from cardiorespiratory diseases (compared with other non-external causes) had a 1.6-2.3% additional increase in PM and NO2 related mortality. Other subgroups that were particularly susceptible were females and those economically inactive. Lower socioeconomic status and causes of cardiorespiratory diseases would increase the likelihood of death associated with air pollution.

  17. A piloted simulation of helicopter air combat to investigate effects of variations in selected performance and control response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Michael S.; Mansur, M. Hossein; Chen, Robert T. N.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study investigating handling qualities and flight characteristics required for helicopter air to air combat is presented. The Helicopter Air Combat system was used to investigate this role for Army rotorcraft. Experimental variables were the maneuver envelope size (load factor and sideslip), directional axis handling qualities, and pitch and roll control-response type. Over 450 simulated, low altitude, one-on-one engagements were conducted. Results from the experiment indicate that a well damped directional response, low sideforce caused by sideslip, and some effective dihedral are all desirable for weapon system performance, good handling qualities, and low pilot workload. An angular rate command system was favored over the attitude type pitch and roll response for most applications, and an enhanced maneuver envelope size over that of current generation aircraft was found to be advantageous. Pilot technique, background, and experience are additional factors which had a significant effect on performance in the air combat tasks investigated. The implication of these results on design requirements for future helicopters is presented.

  18. Operational Characteristics of a Rotating Detonation Engine Using Hydrogen and Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    pressure increased by approximately 1.5 psig, as shown in Fig. 5. Since helium is lighter than hydrogen and has a higher specific heat ratio, γ (1.66...Figure 5. Cold flow data for helium -air test (12) 14    Based on these results and published data relating the initial pressure of hydrogen to...the detonation cell size, λ, an estimate for cell size was extrapolated. For the pressure associated with the helium -air test, an estimated cell size

  19. [Simulation of air pollution characteristics and estimates of environmental capacity in Zibo City].

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen-Bo; Wang, Jin-Nan; Yang, Jin-Tian; Lei, Yu; Yan, Li; He, Jin-Yu; Han, Bao-Ping

    2013-04-01

    To develop a new pattern of air pollution control that is based on the integration of "concentration control, total amount control, and quality control", and in the context of developing national (2011-2015 air pollution control plan for key areas) and (Environmental protection plan of Zibo municipality for the "12th Five-Year Plan" period), a simulation of atmospheric dispersion of air pollutants in Zibo City and its peripheral areas is carried out by employing CALPUFF model, and the atmospheric environmental capacity of SO2, NO(x) and PM10 is estimated based on the results of model simulation and using multi-objective linear programming optimization. The results indicates that the air pollution in Zibo City is significantly related to the pollution sources outside of Zibo City, which contributes to the annual average concentration of SO2, NO2 and PM10 in Zibo City by 26.34%, 21.23%, and 14.58% respectively. There is a notable interaction between districts and counties of Zibo municipality, in which the contribution of SO2, NO(x) and PM10 emissions in surrounding counties and districts to the annual average concentrations of SO2, NO2 and PM10 in downtown area are 35.96%, 43.17%, and 17.69% respectively. There is a great variation in spatial sensitivity of air pollutant emission, and the environmental impact of unit pollutant emissions from Zhoucun, Huantai, Zhangdian and Zichuan is greater than that released from other districts/counties. To meet the requirement of (Ambient air quality standard) (GB 3095-2012), the environmental capacities of SO2, NO(x) and PM10 of Zibo City are only 8.03 x 10(4) t, 19.16 x 10(4) t and 3.21 x 10(4) t, respectively. Therefore, it is imperative to implement regional air pollution joint control in Shandong peninsula in order to ensure the achievement of air quality standard in Zibo City.

  20. Identification of oxidation products of solanesol produced during air sampling for tobacco smoke by electrospray mass spectrometry and HPLC.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Samuel P; Pretty, Jack R

    2005-10-01

    Solanesol, a 45-carbon, trisesquiterpenoid alcohol found in tobacco leaves and tobacco smoke, has been used as a quantitative marker for tobacco smoke for years. However, solanesol appears to be unreliable as a quantitative marker for tobacco smoke during environmental air sampling because it can be degraded substantially when present as a component of tobacco smoke and by as much as 100% when present as pure solanesol on fortified filters during air sampling. Since there is strong evidence that ozone is the agent responsible for the degradation, solanesol appears to be unreliable as a quantitative marker during indoor air sampling when indoor levels of ozone are greater than about 15 ppb. The degree of loss of pure solanesol is directly proportional to the concentration of ozone and the length of the sampling period and depends on the type of 37 mm membrane filter used for air sampling (PTFE or quartz fiber). While the degree of loss of solanesol is inversely proportional to the relative humidity of the air at a sampling rate of 1.7 L min(-1), the degree of loss is virtually independent of relative humidity at a lower sampling rate; i.e., 0.25 L min(-1). A curve of loss of solanesol on a filter versus concentration of ozone from an ozone generator is virtually identical to a curve segment based on atmospheric ozone under the same conditions of air sampling. Oxidation of solanesol by ozone to approximately 25 to 60% completion produces at least three series of products for a total of at least 26 compounds: (1) isoprenoid acetones, (2)omega-hydroxyisoprenoid acetaldehydes, and (3) isoprenoid oxoaldehydes. All products in each series were tentatively identified as their derivatives with 2-(p-aminophenyl)ethanol (APE) by electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS). Ten ozonation products were detected as their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives by HPLC at 360 nm: 4-oxopentanal and nine isoprenoid acetones (acetone, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, geranylacetone

  1. Effect of uniform magnetic and electric fields on microstructure and substructure characteristics of combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, A. P.; Mostovshchikov, A. V.; Pak, A. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    We have analyzed the effect of constant electric and magnetic fields on the micro- and substructure characteristics of the combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air. It has been found that the combustion of aluminum nanopowder in a magnetic field leads to the formation of single crystals of the hexagonal habitus, while the combustion in an electric field results in the formation of faceted crystallites with layered morphology. The fields noticeably affect the crystal lattice parameters of aluminum oxide and nitride (reduce the coherent scattering regions in aluminum nitride and increase such regions in aluminum γ-oxide). At the same time, the displacement of atoms relative to the equilibrium position becomes noticeably smaller for all crystal phases under the action of the fields (except for aluminum nitride in a magnetic field). These results have been explained by the orienting and stabilizing actions of the fields on the combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air.

  2. Increasing reliability of gas-air systems of piston and combined internal combustion engines by improving thermal and mechanic flow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodov, Yu. M.; Grigor'ev, N. I.; Zhilkin, B. P.; Plotnikov, L. V.; Shestakov, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Results of experimental study of thermal and mechanical characteristics of gas exchange flow in piston and combined engines are presented. Ways for improving intake and exhaust processes to increase reliability of gas-air engine systems are proposed.

  3. Air pollution characteristics and their relation to meteorological conditions during 2014-2015 in major Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    He, Jianjun; Gong, Sunling; Yu, Ye; Yu, Lijuan; Wu, Lin; Mao, Hongjun; Song, Congbo; Zhao, Suping; Liu, Hongli; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Ruipeng

    2017-04-01

    In January 2013, the real-time hourly average concentrations of six pollutants (CO, NO2, O3, PM10, PM2.5 and SO2) based on data from air quality monitoring stations in major Chinese cities were released to the public. That report provided a good opportunity to publicise nationwide temporal and spatial pollution characteristics. Although several studies systematically investigated the temporal and spatial trends of pollutant concentrations, the relation between air pollution and multi-scale meteorological conditions and their spatial variations on a nationwide scale remain unclear. This study analysed the air pollution characteristics and their relation to multi-scale meteorological conditions during 2014-2015 in 31 provincial capital cities in China. The annual average concentrations of six pollutants for 31 provincial capital cities were 1.2 mg m(-3), 42.4 μg m(-3), 49.0 μg m(-3), 109.8 μg m(-3), 63.7 μg m(-3), and 32.6 μg m(-3) in 2014. The annual average concentrations decreased 5.3%, 4.9%, 11.4%, 12.0% and 21.5% for CO, NO2, PM10, PM2.5 and SO2, respectively, but increased 7.4% for O3 in 2015. The highest rate of a major pollutant over China was PM2.5 followed by PM10, O3, NO2, SO2 and CO. Meteorological conditions were the primary factor determining day-to-day variations in pollutant concentrations, explaining more than 70% of the variance of daily average pollutant concentrations over China. Meteorological conditions in 2015 were more adverse for pollutant dispersion than in 2014, indicating that the improvement in air quality was caused by emission controls.

  4. Upper air relaxation in regional climate model improves resolved interannual variability of the surface mass balance of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Berg, Willem Jan; Medley, Brooke; van Meijgaard, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) determines the variability of the mass balance of the Antarctic Ice sheet on sub-decadal timescales. Since continent-wide SMB cannot be measured, it must be modeled and regional climate models (RCMs) generally outperform global reanalyses in the representation of total mass flux and the spatial distribution of SMB. However, if RCMs are only forced with reanalysis on their lateral boundaries, the representation of the interannual variability of SMB deteriorates significantly. In this study we show how to improve the resolved interannual variability in RCM modeled SMB. For this purpose we use annual SMB observations in the Thwaites drainage basin in Antarctica derived from airborne radar reflections and the RCM RACMO2. RACMO2, driven by ERA-Interim, better represents the mean spatial SMB pattern in this basin than ERA-Interim. However, without relaxation in the interior, RACMO2 poorly resolves the observed interannual SMB variability. If we gently relax the temperature and wind field in the upper atmosphere in RACMO2 to ERA-Interim, RACMO2 gets the best of both. Upper air relaxation little changes the mean SMB and spatial pattern compared to the original RACMO2 output, but allows RACMO2 to resolve the observed interannual SMB as good as ERA-Interim.

  5. The characteristics of coarse particulate matter air pollution associated with alterations in blood pressure and heart rate during controlled exposures

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Masako; Bard, Robert L.; Wang, Lu; Das, Ritabrata; Dvonch, J. Timothy; Spino, Catherine; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Sun, Qinghua; Harkema, Jack R.; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Brook, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Although fine particulate matter (PM) air pollution <2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) is a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, the potential health effects of coarse PM (2.5–10 μm in aerodynamic diameter; PM10–2.5) remain less clearly understood. We aimed to elucidate the components within coarse PM most likely responsible for mediating these hemodynamic alterations. Thirty-two healthy adults (25.9 ± 6.6 years) were exposed to concentrated ambient coarse PM (CAP) (76.2 ± 51.5 μg/m3) and filtered air (FA) for 2 h in a rural location in a randomized double-blind crossover study. The particle constituents (24 individual elements, organic and elemental carbon) were analyzed from filter samples and associated with the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) changes occurring throughout CAP and FA exposures in mixed model analyses. Total coarse PM mass along with most of the measured elements were positively associated with similar degrees of elevations in both systolic BP and HR. Conversely, total PM mass was unrelated, whereas only two elements (Cu and Mo) were positively associated with and Zn was inversely related to diastolic BP changes during exposures. Inhalation of coarse PM from a rural location rapidly elevates systolic BP and HR in a concentration-responsive manner, whereas the particulate composition does not appear to be an important determinant of these responses. Conversely, exposure to certain PM elements may be necessary to trigger a concomitant increase in diastolic BP. These findings suggest that particulate mass may be an adequate metric of exposure to predict some, but not all, hemodynamic alterations induced by coarse PM mass. PMID:25227729

  6. Preliminary evaluation of the air and fuel specific-impulse characteristics of several potential ram-jet fuels IV : hydrogen, a-methylnaphthalene, and carbon / Benson E. Gammon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, Benson E

    1951-01-01

    A preliminary analytical evaluation of the air and fuel specific-impulse characteristics of hydrogen, a-methylnapthalene, and graphite carbon has been made. Adiabatic constant-pressure combustion flame temperatures for each fuel at several equivalence ratios were calculated for an initial air temperature of 560 degrees R and a pressure of 2 atmospheres.

  7. Decomposing the profile of PM in two low polluted German cities--mapping of air mass residence time, focusing on potential long range transport impacts.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to decompose the profile of particulates in Karlsruhe and Potsdam (Germany), focusing on the localization of PM potential transboundary sources. An air mass cluster analysis was implemented, followed by a study of air mass residence time on a grid of a 0.5° × 0.5° resolution. Particulate/gaseous daily air pollution and meteorological data were used to indicate PM local sources. Four Principal Component Analysis (PCA) components were produced: traffic, photochemical, industrial/domestic and particulate. PM2.5/PM10 ratio seasonal trends, indicated production of PMCOARSE (PM10-PM2.5) from secondary sources in Potsdam during warm period (WP). The residing areas of incoming slow moving air masses are potential transboundary PM sources. For Karlsruhe those areas were mainly around the city. An air mass residence time secondary peak was observed over Stuttgart. For Potsdam, areas with increased dwelling time of the arriving air parcels were detected particularly above E/SE Germany.

  8. [Characteristic of Mercury Emissions and Mass Balance of the Typical Iron and Steel Industry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-hui; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ding-yong; Luo, Cheng-zhong; Yang, Xi; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    To preliminarily discuss the mercury emission characteristics and its mass balance in each process of the iron and steel production, a typical iron and steel enterprise was chosen to study the total mercury in all employed materials and estimate the input and output of mercury during the steel production process. The results showed that the mercury concentrations of input materials in each technology ranged 2.93-159.11 µg · kg⁻¹ with the highest level observed in ore used in blast furnace, followed by coal of sintering and blast furnace. The mercury concentrations of output materials ranged 3.09-18.13 µg · kg⁻¹ and the mercury concentration of dust was the highest, followed by converter slag. The mercury input and the output in the coking plant were 1346.74 g · d⁻¹ ± 36.95 g · d⁻¹ and 177.42 g · d⁻¹ ± 13.73 g · d⁻¹, respectively. In coking process, mercury mainly came from the burning of coking coal. The sintering process was the biggest contributor for mercury input during the iron and steel production with the mercury input of 1075. 27 g · d⁻¹ ± 60.89 g · d⁻¹ accounting for 68.06% of the total mercury input during this production process, and the ore powder was considered as the main mercury source. For the solid output material, the output in the sintering process was 14.15 g · d⁻¹ ± 0.38 g · d⁻¹, accounting for 22.61% of the total solid output. The mercury emission amount from this studied iron and steel enterprise was estimated to be 553.83 kg in 2013 with the emission factor of 0.092 g · t⁻¹ steel production. Thus, to control the mercury emissions, iron and steel enterprises should combine with production practice, further reduce energy consumption of coking and sintering, or improve the quality of raw materials and reduce the input of mercury.

  9. Air-sea fluxes and satellite-based estimation of water masses formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabia, Roberto; Klockmann, Marlene; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Recent work linking satellite-based measurements of sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) with traditional physical oceanography has demonstrated the capability of generating routinely satellite-derived surface T-S diagrams [1] and analyze the distribution/dynamics of SSS and its relative surface density with respect to in-situ measurements. Even more recently [2,3], this framework has been extended by exploiting these T-S diagrams as a diagnostic tool to derive water masses formation rates and areas. A water mass describes a water body with physical properties distinct from the surrounding water, formed at the ocean surface under specific conditions which determine its temperature and salinity. The SST and SSS (and thus also density) at the ocean surface are largely determined by fluxes of heat and freshwater. The surface density flux is a function of the latter two and describes the change of the density of seawater at the surface. To obtain observations of water mass formation is of great interest, since they serve as indirect observations of the thermo-haline circulation. The SSS data which has become available through the SMOS [4] and Aquarius [5] satellite missions will provide the possibility of studying also the effect of temporally-varying SSS fields on water mass formation. In the present study, the formation of water masses as a function of SST and SSS is derived from the surface density flux by integrating the latter over a specific area and time period in bins of SST and SSS and then taking the derivative of the total density flux with respect to density. This study presents a test case using SMOS SSS, OSTIA SST, as well as Argo ISAS SST and SSS for comparison, heat fluxes from the NOCS Surface Flux Data Set v2.0, OAFlux evaporation and CMORPH precipitation. The study area, initially referred to the North Atlantic, is extended over two additional ocean basins and the study period covers the 2011-2012 timeframe. Yearly, seasonal

  10. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and air mass factor concept for a multiply scattering vertically inhomogeneous medium: theoretical consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. V.; Rozanov, A. V.

    2010-06-01

    The Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is widely used to retrieve amounts of atmospheric species from measurements of the direct solar light transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere as well as of the solar light scattered in the atmosphere or reflected from the Earth's surface. For the transmitted direct solar light the theoretical basis of the DOAS technique represented by the Beer-Lambert law is well studied. In contrast, scarcely investigated is the theoretical basis and validity range of the DOAS method for those cases where the contribution of the multiple scattering processes is not negligible. Our study is intended to fill this gap by means of a theoretical investigation of the applicability of the DOAS technique for the retrieval of amounts of atmospheric species from observations of the scattered solar light with a non-negligible contribution of the multiple scattering. Starting from the expansion of the intensity logarithm in the functional Taylor series we formulate the general form of the DOAS equation. The thereby introduced variational derivative of the intensity logarithm with respect to the variation of the gaseous absorption coefficient, which is often referred to as the weighting function, is demonstrated to be closely related to the air mass factor. Employing some approximations we show that the general DOAS equation can be rewritten in the form of the weighting function (WFDOAS), the modified (MDOAS), and the standard DOAS equations. For each of these forms a specific equation for the air mass factor follows which, in general, is not suitable for other forms of the DOAS equation. Furthermore, the validity range of the standard DOAS equation is quantitatively investigated using a suggested criterion of a weak absorption. The results presented in this study are intended to provide a basis for a better understanding of the applicability range of different forms of the DOAS equation as well as of the relationship between

  11. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and air mass factor concept for a multiply scattering vertically inhomogeneous medium: theoretical consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. V.; Rozanov, A. V.

    2010-02-01

    The Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is widely used to retrieve amounts of atmospheric species from measurements of the direct solar light transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere as well as of the solar light scattered in the atmosphere or reflected from the Earth's surface. For the transmitted direct solar light the theoretical basis of the DOAS technique represented by the Beer-Lambert law is well studied. In contrast, scarcely investigated is the theoretical basis and validity range of the DOAS method for those cases where the contribution of the multiple scattering processes is not negligible. Our study is intended to fill this gap by means of a theoretical investigation of the applicability of the DOAS technique for the retrieval of amounts of atmospheric species from observations of the scattered solar light with a non-negligible contribution of the multiple scattering. Starting from the expansion of the intensity logarithm in the functional Taylor series we formulate the general form of the DOAS equation. The thereby introduced variational derivative of the intensity logarithm with respect to the variation of the gaseous absorption coefficient, which is often referred to as the weighting function, is demonstrated to be closely related to the air mass factor. Employing some approximations we show that the general DOAS equation can be rewritten in the form of the weighting function (WFDOAS), the modified (MDOAS), and the standard DOAS equations. For each of these forms a specific equation for the air mass factor follows which, in general, is not suitable for other forms of the DOAS equation. Furthermore, the validity range of the standard DOAS equation is quantitatively investigated using a suggested criterion of a weak absorption. The results presented in this study are intended to provide a basis for a better understanding of the applicability range of different forms of the DOAS equation as well as of the relationship between

  12. Characteristic fragmentation of thromboxane B2 in thermospray high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abián, J; Gelpí, E

    1991-01-02

    Cyclo- and lipo-oxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid have been reported to have very simple thermospray mass spectra. However, thromboxane B2 (TXB) in ammonium acetate-methanol and at interface temperatures below the point of total vaporization shows a mass spectral pattern characterized by abundant ions at low masses. The more abundant TXB fragment ions have been characterized as adducts from four principal fragments with molecular masses of 156, 170, 196 and 326. Positive- and negative-ion mass spectra, and mass spectra obtained with an alternative thermospray buffer (butylammonium acetate) support the molecular masses of these fragments. A tentative assignment of the fragments can be made by comparison of the thermospray mass spectra of TXB, 2,3-dinor-TXB and some of their methyl ester and methyl oxime derivatives. Interface temperature and solvent composition effects on the fragmentation, as well as in the electron-capture processes observed when working in the filament-on mode, are discussed. Fragmentation mechanisms can be related to those observed for monosaccharides, and imply retro-Diels-Alder as well as retroaldolic condensation-type rearrangements.

  13. Effects of CO addition on the characteristics of laminar premixed CH{sub 4}/air opposed-jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-Y.; Chao, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-P.; Ho, C.-T.; Cheng, T.S.

    2009-02-15

    The effects of CO addition on the characteristics of premixed CH{sub 4}/air opposed-jet flames are investigated experimentally and numerically. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations of the flame front position, temperature, and velocity are performed in stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air opposed-jet flames with various CO contents in the fuel. Thermocouple is used for the determination of flame temperature, velocity measurement is made using particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the flame front position is measured by direct photograph as well as with laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) of OH imaging techniques. The laminar burning velocity is calculated using the PREMIX code of Chemkin collection 3.5. The flame structures of the premixed stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air opposed-jet flames are simulated using the OPPDIF package with GRI-Mech 3.0 chemical kinetic mechanisms and detailed transport properties. The measured flame front position, temperature, and velocity of the stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air flames are closely predicted by the numerical calculations. Detailed analysis of the calculated chemical kinetic structures reveals that as the CO content in the fuel is increased from 0% to 80%, CO oxidation (R99) increases significantly and contributes to a significant level of heat-release rate. It is also shown that the laminar burning velocity reaches a maximum value (57.5 cm/s) at the condition of 80% of CO in the fuel. Based on the results of sensitivity analysis, the chemistry of CO consumption shifts to the dry oxidation kinetics when CO content is further increased over 80%. Comparison between the results of computed laminar burning velocity, flame temperature, CO consumption rate, and sensitivity analysis reveals that the effect of CO addition on the laminar burning velocity of the stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air flames is due mostly to the transition of the dominant chemical kinetic steps. (author)

  14. The most characteristic lesions and radiologic signs of Crohn disease of the small bowel: air enteroclysis, MDCT, endoscopy, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Carbo, Alberto I; Reddy, Threta; Gates, Thomas; Vesa, Telciane; Thomas, Jaiyeola; Gonzalez, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    This pictorial essay describes the most characteristic lesions and radiologic signs of Crohn disease of the small bowel: nodular lymphoid hyperplasia, abnormal mucosal folds, villous pattern, aphthous ulcerations, linear ulcerations, cobblestone pattern, string sign, target sign, comb sign, creeping fat, sinus tracts, fistulas, and abscesses. Each description includes the definition, a correlation with the pathologic findings, an explanation of the possible physiopathologic mechanism, sample radiologic images with air enteroclysis or MDCT, the correspondence with the endoscopic findings when possible, and a list of differential diagnoses.

  15. A study of the glow discharge characteristics of contact electrodes at atmospheric pressure in air

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenzheng Sun, Guangliang Li, Chuanhui; Zhang, Rongrong

    2014-04-15

    Electric field distributions and discharge properties of rod-rod contact electrodes were studied under the condition of DBD for the steady generation of atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma (APGD) in air. We found that under the effect of the initial electrons generated in a nanometer-scale gap, the rod-rod cross-contact electrodes yielded APGD plasma in air. Regarding the rod-rod cross-contact electrodes, increasing the working voltage expanded the strong electric field area of the gas gap so that both discharge area and discharge power increased, and the increase in the number of contact points kept the initial discharge voltage unchanged and caused an increase in the plasma discharge area and discharge power. A mesh-like structure of cross-contact electrodes was designed and used to generate more APGD plasma, suggesting high applicability.

  16. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  17. [Rural women's use of indoor air pollutants in Alexandria Governorate: relationship with sociodemographic characteristics and illness].

    PubMed

    El Asaal, Amal El Sayed

    2008-01-01

    This study determined the relationship between women's use of indoor air pollutants and sociodemographic variables and illness. Data were collected by observation and interview of 240 rural women in Alexandria Governorate. The use of chemical and microbial indoor air pollutants was high in 87.5% and 67.5% of the women respectively. Also, 27.5% of the women had chronic headache, 25.5% respiratory diseases and 16.3% eye diseases. There was a significant positive relationship between women's level of use and number of sons, type of family and number of family members; there was a significant negative relationship with women's education and their son's education. There were significant positive relationships between illness and overuse of insecticides, garbage burning in front of the house and having an unclean house.

  18. Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

    2012-07-08

    A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

  19. Characteristics of an Air Cushion Landing System incorporating an inelastic trunk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boghani, A. B.; Captain, K. M.; Wormley, D. N.

    1978-01-01

    A series of static and dynamic tests performed on an Air Cushion Landing System (ACLS) incorporating inelastic trunk are described. The tests were performed on an apparatus which had provisions to isolate heave-pitch and roll motion on the prototype cushion. The results of the test show that the sides of the trunk behave differently from the trunk ends. The tests also demonstrate that the current ACLS designs suffer from low heave damping, low roll stiffness and fan stall problems.

  20. Relationships of Type A Behavior with Biographical Characteristics and Training Performance of Air Traffic Controllers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    Helmreich, Beane , predictive of performance in the Academy screen and Lucker (1980), using the Jenkins Activity Survey, program. demonstrated that...Making it without losing it: Type A, achievement Matthews, K. A., Helmreich, R. L., Beane , W. F., & motivation, and scientific attainment revisited. Lucker...Aviation Medicine Report, the new aptitude testing procedures for selection DOT/ FAVA /A I-78-39. of FAA air traffic control specialists. In Schroeder, D. J

  1. Aerosol properties associated with air masses arriving into the North East Atlantic during the 2008 Mace Head EUCAARI intensive observing period: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Ceburnis, D.; Martucci, G.; Bialek, J.; Dupuy, R.; Jennings, S. G.; Berresheim, H.; Wenger, J.; Healy, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Rinaldi, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Finessi, E.; Worsnop, D.; Ehn, M.; Mikkilä, J.; Kulmala, M.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2010-09-01

    As part of the EUCAARI Intensive Observing Period, a 4-week campaign to measure aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, atmospheric structure, and cloud microphysics was conducted from mid-May to mid-June, 2008 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, located at the interface of Western Europe and the N. E. Atlantic and centered on the west Irish coastline. During the campaign, continental air masses comprising both young and aged continental plumes were encountered, along with polar, Arctic and tropical air masses. Polluted-continental aerosol concentrations were of the order of 3000 cm-3, while background marine air aerosol concentrations were between 400-600 cm-3. The highest marine air concentrations occurred in polar air masses in which a 15 nm nucleation mode, with concentration of 1100 cm-3, was observed and attributed to open ocean particle formation. Continental air submicron chemical composition (excluding refractory sea salt) was dominated by organic matter, closely followed by sulphate mass. Although the concentrations and size distribution spectral shape were almost identical for the young and aged continental cases, hygroscopic growth factors (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to total condensation nuclei (CN) concentration ratios were significantly less in the younger pollution plume, indicating a more oxidized organic component to the aged continental plume. The difference in chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factor appear to result in a 40-50% impact on aerosol scattering coefficients and Aerosol Optical Depth, despite almost identical aerosol microphysical properties in both cases, with the higher values been recorded for the more aged case. For the CCN/CN ratio, the highest ratios were seen in the more age plume. In marine air, sulphate mass dominated the sub-micron component, followed by water soluble organic carbon, which, in turn, was dominated by methanesulphonic acid (MSA). Sulphate concentrations were

  2. Velocity and temperature field characteristics of water and air during natural convection heating in cans.

    PubMed

    Erdogdu, Ferruh; Tutar, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Presence of headspace during canning is required since an adequate amount allows forming vacuum during the process. Sealing technology may not totally eliminate all entrapped gases, and headspace might affect heat transfer. Not much attention has been given to solve this problem in computational studies, and cans, for example, were mostly assumed to be fully filled with product. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine velocity and temperature evolution of water and air in cans during heating to evaluate the relevance of headspace in the transport mechanism. For this purpose, canned water samples with a certain headspace were used, and required governing continuity, energy, and momentum equations were solved using a finite volume approach coupled with a volume of fluid element model. Simulation results correlated well with experimental results validating faster heating effects of headspace rather than insulation effects as reported in the literature. The organized velocity motions along the air-water interface were also shown. Practical Application: Canning is a universal and economic method for processing of food products, and presence of adequate headspace is required to form vacuum during sealing of the cans. Since sealing technology may not totally eliminate the entrapped gases, mainly air, headspace might affect heating rates in cans. This study demonstrated the increased heating rates in the presence of headspace in contrast with some studies in the literature. By applying the effect of headspace, required processing time for thermally processed foods can be reduced leading to more rapid processes and lower energy consumptions.

  3. Air quality and changes in inversion characteristics in the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raudzens Bailey, A.; Chase, T. N.

    2009-12-01

    Though noxious emissions are the root cause of poor air quality, meteorological conditions are largely responsible for deviations in mean pollution concentrations. Temperature inversions, for example, are a common feature of high pollution episodes around the world. Characterized by an inverted lapse rate, in which temperature increases with height in the atmosphere, inversions trap pollutants in a cold pool under a warmer layer of air. The resulting atmospheric stagnation inhibits pollutants from dispersing out of the region. Climate modeling studies suggest that the meteorological conditions that favor atmospheric stagnation will increase as greenhouse gas concentrations alter global climate. To put this hypothesis to the test, we analyze upper air soundings for the period 1994-2008 from six Southwestern cities: Denver, Albuquerque, El Paso, Tucson, Flagstaff, and Salt Lake City. We note that while the overall strength (temperature difference) of low-level afternoon inversions increased through 2006, the frequency of inversions decreased for all six locations. We correlate these findings with the North American Regional Reanalysis, using Self-Organizing Maps to partition synoptic-scale meteorological patterns between days when inversions are present and absent. During the 15-year period of analysis, we test for significant changes in synoptic meteorology to determine whether large-scale weather patterns are responsible for the observed variations in inversion strength and frequency across the six sites.

  4. Investigation into some characteristics of the mass-customized production paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapper, Jerome; Sundar, Pratap S.; Kamarthi, Sagar V.

    2000-10-01

    In recent times, while markets are reaching their saturation limits and customers are becoming more demanding, a paradigm shift has been taking place from mass production to mass- customized production (MCP). The concept of mass customization (MC) focuses on satisfying a customer's unique needs with the help of new technologies such as Internet, digital product realization, and re-configurable production facilities. In MC the needs of an individual customer are translated into design, accordingly produced, and delivered to the customer. In this research three hypothesis related to MCP are investigated by the data/information collected from ten companies, which are engaged in MCP. These three hypothesis are (1) mass-customized production systems can be classified into make-to-stock MCP, assemble-to-order MCP, make-to-order MCP, engineer-to-order MC, and develop-to-order MCP, (2) in mass-customized production systems the process of customization eliminates customer sacrifice, and (3) mass-customized production systems can deliver products at mass-production cost. The preliminary study indicates that while the first hypothesis is valid, MCP companies rarely fulfill what is stated in the other two hypotheses.

  5. Distinct synoptic patterns and air masses responsible for long-range desert dust transport and sea spray in Palermo, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, K.; Paschalidou, A. K.; Kassomenos, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    Undoubtedly, anthropogenic emissions carry a large share of the risk posed on public health by particles exposure in urban areas. However, natural emissions, in the form of desert dust and sea spray, are well known to contribute significantly to the PM load recorded in many Mediterranean environments, posing an extra risk burden on public health. In the present paper, we examine the synoptic climatology in a background station in Palermo, Italy, through K-means clustering of the mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) maps, in an attempt to associate distinct synoptic patterns with increased PM10 levels. Four-day backward trajectory analysis is then applied, in order to study the origins and pathways of air masses susceptible of PM10 episodes. It is concluded that a number of atmospheric patterns result in several kind of flows, namely south, west, and slow-moving/stagnant flows, associated with long-range dust transport and sea spray.

  6. Seasonal variability of tritium and ion concentrations in rain at Kumamoto, Japan and back-trajectory analysis of air mass

    SciTech Connect

    Momoshima, N.; Sugihara, S.; Toyoshima, T.; Nagao, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Nakamura, Y.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium and major ion concentrations in rain were analyzed in Kumamoto (Japan)) between 2001 and 2006 to examine present tritium concentration and seasonal variation. The average tritium concentration was 0.36 {+-} 0.19 Bq/L (n=104) and higher tritium concentrations were observed in spring than the other seasons. Among the ions, non-sea-salt (nss) SO{sub 4}{sup 2}'- showed higher concentration in winter while other ions did not show marked increase in winter. Based on the back-trajectory analyses of air masses, the increase in tritium concentrations in spring arises from downward movement of naturally produced tritium from stratosphere to troposphere, while the increase of the nss-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations in winter is due to long range transport of pollutants from China to Japan. (authors)

  7. Characterisation of a smartphone image sensor response to direct solar 305nm irradiation at high air masses.

    PubMed

    Igoe, D P; Amar, A; Parisi, A V; Turner, J

    2017-06-01

    This research reports the first time the sensitivity, properties and response of a smartphone image sensor that has been used to characterise the photobiologically important direct UVB solar irradiances at 305nm in clear sky conditions at high air masses. Solar images taken from Autumn to Spring were analysed using a custom Python script, written to develop and apply an adaptive threshold to mitigate the effects of both noise and hot-pixel aberrations in the images. The images were taken in an unobstructed area, observing from a solar zenith angle as high as 84° (air mass=9.6) to local solar maximum (up to a solar zenith angle of 23°) to fully develop the calibration model in temperatures that varied from 2°C to 24°C. The mean ozone thickness throughout all observations was 281±18 DU (to 2 standard deviations). A Langley Plot was used to confirm that there were constant atmospheric conditions throughout the observations. The quadratic calibration model developed has a strong correlation between the red colour channel from the smartphone with the Microtops measurements of the direct sun 305nm UV, with a coefficient of determination of 0.998 and very low standard errors. Validation of the model verified the robustness of the method and the model, with an average discrepancy of only 5% between smartphone derived and Microtops observed direct solar irradiances at 305nm. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using the smartphone image sensor as a means to measure photobiologically important solar UVB radiation. The use of ubiquitous portable technologies, such as smartphones and laptop computers to perform data collection and analysis of solar UVB observations is an example of how scientific investigations can be performed by citizen science based individuals and groups, communities and schools.

  8. Persistent organic contaminants in Saharan dust air masses in West Africa, Cape Verde and the eastern Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.; Genualdi, Susan A.; Mohammed, Azad; Massey Simonich, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) that persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, are toxic at low concentrations, and undergo long-range atmospheric transport (LRT) were identified and quantified in the atmosphere of a Saharan dust source region (Mali) and during Saharan dust incursions at downwind sites in the eastern Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago) and Cape Verde. More organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in the Saharan dust region than at downwind sites. Seven of the 13 OCPPs detected occurred at all sites: chlordanes, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, endosulfans, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trifluralin. Total SOCs ranged from 1.9–126 ng/m3 (mean = 25 ± 34) at source and 0.05–0.71 ng/m3 (mean = 0.24 ± 0.18) at downwind sites during dust conditions. Most SOC concentrations were 1–3 orders of magnitude higher in source than downwind sites. A Saharan source was confirmed for sampled air masses at downwind sites based on dust particle elemental composition and rare earth ratios, atmospheric back trajectory models, and field observations. SOC concentrations were considerably below existing occupational and/or regulatory limits; however, few regulatory limits exist for these persistent organic compounds. Long-term effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of SOCs are unknown, as are possible additive or synergistic effects of mixtures of SOCs, biologically active trace metals, and mineral dust particles transported together in Saharan dust air masses.

  9. The collision cross sections of iodide salt cluster ions in air via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Hui; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Oberreit, Derek R; Hogan, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    To date, most collision cross section (CCS) predictions have invoked gas molecule impingement-reemission rules in which specular and elastic scattering of spherical gas molecules from rigid polyatomic surfaces are assumed. Although such predictions have been shown to agree well with CCSs measured in helium bath gas, a number of studies reveal that these predictions do not agree with CCSs for ions in diatomic gases, namely, air and molecular nitrogen. To further examine the validity of specular-elastic versus diffuse-inelastic scattering models, we measured the CCSs of positively charged metal iodide cluster ions of the form [MI]n[M(+)]z, where M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs, n = 1 - 25, and z = 1 - 2. Measurements were made in air via differential mobility analysis mass spectrometry (DMA-MS). The CCSs measured are compared with specular-elastic as well as diffuse-inelastic scattering model predictions with candidate ion structures determined from density functional theory. It is found that predictions from diffuse-inelastic collision models agree well (within 5%) with measurements from sodium iodide cluster ions, while specular-elastic collision model predictions are in better agreement with cesium iodide cluster ion measurements. The agreement with diffuse-inelastic and specular-elastic predictions decreases and increases, respectively, with increasing cation mass. However, even when diffuse-inelastic cluster ion predictions disagree with measurements, the disagreement is of a near-constant factor for all ions, indicating that a simple linear rescaling collapses predictions to measurements. Conversely, rescaling cannot be used to collapse specular-elastic predictions to measurements; hence, although the precise impingement reemission rules remain ambiguous, they are not specular-elastic.

  10. The Collision Cross Sections of Iodide Salt Cluster Ions in Air via Differential Mobility Analysis-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hui; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Oberreit, Derek R.; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    To date, most collision cross section (CCS) predictions have invoked gas molecule impingement-reemission rules in which specular and elastic scattering of spherical gas molecules from rigid polyatomic surfaces are assumed. Although such predictions have been shown to agree well with CCSs measured in helium bath gas, a number of studies reveal that these predictions do not agree with CCSs for ions in diatomic gases, namely, air and molecular nitrogen. To further examine the validity of specular-elastic versus diffuse-inelastic scattering models, we measured the CCSs of positively charged metal iodide cluster ions of the form [MI]n[M+]z, where M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs, n = 1 - 25, and z = 1 - 2. Measurements were made in air via differential mobility analysis mass spectrometry (DMA-MS). The CCSs measured are compared with specular-elastic as well as diffuse-inelastic scattering model predictions with candidate ion structures determined from density functional theory. It is found that predictions from diffuse-inelastic collision models agree well (within 5 %) with measurements from sodium iodide cluster ions, while specular-elastic collision model predictions are in better agreement with cesium iodide cluster ion measurements. The agreement with diffuse-inelastic and specular-elastic predictions decreases and increases, respectively, with increasing cation mass. However, even when diffuse-inelastic cluster ion predictions disagree with measurements, the disagreement is of a near-constant factor for all ions, indicating that a simple linear rescaling collapses predictions to measurements. Conversely, rescaling cannot be used to collapse specular-elastic predictions to measurements; hence, although the precise impingement reemission rules remain ambiguous, they are not specular-elastic.

  11. Development of a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for determining personal care products in air.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Borrull, Francesc

    2010-06-25

    This study describes the development of a new analytical method for determining 14 personal care products (PCPs) - nine synthetic musks, four parabens and one insect repellent - in air samples. The method is based on active sampling on sorbent tubes and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and is rapid, sensitive and drastically reduces the risk of sample contamination. Three kinds of tubes and traps were tested, those filled with Tenax TA being the most suitable for this study. Method validation showed good repeatability and reproducibility, low detection limits (between 0.03 ng m(-3) for DPMI and 12.5 ng m(-3) for propyl paraben) and good linearity for all compounds. Stability during storage indicated that samples must be kept refrigerated at 4 degrees C and analysed within 1 week of collection. The applicability of the technique to real samples was tested in different indoor and outdoor atmospheres. The total PCP values for indoor air ranged from 135 ng m(-3) in a pharmacy to 2838 ng m(-3) in a hairdresser's, whereas the values for outdoor air ranged from 14 ng m(-3) for a suburban environment to 26 ng m(-3) for an urban environment. In general, the most abundant synthetic musks were galaxolide (5.9-1256 ng m(-3)), musk xylene (1.6-766 ng m(-3)) and tonalide (1.1-138 ng m(-3)). Methyl and ethyl paraben (2.4-313 ng m(-3) and 1.8-117 ng m(-3), respectively) were the most abundant parabens. Although thermal desorption methods have been widely used for determining volatile organic compounds, they are rarely used with semi-volatile compounds. This study thus demonstrates that the thermal desorption method performs well with semi-volatile compounds and, for the first time, that it can be used for determining PCPs.

  12. Association between indoor air pollutant exposure and blood pressure and heart rate in subjects according to body mass index.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chien-Cheng; Su, Huey-Jen; Liang, Hsiu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of high body mass index (BMI) of subjects on individual who exhibited high cardiovascular disease indexes with blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) when exposed to high levels of indoor air pollutants. We collected 115 office workers, and measured their systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and HR at the end of the workday. The subjects were divided into three groups according to BMI: 18-24 (normal weight), 24-27 (overweight) and >27 (obese). This study also measured the levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5μm (PM2.5), as well as the bacteria and fungi in the subjects' work-places. The pollutant effects were divided by median. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the health effects of indoor air pollution exposure according to BMI. Our study showed that higher levels of SBP, DBP and HR occurred in subjects who were overweight or obese as compared to those with normal weight. Moreover, there was higher level of SBP in subjects who were overweight or obese when they were exposed to higher levels of TVOC and fungi (p<0.05). We also found higher value for DBP and HR with increasing BMI to be associated with exposure to higher TVOC levels. This study suggests that individuals with higher BMI have higher cardiovascular disease risk when they are exposed to poor indoor air quality (IAQ), and specifically in terms of TVOC.

  13. Air flow-assisted ionization imaging mass spectrometry method for easy whole-body molecular imaging under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhigang; He, Jiuming; Chen, Yi; He, Jingjing; Gong, Tao; Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao; Zhang, Ruiping; Huang, Lan; Zhang, Lianfeng; Lv, Haining; Ma, Shuanggang; Fu, Zhaodi; Chen, Xiaoguang; Yu, Shishan; Abliz, Zeper

    2013-03-05

    Whole-body molecular imaging is able to directly map spatial distribution of molecules and monitor its biotransformation in intact biological tissue sections. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), a label-free molecular imaging method, can be used to image multiple molecules in a single measurement with high specificity. Herein, a novel easy-to-implement, whole-body IMS method was developed with air flow-assisted ionization in a desorption electrospray ionization mode. The developed IMS method can effectively image molecules in a large whole-body section in open air without sample pretreatment, such as chemical labeling, section division, or matrix deposition. Moreover, the signal levels were improved, and the spatial assignment errors were eliminated; thus, high-quality whole-body images were obtained. With this novel IMS method, in situ mapping analysis of molecules was performed in adult rat sections with picomolar sensitivity under ambient conditions, and the dynamic information of molecule distribution and its biotransformation was provided to uncover molecular events at the whole-animal level. A global view of the differential distribution of an anticancer agent and its metabolites was simultaneously acquired in whole-body rat and model mouse bearing neuroglioma along the administration time. The obtained drug distribution provided rich information for identifying the targeted organs and predicting possible tumor spectrum, pharmacological activity, and potential toxicity of drug candidates.

  14. Statistical Characteristics of Experimental Geysers: Factors Controlling Mass and Style of Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toramaru, A.; Maeda, K.

    2011-12-01

    We carried out laboratory experiments of geysers, which reproduce the time predictability similar to natural geysers in Yellowstone. We measured pressure and temperature in hot water chamber (glass flask), flux from cold water reservoir and erupted mass through several tens to one hundred eruptions, varying the experimental conditions such as the heating temperature, water quality, and system geometry. We found two types of eruptions styles, "jet" and "flow": "jet" is defined as an explosive outflow of hot water and steam from the vent exceeding 20 cm in height (chamber to vent is approximately 1 m in height) whereas "flow" is an effusive outflow of hot water less than 20 cm in height. In some conditions only "jet" events occur, in the other "jet" and "flow" events coexist. From the statistics of erupted mass, an experiment setup which produces only "jet" events exhibits a narrow range of frequency distribution like Gaussian with relative large average of mass. As the proportion of "flow" events increases, the frequency distribution of erupted mass becomes wide showing relatively small average of mass, extremely like white noise in the case that mostly "flows" events occur. From temperature measurement it is found that the "jet"-dominated type of experimental setup shows less magnitude of temperature fluctuations than "flow"-dominated type. In order to explain the experimental correlation between erupted mass, style and magnitude of thermal heterogeneity, we present a Monte Carlo model in which water in heated flask is represented by a square consisting of n ± n parcels. Temperature of each parcel is regarded as a stochastic variable which follows a Gaussian probability distribution function (PDF) with average and variance. An eruption is triggered by the precursory outflow, when the superheated mass fraction φ S (number fraction of parcels with temperature higher than boiling point under the conduit hydrostatic pressure) exceeds the threshold value corresponding

  15. Mass modeling of fig (Ficus carica L.) fruit with some physical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Feizollah; Rahmati, Satar

    2013-03-01

    Horticultural crops with the similar weight and uniform shape are in high demand in terms of marketing value, which are used as food. For proper design of grading systems, important relationships among the mass and other properties of fruits such as length, width, thickness, volumes, and projected areas must be known. The aim of this research was to measure and present some physical properties of fig fruits. In addition, Linear, Quadratic, S-curve, and Power models are used for mass predication of fig fruits based on measured physical properties. The results showed that all measured physical properties were statistically significant at the 1% probability level. For mass predication of fig fruits, the best and the worst models were obtained based on criteria projected area and thickness of the fruits with determination coefficients (R (2)) of 0.984 and 0.664, respectively. At last, from economical standpoint, mass modeling of fig fruits based on first projected area is recommended.

  16. Stenotrophomonas, Mycobacterium, and Streptomyces in home dust and air: Associations with moldiness and other home/family characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kettleson, Eric; Kumar, Sudhir; Reponen, Tiina; Vesper, Stephen; Méheust, Delphine; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Adhikari, Atin

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory illnesses have been linked to children’s exposures to water-damaged homes. Therefore, understanding the microbiome in water-damaged homes is critical to preventing these illnesses. Few studies have quantified bacterial contamination, especially specific species, in water-damaged homes. We collected air and dust samples in twenty-one low-mold homes and twenty-one high-mold homes. The concentrations of three bacteria/genera, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Streptomyces sp. and Mycobacterium sp., were measured in air and dust samples using quantitative PCR (QPCR). The concentrations of the bacteria measured in the air samples were not associated with any specific home characteristic based on multiple regression models. However, higher concentrations of S. maltophilia in the dust samples were associated with water damage, i.e. with higher floor surface moisture and higher concentrations of moisture-related mold species. The concentrations of Streptomyces and Mycobacterium sp. had similar patterns and may be partially determined by human and animal occupants and outdoor sources of these bacteria. PMID:23397905

  17. The Effects of Mass Transfer and Angle of Attack on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    temperature was measured with a singly shielded thermocouple (tip height approximately 0.050"). This probe was calibrated in the free stream for several...thickness, (P u 9/ ) e e e r - radius measured from axis of symmetry; recovery factor s - wetted length along surface of body St - Stanton number, w /(Pu) e...experiment considered mass addition rates which cover the ablation gas range for current heat shield materials (simulated ablation via gaseous mass

  18. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  19. Fractal characteristics of seismic process in rock mass surrounding the excavation at mining. Mathematical modelling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, M. O.; Makarov, P. V.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown in the paper that the system of equations of solid mechanics, which has a mixed type, demonstrate the most common features of evolution of nonlinear dynamic systems. Previous investigations of seismic process were carried out on the base of simplified (sand-pile, land-slide) models which gave a graph of recurrence of seismic events and information about the state of self-organized criticality (SOC). However, these simplified models do not contain the information about the stress-strain state of the loaded geomedia and its proximity to the critical state. In the proposed paper the model of rock mass with excavation is constructed and general step of roof caving is modelled. On the base of these modelling the formation of critical state in loaded geomedia is studied. The fluctuations of stress-strain state at different points of geomedia are studied as the reflection of fracture process occurring in the main elements of rock mass: roof and floor, when the coal face is advanced. It is shown that the PDF dependencies, amplitude-frequency characteristics reflect the state of the rock mass and might be considered as the fractal characteristics of fracture process within. The evolution of these dependencies shows the dramatic change when the critical state is formed in the rock mass surrounding the underground opening.

  20. Selected Ion Flow-Drift Tube Mass Spectrometry: Quantification of Volatile Compounds in Air and Breath.

    PubMed

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-12-15

    A selected ion flow-drift tube mass spectrometric analytical technique, SIFDT-MS, is described that extends the established selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, by the inclusion of a static but variable E-field along the axis of the flow tube reactor in which the analytical ion-molecule chemistry occurs. The ion axial speed is increased in proportion to the reduced field strength E/N (N is the carrier gas number density), and the residence/reaction time, t, which is measured by Hadamard transform multiplexing, is correspondingly reduced. To ensure a proper understanding of the physics and ion chemistry underlying SIFDT-MS, ion diffusive loss to the walls of the flow-drift tube and the mobility of injected H3O(+) ions have been studied as a function of E/N. It is seen that the derived diffusion coefficient and mobility of H3O(+) ions are consistent with those previously reported. The rate coefficient has been determined at elevated E/N for the association reaction of the H3O(+) reagent ions with H2O molecules, which is the first step in the production of H3O(+)(H2O)1,2,3 reagent hydrate ions. The production of hydrated analyte ion was also experimentally investigated. The analytical performance of SIFDT-MS is demonstrated by the quantification of acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath. Finally, the essential features of SIFDT-MS and SIFT-MS are compared, notably pointing out that a much lower speed of the flow-drive pump is required for SIFDT-MS, which facilitates the development of smaller cost-effective analytical instruments for real time breath and fluid headspace analyses.

  1. Measurement error models in chemical mass balance analysis of air quality data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, William F.; Gunst, Richard F.

    The chemical mass balance (CMB) equations have been used to apportion observed pollutant concentrations to their various pollution sources. Typical analyses incorporate estimated pollution source profiles, estimated source profile error variances, and error variances associated with the ambient measurement process. Often the CMB model is fit to the data using an iteratively re-weighted least-squares algorithm to obtain the effective variance solution. We consider the chemical mass balance model within the framework of the statistical measurement error model (e.g., Fuller, W.A., Measurement Error Models, Wiley, NewYork, 1987), and we illustrate that the models assumed by each of the approaches to the CMB equations are in fact special cases of a general measurement error model. We compare alternative source contribution estimators with the commonly used effective variance estimator when standard assumptions are valid and when such assumptions are violated. Four approaches for source contribution estimation and inference are compared using computer simulation: weighted least squares (with standard errors adjusted for source profile error), the effective variance approach of Watson et al. (Atmos, Environ., 18, 1984, 1347), the Britt and Luecke (Technometrics, 15, 1973, 233) approach, and a method of moments approach given in Fuller (1987, p. 193). For the scenarios we consider, the simplistic weighted least-squares approach performs as well as the more widely used effective variance solution in most cases, and is slightly superior to the effective variance solution when source profile variability is large. The four estimation approaches are illustrated using real PM 2.5 data from Fresno and the conclusions drawn from the computer simulation are validated.

  2. Performance Characteristics of a Micro Air Grinder Operated by a Two-Stages Axial-Type Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo-Yong; Choi, Sang-Kyu

    Performance characteristics are experimentally studied with various nozzles, stators and rotors on a partially admitted small axial-type turbine, which could be applied to a driver of micro air grinders. When air tools adopt axial-type turbines as a driver, they could operate without friction and abrasion because the turbine rotor does not make contact with the casing. In order to maintain these merits on a small axial-type turbine without reducing power, performance characteristics are examined through measuring the specific output power with eight different stators and three different rotors and nozzles. The tested turbine consists of two-stages and its mean radius of flow passage is 9.2mm. The experimental results show that the output power improvement on the first stage is significant comparing with that on the second stage because partially admitted flow is fully diffused in the second stage. Meanwhile, the output power is increased to 16-22% by changing the nozzle blade angle from 60° to 70° because the first stage performance is directly affected by the flow spouted from the nozzle. These results indicate that blade angles greatly influence the performance of a micro turbine operating in partial admission. When an appropriate stator and rotor that are designed in accordance with the flow spouted from the nozzle are installed in the rotating part, the output power is increased up to 38% depending on the blade angle.

  3. A testing machine for dental air-turbine handpiece characteristics: free-running speed, stall torque, bearing resistance.

    PubMed

    Darvell, Brain W; Dyson, J E

    2005-01-01

    The measurement of performance characteristics of dental air turbine handpieces is of interest with respect to product comparisons, standards specifications and monitoring of bearing longevity in clinical service. Previously, however, bulky and expensive laboratory equipment was required. A portable test machine is described for determining three key characteristics of dental air-turbine handpieces: free-running speed, stall torque and bearing resistance. It relies on a special circuit design for performing a hardware integration of a force signal with respect to rotational position, independent of the rate at which the turbine is allowed to turn during both stall torque and bearing resistance measurements. Free-running speed without the introduction of any imbalance can be readily monitored. From the essential linear relationship between torque and speed, dynamic torque and, hence, power, can then be calculated. In order for these measurements to be performed routinely with the necessary precision of location on the test stage, a detailed procedure for ensuring proper gripping of the handpiece is described. The machine may be used to verify performance claims, standard compliance checks should this be established as appropriate, monitor deterioration with time and usage in the clinical environment and for laboratory investigation of design development.

  4. Chemical composition of air masses transported from Asia to the U.S. West Coast during ITCT 2K2: Fossil fuel combustion versus biomass-burning signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouw, J. A.; Cooper, O. R.; Warneke, C.; Hudson, P. K.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Hübler, G.; Nicks, D. K., Jr.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Donnelly, S. G.; Schauffler, S. M.; Stroud, V.; Johnson, K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Streets, D. G.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation experiment in 2002 (ITCT 2K2), a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D research aircraft was used to study the long-range transport of Asian air masses toward the west coast of North America. During research flights on 5 and 17 May, strong enhancements of carbon monoxide (CO) and other species were observed in air masses that had been transported from Asia. The hydrocarbon composition of the air masses indicated that the highest CO levels were related to fossil fuel use. During the flights on 5 and 17 May and other days, the levels of several biomass-burning indicators increased with altitude. This was true for acetonitrile (CH3CN), methyl chloride (CH3Cl), the ratio of acetylene (C2H2) to propane (C3H8), and, on May 5, the percentage of particles measured by the particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry (PALMS) instrument that were attributed to biomass burning based on their carbon and potassium content. An ensemble of back-trajectories, calculated from the U.S. west coast over a range of latitudes and altitudes for the entire ITCT 2K2 period, showed that air masses from Southeast Asia and China were generally observed at higher altitudes than air from Japan and Korea. Emission inventories estimate the contribution of biomass burning to the total emissions to be low for Japan and Korea, higher for China, and the highest for Southeast Asia. Combined with the origin of the air masses versus altitude, this qualitatively explains the increase with altitude, averaged over the whole ITCT 2K2 period, of the different biomass-burning indicators.

  5. Chemical Characteristics of Particulate Matter from Vehicle emission using High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, T.; Lee, T.; Kang, S.; Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Son, J.; Yoo, H. M.; Kim, K.; Park, G.

    2015-12-01

    Car emissions are major contributors of particulate matter (PM) in the urban environment and effects of air pollution, climate change, and human activities. By increasing of interest in research of car emission for assessment of the PM control, it became require to understand the chemical composition and characteristics of the car exhaust gases and particulate matter. To understand car emission characteristics of PM, we will study PM of car emissions for five driving modes (National Institute Environmental Research (NIER)-5, NIER-9, NIER-12, NIER-14) and three fixed speed driving modes (30km/h, 70km/h, 110km/h) using different fuel types (gasoline, diesel, and LPG) at Transportation Pollution Research Center (TPRC) of NIER in Incheon, South Korea. PM chemical composition of car emission was measured for concentrations of organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, PAHs, oxidation states and size distribution using an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) on real-time. In the study, organics concentration was dominated for all cases of driving modes and the concentration of organics was increased in 110km/h fixed speed mode for gasoline and diesel. The presentation will provide an overview of the chemical composition of PM in the car emissions.

  6. Remote sensing observations for monitoring and mathematical simulations of transboundary air pollutants migration from Siberian mass wildfires to Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaipov, I. V.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropogenic and natural factors have increased the power of wildfires in massive Siberian woodlands. As a consequence, the expansion of burned areas and increase in the duration of the forest fire season have led to the release of significant amounts of gases and aerosols. Therefore, it is important to understand the impact of wildland fires on air quality, atmospheric composition, climate and accurately describe the distribution of combustion products in time and space. The most effective research tool is the regional hydrodynamic model of the atmosphere, coupled with the model of pollutants transport and chemical interaction. Taking into account the meteorological parameters and processes of chemical interaction of impurities, complex use of remote sensing techniques for monitoring massive forest fires and mathematical modeling of long-range transport of pollutants in the atmosphere, allow to evaluate spatial and temporal scale of the phenomenon and calculate the quantitative characteristics of pollutants depending on the height and distance of migration.

  7. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying

    2013-09-30

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  8. Investigation of spray characteristics for flashing injection of fuels containing dissolved air and superheated fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Chen, L. D.; Faeth, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    The flow, atomization and spreading of flashing injector flowing liquids containing dissolved gases (jet/air) as well as superheated liquids (Freon II) were considered. The use of a two stage expansion process separated by an expansion chamber, ws found to be beneficial for flashing injection particularly for dissolved gas systems. Both locally homogeneous and separated flow models provided good predictions of injector flow properties. Conventional correlations for drop sizes from pressure atomized and airblast injectors were successfully modified, using the separated flow model to prescribe injector exit conditions, to correlate drop size measurements. Additional experimental results are provided for spray angle and combustion properties of sprays from flashing injectors.

  9. Aerodynamic characteristics of a series of single-inlet air-breathing missile configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of air-breathing missile configurations was investigated to provide a data base for the design of such missiles. The model could be configured with either a single axisymmetric or a two dimensional inlet located at the bottom of the body. Two tail configurations were investigated: a tri-tail and an X-tail. The tail surfaces could be deflected to provide pitch control. A wing could be located above the inlet on the center line of the model. Tests were made at supersonic Mach numbers with the inlet open and internal flow, and at subsonic-transonic Mach numbers with the internal duct closed and no internal flow.

  10. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying; Bao, Wenting

    2013-09-01

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  11. Bird flight and airplane flight. [instruments to measure air currents and flight characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnan, A.

    1980-01-01

    Research was based on a series of mechanical, electrical, and cinematographic instruments developed to measure various features of air current behavior as well as bird and airplane flight. Investigation of rising obstruction and thermal currents led to a theory of bird flight, especially of the gliding and soaring types. It was shown how a knowledge of bird flight can be applied to glider and ultimately motorized aircraft construction. The instruments and methods used in studying stress in airplanes and in comparing the lift to drag ratios of airplanes and birds are described.

  12. The influence of air temperature inversions on snowmelt and glacier mass-balance simulations, Ammassalik island, SE Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard; Liston, Glen

    2009-01-01

    In many applications, a realistic description of air temperature inversions is essential for accurate snow and glacier ice melt, and glacier mass-balance simulations. A physically based snow-evolution modeling system (SnowModel) was used to simulate eight years (1998/99 to 2005/06) of snow accumulation and snow and glacier ice ablation from numerous small coastal marginal glaciers on the SW-part of Ammassalik Island in SE Greenland. These glaciers are regularly influenced by inversions and sea breezes associated with the adjacent relatively low temperature and frequently ice-choked fjords and ocean. To account for the influence of these inversions on the spatiotemporal variation of air temperature and snow and glacier melt rates, temperature inversion routines were added to MircoMet, the meteorological distribution sub-model used in SnowModel. The inversions were observed and modeled to occur during 84% of the simulation period. Modeled inversions were defined not to occur during days with strong winds and high precipitation rates due to the potential of inversion break-up. Field observations showed inversions to extend from sea level to approximately 300 m a.s.l., and this inversion level was prescribed in the model simulations. Simulations with and without the inversion routines were compared. The inversion model produced air temperature distributions with warmer lower elevation areas and cooler higher elevation areas than without inversion routines due to the use of cold sea-breeze base temperature data from underneath the inversion. This yielded an up to 2 weeks earlier snowmelt in the lower areas and up to 1 to 3 weeks later snowmelt in the higher elevation areas of the simulation domain. Averaged mean annual modeled surface mass-balance for all glaciers (mainly located above the inversion layer) was -720 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} for inversion simulations, and -880 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} without the inversion routines, a difference of 160 mm w.eq. y

  13. Air mass 1.5 global and direct solar simulation and secondary reference cell calibration using a filtered large area pulsed solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral mismatch between a solar simulator and a desired spectrum can result in nearly 20 percent measurement error in the output of photovoltaic devices. This occurs when a crystalline silicon cell monitors the intensity of an unfiltered large area pulsed solar simulator (LAPSS) simulating the ASTM air mass 1.5 direct spectrum and the test device is amorphous silicon. The LAPSS spectral irradiance is modified with readily available glass UV filters to closely match either the ASTM air mass 1.5 direct or global spectrum. Measurement error is reduced to about 1 percent when using either filter if the reference cell and test device are the same general type.

  14. First day of an oil spill on the open sea: early mass transfers of hydrocarbons to air and water.

    PubMed

    Gros, Jonas; Nabi, Deedar; Würz, Birgit; Wick, Lukas Y; Brussaard, Corina P D; Huisman, Johannes; van der Meer, Jan R; Reddy, Christopher M; Arey, J Samuel

    2014-08-19

    During the first hours after release of petroleum at sea, crude oil hydrocarbons partition rapidly into air and water. However, limited information is available about very early evaporation and dissolution processes. We report on the composition of the oil slick during the first day after a permitted, unrestrained 4.3 m(3) oil release conducted on the North Sea. Rapid mass transfers of volatile and soluble hydrocarbons were observed, with >50% of ≤C17 hydrocarbons disappearing within 25 h from this oil slick of <10 km(2) area and <10 μm thickness. For oil sheen, >50% losses of ≤C16 hydrocarbons were observed after 1 h. We developed a mass transfer model to describe the evolution of oil slick chemical composition and water column hydrocarbon concentrations. The model was parametrized based on environmental conditions and hydrocarbon partitioning properties estimated from comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) retention data. The model correctly predicted the observed fractionation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the oil slick resulting from evaporation and dissolution. This is the first report on the broad-spectrum compositional changes in oil during the first day of a spill at the sea surface. Expected outcomes under other environmental conditions are discussed, as well as comparisons to other models.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air on small spatial and temporal scales - II. Mass size distributions and gas-particle partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, Gerhard; Klánová, Jana; Ilić, Predrag; Kohoutek, Jiří; Gasić, Bojan; Kovacić, Igor; Škrdlíková, Lenka

    2010-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured together with inorganic air pollutants at two urban sites and one rural background site in the Banja Luka area, Bosnia and Hercegovina, during 72 h in July 2008 using a high time resolution (5 samples per day) with the aim to study gas-particle partitioning, aerosol mass size distributions and to explore the potential of a higher time resolution (4 h-sampling). In the particulate phase the mass median diameters of the PAHs were found almost exclusively in the accumulation mode (0.1-1.0 μm of size). These were larger for semivolatile PAHs than for non-volatile PAHs. Gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile PAHs was strongly influenced by temperature. The results suggest that the Junge-Pankow model is inadequate to explain the inter-species variation and another process must be significant for phase partitioning which is less temperature sensitive than adsorption. Care should be taken when interpreting slopes m of plots of the type log K p = m log p L0 + b based on 24 h means, as these are found sensitive to the time averaging, i.e. tend to be higher than when based on 12 h-mean samples.

  16. Characteristics of Ambient Black Carbon Mass and Size-Resolved Particle Number Concentrations during Corn Straw Open-Field Burning Episode Observations at a Rural Site in Southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Yang, Li-Sing

    2016-07-08

    Information on the effect of open-field burning of agricultural residues on ambient black carbon (BC) mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations is scarce. In this study, to understand the effect of such open-field burning on short-term air quality, real-time variations of the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations were monitored before and during a corn straw open-field burning episode at a rural site. Correlations between the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations during the episode were investigated. Moreover, the particle number size distribution and absorption Ångström exponent were determined for obtaining the characteristics of aerosol emissions from the corn straw open-field burning. The results can be used to address public health concerns and as a reference for managing similar episodes of open-field burning of agricultural residues.

  17. Characteristics of Ambient Black Carbon Mass and Size-Resolved Particle Number Concentrations during Corn Straw Open-Field Burning Episode Observations at a Rural Site in Southern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Yang, Li-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Information on the effect of open-field burning of agricultural residues on ambient black carbon (BC) mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations is scarce. In this study, to understand the effect of such open-field burning on short-term air quality, real-time variations of the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations were monitored before and during a corn straw open-field burning episode at a rural site. Correlations between the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations during the episode were investigated. Moreover, the particle number size distribution and absorption Ångström exponent were determined for obtaining the characteristics of aerosol emissions from the corn straw open-field burning. The results can be used to address public health concerns and as a reference for managing similar episodes of open-field burning of agricultural residues. PMID:27399754

  18. Dynamic measurement of the torque-speed characteristics of dental high speed air turbine handpieces.

    PubMed

    Brockhurst, P J; Shams, R

    1994-02-01

    The first requirement for adequate performance of an air turbine handpiece is sufficient power. Suppliers of such handpieces do not provide data on the power produced by their equipment. A method for determining the torque, speed and hence power during simulated operation is described. Forty-one new and used handpieces were tested. Maximum speeds up to 500,000 rpm, maximum torques up to 2.33 N.mm and maximum power up to 29.6 watt were observed. The maximum power was produced at between 49 and 79 per cent of the free-running speed. A relationship between maximum power and stall torque was noted. The maximum torque is at stall for ball-bearing units. The stall torque can be easily determined by a simple stall torque test which is described. Using this test, the performance of handpieces can be easily checked in the clinic. The one air-bearing handpiece tested performed in a manner similar to the others, except that stall occurred below 60,000 rpm.

  19. Cyclic organic peroxides identification and trace analysis by Raman microscopy and open-air chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena-Quevedo, Alvaro Javier

    The persistent use of cyclic organic peroxides in explosive devices has increased the interest in study these compounds. Development of methodologies for the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) has become an urgent priority. However, differences in physical properties between cyclic organic peroxides make difficult the development of a general method for peroxide analysis and detection. Following this urgency, the first general technique for the analysis of any peroxide, regarding its structural differences is reported. Characterization and detection of TATP and HMTD was performed using an Open-Air Chemical Ionization High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer. The first spectrometric analysis for tetramethylene diperoxide dicarbamide (TMDD) and other nitrogen based peroxides using Raman Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry is reported. Analysis of cyclic peroxides by GC-MS was also conducted to compare results with OACI-HRTOF data. In the OACI mass spectrum, HMTD showed a clear signal at m/z 209 MH + and a small adduct peak at m/z 226 [M+NH4]+ that allowed its detection in commercial standard solutions and lab made standards. TMDD presented a molecular peak of m/z 237 MH+ and an adduct peak of m/z 254 [M+NH4]+. TATP showed a single peak at m/z 240 [M+NH4]+, while the peak of m/z 223 or 222 was completely absent. This evidence suggests that triperoxides are stabilized by the ammonium ion. TATP samples with deuterium enrichment were analyzed to compare results that could differentiate from HMTD. Raman microscopy was used as a complementary characterization method and was an essential tool for cyclic peroxides identification, particularly for those which could not be extensively purified. All samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy to confirm the Mass Spectrometry results. Peroxide O-O vibrations were observed around 750-970 cm-1. D18-TATP studies had identified ketone triperoxide nu(O-O) vibration around

  20. Turbulent mass flux closure modeling for variable density turbulence in the wake of an air-entraining transom stern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Kelli; Yue, Dick

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the development and a priori testing of closure models for the incompressible highly-variable density turbulent (IHVDT) flow in the near wake region of a transom stern. This complex, three-dimensional flow includes three regions with distinctly different flow behavior: (i) the convergent corner waves that originate from the body and collide on the ship center plane; (ii) the "rooster tail" that forms from the collision; and (iii) the diverging wave train. The characteristics of these regions involve violent free-surface flows and breaking waves with significant turbulent mass flux (TMF) at Atwood number At = (ρ2 -ρ1) / (ρ2 +ρ1) 1 for which there is little guidance in turbulence closure modeling for the momentum and scalar transport along the wake. Utilizing datasets from high-resolution simulations of the near wake of a canonical three-dimensional transom stern using conservative Volume-of-Fluid (cVOF), implicit Large Eddy Simulation (iLES), and Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM), we develop explicit algebraic turbulent mass flux closure models that incorporate the most relevant physical processes. Performance of these models in predicting the turbulent mass flux in all three regions of the wake will be presented. Office of Naval Research.

  1. The potential of LIRIC to validate the vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration estimated by an air quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Filoglou, Maria; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyros; Melas, Dimitris; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Balis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by a retrieval algorithm that uses combined sunphotometer and LIDAR data (LIRIC) were used in order to validate the mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. LIDAR and CIMEL measurements of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki were used for this validation.The aerosol mass concentration profiles of the fine and coarse mode derived by CAMx were compared with the respective profiles derived by the retrieval algorithm. For the coarse mode particles, forecasts of the Saharan dust transportation model BSC-DREAM8bV2 were also taken into account. Each of the retrieval algorithm's profiles were matched to the models' profile with the best agreement within a time window of four hours before and after the central measurement. OPAC, a software than can provide optical properties of aerosol mixtures, was also employed in order to calculate the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values for 355nm and 532nm for each of the model's profiles aiming in a comparison with the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values derived by the retrieval algorithm for each measurement. The comparisons between the fine mode aerosol concentration profiles resulted in a good agreement between CAMx and the retrieval algorithm, with the vertical mean bias error never exceeding 7 μgr/m3. Concerning the aerosol coarse mode concentration profiles both CAMx and BSC-DREAM8bV2 values are severely underestimated, although, in cases of Saharan dust transportation events there is an agreement between the profiles of BSC-DREAM8bV2 model and the retrieval algorithm.

  2. PMF receptor modelling of fine and coarse PM 10 in air masses governing monsoon conditions in Hanoi, northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, P. D.; Bac, V. T.; Thinh, N. T. H.

    Fine and coarse PM 10 samples collected in Hanoi in 1999-2001 were analysed for black carbon (BC) and water soluble ions (WSI) and measured data were disaggregated according to three types of back trajectories, namely (1) northerly, over inland China, (2) northeasterly, over East China Sea and, (3) southwesterly over Indochina peninsula. Trajectories of types 1, 2 and 3 prevail in September/October-December, January-March/April and May-August, respectively. A source-receptor modelling was performed for each type of trajectories individually using the Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF) technique. Six or seven sources were extracted for each trajectory type, including soil dust, primary and secondary emissions from local burning (LB), vehicle/road dust, sea salt, Cl-depleted marine aerosols and long-range transport (LRT). LRT contributes little to the coarse mass, but accounts for 50%, 34% and 33% of the fine mass in trajectories of types 1, 2 and 3, respectively. More than two-thirds of the fine mode sulphate are attributed to LRT and associated with ammonium. The comparison of LRT and LB source profiles suggests that air masses arriving from north-northeasterly trajectories are more polluted than those coming from the southwest. Therefore the contribution of LRT's aerosols further enhances the seasonal contrast in the particulate concentration with maximum in winter and minimum in summer. Various mechanisms of sulphate formation in LRT and LB were suggested based on the concentration ratios of [SO 42-]/[K +], [SO 42-]/[BC] and [NH 4+]/[SO 42-] for the two sources.

  3. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, N.; Filioglou, M.; Poupkou, A.; Liora, N.; Dimopoulos, S.; Melas, D.; Chaikovsky, A.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC), that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E) from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  4. Investigation of physico-chemical characteristics of size-segregated particulate matter in a metropolitan environment and their impact on air quality in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakbin, Payam

    Numerous epidemiological studies have associated the adverse respiratory and cardiovascular effects to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) exposure. There is ample literature providing evidence of adverse effects for all inhalable particle size ranges, however the biological mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of PM are still uncertain. Due to the lack of data about how different PM components act in a complex mixture, it is not possible to precisely quantify the contributions from the main sources and components to the effects on human health. Thus, PM in health impact assessments is usually regarded as a uniform pollutant, regardless of the contribution from different sources, and assuming the same effect on morality. This is probably not a correct assumption, but is a pragmatic compromise while waiting for sufficient knowledge that will allow the use of indicators other than particle mass. As a result linking the toxicity of PM with several of its chemical components has been the focus of considerable research over the past decade. The associations between health endpoints with the hundreds of potentially toxic chemical species and PM characteristics may be daunting and not cost efficient. Therefore it is desirable to focus on the casualty of the few critical chemical components that current science supports as potentially the most harmful to human health. Such information will allow for more effective regulatory control strategies, more targeted air quality standards, and as a result, reductions in population exposure to the most harmful types of airborne PM. The current particulate matter emission standards are based on PM mass only. However, the prevailing scientific opinion contends that PM mass is a surrogate measure of other physical and chemical properties of PM that are the actual causes of the observed health effects. In this study we focus on the PM components that are not currently regulated, while there is ample evidence that they can cause

  5. Wetting and Mechanical Characteristics of the Reactive Air Braze for Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.

    2005-03-01

    Reactive air brazing (RAB) technique was developed as an effective alternative for the joining of complicated ceramic parts. The most important advantage of RAB over conventional active metal brazing is that joining operation of RAB technique can be conducted without using controlled atmosphere. It has been reported by us that the reactive component (copper) in the Ag-CuO braze is reactively to modify faying surfaces of alumina, improving the wettability with the oxide and potentially increasing bond strenth between braze and ceramics. In this work, the effects of CuO content on wetting behavior of Ag-CuO braze with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates and the mechanical properties of brazed YSZ have been investigated. The results of this study to date will be discussed.

  6. PAH characteristics and genotoxicity in the ambient air of a petrochemical industry complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Peng, Being-Hwa; Lee, Ding-Zang; Lee, Ching-Chang

    1995-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) samples, at four sampling sites, in the ambient air of petrochemical plants were collected by several PS-1 samplers from October 1993 to July 1994 in a petrochemical complex area located in southern Taiwan. In addition, the genotoxicity of the PAH samples were investigated by the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system. The winter/summer ratios of total-PAH composition were 0.60, 1.39, 2.97, and 1.28 for sites A, B, C, and D, respectively. This result implied that wind direction is the most significant parameter affecting the total-PAH composition in these four sampling sites. Sampling sites B, C, and D were located on the downwind side of the petrochemical plant and gave higher total-PAH composition than those of sampling site A. Particle phase PAHs had higher mutagenicity than those in the gas phase.

  7. Effect of double air injection on performance characteristics of centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Tatsuya; Yasui, Ryutaro; Tsujita, Hoshio

    2017-02-01

    In the operation of a centrifugal compressor of turbocharger, instability phenomena such as rotating stall and surge are induced at a lower flow rate close to the maximum pressure ratio. In this study, the compressed air at the exit of centrifugal compressor was re-circulated and injected to the impeller inlet by using two injection nozzles in order to suppress the surge phenomenon. The most effective circumferential position was examined to reduce the flow rate at the surge inception. Moreover, the influences of the injection on the fluctuating property of the flow field before and after the surge inception were investigated by examining the frequency of static pressure fluctuation on the wall surface and visualizing the compressor wall surface by oil-film visualization technique.

  8. Characteristics of vertical and lateral tunnel turbulence measured in air in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeper, Robert K.; Keller, Donald F.; Perry, Boyd, III; Sandford, Maynard C.

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary measurements of the vertical and lateral velocity components of tunnel turbulence were obtained in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel test section using a constant-temperature anemometer equipped with a hot-film X-probe. For these tests air was the test medium. Test conditions included tunnel velocities ranging from 100 to 500 fps at atmospheric pressure. Standard deviations of turbulence velocities were determined and power spectra were computed. Unconstrained optimization was employed to determine parameter values of a general spectral model of a form similar to that used to describe atmospheric turbulence. These parameters, and others (notably break frequency and integral scale length), were determined at each test condition and compared with those of Dryden and Von Karman atmospheric turbulence spectra. When the data were discovered to be aliased, the spectral model was modified to account for and 'eliminate' the aliasing.

  9. Biomass Burning versus Fossil Fuel Combustion Signatures of Air Masses Transported from Asia to the U.S. West Coast during ITCT2k2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouw, J.; Cooper, O.; Warneke, C.; Hudson, P.; Brock, C.; Fehsenfeld, F.; Holloway, J.; Huebler, G.; Murphy, D.; Nowak, J.; Parrish, D.; Ryerson, T.; Trainer, M.; Atlas, E.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation experiment in 2002 (ITCT2k2) was to study the transport of air pollution from Asia across the Pacific Ocean, and the implications for the background atmospheric composition at the surface in North America. During research flights of the NOAA WP-3 research aircraft on May 5 and 17, strong enhancements of carbon monoxide (CO) and other species were observed in air masses that had been transported from Asia in the free troposphere to North America. The hydrocarbon composition of the air masses indicated that the highest CO levels were related to fossil fuel use. During the flights on May 5, 17 and other days, the levels of several biomass-burning indicators increased with altitude. This was true for acetonitrile (CH3CN), methyl chloride (CH3Cl), the ratio of acetylene (C2H2) versus propane (C3H8), and the percentage of particles measured by the PALMS (particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry) instrument that were attributed to biomass burning based on their carbon and potassium content. An ensemble of back-trajectories, calculated from the U.S. west coast at various latitudes and pressures during the entire ITCT2k2 period, showed that air masses from South-East Asia and China were generally transported at higher altitudes than air from Japan and Korea. Emission inventories estimate the contribution of biomass burning to the total emissions to be low for Japan and Korea, higher for China, and the highest for South-East Asia. Combined with the origin of the air masses versus altitude determined by the back-trajectories, this explains the measured altitude profiles of the biomass burning indicators.

  10. Characteristics and popular topics of latest researches into the effects of air particulate matter on cardiovascular system by bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xinbiao; Li, Haicun; An, Xinying; Zhao, Yingguang

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, many epidemiological and toxicological studies have investigated the adverse effects of air particulate matter (PM) on the cardiovascular system. However, it is difficult for the researchers to have a timely and effective overall command of the latest characteristics and popular topics in such a wide field. Different from the previous reviews, in which the research characteristics and trends are empirically concluded by experts, we try to have a comprehensive evaluation of the above topics for the first time by bibliometric analysis, a quantitative tool in information exploration. This study aims to introduce the bibliometric method into the field of PM and cardiovascular system. The articles were selected by searching PubMed/MEDLINE (from 2007 to 2012) using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms "particulate matter" and "cardiovascular system". A total of 935 eligible articles and 1895 MeSH terms were retrieved and processed by the software Thomson Data Analyzer (TDA). The bibliographic information and the MeSH terms of these articles were classified and analyzed to summarize the research characteristics. The top 200 high-frequency MeSH terms (the cumulative frequency percentage was 74.2%) were clustered for popular-topic conclusion. We summarized the characteristics of published articles, of researcher collaborations and of the contents. Ten clusters of MeSH terms are presented. Six popular topics are concluded and elaborated for reference. Our study presents an overview of the characteristics and popular topics in the field of PM and cardiovascular system in the past five years by bibliometric tools, which may provide a new perspective for future researchers.

  11. Effects of internal mass distribution and its isolation on the acoustic characteristics of a submerged hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Herwig; Kinns, Roger; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    The primary aim of machinery isolation in marine vessels is to isolate structural vibration of the onboard machinery from the hull and to reduce far-field radiation of underwater noise. A substantial proportion of the total submarine mass is on flexible mounts that isolate supported masses from the hull at frequencies above the mounting system resonant frequency. This reduces the dynamically effective mass of the hull and affects the signature of the marine vessel due to propeller excitation. A fully coupled finite element/boundary element (FE/BE) model has been developed to investigate the effect of mass distribution and isolation in a submerged hull. The finite element model of the structure includes internal structures to represent the machinery and other flexibly mounted components. Changes in the radiated sound power demonstrate the effect of machinery isolation on the acoustic signature of the submerged hull due to the external propeller forces. Results are also presented to show how the arrangement of flexible mounts for a large internal structure can influence the radiation due to machinery forces.

  12. Protein/Arabinoxylans Gels: Effect of Mass Ratio on the Rheological, Microstructural and Diffusional Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Berlanga-Reyes, Claudia M.; Carvajal-Millan, Elizabeth; Hicks, Kevin B.; Yadav, Madhav P.; Rascón-Chu, Agustín; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Toledo-Guillén, Alma R.; Islas-Rubio, Alma R.

    2014-01-01

    Wheat bran arabinoxylan (WBAX) gels entrapping standard model proteins at different mass ratios were formed. The entrapment of protein affected the gel elasticity and viscosity values, which decreased from 177 to 138 Pa. The presence of protein did not modify the covalent cross-links content of the gel. The distribution of protein through the network was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In mixed gels, protein aggregates forming clusters were detected at protein/polysaccharide ratios higher than 0.25. These clusters were not homogeneously distributed, suggesting that WBAX and protein are located in two different phases. The apparent diffusion coefficient (Dm) of proteins during release from mixed gels was investigated for mass ratios of 0.06 and 0.12. For insulin, Dm increased significantly from 2.64 × 10−7 to 3.20 × 10−7 cm2/s as the mass ratio augmented from 0.06 to 0.12. No significant difference was found for Dm values of ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin released from the mixed gels. The results indicate that homogeneous protein/WBAX gels can be formed at low mass ratios, allowing the estimation of Dm by using an analytical solution of the second Fick’s law. PMID:25338049

  13. Protein/Arabinoxylans Gels: Effect of mass ratio on the rheological, microstructural and diffusional characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabinoxylan (AX) gels entrapping standard model proteins at different mass ratios were formed. The distribution of protein through the network was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In mixed gels, protein aggregates forming clusters were detected at protein/polysaccharide ra...

  14. Links between Adolescent Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, and Adolescent and Parent Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Susan Lee; Mummery, W. Kerry

    2011-01-01

    Identification of the relationships between adolescent overweight and obesity and physical activity and a range of intrapersonal and interpersonal factors is necessary to develop relevant interventions which target the health needs of adolescents. This study examined adolescent body mass index (BMI) and participation in moderate and vigorous…

  15. Satellite-based identification of tropopause folding signatures along air mass boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmers, Anthony James

    Tropopause folding is a significant though frequently underestimated source of mass exchange between the stratosphere and the troposphere. Although tropopause folds are inherently three-dimensional phenomena, empirical evidence shows that certain signature features in two-dimensional satellite products that are sensitive to tropopause height can be used to infer the vertical layering that characterizes tropopause folds. Both Altered Water Vapor (AWV) imagery and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) total ozone reveal significant gradients at the "openings" of tropopause folds, and the direction of the gradient indicates the direction of the intrusion. This is demonstrated empirically with a comparison of the satellite imagery to a data set of aircraft-based ozone lidar transects from the Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) experiment. Using the data set to optimize the parameters of this empirical relationship, a statistical model is developed to predict the location of tropopause folds based solely on the properties of AWV imagery, which operates on a hemispheric-scale domain and at the approximately 10-km resolution of the GOES water vapor channel. Validation of this model with evidence of tropopause folding from operational radiosonde data was only partially successful; the validation was not reliable enough to provide precise confirmation of the model parameter values, but it did provide some confirmation that the model was well calibrated. Application of this model over a February to May, 2000 time period provides a four-month "climatology" of tropopause folding activity around North America. During this time period, tropopause folding activity was strongest over the northeast Pacific and northwest Atlantic, and at a minimum in the high latitudes around Hudson Bay. Over the entire domain (25--63° N, 40--165° W), tropopause folding activity was greatest in March. This result does not prove that downward vertical transport from

  16. Recent trends of persistent organic pollutants in air in central Europe - Air monitoring in combination with air mass trajectory statistics as a tool to study the effectivity of regional chemical policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorská, A.; Lammel, G.; Holoubek, I.

    We use air mass back trajectory analysis of persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels monitored at a regional background site, Košetice, Czech Republic, as a tool to study the effectiveness of emission reduction measures taken in the last decade in the region. The representativity of the chosen trajectory starting height for air sampling near ground was ensured by excluding trajectories starting at time of inversions lower than their starting height. As the relevant pollutant sources are exclusively located in the atmospheric boundary layer, trajectory segments above this layer were also excluded from the analysis. We used a linear time weight to account for the influence of dispersion and deposition on trace components abundances and to quantify the ground source loading, a continuous measure for the influence of surface emissions. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT, and two time periods, the years 1997-1999 and 2004-2006, were studied. The pollutant levels transported to Košetice decreased for all substances except HCB. Except for lindane seasonal emissions were insignificant. Increasing emissions of HCB were at least partly linked to the 2002 floods in the Danube basin. Major emissions of 1997-1999 which decreased significantly were in France (lindane), western Poland, Hungary and northern ex-Yugoslavia (technical HCH), and the Czech Republic (DDT). Emissions remaining in 2004-2006 include HCB and DDT in the northern Czech Republic, HCB and PCBs in Germany. Besides changes in emission strength meteorological factors influence the level of transported pollutant concentrations. The prevailing air flow pattern limits the geographic coverage of this analysis to central Europe and parts of western Europe. However, no POP monitoring stations exist in areas suitable for a possible extension of the study area.

  17. [Characteristics of aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions in three types air-pollution incidents of Nanjing City].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Chen; Zhu, Bin; Su, Ji-Feng; Wang, Hong-Lei

    2012-06-01

    In order to compare aerosol water-soluble inorganic species in different air-pollution periods, samples of PM10, PM2.1, PM1.1 and the main water-soluble ions (NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, NO2(-), F(-), NO3(-), Cl(-), SO4(2-)) were measured, which were from 3 air-pollution incidents (continued pollution in October 16-30 of 2009, sandstorm pollution in April 27-30 of 2010, and crop burning pollution in June 14 of 2010. The results show that aerosol pollution of 3 periods is serious. The lowest PM2.1/PM10 is only 0.27, which is from sandstorm pollution period, while the largest is 0. 7 from crop burning pollution period. In continued pollution periods, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) are the dominant ions, and the total anions account for an average of 18.62%, 32.92% and 33.53% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1. Total water-soluble ions only account for 13.36%, 23.72% and 28.54% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1 due to the insoluble species is increased in sandstorm pollution period. The mass concentration of Ca2+ in sandstorm pollution period is higher than the other two pollution periods, and which is mainly in coarse particles with diameter larger than 1 microm. All the ten water-soluble ions are much higher in crop burning pollution especially K+ which is the tracer from crop burning. The peak mass concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NH4+ are in 0.43-0.65 microm.

  18. Validation and Application of the Mass Balance Model To Determine the Effectiveness of Portable Air Purifiers in Removing Ultrafine and Submicrometer Particles in an Apartment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Chen; Catalano, Paul J; Yoo, Jun Young; Park, Chan Jung; Koutrakis, Petros

    2015-08-18

    We validated the use of the mass balance model to determine the effectiveness of portable air purifiers in removing ultrafine (<0.10 μm) and submicrometer particles (0.10-0.53 μm) in an apartment. We evaluated two identical portable air purifiers, equipped with high efficiency particulate air filters, for their performance under three different air flow settings and three target air exchange rates: 0.60, 0.90, and 1.20 h(-1). We subsequently used a mixed effects model to estimate the slope between the measured and modeled effectiveness by particle size. Our study showed that effectiveness was highly particle size-dependent. For example, at the lowest target air exchange rate, it ranged from 0.33 to 0.56, 0.51 to 0.75, and 0.60 to 0.81 for the three air purifier flow settings, respectively. Our findings suggested that filtration was the dominant removal mechanism for submicrometer particles, whereas deposition could play a more important role in ultrafine particle removal. We found reasonable agreement between measured and modeled effectiveness with size-resolved slopes ranging from 1.11 ± 0.06 to 1.25 ± 0.07 (mean ± SE), except for particles <35 nm. Our study design can be applied to investigate the performances of other portable air purifiers as well as the influences of various parameters on effectiveness in different residential settings.

  19. Air mass origin signals in δ 18O of tree-ring cellulose revealed by back-trajectory modeling at the monsoonal Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernicke, Jakob; Hochreuther, Philipp; Grießinger, Jussi; Zhu, Haifeng; Wang, Lily; Bräuning, Achim

    2016-12-01

    A profound consideration of stable oxygen isotope source water origins is a precondition for an unambiguous palaeoenvironmental interpretation of terrestrial δ 18O archives. To stress the influence of air mass origins on widely used δ 18O tree-ring chronologies, we conducted correlation analyses between six annually resolved δ 18O tree-ring cellulose ( δ ^{18}O_{TC}) chronologies and mean annual air package origins obtained from backward trajectory modeling. This novel approach has been tested for a transect at the southeastern Tibetan plateau (TP), where air masses with different isotopic composition overlap. Detailed examinations of daily precipitation amounts and monthly precipitation δ 18O values ( δ ^{18}OP) were conducted with the ERA Interim and Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique General Circulation Model (LMDZiso) data, respectively. Particularly the southernmost study sites are influenced by a distinct amount effect. Here, air package origin δ ^{18}O_{TC} relations are generally weaker in contrast to our northern located study sites. We found that tree-ring isotope signatures at dry sites with less rain days per year tend to be influenced stronger by air mass origin than tree-ring isotope values at semi-humid sites. That implies that the local hydroclimate history inferred from δ ^{18}O_{TC} archives is better recorded at semi-humid sites.

  20. Flaccidgrass forage mass and canopy characteristics related to steer digesta kinetics and intake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Carostan’ flaccidgrass (Pennisetum flaccidum Griseb.) has potential as a perennial, warm-season grass for pastures. This 2-yr study examined digesta kinetics, dry matter intake (DMI), and diet of steers as related to canopy characteristics. Steers (Bos Taurus L.) were continuously and variably stoc...

  1. Some Characteristics of Korean Immigrants in the Los Angeles Area: Initial Perceptions and Mass Media Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Jung S.

    A total of 109 Korean immigrants completed either an English or Korean version of a nine-page questionnaire in a study of the characteristics, assimilation processes, and media usage of Korean immigrants to the Los Angeles, California area. The findings revealed that ambivalent attitudes prevailed among the immigrants. Most were not satisfied with…

  2. Investigation into air flow characteristics through inlet valve of directed ports

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.; Xiao, F.; Guan, L.; Liu, X.

    1994-09-01

    The velocity and turbulence intensity profiles at exit of intake valve from typical SI engine intake ports (horizontal and sloping directed ports) were measured by hot wire anemometry (HWA) in a steady flow rig. The characteristics of velocity and turbulence intensity distribution under different valve lifts and at distances along valve axis were analysed and compared between above two intake ports. Results showed that velocity and turbulence intensity profiles are strongly dependent on intake port form, valve lift and surrounding geometry. They vary not only around the valve head periphery but also along the valve axis. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  3. Combining Experiments and Simulation of Gas Absorption for Teaching Mass Transfer Fundamentals: Removing CO2 from Air Using Water and NaOH

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, William M.; Jackson, Yaminah Z.; Morin, Michael T.; Ferraro, Giacomo P.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and computer models for studying the mass transfer process of removing CO2 from air using water or dilute NaOH solution as absorbent are presented. Models tie experiment to theory and give a visual representation of concentration profiles and also illustrate the two-film theory and the relative importance of various…

  4. REAL TIME, ON-LINE CHARACTERIZATION OF DIESEL GENERATOR AIR TOXIC EMISSIONS BY RESONANCE ENHANCED MULTI-PHOTON IONIZATION TIME OF FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The laser based resonance, enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) technique has been applied to the exhaust gas stream of a diesel generator to measure, in real time, concentration levels of aromatic air toxics. Volatile organic compounds ...

  5. Mass Shootings in the United States: Common Characteristics and Predictive Behaviors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-14

    in age, prior to his self-inflicted suicide (Bratu 2013). In total, at least 16 mass shootings occurred within the United States during 2012...problems – either a hospitalization, a presription for psychiatric drugs, a suicide attempt or evidence of psychosis” prior to the incident...Further, social marginalization is defined as a combination of bullying and loner status (Newman et al. 2004). Bullying included instances when the

  6. Thermospray liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry of thiol radioprotective agents: Characteristics spectra. Scientific report

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, T.L.; Buchner, J.; Pizzitola, V.; Blakeley, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    Ethiofos (S-2(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid or WR-2721) is currently being evaluated in clinical radiotherapy trials (Kligerman et al., 1980) because of its potential for enhancing the efficacy of radiotherapy (Kligerman et al., 1980; Yuhas and Storer, 1969). For proper drug usage and pharmacological studies, it is necessary to assess the stability of the aminothiol and the presence of impurities or decomposition products. In addition, monitoring the plasma levels of WR-2721 and its metabolites should improve the therapeutic usefulness of WR-2721. Several high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methodologies have been developed that are applicable for routine analysis of aminothiols and endogeneous cellular thiols (Newton et al., 1981; Swynnerton et al., 1984). One of these methodologies, electrochemical detection, permits the simultaneous detection of the free thiol and the disulfides (Swynnerton et al. 1984). Mass spectrometry (MS) is a sensitive technique that can confirm purity and provide useful structural information. Using a thermospray interface, samples can be introduced into the mass spectrometer from a liquid chromatograph (LC) (Vestal, 1984). The interface thermally nebulizes the eluant into a high-pressure region of the mass spectrometer where a variety of soft-ionization techniques may be used to ionize the analyte molecules. The feasibility of LC coupled to MS-detection was studied for the analysis of thiol-containing radioprotective agents, including glutathione, WR-2721, and WR-1065, the dephosphorylated sulfhydryl form of WR-2721, which has been shown to be its active radioprotective metabolite (Calabro-Jones et al., 1983).

  7. Effects of initial air removal methods on microorganisms and characteristics of fermented plant beverages.

    PubMed

    Kantachote, Duangporn; Charernjiratrakul, Wilawan

    2008-01-15

    The effects of 3 different methods for removing the initial air on the properties of fermented plant beverages produced from phom-nang seaweed (Gracilaria fisheri) and wild forest noni (Morinda coreia Ham.) were investigated. Only method M which covered the space above the fermentation liquid with a water filled plastic bag produced no surface film of yeast, had the highest acidity and also antibacterial activity from both plants after 90 days of fermentation. However, the yeast count still exceeded the standard guidelines for plant beverages. The fermented beverage from wild forest noni showed more antibacterial activity against 3 of 4 pathogenic bacteria tested than that from the phomnang seaweed, probably for its higher levels of acidity and ethanol content. Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from the fermentation samples from days 1-5 using the method M from both fermented plant beverages were Leuconostoc mesenteroides supsp. mesenteroides and Leu. mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum while presence of Lactobacilus plantarum was only recorded at days 4-5 in the wild forest noni beverage. From days 6-14 the isolates were Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus brevis from wild forest noni beverage, whereas only L. brevis was not detected in the seaweed beverage. During days 21-45 both beverages had a similar LAB population of L. plantarum and L. brevis while L. coryniformis was only found in the wild forest noni beverage. Between days 60-90 in both plant beverages only L. plantarum and Lactobacillius sp. were detected.

  8. Liberation characteristics after cryogenic modification and air table separation of discarded printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cuihong; Pan, Yongtai; Lu, Maxi; Yang, Changshun

    2016-07-05

    Liberating useful materials from printed circuit boards (PCBs) is challenging because PCBs are flexible and complex in terms of materials and components. In this study, the crushing of PCBs at low-temperature was investigated. The results indicated that when the temperature was decreased to approximately -20 °C, the strength of PCBs decreased and their brittleness increased, making them easier to crush. A double roll crusher was selected to crush the PCBs. The particle size distribution and power consumption were studied under different working conditions. The results showed that the particle size of most of the lumps was in the range 15×20-25×20 mm, and that power consumption was minimal when the frequency of the crusher was 40-50 Hz. A small shredder was used for cryogenic grinding, and it was found that its power consumption strongly depended on the cooling temperature. An orthogonal experiment was conducted, which revealed that a smaller cutter gap and higher rotational speed could achieve higher yield. Furthermore, the results indicated that the air table developed to liberate PCB materials could effectively separate 2.8-0.5mm grade materials. Overall, the results of this study provide an experimental foundation for more effectively recycling discarded PCBs.

  9. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B. S.; Said, Syed A. M.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Matin, Asif

    2016-07-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface.

  10. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B. S.; Said, Syed A. M.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Matin, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface. PMID:27445272

  11. Responses of herbaceous plants to urban air pollution: effects on growth, phenology and leaf surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Honour, Sarah L; Bell, J Nigel B; Ashenden, Trevor W; Cape, J Neil; Power, Sally A

    2009-04-01

    Vehicle exhaust emissions are a dominant feature of urban environments and are widely believed to have detrimental effects on plants. The effects of diesel exhaust emissions on 12 herbaceous species were studied with respect to growth, flower development, leaf senescence and leaf surface wax characteristics. A diesel generator was used to produce concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) representative of urban conditions, in solardome chambers. Annual mean NO(x) concentrations ranged from 77 nl l(-l) to 98 nl l(-1), with NO:NO(2) ratios of 1.4-2.2, providing a good experimental simulation of polluted roadside environments. Pollutant exposure resulted in species-specific changes in growth and phenology, with a consistent trend for accelerated senescence and delayed flowering. Leaf surface characteristics were also affected; contact angle measurements indicated changes in surface wax structure following pollutant exposure. The study demonstrated clearly the potential for realistic levels of vehicle exhaust pollution to have direct adverse effects on urban vegetation.

  12. Determination of trichloroanisole and trichlorophenol in wineries' ambient air by passive sampling and thermal desorption-gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Camino-Sánchez, F J; Bermúdez-Peinado, R; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ruíz-García, J; Vílchez-Quero, J L

    2015-02-06

    The present paper describes the calibration of selected passive samplers used in the quantitation of trichlorophenol and trichloroanisole in wineries' ambient air, by calculating the corresponding sampling rates. The method is based on passive sampling with sorbent tubes and involves thermal desorption-gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis. Three commercially available sorbents were tested using sampling cartridges with a radial design instead of axial ones. The best results were found for Tenax TA™. Sampling rates (R-values) for the selected sorbents were determined. Passive sampling was also used for accurately determining the amount of compounds present in the air. Adequate correlation coefficients between the mass of the target analytes and exposure time were obtained. The proposed validated method is a useful tool for the early detection of trichloroanisole and its precursor trichlorophenol in wineries' ambient air while avoiding contamination of wine or winery facilities.

  13. Determination of benzene at trace levels in air by a novel method based on solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saba, A; Cuzzola, A; Raffaelli, A; Pucci, S; Salvadori, P

    2001-01-01

    A new method for the determination of benzene at trace levels in air is presented. The method consists of the collection of air samples on adsorbent cartridges with simultaneous adsorption of pre-established amounts of D6-labeled internal standard. Desorption from the cartridge is performed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using an ion trap mass spectrometer. The influence of several parameters (type of SPME fiber, temperature, time, for example) was investigated, and good linearity in the range 10-400 ng of C6D6, with a coefficient of variance (CV) around 3-5%, was obtained. The method was tested by sampling air in a town center in Italy, and a benzene concentration of approximately 50 microg/m(3) was determined. The maximum limit recommended by the European Community is 10 microg/m(3).

  14. Improved Wetting Characteristics in TiO2–Modified Ag-CuO Air Braze Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong; Hardy, John S.; Darsell, Jens T.

    2006-01-04

    A silver-based joining technique referred to as reactive air brazing (RAB) has been recently developed for joining high temperature structural ceramic components of the type used in high-temperature electrochemical devices. In prior work, it was found that additions of CuO to silver have a significant effect on the wettability and joint strength characteristics of the resulting braze on polycrystalline alumina substrates. More recently, it has been found that by adding as little as 0.5 mol % titania to these Ag-CuO brazes, the wettability of the RAB on alumina surfaces is further enhanced. The results of wettabilty measurements of Ag-CuO-TiO2 RAB compositions on alumina will be presented along with the microstructural characterization of Ag-CuO-TiO2 braze joints in alumina.

  15. Hydrographic characteristics of water masses and circulation in the Northern Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budillon, Giorgio; Bue, Nadia Lo; Siena, Giuseppe; Spezie, Giancarlo

    2010-03-01

    The hydrography of intermediate and deep-water masses in the Northern Ionian Sea (Apulian Plateau) was studied through four quasi-synoptic multidisciplinary surveys carried out in 2004-2006 as an ancillary oceanographic activity in the frame of the APLABES project. This area plays a crucial role for the entire Mediterranean Basin, being influenced by the water outflow of Adriatic origin, which, under severe winter conditions, is a primary source of dense water for the Eastern Mediterranean. At the end of the 1980s such outflow showed a different behavior, and only in the recent years has a gradual re-establishing of the former condition been detected. As such, the Adriatic Sea has regained its role as a main source of the East Mediterranean Deep Water, which was temporarily inhibited during the well-known Eastern Mediterranean Transient which progressively modified the intermediate and deep layers of the Mediterranean Sea. The general structure of water masses was similar through the investigated period, but interesting differences within the bottom layer have been detected. The interaction of the different water types present in the basin is reviewed by means of property-property plots, vertical sections, isopycnal analyses and using an Optimum Multiparameter Analysis (OMP), which is an objective method to measure the mixing of water masses. Due to the lack of any direct information about the dynamics of the water column in the area of the Apulian Plateau during the whole analyzed period, the classical method to infer the baroclinic velocity from the mass field has been applied to hydrographic data. The well-known indeterminacy of this method due to the barotropic component of the velocity field has been resolved using a short time series of current velocities acquired synoptically by a mooring located in the northern part of the studied area. The wavelet transform was adopted for localizing and quantifying the variability of currents simultaneously in both

  16. [Impact of canopy structural characteristics on inner air temperature and relative humidity of Koelreuteria paniculata community in summer].

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhong; Li, Zhan-dong; Cheng, Fang-yun; Sha, Hai-feng

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the diurnal variation of the correlations between the cooling and humidifying effects and canopy structural characteristics of the Koelreuteria paniculata community, the measurements of air temperature, relative humidity, canopy density, leaf area index (LAI) and mean leaf angle (MLA) were performed on calm sunny summer days in the community in Beijing Olympic Forest Park, China. There were significant correlations between the canopy density, LAI and MLA, which affected the cooling and humidifying effects together. The cooling effect reached its maximum by 12:00, whereas the humidifying effect reached its peak at 10:00. Compared with the control open space site, the community appeared to lower the air temperature by 0.43 to 7.53 °C and to increase the relative humidity by 1%-22% during the daytime. However, the cooling and humidifying effects seem to be not effective during the night. The canopy density and LAI were better for determining the cooling and humidifying effects from 9:00 to 12:00. However, these effects were largely controlled only by the canopy density from 12:00 to 14:00 and were significantly correlated with the canopy density and LAI afterwards until 18:00.

  17. Effect of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics in laser ignition of natural gas and air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Riley, M. J. W.; Borman, A.; Dowding, C.; Kirk, A.; Bickerton, R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced spark ignition offers the potential for greater reliability and consistency in ignition of lean air/fuel mixtures. This increased reliability is essential for the application of gas turbines as primary or secondary reserve energy sources in smart grid systems, enabling the integration of renewable energy sources whose output is prone to fluctuation over time. This work details a study into the effect of flow velocity and temperature on minimum ignition energies in laser-induced spark ignition in an atmospheric combustion test rig, representative of a sub 15 MW industrial gas turbine (Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, UK). Determination of minimum ignition energies required for a range of temperatures and flow velocities is essential for establishing an operating window in which laser-induced spark ignition can operate under realistic, engine-like start conditions. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm wavelength and 4 ns pulse length. Analysis of the influence of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics is presented in terms of required photon flux density, a useful parameter to consider during the development laser ignition systems.

  18. Formic and Acetic Acid Observations over Colorado by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Organic Acids' Role in Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treadaway, V.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Heikes, B.; Silwal, I.; McNeill, A.

    2015-12-01

    Formic acid (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc) have both natural and anthropogenic sources and a role in the atmospheric processing of carbon. These organic acids also have an increasing importance in setting the acidity of rain and snow as precipitation nitrate and sulfate concentrations have decreased. Primary emissions for both organic acids include biomass burning, agriculture, and motor vehicle emissions. Secondary production is also a substantial source for both acids especially from biogenic precursors, secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), and photochemical production from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs). Chemical transport models underestimate organic acid concentrations and recent research has sought to develop additional production mechanisms. Here we report HFo and HAc measurements during two campaigns over Colorado using the peroxide chemical ionization mass spectrometer (PCIMS). Iodide clusters of both HFo and HAc were recorded at mass-to-charge ratios of 173 and 187, respectively. The PCIMS was flown aboard the NCAR Gulfstream-V platform during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) and aboard the NCAR C-130 during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE). The DC3 observations were made in May and June 2012 extending from the surface to 13 km over the central and eastern United States. FRAPPE observations were made in July and August 2014 from the surface to 7 km over Colorado. DC3 measurements reported here are focused over the Colorado Front Range and complement the FRAPPE observations. DC3 HFo altitude profiles are characterized by a decrease up to 6 km followed by an increase either back to boundary layer mixing ratio values or higher (a "C" shape). Organic acid measurements from both campaigns are interpreted with an emphasis on emission sources (both natural and anthropogenic) over Colorado and in situ photochemical production especially ozone precursors.

  19. Combustion and NOx emission characteristics with respect to staged-air damper opening in a 600 MWe down-fired pulverized-coal furnace under deep-air-staging conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Min; Li, Zhengqi; Wang, Zhihua; Jing, Xinjing; Liu, Chunlong; Zhu, Qunyi; Ling, Zhongqian

    2014-01-01

    Deep-air-staging combustion conditions, widely used in tangential-fired and wall-arranged furnaces to significantly reduce NOx emissions, are premature up to now in down-fired furnaces that are designed especially for industry firing low-volatile coals such as anthracite and lean coal. To uncover combustion and NOx emission characteristics under deep-air-staging conditions within a newly operated 600 MWe down-fired furnace and simultaneously understand the staged-air effect on the furnace performance, full-load industrial-size measurements taken of gas temperatures and species concentrations in the furnace, CO and NOx emissions in flue gas, and carbon in fly ash were performed at various staged-air damper openings of 10%, 20%, 30%, and 50%. Increasing the staged-air damper opening, gas temperatures along the flame travel (before the flame penetrating the staged-air zone) increased initially but then decreased, while those in the staged-air zone and the upper part of the hopper continuously decreased and increased, respectively. On opening the staged-air damper to further deepen the air-staging conditions, O2 content initially decreased but then increased in both two near-wall regions affected by secondary air and staged air, respectively, whereas CO content in both two regions initially increased but then decreased. In contrast to the conventional understanding about the effects of deep-air-staging conditions, here increasing the staged-air damper opening to deepen the air-staging conditions essentially decreased the exhaust gas temperature and carbon in fly ash and simultaneously increased both NOx emissions and boiler efficiency. In light of apparently low NOx emissions and high carbon in fly ash (i.e., 696-878 mg/m(3) at 6% O2 and 9.81-13.05%, respectively) developing in the down-fired furnace under the present deep-air-staging conditions, further adjustments such as enlarging the staged-air declination angle to prolong pulverized-coal residence times in the

  20. Mass transfer characteristics of eggplant slices during length of continuous band dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaveh, Mohammad; Amiri Chayjan, Reza; Nikbakht, Ali Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    This study presents a mathematical modeling of eggplant slice drying process in a continuous band dryer. The experiments for drying of eggplant slices were conducted at three air temperature levels of 45, 60, and 75 °C, inlet air velocities of 1, 1.5, and 2 m/s, and belt linear speeds of 2.5, 6.5, and 10.5 mm/s. To estimate the drying kinetics of eggplant slices, different mathematical models were utilized to fit the empirical data of thin layer drying. The models were compared based on their coefficients of determination (R 2), reduced Chi squares (χ 2) and root mean square errors (RMSE) between the experimental and predicted moisture ratios (MR). A feed and cascade forward with back-propagation algorithm was employed to predict the moisture ratio (MR) and drying rate (DR). The effective moisture diffusivity varied from 3.40 × 10-9 to 1.13 × 10-8 m2/s. The activation energy varied from 14.18 to 25.09 kJ/mol. The obtained results show that the feed forward back-propagation network with training algorithm of Levenberg-Marquardt, 4-5-5-2 topology, threshold functions of tansig-tansig-tansig can able to predict the moisture content and drying rate with R2 values of 0.9992 and 0.9726, respectively. Comparison of ANN results with mathematical models revealed that mathematical modeling yields better accuracy to predict the moisture content and drying rate of eggplant.

  1. Drag and Propulsive Characteristics of Air-Cooled Engine-Nacelle Installations for Large Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe; Wilson, Herbert A , Jr

    1942-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NACA full-scale wind tunnel to determine the drag and the propulsive efficiency of nacelle-propeller arrangements for a large range of nacelle sizes. In contrast with usual tests with a single nacelle, these tests were conducted with nacelle-propeller installations on a large model of a four-engine airplane. Data are presented on the first part of the investigation, covering seven nacelle arrangements with nacelle diameters from 0.53 to 1.5 times the wing thickness. These ratios are similar to those occurring on airplanes weighing from about 20 to 100 tons. The results show the drag, the propulsive efficiency, and the over-all efficiency of the various nacelle arrangements as functions of the nacelle size, the propeller position, and the airplane lift coefficient. The effect of the nacelles on the aerodynamic characteristics of the model is shown for both propeller-removed and propeller-operating conditions.

  2. Modernisation of a test rig for determination of vehicle shock absorber characteristics by considering vehicle suspension elements and unsprung masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniowski, M.; Para, S.; Knapczyk, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a modernization approach of a standard test bench for determination of damping characteristics of automotive shock absorbers. It is known that the real-life work conditions of wheel-suspension dampers are not easy to reproduce in laboratory conditions, for example considering a high frequency damper response or a noise emission. The proposed test bench consists of many elements from a real vehicle suspension. Namely, an original tyre-wheel with additional unsprung mass, a suspension spring, an elastic top mount, damper bushings and a simplified wheel guiding mechanism. Each component was tested separately in order to identify its mechanical characteristics. The measured data serve as input parameters for a numerical simulation of the test bench behaviour by using a vibratory model with 3 degrees of freedom. Study on the simulation results and the measurements are needed for further development of the proposed test bench.

  3. Spectral Characteristics of Laser-Induced Graphite Plasma in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinmei; Zheng, Peichao; Liu, Hongdi; Fang, Liang

    2016-11-01

    An experimental setup of laser-induced graphite plasma was built and the spectral characteristics and properties of graphite plasma were studied. From the temporal behavior of graphite plasma, the duration of CN partials (B2 Σ+ → X2 Σ+) emission was two times longer than that of atomic carbon, and all intensities reached the maximum during the early stage from 0.2 μs to 0.8 μs. The electron temperature decreased from 11807 K to 8755 K, the vibration temperature decreased from 8973 K to 6472 K, and the rotational temperature decreased from 7288 K to 4491 K with the delay time, respectively. The effect of the laser energy was also studied, and it was found that the thresholds and spectral characteristics of CN molecular and C atomic spectroscopy presented great differences. At lower laser energies, the electron excited temperature, the electron density, the vibrational temperature and rotational temperature of CN partials increased rapidly. At higher laser energies, the increasing of electron excited temperature and electron density slow down, and the vibrational temperature and rotational temperature even trend to saturation due to plasma shielding and dissociation of CN molecules. The relationship among the three kinds of temperatures was Telec>Tvib>Trot at the same time. The electron density of the graphite plasma was in the order of 1017 cm-3 and 1018 cm-3. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61205149), Scientific Research Foundation for the Retu