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Sample records for air nitrogen argon

  1. Decay of femtosecond laser-induced plasma filaments in air, nitrogen, and argon for atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, N L; Bodrov, S B; Tsarev, M V; Murzanev, A A; Sergeev, Yu A; Malkov, Yu A; Stepanov, A N

    2016-07-01

    The temporal evolution of a plasma channel at the trail of a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse was studied experimentally and theoretically in air, nitrogen (with an admixture of ∼3% O_{2}), and argon in a wide range of gas pressures (from 2 to 760 Torr). Measurements by means of transverse optical interferometry and pulsed terahertz scattering techniques showed that plasma density in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure reduces by an order of magnitude within 3-4 ns and that the decay rate decreases with decreasing pressure. The argon plasma did not decay within several nanoseconds for pressures of 50-760 Torr. We extended our theoretical model previously applied for atmospheric pressure air plasma to explain the plasma decay in the gases under study and to show that allowance for plasma channel expansion affects plasma decay at low pressures. PMID:27575227

  2. Decay of femtosecond laser-induced plasma filaments in air, nitrogen, and argon for atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Bodrov, S. B.; Tsarev, M. V.; Murzanev, A. A.; Sergeev, Yu. A.; Malkov, Yu. A.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    The temporal evolution of a plasma channel at the trail of a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse was studied experimentally and theoretically in air, nitrogen (with an admixture of ˜3% O2), and argon in a wide range of gas pressures (from 2 to 760 Torr). Measurements by means of transverse optical interferometry and pulsed terahertz scattering techniques showed that plasma density in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure reduces by an order of magnitude within 3-4 ns and that the decay rate decreases with decreasing pressure. The argon plasma did not decay within several nanoseconds for pressures of 50-760 Torr. We extended our theoretical model previously applied for atmospheric pressure air plasma to explain the plasma decay in the gases under study and to show that allowance for plasma channel expansion affects plasma decay at low pressures.

  3. Water-vapor line broadening and shifting by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon in the 720-nm wavelength region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic measurements of H2O vapor in the 720-nm wavelength region were conducted to investigate the broadening and shifting of H2O lines by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. For each of the buffer gases under study, a linear relationship was found between the widths and the shifts, with the broader lines having the smaller pressure shifts. The pressure shifts measured compared favorably with theoretical values reported by Bykov et al. (1988). The temperature-dependence exponents for air-broadening were found to be J-dependent, with the lower-J lines having the higher exponents.

  4. Interaction of Plutonium with Diverse Materials in Moist Air and Nitrogen-Argon Atmospheres at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Haschke; Raymond J. Martinez; Robert E. Pruner II; Barbara Martinez; Thomas H. Allen

    2001-04-01

    Chemical and radiolytic interactions of weapons-grade plutonium with metallic, inorganic, and hydrogenous materials in atmospheres containing moist air-argon mixtures have been characterized at room temperature from pressure-volume-temperature and mass spectrometric measurements of the gas phase. A reaction sequence controlled by kinetics and gas-phase composition is defined by correlating observed and known reaction rates. In all cases, O{sub 2} is eliminated first by the water-catalyzed Pu + O{sub 2} reaction and H{sub 2}O is then consumed by the Pu + H{sub 2}O reaction, producing a gas mixture of N{sub 2}, argon, and H{sub 2}. Hydrogen formed by the reaction of water and concurrent radiolysis of hydrogenous materials either reacts to form PuH{sub 2} or accumulates in the system. Accumulation of H{sub 2} is correlated with the presence of hydrogenous materials in liquid and volatile forms that are readily distributed over the plutonium surface. Areal rates of radiolytic H{sub 2} generation are determined and applied in showing that modest extents of H{sub 2} production are expected for hydrogenous solids if the contact area with plutonium is limited. The unpredictable nature of complex chemical systems is demonstrated by occurrence of the chloride-catalyzed Pu + H{sub 2}O reaction in some tests and hydride-catalyzed nitriding in another.

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  8. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  9. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  10. Effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calaprice, F.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Di Pompeo, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Gallo, V.; Grandi, L.; Meng, G.; Modena, I.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Piano Mortari, G. B.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Roncadelli, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.

    2010-06-01

    A dedicated test of the effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon has been performed at the INFN-Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) within the WArP R&D program. A detector has been designed and assembled for this specific task and connected to a system for the injection of controlled amounts of gaseous Nitrogen into the liquid Argon. The purpose of the test is to detect the reduction of the Ar scintillation light emission as a function of the amount of the Nitrogen contaminant injected in the Argon volume. A wide concentration range, spanning from ~ 10-1 ppm up to ~ 103 ppm, has been explored. Measurements have been done with electrons in the energy range of minimum ionizing particles (γ-conversion from radioactive sources). Source spectra at different Nitrogen contaminations are analyzed, showing sensitive reduction of the scintillation yield at increasing concentrations. Direct PMT signal acquisition exploiting high time resolution by fast waveform recording allowed high precision extraction of the main characteristics of the scintillation light emission in contaminated LAr. In particular, the decreasing behavior in lifetime and relative amplitude of the slow component is found to be appreciable starting from Script O(1 ppm) of Nitrogen concentrations. The rate constant of the quenching process induced by Nitrogen in liquid Ar has been found to be kQ(N2) = 0.11 ± 0.01 μs-1ppm-1, consistent with a previous measurement of this quantity but with significant improvement in precision. On the other hand, no evidence for absorption by N2 impurities has been found up to the higher concentrations here explored.

  11. 46 CFR § 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2015-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2015-10-01 2015-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. § 151.50-36 Section § 151.50-36... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172...

  12. Thermodynamic Properties of Air and Mixtures of Nitrogen, Argon, and Oxygen From 60 to 2000 K at Pressures to 2000 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, Eric W.; Jacobsen, Richard T.; Penoncello, Steven G.; Friend, Daniel G.

    2000-05-01

    A thermodynamic property formulation for standard dry air based upon available experimental p-ρ-T, heat capacity, speed of sound, and vapor-liquid equilibrium data is presented. This formulation is valid for liquid, vapor, and supercritical air at temperatures from the solidification point on the bubble-point curve (59.75 K) to 2000 K at pressures up to 2000 MPa. In the absence of reliable experimental data for air above 873 K and 70 MPa, air properties were predicted from nitrogen data in this region. These values were included in the determination of the formulation to extend the range of validity. Experimental shock tube measurements on air give an indication of the extrapolation behavior of the equation of state up to temperatures and pressures of 5000 K and 28 GPa. The available measurements of thermodynamic properties of air are summarized and analyzed. Separate ancillary equations for the calculation of dew and bubble-point pressures and densities of air are presented. In the range from the solidification point to 873 K at pressures to 70 MPa, the estimated uncertainty of density values calculated with the equation of state is 0.1%. The estimated uncertainty of calculated speed of sound values is 0.2% and that for calculated heat capacities is 1%. At temperatures above 873 K and 70 MPa, the estimated uncertainty of calculated density values is 0.5% increasing to 1.0% at 2000 K and 2000 MPa. In addition to the equation of state for standard air, a mixture model explicit in Helmholtz energy has been developed which is capable of calculating the thermodynamic properties of mixtures containing nitrogen, argon, and oxygen. This model is valid for temperatures from the solidification point on the bubble-point curve to 1000 K at pressures up to 100 MPa over all compositions. The Helmholtz energy of the mixture is the sum of the ideal gas contribution, the real gas contribution, and the contribution from mixing. The contribution from mixing is given by a single

  13. Study of argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V.; Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2013-10-28

    In this work, the reaction kinetics in argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure argon was created in quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 60 W. The nitrogen was added into the afterglow at the distance of 9 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. The argon spectral lines and after nitrogen addition also nitrogen second positive system (SPS) were identified in the spectra. The measurement of spatial dependence of SPS intensity showed a very slow decay of the intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the nitrogen concentration. In order to explain this behavior a kinetic model for reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that C {sup 3}Π{sub u} state of molecular nitrogen, which is the upper state of SPS emission, is produced by excitation transfer from argon metastables to nitrogen molecules. However, the argon metastables are also produced at Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ion recombination with electrons and this limits the decay of argon metastable concentration and it results in very slow decay of SPS intensity.

  14. Experimental thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat values for mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, R. A.; Cieszkiewicz, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity obtained with a transient hot-wire apparatus are reported for three mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon. Values of the specific heat, Cp, are calculated from these measured values and the density calculated with an equation of state. The measurements were made at temperatures between 65 and 303 K with pressures between 0.1 and 70 MPa. The data cover the vapor, liquid, and supercritical gas phases for the three mixtures. The total reported points are 1066 for the air mixture (78.11 percent nitrogen, 20.97 percent oxygen, and 0.92 percent argon), 1058 for the 50 percent nitrogen, 50 percent oxygen mixture, and 864 for the 25 percent nitrogen, 75 oxygen mixture. Empirical thermal conductivity correlations are provided for the three mixtures.

  15. Numerical simulation of atomic nitrogen formation in plasma of glow discharge in nitrogen-argon mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomich, V. A.; Ryabtsev, A. V.; Didyk, E. G.; Zhovtyansky, V. A.; Nazarenko, V. G.

    2010-10-01

    We consider the problem of determining the content of atomic nitrogen as an active component responsible for the efficiency of metal surface modification in plasma of stationary low-pressure glow discharge in nitrogen-argon mixture (widely used in this technology). The influence of the gas mixture composition on the rate constant of molecular nitrogen dissociation, which determines the atomic nitrogen production, has been calculated, The parameters of plasma have been experimentally determined using the method of double probes. The electron energy distribution function is found by numerically integrating the Boltzmann equation in a two-term approximation for the molecular nitrogen-argon mixture.

  16. XUV radiation from gaseous nitrogen and argon target laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbová, M.; Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Krejčí, F.; Kroupa, M.; Jakůbek, J.

    2012-06-01

    Laser plasma created in gaseous target is studied as a source of radiation in the "water window" wavelength range. Plasma is created by focusing an 800 mJ/7 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse into the gas-puff target. Using nitrogen gas results in emission of an intense quasi-monochromatic radiation with the wavelength 2.88 nm, corresponding to the quantum transition 1s2p → 1s2 of helium -like nitrogen ion. The emission spectrum with argon target covers all the water window range. Laboratory and computer experiments have been performed for both target gases. The spatial distributions of emitted energy in the water window spectral range were compared. The total emitted energy with argon was one order higher than with nitrogen.

  17. Modeling of Magnetron Argon Plasma Issuing into Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Cun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented to describe the heat transfer and fluid flow in a magnetron plasma torch, by means of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code fluent. Specific calculations are presented for a gas-mixing system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an air environment), operating in a laminar mode. Numerical results show that an external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of an arc plasma, i.e., the AMF will impel the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. In addition, the use of an AMF induces a strong air indraft at the torch spout, and the air mixing with the argon gas results in a marked increase in arc voltage. An increment in the amount of the oncoming argon gas restrains the quantity of the air indraft, and this should be responsible for a lower arc voltage in such an AMF torch when a larger gas inflow is used.

  18. Infrared spectrum of the complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide in argon and nitrogen matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Zwet, G. P.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Baas, F.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide has been studied by infrared spectroscopy in argon and nitrogen matrices. The shifts relative to the free species show that the complex is weak and similar in argon and nitrogen. The results give evidence for T-shaped complexes, which are isolated in several configurations. Some evidence is also presented which indicates that, in addition to the two well-known sites in argon, carbon dioxide can be trapped in a third site.

  19. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-15

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N{sub 2}). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  20. The nature of fluctuations in a double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Xin; Yan Jianhua; Yu Liang; Cen, Kefa; Cheron, Bruno

    2007-09-24

    The dynamic behavior of the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet is investigated by combined means of the fast Fourier transform, correlation function, and Wigner distribution. The restrike mode is identified as the fluctuation behavior in an argon-nitrogen plasma jet. The Fourier spectra exhibit two characteristic frequencies of 150 Hz and 4.1 kHz, which indicates that the nature of fluctuations in the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma can be ascribed to the power supply undulation and both arc roots motion on the anode channels. It is further found that the double anode torch could inhibit and reduce the restrike phenomenon.

  1. Cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixture in natural air samples for isotopic and molecular ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeeb Rahman, Keedakkadan; Abe, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of mass independent isotope fractionation in oxygen during the formation of ozone in the stratosphere has initiated a wide application in isotope geochemistry field. Separation of oxygen-argon mixture has become the foundation of high precision analysis of Δ17O and δ(O2/Ar) for geochemical applications. Here we present precise and simplified cryogenic separation of argon oxygen mixture from the atmospheric and dissolved air using 30/60 mesh 5A molecular sieve zeolite. A pioneer study of this method was conducted by Thiemens and Meagher in 1984. The column which is made of glass tube contains about 1.1 grams of molecular sieve zeolite and both ends of column was filled with glass wools. The experimental set up was tested for different combination of molecular sieves and slurry temperatures. We found the most efficient condition for the separation was at a column temperature of -103°C. For complete transfer of O2 and Ar mixture usually takes in 15-20 minutes time. The isotopic ratios of oxygen were analyzed using mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer Delta Plus) relative to reference oxygen-argon mixture at 3V of m/z 32 for both sample and reference side. The signals of m/z 28, 32, and 40 were measured by dynamically to determine oxygen -argon ratio and to check nitrogen contamination. Repeated measurements of atmospheric air yielded a reproducibility (SE n=80) of 0.006, 0.004 and 0.19‰ for δ17O, δ18O and δO2/Ar respectively. The isotopic and molecular fractionation of argon- oxygen mixture during gas adsorption and desorption while using molecular sieve under liquid nitrogen temperature was studied. We have established a linear relationship governing the effect of 13X and 5A molecular sieves on molecular fractionation. And suggested the use of single 1/8" pellet 13X molecular sieve provided a negligible fractionation.

  2. Electron densities and energies of a guided argon streamer in argon and air environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, S.; Hofmann, S.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the temporally and spatially resolved electron densities and mean energies of a guided argon streamer in ambient argon and air obtained by Thomson laser scattering. The plasma is driven by a positive monopolar 3.5 kV pulse, with a pulse width of 500 ns and a frequency of 5 kHz which is synchronized with the high repetition rate laser system. This configuration enables us to use the spatial and temporal stability of the guided streamer to accumulate a multitude of laser/plasma shots by a triple grating spectrometer equipped with an ICCD camera and to determine the electron parameters. We found a strong initial ne-overshoot with a maximum of 7 × 1019 m-3 and a mean electron energy of 4.5 eV. This maximum is followed by a fast decay toward the streamer channel. Moreover, a 2D distribution of the electron density is obtained which exhibits a peculiar mushroom-like shape of the streamer head with a diameter significantly larger than that of the emission profile. A correlation of the width of the streamer head with the expected pre-ionization channel is found.

  3. Numerical study of breakdown pattern induced by an intense microwave under nitrogen and argon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-07-01

    Filamentary plasma induced by microwave beam irradiation was reproduced in nitrogen and argon by combining fluid or particle plasma models with electromagnetic wave propagation. Transport coefficients used in the fluid model are estimated from particle simulation to maintain consistency of the breakdown structure between the fluid and particle models. A discrete structure was obtained using the one-dimensional (1D) fluid model, because a standing wave is generated in front of the plasma when the incident microwave beam is reflected by the overcritical plasma, which agrees with the breakdown structure obtained using the 1D particle model. A 2D plasma filament was also reproduced using the fluid model in nitrogen and argon. Reflection of the incident microwave in argon becomes stronger than that in nitrogen because of the denser argon plasma. Change in filament shape is induced in argon because the electric field is deformed at the plasma tip owing to stronger wave reflection from the neighboring filament. The propagation speed of the plasma front becomes larger in argon breakdown because of the larger ionization frequency and the larger diffusion coefficient.

  4. Pore size analysis of activated carbons from argon and nitrogen porosimetry using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, R.J.; Hyduke, D.R.; Lastoskie, C.M.

    2000-05-30

    The authors present isotherms calculated from density functional theory for the adsorption of argon in model slit-shaped carbon pores at 77 K. The model isotherms are used to interpret experimental argon uptake measurements and to obtain the pore size distributions of several porous carbons. A similar set of density measurements and to obtain the pore size distributions of several porous carbons. A similar set of density functional theory isotherms, previously reported for nitrogen adsorption on carbon slit pores at 77 K, are used to determine pore size distributions for the same set of carbons. The pore size distribution maxima, mean pore widths, and specific pore volumes measured using the two different probe gases are all found to agree to within approximately 8% on average. Some of the differences in the pore size distributions obtained from argon and nitrogen porosimetry may be attributable to quadrupolar interactions of the nitrogen molecules with functional groups on the carbon surface.

  5. Characterization of an atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, X.; Cheron, B. G.; Yan, J. H.; Yu, L.; Cen, K. F.

    2008-05-15

    In the framework of studies devoted to hazardous waste destruction, an original dc double anode plasma torch has been designed and tested, which produces an elongated, weak fluctuation and reproducible plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The arc instabilities and dynamic behavior of the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet are investigated through the oscillations of electrical signals by combined means of fast Fourier transform and Wigner distribution. In our experiment, the restrike mode is identified as the typical fluctuation behavior in an argon-nitrogen plasma jet. The Fourier spectra and Wigner distributions exhibit two characteristic frequencies of 150 Hz and 4.1 kHz, which reveals that the nature of fluctuations in the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma can be ascribed to the undulation of the power supply and both arc roots motion on the anode channels. In addition, the microscopic properties of the plasma jet inside and outside the arc chamber are investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy, which yields excitation, electronic, rotational, and vibrational temperatures, as well as the electron number density. The results allow us to examine the validity criteria of a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state in the plasma arc. The measured electron densities are in good agreement with those calculated from the LTE model, which indicates that the atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma in the core region is close to the LTE state under our experimental conditions.

  6. Argon and nitrogen adsorption in disordered nanoporous carbons: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Pikunic, Jorge; Llewellyn, Philip; Pellenq, Roland; Gubbins, Keith E

    2005-05-10

    We report experimental measurements of the isosteric heats of adsorption for argon and nitrogen in two microporous saccharose-based carbons, using a Tian-Calvet microcalorimeter. These data are used to test recently developed molecular models of these carbons, obtained by a constrained reverse Monte Carlo method. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats for these systems, and the results for the latter are compared to the experimental data. For argon, excellent quantitative agreement is obtained over the entire range of pore filling. In the case of nitrogen, very good agreement is obtained over the range of coverage 0.25 < or = gamma/gamma 0 < or = 0.85, but discrepancies are observed at lower and higher coverages. The discrepancy at low coverage may be due to the presence of oxygenated groups on the pore surfaces, which are not taken into account in the model. The differences at high coverage are believed to arise from the presence of a few mesopores, which again are not included in the model. Pair correlation functions (argon-carbon and argon-argon) are determined from the simulations and are discussed as a function of pore filling. Snapshots of the simulations are presented and provide a picture of the pore filling process. PMID:16032857

  7. Development of a diffuse air-argon plasma source using a dielectric-barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Jie; Jiang Weiman; Zhao Wei; Wang Yishan; Li Shibo; Wang Haojing; Duan Yixiang

    2013-01-21

    A stable diffuse large-volume air plasma source was developed by using argon-induced dielectric-barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be operated in a filamentary discharge with the average areal power density of 0.27 W/cm{sup 2} and the gas temperature of 315{+-}3 K. Spatial measurement of emission spectrum and temperature indicates that this plasma is uniform in the central region along the transverse direction. It is also found that the formation of diffuse air plasma mainly lies in the creation of sufficient seed electrons by the Penning effect through collisions between two argon or nitrogen metastables at low electric fields.

  8. ECR Plasma Sterilisation, Argon and Nitrogen Treated Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helhel, Selcuk; Oksuz, Lutfi; Cerezci, Osman; Rad, Abbas Y.

    2004-09-01

    ECR type plasma system was built to produce plasma in axial direction. Plasma was initiated in a specially designed Nickel - Chrome cylindrical vacuum tube which is being driven through dielectric window by 2.45GHz commercial magnetron source. Tube is also surrounded by a coil driving 150ADC to generate approximately 875Gauss magnetic field at the center. Langmuir probe and ICCD for optical spectrometry were used to characterize internal parameters like electron density, electron temperature and different characteristics of the plasma. Bacillus Subtilis var nigar, bacillus Stearothermophilus, bacillus pumilus E601, Escherichia coli and staphylococcus aureus type bacteria were selected as a reference. Each is resistant for different actions while the Bacilus cereus is the most resistant bacteria for microwave interaction. This study presents the effect of system on used bacteria. Those are gram positive and gram negative bacteria that refers to structure of cell wall. The sterilization efficacy of Argon type ECR plasma was found to be over 99, 5% in Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis (vegetative cell), Bacillus cereus (vegetative cell), Bacillus pumilus and Escherichia coli. System response type is less than 2 minutes.

  9. Electron kinetics in atmospheric-pressure argon and nitrogen microwave microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    Electron kinetics in atmospheric-pressure argon and nitrogen microwave (4 GHz) microdischarges is studied using a self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. The reversal of electric field (i.e., inverted sheath formation) is obtained in nitrogen and is not obtained in argon. This is explained by the different energy dependencies of electron-neutral collision cross sections in atomic and molecular gases and, as a consequence, different drag force acting on electrons. A non-local behavior of electron energy distribution function is obtained in both gases owing to electrons are generated in the plasma sheath. In both gases, electron energy relaxation length is comparable with the interelectrode gap, and therefore, they penetrate the plasma bulk with large energies.

  10. The variation of hydrophobicity of aluminum alloy by nitrogen and argon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Sang Cheol; Kim, Ki Wook; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen and argon ions were irradiated on the surface of aluminum alloy. Ion irradiation appeared to increase contact angle of the metallic specimens. In order to investigate the factors affecting the changes of contact angles, changes in the characteristics of the surfaces were examined using SEM, AFM, and X-ray diffraction. The contact angle increased due to surface composition changes and surface roughness changes.

  11. [The Status of Hemostasis System in Hypoxic Nitrogen-Oxygen and Argon-Oxygen Diving Gases].

    PubMed

    Kuzichkin, D S; Markin, A A; Juravlyova, O A; Morukov, B V; Zabolotskaya, I V; Vostrikova, L V

    2015-01-01

    In this study the effect of factors of hermetic chamber with modified gas medium on the hemostasis system is analyzed in order to estimate and to compare different diving breathing gases. The parameters characterizing pro-, anticoagulant as well as fibrinolytic components of hemostasis were determined using clotting, chromogenic and immunological methods. The applied exposure did not affect the activity and regulatory potential of hemostasis significantly; however, the nitrogen-oxygen and argon-oxygen diving gases have a different effect on the hemostasis functioning, especially in the recovery period. PMID:26485798

  12. Investigation of magnetic-pole-enhanced inductively coupled nitrogen-argon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, F.; Khan, A. W.; Saeed, A.; Zakaullah, M.

    2012-09-01

    This article presented the features of the mixed mode and H mode in magnetic pole enhanced, inductively coupled Ar-N2 plasmas using RF-compensated Langmuir probe measurements. To fully characterize plasma parameters and electron energy probability functions (EEPFs), the gas pressure and argon content were varied. It was observed that with increasing the nitrogen content and gas pressure, the critical RF power to sustain H mode increases; this increase was more prominent for pure nitrogen discharge at higher pressure. The electron number density (ne) shows increasing trend with increasing RF power, while at higher gas pressures, the electron number density decreases at fixed RF power. Mostly, the EEPFs show a Maxwellian distribution even at low RF power (for higher argon content in the discharge) and at moderate RF power (for higher or pure nitrogen content in the discharge) for pressures of 15-60 mTorr. With increasing the nitrogen content in the mixture, the low energy part of the EEPF is more Druyvesteyn with a distorted high energy tail at low RF power. At fixed RF power, the slope of EEPF changes sharply with increasing pressure. It was observed that in hybrid mode, the EEPF at higher gas pressure (75 mTorr) in a pure nitrogen discharge shows a flat hole near the average electron energy of 3 eV and changes to Maxwellian distribution in H mode. The skin depth versus RF power shows that the skin depth is smaller than the critical dimension of the chamber, regardless of the gas type and the gas pressure.

  13. A measurement of the absorption of liquid argon scintillation light by dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; Chiu, C. S.; Conrad, J. M.; Ignarra, C. M.; Katori, T.; Toups, M.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source. The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that nitrogen absorbs argon scintillation light with strength of (1.51±0.15) × 10-4 cm-1ppm-1, corresponding to an absorption cross section of (4.99±0.51) × 10-21 cm2molecule-1. We obtain the relationship between absorption length and nitrogen concentration over the 0 to 50 ppm range and discuss the implications for the design and data analysis of future large liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detectors. Our results indicate that for a current-generation LArTPC, where a concentration of 2 parts per million of nitrogen is expected, the attenuation length due to nitrogen will be 30±3 meters.

  14. Flow properties in expansion tube with helium, argon, air, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    Test flow velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec were generated in a 6-in. expansion tube using helium, argon, air, and CO2 test gases. Pitot pressure profiles across the flow at the test section are presented for the four test gases, and measured flow quantities are compared to computer predicted values. Comparison of predicted and measured flow quantities suggests the expansion to be near thermochemical equilibrium for all test gases and implies the existence of a totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm. Argon, air, and CO2 flows were observed to attenuate while traversing the acceleration section, whereas no attenuation was observed for helium.

  15. Nitrogen and Argon in ALH 84001 Revisited: Unravelling a Martian Atmospheric Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1996-03-01

    We have measured nitrogen and argon released simultaneously upon combustion of two samples of ALH 84001 (A84). Both nitrogen and argon appeared to be heterogeneously distributed in the rock: one sample liberated very little gas above blank levels, whereas the second sample, selected because it contained abundant material from the "crush zones", was rich in both species. Using the ^40Ar/^14N ratio and delta ^15N of the gas liberated above 700 degrees C from this second sample, an attempt has been made to calculate the relative quantities of adsorbed terrestrial gases and trapped martian atmospheric species. Following from this, excess ^40Ar attributed to radiogenic production from potassium decay can be used to determine a K-Ar age of the sample. We calculate that ~17.5% of the total ^40Ar is indigenous to the sample. Assuming that the trapped component would have a ^40Ar/^14N ratio equivalent to that in the present-day martian atmosphere (~0.33), then there is a small excess of ^40Ar (amounting to about 1.5% of the total ^40Ar). Taking a reasonable estimate of the potassium abundance (100-200 ppm) implies that A84 has a K-Ar age of ~0.76-1.28 Gyr, which is much younger than ages determined in previous studies and using other methods.

  16. Calorimetry by immersion into liquid nitrogen and liquid argon: a better way to determine the internal surface area of micropores.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Ricardo; Llewellyn, Philip; Rouquerol, Françoise; Denoyel, Renaud; Rouquerol, Jean

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this work is to assess the internal surface area of a set of samples (either carbons or oxides, either porous or nonporous, either microporous or mesoporous) by microcalorimetry via immersion into liquid nitrogen or argon. We have made use of an isothermal, heat-flux microcalorimeter, initially designed and built in our laboratory for the sake of gas adsorption experiments at 77 or 87 K. It seems that immersion calorimetry into liquid nitrogen and argon makes it possible to go one step further in the determination of the internal surface area of micropores. PMID:15341849

  17. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements. PMID:23794223

  18. Study of non-thermal plasma jet with dielectric barrier configuration in nitrogen and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, C. Y.; Chin, O. H.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is advantageous in generating non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure, as it avoids transition to thermal arc and dispenses with costly vacuum system. It has found useful applications in treating heat-sensitive materials such as plastics and living tissue. In this work, the discharge formed between the Pyrex glass layer and the ground electrode is extruded through a nozzle to form the non-thermal plasma jet. The DBD characteristics were investigated in terms of charge transferred and mean power dissipated per cycle when operated in nitrogen and argon at various flow rates and applied voltages. These characteristics were then correlated to the dimension of the plasma jet. The mean power dissipated in the DBD was below 7 W giving an efficiency of 17 %. The length of the plasma jet was greatly limited to below 1 cm due to the configuration of the DBD system and nozzle.

  19. Cryogenic and Simulated Fuel Jet Breakup in Argon, Helium and Nitrogen Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1995-01-01

    Two-phase flow atomization of liquid nitrogen jets was experimentally investigated. They were co-axially injected into high-velocity gas flows of helium, nitrogen and argon, respectively, and atomized internally inside a two-fluid fuel nozzle. Cryogenic sprays with relatively high specific surface areas were produced, i.e., ratios of surface area to volume were fairly high. This was indicated by values of reciprocal Sauter mean diameters, RSMD's, as measured with a scattered- light scanning instrument developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. Correlating expressions were derived for the three atomizing gases over a gas temperature range of 111 to 422 K. Also, the correlation was extended to include waterjet breakup data that had been previously obtained in simulating fuel jet breakup in sonic velocity gas flow. The final correlating expression included a new dimensionless molecular-scale acceleration group. It was needed to correlate RSMD data, for LN2 and H2O sprays, with the fluid properties of the liquid jets and atomizing gases used in this investigation.

  20. Spectral dependence of purely-Kerr-driven filamentation in air and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettoumi, W.; Béjot, P.; Petit, Y.; Loriot, V.; Hertz, E.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P.

    2010-09-01

    Based on numerical simulations, we show that higher-order nonlinear indices (up to n8 and n10, respectively) of air and argon have a dominant contribution to both focusing and defocusing in the self-guiding of ultrashort laser pulses over most of the spectrum. Plasma generation and filamentation are therefore decoupled. As a consequence, ultraviolet wavelength may not be the optimal wavelength for applications requiring to maximize ionization.

  1. Spectral dependence of purely-Kerr-driven filamentation in air and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Ettoumi, W.; Petit, Y.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P.; Bejot, P.; Hertz, E.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.; Loriot, V.

    2010-09-15

    Based on numerical simulations, we show that higher-order nonlinear indices (up to n{sub 8} and n{sub 10}, respectively) of air and argon have a dominant contribution to both focusing and defocusing in the self-guiding of ultrashort laser pulses over most of the spectrum. Plasma generation and filamentation are therefore decoupled. As a consequence, ultraviolet wavelength may not be the optimal wavelength for applications requiring to maximize ionization.

  2. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopic measurement of air entrainment in argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into an argon plasma jet has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition to turbulence occurs, air is rapidly entrained into the jet core. The location of the transition region is thought to be driven by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopic measurement of air entrainment in argon plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincke, J. R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C. G.

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into an argon plasma jet has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition to turbulence occurs, air is rapidly entrained into the jet core. The location of the transition region is thought to be driven by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number.

  4. Infrared spectra and electronic structure calculations for NN complexes with U, UN, and NUN in solid argon, neon, and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lester; Wang, Xuefeng; Gong, Yu; Kushto, Gary P; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Gagliardi, Laura

    2014-07-17

    Reactions of laser-ablated U atoms with N2 molecules upon codeposition in excess argon or neon at 4 K gave intense NUN and weak UN absorptions. Annealing produced progressions of new absorptions for the UN2(N2)1,2,3,4,5 and UN(N2)1,2,3,4,5,6 complexes. The neon-to-argon matrix shift decreases with increasing NN ligation and therefore the number of noble gas atoms left in the primary coordination sphere around the NUN molecule. Small matrix shifts are observed when the secondary coordination layers around the primary UN2(N2)1,2,3,4,5 and UN(N2)1,2,3,4,5,6 complexes are changed from neon-to-argon to nitrogen. Electronic structure, energy, and frequency calculations provide support for the identification of these complexes and the characterization of the N≡U≡N and U≡N core molecules as terminal uranium nitrides. Codeposition of U with pure nitrogen produced the saturated U(NN)7 complex, which UV irradiation converted to the NUN(NN)5 complex with slightly lower frequencies than found in solid argon. PMID:24878246

  5. A Supersonic Argon/Air Coaxial Jet Experiment for Computational Fluid Dynamics Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, Chandler W.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    A non-reacting experiment is described in which data has been acquired for the validation of CFD codes used to design high-speed air-breathing engines. A coaxial jet-nozzle has been designed to produce pressure-matched exit flows of Mach 1.8 at 1 atm in both a center jet of argon and a coflow jet of air, creating a supersonic, incompressible mixing layer. The flowfield was surveyed using total temperature, gas composition, and Pitot probes. The data set was compared to CFD code predictions made using Vulcan, a structured grid Navier-Stokes code, as well as to data from a previous experiment in which a He-O2 mixture was used instead of argon in the center jet of the same coaxial jet assembly. Comparison of experimental data from the argon flowfield and its computational prediction shows that the CFD produces an accurate solution for most of the measured flowfield. However, the CFD prediction deviates from the experimental data in the region downstream of x/D = 4, underpredicting the mixing-layer growth rate.

  6. Global rate coefficients for ionization and recombination of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Annaloro, Julien; Morel, Vincent; Bultel, Arnaud; Omaly, Pierre

    2012-07-15

    The flow field modeling of planetary entry plasmas, laser-induced plasmas, inductively coupled plasmas, arcjets, etc., requires to use Navier-Stokes codes. The kinetic mechanisms implemented in these codes involve global (effective) rate coefficients. These rate coefficients result from the excited states coupling during a quasi-steady state. In order to obtain these global rate coefficients over a wide electron temperature (T{sub e}) range for ionization and recombination of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon, the behavior of their excited states is investigated using a zero-dimensional (time-dependent) code. The population number densities of these electronic states are considered as independent species. Their relaxation is studied within the range 3000 K{<=}T{sub e}{<=}20 000 K and leads to the determination of the ionization (k{sub i}) and recombination (k{sub r}) global rate coefficients. Comparisons with existing data are performed. Finally, the ratio k{sub i}/k{sub r} is compared with the Saha equilibrium constant. This ratio increases more rapidly than the equilibrium constant for T{sub e}>15 000 K.

  7. Cryogenic spray vaporization in high-velocity helium, argon and nitrogen gasflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    Effects of gas properties on cryogenic liquid-jet atomization in high-velocity helium, nitrogen, and argon gas flows were investigated. Volume median diameter, D(sub v.5e), data were obtained with a scattered-light scanning instrument. By calculating the change in spray drop size, -Delta D(sub v.5)(exp 2), due to droplet vaporization, it was possible to calculate D(sub v.5C). D(sub v.5C) is the unvaporized characteristic drop size formed at the fuel-nozzle orifice. This drop size was normalized with respect to liquid-jet diameter, D(sub O). It was then correlated with several dimensionless groups to give an expression for the volume median diameter of cryogenic LN2 sprays. This expression correlates drop size D(sub v.5c) with aerodynamic and liquid-surface forces so that it can be readily determined in the design of multiphase-flow propellant injectors for rocket combustors.

  8. Increased Efficiency in SI Engine with Air Replaced by Oxygen in Argon Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N J; Rapp, V H; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-01-13

    Basic engine thermodynamics predicts that spark ignited engine efficiency is a function of both the compression ratio of the engine and the specific heat ratio of the working fluid. In practice the compression ratio of the engine is often limited due to knock. Both higher specific heat ratio and higher compression ratio lead to higher end gas temperatures and increase the likelihood of knock. In actual engine cycles, heat transfer losses increase at higher compression ratios and limit efficiency even when the knock limit is not reached. In this paper we investigate the role of both the compression ratio and the specific heat ratio on engine efficiency by conducting experiments comparing operation of a single-cylinder variable-compression-ratio engine with both hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures. For low load operation it is found that the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures result in higher indicated thermal efficiencies. Peak efficiency for the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures is found at compression ratio 5.5 whereas for the hydrogen-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.24 the peak efficiency is found at compression ratio 13. We apply a three-zone model to help explain the effects of specific heat ratio and compression ratio on efficiency. Operation with hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures at low loads is more efficient because the lower compression ratio results in a substantially larger portion of the gas to reside in the adiabatic core rather than in the boundary layer and in the crevices, leading to less heat transfer and more complete combustion.

  9. Characterization of an inductively coupled nitrogen-argon plasma by Langmuir probe combined with optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, M. A.; Lee, Y. W.; Chung, T. H.

    2011-02-15

    The properties of low-pressure inductively coupled nitrogen-argon plasmas were investigated by using a Langmuir probe combined with optical emission spectroscopy (OES) under the conditions of pressures in the range of 1-30 mTorr and applied rf powers of 200-600 W. In the experiments, the argon was introduced as an actinometer and as an adding gas. The effect of the argon content in the gas mixture was examined in the range of 5%-80%. The electron energy probability function (EEPF), the electron density, and the electron temperature were obtained by using an rf-compensated Langmuir probe. The dissociation fractions were obtained from the OES actinometry. The electron temperature was also obtained by OES corona model and compared with that measured by the probe. The second positive and first negative systems of spectral bands from nitrogen molecules were analyzed to estimate the vibrational and rotational temperatures. The effects of the control parameters on the plasma parameters and dissociation fraction were investigated. While the calculated nitrogen atom density increased with power, it exhibited a maximum value near the Ar content of 30%.

  10. Laboratory Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles: Quinoline, and Phenanthridine in Solid Argon and H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Mattioda, A. L.; Sandford, S. A.; Hudgins, D. M.

    2004-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common throughout the universe. Their detection and identification are based on telescopic infrared (IR) spectra compared with laboratory data. Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs) are heterocyclic aromatics i.e., PAHs with carbon atoms replaced by a nitrogen atom. These molecules should be present in the interstellar medium, but have received relatively little attention. We present mid-IR spectra of two PANHs, quinoline (C9H7N), and phenanthridine (C13H9N) isolated in solid argon and frozen in solid H2O at 12 K, conditions yielding data directly comparable to astronomical observations. In contrast to simple PAHs, that do not interact strongly with solid H2O, the nitrogen atoms in PANHs are potentially capable of hydrogen bonding with H2O. Whereas the IR spectrum of phenanthridine in H2O is similar to that of the same compound isolated in an argon matrix, quinoline absorptions shift up to 16 cm(sup -1) (0.072 mm) between argon and H2O. Thus, astronomers will not always be able to rely on IR band positions of matrix isolated PANHs to correctly interpret the absorptions of PANHs frozen in H2O ice grains. Furthermore, our data suggest that relative band areas also vary, so determining column densities to better than a factor of 3 will require knowledge of the matrix in which the PANH is embedded and laboratory studies of relevant samples.

  11. Radiative properties of molecular nitrogen ions produced by helium Penning ionization and argon effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, George, III; Song, Kyo-Dong

    1994-01-01

    The development of hypersonic aerospace vehicles requires a better understanding on the thermal and chemical nonequilibrium kinetics of participating species in shock layers. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes developed for such flowfields overestimate the radiation in the spectral region of 300 - 600 nm. A speculation for this overestimation is that inclusion of Ar, CO2, and H2O at the upper atmosphere flight region makes a significant impact on radiative kinetics of molecular nitrogen ions. To define the effects of minority species on the radiative kinetics of N2(+), an experimental setup was made by using the helium Penning ionization. The vibrational and rotational temperature were measured by mapping the vibrational and rotational distributions of N2(+) emission with high spectroscopic resolution and absolute intensity measurements. Measured vibrational temperatures were in the range from 18,000 to 36,000 K, and rotational temperatures were in the range from 300 to 370 K. The irradiance of 391.44 nm line and rotational and vibrational temperatures were analyzed to define argon and CO2 effects on the N2(+) emission. When Ar or CO2 is injected with N2, the rotational temperature did not change. The irradiances were reduced by 34 percent and 78 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. The vibrational temperatures were increased by 24.1 percent and 82.9 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. It appears that there are no significant effects from small concentrations of Ar and CO2 at the upper atmosphere flight region.

  12. Honeycomb superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in argon/air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ping; Dong, Lifang Yang, Jing; Gao, Yenan; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Ben

    2015-02-15

    We report on a honeycomb superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in argon/air for the first time. It consists of hexagon lattice and honeycomb framework and bifurcates from a hexagon pattern as the applied voltage increases. A phase diagram of the pattern as a function of the gas component and gas pressure is presented. The instantaneous images show that the hexagon lattice and honeycomb framework are ignited in turn in each half voltage cycle. The honeycomb framework is composed of filaments ignited randomly. The spatiotemporal dynamics of honeycomb superlattice pattern is discussed by wall charges.

  13. High enthalpy, hypervelocity flows of air and argon in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, A. J; Stalker, R. J.; Paull, A.

    1991-01-01

    An expansion tube with a free piston driver has been used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon and air at flow velocities in excess of 9 km/s. Irregular test flow unsteadiness has limited the performance of previous expansion tubes, and it has been found that this can be avoided by attention to the interaction between the test gas accelerating expansion and the contact surface in the primary shock tube. Test section measurements of pitot pressure, static pressure and flat plate heat transfer are reported. An approximate analytical theory has been developed for predicting the velocities achieved in the unsteady expansion of the ionizing or dissociating test gas.

  14. An argon ICP-based continuous emissions monitor for hazardous air pollutant metals: Field evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, M.D.; Mayer, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    A fully-operational, argon ICP-based continuous emissions monitor (CEM) for hazardous air pollutant (HAP) metals has recently been demonstrated. The CEM has undergone extensive field evaluation in conjunction with a variety of combustor configurations including coal-fired power plants, waste incinerators, and ordnance deactivation furnaces. The CEM has been successfully demonstrated to provide both speed and sensitivity for simultaneous, multielement detection of HAP metals while exhibiting considerable tolerance for both particulate and moisture loading in sample air streams. The CEM employs a state-of-the-art argon inductively coupled plasma spectrometer as an elemental analyzer. Stack air, continuously extracted under strictly isokinetic conditions, is transported to the CEM through heated sample lines. A sampling interface of novel design permits extraction of air at the high, often variable flow rates required for isokinetic sampling while at the same time, provides aliquots of sample air to the plasma spectrometer at the relatively low but constant analytical flow rates that are appropriate for plasma injection. The CEM is automated to high degree and can operate unattended for several hours at a time. CEM calibration is accomplished using precision-generated metal aerosols. Provision is made for correction of spectral interferences from concomitant metals and molecular species in stack gases. The prototype instrumentation described here is presently considered to be the leading candidate for multimetals CEM application. While specifically designed and implemented to monitor metal emissions from military furnaces used for ordnance deactivation, the CEM has exhibited versatility that makes it well-suited for numerous compliance and process control applications. Results of field testing under various conditions and relative accuracy assessments will be presented.

  15. Activation energies for phase transformations in electrospun titania nanofibers: comparing the influence of argon and air atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albetran, H.; O'Connor, B. H.; Low, I. M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on titania absolute phase level (amorphous, anatase, and rutile forms) changes in electrospun amorphous titania nanofibers from 25 to 900 °C in air and argon atmospheres. A novel method was developed to extract absolute levels of amorphous titania and crystalline anatase and rutile from the synchrotron radiation diffraction (SRD) data. This is a sequel to a relative phase concentrations study that has been reported previously by Albetran et al. (Appl Phys A 116:161 [2014]). Determination of absolute phase levels facilitated estimation of the activation energies for the amorphous-to-anatase transformation of 45(9) kJ/mol in argon and 69(17) in air, and for the anatase-to-rutile transformation energies of 97(7) kJ/mol for argon and 129(5) for air. An activation energy estimate for amorphous-to-crystalline titania in argon of 142(21) kJ/mol, achieved using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), is consistent with the SRD results. The differences in phase transition and activation energies when the titania nanofibers are heated in argon is attributed to the presence of substantial oxygen vacancies in anatase. Estimates of anatase and rutile oxygen site occupancies from the SRD data show that anatase has discernible oxygen vacancies in argon, which correspond to stoichiometric TiO2- x with x < 0.4 that the anatase stoichiometry in air is TiO2. Rutile does not have significant oxygen vacancies in either argon or air.

  16. Morphology and characteristics of laser-induced aluminum plasma in argon and in air: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xueshi; Cao, Fan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Yanping; Yu, Jin

    2015-11-01

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), ablation takes place in general in an ambient gas of the atmospheric pressure, often in air but also in noble gas such as argon or helium. The use of noble gas is known to significantly improve the performance of the technique. We investigate in this work the morphology and the characteristics of induced plasma in argon and in air. The purpose is to understand the mechanism of the analytical performance improvement by the use of argon ambient with respective to air ambient and the dependence on the other experimental parameters such as the laser fluence. The observation of plasma morphology in different ambient gases provides also information for better design of the detection system which optimizes the signal collection according to the used ambient gases. More specifically, the expansion of the plasma induced on an aluminum target with nanosecond infrared (1064 nm) laser pulse in two ambient gases, argon and the atmospheric air, has been studied with spectroscopic imaging at short delays and with emission spectroscopy at longer delays. With relatively low ablation laser fluence (65 J/cm2), similar morphologies have been observed in argon and in air over the early stage of plasma expansion, while diagnostics at longer delay shows stronger emission, higher electron density and temperature for plasma induced in argon. With higher ablation laser fluence (160 J/cm2) however, different expansion behaviors have been observed, with a stagnating aluminum vapor near the target surface in air while a propagating plume away from the target in argon. The craters left on the target surface show as well corresponding difference: in air, the crater is very shallow with a target surface chaotically affected by the laser pulse, indicating an effective re-deposition of the ablated material back to the crater; while in Ar a deeper crater is observed, indicating an efficient mass removal by laser ablation. At longer delays, a brighter

  17. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  18. Nitrogen and argon in Sung Valley and Ambadongar carbonatite complexes: Evidence of incomplete homogenization of mantle and recycled components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Murty, S. V. S.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen and argon concentrations and isotopic ratios have been measured in mineral separates (carbonates, apatites and magnetites) of two temporally and spatially different Indian carbonatites from Sung Valley (107 Ma) and Ambadongar (65 Ma). Gases were extracted by vacuum crushing (carbonates, apatites and magnetites) and stepwise pyrolysis (only apatite) to look for the trapped gases and resolve the different components. δ15N varies from +1.4‰ to +13.6‰ (with accompanying 40Ar/36Ar varying from 900 to 4956) in Sung Valley, and from -3.4 to +14.2 (with accompanying 40Ar/36Ar varying from 353 to 5301) in Ambadongar. This clearly shows the presence of more than one component in these carbonatites. We identify primary and recycled nitrogen and argon in these carbonatites. Additionally, N may be present in other speciation, like solid inorganic form with elevated δ15N ratios up to 16.9‰. Unlike the well-studied carbonatites from Kola, these Indian carbonatites do not show complete homogenization of the different components that can be hosted in different populations of inclusions and, as a result, can be identified. Preservation of such heterogeneity indicates that carbonatite magmatism originated from a small-scale heterogeneous subcontinental mantle initiated during lithospheric rifting.

  19. Interaction of air temperature and nitrogen supply on root growth and nitrogen uptake by corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient uptake rates by plants are governed by both plant processes and soil properties. Simulation models of nitrogen uptake should account for both demand and availability of nitrogen. The goal of this study was to quantify root growth and nitrogen uptake by corn plants (maize) as affected by air...

  20. Effect of hydrogen addition on the deposition of titanium nitride thin films in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, P.; Bhuyan, H.; Diaz-Droguett, D. E.; Guzman, F.; Mändl, S.; Saikia, B. K.; Favre, M.; Maze, J. R.; Wyndham, E.

    2016-06-01

    The properties and performance of thin films deposited by plasma assisted processes are closely related to their manufacturing techniques and processes. The objective of the current study is to investigate the modification of plasma parameters occurring during hydrogen addition in N2  +  Ar magnetron plasma used for titanium nitride thin film deposition, and to correlate the measured properties of the deposited thin film with the bulk plasma parameters of the magnetron discharge. From the Langmuir probe measurements, it was observed that the addition of hydrogen led to a decrease of electron density from 8.6 to 6.2  ×  (1014 m‑3) and a corresponding increase of electron temperature from 6.30 to 6.74 eV. The optical emission spectroscopy study reveals that with addition of hydrogen, the density of argon ions decreases. The various positive ion species involving hydrogen are found to increase with increase of hydrogen partial pressure in the chamber. The thin films deposited were characterized using standard surface diagnostic tools such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Although it was possible to deposit thin films of titanium nitride with hydrogen addition in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma, the quality of the thin films deteriorates with higher hydrogen partial pressures.

  1. Raman and morphology visualization in epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC by Nitrogen or Argon ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Gang; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Graphene is a one-atom-thick planar sheet of carbon atoms that are densely packed into a honeycomb crystal lattice and is attracting tremendous interest since being discovered in 2004. Epitaxial growth of graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) is an effective method to obtain high quality layers. In this work, the effects of irradiation on epitaxial SiC/graphene were studied. The samples were irradiated with Nitrogen and Argon ions at an energy of 200 keV and different fluence with 4 × 1012 ions/cm2 to 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. The results of Raman measurements indicate that ion beam irradiation causes defects and disorder in the graphene crystal structure, and the level of defects increases with increasing ion fluence. Surface morphology images are obtained by atomic force microscope (AFM). This work is valuable for the potential application of epitaxial graphene on SiC in the field of optoelectronics devices.

  2. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  3. PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS AMONG FORMALDEHYDE, CHLORINE, AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical reactions among chlorine, nitrogen dioxide, and formaldehyde were studied, using parts-per-million concentrations in 1 atm of air. The reactant mixtures were irradiated by ultraviolet fluorescent lamps and simultaneously analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared te...

  4. Thermomechanical fatigue behavior of SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb in air and argon environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Verrilli, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    A series of tension-tension, load-controlled thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on a titanium aluminide composite in both laboratory air and a flowing argon environment. Results from these tests show that the environment plays an increasingly important role as applied stress levels are decreased. Differences in damage mechanisms between the two environments were observed which corresponds to observed variations in TMF lives.

  5. A Method to Exchange Air Nitrogen Emission Reductions for Watershed Nitrogen Load Reductions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation of the method developed for the Chesapeake Bay Program to estimate changes in nitrogen loading to Chesapeake due to changes in Bay State state-level nitrogen oxide emissions to support air-water trading by the Bay States. Type for SticsUnder AMAD Application QAPP, QA...

  6. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man; Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-01

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H2O), glycerol (C3H8O3) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  7. GASP - THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HELIUM, METHANE, NEON, NITROGEN, CARBON MONOXIDE, CARBON DIOXIDE, OXYGEN, AND ARGON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, GASP, has been written to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, methane, neon, nitrogen, and oxygen. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, or density as input. In addition, entropy and enthalpy are possible inputs. Outputs are temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, expansion coefficient, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. A special technique is provided to estimate the thermal conductivity near the thermodynamic critical point. GASP is a group of FORTRAN subroutines. The user typically would write a main program that invoked GASP to provide only the described outputs. Subroutines are structured so that the user may call only those subroutines needed for his particular calculations. Allowable pressures range from 0.l atmosphere to 100 to l,000 atmospheres, depending on the fluid. Similarly, allowable pressures range from the triple point of each substance to 300 degrees K to 2000 degrees K, depending on the substance. The GASP package was developed to be used with heat transfer and fluid flow applications. It is particularly useful in applications of cryogenic fluids. Some problems associated with the liquefication, storage, and gasification of liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas can also be studied using GASP. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is available for implementation on IBM 7000 series computers. GASP was developed in 1971.

  8. Oxidation of GaAs Using Helicon-Wave Excited Nitrogen-Oxygen-Argon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Satoshi; Kasahara, Fumio; Hara, Akio; Ikoma, Hideaki

    1998-04-01

    GaAs (100) substrates were exposed to the helicon-wave excited N2 O2 Ar plasma without and with substrate heating at 200°C. The oxide dominantly composed of Ga2O3 and As2O3, was grown on the GaAs substrate using this technique. The chemical composition of this oxide was highly uniform along the thickness of the oxide film. Relatively good capacitance-voltage (C V) characteristics were obtained. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data indicated that gallium nitride (GaN) bonds were formed at the oxide/GaAs interface only with both substrate heating and post-thermal annealing at 200°C for 30 min in a nitrogen ambient. The formation of the GaN/GaAs interface improved the C V characteristics to some extent.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Optical emission spectroscopy in low-temperature plasmas containing argon and nitrogen: determination of the electron temperature and density by the line-ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2010-10-01

    This article reviews a variety of methods to obtain the electron temperature and density by the emission line ratios for low-temperature plasmas containing argon or nitrogen gas. Based on the collisional-radiative model of excited particles, the underlying principle of each of these methods is described, along with the criterion on how to select an appropriate line-ratio method according to the discharge conditions. Limitations on the application of each line-ratio technique are also discussed.

  10. Variable oxygen/nitrogen enriched intake air system for internal combustion engine applications

    DOEpatents

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.; Cole, Roger L.

    1997-01-01

    An air supply control system for selectively supplying ambient air, oxygen enriched air and nitrogen enriched air to an intake of an internal combustion engine includes an air mixing chamber that is in fluid communication with the air intake. At least a portion of the ambient air flowing to the mixing chamber is selectively diverted through a secondary path that includes a selectively permeable air separating membrane device due a differential pressure established across the air separating membrane. The permeable membrane device separates a portion of the nitrogen in the ambient air so that oxygen enriched air (permeate) and nitrogen enriched air (retentate) are produced. The oxygen enriched air and the nitrogen enriched air can be selectively supplied to the mixing chamber or expelled to atmosphere. Alternatively, a portion of the nitrogen enriched air can be supplied through another control valve to a monatomic-nitrogen plasma generator device so that atomic nitrogen produced from the nitrogen enriched air can be then injected into the exhaust of the engine. The oxygen enriched air or the nitrogen enriched air becomes mixed with the ambient air in the mixing chamber and then the mixed air is supplied to the intake of the engine. As a result, the air being supplied to the intake of the engine can be regulated with respect to the concentration of oxygen and/or nitrogen.

  11. Microwave synthesis of aluminum titanate in air and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, M.D.; Agrawal, D.K.; Roy, R.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of microwave heating on solid state reactions is a key issue in materials processing. The microwave-assisted solid state reaction of alumina and anatase to form aluminum titanate was studied. The reaction was carried out in both air and nitrogen atmospheres. It was found that aluminum titanate can be synthesized at 1150{degrees}C in air and at 1050{degrees}C in nitrogen. Dielectric studies show a three-fold increase in the dielectric constant when processed in nitrogen as opposed to air, indicating the evolution of defects. Comparison of the dielectric measurement data shows the onset of the solid state reaction is enhanced when nitrogen processing is employed. XRD analysis of the resulting materials shows that anatase is converted to rutile before the Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} reaction occurs. Additionally, Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} was synthesized from an alumina-defect rutile route in nitrogen. The Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} was nucleated at 600{degrees}C and was about 70% reacted by 900{degrees}C.

  12. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR OXIDES OF NITROGEN (Final, 1982)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation and assessment of scientific information relative to determining the health and welfare effects associated with exposure to various concentrations of nitrogen oxides in ambient air. The document is not intended as a complete, detailed literature rev...

  13. Full title page pp iii Exsolution of nitrogen and argon by methanogenesis in Dutch ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuin, Nienke P. M.; Willemsen, August

    2005-01-01

    Dutch ground water was sampled under high pressure in stainless steel vessels and analysed by gas chromatography for Ar, N 2, CH 4 and O 2. Results show a deficit N 2 and Ar concentrations combined with a high CH 4 concentration that are attributed to the occurrence of exsolution of Ar and N 2 during methanogenesis (the focus of this article). They also show N 2 and Ar in concentrations exceeding the concentration in equilibrium with atmospheric air that are caused by the entrapment and subsequent (partial) dissolution of excess air; in recent ground water, N 2 excesses also are caused by denitrification. PHREEQC model runs of methanogenesis at different pressures, with different amounts of organic matter decomposition and different amounts of initial dissolved N 2 show five features. Firstly, methanogenesis under lower hydrostatic pressures causes more N 2 and Ar exsolution than methanogenesis under higher hydrostatic pressures. Secondly, when little organic matter is decomposed (e.g. 1 mmol/l), the value taken for the fixed total pressure (between 1.05 and 3.0 atm.) influences mostly the N 2 and Ar concentration, and when much organic matter is decomposed (e.g. 16 mmol/l), the value taken for the fixed total pressure influences mostly the CH 4 concentration. Thirdly, in order to explain the observed gas concentrations, not more than 27 mmol of organic matter should be decomposed per litre of soil. Fourthly, the PHREEQC run with initial denitrification (initial N 2 pressure=1.0 atm.) fits the data better than the PHREEQC run without initial denitrification. Fifthly, the maximum total pressure of bubble formation is 3.0 atm. Analysed gas concentration profiles show that the greatest source of CH 4 is found up to approximately 20 m below surface. However, samples with CH 4 partial pressures >0.25 atm. were found up to a maximum average sampling screen depth of 81 m below surface.

  14. Improved installation prototype for measurement of low argon-37 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Sergei; Dubasov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    On-site Inspection (OSI) is a key element of verification of State Parties' compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). An on-site inspection is launched to establish whether or not a nuclear explosion has been carried out. One of the most significant evidence of n underground nuclear explosion (UNE) is detection above background concentrations of argon-37 in near surface air. Argon-37 is formed in large amounts at interaction of neutrons of UNE with the potassium which is a part of the majority of rocks. Its estimated contents for the 100th days after explosion with a energy of 1000 t of TNT near a surface can vary from 1 to 1000 mBq/m3. The background concentrations of argon-37 in subsoil air vary 1 do100 mBq/m3. Traditionally, for argon-37 activity measurement the gas-proportional counters are used. But at Khlopin Radium institute the developments of the new type of highly sensitive and low-background installation capable to provide the required range of measurements of the argon-37 concentration are conducted. The liquid scintillation method of the registration of the low-energetic argon-37 electrons is the basic installation principle and as scintillator, the itself condensed air argon sample is used. Registration of scintillations of liquid argon is made by means of system from 3 PMT which cathodes are cooled near to the temperature of liquid nitrogen together with the measuring chamber in which placed the quartz glass ampule, containing the measured sample of the liquefied argon. For converse the short wavelength photons (λ = 127 nm) of liquid argon scintillations to more long-wave, corresponding to the range of PMT sensitivity, the polymer film with tetra-phenyl-butadiene (TPB) is provided. Even the insignificant impurities of nitrogen, oxygen and others gaseous in the liquid argon samples can to cause the quenching of scintillation, especially their slow components. To account this effect and it influence on change of registration

  15. Neutral gas temperature maps of the pin-to-plate argon micro discharge into the ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.; Majeed, Asif

    2015-03-15

    This study is designed to explore the two dimensional temperature maps of the atmospheric argon discharge consisting of pin-to-plane electrodes supplied by a high voltage DC source. After checking the stability of the micro discharge, the two dimensional image plane focused by a quartz lens was scanned by the fiber probe driven by a 3D Mobile Platform. The rotational and vibrational temperatures are calculated using nitrogen emissions collected by the high resolution spectrometer and high sensitive intensified charge coupled device. The rotational temperature varies from 1558.15 K to 2621.14 K and vibrational temperature varies from 3010.38 K to 3774.69 K, indicating a great temperature gradient due to small discharge size. The temperature maps show a lateral expansion and a sharp truncation in the radial direction. A double layers discharge is identified, where an arc discharge coats the glow discharge.

  16. Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

    2004-09-14

    Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  1. Thermal degradation of cereal straws in air and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ergundenler, A.

    1991-12-31

    The termogravimetric behavior of four cereal straws (wheat, barley, oats, and rye) was examined at three heating rates (10, 20, and 50{degrees}C/min) in air and nitrogen atmospheres. The thermal degradation rate in active and passive pyrolysis zones, the initial degradation temperature, and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were determined for these straws in both atmospheres. Increasing the heating rate increased the thermal degradation rate, and decreased both the initial degradation temperature and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The higher the cellulosic content of the straw, the higher the thermal degradation rate and the initial degradation temperature. Also, higher ash content in the straw resulted in higher residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The thermal degradation rate in active pyrolysis zone was lower in air atmosphere than in nitrogen atmosphere, whereas the thermal degradation rate in passive pyrolysis zone and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were higher in nitrogen atmosphere than in air atmosphere.

  2. Characterization of argon direct-current glow discharge with a longitudinal electric field applied at ambient air

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-01-01

    A direct-current-driven plasma jet is developed by applying a longitudinal electric field on the flowing argon at ambient air. This plasma shows a torch shape with its cross-section increased from the anode to the cathode. Comparison with its counterparts indicates that the gas flow plays a key role in variation of the plasma structure and contributes much to enlarging the plasma volume. It is also found that the circular hollow metal base promotes generation of plasma with a high-power volume density in a limited space. The optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnosis indicates that the plasma comprises many reactive species, such as OH, O, excited N2, and Ar metastables. Examination of the rotational and vibrational temperature indicates that the plasma is under nonequilibrium condition and the excited species OH(A 2Σ+), O(5P), and N2(C 3Πu) are partly generated by energy transfer from argon metastables. The spatially resolved OES of plasma reveals that the negative glow, Faraday dark space, and positive column are distributed across the gas gap. The absence of the anode glow is attributed to the fact that many electrons in the vicinity of the anode follow ions into the positive column due to the ambipolar diffusion in the flowing gas. PMID:25205176

  3. Characterization of argon direct-current glow discharge with a longitudinal electric field applied at ambient air.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-01-01

    A direct-current-driven plasma jet is developed by applying a longitudinal electric field on the flowing argon at ambient air. This plasma shows a torch shape with its cross-section increased from the anode to the cathode. Comparison with its counterparts indicates that the gas flow plays a key role in variation of the plasma structure and contributes much to enlarging the plasma volume. It is also found that the circular hollow metal base promotes generation of plasma with a high-power volume density in a limited space. The optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnosis indicates that the plasma comprises many reactive species, such as OH, O, excited N2, and Ar metastables. Examination of the rotational and vibrational temperature indicates that the plasma is under nonequilibrium condition and the excited species OH(A (2)Σ(+)), O((5)P), and N2(C (3)Πu) are partly generated by energy transfer from argon metastables. The spatially resolved OES of plasma reveals that the negative glow, Faraday dark space, and positive column are distributed across the gas gap. The absence of the anode glow is attributed to the fact that many electrons in the vicinity of the anode follow ions into the positive column due to the ambipolar diffusion in the flowing gas. PMID:25205176

  4. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-31

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H{sub 2}O), glycerol (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O{sub 3}) and diiodomethane (CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  5. Infrared, Raman, and visible spectroscopic studies of Zn and Cd matrix reactions with ozone. Spectra of metal ozonides and oxides in solid argon and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Eleanor S.; Andrews, Lester

    1980-06-01

    Reactions of zinc and cadmium atoms with ozone during condensation with excess nitrogen or argon produced B+O3- ion-pairs having infrared, Raman, and optical spectra similar to the analogous alkali and alkaline earth metal species. Additional infrared and Raman evidence was found for a different B+O3- ion-pair geometry. Mercury arc photolysis reduced ozonide absorptions and produced new 810 cm-1 zinc isotopic triplets which showed the appropriate 18O shifts for ZnO, and a new 719 cm-1 band which showed the proper 18O displacement for CdO. This nitrogen matrix work provides good measures of the yet-to-be-observed gas-phase fundamentals of these high temperature oxides.

  6. Numerical analysis of nitrogen-mixed argon plasma characteristics and injected particle behavior in an ICP torch for ultrafine powder synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Hong, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The ICP (inductively coupled plasma) torches have been extensively used for the synthesis of various ceramics and new materials as effective hot-temperature heat sources in the field of material processing. Here, a numerical model is presented for the analysis of plasma characteristics of an ICP torch and gas mixing effects on the plasma when a nitrogen gas is added into the argon plasma as a carrier or sheath gas at the torch inlet. The fluid equations describing the plasma flow and temperature fields and the diffusions between two different gases are solved along with a magnetic vector potential equation for electromagnetic fields. The trajectory and the temperature change with time for a particle injected into the plasma are also investigated by a plasma-particle interaction model to find out optimum injection conditions for the synthesis of ultra/fine nitride ceramic powders. It is found from the calculations that the nitrogen-mixed argon plasma with a nitrogen carrier gas for the reaction kinetics of nitride synthesis. It is also found that the radial injection through the holes of the tube wall is preferable to the axial injection at the torch inlet for the complete evaporation of injected particle and the effective chemical reaction of reactant vapor with nitrogen. For the radial injection in an ICP torch of 20 cm in axial length, the optimum injection locations and initial velocities of 50-{micro}m aluminum particles are found for synthesizing aluminum nitride are in the range of 6{approximately}12 cm apart from the torch inlet and over 15 m/s, respectively.

  7. Electron properties and air mixing in radio frequency driven argon plasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gessel, Bram van; Bruggeman, Peter; Brandenburg, Ronny

    2013-08-05

    A time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet operated with an Ar mixture is investigated by measuring the electron density and electron temperature using Thomson scattering. The measurements have been performed spatially resolved for two different electrode configurations and as a function of the plasma dissipated power and air concentration admixed to the Ar. Time resolved measurements of electron densities and temperatures during the RF cycle and after plasma power switch-off are presented. Furthermore, the influence of the plasma on the air entrainment into the effluent is studied using Raman scattering.

  8. Defining Nitrogen Kinetics for Air Break in Prebreathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2009-01-01

    Actual tissue nitrogen (N2) kinetics are complex; the uptake and elimination is often approximated with a single half-time compartment in statistical descriptions of denitrogenation [prebreathe (PB)] protocols. Air breaks during PB complicate N2 kinetics. A comparison of symmetrical versus asymmetrical N2 kinetics was performed using the time to onset of hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) as a surrogate for actual venous N2 tension. Published results of 12 tests involving 179 hypobaric exposures in altitude chambers after PB, with and without air breaks, provide the complex protocols from which to model N2 kinetics. DCS survival time for combined control and air breaks were described with an accelerated log logistic model where N2 uptake and elimination before, during, and after the air break was computed with a simple exponential function or a function that changed half-time depending on ambient N2 partial pressure. P1N2-P2 = delta P defined DCS dose for each altitude exposure, where P2 was the test altitude and P1N2 was computed N2 pressure at the beginning of the altitude exposure. The log likelihood (LL) without DCS dose (null model) was -155.6, and improved (best-fit) to -97.2 when dose was defined with a 240 min half-time for both N2 elimination and uptake during the PB. The description of DCS survival time was less precise with asymmetrical N2 kinetics, for example, LL was -98.9 with 240 min half-time elimination and 120 min half-time uptake. The statistical regression described survival time mechanistically linked to symmetrical N2 kinetics during PBs that also included air breaks. The results are data-specific, and additional data may change the conclusion. The regression is useful to compute additional PB time to compensate for an air break in PB within the narrow range of tested conditions.

  9. Energy balance in nanosecond pulse discharges in nitrogen and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2016-02-01

    Kinetic modeling is used to analyze energy partition and energy transfer in nanosecond pulse discharges sustained between two spherical electrodes in nitrogen and air. The modeling predictions are compared with previous time-resolved temperature and {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft(X {}1Σ\\text{g}+,v=0-9\\right) vibrational population measurements by picosecond broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and phase-locked Schlieren imaging. The model shows good agreement with experimental data, reproducing experimental discharge current pulse waveforms, as well as dominant processes of energy transfer in the discharge and the afterglow. Specifically, the results demonstrate that the temperature rise in the plasma occurs in two stages, (i) ‘rapid’ heating on sub-acoustic time scale, dominated by {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft(A {}3Σ\\text{u}+\\right) energy pooling processes, N2(B 3Πg) and N(2P,2D) quenching (in nitrogen), and by quenching of excited electronic states of N2 molecules by O2 (in air), and (ii) ‘slow’ heating due to N2 vibrational relaxation by O atoms (in air), nearly completely missing in nitrogen. Comparison of the model predictions with N2 vibrational level populations confirms that the N2 vibrational temperature rises after the discharge pulse is caused by the ‘downward’ vibrational-vibrational exchange depopulating higher vibrational levels and populating vibrational level v  =  1. The model reproduces temporal dynamics of vibrational level populations and temperature in the discharge and the afterglow, indicating that energy partition among different modes (vibrational, electronic, dissociation, and ionization) is predicted accurately. At the present conditions, energy fraction coupled to the positive column of the discharge filament in air is approximately 50%, with the rest coupled to the cathode layer. Nearly 10% of the total pulse energy is spent on O atom generation, and about 10% is thermalized on a sub-acoustic time scale

  10. Impact of historical air pollution emissions reductions on nitrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughner, C.; Tzortziou, M.; Duffy, M.; Duncan, B. N.; Hains, J.; Pickering, K. E.; Yoshida, Y.; Follette-Cook, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    There have been significant NOx emissions reductions since 2002 in the eastern and central US through a combination of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) NOx State Implementation Plan (SIP) call, which required 22 states and the District of Columbia to regulate NOx emissions to mitigate ozone transport, the NOx Budget Trading Program, subsequent EPA rules, court-orders, and state regulations. As reported by the EPA's National Emissions Inventory (NEI), NOx emissions nationwide have been reduced by 37% between 2002 and 2011. The benefit of these emissions reductions on decreasing nitrogen deposition onto terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems will be presented by comparing CMAQ air quality model simulations for July 2011 from a 12 km domain over the eastern US and a 4 km domain over the Mid-Atlantic with anthropogenic emissions appropriate for 2002 and 2011. Previously we showed that the historical emissions reductions from 2002 to 2011 prevented 9 to 13 ozone standard exceedance days throughout much of the Ohio River Valley and 3 to 9 ozone exceedance days throughout the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area for the month of July 2011. Here, we focus on how the historical emissions reductions decreased nitrogen deposition, subsequently benefiting terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The base case simulation with emissions appropriate for 2011 everywhere was evaluated with ground-, ship-, aircraft-, and satellite-based observations, which include measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) and GeoCAPE-CBODAQ (Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events-Chesapeake Bay Oceanographic Campaign with DISCOVER-AQ) field campaigns.

  11. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  12. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  13. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  14. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  15. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  16. Incident shock-wave characteristics in air, argon, carbon dioxide, and helium in a shock tube with unheated helium driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Jones, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Incident shock-wave velocities were measured in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube, operated as a shock tube, with air, argon, carbon dioxide, and helium as test gases. Unheated helium was used as the driver gas and most data were obtained at pressures of approximately 34 and 54 MN/sq m. A range of pressure ratio across the diaphragm was obtained by varying the quiescent test-gas pressure, for a given driver pressure, from 0.0276 to 34.5 kN/sq m. Single- and double-diaphragm modes of operation were employed and diaphragms of various materials tested. Shock velocity was determined from microwave interferometer measurements, response of pressure transducers positioned along interferometer measurements, response of pressure transducers positioned along the driven section (time-of-arrival gages), and to a lesser extent, measured tube-wall pressure. Velocities obtained from these methods are compared and limitations of the methods discussed. The present results are compared with theory and the effects of diaphragm mode (single or double diaphragm), diaphragm material, heating of the driver gas upon pressurization of the driver section, diaphragm opening time, interface mixing, and two-dimensional (nonplanar) flow are discussed.

  17. Impact of Clean Air Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in Neuse River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated impacts of Clean Air Act (CAA) nitrogen emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) models were used. Two scenar...

  18. 76 FR 46083 - Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ...This proposed rule is being issued as required by a consent decree governing the schedule for completion of this review of the air quality criteria and the secondary national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for oxides of nitrogen and oxides of sulfur. Based on its review, EPA proposes to retain the current nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) secondary......

  19. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2015-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al+ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr2+ ions were dominating in Ar and N2 and Cr+ in O2 atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high-energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were formed at greater distance from the cathode spot and thus less subject to accelerating gradients. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen and oxygen-containing ions were observed in O2 atmosphere. The obtained results are intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the ion energies and charge states in the arc plasma of AlCr composite cathodes in different gas atmospheres as such plasmas are frequently used to deposit thin films and coatings. PMID:26120236

  20. Estimation of Minimal Breakdown Point in a GaP Plasma Structure and Discharge Features in Air and Argon Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, H. Hilal; Tanrıverdi, Evrim

    2016-08-01

    We present gas discharge phenomena in argon and air media using a gallium phosphide (GaP) semiconductor and metal electrodes. The system has a large-diameter ( D) semiconductor and a microscaled adjustable interelectrode gap ( d). Both theoretical and experimental findings are discussed for a direct-current (dc) electric field ( E) applied to this structure with parallel-plate geometry. As one of the main parameters, the pressure p takes an adjustable value from 0.26 kPa to 101 kPa. After collection of experimental data, a new theoretical formula is developed to estimate the minimal breakdown point of the system as a function of p and d. It is proven that the minimal breakdown point in the semiconductor and metal electrode system differs dramatically from that in metal and metal electrode systems. In addition, the surface charge density σ and spatial electron distribution n e are calculated theoretically. Current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) demonstrate that there exist certain negative differential resistance (NDR) regions for small interelectrode separations (i.e., d = 50 μm) and low and moderate pressures between 3.7 kPa and 13 kPa in Ar medium. From the difference of currents in CVCs, the bifurcation of the discharge current is clarified for an applied voltage U. Since the current differences in NDRs have various values from 1 μA to 7.24 μA for different pressures, the GaP semiconductor plasma structure can be used in microwave diode systems due to its clear NDR region.

  1. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d64p (3d54s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6-9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels.

  2. Generation and reactivity of the phenyl cation in cryogenic argon matrices: monitoring the reactions with nitrogen and carbon monoxide directly by IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Michael; Sander, Wolfram

    2006-08-18

    The phenyl cation 1 has been prepared by co-deposition of iodobenzene 6 or bromobenzene 7 with a microwave-induced argon plasma and characterized by IR spectroscopy in cryogenic argon matrices. The cation can clearly be identified by its strongest absorption at 3110 cm(-1) that is rapidly bleached upon visible light irradiation. This characteristic band is observed neither in the conventional photochemistry of 6 or 7 nor in discharge experiments with alkyl halides or chlorobenzene. The latter finding is in line with energetic considerations. According to density functional theory (DFT) computations, the strongest absorption of 1 is caused by a C-H stretching vibration that involves almost entirely the ortho-hydrogens. This is confirmed by isotopic labeling experiments. Co-deposition of halobenzene/N2 mixtures leads to a decrease of the 3110 cm(-1) absorption, whereas several new signals are detected in the 2200-2400 cm(-1) range of the IR spectrum. Annealing of a matrix that contains 1 and 1% N2 leads to an increase of a broad band at 2260 cm(-1) that is assigned to the benzenediazonium ion 2. A sharp signal at 2327 cm(-1) that had previously been assigned to the N-N stretching vibration of 2 is due to molecular nitrogen. The mechanism that triggers the IR activity of N2 is not yet understood. Annealing of a matrix that contains 1 and 0.5% CO leads to an increase of a broad band at 2217 cm(-1) that is considerably stronger than the 2260 cm(-1) absorption of 2. This signal is assigned to the C-O stretching vibration of the benzoyl cation 12, in excellent agreement with previous investigations of 12 in superacidic media. Some consequences of the measured frequencies with regard to bonding in 2 and 12 are discussed. PMID:16901116

  3. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR OXIDES OF NITROGEN (Final, 1993)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This criteria document focuses on a review and assessment of the effects on human health and welfare of the nitrogen oxides, nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and the related compounds, nitrites, nitrates, nitrogenous acids, and nitrosamines. Although the emphasis is ...

  4. Use of a nitrogen-argon plasma to improve adherence of sputtered titanium carbide coatings on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440-C steel surfaces that had been RF-sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that a small partial pressure of nitrogen (about 0.5%) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied on sputter-etched oxidized surfaces or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  5. Defining Nitrogen Kinetics for Air Break in Prebreath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2010-01-01

    Actual tissue nitrogen (N2) kinetics are complex; the uptake and elimination is often approximated with a single half-time compartment in statistical descriptions of denitrogenation [prebreathe(PB)] protocols. Air breaks during PB complicate N2 kinetics. A comparison of symmetrical versus asymmetrical N2 kinetics was performed using the time to onset of hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) as a surrogate for actual venous N2 tension. METHODS: Published results of 12 tests involving 179 hypobaric exposures in altitude chambers after PB, with and without airbreaks, provide the complex protocols from which to model N2 kinetics. DCS survival time for combined control and airbreaks were described with an accelerated log logistic model where N2 uptake and elimination before, during, and after the airbreak was computed with a simple exponential function or a function that changed half-time depending on ambient N2 partial pressure. P1N2-P2 = (Delta)P defined decompression dose for each altitude exposure, where P2 was the test altitude and P1N2 was computed N2 pressure at the beginning of the altitude exposure. RESULTS: The log likelihood (LL) without decompression dose (null model) was -155.6, and improved (best-fit) to -97.2 when dose was defined with a 240 min half-time for both N2 elimination and uptake during the PB. The description of DCS survival time was less precise with asymmetrical N2 kinetics, for example, LL was -98.9 with 240 min half-time elimination and 120 min half-time uptake. CONCLUSION: The statistical regression described survival time mechanistically linked to symmetrical N2 kinetics during PBs that also included airbreaks. The results are data-specific, and additional data may change the conclusion. The regression is useful to compute additional PB time to compensate for an airbreak in PB within the narrow range of tested conditions.

  6. Effects of nitrogen on the apoptosis of and changes in gene expression in human lymphoma U937 cells exposed to argon-based cold atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Yunoki, Tatsuya; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) is known as a source of biologically active agents, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). In the present study, we examined the effects of nitrogen (N2) on the apoptosis of and changes in gene expression in human lymphoma U937 cells exposed to argon (Ar)-CAP. Enormous amounts of hydroxyl (·OH) radicals in aqueous solution were produced using Ar‑CAP generated using a 20 kHz low frequency at 18 kV with a flow rate of 2 l/min. The increase in the levels of ·OH radicals was significantly attenuated by the addition of N2 to Ar gas. On the other hand, the level of total nitrate/nitrite in the supernatant was significantly elevated in the Ar + N2-CAP‑exposed U937 cells. When the cells were exposed to Ar‑CAP, a significant increase in apoptosis was observed, whereas apoptosis was markedly decreased in the cells exposed to Ar + N2-CAP. Microarray and pathway analyses revealed that a newly identified gene network containing a number of heat shock proteins (HSPs), anti-apoptotic genes, was mainly associated with the biological function of the prevention of apoptosis. Quantitative PCR revealed that the expression levels of HSPs were significantly elevated in the cells exposed to Ar + N2-CAP than those exposed to Ar‑CAP. These results indicate that N2 gas in Ar‑CAP modifies the ratio of ROS to RNS, and suppresses the apoptosis induced by Ar‑CAP. The modulation of gaseous conditions in CAP may thus prove to be useful for future clinical applications, such as for switching from a sterilizing mode to cytocidal effect for cancer cells. PMID:27121589

  7. A new DBD-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet source on air or nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnin, Eduard A.; Panarin, Victir A.; Skakun, Victor S.; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Pechenitsin, Dmitrii S.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir S.

    2015-12-01

    The paper proposes a new atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source for operation in air and nitrogen. The conditions for the formation of stable plasma jets 4 cm long are determined. Energy and spectral measurement data are presented.

  8. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeya Sharma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  9. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    PubMed

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  10. A parametric experimental investigation of a scramjet nozzle at Mach 6 with Freon and argon or air used for exhaust simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubbage, James M.; Monta, William J.

    1991-01-01

    A parametric experimental investigation of a scramjet nozzle was conducted with a gas mixture used to simulate the scramjet engine exhaust flow at a free-stream Reynolds number of approximately 6.5 x 10(exp 6) per foot. External nozzle surface angles of 16, 20, and 24 deg were tested with a fixed-length ramp and for cowl internal surface angles of 6 and 12 deg. Pressure data on the external nozzle surface were obtained for mixtures of Freon and argon gases with a ratio of specific heats of about 1.23, which matches that of a scramjet exhaust. Forces and moments were determined by integration of the pressure data. Two nozzle configurations were also tested with air used to simulate the exhaust flow. On the external nozzle surface, lift and thrust forces for air exhaust simulation were approximately half of those for Freon-argon exhaust simulation and the pitching moment was approximately a third. These differences were primarily due to the difference in the ratios of specific heats between the two exhaust simulation gases. A 20 deg external surface angle produced the greatest thrust for a 6 deg cowl internal surface angle. A flow fence significantly increased lift and thrust forces over those for the nozzle without a flow fence.

  11. Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the Neuse River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, M. C.; Knightes, C. D.; Dennis, R. L.; Cooter, E. J.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated impacts of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) NOx emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA from 1990 to 2020. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system were used. CMAQ simulated atmospheric chemical transport and nitrogen deposition. This data was entered into SWAT which simulated watershed hydrology and water quality. Two cases were investigated: one that incorporates CAAA regulatory emissions controls in CMAQ simulation (with) and a second case that does not (without). SWAT model results forecasted a 70% decrease in inorganic nitrogen discharge from the Little River watershed and a 50% decrease for the Nahunta watershed by 2020 under the emission control (with) scenario. Denitrification and plant nitrogen uptake played important roles in nitrogen discharge from each watershed. The nitrogen discharge response time following a change in atmospheric nitrogen deposition was 4 years for the Nahunta watershed and 2 years for the Little River watershed. The longer response time for Nahunta is primarily due to a higher percentage of soybean land cover (22.5% [Nahunta]; 1.6% [Little River]). Agricultural land covers had varied nitrogen response times to changes in atmospheric deposition, particularly for soybean, hay and corn. The studied watersheds retained >80% of all nitrogen delivered by agriculture fertilization, biological fixation and atmospheric deposition.

  12. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR OXIDES OF NITROGEN (External Review Draft, 1991)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The revised air quality criteria document for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) reviews and evaluates the scientific information on the health and welfare effects associated with exposure to concentrations of NO2 found in ambient air. Although the document is not intended to be an exhaust...

  13. Interactions of nitrogenous air pollutants and ozone with California forests

    SciTech Connect

    Bytnerowicz, A.

    1994-12-31

    Ozone has been blamed for the decline of ponderosa and Jeffrey pines in Sierra Nevada and the San Bernardino Mountains. However, also other components of photochemical smog, and especially various nitrogenous compounds, play an important role in the observed changes in California forests. Gaseous nitric acid and peroxyacetyl nitrate may directly effects plants (development of foliar injury) or may predispose foliage to the deleterious effects of acidic wet deposition, elevated levels of the UV-B radiation or other stresses. In addition, the long-term deposition of nitrate and ammonium in wet precipitation, dry deposition of gaseous nitric acid, ammonia, nitrogen oxides, particulate nitrate and ammonium can significantly change nitrogen status of forests in California. Initially, changes in phenology of plants, higher rates of physiological processes, changed plant chemical composition, altered biochemical processes and improved growth can be observed. These changes may lead to increased susceptibility of plants to various abiotic and biotic stresses. After long periods of increased nitrogen deposition, deficiencies of calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, and other nutrients may develop. As a consequence of the elevated N deposition interacting with ozone phytotoxicity, perturbations in normal growth of plants and changes in species composition in forest stands may be taking place. Oversaturating forests with nitrogen may also result in increased nitrate content in ground water of the affected watersheds.

  14. Effect of fuel-air-ratio nonuniformity on emissions of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1981-01-01

    The inlet fuel-air ratio nonuniformity is studied to deterine how nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions are affected. An increase in NOx emissions with increased fuel-air ratio nonuniformity for average equivalence ratios less than 0.7 and a decrease in NOx emissions for average equivalence ratios near stoichiometric is predicted. The degree of uniformityy of fuel-air ratio profiles that is necessary to achieve NOx emissions goals for actual engines that use lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion systems is determined.

  15. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS Pt. 50, App. S Appendix S to Part 50—Interpretation of the Primary... be submitted to EPA's Air Quality System (AQS), or otherwise available to EPA, meeting...

  16. Pitot survey of exhaust flow field of a 2-D scramjet nozzle at Mach 6 with air or freon and argon used for exhaust simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monta, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A pitot-rake survey of the simulated exhaust of a half-span scramjet nozzle model was conducted in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel to provide an additional data set for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code comparisons. A wind-tunnel model was tested with a 26-tube pitot rake that could be manually positioned along the mid-semispan plane of the model. The model configuration had an external expansion surface of 20 degrees and an internal cowl expansion of 12 degrees; tests were also performed with a flow fence. Tests were conducted at a free-stream Reynolds number of approximately 6.5 x 10(exp 6) per foot and a model angle of attack of -0.75 degrees. The two exhaust gas mediums that were tested were air and a Freon 12-argon mixture. Each medium was tested at two jet total pressures at approximately 28 and 14 psia. This document presents the flow-field survey results in graphical as well as tabular form, and several observations concerning the results are discussed. The surveys reveal the major expected flow-field characteristics for each test configuration. For a 50-percent freon 12 and 50-percent argon mixture by volume (Fr-Ar), the exhaust jet pressures were slightly higher than those for air. The addition of a flow fence slightly raised the pitot pressure for the Fr-Ar mixture, but it produced little change for air. For the Fr-Ar exhaust, the plume was larger and the region between the shock wave and plume was smaller.

  17. Torrefaction and low temperature carbonization of oil palm fiber and Eucalyptus in nitrogen and air atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ke-Miao; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Liu, Shih-Hsien; Lin, Ta-Chang

    2012-11-01

    Torrefaction is a pretreatment method for upgrading biomass as solid fuels. To provide flexible operations for effectively upgrading biomass at lower costs, the aim of this study was to investigate the properties of oil palm fiber and eucalyptus pretreated in nitrogen and air atmospheres at temperatures of 250-350°C for 1h. Based on energy and solid yield and introducing an energy-mass co-benefit index (EMCI), oil palm fiber pretreatment under nitrogen at 300°C provided the solid fuel with higher energy density and less volume compared to other temperatures. Pretreatment of oil palm fiber in air resulted in the fuel with low solid and energy yields and is therefore not recommended. For eucalyptus, nitrogen and air can be employed to upgrade the biomass, and the suggested temperatures are 325 and 275°C, respectively. PMID:22940305

  18. “Exchanges of Aggregate Air Nitrogen Emissions and Watershed Nitrogen Loads”

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approach has been developed to define transfer coefficients that can be used to convert changes in air emissions to changes in air deposition and subsequently to changes in loads delivered to the Bay. This approach uses a special CMAQ version that quantitatively attributes wa...

  19. 75 FR 20595 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: First External Review Draft (75 FR 11877; March 12, 2010... AGENCY Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides... a proposal addressing the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and sulfur oxides (SO X ) secondary...

  20. Implications of Nitrogen-Climate Interactions for Ambient Air Pollution and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeuber, R.; Peel, J. L.; Garcia, V.; Neas, L.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOX) are important components of ambient and indoor air pollution and are emitted from a range of combustion sources, including on-road mobile sources, electric power generators, and non-road mobile sources. While anthropogenic sources dominate, NOX is also formed by lightning and wildland fires and is emitted by soil. Reduced nitrogen (e.g., ammonia, NH3) is also emitted by various sources, including fertilizer application and animal waste decomposition. NOX, ozone and PM2.5 pollution related to atmospheric emissions of nitrogen and other pollutants can cause premature death and a variety of serious health effects. Climate change is expected to impact how nitrogen-related pollutants affect human health. For example, changes in temperature and precipitation patterns are projected to both lengthen the ozone season and intensify high ozone episodes in some areas. Other climate-related changes may increase the atmospheric release of nitrogen compounds through impacts on wildfire regimes, soil emissions, and biogenic emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. This session will examine the potential human health implications of climate change and nitrogen cycle interactions related to ambient air pollution.

  1. 76 FR 52283 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions From Glass Melting Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... (NO X ) emissions from glass melting furnaces. EPA is approving these revisions to reduce NO X emissions from glass melting furnaces in accordance with the requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA)....

  2. 76 FR 34021 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions From Glass Melting Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... oxide (NO X ) emissions from glass melting furnaces. This action is being taken under the Clean Air Act... revision to its State Implementation Plan for the control of NO X from glass melting furnaces....

  3. MANURE NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS IN AIR, SOIL AND CROPS ON DAIRY FARMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Only 25 to 35 % of the crude protein (CP) consumed by dairy cows is converted into milk. Such poor use of dietary CP may be due to inefficiencies associated with forage nitrogen (N) capture and metabolism. Manure N excreted in feces and urine, and the transformation of manure N in air, soil and crop...

  4. A Passive Sampler for Determination of Nitrogen Dioxide in Ambient Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Dan; Lin, Lianzhi; Yuan, Hongyan; Choi, Martin M. F.; Chan, Winghong

    2005-01-01

    A passive sampler that provides a convenient, simple, and fast method for nitrogen dioxide determination is proposed. The experiment can be modified for determinations of other air pollutants like formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide for hands-on experience for students studying environmental pollution problems.

  5. Chapter 7: Impact of Nitrogen and Climate Change Interactions on Ambient Air Pollution and Human Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen oxides (NOX) are important components of ambient and indoor air pollution and are emitted from a range of combustion sources, including on-road mobile sources, electric power generators, and non-road mobile sources. While anthropogenic sources dominate, NOX is also forme...

  6. 75 FR 32858 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Control of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From Industrial Boilers and Process Heaters at Petroleum Refineries Correction...

  7. Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in Neuse River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated impacts of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) NOx emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA from 1990 to 2020. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-...

  8. The Condensation Line of Air and the Heats of Vaporization of Oxygen and Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furukawa, George T; Mccoskey, Robert E

    1953-01-01

    The condensation pressure of air was determined over the range of temperature from 60 to 85 K. The experimental results were slightly higher than the calculated values based on the ideal solution law. Heat of vaporization of oxygen was determined at four temperatures ranging from about 68 to 91 K and of nitrogen similarly at four temperatures ranging from 62 to 78 K.

  9. Contribution of nitrogen atoms and ions to the luminescence emission during femotosecond filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-Yu; Li, Shu-Chang; Sui, Lai-Zhi; Jiang, Yuan-Fei; Chen, An-Min; Jin, Ming-Xing

    2016-01-01

    During femtosecond filamentation in air, nitrogen molecules and corresponding molecular ions undergo dissociation due to the high intensity of laser pulses, generating nitrogen atoms and atomic ions. The generated atoms and atomic ions emit luminescence in the UV range, which superposes on those emissions for the neutral and ionic nitrogen molecules. Here we report on a significant difference between the emission behavior of the 391-nm line and the other spectral lines under different pump laser polarizations. We attribute this difference to the contribution of the atomic ions to the luminescence emission around 391 nm. The difference becomes more evident in tightly focusing cases, providing an indirect but effective evidence for the dissociation of nitrogen molecular ions.

  10. GASP: A computer code for calculating the thermodynamic and transport properties for ten fluids: Parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. [enthalpy, entropy, thermal conductivity, and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Baron, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV subprogram called GASP is discussed which calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties for 10 pure fluids: parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. The pressure range is generally from 0.1 to 400 atmospheres (to 100 atm for helium and to 1000 atm for hydrogen). The temperature ranges are from the triple point to 300 K for neon; to 500 K for carbon monoxide, oxygen, and fluorine; to 600 K for methane and nitrogen; to 1000 K for argon and carbon dioxide; to 2000 K for hydrogen; and from 6 to 500 K for helium. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature and density as input conditions along with pressure, and either entropy or enthalpy. The properties available in any combination as output include temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. The subprogram design is modular so that the user can choose only those subroutines necessary to the calculations.

  11. Inorganic nitrogenous air pollutants, atmospheric nitrogen deposition and their potential ecological impacts in remote areas of western North America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytnerowicz, A.; Fenn, M. E.; Fraczek, W.; Johnson, R.; Allen, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    Dry deposition of gaseous inorganic nitrogenous (N) air pollutants plays an important role in total atmospheric N deposition and its ecological effects in the arid and semi-arid ecosystems. Passive samplers and denuder/ filter pack systems have been used for determining ambient concentrations of ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and nitric acid vapor (HNO3) in the topographically complex remote areas of the western United States and Canada. Concentrations of the measured pollutants varied significantly between the monitoring areas. Highest NH3, NO2 and HNO3 levels occurred in southern California areas downwind of the Los Angeles Basin and in the western Sierra Nevada impacted by emissions from the California Central Valley and the San Francisco Bay area. Strong spatial gradients of N pollutants were also present in southeastern Alaska due to cruise ship emissions and in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region in Canada affected by oil exploitation. Distribution of these pollutants has been depicted by maps generated by several geostatistical methodologies within the ArcGIS Geostatistical Analyst (ESRI, USA). Such maps help to understand spatial and temporal changes of air pollutants caused by various anthropogenic activities and locally-generated vs. long range-transported air pollutants. Pollution distribution maps for individual N species and gaseous inorganic reactive nitrogen (Nr) have been developed for the southern portion of the Sierra Nevada, Lake Tahoe Basin, San Bernardino Mountains, Joshua Tree National Park and the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. The N air pollution data have been utilized for estimates of dry and total N deposition by a GIS-based inferential method specifically developed for understanding potential ecological impacts in arid and semi-arid areas. The method is based on spatial and temporal distribution of concentrations of major drivers of N dry deposition, their surface deposition velocities and stomatal conductance values

  12. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-11-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  13. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  14. Ecological effects of nitrogen and sulfur air pollution in the US: what do we know?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greaver, Tara L.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Herrick, Jeffrey D.; Barber, Mary C.; Baron, Jill S.; Cosby, Bernard J.; Deerhake, Marion E.; Dennis, Robin L.; Dubois, Jean-Jacque B.; Goodale, Christine L.; Herlihy, Alan T.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Liu, Lingli; Lynch, Jason A.; Novak, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Four decades after the passage of the US Clean Air Act, air-quality standards are set to protect ecosystems from damage caused by gas-phase nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) compounds, but not from the deposition of these air pollutants to land and water. Here, we synthesize recent scientific literature on the ecological effects of N and S air pollution in the US. Deposition of N and S is the main driver of ecosystem acidification and contributes to nutrient enrichment in many natural systems. Although surface-water acidification has decreased in the US since 1990, it remains a problem in many regions. Perturbations to ecosystems caused by the nutrient effects of N deposition continue to emerge, although gas-phase concentrations are generally not high enough to cause phytotoxicity. In all, there is overwhelming evidence of a broad range of damaging effects to ecosystems in the US under current air quality conditions.

  15. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  16. Interaction of Streamer Discharges in Air and Other Oxygen-Nitrogen Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Luque, A.; Hundsdorfer, W.; Ebert, U.

    2008-08-15

    The interaction of streamers in nitrogen-oxygen mixtures such as air is studied. First, an efficient method for fully three-dimensional streamer simulations in multiprocessor machines is introduced. With its help, we find two competing mechanisms how two adjacent streamers can interact: through electrostatic repulsion and through attraction due to nonlocal photoionization. The nonintuitive effects of pressure and of the nitrogen-oxygen ratio are discussed. As photoionization is experimentally difficult to access, we finally suggest to measure it indirectly through streamer interactions.

  17. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  18. Structure, optical, and electrical properties of indium tin oxide thin films prepared by sputtering at room temperature and annealed in air or nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, C.; Herrero, J.

    2007-04-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films have been grown onto soda-lime glass substrates by sputtering at room temperature with various oxygen to argon partial pressure ratios. After deposition, the samples have been annealed at temperatures ranging from 100 to 500 degree sign C in nitrogen or in air. The structure, optical, and electrical characteristics of the ITO coatings have been analyzed as a function of the deposition and the annealing parameters by x-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, and Hall effect measurements. It has been found that the as-grown amorphous layers crystallize in the cubic structure by heating above 200 degree sign C. Simultaneously, the visible optical transmittance increases and the electrical resistance decreases, in proportions that depend mainly on the sputtering conditions. The lowest resistivity values have been obtained by annealing at 400 degree sign C in nitrogen, where the highest carrier concentrations are achieved, related to oxygen vacancy creation. Some relationships between the analyzed properties have been established, showing the dependence of the cubic lattice distortion and the infrared optical characteristics on the carrier concentration.

  19. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National primary and secondary ambient... PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS § 50.11 National primary and secondary ambient air... national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  20. Microstructure and DC electrical conductivity of spinel nickel ferrite sintered in air and nitrogen atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Baogang; Zhou, Kechao; Li, Zhiyou; Zhang, Dou; Zhang, Lei

    2010-11-15

    In recent years, the development of inert anode materials has gained considerable attention because such materials are capable of producing only environment-friendly O{sub 2} and saving energy during aluminum electrolysis. Nickel ferrite was prepared by a solid-state reaction as the inert anode in this study and its microstructures and direct current conductivities were analyzed in detail regarding the effects of different sintering atmospheres. A single-phase spinel structure was confirmed for all samples by X-ray powder diffraction. The grain sizes and the relative densities of the samples sintered in nitrogen increased by over 7 {mu}m and 10.8%, respectively, compared to those sintered in air. The direct current conductivities of the samples sintered in nitrogen showed a drastic increase compared to those sintered in air, believed to be due to the effects of increased Fe{sup 2+} ion concentration at octahedral sites and the increase of the relative density.

  1. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [evaluation of methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Samples of liquid oxygen, high pressure nitrogen, low pressure nitrogen, and missile grade air were studied to determine the hydrocarbon concentrations. Concentration of the samples was achieved by adsorption on a molecular sieve and activated charcoal. The trapped hydrocarbons were then desorbed and transferred to an analytical column in a gas chromatograph. The sensitivity of the method depends on the volume of gas passed through the adsorbent tubes. The value of the method was verified through recoverability and reproducibility studies. The use of this method enables LOX, GN2, and missile grade air systems to be routinely monitored to determine low level increases in specific hydrocarbon concentration that could lead to potentially hazardous conditions.

  2. Linking agricultural crop management and air quality models for regional to national-scale nitrogen assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooter, E. J.; Bash, J. O.; Benson, V.; Ran, L.

    2012-10-01

    While nitrogen (N) is an essential element for life, human population growth and demands for energy, transportation and food can lead to excess nitrogen in the environment. A modeling framework is described and implemented to promote a more integrated, process-based and system-level approach to the estimation of ammonia (NH3) emissions which result from the application of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers to agricultural soils in the United States. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate plant demand-driven fertilizer applications to commercial cropland throughout the continental US. This information is coupled with a process-based air quality model to produce continental-scale NH3 emission estimates. Regional cropland NH3 emissions are driven by the timing and amount of inorganic NH3 fertilizer applied, soil processes, local meteorology, and ambient air concentrations. Initial fertilizer application often occurs when crops are planted. A state-level evaluation of EPIC-simulated, cumulative planted area compares well with similar USDA reported estimates. EPIC-annual, inorganic fertilizer application amounts also agree well with reported spatial patterns produced by others, but domain-wide the EPIC values are biased about 6% low. Preliminary application of the integrated fertilizer application and air quality modeling system produces a modified geospatial pattern of seasonal NH3 emissions that improves current simulations of observed atmospheric particle nitrate concentrations. This modeling framework provides a more dynamic, flexible, and spatially and temporally resolved estimate of NH3 emissions than previous factor-based NH3 inventories, and will facilitate evaluation of alternative nitrogen and air quality policy and adaptation strategies associated with future climate and land use changes.

  3. Linking agricultural crop management and air quality models for regional to national-scale nitrogen assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooter, E. J.; Bash, J. O.; Benson, V.; Ran, L.

    2012-05-01

    While nitrogen (N) is an essential element for life, human population growth and demands for energy, transportation and food can lead to excess nitrogen in the environment. A modeling framework is described and implemented, to promote a more integrated, process-based and system-level approach to the estimation of ammonia (NH3) emissions resulting from the application of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers to agricultural soils in the United States. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate plant demand-driven fertilizer applications to commercial cropland throughout the continental US. This information is coupled with a process-based air quality model to produce continental-scale NH3 emission estimates. Regional cropland NH3 emissions are driven by the timing and amount of fertilizer applied, local meteorology, and ambient air concentrations. An evaluation of EPIC-simulated crop management activities associated with fertilizer application at planting compared with similar USDA state-level event estimates shows temporally progressive spatial patterns that agree well with one another. EPIC annual inorganic fertilizer application amounts also agree well with reported spatial patterns produced by others, but domain-wide the EPIC values are biased about 6 % low. Preliminary application of the integrated fertilizer application and air quality modeling system produces a modified geospatial pattern of seasonal NH3 emissions that improves current simulations of observed atmospheric nitrate concentrations. This modeling framework provides a more dynamic, flexible, and spatially and temporally resolved estimate of NH3 emissions than previous factor-based NH3 inventories, and will facilitate evaluation of alternative nitrogen and air quality policy and adaptation strategies associated with future climate and land use changes.

  4. Dissociation-excitation reactions of argon metastables with carbon dioxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a study showing that a metastable argon-carbon dioxide reaction results in dissociation of carbon dioxide and electronic excitation of one of the products, carbon monoxide or oxygen. A flow system using a 2450-MHz discharge was used to produce metastable argon atoms. Metastable argon in the afterglow was confirmed by adding nitrogen to the afterglow. Without addition of carbon dioxide no argon line emission, or any other emission, is observed from the reaction zone. Absence of argon line emission produced by recombination indicates the absence of charged species.

  5. Performance analysis of small capacity liquid nitrogen generator based on Joule-Thomson refrigerator coupled with air separation membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska-Hajnus, Agnieszka; Chorowski, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Joule - Thomson small capacity refrigerators supplied with gas mixture are studied theoretically and experimentally for a variety of applications. They can be especially promising when coupled with membrane air separators. We present liquid nitrogen generation system based on Joule - Thomson cooler joined with air separation membrane. Hollow fiber membrane is used for nitrogen separation from compressed and purified atmospheric air. Joule-Thomson refrigerator operates with a dedicated nitrogen - hydrocarbons mixture and provides a cooling power used for the separated nitrogen liquefaction. Special attention has been paid to a heat exchanger coupling the Joule- Thomson refrigerator with the membrane air separator. This paper describes the system design, the procedure of its working parameters optimization and tests results.

  6. Passive dosimeters for nitrogen dioxide in personal/indoor air sampling: A review

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang Ho; Morandi, Maria T.; Weisel, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of nitrogen dioxide concentrations in both outdoor and indoor environments, including personal exposures, is a fundamental step for linking atmospheric nitrogen dioxide levels to potential health and ecological effects. The measurement has been conducted generally in two ways: active (pumped) sampling and passive (diffusive) sampling. Diffusion samplers, initially developed and used for workplace air monitoring, have been found to be useful and cost-effective alternatives to conventional pumped samplers for monitoring ambient, indoor and personal exposures at the lower concentrations found in environmental settings. Since the 1970s, passive samplers have been deployed for ambient air monitoring in urban and rural sites, and to determine personal and indoor exposure to NO2. This article reviews the development of NO2 passive samplers, the sampling characteristics of passive samplers currently available, and their application in ambient and indoor air monitoring and personal exposure studies. The limitations and advantages of the various passive sampler geometries (i.e., tube, badge, and radial type) are also discussed. This review provides researchers and risk assessors with practical information about NO2 passive samplers, especially useful when designing field sampling strategies for exposure and indoor/outdoor air sampling. PMID:18446185

  7. Spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering of ultraviolet light in nitrogen, dry air, and moist air.

    PubMed

    Witschas, Benjamin; Vieitez, Maria O; van Duijn, Eric-Jan; Reitebuch, Oliver; van de Water, Willem; Ubachs, Wim

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric lidar techniques for the measurement of wind, temperature, and optical properties of aerosols rely on the exact knowledge of the spectral line shape of the scattered laser light on molecules. We report on spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering measurements in the ultraviolet at a scattering angle of 90 degrees on N(2) and on dry and moist air. The measured line shapes are compared to the Tenti S6 model, which is shown to describe the scattering line shapes in air at atmospheric pressures with small but significant deviations. We demonstrate that the line profiles of N(2) and air under equal pressure and temperature conditions differ significantly, and that this difference can be described by the S6 model. Moreover, we show that even a high water vapor content in air up to a volume fraction of 3.6vol.% has no influence on the line shape of the scattered light. The results are of relevance for the future spaceborne lidars on ADM-Aeolus (Atmospheric Dynamics Mission) and EarthCARE (Earth Clouds, Aerosols, and Radiation Explorer). PMID:20676176

  8. Nitrogen mineralization from anaerobically digested centrifuge cake and aged air-dried biosolids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kuldip; Hundal, Lakhwinder S; Cox, Albert E; Granato, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to estimate nitrogen (N) mineralization of anaerobically digested centrifuge cake from the Stickney Water Reclamation Plant (SWRP) and Calumet Water Reclamation Plant (CWRP), lagoon-aged air-dried biosolids from the CWRP, and Milorganite at three rates of application (0, 12.5 and 25 Mg ha(-1)). The N mineralized varied among biosolids as follows: Milorganite (44%) > SWRP centrifuge cake (35%) > CWRP centrifuge cake (31%) > aged air-dried (13%). The N mineralized in the SWRP cake (32%) and CWRP aged air-dried biosolids (12%) determined from the 15N study were in agreement with the first study. The N mineralization value for centrifuge cake biosolids observed in our study is higher than the value given in the Part 503 rule and Illinois Part 391 guidelines. These results will be used to fine-tune biosolids application rate to match crop N demand without compromising yield while minimizing any adverse effect on the environment. PMID:25327023

  9. The Structure of W/C (0.15 < γ < 0.8) Multilayers Annealed in Argon or Air.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, J; Chao, B S; Ovshinsky, S R; Allred, D D

    1996-01-01

    this group and, more importantly, mostly involves increases in the thickness of the high Z components. Samples annealed in air at temperatures below 300°C are progressively destroyed by the oxidation of both tungsten and carbide layers. Encapsulation of similar multilayers with a thin (30 nm) dielectric layer of any of several types can retard oxidation to 600°C. The silicon-containing encapsulants generally perform better. Failure at this temperature is seen to occur from pinhole formation. PMID:21307510

  10. Observation of nuclear spin species conversion inside the 1593 cm -1 structure of H 2O trapped in argon matrices: Nitrogen impurities and the H 2O:N 2 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardanaud, Cédric; Vasserot, Anne-Marie; Michaut, Xavier; Abouaf-Marguin, L.

    2008-02-01

    We have investigated, at high resolution (0.03 cm -1), the 1593 cm -1 structure observed in the IR absorption spectrum of water trapped in solid argon doped with nitrogen. It exhibits a doublet at 1592.59 ± 0.05 and 1593.08 ± 0.05 cm -1 and a line centered at 1592.93 ± 0.05 cm -1. The central component, which increases irreversibly upon annealing and when the concentration is increased, is due to the proton acceptor submolecule of the H 2O dimer, as mentioned in the literature. The doublet is assigned to the H 2O:N 2 complex. After a fast cooling of the sample from 20 to 4 K, the low frequency line of the doublet decreases with time and the high frequency one increases, the total integrated absorption increasing slightly. The ratio of the integrated intensities between the low frequency component and the high frequency one reaches a constant limit of 0.5 ± 0.1 at infinite time. This time behavior, perfectly exponential with a time constant τ of about 680 min, is reproducible. As the nitrogen molecule cannot rotate in an argon substitutional site, and as the H 2O submolecule seems to preserve somewhat its identity, this is interpreted as nuclear spin species conversion between ortho and para states of the H 2O submolecule within the complex. The order of magnitude of the energy difference between the ortho and para lowest levels, about 5 cm -1, is too weak to imply any, even very hindered, rotational motion of H 2O, but it could be the energy range of a tunneling effect. When the temperature is increased, the two components coalesce at 25 K into a single symmetrical line pointing at 1593.3 cm -1 and the conversion time shortens dramatically. An Arrhenius plot leads to a weak activation energy of the conversion process (about 30 cm -1). A possible geometry of the complex in solid argon, different from the gas phase one, is proposed.

  11. Photocatalytic equipment with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide for air cleaning and disinfecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son Le, Thanh; Buu Ngo, Quoc; Dung Nguyen, Viet; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Hien Dao, Trong; Tin Tran, Xuan; Kabachkov, E. N.; Balikhin, I. L.

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO2 nanoparticle photocatalysts were synthesized by a sol-gel procedure using tetra-n-butyl orthotitanate as a titanium precursor and urea as a nitrogen source. Systematic studies for the preparation parameters and their impact on the material's structure were carried out by multiple techniques: thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetric analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry showed that the nitrogen-doped TiO2 calcined at 500 °C for 3 h exhibited a spherical form with a particle size about 15-20 nm and crystal phase presented a mixture of 89.12% anatase. The obtained product was deposited on a porous quartz tube (D = 74 mm l = 418 mm) to manufacture an air photocatalytic cleaner as a prototype of the TIOKRAFT company's equipment. The created air cleaner was able to remove 60% of 10 ppm acetone within 390 min and degrade 98.5% of bacteria (total aerobic bacteria and fungi, 300 cfu m-3) within 120 min in a 10 m3 box. These photodegradation activities of N-TiO2 are higher than that of the commercial nano-TiO2 (Skyspring Inc., USA, particle size of 5-10 nm).

  12. Laser-rf creation and diagnostics of seeded atmospheric pressure air and nitrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Siqi; Denning, C. Mark; Scharer, John E.

    2008-07-01

    A laser initiation and radio frequency (rf) sustainment technique has been developed and improved from our previous work to create and sustain large-volume, high-pressure air and nitrogen plasmas. This technique utilizes a laser-initiated, 15 mTorr partial pressure tetrakis (dimethylamino) ethylene seed plasma with a 75 Torr background gas pressure to achieve high-pressure air/nitrogen plasma breakdown and reduce the rf power requirement needed to sustain the plasma. Upon the laser plasma initiation, the chamber pressure is raised to 760 Torr in 0.5 s through a pulsed gas valve, and the end of the chamber is subsequently opened to the ambient air. The atmospheric-pressure plasma is then maintained with the 13.56 MHz rf power. Using this technique, large-volume (1000 cm{sup 3}), high electron density (on the order of 10{sup 11-12} cm{sup -3}), 760 Torr air and nitrogen plasmas have been created while rf power reflection is minimized during the entire plasma pulse utilizing a dynamic matching method. This plasma can project far away from the antenna region (30 cm), and the rf power budget is 5 W/cm{sup 3}. Temporal evolution of the plasma electron density and total electron-neutral collision frequency during the pulsed plasma is diagnosed using millimeter wave interferometry. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) aided by SPECAIR, a special OES simulation program for air-constituent plasmas, is used to analyze the radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma. Rotational and vibrational temperatures of 4400-4600{+-}100 K are obtained from the emission spectra from the N{sub 2}(2+) and N{sub 2}{sup +}(1-) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results. Based on the relation between the electron collision frequency and the neutral density, utilizing millimeter wave interferometry, the electron temperature of the 760 Torr nitrogen plasma is found to be 8700{+-}100 K (0.75{+-}0.1 eV). Therefore, the plasma

  13. Decomposition of nitric oxide in a hot nitrogen stream to synthesize air for hypersonic wind tunnel combustion testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumdieck, J. F.; Zlatarich, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    A clean source of high enthalpy air was obtained from the exothermic decomposition of nitric oxide in the presence of strongly heated nitrogen. A nitric oxide jet was introduced into a confined coaxial nitrogen stream. Measurements were made of the extent of mixing and reaction. Experimental results are compared with one- and two-dimensional chemical kinetics computations. Both analyses predict much lower reactivity than was observed experimentally. Inlet nitrogen temperatures above 2400 K were sufficient to produce experimentally a completely reacted gas stream of synthetic air.

  14. CO{sub 2} laser welding of duplex and super-duplex stainless steels (the effect of argon-nitrogen assist-gas mixtures)

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.; Reed, R.C.; Camyab, A.

    1996-12-31

    Continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser welds have been fabricated on duplex and super duplex stainless steel substrates at a power of 3.5 kW. The work has examined the influence of Ar-N{sub 2} assist-gas mixtures on weld metal composition and microstructure. Welding in pure argon leads to reduction in the Cr, Ni, Mo and N content of the weld metal and a significant decrease in austenite volume fraction relative to the baseplate. Relative to welding in Ar, the use of a N{sub 2} bearing assist-gas restores the Cr, Ni and Mo levels to those found in the baseplate at the welding speeds employed. Moreover, the N{sub 2} bearing assist-gases result in an increase in the weld metal N content and austenite volume fraction relative to welding in pure Ar.

  15. Air pollution and watershed research in the central Sierra Nevada of California: nitrogen and ozone.

    PubMed

    Hunsaker, Carolyn; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Auman, Jessica; Cisneros, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining healthy forests is the major objective for the Forest Service scientists and managers working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Air pollution, specifically ozone (O3) and nitrogenous (N) air pollutants, may severely affect the health of forest ecosystems in the western U.S. Thus, the monitoring of air pollution concentration and deposition levels, as well as studies focused on understanding effects mechanisms, are essential for evaluation of risks associated with their presence. Such information is essential for development of proper management strategies for maintaining clean air, clean water, and healthy ecosystems on land managed by the Forest Service. We report on two years of research in the central Sierra Nevada of California, a semi-arid forest at elevations of 1100-2700 m. Information on O3 and N air pollutants is obtained from a network of 18 passive samplers. We relate the atmospheric N concentration to N concentrations in streams, shallow soil water, and bulk deposition collectors within the Kings River Experimental Watershed. This watershed also contains an intensive site that is part of a recent Forest Service effort to calculate critical loads for N, sulfur, and acidity to forest ecosystems. The passive sampler design allows for extensive spatial measurements while the watershed experiment provides intensive spatial data for future analysis of ecosystem processes. PMID:17450299

  16. Review of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide: Risk and Exposure Assessment Planning Document

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting a review of the air quality criteria and the primary (health-based) national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The major phases of the process for reviewing NAAQS include the following: (...

  17. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  18. Potential Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the Neuse River Basin: a Modeling Investigation Using CMAQ and SWAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been extensive analysis of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) regulation impacts to changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition; however, few studies have focused on watershed nitrogen transfer particularly regarding long-term predictions. In this study, we investigated impa...

  19. Effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas-turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen from a gas-turbine combustor. Combustor inlet-air temperature ranged from 450 F to 1050 F. The tests were run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NO sub x emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet-air humidity at a constant exponential rate of 19 percent per mass percent water vapor in the air. This decrease of NO sub x emission index with increasing humidity was found to be independent of inlet-air temperature.

  20. Nitrogen metastable (N2(A3 Σu + )) in a cold argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet: Shielding and gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseni, Sylvain; Bruggeman, Peter J.; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) metastable species are detected and measured in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet by laser induced fluorescence. A shielding device is used to change the ambient conditions additionally to the feeding gas composition. Varying the amount of N2 and air admixed to the feeding gas as well as changing the shielding gas from N2 to air reveals that the highest N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) is achieved in the case of air admixtures in spite of the enhanced collisional quenching due to the presence of O2. The reasons for these observations are discussed in detail.

  1. Comparison of silver nanoparticles stored under air or argon with respect to the induction of intracellular free radicals and toxic effects toward keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C; Werner, Luise; Epple, Matthias; Diendorf, Joerg; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Vogt, Annika; Rancan, Fiorenza

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial infections decreased considerably after the discovery of antibiotics. Nevertheless, because of the rising rate of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains, the search for new bactericidal agents has again become a crucial topic in clinical medicine. Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have a huge potential in dermatology and wound care management because of their ability to release silver ions (Ag(+) ions) in a prolonged and sustained way. However, negative effects of silver on the patient's cells should not be underestimated. Furthermore, it has been controversially discussed whether AgNP are responsible for nanoparticle-specific outcomes or not. In this study, we investigated the effects of AgNP on human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) in order to better understand the mechanisms of cytotoxicity and to improve the use of this highly reactive biocide in wound healing. We found that most of the cells with internalized AgNP displayed the typical morphological signs of apoptosis. The cell viability assay (XTT) showed concentration-dependent toxic effects of the AgNP toward HaCaT cells. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by AgNP was investigated in cell suspensions by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In order to distinguish between the effects of Ag(+) ions released during AgNP storage and those of Ag(+) ions released after nanoparticle application, we compared AgNP stored under air (O2) with AgNP stored under argon (Ar). Dispersions of AgNP stored under Ar have a low content of Ag(+) ions because of the absence of oxygen which is needed for oxidative dissolution. The results show that Ag(+) ions released during particle storage are responsible for most of the ROS produced during 1h incubation with the cells. AgNP (Ar) also induced intracellular ROS but to a much smaller extent compared to AgNP (O2). These findings highlight the complexity of experiments to assess the toxicity of AgNP and suggest the

  2. Biofiltration of air contaminated by styrene: Effect of nitrogen supply, gas flow rate, and inlet concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Jorio, H.; Bibeau, L.; Heitz, M.

    2000-05-01

    The biofiltration process is a promising technology for the treatment of dilute styrene emissions in air. The efficiency of this process is however strongly dependent upon various operational parameters such as the filter bed characteristics, nutrient supplies, input contaminant concentrations, and gas flow rates. The biofiltration of air containing styrene vapors was therefore investigated, employing a novel biomass filter material, in two identical but separate laboratory scale biofiltration units (units 1 and 2), both biofilters being initially inoculated with a microbial consortium. Each biofilter was irrigated with a nutrient solution supplying nitrogen in one of two forms; i.e., mainly as ammonia for unit 1 and exclusively as nitrate for unit 2. The experimental results have revealed that greater styrene elimination rates are achieved in the biofilter supplied with ammonia as the major nitrogen source in comparison to the lesser elimination performance obtained with the nitrate provided biofilter. However, in achieving the high styrene removal rates in the ammonia supplied biofilter, the excess of biomass accumulates on the filtering pellets and causes progressive clogging of the filter media. Furthermore, the effectiveness of nitrate supply as the sole nitrogen nutrient form, on reducing or controlling the biomass accumulation in the filter media in comparison to ammonia, could not be satisfactorily demonstrated because the two biofilters operated with very different styrene elimination capacities. The monitoring of the carbon dioxide concentration profile through both biofilters revealed that the ratio of carbon dioxide produced to the styrene removed was approximately 3/1, which confirms the complete biodegradation of removed styrene, given that some of the organic carbon consumed is also used for the microbial growth. The effects of the most important design parameters, namely styrene input concentrations and gas flow rates, were investigated for each

  3. On the dependence of structural and sensing properties of sputtered MoO3 thin films on argon gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojier, K.; Savaloni, H.; Zolghadr, S.

    2014-11-01

    Nitrogen and carbon oxides (CO, NO and NO2), released from combustion facilities and automobiles, are known to be extremely harmful to the human body and also are the main cause of air pollution. Therefore, effective methods to monitor and suppress the carbon and nitrogen oxides have been highly demanded for atmospheric environmental measurements and controls. It is known that molybdenum oxide (MoO3) can be a good semiconductor material for use as a gas sensor in monitoring CO, NO and NO2. In this paper we report the structural characteristics and sensing properties of the sputtered MoO3 thin films as a function of argon gas flow. MoO3 thin films were deposited by DC reactive magnetron sputtering technique on glass substrates at different argon gas flows in the range of 5-20 sccm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used for studying crystallographic structure. XRD results showed that all of our films were of polycrystalline structure and of α-MoO3 stable orthorhombic phase. Results also showed that crystallite size increases while compressive nano-strain in the structure of the films decreases with increasing the argon gas flow. Atomic force microscope and the field emission scanning electron microscope studies showed granular structures for all samples, which increased in size consistent with the XRD results, with argon gas flow, while the surface roughness of the films also increased with argon gas flow. Chemical composition study showed optimum reaction between oxygen and molybdenum atoms for films produced at 15 sccm flow of argon gas. The electrical response of samples was measured in the vacuum and the CO environments in the temperature range of 150-350 K. All samples showed Ohmic behavior and the electrical resistances of the films measured in the CO environment were lower than those measured in vacuum. This study showed that the sensing ability of MoO3 for CO improves with increasing the argon gas flow.

  4. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  5. Effects of argon enriched low-oxygen atmospheres and of high-oxygen atmospheres on the kinetics of polyphenoloxidase (PPO).

    PubMed

    O'Beirne, David; Murphy, Eileen; Ni Eidhin, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    The reported benefits of enrichment of air atmospheres with argon or oxygen for control of enzymatic browning were investigated by determining the effects of these atmospheres on PPO kinetics. Kinetics of purified apple PPO and a commercially available mushroom PPO were studied in an in vitro model system. Enrichment with argon produced greater inhibitory effects than the current industry practice of enrichment with nitrogen. Km(app) values (mM) for apple PPO in 3%O(2)/97%Ar, 3%O(2)/97%N(2), and air, were 133, 87, and 48, respectively. The data indicate that inhibition by both gases is competitive, and also support the hypothesis that the greater inhibitory effect of argon was proportional to the size of the Van der Waals radius of argon against nitrogen (1.91 Å against 1.54 Å). Much smaller inhibitory effects were observed in the presence of 80% O(2) (Km(app) 57 mM), and the nature of this inhibition was less clear. The results suggest that the benefits of argon enrichment may be relatively small, and may require critical enzyme, substrate, and gas levels to be successful. However, these benefits may be exploitable commercially in some fresh-cut products, and may allow less anoxic atmospheres to be used. Practical Application: Control of enzymatic browning without sulfites continues to be a challenge in some fresh-cut products. While sporadic benefits of these atmospheres in control of enzymatic browning have been reported, results have been inconsistent in commercial practice. The results suggest that the benefits of argon enrichment may be relatively small, and may require critical enzyme, substrate, and gas levels to be successful. However, these benefits may be exploitable commercially in some fresh-cut products, and allow less anoxic atmospheres to be used. PMID:21535678

  6. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yongjun; Ambrogi, Martina; Han, Baohang; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m2/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection. PMID:27070588

  7. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air.

    PubMed

    Men, Yongjun; Ambrogi, Martina; Han, Baohang; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m²/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection. PMID:27070588

  8. Measurements of air-broadened and nitrogen-broadened half-widths and shifts of ozone lines near 9 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.; Rinsland, C. P.; Devi, Malathy V.; Benner, D. Chris; Thakur, K. B.

    1988-01-01

    Air- and nitrogen-broadened half-widths and line shifts at room temperature for more than 60 individual vibration-rotation transitions in the nu1 fundamental band of (O-16)3 and several transitions in the nu3 band were determined from infrared absorption spectra. These spectra were recorded at 0.005/cm resolution with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. A tunable-diode-laser spectrometer operating in the 1090-1150/cm region was also used to record data on oxygen-, nitrogen-, and air-broadened half-widths for selected individual transitions. The nitrogen- and air-broadened half-widths determined by these two different measurement techniques are consistent to within 4 percent. The results are in good agreement with other published measurements and calculations.

  9. Laboratory study of asthmatic volunteers exposed to nitrogen dioxide and to ambient air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Avol, E.L.; Linn, W.S.; Peng, R.C.; Valencia, G.; Little, D.; Hackney, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    Adult volunteers with moderate to severe asthma (N = 59) underwent dose-response studies to assess their reactivity to nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) in otherwise clean air. Exposure concentrations were 0.0 (control), 0.3 and 0.6 ppm. A subgroup (N = 36) also underwent exposures to Los Angeles area ambient air at times when NO/sub 2/ pollution was expected. Concentrations of NO/sub 2/ during ambient exposures were 0.086 +/- 0.024 ppm (mean +/- s.d.). All exposures took place in a movable chamber/laboratory facility. Each study lasted 2 hr, with alternating 10 min periods of exercise (mean ventilation rate 40 L/min) and rest. Lung function was measured prior to exposure and after 10 min, 1 hr and 2 hr of exposure. Symptoms were recorded prior to exposure, during exposure and for 1 week afterward. In some subjects bronchial reactivity to cold air was measured 1 hr after the end of exposure and again 24 hr later. Different exposure conditions were presented in randomized order, 1 week apart. No pollutant exposure produced statistically significant changes in lung function, symptoms, or bronchial reactivity, relative to clean air. Ambient air exposures produced the largest (still nonsignificant) mean changes in some lung function tests. Given the physiological and atmospheric variability, negative statistical results do not rule out a small unfavorable effect of ambient pollution on lung function. If any such effect occurred, it was not likely caused by NO/sub 2/. Statistical results remained negative when the analysis was restricted to the 20 subjects with most severe lung dysfunction. In conclusion at least in the Los Angeles area, sensitivity to ambient concentrations of NO/sub 2/ is not common, even among adult asthmatics with moderate to severe disease.

  10. Perovskite-nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube composite as bifunctional catalysts for rechargeable lithium-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Hey Woong; Lee, Dong Un; Park, Moon Gyu; Ahmed, Raihan; Seo, Min Ho; Nazar, Linda F; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-03-01

    Developing an effective bifunctional catalyst is a significant issue, as rechargeable metal-air batteries are very attractive for future energy systems. In this study, a facile one-pot process is introduced to prepare an advanced bifunctional catalyst (op-LN) incorporating nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) into perovskite La0.5 Sr0.5 Co0.8 Fe0.2 O3 nanoparticles (LSCF-NPs). Confirmed by half-cell testing, op-LN exhibits synergistic effects of LSCF-NP and NCNT with excellent bifunctionality for both the oxygen reduction reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction. Furthermore, op-LN exhibits comparable performances in these reactions to Pt/C and Ir/C, respectively, which highlights its potential for use as a commercially viable bifunctional catalyst. Moreover, the results obtained by testing op-LN in a practical Li-air battery demonstrate improved and complementary charge/discharge performance compared to those of LSCF-NP and NCNT, and this confirms that simply prepared op-LN is a promising candidate as a highly effective bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air batteries. PMID:25684405

  11. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  12. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Application to Air Quality Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Khan, Maudood; Biazar, Arastoo; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are discussed. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark)(NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NO(x) (= NO + NO2). The latest LNOM estimates of lightning channel length distributions, lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and the vertical profile of lightning NO(x) are presented. The primary improvement to the LNOM is the inclusion of non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: (1) hot core stepped and dart leaders, (2) stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NO(x) for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  13. Measurement of the First Townsend's Ionization Coefficients in Helium, Air, and Nitrogen at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Junxia; Luo, Haiyun; Yue, Yang; Wang, Xinxin

    2014-07-01

    In the past the first Townsend’s ionization coefficient α could only be measured with Townsend discharge in gases at low pressure. After realizing Townsend discharge in some gases at atmospheric pressure by using dielectric barrier electrodes, we had developed a new method for measuring α coefficient at atmospheric pressure, a new optical method based on the discharge images taken with ICCD camera. With this newly developed method α coefficient in helium, nitrogen and air at atmospheric pressure were measured. The results were found to be in good agreement with the data obtained at lower pressure but same reduced field E/p by other groups. It seems that the value of α coefficient is sensitive to the purity of the working gas.

  14. Pyrolysis and combustion of tobacco in a cigarette smoking simulator under air and nitrogen atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Busch, Christian; Streibel, Thorsten; Liu, Chuan; McAdam, Kevin G; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2012-04-01

    A coupling between a cigarette smoking simulator and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer was constructed to allow investigation of tobacco smoke formation under simulated burning conditions. The cigarette smoking simulator is designed to burn a sample in close approximation to the conditions experienced by a lit cigarette. The apparatus also permits conditions outside those of normal cigarette burning to be investigated for mechanistic understanding purposes. It allows control of parameters such as smouldering and puff temperatures, as well as combustion rate and puffing volume. In this study, the system enabled examination of the effects of "smoking" a cigarette under a nitrogen atmosphere. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with a soft ionisation technique is expedient to analyse complex mixtures such as tobacco smoke with a high time resolution. The objective of the study was to separate pyrolysis from combustion processes to reveal the formation mechanism of several selected toxicants. A purposely designed adapter, with no measurable dead volume or memory effects, enables the analysis of pyrolysis and combustion gases from tobacco and tobacco products (e.g. 3R4F reference cigarette) with minimum aging. The combined system demonstrates clear distinctions between smoke composition found under air and nitrogen smoking atmospheres based on the corresponding mass spectra and visualisations using principal component analysis. PMID:22392377

  15. Workshop in Support of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen (NOx) and Sulfur Oxides (SOx)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing a workshop to discuss policy-relevant science to Inform EPA’s "Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur" report. The workshop is being organized by EPA’s Office of Research and Development’s, Nation...

  16. Rheological characterization of degradation and polycondensation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) melt in air and in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Matthias; Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H.; Wagner, Manfred H.

    2013-04-01

    Three different poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) samples based on dimethyl terephthalate or terephthalic acid, were studied in terms of alterations and mutations caused by thermal exposure during rheological characterization. Thermal stability and frequency sweep experiments were performed in the melt state at a temperature of 280°C, and the influence of the atmosphere (air or nitrogen) as well as the effect of sample preparation (pellets molten directly between the plates of the rheometer vs. samples cut from compression molded sheets) were studied. Thermal stability tests reveal a fundamentally different behavior of the storage (G') and the loss (G″) modulus for measurements in air compared to measurements in a pure nitrogen atmosphere. Samples measured in air show a decrease of both moduli due to thermal degradation, while an unexpected strong increase was observed in nitrogen due to polycondensation. The loading time of the samples caused already a significant change of the rheological properties, which could be reconstructed by extrapolation to zero loading time. Frequency sweep test were significantly affected by the rapid changes of the molecular structure. Frequency sweeps were conducted bidirectional, i.e. by first increasing the angular frequency from 0.05 rad.s-1 to 500 rad.s-1, which was then followed by a decrease from 500 rad.s-1 to 0.05 rad.s-1, and vice versa. These tests confirm the effects of the atmosphere applied, air or nitrogen, causing degradation and condensation, respectively. However, besides these dominating alterations, i.e. reduction of the molecular weight due to chain scission in air and increase of the molecular weight due to condensation reactions in nitrogen, also the opposite effects were detected. This indicates clearly the formation of a bimodal molecular weight distribution whose existence was supported by the rheological characterization of compression molded plates, which were found to show more degradation but also

  17. Monitoring organic nitrogen species in the UT/LS - a new system for analysis of CARIBIC whole air samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, Carina; Thorenz, Ute; Baker, Angela; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    The CARIBIC project is a unique program for long term and global scale monitoring of the atmosphere (http://www.caribic-atmospheric.com). An instrument container is installed monthly into a civil aircraft operated by Lufthansa (Airbus A 340-600) and makes atmospheric observations en route from Frankfurt, Germany to various destinations around the globe. In four to six long distance flights at a cruising altitude of 10 to 12 km online measurements of various atmospheric tracers are performed during the flight as well as whole air samples are taken with two different sampling units (116 samples in both glass and stainless steel canisters). These samples are routinely analyzed for greenhouse gases, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and halogenated compounds. Nitrogen containing compounds play various important roles in the atmosphere. Alkyl nitrates (RONO2) are products of the reaction of NMHC with OH and other oxidants in the presence of NO. They can provide information on the oxidative history of an air mass. Moreover they influence photolchemical ozone formation and act as a transport mechanism for reactive nitrogen. Less reactive nitrogen containing species such as HCN and acetonitrile are important markers for biomass burning, while organic amines are involved in gas to particle partitioning. Finally N2O is a long lived nitrogen containing gas important for the Earth's radiative budget. Regular measurements of such nitrogen compounds would therefore be a significant contribution to the CARIBIC data set. Especially for high altitude samples, in which the mixing ratios of many species are expected to be in the low ppt range, a highly sensitive method for analysis is required. Therefore a new system for measurement of nitrogen compounds has been built up, comprising a gas chromatograph (GC) using a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). An important advantage of the NCD is that it is selective for nitrogen and equimolar. The nitrogen compounds are sequentially pre

  18. Nitrogen potential recovery and concentration of ammonia from swine manure using electrodialysis coupled with air stripping.

    PubMed

    Ippersiel, D; Mondor, M; Lamarche, F; Tremblay, F; Dubreuil, J; Masse, L

    2012-03-01

    The practice of intensive animal production in certain areas has resulted in excessive manure production for the available regional land base. Consequently, there is a need to develop treatment technologies to recover the valuable nutrients that manure contains so that the resulting product can be transported and used as fertilizer on agricultural land. The project presented here used electrodialysis in a dilution/concentration configuration to transfer the manure ammonia in the diluate solution by electromigration to an adjacent solution separated by an ion-exchange membrane under the driving force of an electrical potential. Then, air stripping from the electrodialysis-obtained concentrate solution without pH modification was used to isolate the ammonia in an acidic solution. An optimal process operating voltage of 17.5 V was first determined on the basis of current efficiency and total energy consumption. During the process, the swine manure pH varied from 8.5 to 8.2, values favourable for NH(4)(+) electromigration. Total ammonia nitrogen reached 21,352 mg/L in the concentrate solution, representing approximately seven times the concentration in the swine manure. Further increases in concentration were limited by water transfer from the diluate solution due to electroosmosis and osmosis. Applying vacuum to the concentrate reservoir was found to be more efficient than direct concentrate solution aeration for NH(3) recuperation in the acid trap, given that the ammonia recuperated under vacuum represented 14.5% of the theoretical value of the NH(3) present in the concentrate solution as compared to 6.2% for aeration. However, an excessively low concentrate solution pH (8.6-8.3) limited NH(3)volatilization toward the acid trap. These results suggest that the concentrate solution pH needs to be raised to promote the volatile NH(3) form of total ammonia nitrogen. PMID:21658837

  19. Noble Gas (Argon and Xenon)-Saturated Cold Storage Solutions Reduce Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Rat Model of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Y.; Pype, J.L.; Martin, A.R.; Chong, C.F.; Daniel, L.; Gaudart, J.; Ibrahim, Z.; Magalon, G.; Lemaire, M.; Hardwigsen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Following kidney transplantation, ischemia-reperfusion injury contributes to adverse outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a cold-storage solution saturated with noble gas (xenon or argon) could limit ischemia-reperfusion injury following cold ischemia. Methods Sixty Wistar rats were randomly allocated to 4 experimental groups. Kidneys were harvested and then stored for 6 h before transplantation in cold-storage solution (Celsior®) saturated with either air, nitrogen, xenon or argon. A syngenic orthotopic transplantation was performed. Renal function was determined on days 7 and 14 after transplantation. Transplanted kidneys were removed on day 14 for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Creatinine clearance was significantly higher and urinary albumin significantly lower in the argon and xenon groups than in the other groups at days 7 and 14. These effects were considerably more pronounced for argon than for xenon. In addition, kidneys stored with argon, and to a lesser extent those stored with xenon, displayed preserved renal architecture as well as higher CD-10 and little active caspase-3 expression compared to other groups. Conclusion Argon- or xenon-satured cold-storage solution preserved renal architecture and function following transplantation by reducing ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:22470401

  20. A synthesis of the ecological effects of air pollution from nitrogen and sulfur in the U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greaver, T.L.; Sullivan, T.; Herrick, J.D.; Barber, M.; Baron, J.; Cosby, B.; Deerharke, M.; Dennis, R.; Dubois, J.J.D.; Goodale, C.; Herlihy, A.; Lawrence, G.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.; Novak, K.

    2012-01-01

    Four decades after the passage of the US Clean Air Act, air-quality standards are set to protect ecosystems from damage caused by gas-phase nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) compounds, but not from the deposition of these air pollutants to land and water. Here, we synthesize recent scientific literature on the ecological effects of N and S air pollution in the US. Deposition of N and S is the main driver of ecosystem acidification and contributes to nutrient enrichment in many natural systems. Although surface-water acidification has decreased in the US since 1990, it remains a problem in many regions. Perturbations to ecosystems caused by the nutrient effects of N deposition continue to emerge, although gas-phase concentrations are generally not high enough to cause phytotoxicity. In all, there is overwhelming evidence of a broad range of damaging effects to ecosystems in the US under current air quality conditions.

  1. Argon Collection And Purification For Proliferation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Achey, R.; Hunter, D.

    2015-10-09

    In order to determine whether a seismic event was a declared/undeclared underground nuclear weapon test, environmental samples must be taken and analyzed for signatures that are unique to a nuclear explosion. These signatures are either particles or gases. Particle samples are routinely taken and analyzed under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) verification regime as well as by individual countries. Gas samples are analyzed for signature gases, especially radioactive xenon. Underground nuclear tests also produce radioactive argon, but that signature is not well monitored. A radioactive argon signature, along with other signatures, can more conclusively determine whether an event was a nuclear test. This project has developed capabilities for collecting and purifying argon samples for ultra-low-background proportional counting. SRNL has developed a continuous gas enrichment system that produces an output stream containing 97% argon from whole air using adsorbent separation technology (the flow diagram for the system is shown in the figure). The vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) enrichment system is easily scalable to produce ten liters or more of 97% argon within twelve hours. A gas chromatographic separation using a column of modified hydrogen mordenite molecular sieve has been developed that can further purify the sample to better than 99% purity after separation from the helium carrier gas. The combination of these concentration and purification systems has the capability of being used for a field-deployable system for collecting argon samples suitable for ultra-low-background proportional counting for detecting nuclear detonations under the On-Site Inspection program of the CTBTO verification regime. The technology also has applications for the bulk argon separation from air for industrial purposes such as the semi-conductor industry.

  2. Antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, Sabrina; Kepp, Oliver; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Chaba, Kariman; Adjemian, Sandy; Pype, Jan; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Lemaire, Marc; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-08-15

    Although chemically non-reactive, inert noble gases may influence multiple physiological and pathological processes via hitherto uncharacterized physical effects. Here we report a cell-based detection system for assessing the effects of pre-defined gas mixtures on the induction of apoptotic cell death. In this setting, the conventional atmosphere for cell culture was substituted with gas combinations, including the same amount of oxygen (20%) and carbon dioxide (5%) but 75% helium, neon, argon, krypton, or xenon instead of nitrogen. The replacement of nitrogen with noble gases per se had no effects on the viability of cultured human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Conversely, argon and xenon (but not helium, neon, and krypton) significantly limited cell loss induced by the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor staurosporine, the DNA-damaging agent mitoxantrone and several mitochondrial toxins. Such cytoprotective effects were coupled to the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity, as demonstrated by means of a mitochondrial transmembrane potential-sensitive dye and by assessing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In line with this notion, argon and xenon inhibited the apoptotic activation of caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy coupled to automated image analysis. The antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon may explain their clinically relevant cytoprotective effects. PMID:23907115

  3. Effect of dynamic diffusion of air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media on the microhardness of ionic crystals with juvenile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyavin, O. V.; Fedorov, V. Yu.; Chernov, Yu. M.; Shpeizman, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The load dependences of the microhardness of surface layers of NaCl and LiF ionic single crystals with juvenile surfaces and surfaces exposed to air for a long time measured in the air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media have been investigated. It has been found that there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness as a function of the load for LiF crystals indented in helium and after their aging in air, as well as a weaker effect of the nitrogen and air gaseous media on the studied dependences as compared to NaCl crystals. It has also been found that, after the aging of the surface of NaCl crystals in air, there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness in the nitrogen and air gaseous media, as well as a pronounced change in the microhardness as a function of the time of aging the samples in air as compared to the weaker effect of the gaseous medium for LiF crystals. The obtained data have been analyzed in terms of the phenomenon of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of particles from the external medium into crystalline materials during their plastic deformation along the nucleating and moving dislocations. It has been shown that this phenomenon affects the microhardness through changes in the intensity of dislocation multiplication upon the formation of indentation rosettes in different gaseous media. The performed investigation of the microhardness of the juvenile surface of NaCl and LiF crystals in different gaseous media has revealed for the first time a different character of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of these media in a "pure" form.

  4. Simulation study on nitrogen vibrational kinetics in a single nanosecond pulse high voltage air discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-05-01

    We report a simulation study on nitrogen vibrational kinetics N 2 ( X 1 Σg + , v = 0 - 12 ) in a single nanosecond pulse high voltage discharge in dry-air at a pressure of 100 Torr. Apart from the usual processes such as vibrational-vibrational exchange and vibrational-translational relaxation, the state-specific vibrational kinetics take into account the electronic-vibrational (E-V) process and chemical-vibrational process. The vibrational kinetics, coupled with electron Boltzmann equation solver, plasma chemical kinetics, and gas thermal balance are used to model the 100 ns discharge and its subsequent 10 ms afterglow. The self-consistent model shows good agreement with recent experimental results, with regard to time-resolved vibrational and translational temperature. According to the modeling results, The E-V mechanism has a small but non-negligible effect (about 2%) in rising of vibrational quanta in the early afterglow from 100 ns to 1μs. Another possible reason is the convective transport associated with the gas dynamic expansion in time delays around 1μs to 10 μs.

  5. Application of pig slurry to soils. Effect of air stripping treatment on nitrogen and TOC leaching.

    PubMed

    Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia; García-Sinovas, David; Alvarez-Benedí, Javier

    2010-12-01

    The effect of physical-chemical slurry treatment on the mobility and transformation of nitrogen and organic matter from pig slurry after soil application is evaluated. Two different pig slurries (one treated by stripping with air at pH=9 and another non-treated) were applied at the top of a soil column, containing approximately 100 kg of soil. Effluents were monitored measuring concentration values of ammonia, nitrites, nitrates and total organic carbon (TOC). The breakthrough curves were modelled using STANMOD and HYDRUS 1D codes. Low concentrations of ammonia were detected in the effluent recovered at the bottom of the soil profile for both types of slurry. Nitrate concentration in effluent was lower and more homogenous over time when applying stripping treated pig slurry. In N modelling, adsorption of ammonia by soil proved an important process, nitrite and nitrate adsorption being less significant, although not negligible. Transformation from ammonia to nitrite controls the kinetics of the nitrification process. Total organic carbon in the column effluent was higher in the experiment using treated pig slurry, which can be attributed to organic matter solubilisation in the stripping treatment process. PMID:20705384

  6. Low temperature, atmospheric pressure, direct current microplasma jet operated in air, nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Kolb, J. F.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Micro-plasma jets in atmospheric pressure molecular gases (nitrogen, oxygen, air) were generated by blowing these gases through direct current microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs). The tapered discharge channel, drilled through two 100 to 200 μm thick molybdenum electrodes separated by a 200 μm thick alumina layer, is 150 to 450 μm in diameter in the cathode and has an opening of 100 to 300 μm in diameter in the anode. Sustaining voltages are 400 to 600 V, the maximum current is 25 mA. The gas temperature of the microplasma inside the microhollow cathode varies between ~2000 K and ~1000 K depending on current, gas, and flow rate. Outside the discharge channel the temperature in the jet can be reduced by manipulating the discharge current and the gas flow to achieve values close to room temperature. This cold microplasma jet can be used for surface treatment of heat sensitive substances, and for sterilization of contaminated areas.

  7. Unique erosion features of hafnium cathode in atmospheric pressure arcs of air, nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Meher, K. C.; Kar, R.; Tiwari, N.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigation of cathode erosion in atmospheric pressure hafnium-electrode plasma torches is reported under different plasma environments along with the results of numerical simulation. Air, nitrogen and oxygen are the plasma gases considered. Distinct differences in the erosion features in different plasmas are brought out. Cathode images exhibiting a degree of erosion and measured erosion rates are presented in detail as a function of time of arc operation and arc current. Physical erosion rates are determined using high precision balance. The changes in the surface microstructures are investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Evolution of cathode chemistry is determined using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Numerical simulation with proper consideration of the plasma effects is performed for all the plasma gases. The important role of electromagnetic body forces in shaping the flow field and the distribution of pressure in the region is explored. It is shown that the mutual interaction between fluid dynamic and electromagnetic body forces may self-consistently evolve a situation of an extremely low cathode erosion rate.

  8. Three air quality studies: Great Lakes ozone formation and nitrogen dry deposition; and Tucson aerosol chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Theresa

    The Clean Air Act of 1970 was promulgated after thousands of lives were lost in four catastrophic air pollution events. It authorized the establishment of National Ambient Air Quality Standards or (NAAQS) for six pollutants that are harmful to human health and welfare: carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, ozone and sulfur dioxide. The Clean Air Act also led to the establishment of the United Stated Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) to set and enforce regulations. The first paper in this dissertation studies ozone in the Lake Michigan region (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Jacko, R., Hillery, J., 2011. Lake Michigan air quality: The 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP). Atmospheric Environment 45, 3192-3202.) The Chicago-Milwaukee-Gary metropolitan area has been unable to meet the ozone NAAQS since the Clean Air Act was implemented. The Lake Michigan Air Directors' Consortium (LADCO) hypothesized that land breezes transport ozone precursor compounds over the lake, where a large air/water temperature difference creates a shallow conduction layer, which is an efficient reaction chamber for ozone formation. In the afternoon, lake breezes and prevailing synoptic winds then transport ozone back over the land. To further evaluate this hypothesis, LADCO sponsored the 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP) to measure the air quality over Lake Michigan and the surrounding areas. This study has found that the LAP data supports this hypothesis of ozone formation, which has strong implications for ozone control strategies in the Lake Michigan region. The second paper is this dissertation (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Wolf, A.M.A., 2012. Ambient PM10 and metal concentrations measured in the Sunnyside Unified School District, Tucson, Arizona. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 43, 67-76) evaluated the airborne concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 microns or less) and eight metalloids and metals

  9. What is Air? A Standard Model for Combustion Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    2001-08-01

    Most combustion devices utilize air as the oxidizer. Thus, reactive flow simulations of these devices require the specification of the composition of air as part of the physicochemical input. A mixture of only oxygen and nitrogen often is used, although in reality air is a more complex mixture of somewhat variable composition. We summarize some useful parameters describing a standard model of dry air. Then we consider modifications to include water vapor for creating the desired level of humidity. The ''minor'' constituents of air, especially argon and water vapor, can affect the composition by as much as about 5 percent in the mole fractions.

  10. Lunar exospheric argon modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grava, Cesare; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Greathouse, T. K.; Hurley, D. M.; Hodges, R. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Cook, J. C.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Argon is one of the few known constituents of the lunar exosphere. The surface-based mass spectrometer Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment (LACE) deployed during the Apollo 17 mission first detected argon, and its study is among the subjects of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) and Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission investigations. We performed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of neutral atomic argon that we use to better understand its transport and storage across the lunar surface. We took into account several loss processes: ionization by solar photons, charge-exchange with solar protons, and cold trapping as computed by recent LRO/Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) mapping of Permanently Shaded Regions (PSRs). Recycling of photo-ions and solar radiation acceleration are also considered. We report that (i) contrary to previous assumptions, charge exchange is a loss process as efficient as photo-ionization, (ii) the PSR cold-trapping flux is comparable to the ionization flux (photo-ionization and charge-exchange), and (iii) solar radiation pressure has negligible effect on the argon density, as expected. We determine that the release of 2.6 × 1028 atoms on top of a pre-existing argon exosphere is required to explain the maximum amount of argon measured by LACE. The total number of atoms (1.0 × 1029) corresponds to ∼6700 kg of argon, 30% of which (∼1900 kg) may be stored in the cold traps after 120 days in the absence of space weathering processes. The required population is consistent with the amount of argon that can be released during a High Frequency Teleseismic (HFT) Event, i.e. a big, rare and localized moonquake, although we show that LACE could not distinguish between a localized and a global event. The density of argon measured at the time of LACE appears to have originated from no less than four such episodic events. Finally, we show that the extent of the PSRs that trap

  11. Nitrogen, oxygen and air broadened widths and relative intensities of N2O lines near 2450/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Spectra of the v sub 1 + 2v sub 2 and the weak underlying v sub 1 + 3v sub 2 - v sub 2 band of N2O near 2450/cm were analyzed by the nonlinear, least squares, whole band technique. The oxygen, nitrogen, and air broadened line widths and the relative line intensities were determined. The air broadened widths, for/m/3, are in agreement with those in the 1980 AFGL line listing and the relative band intensities also agree, within about 20% with the values in this listing.

  12. Analysis of effect of flameholder characteristics on lean, premixed, partially vaporized fuel-air mixtures quality and nitrogen oxides emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the effect of flameholding devices on the precombustion fuel-air characteristics and on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for combustion of premixed partially vaporized mixtures. The analysis includes the interrelationships of flameholder droplet collection efficiency, reatomization efficiency and blockage, and the initial droplet size distribution and accounts for the contribution of droplet combustion in partially vaporized mixtures to NOx emissions. Application of the analytical procedures is illustrated and parametric predictions of NOx emissions are presented.

  13. Developing Oxidized Nitrogen Atmospheric Deposition Source Attribution from CMAQ for Air-Water Trading for Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, R. L.; Napelenok, S. L.; Linker, L. C.; Dudek, M.

    2012-12-01

    Estuaries are adversely impacted by excess reactive nitrogen, Nr, from many point and nonpoint sources, including atmospheric deposition to the watershed and the estuary itself as a nonpoint source. For effective mitigation, trading among sources of Nr is being considered. The Chesapeake Bay Program is working to bring air into its trading scheme, which requires some special air computations. Airsheds are much larger than watersheds; thus, wide-spread or national emissions controls are put in place to achieve major reductions in atmospheric Nr deposition. The tributary nitrogen load reductions allocated to the states to meet the TMDL target for Chesapeake Bay are large and not easy to attain via controls on water point and nonpoint sources. It would help the TMDL process to take advantage of air emissions reductions that would occur with State Implementation Plans that go beyond the national air rules put in place to help meet national ambient air quality standards. There are still incremental benefits from these local or state-level controls on atmospheric emissions. The additional air deposition reductions could then be used to offset water quality controls (air-water trading). What is needed is a source to receptor transfer function that connects air emissions from a state to deposition to a tributary. There is a special source attribution version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality model, CMAQ, (termed DDM-3D) that can estimate the fraction of deposition contributed by labeled emissions (labeled by source or region) to the total deposition across space. We use the CMAQ DDM-3D to estimate simplified state-level delta-emissions to delta-atmospheric-deposition transfer coefficients for each major emission source sector within a state, since local air regulations are promulgated at the state level. The CMAQ 4.7.1 calculations are performed at a 12 km grid size over the airshed domain covering Chesapeake Bay for 2020 CAIR emissions. For results, we first present

  14. Fine particulate air pollution, nitrogen dioxide, and systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease in Calgary, Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Bernatsky, Sasha; Smargiassi, Audrey; Johnson, Markey; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Barnabe, Cheryl; Svenson, Larry; Brand, Allan; Bertazzon, Stefania; Hudson, Marie; Clarke, Ann E; Fortin, Paul; Edworthy, Steven; Bélisle, Patrick; Joseph, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between fine particulate (PM2.5) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution and systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs). Methods Associations between ambient air pollution (PM2.5 and NO2) and SARDs were assessed using land-use regression models for Calgary, Alberta and administrative health data (1993-2007). SARD case definitions were based on ≥2 physician claims, or ≥1 rheumatology billing code; or ≥1 hospitalization code (for systemic lupus, Sjogren's Syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, or undifferentiated connective tissue disease). Bayesian hierarchical latent class regression models estimated the probability that each resident was a SARD case, based on these case definitions. The sum of individual level probabilities provided the estimated number of cases in each area. The latent class model included terms for age, sex, and an interaction term between age and sex. Bayesian logistic regression models were used to generate adjusted odds ratios (OR) for NO2 and PM2.5. pollutant models, adjusting for neighborhood income, age, sex, and an interaction between age and sex. We also examined models stratified for First-Nations (FN) and non-FN subgroups. Results Residents that were female and/or aged > 45 had a greater probability of being a SARD case, with the highest OR estimates for older females. Independently, the odds of being a SARDs case increased with PM2.5 levels, but the results were inconclusive for NO2. The results stratified by FN and Non-FN groups were not distinctly different. Conclusion In this urban Canadian sample, adjusting for demographics, exposure to PM2.5 was associated with an increased risk of SARDs. The results for NO2 were inconclusive. PMID:25988990

  15. Free-air CO2 enrichment of sorghum: soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics.

    PubMed

    Prior, S A; Torbert, H A; Runion, G B; Rogers, H H; Kimball, B A

    2008-01-01

    The positive impact of elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration on crop biomass production suggests more carbon inputs to soil. Further study on the effect of elevated CO(2) on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics is key to understanding the potential for long-term carbon storage in soil. Soil samples (0- to 5-, 5- to 10-, and 10- to 20-cm depths) were collected after 2 yr of grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.] production under two atmospheric CO(2) levels: (370 [ambient] and 550 muL L(-1) [free-air CO(2) enrichment; FACE]) and two water treatments (ample water and limited water) on a Trix clay loam (fine, loamy, mixed [calcareous], hyperthermic Typic Torrifluvents) at Maricopa, AZ. In addition to assessing treatment effects on soil organic C and total N, potential C and N mineralization and C turnover were determined in a 60-d laboratory incubation study. After 2 yr of FACE, soil C and N were significantly increased at all soil depths. Water regime had no effect on these measures. Increased total N in the soil was associated with reduced N mineralization under FACE. Results indicated that potential C turnover was reduced under water deficit conditions at the top soil depth. Carbon turnover was not affected under FACE, implying that the observed increase in soil C with elevated CO(2) may be stable relative to ambient CO(2) conditions. Results suggest that, over the short-term, a small increase in soil C storage could occur under elevated atmospheric CO(2) conditions in sorghum production systems with differing water regimes. PMID:18453395

  16. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  17. Linking Agricultural Crop Management and Air Quality Models for Regional to National-Scale Nitrogen Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    While nitrogen (N) is an essential element for life, human population growth and demands for energy, transportation and food can lead to excess nitrogen in the environment. A modeling framework is described and implemented to promote a more integrated, process-based and system le...

  18. 76 FR 68698 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Revision to Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... to Nitrogen Oxides Budget Trading Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... the Commonwealth of Virginia that revises regulatory language that inadvertently ended its nitrogen oxides (NO X ) budget at the end of the 2008 ozone season. In the Final Rules section of this...

  19. Reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPÉ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prenni, A. J.; Benedict, K. B.; Evanoski-Cole, A. R.; Zhou, Y.; Sullivan, A.; Day, D.; Sive, B. C.; Zondlo, M. A.; Schichtel, B. A.; Vimont, J.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) took place in July-August 2014. This collaborative study was aimed at characterizing those processes which control air quality along Colorado's Front Range. Although the study was largely focused on ozone, an additional goal of the study included characterizing contributions from Front Range sources and long-range transport to total reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park (ROMO). Import of reactive nitrogen into ROMO and other pristine, high elevation areas has the potential to negatively impact terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We present measurements of reactive nitrogen species measured within ROMO during FRAPPÉ, and compare these data to measurements made in the surrounding areas. At our monitoring site in ROMO, co-located with IMPROVE and CASTNet monitoring, measurements of NO, NO2, NOx, NOy, NH3, and total reactive nitrogen (TNx) were made at high time resolution. Additional measurements of NH3, HNO3 and PM2.5 ions were made at hourly resolution using a MARGA and also at 24-hour time resolution using URG denuder-filter pack sampling. Precipitation samples also were collected to quantify wet deposition of ammonium, nitrate, and organic nitrogen. Finally, measurements of organic gases were made using online gas chromatography and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry. Preliminary results for ammonia show both a diel pattern, with concentrations increasing each morning, and a strong dependence on wind direction, implicating the importance of transport. Higher concentrations of NOx and NOy also were observed in the daytime, but in general these patterns differed from that of ammonia. Several upslope events were observed during the measurement period during which NOx, NH3, 2-propylnitrate, 2-butylnitrate, ethane, butane, and pentane were observed to increase in concentration along with ozone.

  20. Insights into discharge argon mediated biofilm inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Danni; Azzam, Robin; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in biomedical sciences. Conventional sterilization and decontamination methods are not suitable for new and more sophisticated biomaterials. In this paper, the efficiency and effectiveness of gas discharges in inactivation and removal of biofilms on biomaterials were studied. We found that although discharge oxygen, nitrogen and argon all demonstrated excellent antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, gases with distinct chemical/physical properties underwent different mechanisms of action. Discharge oxygen and nitrogen mediated decontamination was associated with strong etching effects, which can cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. On the contrary, although discharge argon at low powers maintained excellent antibacterial ability, it had negligible etching effects. Based on these results, an effective decontamination approach using discharge argon was established in which bacteria and biofilms were killed in situ and then removed from contaminated biomaterials. This novel procedure is applicable for a wide range of biomaterials and biomedical devices in an in vivo and clinical setting. PMID:24070412

  1. Vertical distribution of ozone and nitrogenous pollutants in an air quality class I area, the San Gorgonio wilderness, southern California.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Rocío; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Information about spatial and temporal distribution of air pollutants is essential for better understanding of environmental stresses affecting forests and estimation of potential risks associated with air pollutants. Ozone and nitrogenous air pollutants were monitored along an elevation gradient in the Class I San Gorgonio Wilderness area (San Bernardino Mountains, California, U.S.) during the summer of 2000 (mid-June to mid-October). Passive samplers were exposed for 2-week periods at six sampling sites located at 300 m intervals ranging from 1200 to 2700 m elevation. Elevated concentrations of ozone were found in this area with summer 24-h hourly means ranging from 53 to 59 ppb. The highest ozone concentrations were detected in the period July 25-August 8, reaching values of 64 to 72 ppb expressed as 2-week mean. Passive-sampler ozone data did not show a clear relationship with elevation, although during the periods with higher ozone levels, ozone concentrations were higher at those sites below 2000 m than at sites located above that elevation. All nitrogenous pollutants studied showed a consistent decrease of concentrations with elevation. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels were low, decreasing with increasing elevation from 6.4 to 1.5 ppb summer means. Nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were around 1 to 2 ppb, which is within the range of the detection levels of the devices used. Nitric acid (HNO3) vapor concentrations were lower at higher elevations (summer means 1.9-2.5 microg m(-3) than at lower elevations (summer means 4.3-5.1 microg m(-3). Summer concentrations of ammonia (NH3) were slightly higher than nitric acid ranging from 6 microg m(-3) at the lowest site to 2.5 microg m(-3) registered at the highest elevation. Since complex interactions between ozone and nitrogenous air pollutants have already been described for forests, simultaneous information about the distribution of these pollutants is needed. This is particularly important in mountain terrain where

  2. Thermophysical properties of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, A.

    1988-02-01

    The entire report consists of tables of thermodynamic properties (including sound velocity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, Prandtl number, density) of argon at 86 to 400/degree/K, in the form of isobars over 0.9 to 100 bars. (DLC)

  3. Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) in ambient and firn interstitial air at Dome C: implications for modeling reactive nitrogen cycling on the East Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Brough, N.; Thomas, J. L.; Jones, A. E.; Savarino, J.

    2012-04-01

    The nitrogen oxides NO and NO2 (NOx) play a key role in determining the oxidizing capacity of the boundary layer in high latitudes. This influence is achieved via the photolysis of NO2 - the only source for in situ production of tropospheric ozone (O3) - and through shifting HOx radical partitioning towards the hydroxyl radical (OH) via the reaction NO + HO2 → OH + NO2. Numerous field campaigns in the high latitudes demonstrated that the polar snow pack can emit significant amounts of NOx and that one of the major driving mechanisms is UV-photolysis of nitrate (NO3-) in snow. Previously, we presented the first measurements of atmospheric NOx at Dome C, East Antarctica (75.1°S 123.3°E, 3233 m) during austral summer 2009/2010. NOx mixing ratios were highly perturbed, with a mean of 240 pptv (range 10-1000 pptv), but unlike at South Pole showed a strong diurnal variability. The timing of daily concentration extrema, the minimum at noon and the maximum in the evening, was shown to be largely determined by the dynamics of the local boundary layer. Here we focus on NOx observations in the firn interstitial air: gas phase mixing ratios at 10 cm depth were up to 10-fold those in the air above the snow and varied in phase with solar radiation, consistent with a photolytic source in the surface-near snow. Furthermore, shading experiments and firn air profiles suggest the existence of a NOx reservoir in the upper snow pack. And finally, we estimate the total oxidant burden in the open pore space, a quantity, which is not easily measured, using NOx flux measurements and deviations of the NO2:NO ratio from steady state. Observations were compared to the 1-D atmosphere-snow model MISTRA-SNOW, used previously to investigate NOx snow-photochemistry at Summit/Greenland. Model runs constrained by wind speed, snow pack profiles of NO3- concentrations and actinic flux are in close agreement with observations in ambient air. We examine how the parameterization of reactive nitrogen

  4. Composition of the atmosphere at the surface of Mars - Detection of argon-36 and preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Biemann, K.

    1976-01-01

    The composition of the Martian atmosphere was determined by the mass spectrometer in the molecular analysis experiment. The presence of argon and nitrogen was confirmed and a value of 1 to 2750 plus or minus 500 for the ratio of argon-36 to argon-40 was established. A preliminary interpretation of these results suggests that Mars had a slightly more massive atmosphere in the past, but that much less total outgassing has occurred on Mars than on earth.

  5. The effects of argon in the bioenergetics of the hamster and the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1974-01-01

    Oxygen consumption was examined in hamsters and rats exposed to normoxic mixtures of argon at 1 atm. In fasted and nonfasted animals, no marked change in O2 utilization was detectable at 22 C. However, at 7 C a significant decrease in oxygen consumption was observed where the animals were exposed in argon. The data are interpreted in terms of the greater thermal conductivity of nitrogen. The study was prompted by conflicting reports on the metabolic effects of argon and helium.

  6. 78 FR 54813 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maine; Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maine; Oxides of... comment period on our proposed Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maine... materials are available either electronically in www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at Air Quality...

  7. Review of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's health effects and exposure assessment documents on nitrogen dioxide. Report of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-09

    At the request of the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee conducted a review on the potential health hazards associated with exposure to 0.1 to 1.0 ppm nitrogen dioxide generated by unvented indoor combustion sources. The committee concluded that: (1) repeated peak exposures at concentrations of 0.3 ppm of nitrogen dioxide may cause health effects in some individuals; (2) the population groups that appear most sensitive to nitrogen dioxide exposure include children, chronic bronchitics, asthmatics, and individuals with emphysema; and (3) the most direct evidence regarding lung damage associated with nitrogen dioxide is obtained from animal studies.

  8. Vibrational and rotational CARS measurements of nitrogen in afterglow of streamer discharge in atmospheric pressure fuel/air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, S. J.; Montello, A.; Carter, C.; Lempert, W.; Gundersen, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The use of nonequilibrium plasma generated by nanosecond discharges to ignite fuel/air mixtures, known as transient plasma ignition (TPI), has been shown to effectively reduce ignition delay and improve engine performance relative to spark ignition for combustion engines. While this method is potentially useful for many engine applications, at present the underlying physics are poorly understood. This work uses coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to measure the rotational and vibrational excitation of nitrogen molecules in the discharge afterglow in a variety of fuel/air mixtures outside the limits of combustion in order to elucidate the thermal behaviour of TPI. The time evolution of relative populations of vibrationally excited states of nitrogen in the electronic ground state are reported for each gas mixture; it is shown that generation of these vibrationally excited states is inefficient during the discharge in air but that generation occurs at a high rate roughly 5 µs following the discharge; with the addition of fuels vibrationally excited states are observed during the discharge but an increase in population is still seen at 5 µs. Possible mechanisms for this behaviour are discussed. In addition, rotational temperature increases of at least 500 K are reported for all gas mixtures. The effect of this temperature increase on ignition, reaction rates, and thermal energy pathways are discussed.

  9. Cellular Attachment and Differentiation on Titania Nanotubes Exposed to Air- or Nitrogen-Based Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hye Yeon; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Choi, Yu-Ri; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-01-01

    The surface topography and chemistry of titanium implants are important factors for successful osseointegration. However, chemical modification of an implant surface using currently available methods often results in the disruption of topographical features and the loss of beneficial effects during the shelf life of the implant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to apply the recently highlighted portable non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ), elicited from one of two different gas sources (nitrogen and air), to TiO2 nanotube surfaces to further improve their osteogenic properties while preserving the topographical morphology. The surface treatment was performed before implantation to avoid age-related decay. The surface chemistry and morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surfaces before and after the NTAPPJ treatment were determined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a surface profiler, a contact angle goniometer, and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability, attachment and morphology were confirmed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining, and analysis of gene expression using rat mesenchymal stem cells was performed using a real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that both portable nitrogen- and air-based NTAPPJ could be used on TiO2 nanotube surfaces easily and without topographical disruption. NTAPPJ resulted in a significant increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces as well as changes in the surface chemistry, which consequently increased the cell viability, attachment and differentiation compared with the control samples. The nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment group exhibited a higher osteogenic gene expression level than the air-based NTAPPJ treatment group due to the lower atomic percentage of carbon on the surface that resulted from treatment. It was concluded that NTAPPJ treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces results in an increase in cellular activity

  10. Simultaneous observation of rotational coherent Stokes Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering in air and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, J. B.; Chang, R. K.; Zheng, J. B.; Leipertz, A.

    1983-01-01

    Rotational coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) in air and in nitrogen were observed simultaneously by using broadband generation and detection. In the broadband technique used, the entire CARS and CSRS spectrum was generated in a single laser pulse; the CSRS and CARS signals were dispersed by a spectrograph and detected simultaneously by an optical multichannel analyzer. A three-dimensional phase-matching geometry was used to achieve spatial resolution of the CSRS and CARS beams from the input beams. Under resonant conditions, similar experiments may provide a means of investigating the possible interaction between the CSRS and CARS processes in driving the rotational levels.

  11. Prediction of hydrodynamics and chemistry of confined turbulent methane-air flames with attention to formation of oxides of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elghobashi, S.; Spalding, D. B.; Srivatsa, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A formulation of the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and reacting chemical species in a tubular combustor is presented. A numerical procedure for the solution of the governing differential equations is described, and models for chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetics calculations are presented. The chemical equilibrium model is used to characterize the hydrocarbon reactions. The chemical kinetics model is used to predict the concentrations of the oxides of nitrogen. The combustor consists of a cylindrical duct of varying cross sections with concentric streams of gaseous fuel and air entering the duct at one end. Four sample cases with specified inlet and boundary conditions are considered, and the results are discussed

  12. Femtosecond laser guiding of a high-voltage discharge and the restoration of dielectric strength in air and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Leonov, S. B.; Firsov, A. A.; Shurupov, M. A.; Michael, J. B.; Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.; Popov, N. A.

    2012-12-15

    The use of a low energy, high peak intensity (>100 TW/cm{sup 2}) femtosecond laser pulse is investigated for guiding and control of a sub-microsecond high voltage discharge. Study of the laser induced plasma channel and measurements of the field required for breakdown in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure are presented. Direct imaging of the dynamics of the discharge breakdown shows effective laser guiding. The effectiveness of laser guiding is shown to be critically dependent on the laser focusing geometry, timing, and location relative to the electrodes.

  13. Femtosecond laser guiding of a high-voltage discharge and the restoration of dielectric strength in air and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, S. B.; Firsov, A. A.; Shurupov, M. A.; Michael, J. B.; Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.; Popov, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    The use of a low energy, high peak intensity (>100 TW/cm2) femtosecond laser pulse is investigated for guiding and control of a sub-microsecond high voltage discharge. Study of the laser induced plasma channel and measurements of the field required for breakdown in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure are presented. Direct imaging of the dynamics of the discharge breakdown shows effective laser guiding. The effectiveness of laser guiding is shown to be critically dependent on the laser focusing geometry, timing, and location relative to the electrodes.

  14. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    H. Oona; J.C. Solem; L.R. Veeser, C.A. Ekdahl; P.J. Rodriquez; S.M. Younger; W. Lewis; W.D. Turley

    1997-08-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal.

  15. Kinetics of excited states and radicals in a nanosecond pulse discharge and afterglow in nitrogen and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkurenkov, Ivan; Burnette, David; Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-12-01

    The present kinetic modelling calculation results provide key new insights into the kinetics of vibrational excitation of nitrogen and plasma chemical reactions in nanosecond pulse, ‘diffuse filament’ discharges in nitrogen and dry air at a moderate energy loading per molecule, ˜0.1 eV per molecule. It is shown that it is very important to take into account Coulomb collisions between electrons because they change the electron energy distribution function and, as a result, strongly affect populations of excited states and radical concentrations in the discharge. The results demonstrate that the apparent transient rise of N2 ‘first level’ vibrational temperature after the discharge pulse, as detected in the experiments, is due to the net downward V-V energy transfer in N2-N2 collisions, which increases the N2(X 1Σ, v = 1) population. Finally, a comparison of the model's predictions with the experimental data shows that NO formation in the afterglow occurs via reactive quenching of multiple excited electronic levels of nitrogen molecule, N2\\ast , by O atoms. ) published in this volume, which focuses on the kinetic modelling of the experiments. This paper presents the results of the experiments.

  16. Addressing Air, Land & Water Nitrogen Issues under Changing Climate Trends & Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    The climate of western U.S. dairy producing states is anticipated to change significantly over the next 50 to 75 years. A multimedia modeling system based upon the “nitrogen cascade” concept has been configured to address three aspects of sustainability (environmenta...

  17. 75 FR 6473 - Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... parts per million (ppm) (53 ppb), annual average (36 FR 8186). EPA completed reviews of the air quality criteria and NO 2 standards in 1985 and 1996 with decisions to retain the standard (50 FR 25532, June 19, 1985; 61 FR 52852, October 8, 1996). EPA initiated the current review of the air quality criteria...

  18. Experimental exposures of young asthmatic volunteers to 0. 3 ppm nitrogen dioxide and to ambient air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Avol, E.L.; Linn, W.S.; Peng, R.C.; Whynot, J.D.; Shamoo, D.A.; Little, D.E.; Smith, M.N.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1989-12-01

    Asthmatic volunteers aged 8 to 16 (N = 34) were exposed on separate occasions to clean air (control), to 0.30 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) in otherwise clean air, and to polluted Los Angeles area ambient air on summer mornings when NO2 pollution was expected. Exposures lasted 3 hr, with alternating 10-min periods of exercise and rest. In ambient pollution exposures, 3-hr average NO{sub 2} concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 0.26 ppm, with a mean of 0.09 ppm. Ambient exposures did not significantly affect lung function, symptoms, or bronchial reactivity to cold air, relative to the control condition. Responses to 0.3 ppm NO{sub 2} exposures were equivocal. Asthma symptoms were more severe during 1-week periods before 0.3 ppm exposures, and lung function was decreased immediately before 0.3 ppm exposures, compared to other conditions. Lung function declined slightly during the first hour at 0.3 ppm, but improved over the remaining 2 hr. Compared to other conditions, symptoms were not increased during 0.3 ppm exposures, but were increased during 1-week periods afterward. These observations may reflect untoward effects of 0.3 ppm NO{sub 2}, or may reflect chance increases in asthma severity prior to 0.3 ppm exposures.

  19. Argon Purification Reference and Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-05-23

    This engineering note is a reference for future consideration on the purification of argon. The original concern was for the possibility of argon contamination from components in the cryostats over long-term storage. An argon purification system could also be useful for purifying the contents of the argon dewar. The general conclusion is that most of the systems researched are too expensive at this time, but the recommended choice would be Centorr Furnaces. There were three basic types of purification systems which were to be considered. The first was the molecular sieve. This method would have been the preferred one, because it was claimed that it could purify liquid argon, removing liquid oxygen from the argon. However, none of the commercial companies researched provided this type of purification for use with liquid argon. Most companies said that this type of purification was impossible, and tests at IB-4 confirmed this. The second system contained a copper oxide to remove gaseous oxygen from argon gas. The disadvantage of this system wass that the argon had to be heated to a gas, and then cooled back down to liquid. The third system was similar to the second, except that it used tungsten or another material like titanium. This system also needed to heat the argon to gas, however the advantage of this system was that it supposedly removed all contaminants, that is, everything except for inert gases. Of the three systems, the third is the type manufactured by Centorr Furnaces, which uses a titanium charge.

  20. Nitrogen-doped carbonaceous catalysts for gas-diffusion cathodes for alkaline aluminum-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, E. S.; Atamanyuk, I. N.; Ilyukhin, A. S.; Shkolnikov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Cobalt tetramethoxyphenyl porphyrin and polyacrylonitrile - based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction were synthesized and characterized by means of SEM, TEM, XPS, BET, limited evaporation method, rotating disc and rotating ring-disc electrode methods. Half-cell and Al-air cell tests were carried out to determine the characteristics of gas-diffusion cathodes. Effect of active layer thickness and its composition on the characteristics of the gas-diffusion cathodes was investigated. Power density of 300 mW cm-2 was achieved for alkaline Al-air cell with an air-breathing polyacrylonitrile-based cathode.

  1. Argon gas concentration effects on nanostructured molybdenum nitride layer growth using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlaq, U.; Ahmad, R.; Saleem, S.; Shah, M. S.; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Khan, N.; Khalid, N.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of argon concentration (10%-40%) on the surface properties of molybdenum is studied in nitrogen-argon mixture using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge. The analysis is carried out by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Vickers microhardness tester to investigate surface properties of the nitrided samples. XRD results exhibit the formation of molybdenum nitrides. Crystallite size analysis and SEM morphology confirm the growth of nanostructured molybdenum nitride layers. Moreover, significant increase in surface hardness (by a factor of about two times) is found when the sample is treated for 30% argon in nitrogen-argon mixed plasma.

  2. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  3. Air pollution and changes in forest nitrogen status: Fog and rain deposition and nitrogen losses from forested watersheds in the San Bernardino Mountains. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fenn, M.E.; Poth, M.A.

    1998-08-01

    The primary objective of this project was to examine the effects of N deposition on mixed conifer forests in southern California. Studies were conducted at selected sites an air pollution gradient in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). The main tasks were: (1) to measure N deposition to the forest in fog and throughfall, (2) to determine spatial and temporal patterns of nitrate export in stream water, and (3) to quantify trace gas fluxes from soil at sites with high and low N deposition. Fog was found to be an important N source at the western end of the SMB due to his high frequency and presence at elevated concentrations. N deposition from throughfall was found to be similar to levels in forests where adverse effects have occurred. Annual fluxes of N from soil were 18-times higher at the western end of the SBM than at the eastern end. The data provide evidence of forest nitrogen saturation caused by the deposition of anthropogenic pollutants over a multi-decade period in the SBM.

  4. The Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Fennema, A.; Chutjian, A.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Cremers, D.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE). Potassium-Argon dating is shown along with cosmic ray dating exposure. The contents include a flow diagram of the Argon Geochronology Experiment, and schematic diagrams of the mass spectrometer vacuum system, sample manipulation mechanism, mineral heater oven, and the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Operation with elemental abundances is also described.

  5. Tribological characteristics of nitrogen (N+) implanted iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ferrante, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of implantation of nitrogen ions (1.5 MeV) on the friction and wear characteristics of pure ion sliding against M-50 steel (unimplanted) was studied in a pin-on-disk sliding friction apparatus. Test conditions included room temperature (25 C), a dry air atmosphere, a load of 1/2 kg (4.9 N), sliding velocities of 0.043 to 0.078 m/sec (15 to 25 rpm), a pure hydrocarbon lubricant (n-hexadecane), or a U.S.P. mineral oil and nitrogen ion implantation doses of 5x10 to the 15th power and 5x10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm. No differences in wear rates were observed in the low dose experiments. In the high dose experiments, small reductions in initial (40 percent) and steady state (20 percent) wear rates were observed for nitrogen implanted iron riders as compared with unimplanted controls. No differences in average friction coefficients were noted for either dose. Auger electron spectroscopy combined with argon ion bombardment revealed a subsurface Gaussian nitrogen distribution with a maximum concentration of 6 atomic percent at a depth of 0.8 microns. Similar analysis within the wear scar of an implanted rider after 20 microns of wear yielded only background nitrogen concentration. No inward migration of nitrogen ions was observed. Previously announced in STAR as N82-24322

  6. Tribological characteristics of nitrogen (N+) implanted iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Ferrante, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of implantation of nitrogen ions (1.5 MeV) on the friction and wear characteristics of pure ion sliding against M-50 steel (unimplanted) was studied in a pin-on-disk sliding friction apparatus. Test conditions included room temperature (25 C), a dry air atmosphere, a load of 1/2 kg (4.9 N), sliding velocities of 0.043 to 0.078 m/sec (15 to 25 rpm), a pure hydrocarbon lubricant (n-hexadecane), or a U.S.P. mineral oil and nitrogen ion implantation doses of 5x10 to the 15th power and 5x10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm. No differences in wear rates were observed in the low dose experiments. In the high dose experiments, small reductions in initial (40 percent) and steady state (20 percent) wear rates were observed for nitrogen implanted iron riders as compared with unimplanted controls. No differences in average friction coefficients were noted for either dose. Auger electron spectroscopy combined with argon ion bombardment revealed a subsurface Gaussian nitrogen distribution with a maximum concentration of 6 atomic percent at a depth of 0.8 microns. Similar analysis within the wear scar of an implanted rider after 20 microns of wear yielded only background nitrogen concentration. No inward migration of nitrogen ions was observed.

  7. Isentropic compression of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H.

    1997-06-01

    The compression was done in an MC-1 flux compression (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is being sought.

  8. Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  9. Statistical summary and trend evaluation of air quality data for Cleveland, Ohio in 1967 to 1971: Total suspended particulate, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.; Burr, J. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Air quality data for Cleveland, Ohio, for the period of 1967 to 1971 were collated and subjected to statistical analysis. The total suspended particulate component is lognormally distributed; while sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide are reasonably approximated by lognormal distributions. Only sulfur dioxide, in some residential neighborhoods, meets Ohio air quality standards. Air quality has definitely improved in the industrial valley, while in the rest of the city, only sulfur dioxide has shown consistent improvement. A pollution index is introduced which displays directly the degree to which the environmental air conforms to mandated standards.

  10. Production and study of megawatt air-nitrogen plasmatron with divergent channel of an output electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakaev, E. H.; Chinnov, V. F.; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Sargsyan, M. A.; Konovalov, P. V.

    2015-11-01

    Megawatt generator of high-enthalpy air plasma jet (H ≥ 30 kJ/g) is constructed. Plasmatron belongs to the class of plasma torches with thermionic cathode, tangential swirl flow and divergent channel of an output electrode-anode. Plasma torch ensures the formation of the slightly divergent (2α = 12°) air plasma jet with the diameter D = 50 mm. The current-voltage characteristics of the plasma torch has virtually unchanged voltage relative to its current with enhanced (compared with arcs in cylindrical channels) stable combustion zone. Preliminary analysis of the obtained air plasma spectra shows that at a current of 1500 A near-axis zone of the plasma jet is characterized by a temperature of up to 15000 K, and the peripheral radiating area has a temperature of 8000-9000 K.

  11. Remote lasing in air by recombination and electron impact excitation of molecular nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñano, Joseph; Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman; Gordon, Daniel; Fernsler, Richard; Scully, Marlan

    2012-02-01

    We analyze and simulate the physical mechanisms for a remote atmospheric lasing configuration which utilizes a combination of an ultrashort pulse laser to form a plasma filament of seed electrons, and a heater beam to heat the seed electrons. Nitrogen molecules are excited by electron impact and recombination processes to induce lasing in the ultraviolet. Recombination excitation, thermal excitation, gain, and saturation are analyzed and simulated. The lasing gain is sufficiently high to reach saturation within the length of the plasma filament. A remotely generated ultraviolet source may have applications for standoff detection of biological and chemical agents.

  12. Can citizen science produce good science? Testing the OPAL Air Survey methodology, using lichens as indicators of nitrogenous pollution.

    PubMed

    Tregidgo, Daniel J; West, Sarah E; Ashmore, Mike R

    2013-11-01

    Citizen science is having increasing influence on environmental monitoring as its advantages are becoming recognised. However methodologies are often simplified to make them accessible to citizen scientists. We tested whether a recent citizen science survey (the OPAL Air Survey) could detect trends in lichen community composition over transects away from roads. We hypothesised that the abundance of nitrophilic lichens would decrease with distance from the road, while that of nitrophobic lichens would increase. The hypothesised changes were detected along strong pollution gradients, but not where the road source was relatively weak, or background pollution relatively high. We conclude that the simplified OPAL methodology can detect large contrasts in nitrogenous pollution, but it may not be able to detect more subtle changes in pollution exposure. Similar studies are needed in conjunction with the ever-growing body of citizen science work to ensure that the limitations of these methods are fully understood. PMID:23631940

  13. 77 FR 9532 - Air Quality Designations for the 2010 Primary Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Branch, EPA Region 5, 77 West Jackson Minnesota, Ohio, and Street, Chicago, IL... Agency FR Federal Register FRM Federal Reference Method NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NO 2... component of greatest concern and is used as the indicator for the larger group of NO X . (See 75 FR...

  14. 78 FR 47253 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maine; Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... (69 FR 23951) requires areas to request a separate section 182(f) NO X exemption request under the...: (1) The NO X SIP call (63 FR 57356: October 27, 1998); (2) the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) (70..., 1996 (61 FR 5690). If EPA takes final action to approve Maine's section 182(f) NO X exemption...

  15. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen emitted in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires to coastal waters of de la Plata River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda Rojas, Andrea L.; Venegas, Laura E.

    The Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires (MABA) is the third mega-city in Latin America. Atmospheric N emitted in the area deposits to coastal waters of de la Plata River. This study describes the parameterizations included in DAUMOD-RD (v.3) model to evaluate concentrations of nitrogen compounds (nitrogen dioxide, gaseous nitric acid and nitrate aerosol) and their total (dry and wet) deposition to a water surface. This model is applied to area sources and CALPUFF model to point sources of NO x in the MABA. The models are run for 3 years of hourly meteorological data, with a spatial resolution of 1 km 2. Mean annual deposition is 69, 728 kg-N year -1 over 2 339 km 2 of river. Dry deposition contributions of N-NO 2, N-HNO 3 and N-NO 3- to this value are 44%, 22% and 20%, respectively. Wet deposition of N-HNO 3 and N-NO 3- represents 3% and 11% of total annual value, respectively. This very low contribution results from the rare occurrence of rainy hours with wind blowing from the city to the river. Monthly dry deposition flux estimated for coastal waters of MABA varies between 7 and 13 kg-N km -2 month -1. These results are comparable to values reported for other coastal zones in the world.

  16. Argon Welding Inside A Workpiece

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1988-01-01

    Canopies convert large hollow workpiece into inert-gas welding chamber. Large manifold serves welding chamber for attachment of liner parts in argon atmosphere. Every crevice, opening and passageway provided with argon-rich environment. Weld defects and oxidation dramatically reduced; also welding time reduced.

  17. Response of ozone to changes in hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide concentrations in outdoor smog chambers filled with Los Angeles air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Nelson A.; Gunst, Richard F.

    During the summer portion of the 1987 Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS), outdoor smog chamber experiments were performed on Los Angeles air to determine the response of maximum ozone levels, O 3(max), to changes in the initial concentrations of hydrocarbons, HC, and nitrogen oxides, NO x. These captive-air experiments were conducted in downtown Los Angeles and in the downwind suburb of Claremont. Typically, eight chambers were filled with LA air in the morning. In some chambers the initial HC and/or NO x concentrations were changed by 25% to 50% by adding various combinations of a mixture of HC, clean air, or NO x. The O 3 concentration in each chamber was monitored throughout the day to determine O 3(max). An empirical mathematical model for O 3(max) was developed from regression fits to the initial HC and NO x concentrations and to the average daily temperature at both sites. This is the first time that a mathematical expression for the O 3-precursor relationship and the positive effect of temperature on O 3(max) have been quantified using captive-air experiments. An ozone isopleth diagram prepared from the empirical model was qualitatively similar to those prepared from photochemical mechanisms. This constitutes the first solely empirical corroboration of the O 3 contour shape for Los Angeles. To comply with the Federal Ozone Standard in LA, O 3(max) must be reduced by approximately 50%. Several strategies for reducing O 3(max) by 50% were evaluated using the empirical model. For the average initial conditions that we measured in LA, the most efficient strategy is one that reduces HC by 55-75%, depending on the ambient HC/NO x ratio. Any accompanying reduction in NO x would be counter-productive to the benefits of HC reductions. In fact, reducing HC and NO x simultaneously requires larger percentage reductions for both than the reduction required when HC alone is reduced. The HC-reduction strategy is the most efficient on average, but no single

  18. Simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by air under calcium oxide assist.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Liu, Renlong; Shu, Jiancheng; Li, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Leaching tests of electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) indicated that high contents of soluble manganese and ammonia-nitrogen posed a high environmental risk. This work reports the results of simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese by air under calcium oxide assist. The ammonia-nitrogen stripping rate increased with the dosage of CaO, the air flow rate and the temperature of EMR slurry. Stripped ammonia-nitrogen was absorbed by a solution of sulfuric acid and formed soluble (NH4)2SO4 and (NH4)3H(SO4)3. The major parameters that effected soluble manganese precipitation were the dosage of added CaO and the slurry temperature. Considering these two aspects, the efficient operation conditions should be conducted with 8 wt.% added CaO, 60°C, 800 mL min(-1) air flow rate and 60-min reaction time. Under these conditions 99.99% of the soluble manganese was precipitated as Mn3O4, which was confirmed by XRD and SEM-EDS analyses. In addition, the stripping rate of ammonia-nitrogen was 99.73%. Leaching tests showed the leached toxic substances concentrations of the treated EMR met the integrated wastewater discharge standard of China (GB8978-1996). PMID:26301855

  19. Analysis of Mexico City urban air pollution using nitrogen dioxide column density measurements from UV/Visible spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Payne, D. G.; Grutter, M.; Melamed, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The differential optical absorption spectroscopy method (DOAS) was used to get column densities of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the analysis of zenith sky UV/visible spectra. Since the optical path length provides critical information in interpreting NO2 column densities, in conjunction with NO2 column densities, the oxygen dimer (O4) column density was retrieved to give insight into the optical path length. We report observations of year round NO2 and O4 column densities (from august 2009 to september 2010) from which the mean seasonal levels and the daily evolution, as well as the occurrence of elevated pollution episodes are examined. Surface nitric oxide (NO) and NO2 from the local monitoring network, as well as wind data and the vertical aerosol density from continuous Lidar measurements are used in the analysis to investigate specific events in the context of local emissions from vehicular traffic, photochemical production and transport from industrial emissions. The NO2 column density measurements will enhance the understanding Mexico City urban air pollution. Recent research has begun to unravel the complexity of the air pollution problem in Mexico City and its effects not only locally but on a regional and global scale as well.

  20. Formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by repetitive negatively pulsed helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets propagating into humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have many beneficial effects in their use in surface treatment and, in particular, plasma medicine. One of these benefits is the controlled production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the active discharge through the molecular gases added to the primary noble gas in the input mixture, and through the interaction of reactive species in the plasma effluent with the ambient air. In this computational investigation, a parametric study was performed on the production of RONS in a multiply pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet sustained in a He/O2 mixture and flowing into ambient humid air. The consequences of flow rate, O2 fraction, voltage, and repetition rate on reactant densities after a single discharge pulse, after 30 pulses, and after the same total elapsed time were investigated. At the end of the first discharge pulse, voltage has the greatest influence on RONS production. However, the systematic trends for production of RONS depend on repetition rate and flow rate in large part due to the residence time of RONS in the plasma zone. Short residence times result in reactive species produced by the previous pulse still being in the discharge tube or in the path of the ionization wave at the next pulse. The RONS therefore accumulate in the tube and in the near effluent on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This accumulation enables species requiring multiple reactions among the primary RONS species to be produced in greater numbers.

  1. Photoionization of argon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.; Pratt, Stephen T.

    1982-01-01

    Argon clusters were produced in a free supersonic molecular beam expansion of pure argon at room temperature and the photoionization efficiency curves of the trimer through hexamer were measured in the wavelength regions from threshold to 700 Â. A study of the Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve as a function of nozzle stagnation pressure shows that fragmentation of heavier clusters can dominate the spectrum, even near threshold, and even when the nozzle conditions are such that the Ar⁺4 intensity is only a small fraction of the Ar⁺3 intensity. The Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve, obtained using nozzle stagnation conditions such that no heavier ions were detected, exhibits several broad peaks near threshold which show similarities to bands of the dimer. At high nozzle stagnation pressures, the photoionization efficiency curves for Ar⁺3 to Ar⁺6 are nearly identical due to the effects of fragmentation. These spectra exhibit two very broad features which are similar to features observed in the solid. The threshold regions for all the positive ions show extremely gradual onsets, making it difficult to determine the appearance potentials accurately. The appearance potentials for Ar⁺2 and Ar⁺3 are 855.0±1.5 and 865.0±1.5 Â, respectively, yielding a value of 0.18±0.05 eV for the dissociation energy of Ar⁺3. The appearance potentials for the heavier clusters Ar⁺4 through Ar⁺6 are all approximately 870±2 Â.

  2. Isotopic and Chemical Characterization of Particulate Nitrogen in Marine Air at Bermuda during Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turekian, V.; Macko, S.; Keene, W.

    2001-12-01

    Size resolved particulate nitrogen species were measured on Bermuda during spring, 1998. NO3- was primarily associated with super-†m radius aerosol and NH4+ with sub-†m radius aerosol, which is consistent with thermodynamic properties of the gaseous precursors and the size distribution of aerosol acidity. The average d15N for the super-†m aerosol (-2.1 +- 0.5ooo) was depleted in 15N relative to submicron aerosol (d15N = 5.3 +- 1.5 o/oo). The d15N range between super-{μ }m and sub-†m aerosol is consistent with the different sources for NO3- and NH4+. The d15N values indicate that high temperature combustion was the dominant source for the NO3-. The strong correlation between the d15N for paired aerosols with geometric mean radii (GMR) 5.4 and 2.3{μ }m suggests that incorporation of NO3- into the aerosol was unidirectional following the reaction HNO3(g) <--> HNO3(aq)<--> H+ + NO3-(aq). There was nosignificant correlation between the d15N values for paired aerosols with GMR 0.34 and 0.18 {μ }m, suggesting that NH3 actively recycles between phases: NH3(g)<--> NH3 (aq) + H20 (aq) <--> H+ + OH- + NH3(aq) <--> NH4+(aq) + OH- The dry deposition of super-†m aerosol accounted for over 99% of the dry deposition of total NO3- (HNO3 + particulate NO3-) and 62% of NH4+. Based on long-term measurements of wet deposition fluxes on Bermuda during spring, dry-deposition accounted for 24% of the wet + dry deposition total NO3 and approximately 3% of the wet + particuate dry NH4+ flux. Most of the organic nitrogen was associated with the smallest aerosol fraction and accounted for approxiamtely 6% of the total particualte N concentration and <4% of total N depositon flux during this period.

  3. Oxidative Nitration of Styrenes for the Recycling of Low-Concentrated Nitrogen Dioxide in Air.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Dagmar; de Salas, Cristina; Heinrich, Markus R

    2015-09-21

    The oxidative nitration of styrenes in ethyl acetate represents a metal-free, environmentally friendly, and sustainable technique to recover even low concentrations of NO2 in air. Favorable features are that the product mixture comprising nitroalcohols, nitroketones, and nitro nitrates simplifies at lower concentrations of NO2 . Experiments in a miniplant-type 10 L wet scrubber demonstrated that the recycling technique is well applicable on larger scales at which initial NO2 concentrations of >10 000 ppm were reliably reduced to less than 40 ppm. PMID:26284827

  4. Heterogeneous photochemical reactions of a propylene-nitrogen dioxide-metal oxide-dry air system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Ibusuki, Takashi

    Photochemical reactions of a C 3H 6-NO 2-air system in the presence of metal oxide were investigated. The metal oxides showing strong photooxidation activity were found to be n-type semiconductor oxides with the energy band gap around 3 eV. Formation of cyano-compounds (HCN and CH 3CN) was also observed and the activity can be explained in terms of the adsorptivity of NO onto metal oxides. Coalfired fly ash as a model of mixed metal oxides was also examined and their photocatalytic action was discussed.

  5. Nitrogen responses in groundwater, surface water and air following nitrate action plans in the Netherlands and Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, H.; Rozemeijer, J.; Visser, A.; Kronvang, B.; Erisman, J. W.; Refsgaard, J.; Thorling, L.; Slomp, C. P.; Prommer, H.

    2012-12-01

    The emissions of nutrients to air and water tend to increase worldwide. Both The Netherlands and Denmark are notorious for large inputs of nutrients in intensive agricultural practice in the previous 60 years. However, both countries have established legislation and action programs to reduce the supply and impacts of nutrients to air, groundwater and surface waters since 1985. This presentation analyses the response of nitrogen in air, surface water and groundwater following these action programs over the period 1985-2010. Responses of agriculturally derived N in air show a significant and rapid decrease since the beginning of these programs. Responses of N concentrations in many Dutch and Danish agriculturally dominated watersheds are also rapid. A clear response of nitrate-N in groundwater was revealed by age dating the water and simulations show that this also leads to a quick response of N outflow to surface waters. The rapid response of surface water is contra dictionary to the generally accepted idea that the slow transport of the groundwater N pool tends to lengthen the time scales necessary for the full recovery of N concentrations in surface waters. We stipulate that the young and shallow component of groundwater flow can discharge previously applied N effectively which causes the improvement of shallow groundwater quality to be reflected in the quick surface water response. While delay of N discharge may be true for areas with thick unsaturated zones and very limited agricultural use close to water courses, this is clearly not the case for areas with pronounced groundwater-surface water interaction such as the Netherlands delta setting or the Danish estuarine setting. The Dutch and Danish results show that N fluxes towards air and water can be managed and effectively monitored, which may help to counteract the increasing nutrient emissions in other densely populated and intensively used parts of the world. In order to predict time scales for recovery, it

  6. Sterilization of bacterial endospores by an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Lim, Jin P.; Li, Shou Z.

    2007-06-25

    Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. However, the spore-killing efficiency of the atmospheric-pressure argon-oxygen jet depends very sensitively on the oxygen concentration in the argon gas.

  7. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  8. [Oxygen metabolism in the body during substitution of nitrogen by helium in the air].

    PubMed

    Troshikhin, G V; Isaakian, L A; Bekirova, G G

    1975-01-01

    The total gas exchange, body temperature, content of free oxygen in the quadriceps muscle and its changes upon oxygen inhalation of a known dosage (oxygen test) were measured in the Wistar rats during their one-hour exposure to a helium-oxygen atmosphere (21%) at 25 degrees C. In this atmosphere the animals displayed a 1.8 degrees decline in the body temperature, a 20.5% increase in the gas exchange and a 26% decrease of oxygen in the muscular tissue as compared with the respective parameters in the air. After the experiment during the first 20 min exposure to the normal atmosphere oxygen tests were 10-15% lower than before the experiment. These findings give evidence for an increase of oxygen exchange in the muscles of animals exposed to the helium-oxygen atmosphere at a temperature below the comfortable level. PMID:1214483

  9. Investigation of hydrogen-air ignition sensitized by nitric oxide and by nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, M.; Grillo, A.

    1977-01-01

    The sensitization of stoichiometric hydrogen-air ignition by NO, NO2 and a mixture of NO and NO2 was investigated behind reflected shock waves in a shock tube. Induction times were measured in pressure range 0.27 to 2.0 atm, temperature range 800 to 1500 K, and for NO or NO2 mole percent between 0.0 and 4.5. Addition of both NO and NO2 reduced the measured induction times. The experimental data are interpreted in terms of H2-O2-NO(x) oxidation reaction mechanisms. The influence of NO(x) upon a supersonic combustion ramjet combustor test, conducted in an arc-heated facility, is assessed.

  10. Effects of frequency on fatigue behavior of type 316 low-carbon, nitrogen-added stainless steel in air and mercury for the spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Fielden, D. E.; Brooks, C. R.; Brotherton, M. D.; Jiang, L.; Yang, B.; Wang, H.; Strizak, J. P.; Mansur, L. K.

    2006-01-01

    The high-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316 low-carbon, nitrogen-added (LN) stainless steel (SS), the prime-candidate target-container material for the spallation neutron source (SNS), was investigated in air and mercury. Test frequencies ranged from 0.2 to 10 Hz with an R ratio of -1, and 10 to 700 Hz with an R ratio of 0.1. During tension-compression fatigue studies, a significant increase in the specimen temperature was observed at 10 Hz in air, which decreased the fatigue life of the 316 LN SS relative to that at 0.2 Hz. Companion tests in air were carried out, while cooling the specimen with nitrogen gas at 10 Hz in air. In these experiments, fatigue lives were comparable at 10 Hz in air with nitrogen cooling and at 0.2 Hz in air. During tension-tension fatigue studies, a higher specimen temperature was observed at 700 than at 10 Hz. After cooling the specimen, comparable fatigue lives were found at 10 and at 700 Hz. The frequency effect on the fatigue life in mercury was found to be much less than that in air, due to the fact that mercury acts as an effective coolant during the fatigue experiment. Striation spacing on the fracture surface at different test frequencies was closely examined, relative to calculated Δ K values, during fatigue of the 316 LN SS. Specimen self-heating has to be considered in understanding fatigue characteristics of 316 LN SS in air and mercury.

  11. A combined TEM and X-ray microanalytical study of argon in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, R. J.; Goodhew, P. J.

    1988-07-01

    A series of aluminium samples have been implanted at room temperature with a low dose of argon ions. The development of argon bubbles from the initially sub-microscopic argon clusters has been studied by annealing the samples to a series of temperatures up to 0.97 Tm. The argon content of selected volumes of each sample has been determined by X-ray analysis in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). This result has then been compared with that calculated from measurements of bubble sizes taken from TEM micrographs of the visible bubble population in the same volume of the sample. The results indicate that sub-microscopic argon clusters may survive after annealing to temperatures as high as 500°C. Evidence is also found for the trapping of argon at the air formed surface oxide-metal interfaces.

  12. Carbon and nitrogen removal from glucose-glycine melanoidins solution as a model of distillery wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation.

    PubMed

    Phuong Thu, Le; Michèle, Besson

    2016-06-01

    Sugarcane molasses distillery wastewater contains melanoidins, which are dark brown recalcitrant nitrogenous polymer compounds. Studies were carried out in batch mode to evaluate Pt and Ru supported catalysts in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) process of a synthetic melanoidins solution, prepared by stoichiometric reaction of glucose with glycine. The addition of a catalyst slightly improved TOC removal compared with the non-catalytic reaction, and especially promoted the conversion of ammonium produced from organically-bound nitrogen in melanoidins to molecular nitrogen and nitrate. The selectivity to N2 attained 89% in the presence of the Pt catalysts in the reaction conditions used (TOC=2200mgL(-1), TN=280mgL(-1), 0.5g catalyst loaded with 3% metal, 210°C, 70bar total air pressure). To avoid leaching of the active metal by organically-bound nitrogen, the reaction was very efficiently performed in a two-step reaction consisting in WAO to convert nitrogen into ammonium, before the introduction of a catalyst. PMID:26900982

  13. Spectral intensity of the N2 emission in argon low-pressure arc discharges for lighting purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen is discussed as an alternative to hazardous mercury in lamps for general lighting. Molecular nitrogen bands emit in both the near-UV (the second positive system C3Πu → B3Πg) and the visible spectral range (the first positive system B3Πg → A3Σ+u), which reduces conversion losses. To analyse the potential of nitrogen, low-pressure arc discharges in an argon background were characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The spectral intensity of the molecular nitrogen emission rises with increasing nitrogen content in the discharge and shows a maximum around 4 mbar of absolute pressure. With regard to the application as a light source, radiation efficiencies were determined, which are around 5% at maximum. In order to identify the main population processes a collisional radiative model for the nitrogen-argon system was established which reveals the high relevance of heavy-particle collisions due to a pressure of a few mbar. The decisive excitation reactions for the state N2 C3Πu are the well-known processes of energy pooling between metastable nitrogen molecules and energy transfer from metastable argon atoms. For the state N2 B3Πg the main population channels are collision-induced crossings within the nitrogen states, where the collision partner can be either a nitrogen molecule or an argon atom, and the quenching collisions with argon.

  14. Elevated NH 3 and NO 2 air concentrations and nitrogen deposition rates in the vicinity of a highway in Southern Bavaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Manfred; Jakobi, Gert; Feicht, Ernst; Bernhardt, Markus; Fischer, Anton

    A transect study consisting of air concentration and deposition measurements of nitrogen compounds was performed to estimate the potential influence of car emissions on the nitrogen input to ecosystems. Therefore, two transects each consisting of 4 plots, the first in a coniferous forest and the second one in an extensively farmed grassland, were installed perpendicular to a highway south of Munich (Bavaria). Both profiles were influenced mainly by car emissions and showed only small local influences caused by agricultural activities. In the framework of a pilot study based upon denuder measurements we found a strong temporal dependency of both nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and ammonia (NH 3) concentrations on traffic density. In the main study air concentrations of NO 2 and NH 3 were measured by passive samplers; they used as the basis for the estimation of dry deposition. These estimations have been compared with the results of analyses from simultaneously conducted canopy throughfall deposition and open air bulk measurements of nitrate (NO 3-) and ammonium (NH 4+). Additionally, within the forest transect the variety of different soil vegetation species was recorded and quantified. We obtained a strong gradient of gas concentrations along both profiles. Whereas the bulk deposition remained quite constant along the non-forested transect, the nitrogen throughfall deposition rate diminished substantially with the distance from the highway. The deposition rate at the forest edge was twice of that inside. The nitrogen load estimated for the examined forest in the vicinity of the highway was comparable to other forest ecosystems situated near diffuse emission sources from agriculture. It could be shown that changes in soil composition and soil vegetation along the forest transect are caused by decreasing nitrogen deposition with distance from the highway. The application of road salt in winter leads to further impacts.

  15. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, Edgar; Pencheva, Mariana; Benova, Evgenia; Dias, Fransisco; Tatarova, Elena

    2009-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of a microwave (2.45 GHz) Argon plasma torch driven by a surface wave is presented. The theoretical model couples in a self-consistent way the wave electrodynamics and the electron and heavy particle kinetics. The set of coupled equations includes: Maxwell's equations, the electron Boltzmann equation, including electron-electron collisions, and the particle balance equations for electrons, excited atoms (4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, 6s), and atomic (Ar^+) and molecular ions (Ar2^+). The input parameters of the model are: gas pressure (760 Torr), plasma radius (R = 0.75 cm), dielectric permittivity (ɛd = 4.0) and tube thickness (d = 0.15 cm) as well as the measured axial profile of the gas temperature (3500 K - 1500 K). The latter was determined from measurements of the rotational temperature of the OH molecular band in the range 306 - 315 nm. Phase and amplitude sensitive recording provides the data for the axial wavenumber and wave attenuation coefficient. The wavenumber decreases along the generated plasma torch. The electron density (Ne) axial profile as determined from measurements of Hβ Stark broadening is in agreement with the theoretical one.

  16. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  17. In situ X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Analysis of Aromatic Polyester Surface Treated with Argon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narushima, Kazuo; Okamoto, Nanami

    2013-10-01

    Effects of surface modification treatment by argon plasma processing of two types of aromatic polyester, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(oxybenzonate-co-oxynaphthoate) (POCO), were investigated. This paper presents a description of our experiment and a discussion of the surface modification mechanism, which uses a simple and inexpensive procedure to conduct analysis without breaking vacuum after plasma processing. In situ analysis of the chemical composition of a polymer surface was attempted without exposing the sample to air after argon plasma processing. In particular, the respective actions of each active species were investigated for electrons and ions in argon plasma. Electrons and ions in argon plasma break some polymer bonds. Specifically, ester groups are broken and oxygen atoms are kicked out in PET and POCO. No oxygen functional group is formed after argon plasma processing, but such groups are formed if the sample is exposed to air.

  18. Trends of nitrogen oxides in ambient air in nine European cities between 1999 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, Susann; Le Tertre, Alain; Atkinson, Richard W.; Querol, Xavier; Pandolfi, Marco; Zeka, Ariana; Haluza, Daniela; Analitis, Antonis; Katsouyanni, Klea; Bouland, Catherine; Pascal, Mathilde; Medina, Sylvia; Goodman, Patrick G.

    2015-09-01

    Legislation controlling vehicle emissions has been credited with a general downward trend in NOx (NO2+NO) concentrations in Europe since the 1990's. However, recent studies suggest that traffic (roadside) (TR) NO2 concentrations have not decreased as expected, and in some cases increased, most likely due to the use of oxidation catalysts and particle filters in diesel vehicles (EURO III, IV, V, VI). In this study we describe the time trends in NOx, NO2 and NO concentrations in 9 European cities comparing TR and urban background (UB) monitoring locations. In each city, we collected hourly city-specific NOx, NO, and NO2 data from one TR and one UB monitoring site for each year. We describe hourly, weekly, seasonal and inter-annual patterns for periods corresponding to the implementation dates of various EURO vehicle emission standards regulating NOx emissions. The diurnal patterns in all 9 cities strongly reflected morning and evening traffic. In addition, lower weekend concentrations were observed. The NOx concentrations from the TR sites remain unchanged in the majority of the cities over the study period. When stratified by 3 time periods according to the implementation of the EURO standards, an increasing NO2/NOx ratio in 7/9 cities with time was noted. However, over the same time period the NO/NO2 ratio decreased in 8/9 cities. A permanent inversion of the NO/NO2 ratio was observed to occur in 2003 in 5/9 cities. Our analyses of temporal and diurnal patterns of NOx in European cities show reductions in concentrations consistent with reductions in primary emissions likely arising from the implementation of successive EURO standards. The generally constant or increasing NO2 concentrations in the majority of the cities assessed over the study period underline the need of further regulative measures to meet the air quality standards and consequently to minimise adverse effects on human health. The ongoing collection and analysis of pollution concentrations across

  19. An experimental and numerical study of nitrogen oxide formation mechanisms in ammonia-hydrogen-air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen

    quantitatively. The NOx predictions by all the three chemical mechanisms are observed to be in fairly good agreement with the measured NOx, qualitatively, however predictions are found to be 3 to 4 times higher than the measurements for both lean and rich H 2/NH3 premixed flames. For laminar H2/NH3 diffusion flames, detailed 2-D comparisons of in-situ NO measurements with the 2-D simulated NO using the Tian, GRI-Mech3.0 and modified GRI-Mech chemical mechanisms are performed and found to differ from the measured NO by approximately an order of magnitude. For NH3 seeded H2/air diffusion flames, GRI-Mech3.0 seemed to overpredict NO by more than an order of magnitude and failed to capture the fundamental flame characteristics, such as the flame length variation with increasing NH3 in the fuel mixture. On the other hand, the predicted NO profiles by the Tian mechanism were not only found to be in better agreement with the measured NO, but they also captured the in-flame NO distribution as well, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Overall, the Tian mechanism is found to be the superior chemical mechanism to capture the NOx formation chemistry in NH3 seeded flames.

  20. Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene as metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Wang, Shaoyun; Yan, Jun; Cong, Lijie; Chen, Ye; Xi, Hongyuan

    2014-02-01

    Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene (PNCN) was used as an alternative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Here we report a novel, low-cost, scalable, synthetic method for preparation of PNCN via the carbonization of graphite oxide-polyaniline hybrid (GO-PANI), subsequently followed by KOH activation treatment. Due to its high concentration of nitrogen and high specific surface area, PNCN exhibited an excellent catalytic activity for ORR. As a result, the maximum power density of 1159.34mWm(-2) obtained with PNCN catalyst was higher than that of Pt/C catalyst (858.49mWm(-2)) in a MFC. Therefore, porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet could be a good alternative to Pt catalyst in MFCs. PMID:24239870

  1. Changes in a surface of polycrystalline aluminum upon bombardment with argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkhotov, O. G.; Ashkhotova, I. B.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.; Krymshokalova, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between argon ions and a natural oxide layer of polycrystalline aluminum is studied via Auger electron (AE) and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy. It is found that bombardment with argon ions whose energy is lower than the Al2O3 sputtering threshold results in the accumulation of bombarding ions in interstitial surface voids, thus forming a supersaturated solid solution of target atoms and bombarding ions of argon and nitrogen entrapped by the ion beam from the residual gas of the working chamber of the spectrometer.

  2. Computational and Experimental Analysis of the Effectiveness of the Argon Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Brizes, W.

    2003-02-11

    Experimental and computational studies were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of an Argon Reservoir (AR). The AR is designed to prevent the ingress of air into the extraction furnace during the insertion and removal of the extraction basket, which contains Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods. Computational computer code studies were performed to evaluate the AR design concept. Based on the results of this study it was concluded that the Argon reservoir would be very effective in keeping air and moisture from infiltrating into the furnace module if the reservoir was continuously supplied with make-up argon.

  3. Titanium-nitrogen reaction investigated for application to gettering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arntzen, J. D.; Coleman, L. F.; Kyle, M. L.; Pierce, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Titanium is one of several gettering materials available for removing nitrogen from inert gases. The reaction rate of titanium-metal sponge and nitrogen in argon-nitrogen mixtures was studied at 900 degrees C. The rate was found to depend upon the partial pressure of nitrogen in the gas phase. Mathematical relationships simulate titanium systems.

  4. New Spectrophotometric Method for Determining Nitrogen Dioxide in Air Using 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethyl benzothiazoline)-6-Sulfonic Acid-Diammonium Salt and Passive Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Alaa A.; Soliman, Ahmed A.; El-Haty, Ismail A.

    2011-01-01

    A new simple and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method for determining nitrogen dioxide in air was developed. The method is based on converting atmospheric nitrogen dioxide to nitrite ions within the IVL passive samplers used for samples collection. Acidifying nitrite ions with concentrated HCl produced the peroxynitrous acid oxidizing agent which was measured using 2, 2-azino-bis(3-ethyl benzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid-diammonium salt (ABTS) as reducing coloring agent. A parallel series of collected samples were measured for its nitrite content using a validated ion chromatographic method. The results obtained using both methods were compared in terms of their sensitivity and accuracy. Developed spectrophotometric method was shown to be one order of magnitude higher in sensitivity compared to the ion chromatographic method. Quantitation limits of 0.05 ppm and 0.55 μg/m3 were obtained for nitrite ion and nitrogen dioxid, respectively. Standard deviations in the ranges of 0.05–0.59 and 0.63–7.92 with averages of 0.27 and 3.11 were obtained for determining nitrite and nitrogen dioxide, respectively. Student-t test revealed t-values less than 6.93 and 4.40 for nitrite ions and nitrogen dioxide, respectively. These values indicated insignificant difference between the averages of the newly developed method and the values obtained by ion chromatography at 95% confidence level. Compared to continuous monitoring techniques, the newly developed method has shown simple, accurate, sensitive, inexpensive and reliable for long term monitoring of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air. PMID:21760708

  5. An investigation of the source of air Ar contamination in KAr dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mussett, A.E.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1968-01-01

    Precision of young KAr ages is limited by air argon contamination. A series of experiments in which the exposure of basalt and sanidine samples to air argon was controlled, shows that most of the air contamination does not arise in the laboratory. Because of this, it seems unlikely that air argon contamination can be significantly reduced by special sample handling and preparation techniques. ?? 1968.

  6. Effect of inlet-air humidity, temperature, pressure, and reference Mach number on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.; Diehl, L. A.; Trout, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from a gas turbine combustor. Combustor inlet air temperature ranged from 506 K (450 F) to 838 K (1050 F). The tests were primarily run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NOx emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet air humidity at a constant exponential rate: NOx = NOx0e-19H (where H is the humidity and the subscript 0 denotes the value at zero humidity). the emission index increased exponentially with increasing normalized inlet air temperature to the 1.14 power. Additional tests made to determine the effect of pressure and reference Mach number on NOx showed that the NOx emission index varies directly with pressure to the 0.5 power and inversely with reference Mach number.

  7. The photosynthetic and stomatal response of Medicago sativa cv. saranac to free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (F.A.C.E.) and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bridson, N.P.

    1996-08-01

    Plots of Medicago sativa cv. saranac were grown in the field at ambient (355 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1} air) or elevated (600{mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1} air) CO{sub 2} concentrations. High (200kg yr{sup -1}) or low (20kg yr{sup -1}) nitrogen levels were applied to two isogeneic lines, one able and one unable to use nitrogen fixing bacteria. Plants were in the second year of field growth. Exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} was via a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment System (FACE). Elevated CO{sub 2} increased diurnal assimilation by between 12% and 92%. Analysis of A/C{sub i} responses showed that effective nitrogen fertilisation was more important to rubisCO and RuBP activity than elevated CO{sub 2}. No acclimation was consistently observed. Leaves lower down the canopy were found to have lower Vc{sub max} and J{sub max} values, though age may be the cause of the latter effect. FACE conditions have only a small effect on these responses. There was some evidence found for the down-regulation of photosynthesis in the late afternoon. The FACE conditions had no affect on stomatal density but did increase epidermal cell density.

  8. Characteristics of Knock in Hydrogen-Oxygen-Argon SI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N; Rapp, V; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-02-23

    A promising approach for improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines is to employ a working fluid with a high specific heat ratio such as the noble gas argon. Moreover, all harmful emissions are eliminated when the intake charge is composed of oxygen, nonreactive argon, and hydrogen fuel. Previous research demonstrated indicated thermal efficiencies greater than 45% at 5.5 compression ratio in engines operating with hydrogen, oxygen, and argon. However, knock limits spark advance and increasing the efficiency further. Conditions under which knock occurs in such engines differs from typical gasoline fueled engines. In-cylinder temperatures using hydrogen-oxygen-argon are higher due to the high specific heat ratio and pressures are lower because of the low compression ratio. Better understanding of knock under these conditions can lead to operating strategies that inhibit knock and allow operation closer to the knock limit. In this work we compare knock with a hydrogen, oxygen, and argon mixture to that of air-gasoline mixtures in a variable compression ratio cooperative fuels research (CFR) engine. The focus is on stability of knocking phenomena, as well as, amplitude and frequency of the resulting pressure waves.

  9. Influences of flame-vortex interactions on formation of oxides of nitrogen in curved methane-air diffusion flamelets

    SciTech Connect

    Card, J.M.; Ryden, R.; Williams, F.A.

    1994-01-01

    To improve knowledge of production rates of nitrogen oxides in turbulent diffusion flames in reaction-sheet regimes, an analytical investigation is made of the structure of a parabolic flamelet. The mixture-fraction field, scalar dissipation rate and gas velocity relative to the flamelet in the vortex are related to flame curvature at the parabolic tip. Flame structure for major species and temperature is described by rate-ratio asymptotics based on two-step and three-step reduced chemical-kinetic mechanisms. Production rates by prompt, thermal and nitrous-oxide mechanisms are obtained from one-step reduced-chemistry approximations that employ steady states for all reaction intermediaries. For sufficiently large streamwise separation distances between isoscalar surfaces, it is found that equilibrium conditions are closely approached near the flame tip, and the thermal mechanism dominates there, but the prompt mechanism always dominates in the wings, away from the tip, where the highest rates of scalar dissipation occur. Increasing the tip curvature increases the Peclet number and the prompt contribution while decreasing the thermal contribution. At 1 atm and ambient temperatures of 300 K, the prompt mechanism always dominates the total production rate in the parabolic flamelet, and, perhaps surprisingly, the rate of the nitrous-oxide mechanism is faster than that of the thermal mechanism and varies with the tip curvature and with scalar dissipation in the same manner as that of the prompt mechanism, different from that of the thermal mechanism. Conclusion reached is that Zel`dovich NO is relatively insignificant in hydrocarbon-air mixtures in reaction-sheet regimes.

  10. Rate-ratio asymptotic analysis of methane-air diffusion-flame structure for predicting production of oxides of nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hewson, J.C.; Williams, F.A.

    1999-05-01

    Production rates of oxides of nitrogen in laminar methane-air diffusion flames are addressed, with thermal, prompt, and nitrous oxide mechanisms taken into account, as well as consumption processes collectively termed reburn. For this purpose, it is necessary to extend the well-known four-step flame-chemistry description to six steps, with acetylene taken out of steady-state and one-step production of nitric oxide included. Emission indices are calculated as functions of the rate of scalar dissipation at the stoichiometric mixture fraction for near-atmospheric pressures and shown to be in reasonable agreement with results obtained from numerical integrations. The various mechanisms of NO{sub x} production and consumption are verified to be strongly dependent on the flame temperature and on superequilibrium concentrations of radicals, both fuel-derived and from hydrogen-oxygen chemistry; the flame-structure analysis was extended to provide sufficient accuracy in the prediction of these quantities. It was found that for flames in near-normal ambient atmospheres, the prompt mechanism usually is most important. For longer residence times, and especially for ambient pressures and temperatures above standard, the thermal mechanism was found to increase in importance, but this increase was calculated to be offset almost entirely by NO consumption through reburn reactions. Conditions that favor reburn were observed to be those where the ratio of radical concentrations to NO concentrations is small. Longer residence times and higher pressures were demonstrated to lead both to more complete heat release and to smaller superequilibrium radical concentrations whence the correspondence between thermal production and reburn. The nitrous oxide mechanism was found to be generally less important for the conditions considered here.

  11. The statistical evaluation and comparison of ADMS-Urban model for the prediction of nitrogen dioxide with air quality monitoring network.

    PubMed

    Dėdelė, Audrius; Miškinytė, Auksė

    2015-09-01

    In many countries, road traffic is one of the main sources of air pollution associated with adverse effects on human health and environment. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is considered to be a measure of traffic-related air pollution, with concentrations tending to be higher near highways, along busy roads, and in the city centers, and the exceedances are mainly observed at measurement stations located close to traffic. In order to assess the air quality in the city and the air pollution impact on public health, air quality models are used. However, firstly, before the model can be used for these purposes, it is important to evaluate the accuracy of the dispersion modelling as one of the most widely used method. The monitoring and dispersion modelling are two components of air quality monitoring system (AQMS), in which statistical comparison was made in this research. The evaluation of the Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling System (ADMS-Urban) was made by comparing monthly modelled NO2 concentrations with the data of continuous air quality monitoring stations in Kaunas city. The statistical measures of model performance were calculated for annual and monthly concentrations of NO2 for each monitoring station site. The spatial analysis was made using geographic information systems (GIS). The calculation of statistical parameters indicated a good ADMS-Urban model performance for the prediction of NO2. The results of this study showed that the agreement of modelled values and observations was better for traffic monitoring stations compared to the background and residential stations. PMID:26293894

  12. Dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during a subnanosecond breakdown initiated by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F. Beloplotov, D. V.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during breakdown of a gap with a nonuniform distribution of the electric field by nanosecond high-voltage pulses was studied experimentally. Measurements of the amplitude and temporal characteristics of a diffuse discharge and its radiation with a subnanosecond time resolution have shown that, at any polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius, breakdown of the gap occurs via two ionization waves, the first of which is initiated by runaway electrons. For a voltage pulse with an ∼500-ps front, UV radiation from different zones of a diffuse discharge is measured with a subnanosecond time resolution. It is shown that the propagation velocity of the first ionization wave increases after its front has passed one-half of the gap, as well as when the pressure in the discharge chamber is reduced and/or when SF{sub 6} is replaced with air or nitrogen. It is found that, at nitrogen pressures of 0.4 and 0.7 MPa and the positive polarity of the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, the ionization wave forms with a larger (∼30 ps) time delay with respect to applying the voltage pulse to the gap than at the negative polarity. The velocity of the second ionization wave propagating from the plane electrode is measured. In a discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.7 MPa, this velocity is found to be ∼10 cm/ns. It is shown that, as the nitrogen pressure increases to 0.7 MPa, the propagation velocity of the front of the first ionization wave at the positive polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius becomes lower than that at the negative polarity.

  13. Dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF6 during a subnanosecond breakdown initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF6 during breakdown of a gap with a nonuniform distribution of the electric field by nanosecond high-voltage pulses was studied experimentally. Measurements of the amplitude and temporal characteristics of a diffuse discharge and its radiation with a subnanosecond time resolution have shown that, at any polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius, breakdown of the gap occurs via two ionization waves, the first of which is initiated by runaway electrons. For a voltage pulse with an ˜500-ps front, UV radiation from different zones of a diffuse discharge is measured with a subnanosecond time resolution. It is shown that the propagation velocity of the first ionization wave increases after its front has passed one-half of the gap, as well as when the pressure in the discharge chamber is reduced and/or when SF6 is replaced with air or nitrogen. It is found that, at nitrogen pressures of 0.4 and 0.7 MPa and the positive polarity of the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, the ionization wave forms with a larger (˜30 ps) time delay with respect to applying the voltage pulse to the gap than at the negative polarity. The velocity of the second ionization wave propagating from the plane electrode is measured. In a discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.7 MPa, this velocity is found to be ˜10 cm/ns. It is shown that, as the nitrogen pressure increases to 0.7 MPa, the propagation velocity of the front of the first ionization wave at the positive polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius becomes lower than that at the negative polarity.

  14. Irradiation simulation of zirconium using high energy argon implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, D. Q.; Bai, X. D.; Pan, F.

    2007-03-01

    In order to simulate the irradiation damage, the argon ion was implanted in the zirconium with fluence ranging from 1×10 16 to 1×10 17 ions/cm 2, using accelerating implanter at an extraction voltage of 190 kV at liquid nitrogen temperature. Then the effect of argon ion implantation on the aqueous corrosion behavior of zirconium was studied. The valence states of elements in the surface layer of the samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) was employed to examine the phase transformation due to the argon ion implantation. The potentiodynamic polarization technique was employed to evaluate the aqueous corrosion resistance of implanted zirconium in a 1 M H 2SO 4 solution. From XPS, there existed adsorbed carbon and a little of oxygen (depth less than 20 nm) in the surface of samples, zirconium changed from zirconia to metallic zirconium along the depth direction. From GAXRD, the argon-implanted samples are little oxidized. It was found that the corrosion resistance of implanted samples declined with increasing the fluence, which is attributed to the removing of oxide protection layer and the irradiation damage.

  15. Improved TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Zander

    2015-04-01

    This talk will discuss the outcome of recent research and development of wavelength-shifting lightguides for LArTPCs. The response of the lightguides was characterized in both air and liquid argon. Attenuation lengths over 100cm were consistently measured in air, which is an important step in the development of meter-scale lightguides for future LArTPCs. Additionally, good agreement was found between simulations and measurements performed in air and liquid argon. Such agreement indicates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of lightguide production. Zander Moss for the MIT Light Collection R&D Group.

  16. Isotopically Anomalous Nitrogen in Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, K.; Sugiura, N.; Hashizume, K.

    1993-07-01

    Introduction: Presolar grains such as diamond, SiC, and graphite have been reported to have isotopically anomalous nitrogen [1-3]. Because of their stability to chemical treatment, they are relatively easily concentrated in laboratories. There are probably other, less-durable presolar materials in primitive meteorites. We have therefore been searching for such presolar grains in UOCs, using the nitrogen isotope ratio as an indicator. In fact, isotopically heavy nitrogen in Yamato 74191 (LL3.7) and light nitrogen in ALHA 77214 (L3.4), which are not those of diamond, SiC, or graphite, have been reported [4]. Here, we report some other nitrogen isotope anomalies, especially light nitrogen found in many UOCs. Results and Discussion: Nitrogen and argon extracted by the stepped combustion method from 200 degrees C to 1200 degrees C every 100 degrees C are measured with a static QMS. ALHA 77278 (LL3.7), LEW 86018 (L3.1), and ALHA 77216 (H3.7/3.9) have isotopically heavy nitrogen. There is a possibility that these chondrites have solar nitrogen, because ALHA 77216 has a large amount of solar neon and ALHA 77278 has a small amount of solar neon. ALHA 78119 (L3.5) shows a similar degassing profile to ALHA 77214 [4]. Therefore, it may have the same carriers of anomalous nitrogen as ALHA 77214. Since Chainpur also has a similar degassing profile to ALHA 77214, although its light nitrogen abundance is smaller, it has probably the same nitrogen carrier. ALHA 78084 (H4), Grady (H3.7), and Yamato 74024 (L3.8) have very small amounts of nitrogen, probably because of metamorphic loss, and their delta ^15N values are nearly 0 per mil. ALHA 81251 (H3.2/3.4) degasses isotopically light nitrogen and primordial ^36Ar around 1100 degrees C (see Fig. 1), and delta ^15N goes down to -60 per mil at this temperature. Nearly the same degassing profiles have been found in ALH 83007 (L3.2/3.5), ALH 83010 (L3.3), EET 83399 (L3.3), LEW 86022 (L3.2), Yamato 791500, Yamato 82038, and Mezo Madaras

  17. Porous nitrogen doped carbon fiber with churros morphology derived from electrospun bicomponent polymer as highly efficient electrocatalyst for Zn-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gi Su; Lee, Jang-Soo; Kim, Sun Tai; Park, Soojin; Cho, Jaephil

    2013-12-01

    Highly porous nitrogen doped carbon fibers like churros morphology are prepared from a simple and cost-effective fabrication process, electrospinning with bicomponent polymer consisting of polystyrene (PS) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN). From appropriate ratio of two polymer and pyrolysis at 1100 °C, newly churros morphology with extremely high surface area (1271 m2 g-1) is prepared. During carbonization, more unstable PS than PAN plays a critical role in forming such morphology by acting as sacrifice materials, thus providing additional formation of inner pores and outer etched surfaces. Furthermore, it demonstrates excellent electrocatalytic activity toward ORR, which is attributed to highly meso- and macro porous nitrogen-doped large surface area and enhanced graphitic-nitrogen groups of carbon fibers. For example, the performance of a Zn-air cell based on the nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofibers exhibits a peak power density of 194 mW cm-2, comparable to that based on a commercial Pt/C catalyst (192 mW cm-2). Further, the generation of hydrogen peroxide ions (<20%) in a half cell is similar to that on the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  18. Correction of NPL-2013 estimate of the Boltzmann constant for argon isotopic composition and thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Podesta, Michael; Yang, Inseok; Mark, Darren F.; Underwood, Robin; Sutton, Gavin; Machin, Graham

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, a team from NPL, Cranfield University and SUERC published an estimate of the Boltzmann constant based on precision measurements of the speed of sound in argon. A key component of our results was an estimate of the molar mass of the argon gas used in our measurements. To achieve this we made precision comparison measurements of the isotope ratios found in our experimental argon against the ratios of argon isotopes found in atmospheric air. We then used a previous measurement of the atmospheric argon isotope ratios to calibrate the relative sensitivity of the mass spectrometer to different argon isotopes. The previous measurement of the atmospheric argon isotope ratios was carried out at KRISS using a mass spectrometer calibrated using argon samples of known isotopic composition, which had been prepared gravimetrically. We report here a new measurement made at KRISS in October 2014, which directly compared a sample of our experimental gas against the same gravimetrically-prepared argon samples. We consider that this direct comparison has to take precedence over our previous more indirect comparison. This measurement implies a molar mass which is 2.73(60) parts in 106 lighter than our 2013 estimate, a shift which is seven times our 2013 estimate of the uncertainty in the molar mass. In this paper we review the procedures used in our 2013 estimate of molar mass; describe the 2014 measurement; highlight some questions raised by the large change in our estimate of molar mass; and describe how we intend to address the inconsistencies between them. We also consider the effect of a new estimate of the low pressure thermal conductivity of argon at 273.16 K. Finally we report our new best estimate of the Boltzmann constant with revised uncertainty, taking account of the new estimates for the molar mass and the thermal conductivity of the argon.

  19. 75 FR 61486 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft (75 FR 57463, September... an atmospheric chemistry perspective as well as from an environmental effects perspective,...

  20. Experimental investigations of argon and xenon ion sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    The multipole thruster was used to investigate the use of argon and xenon propellants as possible alternatives to the electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole approach was used because of its general high performance level. The design employed, using flat and cylindrical rolled sections of sheet metal, was selected for ease of fabrication, design, assembly, and modification. All testing was conducted in a vacuum facility and the pumping was accomplished by a 0.8 m diffusion pump together with liquid nitrogen cooled liner. Minimum discharge losses were in the 200-250 ev. ion range for both argon and xenon. Flatness parameters were typically in the 0.70-0.75 range.

  1. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size. PMID:18798666

  2. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-21

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Ar{sup m} lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N₂ density [N₂]=0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H₂O]=0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H₂O]=1% and 2.6 ms for [H₂O]=0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  3. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Arm lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N2 density [N2] = 0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H2O] = 0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H2O] = 1% and 2.6 ms for [H2O] = 0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  4. Thermal information regarding the cooldown and operation of liquid argon calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.A.; Cooper, W.E.; Dixon, K.D.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Primdahl, K.; Urbin, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    Three liquid argon calorimeters were cooled down and operated as part of the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The largest vessel contains 248 metric tons of uranium and copper plates and 19 kL (5000 gal.) of liquid argon. The other two vessels are mirror images, each containing 185 metric tons of uranium and stainless steel plates and 12.1 kL (3200 gal.) of liquid argon. The cooldown was accomplished by convection heat transfer between boiling, liquid nitrogen filled finned heat exchangers and argon gas inside the vessels. Information regarding the general internal geometry of the calorimeters, cooldown, operation, and steady state heat loads will be presented.

  5. Thermal information regarding the cooldown and operation of liquid argon calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.A.; Cooper, W.E.; Dixon, K.D.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Primdahl, K.; Urbin, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Three liquid argon calorimeters were cooled down and operated as part of the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The largest vessel contains 248 metric tons of uranium and copper plates and 19 kL (5000 gal.) of liquid argon. The other two vessels are mirror images, each containing 185 metric tons of uranium and stainless steel plates and 12.1 kL (3200 gal.) of liquid argon. The cool down was accomplished by convection heat transfer between boiling liquid nitrogen filled finned heat exchangers and argon gas inside the vessels. Information regarding the general internal geometry of the calorimeters, cool down, operation, and steady state heat loads will be presented.

  6. Assessing the air quality impact of nitrogen oxides and benzene from road traffic and domestic heating and the associated cancer risk in an urban area of Verona (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Marco; Redivo, Martina; Antonacci, Gianluca; Rada, Elena Cristina; Ragazzi, Marco; Zardi, Dino; Giovannini, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of emission and dispersion of nitrogen oxides (NOx) are performed in an urban area of Verona (Italy), characterized by street canyons and typical sources of urban pollutants. Two dominant source categories are considered: road traffic and, as an element of novelty, domestic heaters. Also, to assess the impact of urban air pollution on human health and, in particular, the cancer risk, simulations of emission and dispersion of benzene are carried out. Emissions from road traffic are estimated by the COPERT 4 algorithm, whilst NOx emission factors from domestic heaters are retrieved by means of criteria provided in the technical literature. Then maps of the annual mean concentrations of NOx and benzene are calculated using the AUSTAL2000 dispersion model, considering both scenarios representing the current situation, and scenarios simulating the introduction of environmental strategies for air pollution mitigation. The simulations highlight potentially critical situations of human exposure that may not be detected by the conventional network of air quality monitoring stations. The proposed methodology provides a support for air quality policies, such as planning targeted measurement campaigns, re-locating monitoring stations and adopting measures in favour of better air quality in urban planning. In particular, the estimation of the induced cancer risk is an important starting point to conduct zoning analyses and to detect the areas where population is more directly exposed to potential risks for health.

  7. Nitrogen spark denoxer

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Henry K.; Novick, Vincent J.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.

    1997-01-01

    A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

  8. Gas analysis using Raman spectroscopy demonstrates the presence of intraperitoneal air (nitrogen and oxygen) in a cohort of children undergoing pediatric laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan P; Sato, Thomas T; Balcom, Anthony H; Groth, Travis; Hoffman, George M

    2015-02-01

    Clinically significant gas embolism during laparoscopy is a rare but potentially catastrophic event. Case reports suggest that air, in addition to the insufflation gas, may be present. We studied the effects of equipment design and flushing techniques on the composition of gas present under experimental and routine pediatric surgical conditions. Concentrations of nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured by Raman spectroscopy in gas delivered to and retrieved from a mock peritoneum during simulated laparoscopy. We then analyzed the composition of insufflated and recovered gases during elective laparoscopic procedures conducted with CO2-preflushed and unflushed tubing to determine the presence of significant (10%) quantities of air. In vitro, CO2 was not detected at the distal end of insufflator tubing until after delivery of approximately 0.2 L of gas, and N2 persisted until >0.4 L was delivered, with 40% ± 8% (mean ± SD, range 33%-49%) recovered from the mock peritoneum at the termination of initial insufflation. In clinical studies, preflushing reduced the initial concentration of N2 from 78% ± 0.5% to 23% ± 15%, but >10% air was detected in all subsequent samples, regardless of insufflation technique. Laparoscopic equipment and practice routinely permit delivery of air to the insufflated cavity. Purging the equipment with CO2 reduces but does not eliminate air (N2, O2) within the peritoneal cavity during laparoscopy. Thus, when vascular injury occurs, embolized gases will contain variable quantities of N2, O2, and CO2. As the initial insufflation volume diminishes and approaches the volume of the insufflation tubing, which occurs in infants and young pediatric patients, the concentration of N2 will approximate that of room air in an unflushed system. Small insufflation volumes containing high N2 concentrations can contribute to catastrophic air emboli in neonates and small pediatric patients. PMID:25602452

  9. The relationship between seasonal variations of total-nitrogen and total-phosphorus in rainfall and air mass advection paths in Matsue, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Katsuhiro; Kamiya, Hiroshi; Kano, Yoshihiro; Saki, Yukiko; Yamamuro, Masumi; Ishitobi, Yu

    We collected rainwater samples from every rainfall in Matsue, Japan in order to study variations of nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations over time. The seasonal average concentration by magnitude order of Total Nitrogen (here after T-N) was highest in winter, then in spring, fall, and summer and that of Total Phosphorus (here after T-P) was highest in spring, then in winter, fall, and summer. These seasonal variations were examined in relation to the transportation paths of arrived air masses by using a backward trajectory and rainfall patterns from a surface synoptic weather chart. In winter, continental air masses frequently flow from China or Siberia and the resultant winter rainfall is on many occasions of a continental type. In summer, maritime air masses frequently arrive from the Pacific Ocean and this resultant rainfall therefore was often of maritime type. Looking at average concentrations of T-N and T-P for each rainfall type, continental types were high range and maritime types were low. It was therefore concluded that the monthly average concentration of T-N was affected by continental air masses from northern China in winter and by maritime ones from the Pacific Ocean in summer. The maximum deposition of T-N was caused by this concentration in winter and rainfall depth in summer. Seasonal variation of T-P showed a different fluctuation tendency from T-N, with a maximum concentration in spring, and minimum in summer and fall. T-P was susceptible to the yellow sand phenomenon which maximised T-P deposition in spring.

  10. Surface-Tuned Co3O4 Nanoparticles Dispersed on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene as an Efficient Cathode Electrocatalyst for Mechanical Rechargeable Zinc-Air Battery Application.

    PubMed

    Singh, Santosh K; Dhavale, Vishal M; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-09-30

    The most vital component of the fuel cells and metal-air batteries is the electrocatalyst, which can facilitate the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a significantly reduced overpotential. The present work deals with the development of surface-tuned cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanoparticles dispersed on nitrogen-doped graphene as a potential ORR electrocatalyst possessing some unique advantages. The thermally reduced nitrogen-doped graphene (NGr) was decorated with three different morphologies of Co3O4 nanoparticles, viz., cubic, blunt edged cubic, and spherical, by using a simple hydrothermal method. We found that the spherical Co3O4 nanoparticle supported NGr catalyst (Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h) has acquired a significant activity makeover to display the ORR activity closely matching with the state-of-the-art Pt supported carbon (PtC) catalyst in alkaline medium. Subsequently, the Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h catalyst has been utilized as the air electrode in a Zn-air battery, which was found to show comparable performance to the system derived from PtC. Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h catalyst has shown several hours of flat discharge profile at the discharge rates of 10, 20, and 50 mA/cm(2) with a specific capacity and energy density of ~590 mAh/g-Zn and ~840 Wh/kg-Zn, respectively, in the primary Zn-air battery system. In conjunction, Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h has outperformed as an air electrode in mechanical rechargeable Zn-air battery as well, which has shown consistent flat discharge profile with minimal voltage loss at a discharge rate of 50 mA/cm(2). The present results, thus demonstrate that the proper combination of the tuned morphology of Co3O4 with NGr will be a promising and inexpensive material for efficient and ecofriendly cathodes for Zn-air batteries. PMID:26376490

  11. Iron-nitrogen-activated carbon as cathode catalyst to improve the power generation of single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yajun; Mo, Xiaoping; Li, Kexun; Pu, Liangtao; Liu, Di; Yang, Tingting

    2016-04-01

    In order to improve the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC), iron-nitrogen-activated carbon (Fe-N-C) as an excellent oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst was prepared here using commercial activated carbon (AC) as matrix and employed in single chamber MFC. In MFC, the maximum power density increased to 2437±55mWm(-2), which was 2 times of that with AC. The open circuit potential (OCP) of Fe-N-C cathode (0.47) was much higher than that of AC cathode (0.21V). The R0 of Fe-N-C decreased by 47% from 14.36Ω (AC) to 7.6Ω (Fe-N-C). From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species were present, which played an important role in the ORR performance of Fe-N-C. These results demonstrated that the as-prepared Fe-N-C material provided a potential alternative to Pt in AC air cathode MFC for relatively desirable energy generation and wastewater treatment. PMID:26898678

  12. 75 FR 70258 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft (75 FR 57463, September 21, 2010). The EPA... a later date (75 FR 61486, October 5, 2010). The supplementary materials were: an errata sheet for... an atmospheric chemistry perspective as well as from an environmental effects perspective,...

  13. Microstructures and Argon age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Fitz Gerald, John; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Microstructures can be dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but certain conditions apply. In particular the nature of the physical processes that took place during development of need be identified, and the pattern of gas release (and/or retention) during their evolution in nature, and subsequently in the mass spectrometer, during the measurement process. Most researchers cite temperature as the sole variable of importance. There is a belief that there is a single "closure temperature" or a "closure interval" above which the mineral is incapable of retaining radiogenic argon. This is a false conception. Closure is practically relevant only in circumstances that see a rock cooled relatively rapidly from temperatures that were high enough to prevent significant accumulation of radiogenic argon, to temperatures below which there is insignificant loss of radiogenic argon through the remainder of the geological history. These conditions accurately apply only to a limited subset - for example to rocks that cool rapidly from a melt and thereafter remain at or close to the Earth's surface, without subsequent ingress of fluids that would cause alteration and modification of microstructure. Some minerals in metamorphic rocks might display such "cooling ages" but in principle these data are difficult to interpret since they depend on the rate of cooling, the pressures that applied, and the subsequent geological history. Whereas the science of "cooling ages" is relatively well understood, the science of the Argon Partial Retention Zone is in its infancy. In the Argon PRZ it is evident that ages should (and do) show a strong correlation with microstructure. The difficulty is that, since diffusion of Argon is simultaneously multi-path and multi-scale, it is difficult to directly interrogate the distinct reservoirs that store gas populations and thus the age information that can be recorded as to the multiple events during the history of an individual microstructure. Laser

  14. Gas chromatograph analysis on closed air and nitrogen oxide storage atmospheres of recalcitrant seeds of Quercus Alba

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage of recalcitrant seeds remains an unsolved problem. This study investigated the quantitative gas analysis of nitrous oxide (N2O) and air atmospheres on the recalcitrant seeds of Quercus alba by using gas chromatograph. Ten seeds were placed in each sealed atmospheric system of air and 98/2% N...

  15. ESTIMATES OF THE ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN SPECIES: CLEAN AIR STATUS AND TRENDS NETWORK. 1990 THROUGH 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) was established by EPA in response to the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. To satisfy these requirements CASTNet was designed to assess and report on geographic patterns and long-term, temporal trends in ambient ...

  16. [TESTING THE PROTECTIVE PROPERTIES OF ARGON DURING SUBACUTE EXPOSURE TO HYPOXIC HYPOXIA].

    PubMed

    Soldatov, P E; Dadasheva, O A; Gurieva, T S; Markin, A A; Tatarkin, S V; Nosovskii, A M; Smirnov, I A; Tiurin-Kuzmin, A Iu; Shulagin, Yu A; Smolenskaia, T S; Grishin, V I

    2015-01-01

    Previously it has been shown that argon has a stimulating effect on biological processes including, specifically, strong protective properties during exposure to acute (1-4 hrs.) hypoxic hypoxia. Experiments with animals under hypoxia gradually growing over 3 to 7 days may give insight into mechanisms of the argon protective action. Purpose of the work was to explore character and severity of developing disorders, to attempt their prognosis and to test potentiality of argon as a protector from the effects of subacute hypoxic exposure. In two series of experiments Wistar male rats were housed in pressure chambers with different rates of O2 reduction without argon and with argon in concentration of 32-38%. Oxygen reduction from 20.9 to 9.0% in 3 days led to the death of 50% animals. Oxygen reduction to 12.0% in 7 days and one day in low-oxygen atmosphere was harmless for animals. Argon in air makes the response to hypoxia almost twice as sharp on virtually every level (red blood system, physiological, morphological and biochemical shifts) validating the concept that argon acts as a stimulator. In context of the most critical processes of adaptation to hypoxia--activation of blood formation and lipid metabolism--this sharpening of the response results in depletion of body resources and instigates irreversible shifts. PMID:26087583

  17. Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal features of the liquid argon TPC are outlined and the status of development efforts, particularly at UCI, are discussed. Technical problems associated with liquid TPC's are: the liquid must be maintained at a high level of purity to enable long distance drifting of ionization electrons, and the signal size is small due to the absence of practical charge multiplication as found in gas chambers. These problems have been largely resolved in studies using small (1 to 100 l) detectors, thus allowing a realistic consideration of the physics potential of such devices.

  18. Liquid Argon Calorimetry for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan

    2008-05-01

    This summer, the largest collaborative physics project since the Manhattan project will go online. One of four experiments for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, ATLAS, employs over 2000 people. Canadians have helped design, construct, and calibrate the liquid argon calorimeters for ATLAS to capture the products of the high energy collisions produced by the LHC. From an undergraduate's perspective, explore how these calorimeters are made to handle their harsh requirement. From nearly a billion proton-proton collisions a second, physicists hope to discover the Higgs boson and other new fundamental particles.

  19. Enhancement of the EUV emission of a metallic capillary discharge operated with argon ambient gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, L. S. Tan, D. Saboohi, S. Yap, S. L. Wong, C. S.

    2014-03-05

    In this work, the metallic capillary discharge is operated with two different ambients: air and argon. In the experiments reported here, the chamber is first evacuated to 10{sup −5} mbar. The discharge is initiated by the transient hollow cathode effect generated electron beam, with either air ambient or argon ambient at 10{sup −4} mbar. The bombardment of electron beam at the tip of the stainless steel anode gives rise to a metallic vapor, which is injected into the capillary and initiates the main discharge through the capillary. The EUV emission is measured for different discharge voltages for both conditions and compared. It is found that the metallic capillary discharge with argon ambientis able to produce higher EUV energy compared to that with air ambient.

  20. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  1. Determination of argon resonance line emission in an ICP hitting a biological sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertmann, P.; Bibinov, N.; Halfmann, H.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-02-01

    A Monte Carlo model for the calculation of argon resonance line photon trapping in a double inductively coupled plasma is presented. Different probabilities of photon behaviour are calculated and the flux of photons hitting a target placed in the middle of the chamber is determined by simulation. Different gas admixtures or gas impurities can absorb photons or quench excited argon atoms, which is considered in the simulation. Electron energy distribution function and electron density are measured with a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Nitrogen impurities, due to opening of the chamber, are measured using OES. These measured values and other additional input values such as gas temperature are used for simulation.

  2. Argon Triple-Point Device for Calibration of SPRTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.; Lipiński, L.; Kowal, A.; Steur, P. P. M.; Pavese, F.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an apparatus for the calibration of long-stem platinum resistance thermometers at the argon triple point , designed at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structural Research, Poland (INTiBS). A hermetically sealed cell filled at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Italy with high purity gas (6N) is the main element of this apparatus. The cell is placed in a cryostat fully immersed in liquid nitrogen. A temperature-controlled shield ensures the quasi-adiabatic condition needed for proper realization of the phase transition. A system for correcting the temperature distribution along the thermometer well is also implemented. The cell cooling and argon solidification is carried out by filling the thermometer well with liquid nitrogen. A LabVIEW computer program written at INTiBS automatically controls the triple-point realization process. The duration of a melting plateau in the apparatus lasts for about 24 h. The melting width for between 20 % and 80 % was mK. The reproducibility of the plateau temperature is better than.

  3. Generation Of Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma By Diffusive And Constricted Discharges In Rest And Flowing Gases (Air And Nitrogen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishev, Y.; Grushin, M.; Karalnik, V.; Kochetov, I.; Napartovich A.; Trushkin N.

    2010-07-01

    Weekly ionized non-thermal plasma (NTP) is of great interest for many applications because of its strong non-equilibrium state wherein an average electron energy Te exceeds markedly gas temperature Tg, i.e. electrons in the NTP are strongly overheated compared to neutral gas. Energetic electrons due to frequent collisions with the neutrals excite and dissociate effectively atoms and molecules of the plasma-forming gas that results in a creation of physically-, and bio-chemically active gaseous medium in a practically cold background gas. At present there are many kinds of plasma sources working at low and atmospheric pressure and using MW, RF, low frequency, pulsed and DC power supplies for NTP generation. The NTP at atmospheric pressure is of considerable interest for practice. A reason is that sustaining the NTP at atmospheric pressure at first allows us to avoid the use of expensive vacuum equipment and second gives opportunity to use the NTP for treatment of the exhausted gases and polluted liquids. The second opportunity cannot be realized at all with use of the NTP at low pressure. Main subject of this talk is low current atmospheric pressure gas discharges powering with DC power supplies. Plasma forming gases are air and nitrogen which are much cheaper compared to rare gases like He or Ar. Besides, great interest to molecular nitrogen as plasma forming gas is caused first of all its unique capability to accumulate huge energy in vibration, electron (metastables) and dissociated (atomic) states providing high chemical reactivity of the activated nitrogen. All active particles mentioned above have a long lifetime, and they can be therefore transported for a long distance away from place of their generation. Different current modes (diffusive and constricted) of these discharges are discussed. Experimental and numerical results on generation of chemically active species in the diffusive and constricted mode are presented. Some data on the usage of the

  4. Strain-cycling fatigue behavior of ten structural metals tested in liquid helium (4 K), in liquid nitrogen (78 K), and in ambient air (300 K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtigall, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Strain-cycling fatigue behavior of 10 different structural alloys and metals was investigated in liquid helium (4 K), in liquid nitrogen (78 K), and in ambient air (300 K). At high cyclic lives, fatigue resistance increased with decreasing temperature for all the materials investigated. At low cyclic lives, fatigue resistance generally decreased with decreasing temperature for the materials investigated. Only for Inconel 718 did fatigue resistance increase with decreasing temperature over the entire life range investigated. Comparison of the experimental fatigue behavior with that predicted by the Manson method of universal slopes showed that the fatigue behavior of these materials can be predicted for cryogenic temperatures by using material tensile properties obtained at those same temperatures.

  5. The flow field of an underexpanded H2 jet coaxially injected into a hot free or ducted supersonic jet of air or nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data obtained in an investigation of the mixing of an underexpanded hydrogen jet in a supersonic flow both with and without combustion are presented. Tests were conducted in a Mach 2 test stream with both air and nitrogen as test media. Total temperature of the test stream was 2170 K, and static exit pressure was about one atmosphere. The static pressure at the exit of the hydrogen injector's Mach 2 nozzle was about two atmospheres. Primary measurements included shadowgraphs and pitot pressure surveys of the flow field. Pitot surveys and wall static pressures were measured for the case where the entire flow was shrouded. The results are compared to similar experimental data and theoretical predictions for the matched pressure case.

  6. 75 FR 57463 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ....'' The air quality criteria are to ``accurately reflect the latest scientific knowledge useful in... advances in scientific knowledge on the effects of the pollutant on public health or welfare. The EPA is... Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) and to solicit public comment on the overall structure, framing of...

  7. Argon purge gas cooled by chill box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Cooling argon purge gas by routing it through a shop-fabricated chill box reduces charring of tungsten inert gas torch head components. The argon gas is in a cooled state as it enters the torch and prevents buildup of char caused by the high concentrations of heat in the weld area during welding operations.

  8. Liquid argon calorimetry for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid argon calorimetry is a mature technique. However, adapting it to the challenging environment of the SSC requires a large amount of R D. The advantages of the liquid argon approach are summarized and the issues being addressed by the R D program are described. 18 refs.

  9. Blazing a trail in Rocky Mountain National Park: Application of monitoring and research on nitrogen deposition to air and water quality policy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. H.; Baron, J. S.; Blett, T. F.; Nanus, L.; Collett, J.

    2006-12-01

    The results of 25 years of monitoring and research in the Loch Vale watershed in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado documented ecological effects of nitrogen (N) deposition on alpine and subalpine ecosystems, including changes in soils, terrestrial and aquatic vegetation, and surface-water chemistry. The large body of evidence using various approaches to study diverse components of the ecosystem made a compelling case for the need to reduce atmospheric N deposition in the park, which is federally protected from degradation by any form of air pollution. In 2005, state and federal agencies signed a memorandum of understanding agreeing to work together to reverse the trend of increasing N deposition in the park. Critical loads of nitrogen deposition must now be determined that protect all components of the ecosystem, then target loads must be set as a first step toward emissions reductions. Cost-effective implementation of target loads will require advances in scientific understanding of relative contributions from different source categories and source areas of N emissions. Currently, atmospheric deposition is 4-6 kg N/ha, with just under half in the form of ammonium. Sources include power production, industry, and the transportation sector as well as agricultural emissions from crop and livestock production. Ongoing studies are incorporating atmospheric modeling and natural tracers such as stable isotopes to better define source attribution and spatial distribution of N deposition.

  10. Air quality at Santiago, Chile: a box modeling approach—I. Carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorquera, Héctor

    Ambient monitored data at Santiago, Chile, are analyzed using box models with the goal of assessing contributions of different economic activities to air pollution levels. The period analyzed is 1990-2000, characterized by the introduction of air pollution emissions standards, shift to unleaded gasoline and compressed natural gas, and steady growth of the private and public fleet and the associated fuel consumption growth. The box models explicitly include the seasonal behavior of meteorological variables; the results show that dispersion conditions in fall and winter seasons are 20-30% of the summertime values. This result explains the poor air quality in those seasons and shows that significant emissions reductions are required in order to improve air quality in wintertime. Emissions of CO, NO x and SO 2 are estimated from data on fuel consumption in the city; the estimated parameters are thus fleet-average or industry-average emission factors. In terms of contributions to ambient concentrations, older cars and diesel vehicles are the major contributors to CO and NO x impacts, with more than 60% and 50%, respectively. Ambient concentrations of SO 2 are largely dominated by stationary sources, although long range contributions are not negligible. By contrast, CO and NO x pollution is dominated by local sources within the city boundaries. The box models can be used for forecasting purposes, and they can predict annual average concentrations within 20% of the observed values. The methodology requires data on ambient air quality measurements and fuel consumption statistics, and produces quantitative results, which can be combined with economic models to analyze environmental regulation and public policies.

  11. Improved TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Z.; Bugel, L.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Moon, J.; Toups, M.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-08-01

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments.

  12. Simultaneous temperature and multi-species measurements in opposed jet flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, J. A.; Cheng, T. S.; Pitz, R. W.; Nandula, S.; Wilson, L. G.; Pellett, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    A narrowband UV Raman scattering system is used to obtain measurement profiles of major and minor species concentrations, temperature, and mixture fraction in opposed jet diffusion flames. The measurement profiles can be compared to previously obtained temperature and concentration profiles (Pellett et al., 1989), obtained using CARS, and they can also be qualitatively compared to the predicted concentration and temperature profiles in pure hydrogen/air flames (Gutheil and Williams, 1990) and in diluted hydrogen/air flames (Dixon-Lewis and Missaghi, 1988; Ho and Isaac, 1991). The applied stress-rates for the two flame conditions studied are 240/s and 340/s, with respective hydrogen concentrations in the fuel jet of 0.67 and 0.83, on a mole fraction basis (0.13 and 0.26 hydrogen mass fractions, respectively).

  13. Twenty years of ambient observations of nitrogen oxides and specified hydrocarbons in air masses dominated by traffic emissions in Germany.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Christian; Klemp, Dieter; Rohrer, Franz; Mihelcic, Djuro; Wegener, Robert; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2016-07-18

    The analysis of the individual composition of hydrocarbon (VOC) mixtures enables us to transform observed VOC-concentrations into their respective total VOC-reactivity versus OH radicals (RVOC = Σ(kOH+VOCi × [VOCi])). This is particularly useful because local ozone production essentially depends on this single parameter rather than on the details of the underlying hydrocarbon mixture (Klemp et al., Schriften des Forschungszentrums Jülich, Energy & Environment, 2012, 21). The VOC composition also enables us to pin down the major emission source of hydrocarbons in urban areas to be petrol cars with temporarily reduced catalyst efficiency (the so-called cold-start situation) whereas the source of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) is expected to be nowadays dominated by diesel cars. The observations in the vicinity of main roads in German cities show a decrease in the ratio of OH reactivities of VOC and NO2 (RVOC/RNO2) by a factor of 7.5 over the time period 1994-2014. This is larger than the expected decrease of a factor of 2.9 taking estimated trends of VOC and NOx traffic emissions in Germany (Umweltbundesamt Deutschland, National Trend Tables for the German Atmospheric Emission Reporting, 2015), during this time period. The observed reduction in the RVOC/RNO2 ratio leads to a drastic decrease in local ozone production driven by the reduction in hydrocarbons. The analysis reveals that the overall reduction of ozone production benefits from the low decrease of NOx emissions from road traffic which is a consequence of the eventual absence of catalytic converters for nitrogen oxide removal in diesel cars up to now. PMID:27117015

  14. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  15. Accumulation of air in polymeric materials investigated by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, W. L.; Mothe, E.; Beldjilali, S.; Hermann, J.

    2012-03-01

    We report on spectroscopic analyses of plasmas produced by laser irradiation of nitrogen-free and nitrogen-containing polymer materials. Ultraviolet laser pulses of 5 ns duration and 4 mJ energy were focused onto the samples with a fluence of about 20 Jcm-2. The plasma emission was analyzed with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with a gated detector. Comparing the spectra recorded during ablation in air and argon, it is shown that the spectral line emission of atomic nitrogen originates from the excitation of the ambient air, whereas the CN molecular bands are essentially emitted from the ablation plume. Furthermore, the measurements demonstrate an additional contribution of nitrogen emission from the air molecules accumulated in the polymer. Storage under vacuum over a duration of the order of one day leads to the release of the absorbed air. As a consequence of the air absorption, the measurement of elemental composition of polymers via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is particularly difficult. Here, we quantify the atmospheric contribution to the plume emission during polymer analysis.

  16. Accumulation of air in polymeric materials investigated by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, W. L.; Hermann, J.; Mothe, E.; Beldjilali, S.

    2012-03-15

    We report on spectroscopic analyses of plasmas produced by laser irradiation of nitrogen-free and nitrogen-containing polymer materials. Ultraviolet laser pulses of 5 ns duration and 4 mJ energy were focused onto the samples with a fluence of about 20 Jcm{sup -2}. The plasma emission was analyzed with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with a gated detector. Comparing the spectra recorded during ablation in air and argon, it is shown that the spectral line emission of atomic nitrogen originates from the excitation of the ambient air, whereas the CN molecular bands are essentially emitted from the ablation plume. Furthermore, the measurements demonstrate an additional contribution of nitrogen emission from the air molecules accumulated in the polymer. Storage under vacuum over a duration of the order of one day leads to the release of the absorbed air. As a consequence of the air absorption, the measurement of elemental composition of polymers via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is particularly difficult. Here, we quantify the atmospheric contribution to the plume emission during polymer analysis.

  17. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  18. Performance of the 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel with air, nitrogen, and sulfur hexafluoride media under closed loop automatic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishna, S.; Kilgore, W. Allen

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel was modified in 1994, to operate with any one of the three test gas media viz., air, cryogenic nitrogen gas, or sulfur hexafluoride gas. This document provides the initial test results with respect to the tunnel performance and tunnel control, as a part of the commissioning activities on the microcomputer based controller. The tunnel can provide precise and stable control of temperature to less than or equal to +/- 0.3 K in the range 80-320 K in cyro mode or 300-320 K in air/SF6 mode, pressure to +/- 0.01 psia in the range 15-88 psia and Mach number to +/- O.0015 in the range 0.150 to transonic Mach numbers up to 1.000. A new heat exchanger has been included in the tunnel circuit and is performing adequately. The tunnel airfoil testing benefits considerably by precise control of tunnel states and helps in generating high quality aerodynamic test data from the 0.3-m TCT.

  19. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2015-06-12

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of high voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  20. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of highmore » voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.« less

  1. Argon-39 Background in DUNE Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Gleb; DUNE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a 40-kt liquid argon detector that will be constructed 5000 ft underground in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in order to study neutrino and proton decay physics. Instrumenting liquid argon with photon detectors to record scintillation in addition to the ionization signal can significantly improve time and energy resolution of the experiment. Argon produces light with wavelength of 128 nm. The reference design for the photon detectors includes acrylic bars covered in wavelength shifter, where the scintillation light can be captured and reemitted with longer wavelengths, then detected using silicon photomultipliers. Radiological backgrounds may noticeably deteriorate the photon detection system performance, especially for low-energy interactions. A particularly important background comes from argon-39 decays, because argon-39 is present in natural argon that will be used in DUNE and the background rate increases with the size of the experiment. The effect of the argon-39 background has been studied and is presented in this talk.

  2. 40Ar/39Ar systematics and argon diffusion in amber: implications for ancient earth atmospheres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Argon isotope data indicate retained argon in bulk amber (matrix gas) is radiogenic [40Ar/39Ar ???32o] than the much more abundant surface absorbed argon [40Ar/39Ar ???295.5]. Neutron-induced 39Ar is retained in amber during heating experiments to 150?? -250??C, with no evidence of recoiled 39Ar found after irradiation. A maximum permissible volume diffusion coefficient of argon in amber (at ambient temperature) D???1.5 x 10-17 cm2S-1 is calculated from 39Ar retention. 40Ar/39Ar age calculations indicate Dominican Republic amber is ??? 45 Ma and North Dakota amber is ??? 89 Ma, both at least reasonable ages for the amber based upon stratigraphic and paleontological constraints and upon the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar. To date, over 300 gas analyses of ambers and resins of Cretaceous to Recent age that are geographically distributed among fifteen noted world locations identify mixtures of gases in different sites within amber (Berner and Landis, 1988). The presence of multiple mixing trends between compositionally distinct end-members gases within the same sample and evidence for retained radiogenic argon within the amber argue persuasivley against rapid exchange by diffusion of amber-contained gases with moder air. Only gas in primary bubbles entrapped between successive flows of tree resin has been interpreted as original "ancient air", which is an O2-rich end-member gas with air-like N2/Ar ratios. Gas analyses of these primary bubbles indicate atmospheric O2 levels in the Late Cretaceous of ??? 35%, and that atmospheric O2 dropped by early Tertiary time to near a present atmospheric level of 21% O2. A very low argon diffusion coefficient in amber persuasively argues for a gas in primary bubbles trapped in amber being ancient air (possibly modified only by O2 reaction with amber). ?? 1991.

  3. Experimental investigation on large-area dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric nitrogen and air assisted by the ultraviolet lamp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gu, Biao; Wang, Wenchun; Wang, Dezhen; Peng, Xuwen

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, ultraviolet radiation produced by the ultraviolet lamp is employed to supply pre-ionization for the dielectric barrier discharge in N(2) or air at atmospheric pressure. The effect of the ultraviolet pre-ionization on improving the uniformity of the dielectric barrier discharge is investigated experimentally. The atmospheric pressure glow discharge of the large area (270 mm x 120 mm) is obtained successfully via the ultraviolet pre-ionization in atmospheric DBD in N(2) when the gas gap decrease to 3mm. Based on the emission spectra, the mechanism which ultraviolet pre-ionization improves the uniformity of the dielectric barrier discharge is discussed. PMID:19129005

  4. Hybrid membrane--PSA system for separating oxygen from air

    DOEpatents

    Staiger, Chad L.; Vaughn, Mark R.; Miller, A. Keith; Cornelius, Christopher J.

    2011-01-25

    A portable, non-cryogenic, oxygen generation system capable of delivering oxygen gas at purities greater than 98% and flow rates of 15 L/min or more is described. The system consists of two major components. The first component is a high efficiency membrane capable of separating argon and a portion of the nitrogen content from air, yielding an oxygen-enriched permeate flow. This is then fed to the second component, a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit utilizing a commercially available, but specifically formulated zeolite compound to remove the remainder of the nitrogen from the flow. The system is a unique gas separation system that can operate at ambient temperatures, for producing high purity oxygen for various applications (medical, refining, chemical production, enhanced combustion, fuel cells, etc . . . ) and represents a significant advance compared to current technologies.

  5. Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydorgen/Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two-time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (> 1 x 10(exp -20) moles/cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/air fuel and for the H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA s Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T4) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T3). High values of the regression coefficient R2 are obtained.

  6. Summary of Simplified Two Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydrogen/Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John; Molnar, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (greater than l x 10(exp -20)) moles per cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T(sub 4)). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/Air fuel and for H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T(sub 4)) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T(sub 3)). High values of the regression coefficient R squared are obtained.

  7. METHOD OF FIXING NITROGEN FOR PRODUCING OXIDES OF NITROGEN

    DOEpatents

    Harteck, P.; Dondes, S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for fixing nitrogen from air by compressing the air, irradiating the compressed air in a nuclear reactor, cooling to remove NO/ sub 2/, compressing the cooled gas, further cooling to remove N/sub 2/O and recirculating the cooled compressed air to the reactor.

  8. A method of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide determination in ambient air by use of passive samplers and ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krochmal, Dariusz; Kalina, Andrzej

    A passive sampling method for simultaneous determination of SO 2 and NO 2 in ambient air is presented. Sampling periods from 24 h to 1 month can be applied. SO 2 and NO 2 collected by the sampler are determined as sulphate and nitrite with ion chromatography in a single run. Both suppressed or nonsuppressed IC can be applied with the former giving lower detection limits. Analysis for NO 2 as nitrite can be also performed spectrophotometrically after reaction with Saltzman reagent. The lower determination limit for monthly exposure of samplers is 0.5 and 0.7 μg m -3 for NO 2 and SO 2, respectively. For shorter periods of exposure the determination limit is proportionally higher. Precision of the method as RSD is 6% for NO 2 and 14% for SO 2 at concentrations of around 50 μg m -3. Influence of meteorological factors like sunlight, wind velocity, temperature and humidity of air on sampling rate have been minimised by an appropriate modification of the sampler and calibration of the method under various conditions. The method has been optimised to make it possible to perform large number of analyses at a very low cost. Passive samplers can be stored before and after exposure for a period of up to 10 weeks what makes it possible to prepare and analyse them by a central laboratory for better integrity of data. Samplers can be sent from and back to the central laboratory by mail. Suitability of the method for large-scale monitoring was demonstrated in several projects.

  9. MAX-DOAS tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column measurements compared with the Lotos-Euros air quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlemmix, T.; Eskes, H. J.; Piters, A. J. M.; Schaap, M.; Sauter, F. J.; Kelder, H.; Levelt, P. F.

    2015-02-01

    A 14-month data set of MAX-DOAS (Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) tropospheric NO2 column observations in De Bilt, the Netherlands, has been compared with the regional air quality model Lotos-Euros. The model was run on a 7×7 km2 grid, the same resolution as the emission inventory used. A study was performed to assess the effect of clouds on the retrieval accuracy of the MAX-DOAS observations. Good agreement was found between modeled and measured tropospheric NO2 columns, with an average difference of less than 1% of the average tropospheric column (14.5 · 1015 molec cm-2). The comparisons show little cloud cover dependence after cloud corrections for which ceilometer data were used. Hourly differences between observations and model show a Gaussian behavior with a standard deviation (σ) of 5.5 · 1015 molec cm-2. For daily averages of tropospheric NO2 columns, a correlation of 0.72 was found for all observations, and 0.79 for cloud free conditions. The measured and modeled tropospheric NO2 columns have an almost identical distribution over the wind direction. A significant difference between model and measurements was found for the average weekly cycle, which shows a much stronger decrease during the weekend for the observations; for the diurnal cycle, the observed range is about twice as large as the modeled range. The results of the comparison demonstrate that averaged over a long time period, the tropospheric NO2 column observations are representative for a large spatial area despite the fact that they were obtained in an urban region. This makes the MAX-DOAS technique especially suitable for validation of satellite observations and air quality models in urban regions.

  10. Modelling of RF Discharge in Argon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, P.; Virostko, P.; Hubicka, Z.; Bartos, P.

    2007-12-26

    An one-dimensional hybrid model of RF discharge in low-temperature argon plasma is presented in our paper. The hybrid model consists of two parts--particle model which simulates fast electrons while fluid model simulates slow electrons and positive argon ions. In the particle model the positions and velocities of fast electrons are calculated by means of deterministic Verlet algorithm while the collision processes are treated by the stochastic way. For the solution of fluid equations, for slow electrons and positive argon ions, the Scharfetter-Gummel exponential algorithm was used. Typical results of our calculations presented in this paper are total RF current and RF voltage waveforms on the planar substrate immersed into argon plasma. The next results which can be found here are the ion, electron and displacement current waveforms on the substrate. Especially, the knowledge of waveform of the ion current is very important for experimental physicists during the deposition of thin films.

  11. Clinical periodontics with the argon laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, R. L.

    1995-04-01

    The argon laser has proven to be a valuable tool for the thermodynamic debridement of the periodontal lesion, incisions and tissue fusion. Illustrations of clinical applications and discussion of laser parameters will be provided.

  12. Flexible Support Liquid Argon Heat Intercept

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; /Fermilab

    1987-05-18

    A device in the flexible support system for the Central Calorimeter is the Liquid Argon Heat Intercept. The purpose of this apparatus is to intercept heat outside the inner vessel so that bubbles do not form inside. If bubbles did happen to form inside the vessel, they would cause an electric arc between the read-out board and the absorption plates, thus destroying the pre-amplifier. Since this heat intercept is located in the center of the flexible support, it must also support the load of the Central Caloimeter. Figure 1 shows how the intercept works. The subcooled liquid argon is driven through a 1/4-inch x 0.049-inch w tube by hydrostatic pressure. the ambient heat boils the subcooled argon. The gaseous argon flows through the tube and is condensed at the top of the vessel by a 100 kW cooling coil. This process is rpesent in all four flexible support systems.

  13. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  15. Spherical nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon as an efficient bifunctional electrocatalyst for Zn-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidi, Lida; Davari, Elaheh; Iqbal, Muhammad; Purkait, Tapas K.; Ivey, Douglas G.; Veinot, Jonathan G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Materials based upon porous carbon have gained considerable attention due to their high surface area, electric conductivity, thermal and chemical stability, low density, and availability. These superior properties make them ideal for diverse applications. Doping these carbon nanostructures holds promise of designing the properties of these structures and opening the door to practical applications. Herein, we report the preparation of hollow N-doped mesoporous carbon (HMC) spheres fabricated via polymerization and carbonization of dopamine on a sacrificial spherical SiO2 template that is removed upon hydrofluoric acid etching. The morphology and structural features of these HMCs were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy and the N-doping (7.1 at%) was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The oxygen reduction/evolution reaction (ORR/OER) performance of N-doped HMC was evaluated using rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry in an alkaline electrolyte. N-doped HMC demonstrated a high ORR onset potential of -0.055 V (vs. Hg/HgO) and excellent stability. The outstanding bifunctional activity was implemented in a practical Zn-air battery (ZAB), which exhibited a small charge-discharge voltage polarization of 0.89 V and high stability over repeated cycling.Materials based upon porous carbon have gained considerable attention due to their high surface area, electric conductivity, thermal and chemical stability, low density, and availability. These superior properties make them ideal for diverse applications. Doping these carbon nanostructures holds promise of designing the properties of these structures and opening the door to practical applications. Herein, we report the preparation of hollow N-doped mesoporous carbon (HMC) spheres fabricated via polymerization and carbonization of dopamine on a sacrificial spherical SiO2 template that is removed upon hydrofluoric acid etching. The morphology and structural

  16. Argon Mediates Anti-Apoptotic Signaling and Neuroprotection via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Felix; Kaufmann, Kai; Roesslein, Martin; Wellner, Franziska; Auwärter, Volker; Kempf, Jürgen; Loop, Torsten; Buerkle, Hartmut; Goebel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently, the noble gas argon attracted significant attention due to its neuroprotective properties. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. There is growing evidence that the extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is involved in Argon´s protective effect. We hypothesized that argon mediates its protective effects via the upstream located toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4. Methods Apoptosis in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) was induced using rotenone. Argon treatment was performed after induction of apoptosis with different concentrations (25, 50 and 75 Vol% in oxygen 21 Vol%, carbon dioxide and nitrogen) for 2 or 4 hours respectively. Apoptosis was analyzed using flow cytometry (annexin-V (AV)/propidiumiodide (PI)) staining, caspase-3 activity and caspase cleavage. TLR density on the cells’ surface was analyzed using FACS and immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of TLR signaling and extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) were assessed by western blot, activity assays and FACS analysis. Results Argon 75 Vol% treatment abolished rotenone-induced apoptosis. This effect was attenuated dose- and time-dependently. Argon treatment was accompanied with a significant reduction of TLR2 and TLR4 receptor density and protein expression. Moreover, argon mediated increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated after inhibition of TLR signaling. ERK1/2 and TLR signaling inhibitors abolished the anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective effects of argon. Immunohistochemistry results strengthened these findings. Conclusion These findings suggest that argon-mediated anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective effects are mediated via inhibition of TLR2 and TLR4. PMID:26624894

  17. Determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air by use of a passive sampling technique and triethanolamine as absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Krochmal, D.; Gorski, L. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of temperature, humidity, and storage on a diffusive sampler were tested by use of the Amaya-Sugiura method, modified previously. Several materials were used as carriers for triethanolamine in the sampler. The mass of NO{sub 2} absorbed in the sampler was determined spectrophotometrically as nitrite by using Saltzman solution. The collection efficiency of the sampler was lower than that calculated from Fick's law of diffusion due to significant contribution of liquid phase in the overall sampler diffusive resistance. This resulted in an increase of the mass of NO{sub 2} absorbed in the sampler by ca. 20% per 10{degree}C of temperature growth and by ca. 25% when the relative humidity rose from 0 to 100%. Dependence of concentration of TEA solution in the sampler on the relative humidity of the air was noted. The relative precision of the method characterized by RSD was 10%; the detection limit of NO{sub 2} was 10 {mu}g/m{sup 3} for a 24-h exposure.

  18. Spherical nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon as an efficient bifunctional electrocatalyst for Zn-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Lida; Davari, Elaheh; Iqbal, Muhammad; Purkait, Tapas K; Ivey, Douglas G; Veinot, Jonathan G C

    2015-12-28

    Materials based upon porous carbon have gained considerable attention due to their high surface area, electric conductivity, thermal and chemical stability, low density, and availability. These superior properties make them ideal for diverse applications. Doping these carbon nanostructures holds promise of designing the properties of these structures and opening the door to practical applications. Herein, we report the preparation of hollow N-doped mesoporous carbon (HMC) spheres fabricated via polymerization and carbonization of dopamine on a sacrificial spherical SiO(2) template that is removed upon hydrofluoric acid etching. The morphology and structural features of these HMCs were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy and the N-doping (7.1 at%) was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The oxygen reduction/evolution reaction (ORR/OER) performance of N-doped HMC was evaluated using rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry in an alkaline electrolyte. N-doped HMC demonstrated a high ORR onset potential of -0.055 V (vs. Hg/HgO) and excellent stability. The outstanding bifunctional activity was implemented in a practical Zn-air battery (ZAB), which exhibited a small charge-discharge voltage polarization of 0.89 V and high stability over repeated cycling. PMID:26585893

  19. Heavy-duty diesel engine NO{sub x} reduction with nitrogen-enriched combustion air. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, S.; Energy Systems

    2010-07-28

    The concept of engine emissions control by modifying intake combustion gas composition from that of ambient air using gas separation membranes has been developed during several programs undertaken at Argonne. These have led to the current program which is targeted at heavy-duty diesel truck engines. The specific objective is reduction of NO{sub x} emissions by the target engine to meet anticipated 2007 standards while extracting a maximum of 5 percent power loss and allowing implementation within commercial constraints of size, weight, and cost. This report includes a brief review of related past programs, describes work completed to date during the current program, and presents interim conclusions. Following a work schedule adjustment in August 2002 to accommodate problems in module procurement and data analysis, activities are now on schedule and planned work is expected to be completed in September, 2004. Currently, we believe that the stated program requirements for the target engine can be met, based upon extrapolation of the work completed. Planned project work is designed to experimentally confirm these projections and result in a specification for a module package that will meet program objectives.

  20. Evaluation of 11 terrestrial carbon-nitrogen cycle models against observations from two temperate Free-Air CO2 Enrichment studies.

    PubMed

    Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E; De Kauwe, Martin G; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Hickler, Thomas; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Ying-Ping; El-Masri, Bassil; Thornton, Peter; Jain, Atul; Wang, Shusen; Warlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William; Iversen, Colleen M; Gallet-Budynek, Anne; McCarthy, Heather; Finzi, Adrien; Hanson, Paul J; Prentice, I Colin; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-05-01

    We analysed the responses of 11 ecosystem models to elevated atmospheric [CO2 ] (eCO2 ) at two temperate forest ecosystems (Duke and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments) to test alternative representations of carbon (C)-nitrogen (N) cycle processes. We decomposed the model responses into component processes affecting the response to eCO2 and confronted these with observations from the FACE experiments. Most of the models reproduced the observed initial enhancement of net primary production (NPP) at both sites, but none was able to simulate both the sustained 10-yr enhancement at Duke and the declining response at ORNL: models generally showed signs of progressive N limitation as a result of lower than observed plant N uptake. Nonetheless, many models showed qualitative agreement with observed component processes. The results suggest that improved representation of above-ground-below-ground interactions and better constraints on plant stoichiometry are important for a predictive understanding of eCO2 effects. Improved accuracy of soil organic matter inventories is pivotal to reduce uncertainty in the observed C-N budgets. The two FACE experiments are insufficient to fully constrain terrestrial responses to eCO2 , given the complexity of factors leading to the observed diverging trends, and the consequential inability of the models to explain these trends. Nevertheless, the ecosystem models were able to capture important features of the experiments, lending some support to their projections. PMID:24467623

  1. Evaluation of 11 terrestrial carbon–nitrogen cycle models against observations from two temperate Free-Air CO2 Enrichment studies

    PubMed Central

    Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E; De Kauwe, Martin G; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Hickler, Thomas; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Ying-Ping; El-Masri, Bassil; Thornton, Peter; Jain, Atul; Wang, Shusen; Warlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William; Iversen, Colleen M; Gallet-Budynek, Anne; McCarthy, Heather; Finzi, Adrien; Hanson, Paul J; Prentice, I Colin; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    We analysed the responses of 11 ecosystem models to elevated atmospheric [CO2] (eCO2) at two temperate forest ecosystems (Duke and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments) to test alternative representations of carbon (C)–nitrogen (N) cycle processes. We decomposed the model responses into component processes affecting the response to eCO2 and confronted these with observations from the FACE experiments. Most of the models reproduced the observed initial enhancement of net primary production (NPP) at both sites, but none was able to simulate both the sustained 10-yr enhancement at Duke and the declining response at ORNL: models generally showed signs of progressive N limitation as a result of lower than observed plant N uptake. Nonetheless, many models showed qualitative agreement with observed component processes. The results suggest that improved representation of above-ground–below-ground interactions and better constraints on plant stoichiometry are important for a predictive understanding of eCO2 effects. Improved accuracy of soil organic matter inventories is pivotal to reduce uncertainty in the observed C–N budgets. The two FACE experiments are insufficient to fully constrain terrestrial responses to eCO2, given the complexity of factors leading to the observed diverging trends, and the consequential inability of the models to explain these trends. Nevertheless, the ecosystem models were able to capture important features of the experiments, lending some support to their projections. PMID:24467623

  2. Comparing universal kriging and land-use regression for predicting concentrations of gaseous oxides of nitrogen (NO x) for the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, Laina D.; Szpiro, Adam A.; Sheppard, Lianne; Lindström, Johan; Adar, Sara D.; Allen, Ryan W.; Avol, Edward L.; Oron, Assaf P.; Larson, Timothy; Liu, L.-J. Sally; Kaufman, Joel D.

    2011-08-01

    BackgroundEpidemiological studies that assess the health effects of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution are used to inform public policy. These studies rely on exposure models that use data collected from pollution monitoring sites to predict exposures at subject locations. Land-use regression (LUR) and universal kriging (UK) have been suggested as potential prediction methods. We evaluate these approaches on a dataset including measurements from three seasons in Los Angeles, CA. MethodsThe measurements of gaseous oxides of nitrogen (NO x) used in this study are from a "snapshot" sampling campaign that is part of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air). The measurements in Los Angeles were collected during three two-week periods in the summer, autumn, and winter, each with about 150 sites. The design included clusters of monitors on either side of busy roads to capture near-field gradients of traffic-related pollution. LUR and UK prediction models were created using geographic information system (GIS)-based covariates. Selection of covariates was based on 10-fold cross-validated (CV) R2 and root mean square error (RMSE). Since UK requires specialized software, a computationally simpler two-step procedure was also employed to approximate fitting the UK model using readily available regression and GIS software. ResultsUK models consistently performed as well as or better than the analogous LUR models. The best CV R2 values for season-specific UK models predicting log(NO x) were 0.75, 0.72, and 0.74 (CV RMSE 0.20, 0.17, and 0.15) for summer, autumn, and winter, respectively. The best CV R2 values for season-specific LUR models predicting log(NO x) were 0.74, 0.60, and 0.67 (CV RMSE 0.20, 0.20, and 0.17). The two-stage approximation to UK also performed better than LUR and nearly as well as the full UK model with CV R2 values 0.75, 0.70, and 0.70 (CV RMSE 0.20, 0.17, and 0.17) for summer, autumn, and winter, respectively

  3. Exposure assessment of air pollutants: a review on spatial heterogeneity and indoor/outdoor/personal exposure to suspended particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monn, Christian

    This review describes databases of small-scale spatial variations and indoor, outdoor and personal measurements of air pollutants with the main focus on suspended particulate matter, and to a lesser extent, nitrogen dioxide and photochemical pollutants. The basic definitions and concepts of an exposure measurement are introduced as well as some study design considerations and implications of imprecise exposure measurements. Suspended particulate matter is complex with respect to particle size distributions, the chemical composition and its sources. With respect to small-scale spatial variations in urban areas, largest variations occur in the ultrafine (<0.1 μm) and the coarse mode (PM 10-2.5, resuspended dust). Secondary aerosols which contribute to the accumulation mode (0.1-2 μm) show quite homogenous spatial distribution. In general, small-scale spatial variations of PM 2.5 were described to be smaller than the spatial variations of PM 10. Recent studies in outdoor air show that ultrafine particle number counts have large spatial variations and that they are not well correlated to mass data. Sources of indoor particles are from outdoors and some specific indoor sources such as smoking and cooking for fine particles or moving of people (resuspension of dust) for coarse particles. The relationships between indoor, outdoor and personal levels are complex. The finer the particle size, the better becomes the correlation between indoor, outdoor and personal levels. Furthermore, correlations between these parameters are better in longitudinal analyses than in cross-sectional analyses. For NO 2 and O 3, the air chemistry is important. Both have considerable small-scale spatial variations within urban areas. In the absence of indoor sources such as gas appliances, NO 2 indoor/outdoor relationships are strong. For ozone, indoor levels are quite small. The study hypothesis largely determines the choice of a specific concept in exposure assessment, i.e. whether personal

  4. New Measurement of ^39Ar in Underground Argon with a Low Background Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke

    2012-03-01

    A low background liquid argon detector has been developed for sensitive measurements of the beta radioactive ^39Ar in argon from underground sources. The measurement is motivated by the need to improve on earlier studies that showed no sign of ^39Ar in certain sources of underground argon, but with a limited sensitivity of ˜ 5% relative to ^39Ar in atmospheric argon[1]. We will report preliminary measurements taken with the low background detector that was commissioned and operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Virginia. A combination of passive and active background reduction techniques resulted in a very low background and a null result with sensitivity to ^39Ar less than 1% of atmospheric. The results confirm that underground argon is well suited for direct detection of dark matter WIMPs. [4pt] [1] D. Acosta-Kane et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 587:46 (2008)

  5. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2007-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2007-04-01 2007-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No. 7727-37-9... air. (b) The Food and Drug Administration is developing food-grade specifications for nitrogen...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2003-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2003-04-01 2003-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No. 7727-37-9... air. (b) The Food and Drug Administration is developing food-grade specifications for nitrogen...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2005-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2005-04-01 2005-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No. 7727-37-9... air. (b) The Food and Drug Administration is developing food-grade specifications for nitrogen...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2004-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2004-04-01 2004-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No. 7727-37-9... air. (b) The Food and Drug Administration is developing food-grade specifications for nitrogen...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2006-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2006-04-01 2006-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No. 7727-37-9... air. (b) The Food and Drug Administration is developing food-grade specifications for nitrogen...

  10. Argon isotopic zoning in mantle phlogopite

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.; Onstott, T.C.

    1988-06-01

    Incremental-heating and laser-probe /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar analyses were performed on phlogopite extracted from a garnet-lherzolite mantle nodule entrained by the Precambrian (1200 Ma) Premier kimberlite, South Africa. The spatial resolution of the laser probe has enabled the characterization of argon isotopic zoning in a single phlogopite grain. An apparent age contour map records lower ages (1.2 Ga) along grain margins and high apparent ages (up to 2.4 Ga) at the core. The latter ages are caused by excess argon contamination and subsequent partial diffusive loss, and have no age significance. Comparison with step-heating results indicates that argon spatial distributions inferred from in-vacuo step-heating experiments are, at best, grossly approximate. Variations in the laser-probe apparent ages were observed only laterally across the phlogopite cleavage surface, indicating that argon transport occurs preferentially along phlogopite cleavage planes. Age profiles, when modeled using one-dimensional radial geometry (cylindrical coordinates), do not conform to classical Fick's law diffusion, suggesting that the characteristic dimension of diffusion for argon in phlogopite may be highly variable within individual grains.

  11. Sulfur, trace nitrogen and iron codoped hierarchically porous carbon foams as synergistic catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoyan; Jiang, Congcong; Teng, Chao; Ren, Guangyuan; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei

    2014-12-10

    Sulfur, trace nitrogen and iron codoped, hierarchically porous carbon foams (HPCFs) were fabricated by directly pyrolyzing sulfur-enriched conductive polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene)-polystyrenesulfonic acid (PEDOT-PSS) aerogels under argon atmosphere. This simple pyrolysis treatment results in the molecular rearrangement of heteroatom sulfur, adjacent carbons and trace nitrogen/iron from oxidants to form active catalytic sites of HPCFs. At the same time, the high porosity of HPCFs provides the large surface area for the uniform distribution of active sites, and allows rapid oxygen transport and diffusion. As a result, these HPCFs exhibit the enhanced catalytic performances for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) via a direct four-electron reduction pathway in alkaline electrolyte. Besides, they also display a higher stability and better methanol/CO tolerance than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, which makes them promising low cost, non-precious-metal ORR catalysts for practical application in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:25402945

  12. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energymore » regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.« less

  13. High-pressure stabilization of argon fluorides.

    PubMed

    Kurzydłowski, Dominik; Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk

    2016-01-28

    On account of the rapid development of noble gas chemistry in the past half-century both xenon and krypton compounds can now be isolated in macroscopic quantities. The same does not hold true for the next lighter group 18 element, argon, which forms only isolated molecules stable solely in low temperature matrices or supersonic jet streams. Here we present theoretical investigations into a new high-pressure reaction pathway, which enables synthesis of argon fluorides in bulk and at room temperature. Our hybrid DFT calculations (employing the HSE06 functional) indicate that above 60 GPa ArF2-containing molecular crystals can be obtained by a reaction between argon and molecular fluorine. PMID:26742478

  14. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  15. Argon used as dry suit insulation gas for cold-water diving

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cold-water diving requires good thermal insulation because hypothermia is a serious risk. Water conducts heat more efficiently compared to air. To stay warm during a dive, the choice of thermal protection should be based on physical activity, the temperature of the water, and the duration of exposure. A dry suit, a diving suit filled with gas, is the most common diving suit in cold water. Air is the traditional dry suit inflation gas, whereas the thermal conductivity of argon is approximately 32% lower compared to that of air. This study evaluates the benefits of argon, compared to air, as a thermal insulation gas for a dry suit during a 1-h cold-water dive by divers of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Methods Seven male Special Forces divers made (in total) 19 dives in a diving basin with water at 13°C at a depth of 3 m for 1 h in upright position. A rubber dry suit and woollen undergarment were used with either argon (n = 13) or air (n = 6) (blinded to the divers) as suit inflation gas. Core temperature was measured with a radio pill during the dive. Before, halfway, and after the dive, subjective thermal comfort was recorded using a thermal comfort score. Results No diver had to abort the test due to cold. No differences in core temperature and thermal comfort score were found between the two groups. Core temperature remained unchanged during the dives. Thermal comfort score showed a significant decrease in both groups after a 60-min dive compared to baseline. Conclusions In these tests the combination of the dry suit and undergarment was sufficient to maintain core temperature and thermal comfort for a dive of 1 h in water at 13°C. The use of argon as a suit inflation gas had no added value for thermal insulation compared to air for these dives. PMID:24438580

  16. The long term observed effect of air and water injection into a fracture hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Mario Cesar Suarez Arriaga; Mirna Tello Lopez; Luis de Rio; Hector Gutierrez Puente

    1992-01-01

    Injection of atmospheric air mixed with waste reinjection liquid, has been occurring since 1982 at the Los Azufres, Mexico volcanic hydrothermal system. Several chemical and thermodynamical evidences show that air injection into this fractured geothermal field, could be considered as a long term natural tracer test. Nitrogen and Argon separated from the air mixture migrate from reinjection wells to production zones following preferential paths closely related to high permeability conduits. These paths can be detected, looking into the N2 solubility evolution of production wells. The anisotropic nature of the fractured volcanic rock, would demand considerably amounts of artificial tracer in order to be detected at the producing wells, specially when fluid extraction is low. This explains the unsuccessful recovery of the artificial tracer tests performed in past years at Tejamaniles, the southern field's sector. On the other hand, chloride concentrations and other salts, are increasing in the liquid produced by the oldest wells of the sector.

  17. The use of air as a natural tracer infractured hydrothermal systems, Los Azufres, Mexico, case study

    SciTech Connect

    Mario Cesar Sudrez Arriaga; Hector Gutierrez Puente, Josefina Moreno Ochoa

    1991-01-01

    Injection of atmospheric air mixed with cold water has been occurring since 1982 at the Los Azufres geothermal field. Several chemical and thermodynamical evidences show that air injection into this fractured hydrothermal system could be considered as a long term natural tracer test. Nitrogen and Argon separated from the air mixture migrate, under the action of the induced injection-extraction gradient, from reinjection sectors to production zones following preferential paths closely related to high permeability conduits. A coarse numerical estimation of the average permeability tensor existing at Tejamaniles, the southern sector, explains the unsuccessful recovery of the artificial tracer tests performed in past years: the anisotropic nature of the fractured volcanic rock would demand considerably quantities of tracer in order to be detected at the producing wells, especially when fluid extraction was low. At the same time concentrations of calcium, cesium, chloride, potassium, rubidium and sodium, are increasing in the liquid produced by the oldest wells of this field's sector.

  18. Study on the influence of nitrogen on titanium nitride in a dc post magnetron sputtering plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Borah, Sankar; Bailung, Heremba; Ratan Pal, Arup; Chutia, Joyanti

    2008-10-01

    The characteristics of direct current (dc) glow discharge plasma have been studied in a post magnetron device with an argon and nitrogen gas mixture. The introduction of nitrogen modifies the discharge leading to modifications of plasma parameters, transport mechanism and the cathode sheath. The electron energy distribution function, density and temperature profile are measured to characterize the discharge. Measured plasma potential profiles show the modification of the structure of the cathode sheath and confinement space variation. Optical emission spectroscopy is used to identify prominent transitions of the different species in the discharge. The discharge mode in argon undergoes a transition from metallic mode to reactive mode when nitrogen concentration exceeds argon.

  19. Development of nitrogen dioxide and volatile organic compounds land use regression models to estimate air pollution exposure near an Italian airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeta, Alessandra; Cattani, Giorgio; Di Menno di Bucchianico, Alessandro; De Santis, Antonella; Cesaroni, Giulia; Badaloni, Chiara; Ancona, Carla; Forastiere, Francesco; Sozzi, Roberto; Bolignano, Andrea; Sacco, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the small scale spatial variability of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and selected VOCs (benzene, toluene, acrolein and formaldehyde) concentrations using Land Use Regression models (LURs) in a complex multi sources domain (64 km2), containing a mid-size airport: the Ciampino Airport, located in Ciampino, Rome, Italy. 46 diffusion tube samplers were deployed within a domain centred in the airport over two 2-weekly periods (June 2011-January 2012). GIS-derived predictor variables, with varying buffer size, were evaluated to model spatial variation of NO2, benzene, toluene, formaldehyde and acrolein annual average concentrations. The airport apportionment to air quality was investigated using a Lagrangian dispersion model (SPRAY). A stepwise selection procedure was used to develop the linear regression models. The models were validated using leave one out cross validation (LOOCV) method. In this study, the use of LURs was found to be effective to explain spatial variability of NO2 (adjusted-R2 = 0.72), benzene (adjusted-R2 = 0.53), toluene (adjusted-R2 = 0.50) and acrolein (adjusted-R2 = 0.51), while limited power was achieved with the formaldehyde modeling (adjusted-R2 = 0.24). For all pollutants LURs output showed that the small scale spatial variability was mainly explained by local traffic. The airport contribution to the observed spatial variability was adequately quantified only for acrolein (0.43 (±0.69) μg/m3 in an area of about 6 km2, SW located to the airport runway), while for NO2 and formaldehyde, only a little portion of the spatial variability in a limited portion of the study domain was attributable to airport related emissions.

  20. Using air quality modeling to study source-receptor relationships between nitrogen oxides emissions and ozone exposures over the United States.

    PubMed

    Tong, Daniel Q; Muller, Nicholas Z; Kan, Haidong; Mendelsohn, Robert O

    2009-11-01

    Human exposure to ambient ozone (O(3)) has been linked to a variety of adverse health effects. The ozone level at a location is contributed by local production, regional transport, and background ozone. This study combines detailed emission inventory, air quality modeling, and census data to investigate the source-receptor relationships between nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) emissions and population exposure to ambient O(3) in 48 states over the continental United States. By removing NO(x) emissions from each state one at a time, we calculate the change in O(3) exposures by examining the difference between the base and the sensitivity simulations. Based on the 49 simulations, we construct state-level and census region-level source-receptor matrices describing the relationships among these states/regions. We find that, for 43 receptor states, cumulative NO(x) emissions from upwind states contribute more to O(3) exposures than the state's own emissions. In-state emissions are responsible for less than 15% of O(3) exposures in 90% of U.S. states. A state's NO(x) emissions can influence 2 to 40 downwind states by at least a 0.1 ppbv change in population-averaged O(3) exposure. The results suggest that the U.S. generally needs a regional strategy to effectively reduce O(3) exposures. But the current regional emission control program in the U.S. is a cap-and-trade program that assumes the marginal damage of every ton of NO(x) is equal. In this study, the average O(3) exposures caused by one ton of NO(x) emissions ranges from -2.0 to 2.3 ppm-people-hours depending on the state. The actual damage caused by one ton of NO(x) emissions varies considerably over space. PMID:19656569

  1. The effects of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) on carbon and nitrogen accumulation in grains of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chunwu; Hasegawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations will probably increase rice (Oryza sativa L.) yield but decrease grain nitrogen (GN) concentration. Grains attached to different positions in the panicles differ greatly in weight and quality, but their responses to elevated CO2 (e[CO2]) are poorly understood, which limits our understanding of the mechanisms of yield enhancement and quality degradation. Thus a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment was conducted to examine the effects of e[CO2] on grain mass (GM), grain carbon (GC), and GN accumulation in the spikelets attached to the upper primary rachis branch (superior spikelets; SS) and those attached to the lower secondary rachis (inferior spikelets; IS). e[CO2] stimulated the rice yield by 13% but decreased the N concentration in the panicle by 7% when averaged over two levels of N fertilizations (P < 0.01). The responses of SS and IS to e[CO2] were different particularly under higher N supply. For SS, e[CO2] decreased GN by 24% (P < 0.01) but did not affect GM. For IS, e[CO2] increased GM by 13% (P < 0.05) but GN was not affected. The reduction of GN due to e[CO2] started to appear at the beginning of grain filling. These results suggest that future [CO2] levels probably stimulate the grain growth of IS, most of which are not marketable due to limited size, at the expense of GN reduction in SS. Translocation of N from SS to IS may be a possible mechanism for reduction in GN of SS. This may degrade the grain quality of marketable rice under e[CO2]. PMID:23918962

  2. Evidence from firn air for recent decreases in non-methane hydrocarbons and a 20th century increase in nitrogen oxides in the northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worton, David R.; Sturges, William T.; Reeves, Claire E.; Newland, Mike J.; Penkett, Stuart A.; Atlas, Elliot; Stroud, Verity; Johnson, Kristen; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Solberg, Sverre; Schwander, Jakob; Barnola, Jean-Marc

    2012-07-01

    The atmospheric evolution of eight non-methane hydrocarbons (ethane, acetylene, propane, n-butane, isobutane, n-pentane, isopentane and benzene) and five alkyl nitrates (2-propyl, 2-butyl, 3-methyl-2-butyl and the sum of 2+3-pentyl nitrates) are reconstructed for the latter half of the 20th century based on Arctic firn air measurements. The reconstructed trends of the non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) show increasing concentrations from 1950 to a maximum in 1980 before declining towards the end of last century. These observations provide direct evidence that NMHCs in the northern hemisphere have declined substantially during the period 1980-2001. Benzene concentrations show a smaller increase between 1950 and 1980 than the other NMHCs indicating that additional sources of benzene, other than fossil fuel combustion, were likely important contributors to the benzene budget prior to and during this period. The declining benzene concentrations from 1980 to 2001 would suggest that biomass burning is unlikely to be important in the benzene budget as biomass burning emissions were reportedly increasing over the same period. Methyl and ethyl nitrate show growth patterns in the firn that suggested perturbation by in-situ production from an unidentified mechanism. However, the higher alkyl nitrates show evidence for increasing concentrations from 1950 to maxima in the mid 1990s before decreasing slightly toward the end of the last century. The differing atmospheric evolution of the alkyl nitrates relative to their parent hydrocarbons indicate an increase in their production efficiency per hydrocarbon molecule. Using a steady state analysis of hydrocarbon oxidation and alkyl nitrate production and loss we show that reactive nitrogen oxide (NOx) concentrations in the northern hemisphere have likely increased considerably between 1950 and 2001.

  3. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  4. Solid-liquid phase transition in argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential, a modified cell theory has been used to describe the solid-liquid phase transition in argon. The cell-size variations may be evaluated by a self-consistent condition. With the inclusion of cell-size variations, the transition temperature, the solid and liquid densities, and the liquid-phase radial-distribution functions have been calculated. These ab initio results are in satisfactory agreement with molecular-dynamics calculations as well as experimental data on argon.

  5. Effect of argon ion bombardment on amorphous silicon carbonitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batocki, R. G. S.; Mota, R. P.; Honda, R. Y.; Santos, D. C. R.

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) films were synthesized by radiofrequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Vapor Chemical Deposition (PECVD) using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN) as precursor compound. Then, the films were post-treated by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) in argon atmosphere from 15 to 60 min. The hardness of the film enhanced after ion implantation, and the sample treated at 45 min process showed hardness greater than sixfold that of the untreated sample. This result is explained by the crosslinking and densification of the structure. Films were exposed to oxygen plasma for determining of the etching rate. It decreased monotonically from 33 Å/min to 19 Å/min for the range of process time, confirming structural alterations. Hydrophobic character of the a-SiCN:H films were modified immediately after ion bombardment, due to incorporation of polar groups. However, the high wettability of the films acquired by the ion implantation was diminished after aging in air. Therefore, argon PIII made a-SiCN:H films mechanically more resistant and altered their hydrophobic character.

  6. Post-flight Analysis of the Argon Filled Ion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Goldhagen, P.; Jones, I. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is a complex mixture of primary galactic and solar cosmic rays and a multitude of secondary particles produced in collision with air nuclei. The first series of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurement flights on the NASA research aircraft ER-2 took place in June 1997. The ER-2 flight package consisted of fifteen instruments from six countries and were chosen to provide varying sensitivity to specific components. These AIR ER-2 flight measurements are to characterize the AIR environment during solar minimum to allow the continued development of environmental models of this complex mixture of ionizing radiation. This will enable scientists to study the ionizing radiation health hazard associated with the high-altitude operation of a commercial supersonic transport and to allow estimates of single event upsets for advanced avionics systems design. The argon filled ion chamber representing about 40 percent of the contributions to radiation risks are analyzed herein and model discrepancies for solar minimum environment are on the order of 5 percent and less. Other biologically significant components remain to be analyzed.

  7. Thermal evolution of Venus with argon degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Korenaga, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Decades-old measurements of atmospheric and elemental surface composition constrain the history of Venus. In this study, we search for a model featuring continuous evolution in the stagnant-lid regime that predicts the present-day atmospheric mass of radiogenic argon and satisfies the other available constraints. For comparison, we also consider the end-member scenario of a single catastrophic resurfacing event. Thermal evolution simulations are performed that track the mass transport of argon and potassium and include a simple model of upwelling mantle plumes. Sensitivity analyses and linear regression are used to quantify the range of initial conditions that will produce desired values for key model output parameters. Decompression melting of passively upwelling mantle causes considerable mantle processing and crustal growth during the early evolution of Venus. Mantle plumes have negligible effects on recent crustal production, but may be important to local surface features. For a wide range of initial conditions, continuous evolution in the stagnant-lid regime predicts the correct amount of argon degassing, along with the absence of a global magnetic field, crustal and lithosphere thicknesses matching modern estimates, and volcanism consistent with the cratering record. Argon degassing does not uniquely constrain mantle dynamics, but the success of simple stagnant-lid models diminishes the need to invoke dramatic changes like catastrophic resurfacing.

  8. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm(3) from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi' = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi' increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  9. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Liu, Shengzhong; Pan, Xianzheng; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  10. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Gaseous Argon Shock Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Morris, John; Sheffield, Stephen; Burkett, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lack of published Argon gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Argon Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes never before reached. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 200-500 psi (0.025 - 0.056 g/cc) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/ μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Argon gas initially pressurized to 200-500 psi through Pagosa numerical hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrocode capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Argon gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, but note unanticipated differences in the ionization front temperatures.

  11. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  12. Femtosecond laser flow tagging in non-air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibin; Calvert, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    The Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) [Michael, J. B. et al., Applied optics, 50(26), 2011] method is studied in nitrogen-containing gaseous flows. The underlying mechanism behind the FLEET process is the dissociation of molecular nitrogen into atomic nitrogen, which produces long-lived florescence as the nitrogen atoms recombine. Spectra and images of the resulting tagged line provide insight into the effects of different atmospheric gases on the FLEET process. The ionization cross-section, conductivity and energy states of the gaseous particles are each brought into consideration. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility for long-lived flow tagging on the order of hundreds of microseconds in non-air environments. Of particular interest are the enhancement of the FLEET signal with the addition of argon gas, and the non-monotonic quenching effect of oxygen on the length, duration and intensity of the resulting signal and spectra. FLEET is characterized in number of different atmospheric gases, including that simulating Mar's atmospheric composition.

  13. On the OES line-ratio technique in argon and argon-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate capacitively coupled argon and argon-hydrogen-silane plasmas. The argon collisional-radiative model (CRM) used to extract the electron density and temperature from the spectra is presented. The electron energy distribution function, which is an input parameter to the model, is discussed in detail. Its strong variation with pressure is found to significantly influence the results for the (effective) temperature. For the analysis of the spectra the common line-ratio technique is applied. Special attention is paid to the choice of lines and a pair of line-ratios for optimum accuracy is suggested. For the argon gas mixture at high partial pressure of the admixed molecular gases the CRM reduces to a corona-like model, extended by a quenching term. The line-ratio method is found to fail under these conditions due to the strong depopulation of the argon 1s states. As a consequence, individual line intensities have to be used and an absolute calibration is required. An easy calibration method, which relies on the results obtained by the line-ratio method in pure argon, is proposed and applied.

  14. ELEVATED CO{sub 2} IN A PROTOTYPE FREE-AIR CO{sub 2} ENRICHMENT FACILITY AFFECTS PHOTOSYNTHETIC NITROGEN RELATIONS IN A MATURING PINE FOREST

    SciTech Connect

    ELLSWORTH,D.S.; LA ROCHE,J.; HENDREY,G.R.

    1998-03-01

    A maturing loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest was exposed to elevated CO{sub 2} in the natural environment in a perturbation study conducted over three seasons using the free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) technique. At the time measurements were begun in this study, the pine canopy was comprised entirely of foliage which had developed under elevated CO{sub 2} conditions (atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] {approx} 550 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}). Measurements of leaf photosynthetic responses to CO{sub 2} were taken to examine the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on photosynthetic N nutrition in a pine canopy under elevated CO{sub 2}. Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} response curves (A-c{sub i} curves) were similar in FACE trees under elevated CO{sub 2} compared with counterpart trees in ambient plots for the first foliage cohort produced in the second season of CO{sub 2} exposure, with changes in curve form detected in the foliage cohorts subsequently produced under elevated CO{sub 2}. Differences in the functional relationship between carboxylation rate and N{sub a} suggest that for a given N{sub a} allocated among successive cohorts of foliage in the upper canopy, V{sub c max} was 17% lower in FACE versus Ambient trees. The authors also found that foliar Rubisco content per unit total protein derived from Western blot analysis was lower in late-season foliage in FACE foliage compared with ambient-grown foliage. The results illustrate a potentially important mode of physiological adjustment to growth conditions that may operate in forest canopies. Their findings suggest that mature loblolly pine trees growing in the field may have the capacity for shifts in intrinsic nitrogen utilization for photosynthesis under elevated CO{sub 2} that are not dependent on changes in leaf N. While carboxylation efficiency per unit N apparently decreased under elevated CO{sub 2}, photosynthetic rates in trees at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations {approx} 550 pmol mol{sub {minus}1} are still

  15. Elevated CO{sub 2} in a prototype free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment facility affects photosynthetic nitrogen relations in a maturing pine forest

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, D.S.; LaRoche, J.; Hendrey, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    A maturing loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest was exposed to elevated CO{sub 2} in the natural environment in a perturbation study conducted over three seasons using the free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) technique. At the time measurements were begun in this study, the pine canopy was comprised entirely of foliage which had developed under elevated CO{sub 2} conditions (atmospheric CO{sub 2} {approx} 550 {micro}mol/mol{sup {minus}1}). Measurements of leaf photosynthetic responses to CO{sub 2} were taken to examine the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on photosynthetic N nutrition in a pine canopy under elevated CO{sub 2}. Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} response curves (A-c{sub i} curves) were similar in FACE trees under elevated CO{sub 2} compared with counterpart trees in ambient plots for the first foliage cohort produced in the second season of CO{sub 2} exposure, with changes in curve form detected in the foliage cohorts subsequently produced under elevated CO{sub 2}. Differences in the functional relationship between carboxylation rate and N{sub a} suggest that for a given N{sub a} allocated among successive cohorts of foliage in the upper canopy, V{sub c max} was 17% lower in FACE versus Ambient trees. The authors also found that foliar Rubisco content per unit total protein derived from Western blot analysis was lower in late-season foliage in FACE foliage compared with ambient-grown foliage. The results illustrate a potentially important mode of physiological adjustment to growth conditions that may operate in forest canopies. Findings suggest that mature loblolly pine trees growing in the field may have the capacity for shifts in intrinsic nitrogen utilization for photosynthesis under elevated CO{sub 2} that are not dependent on changes in leaf N. Findings suggest a need for continued examination of internal feedbacks at the whole-tree and ecosystem level in forests that may influence long-term photosynthetic responses to elevated CO{sub 2}.

  16. Measurement of air-surface exchange of speciated nitrogen and sulfur compounds using a modified MARGA 2S: ? Concentrations and fluxes above a grass field

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved measurement methods are needed to characterize dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen compounds to assess ecosystem exposure to nutrients and acidifying compounds and to develop atmospheric deposition budgets in support of critical loads assessments. The purpose of this s...

  17. Measurement of air-surface exchange of speciated nitrogen and sulfur compounds using a modified MARGA 2S: Assessment and control of data quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved measurement methods are needed to characterize dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen compounds to assess ecosystem exposure to nutrients and acidifying compounds and to develop atmospheric deposition budgets in support of critical loads assessments. The purpose of this ...

  18. Field Comparison of Passive Air Samplers with Reference Monitors for Ambient Volatile Organic Compounds and Nitrogen Dioxide Under Week-Long Integrals

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates performance of nitrogen dioxide NO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOC) passive samplers with corresponding reference monitors at two sites in the Detroit, Michigan area during the summer of 2005.

  19. Ab initio pair potential energy curve for the argon atom pair and thermophysical properties for the dilute argon gas. II. Thermophysical properties for low-density argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Jäger, Benjamin; Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard

    2010-12-01

    A recent argon-argon interatomic potential energy curve determined from quantum-mechanical ab initio calculations and described with an analytical representation [B. Jäger, R. Hellmann, E. Bich, and E. Vogel, Mol. Phys. 107, 2181 (2009); 108, 105 (2010)] was used to calculate the most important thermophysical properties of argon governed by two-body interactions. Second pressure, acoustic, and dielectric virial coefficients as well as viscosity and thermal conductivity in the limit of zero density were computed for natural argon from 83 to 10,000 K. The calculated values for the different thermophysical properties are compared with available experimental data and values computed for other argon-argon potentials. This extensive analysis shows that the proposed potential is superior to all previous ones and that the calculated thermophysical property values are accurate enough to be applied as standard values for the complete temperature range of the calculations.

  20. Preferential site occupancy observed in coexpanded argon-krypton clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lundwall, M.; Bergersen, H.; Lindblad, A.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Tchaplyguine, M.

    2006-10-15

    Free heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters have been produced by coexpansion and investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By examining cluster surface and bulk binding energy shifts, relative intensities, and peak widths, we show that in the mixed argon-krypton clusters the krypton atoms favor the bulk and argon atoms are pushed to the surface. Furthermore, we show that krypton atoms in the surface layer occupy high-coordination sites and that heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters produced by coexpansion show the same surface structure as argon host clusters doped with krypton. These observations are supported by site-dependent calculations of chemical shifts.

  1. Electrochemical sensors for volatile nitrogen compounds in air. Final report to J&N Associates, Inc. from Illinois Institute of Technology, Re: Department of Energy Phase I STTR Project DOE No. DE-FG02-99ER86090

    SciTech Connect

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Penrose, William R.; Roh, Sae-Won

    2000-09-07

    Air pollutant gases such as nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrous acid, and peroxyacetyl nitrate are commonly encountered in urban atmospheres. They constitute a nuisance to some, and a positive danger to others with such respiratory conditions as asthma and emphysema. It is known that exposure to these gases is a function of microenvironment, but monitoring of microenvironments is presently too uneconomical to be used except in rare cases, such as ''sick buildings''. Gas sensors that are small, sensitive, selective, and inexpensive are needed to make such monitoring practical. Many sensor types have apparently reached their technological development limit, but porous-electrode amperometric gas sensors have not been thoroughly explored for low-concentration applications. We have explored amperometric gas sensors of several types for lower detection limits to a series of nitrogen gases. Evidence gathered in this study indicates that greater sensitivity will be achieved by reducing the noise level of the working electrode, rather than increasing the output signal.

  2. Soil carbon storage and N{sub 2}O emissions from wheat agroecosystems as affected by free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) and nitrogen treatments. Final Report - February 12, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Leavitt; A. D. Matthias; T. L. Thompson; R. A. Rauschkolb

    1999-02-17

    Rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have prompted concern about response of plants and crops to future elevated CO{sub 2} levels, and particularly the extent to which ecosystems will sequester carbon and thus impact the rate of rise of CO{sub 2} concentrations. Free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) experimentation was used with wheat agroecosystems for two growing seasons to assess effects of CO{sub 2} and soil nitrogen. Over 20 researchers on this experiment variously examined plant production and grain yield, phenology, length of growing season, water-use efficiency ecosystem production, below ground processes (eg, root and microbial activity, carbon and nitrogen cycling), etc.

  3. Effects of metastable species in helium and argon atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) on inactivation of periodontopathogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Seol, Yang-Jo; Kim, Su-Jeong; Bae, Byeongjun; Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The helium and argon have been widely used as discharge gases in atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) for bacteria inactivation. The APPJs show apparent different in bullet propagation speed and bacteria inactivation rate apparently vary with discharge gas species. This work shows that these two distinctive features of APPJs can be linked through one factor, the metastable energy level. The effects of helium and argon metastable species on APPJ discharge mechanism for reactive oxygen nitrogen species (RONS) generation in APPJs are investigated by experiments and numerical estimation. The discharge mechanism is investigated by using the bullet velocity from the electric field which is obtained with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement. The measured electric field also applied on the estimation of RONS generation, as electron energy source term in numerical particle reaction. The estimated RONS number is verified by comparing NO and OH densities to the inactivation rate of periodontitis bacteria. The characteristic time for bacteria inactivation of the helium-APPJ was found to be 1.63 min., which is significantly less than that of the argon-APPJ, 12.1 min. In argon-APPJ, the argon metastable preserve the energy due to the lack of the Penning ionization. Thus the surface temperature increase is significantly higher than helium-APPJ case. It implies that the metastable energy plays important role in both of APPJ bullet propagation and bacteria inactivation mechanism.

  4. Nitrogen Species in Soil, Sediment, and Ground Water at a Former Sewage-Treatment Wastewater Lagoon: Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Island County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, S.E.; Dinicola, R.S.; Huffman, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for contamination of ground water from remnant sewage sludge in re-graded sediments of a deconstructed sewage-treatment lagoon was evaluated. Ground-water levels were measured in temporary drive-point wells, and ground-water samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and other water-quality characteristics. Composite soil and sediment samples were collected and analyzed for organic carbon and nitrogen species. Multiple lines of evidence, including lack of appreciable organic matter in sediments of the former lagoon, agronomic analysis of nitrogen, the sequestration of nitrogen in the developing soils at the former lagoon, and likely occurrence of peat deposits within the aquifer material, suggest that the potential for substantial additions of nitrogen to ground water beneath the former sewage lagoon resulting from remnant sewage sludge not removed from the former lagoon are small. Concentrations of nitrogen species measured in ground-water samples were small and did not exceed the established U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels for nitrate (10 milligrams per liter). Concentrations of nitrate in ground-water samples were less than the laboratory reporting limit of 0.06 milligram per liter. Seventy to 90 percent of the total nitrogen present in ground water was in the ammonia form with a maximum concentration of 7.67 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of total nitrogen in ground water beneath the site, which is the sum of all forms of nitrogen including nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, and organic nitrogen, ranged from 1.15 to 8.44 milligrams per liter. Thus, even if all forms of nitrogen measured in ground water were converted to nitrate, the combined mass would be less than the maximum contaminant level. Oxidation-reduction conditions in ground water beneath the former sewage lagoon were reducing. Given the abundant supply of ambient organic carbon in the subsurface and in ground water at the former lagoon, any

  5. Argon ion pollution of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Construction of a Solar Power Satellite (SPS) would require the injection of large quantities of propellant to transport material from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to the construction site at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO). This injection, in the form of approx 10 to the 32nd power, 2 KeV argon ions (and associated electrons) per SPS, is comparable to the content of the plasmasphere (approx 10 to the 31st power ions). In addition to the mass deposited, this represents a considerable injection of energy. The injection is examined in terms of a simple model for the expansion of the beam plasma. General features of the subsequent magnetospheric convection of the argon are also examined.

  6. Argon Dewar Relief Set Pressure Modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-03-19

    This engineering note documents the calculations of Kelly Dixon, used to determine the maximum allowable set pressure for the argon dewar low relief valve, tag number PSV620A, Anderson Greenwood Type 526J. The original setting was 16 psig. This value was chosen in order to protect against cryostat overpressurization by the source dewar (see D0 Engineering Note 115), however, the following calculations will show that the set pressure can be raised to approximately 18.5 psig, which would result in a faster filling of the cryostat, along with a higher level of liquid argon. Three other engineering notes were revised to reflect the change in set pressure according to this note. They are notes 115, 219, and 263.

  7. Photoassociative Spectroscopy of Ultracold Argon and Krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. K.; Williams, W. D.; Sukenik, C. I.

    2016-05-01

    We report on photoassociative spectroscopy experiments performed separately on ultracold 40 Ar and ultracold 84 Kr with the spectroscopy laser tuned around the trapping transition for each species (ns[ 3 / 2 ] 2 --> np[ 5 / 2 ] 3 where n = 4 for argon and n = 5 for krypton). Previous studies in argon observed several discrete features in the spectrum that have now been positively identified as arising from otherwise undetectable frequency sidebands on the spectroscopy laser and not from molecular structure. Spectra have been taken over a range of laser intensities and show a broad (several GHz) signature of single photon photo-association, but with no individual vibrational levels resolved. We will discuss our results and compare our spectra to those obtained in ultracold, noble gas photoassociative spectroscopy experiments conducted by other groups in recent years. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation, Award, No. PHY-0855290.

  8. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Carminati, L.

    2005-10-12

    The construction of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed and commissioning is in progress. After a brief description of the detector layout, readout electronics and calibration, a review of the present status of the integration and the detector qualification is reported. Finally a selection of performance results obtained during several test beams will be presented with particular attention to linearity, uniformity, position reconstruction and {gamma}/{pi}0 separation.

  9. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

    1998-12-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

  10. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20–150 GPa and 1.9–5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2–23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  11. Current and future liquid argon neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S.

    2015-05-15

    The liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detector technology provides an opportunity for precision neutrino oscillation measurements, neutrino cross section measurements, and searches for rare processes, such as SuperNova neutrino detection. These proceedings review current and future LArTPC neutrino experiments. Particular focus is paid to the ICARUS, MicroBooNE, LAr1, 2-LArTPC at CERN-SPS, LBNE, and 100 kton at Okinoshima experiments.

  12. An impact hypothesis for Venus argon anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaula, W. M.; Newman, W. I.

    1997-03-01

    The Ar-36+38 argon-excess anomally of Venus has been hypothesized to have its origin in the impact of an outer solar system body of about 100-km diameter. A critical evaluation is made of this hypothesis and its competitors; it is judged that its status must for the time being remain one of 'Sherlock Holmes' type, in that something so improbable must be accepted when all alternatives are eliminated.

  13. Distribution and Abundance of Mars' Atmospheric Argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Nelli, Steven; Murphy, Jim; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Janes, K. D.; Crombie, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    One and one half Mars years (MY 26 and 27) of atmospheric Argon measurements are described and studied in the context of understanding how Argon, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. Argon data are from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Subsystem (GS) of the suite of three instruments comprising the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). A comprehensive data analysis including gamma-ray production and attenuation by the atmosphere is included. Of particular interest is the enhanced abundance of Ar over the observed Ar abundance at lower latitudes at south (up to a factor of 10) and north (up to a factor of 4) polar regions during winter. Calibration of the measurements to actual Ar abundance is possible because GS measurements cover the same latitude and season as measurements made by the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) on Viking Landers 1 and 2 (VL1 and VL2). [2].

  14. Resonant- and avalanche-ionization amplification of laser-induced plasma in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili; Jiang, Naibo; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2014-10-14

    Amplification of laser-induced plasma in air is demonstrated utilizing resonant laser ionization and avalanche ionization. Molecular oxygen in air is ionized by a low-energy laser pulse employing (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) to generate seed electrons. Subsequent avalanche ionization of molecular oxygen and nitrogen significantly amplifies the laser-induced plasma. In this plasma-amplification effect, three-body attachments to molecular oxygen dominate the electron-generation and -loss processes, while either nitrogen or argon acts as the third body with low electron affinity. Contour maps of the electron density within the plasma obtained in O₂/N₂ and O₂/Ar gas mixtures are provided to show relative degrees of plasma amplification with respect to gas pressure and to verify that the seed electrons generated by O₂ 2 + 1 REMPI are selectively amplified by avalanche ionization of molecular nitrogen in a relatively low-pressure condition (≤100 Torr). Such plasma amplification occurring in air could be useful in aerospace applications at high altitude.

  15. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Makino, Yuri; Fukukawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide) supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate) and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air), reductive (hydrogen-containing argon), or inert (pure argon) atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs....1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No. 7727-37-9) is a colorless, odorless, flavorless gas that is produced commercially by the fractionation of liquid air. (b) The ingredient must...

  17. The effect of air on solvated electron chemistry at a plasma/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbach, Paul; Bartels, David M.; Mohan Sankaran, R.; Go, David B.

    2015-10-01

    Plasmas in contact with liquids initiate complex chemistry that leads to the generation of a wide range of reactive species. For example, in an electrolytic configuration with a cathodic plasma electrode, electrons from the plasma are injected into the solution, leading to solvation and ensuing reactions. If the gas contains oxygen, electronegative oxygen molecules may react with the plasma electrons via attachment to reduce the electron flux to the solution reducing the production of solvated electrons or produce reactive oxygen species that quickly scavenge solvated electrons in solution. Here, we applied a total internal reflection absorption spectroscopy technique to compare the concentration of solvated electrons produced in solution by an argon plasma containing various amounts of oxygen, nitrogen, and air. Our measurements indicate that in oxygen or air ambients, electron attachment in the plasma phase greatly attenuates the electron flux incident on the liquid surface. The remaining electrons then solvate but are quickly scavenged by reactive oxygen species in the liquid phase.

  18. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    transfer depended on the reactivity of the emitted material. At the lower extreme of reactivity are the noble gases, neon and argon. Most neon and argon emitted during the degassing of the newly formed Earth is still in the atmosphere, and essentially none has been transferred to the hydrosphere or crust. At the other extreme are carbon and sulfur. Over 99% of the carbon and sulfur emitted during degassing are no longer in the atmosphere, but reside in the hydrosphere or the crust. Nitrogen is intermediate. Of the ˜6×106 TgN in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and crust, ˜2/3 is in the atmosphere as N2 with most of the remainder in the crust. The atmosphere is a large nitrogen reservoir primarily, because the triple bond of the N2 molecule requires a significant amount of energy to break. In the early atmosphere, the only sources of such energy were solar radiation and electrical discharges.At this point we had an earth with mostly N2 and devoid of life. How did we get to an earth with mostly N2 and teeming with life? First, N2 had to be converted into reactive N (Nr). (The term reactive nitrogen (Nr) includes all biologically active, photochemically reactive, and radiatively active nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere and biosphere of the Earth. Thus, Nr includes inorganic reduced forms of nitrogen (e.g., NH3 and NH4+), inorganic oxidized forms (e.g., NOx, HNO3, N2O, and NO3-), and organic compounds (e.g., urea, amines, and proteins).) The early atmosphere was reducing and had limited NH3. However, NH3 was a necessary ingredient in forming early organic matter. One possibility for NH3 generation was the cycling of seawater through volcanics (Holland, 1984). Under such a process, NH3 could then be released to the atmosphere where, when combined with CH4, H2, H2O, and electrical energy, organic molecules including amino acids could be formed (Miller, 1953). In essence, electrical discharges and UV radiation can convert mixtures of reduced gases into mixtures of organic

  19. Synthesis and spectroscopy of cyanotriacetylene (HC{sub 7}N) in solid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Couturier-Tamburelli, I. E-mail: mturowski@ichf.edu.pl; Piétri, N.; Crépin, C.; Turowski, M. E-mail: mturowski@ichf.edu.pl; Kołos, R.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2014-01-28

    UV laser irradiations of cryogenic solid argon matrices doped with a mixture of acetylene and cyanodiacetylene (HC{sub 5}N) resulted in the formation of a longer carbon–nitrogen chain, cyanotriacetylene (HC{sub 7}N). The identification of this species was accomplished based on IR vibrational spectroscopy (including the study of isotopically labeled compounds), on electronic luminescence spectroscopy, and on theoretical predictions. Additionally, IR absorption bands recognized as due to HC{sub 7}N were detected in photolysed Ar matrices doped with a cyanoacetylene/diacetylene mixture; this assignment was confirmed with the mass spectrometry of gases released upon the warm-up of the sample.

  20. The Physics Analysis of a Gas Attenuator with Argon as a Working Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov,, D.D.

    2010-12-07

    A gas attenuator is an important element of the LCLS facility. The attenuator must operate in a broad range of x-ray energies, provide attenuation coefficient between 1 and 10{sup 4} with the accuracy of 1% and, at the same time, be reliable and allow for many months of un-interrupted operation. S. Shen has recently carried out a detailed design study of the attenuator based on the use of nitrogen as a working gas. In this note we assess the features of the attenuator based on the use of argon. We concentrate on the physics issues, not the design features.

  1. Experimental characterization of an argon laminar plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois-Bertrand, Emilie; de Izarra, Charles

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with a dc laminar pure argon plasma jet operating at atmospheric pressure in ambient air that was experimentally studied in order to obtain temperature and velocity. Plasma jet temperature was evaluated by optical emission spectroscopy and the plasma jet velocity was determined by various methods using a pressure sensor. It is shown that the maximum plasma jet temperature is 15 000 K and the maximum plasma jet velocity is 250 m s-1 at the plasma jet centre. Finally, a study of the ambient air amount entrained into the plasma jet is presented.

  2. OBSERVATION-BASED ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS ON OZONE AIR QUALITY OVER THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is produced by chemical interactions involving nitrogen oxides (NOx) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the presence of sunlight. At high concentrations, ground-level ozone has been shown to be harmful to human health and the environment. It has been reco...

  3. Participant-Based Monitoring of Indoor and Outdoor Nitrogen Dioxide, Volatile Organic Compounds, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons among MICA-Air Households

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) study in Detroit, Michigan introduced a participant-based approach to reduce the resource burden associated with collection of indoor and outdoor residential air sampling data. A subset of participants designated as MICA-Air c...

  4. MODELING ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTIONS ON OZONE AIR QUALITY IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES: OFFSETTING INCREASES IN ENERGY USE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study is to examine changes in ambient ozone concentrations estimated by a photochemical air quality model in response to the NOx emission reductions imposed on the utility sector. To accomplish this task, CMAQ air quality model simulations were performe...

  5. The study of gas species on THz generation from laser-induced air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji; Zhang, LiangLiang; Wu, YiJian; Wu, Tong; Yuan, Hui; Zhang, CunLin; Zhao, YueJin

    2015-08-01

    Intense Terahertz waves generated from air-induced plasma and serving as broadband THz source provide a promising broadband source for innovative technology. Terahertz generation in selected gases has attracted more and more researchers' interests in recent years. In this research, the THz emission from different atoms is described, such as nitrogen, argon and helium in Michelson. The THz radiation is detected by a Golay Cell equipped with a 6-mm-diameter diamond-inputting window. It can be seen in the first time that when the pump power lies at a stable level, the THz generation created by the femtosecond laser focusing on the nitrogen is higher than which focusing on the helium, and lower than that produced in the argon gas environment. We believe that the THz intensity is Ar > N > Ne because of its atomic mass, which is Ar > N > Ne as well. It is clear that the Gas molecular decides the release of free electrons ionized from ultra short femtosecond laser through the electronic dynamic analysis. The higher the gas mass is, the stronger the terahertz emission will be. We further explore the THz emission at the different laser power levels, and the experimental results can be commendably quadratic fitted. It can be inferred that THz emission under different gas medium environment still complies with the law of four-wave mixing (FWM) process and has nothing to do with the gas environment: the radiation energy is proportional to the quadratic of incident laser power.

  6. The Ashima/MIT Mars GCM and argon in the martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yuan; Richardson, Mark I.; Newman, Claire E.; Lee, Christopher; Toigo, Anthony D.; Mischna, Michael A.; Campin, Jean-Michel

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the ability of modern general circulation models (GCMs) to simulate transport in the martian atmosphere using measurements of argon as a proxy for the transport processes. Argon provides the simplest measure of transport as it is a noble gas with no sinks or sources on seasonal timescales. Variations in argon result solely from 'freeze distillation', as the atmosphere condenses at the winter poles, and from atmospheric transport. Comparison of all previously published models when rescaled to a common definition of the argon enhancement factor (EF) suggest that models generally do a poor job in predicting the peak enhancement in southern winter over the winter pole - the time when the capability of the model transport approaches are most severely tested. Despite observed peak EF values of ˜6, previously published model predictions peaked at EF values of only 2-3. We introduce a new GCM that provides a better treatment of mass conservation within the dynamical core, includes more sophisticated tracer transport approaches, and utilizes a cube-sphere grid structure thus avoiding the grid-point convergence problem at the pole that exists for most current Mars GCMs. We describe this model - the Ashima Research/Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mars General Circulation Model (Ashima/MIT Mars GCM) and use it to demonstrate the significant sensitivity of peak EF to the choices of transport approach for both tracers and heat. We obtain a peak EF of 4.75 which, while over 50% higher than any prior model, remains well short of the observed value. We show that the polar EF value in winter is primarily determined by the competition between two processes: (1) mean meridional import of lower-latitude air not enriched in argon and (2) the leakage of enriched argon out of the polar column by eddies in the lowest atmospheric levels. We suggest possibilities for improving GCM representation of the CO2 cycle and the general circulation that may further improve the

  7. E-H mode transition in low-pressure inductively coupled nitrogen-argon and oxygen-argon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Wook; Lee, Hye Lan; Chung, T. H.

    2011-06-01

    This work investigates the characteristics of the E-H mode transition in low-pressure inductively coupled N2-Ar and O2-Ar discharges using rf-compensated Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). As the ICP power increases, the emission intensities from plasma species, the electron density, the electron temperature, and the plasma potential exhibit sudden changes. The Ar content in the gas mixture and total gas pressure have been varied in an attempt to fully characterize the plasma parameters. With these control parameters varying, the changes of the transition threshold power and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are explored. In N2-Ar and O2-Ar discharges at low-pressures of several millitorr, the transition thresholds are observed to decrease with Ar content and pressure. It is observed that in N2-Ar plasmas during the transition, the shape of the EEDF changes from an unusual distribution with a flat hole near the electron energy of 3 eV in the E mode to a Maxwellian distribution in the H mode. However, in O2 -Ar plasmas, the EEDFs in the E mode at low Ar contents show roughly bi-Maxwellian distributions, while the EEDFs in the H mode are observed to be nearly Maxwellian. In the E and H modes of O2-Ar discharges, the dissociation fraction of O2 molecules is estimated using optical emission actinometry. During the E-H mode transition, the dissociation fraction of molecules is also enhanced.

  8. E-H mode transition in low-pressure inductively coupled nitrogen-argon and oxygen-argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Wook; Lee, Hye Lan; Chung, T. H.

    2011-06-01

    This work investigates the characteristics of the E-H mode transition in low-pressure inductively coupled N{sub 2}-Ar and O{sub 2}-Ar discharges using rf-compensated Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). As the ICP power increases, the emission intensities from plasma species, the electron density, the electron temperature, and the plasma potential exhibit sudden changes. The Ar content in the gas mixture and total gas pressure have been varied in an attempt to fully characterize the plasma parameters. With these control parameters varying, the changes of the transition threshold power and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are explored. In N{sub 2}-Ar and O{sub 2}-Ar discharges at low-pressures of several millitorr, the transition thresholds are observed to decrease with Ar content and pressure. It is observed that in N{sub 2}-Ar plasmas during the transition, the shape of the EEDF changes from an unusual distribution with a flat hole near the electron energy of 3 eV in the E mode to a Maxwellian distribution in the H mode. However, in O{sub 2} -Ar plasmas, the EEDFs in the E mode at low Ar contents show roughly bi-Maxwellian distributions, while the EEDFs in the H mode are observed to be nearly Maxwellian. In the E and H modes of O{sub 2}-Ar discharges, the dissociation fraction of O{sub 2} molecules is estimated using optical emission actinometry. During the E-H mode transition, the dissociation fraction of molecules is also enhanced.

  9. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T.; Escobar, C. O.; Lippincott, W. H.; Rubinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 μm < λ < 1.5 μm). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  10. A 30-cm diameter argon ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

  11. Dendritic microstructure in argon atomized superalloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Kumar, Mahundra

    1986-01-01

    The dendritic microstructure of atomized nickel base superalloy powders (Ni-20 pct Cr, NIMONIC-80A, ASTROALOY, and ZHS6-K) was studied. Prealloyed vacuum induction melted ingots were argon-atomized, the powders were cooled to room temperature, and various powder-size fractions were examined by optical metallography. Linear correlations were obtained for the powder size dependence of the secondary dendrite arm spacing, following the expected d-alpha (R) to the m power dependence on the particle size for all four superalloy compositions. However, the Ni-20 pct Cr alloy, which had much coarser arm spacing as compared to the other three alloys, had a much larger value of m.

  12. Argon laser phototherapy of human malignancies using rhodamine-123 as a new laser dye: The intracellular role of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, D.J.; Saxton, R.E.; Markley, J.; Foote, C.S.; Fetterman, H.R.; Castro, D.J.; Ward, P.H. )

    1990-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the cationic, mitochondrial-specific dye Rhodamine-123 (Rh-123), is an efficient tumor photosensitizer for Argon laser treatment of human cancer cells both in vitro and in tumors grown as xenografts in athymic mice. To demonstrate the photodynamic mechanism of action of this reaction, the intracellular role of oxygen and temperature changes in treated cells have to be defined. In the current study, a large panel of human tumor cell lines of diverse histologic origin were tested for in vitro sensitivity to Rh-123 and the Argon laser (514.5 nm) in oxygen, deuterium oxide (D2O), and nitrogen (N2) environment. Tumor cells in suspension were first sensitized to Rh-123 (1 or 20 micrograms/ml for 1 hour), cooled on ice to 4 degrees C, and then exposed to the Argon laser (delta T = 14 +/- 1 degree C). Cell proliferation measured by (3H)-thymidine uptake 24 hours after sensitization with Rh-123 and laser treatment was significantly decreased in tumor cells kept in oxygen and D2O atmospheres. No decrease in DNA synthesis was seen in Rh-123 and laser treated cells kept in an N2 environment. Control tumor cells treated with Rh-123 or the Argon laser separately did not show any decreased (3H)-thymidine uptake in oxygen, D2O or N2 environment. These results provide evidence of a photodynamic process since Rh-123 sensitization and Argon laser activation occur at nonthermal levels of energy and are oxygen dependent. The high effectiveness of this technique of photodynamic therapy with the Argon laser, and low toxicity of Rh-123 could make its clinical use very attractive for the treatment of superficial malignancies.

  13. Tunable diode laser mesurements of widths of air- and nitrogen-broadened lines in the nu(4) band of C-13H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. M.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Tunable diode laser measurements of air-broadened and N2-broadened halfwidths are reported for 23 lines in the nu(4) band of C-13H4, between 1260 and 1360/cm. For all lines, at least three scans of each of four or more pressures were recorded. The experimental halfwidths presently obtained for C-13H4 are both larger and smaller than the U.S. Air Force Geophysics Laboratory values.

  14. AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENTS USING TRACER GASES: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature review of air filtration measurements using tracer gases, including sulfur hexafluoride, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and radioactive argon and krypton. Sulfur hexafluoride is the commonest tracer gas of choice...

  15. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D.; McEachran, R. P.

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies.

  16. Argon laser-welded arteriovenous anastomoses.

    PubMed

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; White, G; Lyons, R; Fujitani, R; Klein, S R; Uitto, J

    1987-11-01

    This study compared the healing of laser-welded and sutured canine femoral arteriovenous anastomoses. Arteriovenous fistulas 2 cm in length were created bilaterally in the femoral vessels of 10 dogs and were studied at 1 (n = 2), 2 (n = 2), 4 (n = 3), and 8 (n = 3) weeks. In each animal, one anastomosis (control) was closed with running 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral anastomosis (experimental) was sealed with an argon laser (0.5 watt, 4 minutes of exposure, 1830 J/cm2/1 cm length of anastomosis). At removal all experimental anastomoses were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal narrowing. Histologic examination at 4 weeks revealed that laser-welded anastomoses had less inflammatory response and almost normal collagen and elastin reorientation. At 8 weeks sutured anastomoses had significant intimal hyperplasia whereas laser repairs had normal luminal architecture. Tensile strength and collagen production, measured by the synthesis of hydroxyproline and the steady-state levels of type I and type III procollagen messenger ribonucleic acids, at the anastomoses and in adjacent vein and artery specimens were similar in sutured and laser-welded repairs at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. We conclude that argon laser welding of anastomoses is an acceptable alternative to suture techniques, with the advantage of improved healing without foreign body response and possible diminished intimal hyperplasia at the anastomotic line. PMID:3312648

  17. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon.

    PubMed

    Boyle, G J; McEachran, R P; Cocks, D G; White, R D

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies. PMID:25903897

  18. Argon laser photocoagulation in the dog stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Salmon, P R; Kelly, D F; Calder, B M; Pearson, H; Weaver, B M; Read, A E

    1979-01-01

    Laser photocoagulation is one of a number of methods currently under investigation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The Argon ion and Neodymium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd YAG) lasers are theoretically suitable as the beam from each may be transmitted via a flexible fibre. Argon laser photocoagulation has been shown to be effective and we have elucidated which factors determine its safety and efficacy. Studies on normal canine gastric mucosa showed that the depth of tissue damage depended chiefly on the total incident laser energy on any one spot, and that below 50 J the risk of perforation was extremely low. The energy density was much less important. The haemostatic effect depended more on the laser power. In artificial bleeding gastric ulcers in heparinised dogs the most effective level was 7--9 W, at which 22 out of 23 ulcers (96%) stopped bleeding completely, compared with one out of 12 controls. Photocoagulation was achieved in these cases with energies well within the safe limits. The procedure was effective endoscopically, and these results justify early clinical studies in man. PMID:573722

  19. Methane and Nitrogen Abundances on Pluto and Eris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegler, S. C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Grundy, W. M.; Romanishin, W.; Abernathy, M. R.; Bovyn, M. J.; Burt, J. A.; Evans, D. E.; Maleszewski, C. K.; Thompson, Z.; Vilas, F.

    2010-12-01

    We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 m Telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 Å, 5 Å pixel-1) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 m Telescope and Boller and Chivens Spectrograph (7100-9400 Å, 2 Å pixel-1) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov & Yantsevich, and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are ~10% and ~90% and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are ~3% and ~97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with a laboratory ice mixture consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. Although we cannot rule out an argon-rich surface, it seems more likely that nitrogen is the dominant species on Eris because the nitrogen ice 2.15 μm band is seen in spectra of Pluto and Triton.

  20. METHANE AND NITROGEN ABUNDANCES ON PLUTO AND ERIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tegler, S. C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Abernathy, M. R.; Bovyn, M. J.; Burt, J. A.; Evans, D. E.; Maleszewski, C. K.; Thompson, Z.; Grundy, W. M.; Romanishin, W.; Vilas, F. E-mail: David.Cornelison@nau.ed E-mail: wjr@nhn.ou.ed

    2010-12-10

    We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 m Telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 A, 5 A pixel{sup -1}) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 m Telescope and Boller and Chivens Spectrograph (7100-9400 A, 2 A pixel{sup -1}) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich, and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}10% and {approx}90% and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}3% and {approx}97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with a laboratory ice mixture consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. Although we cannot rule out an argon-rich surface, it seems more likely that nitrogen is the dominant species on Eris because the nitrogen ice 2.15 {mu}m band is seen in spectra of Pluto and Triton.

  1. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential. PMID:24533741

  2. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  3. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  5. Performance and technical challenges of liquid argon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, Brian; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    Liquid argon time projection chambers offer the possibility of incredible resolution of particle interactions. This review outlines the ongoing research and development towards the realization of a multi-kiloton scale detector. The ICARUS and ArgoNeuT experiments which make use of liquid argon time projection chamber technology are also described.

  6. Nitrogen-atomized, nickel-based, corrosion-resistant alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Frank J.

    1996-04-01

    Nitrogen gas atomization has been used for many years to produce iron-based powder-metal materials such as stainless and tool steels. However, it is more typical to use argon atomization with nickel-based alloys because it avoids the formation of nitrides that, in some cases, can be detrimental to the mechanical properties of these materials. In this article, two nickel-based materials— alloy 625 and alloy 690—normally used for applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance were evaluated in their nitrogen-atomized powder metal form. Nitrogen atomization uncovered attributes of these nickel alloys that are not present in their conventionally produced counterparts or in argon-atomized versions of the same compositions.

  7. State Air Quality Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollution Engineering, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This article presents in tabular form the air quality standards for sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, photochemicals, non-methane hydrocarbons and particulates for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. (CS)

  8. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a chapter for John Wiley & Son's Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, and covers issues involving air pollution control. Various technologies for controlling sulfur oxides is considered including fuel desulfurization. It also considers control of nitrogen oxides including post...

  9. Preparation and Evaluation of Nitrogen Doped Tungsten Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Koichi; Miura, Noboru; Matsumoto, Setsuko; Nakano, Ryotaro; Matsumoto, Hironaga

    Nitrogen doped tungsten oxide thin films were prepared by RF reactive sputtering in a gas mixture of argon, oxygen and nitrogen at room temperature. As a result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, it was thought that the doped nitrogen in the films is bonding to tungsten of WO3 bonding states as anion and exits in substitution sites in WO3. The optical absorption edge was shifted to lower energy region with nitrogen doping. The nitrogen doped thin films exhibit a coloration to black from transparent yellow by electrochromism. Additionally, a new peak at 2.3 eV related to nitrogen doping is observed in the spectra of color center at bleaching process.

  10. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  11. 74. LIQUID NITROGEN TANK, REGULATOR VALVES, AND PRESSURE GAUGES FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. LIQUID NITROGEN TANK, REGULATOR VALVES, AND PRESSURE GAUGES FOR LIQUID NITROGEN PUMPING STATION - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. 138. LIQUID NITROGEN INSTRUMENT PANEL ON EAST WALL OF LIQUID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    138. LIQUID NITROGEN INSTRUMENT PANEL ON EAST WALL OF LIQUID NITROGEN CONTROL ROOM (115), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Solbrig

    2011-12-01

    The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

  14. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    transfer depended on the reactivity of the emitted material. At the lower extreme of reactivity are the noble gases, neon and argon. Most neon and argon emitted during the degassing of the newly formed Earth is still in the atmosphere, and essentially none has been transferred to the hydrosphere or crust. At the other extreme are carbon and sulfur. Over 99% of the carbon and sulfur emitted during degassing are no longer in the atmosphere, but reside in the hydrosphere or the crust. Nitrogen is intermediate. Of the ˜6×106 TgN in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and crust, ˜2/3 is in the atmosphere as N2 with most of the remainder in the crust. The atmosphere is a large nitrogen reservoir primarily, because the triple bond of the N2 molecule requires a significant amount of energy to break. In the early atmosphere, the only sources of such energy were solar radiation and electrical discharges.At this point we had an earth with mostly N2 and devoid of life. How did we get to an earth with mostly N2 and teeming with life? First, N2 had to be converted into reactive N (Nr). (The term reactive nitrogen (Nr) includes all biologically active, photochemically reactive, and radiatively active nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere and biosphere of the Earth. Thus, Nr includes inorganic reduced forms of nitrogen (e.g., NH3 and NH4+), inorganic oxidized forms (e.g., NOx, HNO3, N2O, and NO3-), and organic compounds (e.g., urea, amines, and proteins).) The early atmosphere was reducing and had limited NH3. However, NH3 was a necessary ingredient in forming early organic matter. One possibility for NH3 generation was the cycling of seawater through volcanics (Holland, 1984). Under such a process, NH3 could then be released to the atmosphere where, when combined with CH4, H2, H2O, and electrical energy, organic molecules including amino acids could be formed (Miller, 1953). In essence, electrical discharges and UV radiation can convert mixtures of reduced gases into mixtures of organic

  15. Argon Adsorption on Open Carbon Nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Brice; Calvillo, Angel; Khanal, Pravin; Migone, Aldo; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako

    We have measured adsorption isotherms for argon adsorbed on a 0.1692 g sample of chemically-opened carbon nanohorns. Two clear substeps are visible in the adsorption data, corresponding to groups of stronger binding sites (lower pressure substep) and weaker binding sites (higher pressure substep). We have measured adsorption at eight different temperatures in the range between approximately 70 and 110 K. The space at the interior of the individual nanohorns is accessible to sorbates in these chemically opened nanohorns. Consequently, higher loadings are obtained on these samples when compared to those measured on unopened (as-produced) nanohorns. Results for the kinetics of adsorption, the effective specific surface area, and the isosteric heat of adsorption as a function of sorbent loading will be presented and compared to results from other gases adsorbed on nanohorns. This work was supported by the NSF through Grant DMR-1006428.

  16. Photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold metastable argon

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M. K.; Ranjit, G.; Sukenik, C. I.; Walhout, M.

    2011-05-15

    We present results of photoassociative spectroscopy performed on ultracold metastable argon atoms in a magneto-optical trap. Ion spectra are obtained with laser detuning up to a few gigahertz below the 4s[3/2]{sub 2}{yields}4p[5/2]{sub 3} trapping transition at 811 nm and with intensities in a range of {approx}(10{sup 2}-10{sup 5})I{sub Sat}. We also compute dipole-dipole potentials for both singly and doubly excited diatomic molecules and use a Leroy-Bernstein analysis to determine the approximate vibrational spacings in the (s+p) and (p+p) manifolds. Based on this theoretical framework, we explain a broad background feature in our data and suggest that double-excitation mechanisms are likely responsible for sharp dips in the ion signal.

  17. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  18. Attosecond Time-Resolved Autoionization of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang He; Chini, Michael; Chen Shouyuan; Zhang Changhua; Cheng Yan; Wu Yi; Thumm, Uwe; He Feng; Chang Zenghu

    2010-10-01

    Autoionization of argon atoms was studied experimentally by transient absorption spectroscopy with isolated attosecond pulses. The peak position, intensity, linewidth, and shape of the 3s3p{sup 6}np {sup 1}P Fano resonance series (26.6-29.2 eV) were modified by intense few-cycle near infrared laser pulses, while the delay between the attosecond pulse and the laser pulse was changed by a few femtoseconds. Numerical simulations revealed that the experimentally observed splitting of the 3s3p{sup 6}4p {sup 1}P line is caused by the coupling between two short-lived highly excited states in the strong laser field.

  19. Large vessel sealing with the argon laser.

    PubMed

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; Lyons, R; White, G; Klein, S R; Pizzurro, D; Abergel, R P; Dwyer, R M; Uitto, J

    1987-01-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser-welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas. Twelve animals had bilateral femoral vessels studied, with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks (four animals for each type of repair), and were evaluated histologically by hematoxylin and eosin, elastin, and trichrome stains; biochemically by the formation of [3H]hydroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis; and mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welding may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large-diameter venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas, as healing is comparable to that seen with suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively. PMID:3306233

  20. Vascular Welding Using The Argon Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rodney A.; Donayre, Carlos; Kopchok, George; White, Geoffrey; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley; Dwyer, Richard; Uitto, Jouni

    1987-03-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas. Bilateral femoral, carotid or jugular vessels were studied with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralatral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks for each type of repair and evaluated histologically by hematoxylineosin, elastin and trichrome stains, biochemically by the formation of [3H] hyaroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis, ana mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welaing may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large diameter venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas, as they heal comparable to suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively.

  1. Argon laser treatment of radiation proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, J.J.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation therapy for malignant gynecologic disease and prostatic cancer has resulted in increased survival and cure rates. This modality has unfortunately produced debilitating radiation proctitis. Recently, five patients were seen with continuous rectal bleeding secondary to radiation disease of the rectum. Four of these patients were women who were being treated for cervical carcinoma and one was a man with prostatic cancer. These patients were refractory to steroid retention enemas, iron therapy, and benproperine enema therapy. Treatment was accomplished using the argon laser with a 300-micron fiber passed via flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscope. The most proximal areas were treated first. One and a half watts at 0.5 pulses was used. Up to 50 pulses were delivered per therapy session. The fiber was placed in contact with the lesion and circumferentially for 0.5 cm surrounding each suspected area. Bleeding stopped in the four women after two sessions and in the man after four sessions.

  2. Explosive cavitation in superheated liquid argon.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, V E; Pavlov, P A; Baidakov, V G

    2008-06-21

    The kinetics of explosive boiling-up of liquid argon has been investigated at negative pressures created by the reflection of a compression pulse 3-5 mus long from the free surface of a liquid by the method of liquid pulse heating on a thin platinum wire (with a rate of temperature increase of about 1 Kmus). The limiting superheats T(*) (stretches p(*)), the effective nucleation rate J(*), and the derivative G(T)=(d ln JdT)(T=T(*) ) have been determined by experimental data on the thermal perturbation of a wire probe and the results of solution of the problem on the initial stage of explosive boiling-up of a liquid. The experimental data are compared with homogeneous nucleation theory. PMID:18570511

  3. A sensitive and efficient method for trace analysis of some phenolic compounds using simultaneous derivatization and air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction from human urine and plasma samples followed by gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Afshar Mogaddam, Mohammad Reza; Alizadeh Nabil, Ali Akbar

    2015-12-01

    In present study, a simultaneous derivatization and air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction method combined with gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection has been developed for the determination of some phenolic compounds in biological samples. The analytes are derivatized and extracted simultaneously by a fast reaction with 1-flouro-2,4-dinitrobenzene under mild conditions. Under optimal conditions low limits of detection in the range of 0.05-0.34 ng mL(-1) are achievable. The obtained extraction recoveries are between 84 and 97% and the relative standard deviations are less than 7.2% for intraday (n = 6) and interday (n = 4) precisions. The proposed method was demonstrated to be a simple and efficient method for the analysis of phenols in biological samples. PMID:26014445

  4. Ability of a gridless ion source to functionalize polypropylene surfaces by low-energy (60-100 eV) nitrogen ion bombardment. Effects of ageing in air and in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Laurent; Scaglione, Salvatore; Flori, Daniele; Riga, Joseph; Caudano, Roland

    2001-12-01

    Polymer surface treatments are of great importance for various industrial applications that can range from food packaging or car bumper painting to biocompatible implants. For such applications, plasma or corona discharges are well known and used "on-line" in polymer plants to incorporate new chemical functions at polymer surfaces. The aim of this work is to investigate the ability of a simple ion source to functionalize polypropylene surfaces in comparison with these intensively used industrial methods. Estimation of the influence of the nitrogen ion dose (from 1×10 15 to 1×10 16 ions/ cm2) and the ion energy (from 60 to 100 eV) on incorporation is attempted in order to be able to use them in a controlled way. The ageing of these polymer surfaces in air and in water was studied by XPS for several months.

  5. Measurements of Nitric-Oxide Nitrogen-Dioxide and Nitric Acid in Ambient and Captive Air by Second Harmonic Detection with Tunable Diode Lasers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Toshio

    A Tropospheric Air Monitoring System (TAMS) was designed and constructed to measure trace gases in ambient air. The second harmonic component of the modulated light from a tunable diode laser due to an absorption line was measured to determine the mixing ratio of a trace gas in the sample. The technique of second harmonic detection increased the signal-to-noise ratio so that a species with mixing ratios in the sub-ppbv range could be detected. Second harmonic signals of an absorption line was calculated at different pressures (line shapes) and different modulation amplitudes to understand the optimum conditions for trace gas measurements. Also examined were the properties of the second harmonic signals due to etalon fringes, wavelength dependence of the laser power, tails of other absorption lines and interferences by these factors. The reduction of random noise by second harmonic detection was also investigated. The TAMS was intercalibrated with a chemiluminescence instrument of the University of Michigan. The system was transported to Los Angeles in fall of 1981 to join a captive air measurement programme. Both the captive and ambient air in Los Angeles was monitored for a one month period. The agreement with the University of Michigan was excellent for NO and satisfactory for NO(,2) and HNO(,3). The results of the intercalibrations and measurements are described.

  6. SIMULTANEOUS CALIBRATION OF OPEN-PATH AND CONVENTIONAL POINT MONITORS FOR MEASURING AMBIENT AIR CONCENTRATIONS OF SULPHUR DIOXIDE, OZONE, AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-stage dilution system and an associated procedure to simultaneously calibrate both open-path (long-path) and conventional point air monitors have been used successfully during a comparison test study of open-path monitoring systems in Houston during August, 1 993. wo open-p...

  7. Influence of oxygen in atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet on sterilization of Bacillus atrophaeous spores

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jin-Pyo; Uhm, Han S.; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2007-09-15

    A nonequilibrium Ar/O{sub 2} plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure was carried out in a coaxial cylindrical reactor with a stepped electrode configuration powered by a 13.56 MHz rf power supplier. The argon glow discharge with high electron density produces oxygen reactive species in large quantities. Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. The decimal reduction time (D values) of the Ar/O{sub 2} plasma jet at an exposure distance of 0.5-1.5 cm ranges from 5 to 57 s. An actinometric comparison of the sterilization data shows that atomic oxygen radicals play a significant role in plasma sterilization. When observed under a scanning electron microscope, the average size of the spores appears to be greatly reduced due to chemical reactions with the oxygen radicals.

  8. Impact of an atmospheric argon plasma jet on a dielectric surface and desorption of organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damany, Xavier; Pasquiers, Stéphane; Blin-Simiand, Nicole; Bauville, Gérard; Bournonville, Blandine; Fleury, Michel; Jeanney, Pascal; Santos Sousa, João

    2016-08-01

    The propagation of a DC-pulsed argon plasma jet through the surrounding ambient air, and its interaction with an ungrounded glass plate placed on the jet trajectory, was studied by means of fast imaging. The surface plays an important role in the spatio-temporal characteristics of the plasma. Indeed, for an argon jet propagating perpendicularly to the surface, the plasma jet structure changes from filamentary to diffuse when the distance between the nozzle of the capillary tube and the surface is short (≤10 mm). Changing the angle between the capillary tube and the glass plate, and varying the gas flow rate strongly affects the spatial extension of the plasma that develops on the surface. This surface plasma propagates while the plasma in the argon jet is maintained with the same luminous intensity. Finally, this plasma jet shows interesting characteristics for desorption of low volatile organic molecules such as bibenzyl. A maximum removal of bibenzyl is located at the intersection area between the jet axis and the glass surface, and some of the initially deposited molecules are found intact in gas phase. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  9. Seasonal variation of Argon in the martian atmosphere as measured by Spirit and Opportunity MER rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Thanasis

    Although there were no meteorological devices on any of the 2 rovers of the MER mission, by using the excellent ability of the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) to detect even a small amount of the Ar gas in a predominantly CO2 martian atmosphere, we were able to obtain detailed information on the variability of the atmospheric Ar as a function of seasonal changes. The technique is simple and straightforward. In order to increase the accuracy of the technique by eliminating any interference from target elements and minimizing the background from the backscattered Pu-L X-ray lines, dedicated APXS atmospheric Ar measurements were performed over a period of almost 4 martian years. In that mode the only visible peak in the x-ray spectra is the Ar Kα x-ray line at energy Eα=2.96 keV. Polar condensation of CO2 during winter periods, when the temperature falls below the freezing point of CO2, causes massive movement of air masses from the equatorial regions towards the poles. As the CO2 freezes, the remaining air there is enriched in argon (and nitrogen). The GRS experiment on the Odyssey orbiter around Mars has observed a six-fold in the Ar/CO2 mixing ratio in the southern polar region during the winter period. During the summer season, the opposite occurs: sublimating CO2 increases the atmospheric pressure and creates an atmospheric high that pushes the air mass with an enriched Ar fraction towards the equatorial regions where when arrives it is detected by the APXS on the Opportunity and Spirit landing sites. Our results indicate that the variation of the Ar in the martian atmosphere at both landing sites follows generally the variation of the atmospheric pressure, but it is not in phase with it: there is a phase shift of almost one martian season. The measurement of the Ar mixing ratio at the Spirit and Opportunity landing sites is thus a direct probe of the global circulation between the polar CO2 resource/sink and the equatorial regions. This information is

  10. Numerical simulation of alumina spraying in argon-helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. H.

    A numerical model is described for simulating thermal plasmas containing entrained particles, with emphasis on plasma spraying applications. The plasma is represented as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting ideal gas, while the particles are tracked as discrete Lagrangian entities coupled to the plasma. Computational results are presented from a transient simulation of alumina spraying in a turbulent argon-helium plasma jet in air environment, including torch geometry, substrate, and multiple species with chemical reactions. Particle-plasma interactions including turbulent dispersion have been modeled in a fully self-consistent manner. Interactions between the plasma and the torch and substrate walls are modeled using wall functions.

  11. Hydrothermal fluids and argon isotopes in quartz veins and cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Grenville

    1988-06-01

    Argon isotopes from a number of sources are present in quartz veins and chert; in situ decay of potassium, parentless 40Ar leached or outgassed from surrounding rocks, atmospheric argon dissolved in ancient hydrothermal fluids, and, modern atmospheric argon. The manner in which the 40Ar- 39Ar techniques can be used to unscramble these components, by way of correlations with Cl and K, is described in relation to two parallel studies of vein quartz and the Gunflint chert. Information concerning several processes can be inferred, including: contributions of surface waters to trapped fluids (from the concentration of atmospheric argon in the fluids), degree of water-rock interaction (from the concentration of parentless 40Ar and/or the ratio of parentless to atmospheric argon), effects of dilution of primary hydrothermal brines by meteoric water (which results in a decrease in the ratio of both Cl and parentless 40Ar to atmospheric argon), effects of boiling (from low concentrations of atmospheric argon and an increase in Cl/40Ar ). The K-Ar chronology of deposition can also be inferred in suitable circumstances. In principle, the ( 40Ar /36Ar ) ratio of the ancient atmosphere can be determined from fluids free of parentless 40Ar. However, a ( 40Ar /36Ar ) ratio determined for a low salinity end member in Gunflint chert probably reflects the presence of modern meteoric water.

  12. Extreme argon purity in a large, non-evacuated cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Tope, Terry; Adamowski, Mark; Carls, B.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Skup, E.; Stancari, M.; Yang, T.

    2014-01-29

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) show promise as scalable devices for the large detectors needed for long-baseline neutrino oscillation physics. Over the last several years at Fermilab a staged approach to developing the technology for large detectors has been developed. The TPC detectors require ultra-pure liquid argon with respect to electronegative contaminants such as oxygen and water. The tolerable electronegative contamination level may be as pure as 60 parts per trillion of oxygen. Three liquid argon cryostats operated at Fermilab have achieved the extreme purity required by TPCs. These three cryostats used evacuation to remove atmospheric contaminants as the first purification step prior to filling with liquid argon. Future physics experiments may require very large detectors with tens of kilotonnes of liquid argon mass. The capability to evacuate such large cryostats adds significant cost to the cryostat itself in addition to the cost of a large scale vacuum pumping system. This paper describes a 30 ton liquid argon cryostat at Fermilab which uses purging to remove atmospheric contaminants instead of evacuation as the first purification step. This cryostat has achieved electronegative contamination levels better than 60 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent. The results of this liquid argon purity demonstration will strongly influence the design of future TPC cryostats.

  13. Load on Trough Bellows Following an Argon Spill

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, K.; /Fermilab

    1988-07-12

    In the case of a gross argon spill from the DO detector, the liquid argon is caught in three plenums. These plenums are to be connected by bellows to make a horizontal trough open at one end for removing the argon. The design of these bellows is dependent on the maximum argon load they must carry. Bellows to connect the three argon-catching plenums in the DO detector must be able to carry at least 92 lbs of argon when closed and 231 lbs when open, plus the load due to argon in the convolutions. Examples of such loads and the method for their calculations are contained in the Discussion. It should be noted that a set of assumptions was used in these calculations. First, we considered a uniform channel and uniform flow. Second, we used a value for Manning's n meant for a similar, but not exactly the same, case. Finally, we were forced to define an average depth, d, to be used to state the hydraulic radius, R, and area of flow, A. These facts may warrant consideration in future calculations.

  14. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziglo, M. J.; Nelson, A. E.; Heo, G.; Major, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm -2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation ( p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  15. Neighbourhood Characteristics and Long-Term Air Pollution Levels Modify the Association between the Short-Term Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations and All-Cause Mortality in Paris

    PubMed Central

    Deguen, Séverine; Petit, Claire; Delbarre, Angélique; Kihal, Wahida; Padilla, Cindy; Benmarhnia, Tarik; Lapostolle, Annabelle; Chauvin, Pierre; Zmirou-Navier, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Background While a great number of papers have been published on the short-term effects of air pollution on mortality, few have tried to assess whether this association varies according to the neighbourhood socioeconomic level and long-term ambient air concentrations measured at the place of residence. We explored the effect modification of 1) socioeconomic status, 2) long-term NO2 ambient air concentrations, and 3) both combined, on the association between short-term exposure to NO2 and all-cause mortality in Paris (France). Methods A time-stratified case-crossover analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of short-term NO2 variations on mortality, based on 79,107 deaths having occurred among subjects aged over 35 years, from 2004 to 2009, in the city of Paris. Simple and double interactions were statistically tested in order to analyse effect modification by neighbourhood characteristics on the association between mortality and short-term NO2 exposure. The data was estimated at the census block scale (n=866). Results The mean of the NO2 concentrations during the five days prior to deaths were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality: overall Excess Risk (ER) was 0.94% (95%CI=[0.08;1.80]. A higher risk was revealed for subjects living in the most deprived census blocks in comparison with higher socioeconomic level areas (ER=3.14% (95%CI=[1.41-4.90], p<0.001). Among these deprived census blocks, excess risk was even higher where long-term average NO2 concentrations were above 55.8 μg/m3 (the top tercile of distribution): ER=4.84% (95%CI=[1.56;8.24], p for interaction=0.02). Conclusion Our results show that people living in census blocks characterized by low socioeconomic status are more vulnerable to air pollution episodes. There is also an indication that people living in these disadvantaged census blocks might experience even higher risk following short-term air pollution episodes, when they are also chronically exposed to higher NO2 levels

  16. Effects of high pressure nitrogen on the thermal stability of SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    1991-01-01

    Polymer-derived SiC fibers were exposed to nitrogen gas pressures of 7 and 50 atm at temperatures up to 1800 C. The fiber weight loss, chemical composition, and tensile strength were then measured at room temperature in order to understand the effects of nitrogen exposure on fiber stability. High pressure nitrogen treatments limited weight loss to 3 percent or less for temperatures up to 1800 C. The bulk Si-C-O chemical composition of the fiber remained relatively constant up to 1800 C with only a slight increase in nitrogen content after treatment at 50 atm; however, fiber strength retention was significantly improved. To further understand the effects of the nitrogen atmosphere on the fiber stability, the results of previous high pressure argon treatments were compared to those of the high pressure nitrogen treatments. High pressure inert gas can temporarily maintain fiber strength by physically inhibiting the evolution of gaseous species which result from internal reactions. In addition to this physical effect, it would appear that high pressure nitrogen further improved fiber temperature capability by chemically reacting with the fiber surface, thereby reducing the rate of gas evolution. Subsequent low pressure argon treatments following the initial nitrogen treatments resulted in stronger fibers than after argon treatment alone, further supporting the chemical reaction mechanism and its beneficial effects on fiber strength.

  17. Melting of corrosion-resisting steels using air in bath agitation at the end of oxygen blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizatulin, R. A.; Valuev, D. V.; Valueva, A. V.; Yedesheva, Ch V.

    2014-10-01

    A number of metallurgical plants employ ladle stirring with argon at the end of oxygen blowing during the melting process of corrosion-resisting steels [1, 2]. At the same time, the scarcity and relatively high cost of argon, its low pressure in a shop air pipeline restrain most plants from using argon for corrosion-resisting steel production. Compressed air was used instead of argon to intensify the process of decarbonizing when chromium-nickel stainless steels were made with a 40-ton electric arc furnace at the Kuznetsk Metallurgical Plant.

  18. Development of a nitrogen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Marshall, R. D.; Powell, J. D., III; Schubert, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    An eight-stage nitrogen generation module was developed. The design integrated a hydrazine catalytic dissociator, three ammonia dissociation stages and four palladium/silver hydrogen separator stages. Alternating ammonia dissociation and hydrogen separation stages are used to remove hydrogen and ammonia formed in the dissociation of hydrazine which results in negligible ammonia and hydrogen concentrations in the product nitrogen stream. An engineering breadboard nitrogen supply subsystem was also developed. It was developed as an integratable subsystem for a central spacecraft air revitalization system. The subsystem consists of the hydrazine storage and feed mechanism, the nitrogen generation module, the peripheral mechanical and electrical components required to control and monitor subsystem performance, and the instrumentation required to interface with other subsystems of an air revitalization system. The breadboard nitrogen supply subsystem was integrated and tested with a one-person capacity experimental air revitalization system. The integration, checkout and testing was successfully accomplished.

  19. Iron- and nitrogen-functionalized graphene as a non-precious metal catalyst for enhanced oxygen reduction in an air-cathode microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sizhe; Hu, Yongyou; Xu, Qian; Sun, Jian; Hou, Bin; Zhang, Yaping

    2012-09-01

    In this work, iron- and nitrogen-functionalized graphene (Fe-N-G) as a non-precious metal catalyst is synthesized via a facile method of thermal treatment of a mixture of Fe salt, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and chemically reduced graphene. The electrocatalytic activity of the prepared catalysts toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) evaluated by using linear sweep voltammetry tests shows that the Fe-N-G catalyst has more positive onset potential and increased reduction current densities as compared to the pristine graphene (P-G) catalyst, indicating an enhanced ORR activity of the Fe-N-G catalyst. More importantly, the Fe-N-G-MFC achieves the highest power density of 1149.8 mW m-2, which is ∼2.1 times of that generated with the Pt/C-MFC (561.1 mW m-2) and much higher than that of the P-G-MFC (109 mW m-2). These results demonstrate that the Fe-N-G catalyst can hold the promise of being an excellent alternative to the costly Pt catalyst for practical MFC applications.

  20. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.G.; Dardin, S.M.; Kadel, R.W.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.B.; Peskov, V.

    2004-03-19

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon in the high electric field (>7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 keV or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  1. Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence of Argon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, Earl; Soderholm, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A pair of axicon lenses create an annular beam path for the emission collection and the pump laser light is confined inside the annulus of the collection beam. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. Here we present optical modeling of and initial results from the axicon based confocal optical system. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  2. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. G.; Dardin, S. M.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J. A.; Peskov, V.; Wenzel, W. A.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon (xe) in the high electric field ( >7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure-dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure-independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure-dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure-independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure-dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  3. Reactive Nitrogen in Atmospheric Emission Inventories

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess reactive Nitrogen (NT) has become one of the most pressing environmental problems leading to air pollution, acidification and eutrophication of ecosystems, biodiversity impacts, leaching of nitrates into groundwater and global warming. This paper investigates how current i...

  4. Argon laser treatment of urethral stricture and vesical neck contracture.

    PubMed

    Adkins, W C

    1988-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the argon laser wavelength allow a precise incision with excellent hemostasis and negligible heating of adjacent tissues resulting in less scarring. These qualities are used to advantage in the treatment of strictures. The argon laser was used to perform 13 internal urethrotomies and ten vesical neck incisions. The operative method used is similar to optical internal urethrotomy. The argon probe incises hemostatically, reducing the need for extensive fulguration of tissues at the operative site and thereby reducing the tendency for more scar tissue to form and compromise the operation. The same hemostasis reduces the need for postoperative indwelling urethral catheterization. Utility of the argon device in most instances allows treatment to be conducted on an outpatient basis without general anesthesia and without use of postoperative urethral catheters, yielding an effective, cost-saving therapy. PMID:3210887

  5. Argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa L; Steinberg, John S

    2011-01-01

    In this brief report, we introduce the principles, indications, advantages, disadvantages, and surgical techniques involved in the use of argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery. PMID:21907597

  6. Trace-Rare-Gas Optical Emission Spectroscopy of Nitrogen Plasma Generated at a Frequency of 13.56 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U. Rehman, N.; U. Khan, F.; Naseer, S.; Murtaza, G.; S. Hussain, S.; I., Ahmad; Zakaullah, M.

    2011-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopic measurement of trace rare gas is carried out to determine the density of nitrogen (N) atom, in a nitrogen plasma, as a function of filling pressure and RF power applied. 2% of argon, used as an actinometer, is mixed with nitrogen. In order to normalize the changes in the excitation cross section and electron energy distribution function at different operational conditions, the Ar-I emission line at 419.83 nm is used, which is of nearly the same excitation efficiency coefficient as that of the nitrogen emission line at 493.51 nm. It is observed that the emission intensity of the selected argon and atomic nitrogen lines increases with both pressure and RF power, as does the nitrogen atomic density.

  7. NITROGEN OXIDE CONTROL FOR STATIONARY COMBUSTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen dioxide is a criteria pollutant under the Clean Air Act and emissions of nitrogen oxides must be controlled to achieve attainment with the ambient standards. his handbook presents an overview of technologies that may be applicable to control the four major stationary sou...

  8. Nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; McCormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  9. Nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; Mccormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  10. Counterflow diffusion flames of hydrogen, and hydrogen plus methane, ethylene, propane, and silane vs. air - Strain rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Five coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJBs) with tube diameter D(T) of 1.8-10 mm and 5 mm conical nozzles were used to form dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of nitrogen and hydrocarbon-diluted H2 versus air in an argon-purged chamber at 1 atm. Area-averaged air jet velocities at blowoff of the central flame, U(air), characterized extinction of the airside flame as functions of input H2 concentration on the fuelside. A master plot of extensive U(air) data at blowoff versus D(T) shows that U(air) varies linearly with D(T). This and other data sets are used to find that nozzle OJB results for U(air)/diameter average 4.24 + or - 0.28 times larger than tubular OJB results for the same fuel compositions. Critical radial velocity gradients consistent with one-dimensional stagnation point boundary theory and with plug flow inputs are estimated. The results compare favorably with published numerical results based only on potential flow.

  11. A study of the trace 39Ar content in argon from deep underground sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Guray, G.; Hohman, T.; Holtz, D.; Ianni, An.; Laubenstein, M.; Loer, B.; Love, C.; Martoff, C. J.; Montanari, D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nelson, A.; Rountree, S. D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wright, A.

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of argon from deep underground sources with significantly less 39Ar than atmospheric argon was an important step in the development of direct dark matter detection experiments using argon as the active target. We report on the design and operation of a low-background single-phase liquid argon detector that was built to study the 39Ar content of this underground argon. Underground argon from the Kinder Morgan CO2 plant in Cortez, Colorado was determined to have less than 0.65% of the 39Ar activity in atmospheric argon, or 6.6 mBq/kg specific 39Ar activity.

  12. Effects of argon gas flow rate on laser-welding.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the rate of argon gas flow on joint strength in the laser-welding of cast metal plates and to measure the porosity. Two cast plates (Ti and Co-Cr alloy) of the same metal were abutted and welded together. The rates of argon gas flow were 0, 5 and 10 L/min for the Co-Cr alloy, and 5 and 10 L/min for the Ti. There was a significant difference in the ratio of porosity according to the rate of argon gas flow in the welded area. Argon shielding had no significant effect on the tensile strength of Co-Cr alloy. The 5 L/min specimens showed greater tensile strength than the 10 L/min specimens for Ti. Laser welding of the Co-Cr alloy was influenced very little by argon shielding. When the rate of argon gas flow was high, joint strength decreased for Ti. PMID:22447067

  13. Solvation effects on the molecular 3s Rydberg state: AZAB/CYCLO octanes clustered with argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Q. Y.; Moreno, P. O.; Li, S.; Bernstein, E. R.

    1993-02-01

    Two color, 1+1, mass resolved excitation spectroscopy (MRES) is used to obtain molecular Rydberg (3s←n) spectra of azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (ABCO) and diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) clustered with argon. Nozzle/laser timing delay studies are employed together with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy to identify cluster composition. Population depletion techniques are used to differentiate between clusters with the same mass, but different geometries. A Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential is used to model the intermolecular interactions and predict minimum energy cluster geometries and cluster binding energies. The experimental results are combined with the cluster geometry calculations to assign spectral features to specific cluster geometries. Three different excited state interactions are required to model the experimentally observed line shapes, spectral shifts, and cluster dissociation. The relationship between these model potentials and the cluster binding sites suggests that the form of the cluster intermolecular potential in the Rydberg excited state is dictated by the distance between the argon and chromophore atoms. A comparison of results for ABCO(Ar)1 and DABCO(Ar)1 leads to the conclusion that the nitrogen 3s Rydberg orbital in clusters of DABCO is delocalized.

  14. A Mach 6 external nozzle experiment with Argon-Freon exhaust simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, James L.

    1989-01-01

    A scramjet exhaust simulation technique for hypersonic wind tunnel testing has been developed. Mixtures of Argon and Freon correctly match the inviscid simulation parameters of Mach number, static-pressure ratio, and the ratio of specific heats at the combustor exit location; this simulation is accomplished at significantly reduced temperatures and without combustion. An investigation of nozzle parametrics in a Mach 6 freestream showed that the external nozzle ramp angle, the cowl trailing-edge angle, an external nozzle flow fence and the nozzle static-pressure ratio significantly affected the external nozzle thrust and pitching moment as measured by the integration of surface-pressure data. A comparison of Argon-Freon and air exhaust simulation showed that the external nozzle thrust and pitching moment were in error by roughly a factor of 2 using air due to the incorrect match of the ratio of specific heats. An assessment of two-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes codes for predicting external nozzle aerodynamic characteristics was made by comparing computed and experimental results.

  15. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  16. Concerning Apparent Similarity of Structures of Fluoropolymer Surfaces Exposed to an Argon Plasma or Argon Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Covington, M. Alan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) C(sub 1s) spectra of fluoropolymers exposed to either an argon plasma or argon ion beam show remarkable similarity, implying that the surface-modification reactions for these two processes likely proceed through comparable mechanisms, revolving predominantly ion-surface interactions. The importance of working with a monochromatized x-ray source for XPS analysis of the surface-modified fluoropolymers is once again emphasized.

  17. Nitrogen mineralization in a tussock tundra soil

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, G.M.; Miller, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of substrate quality, temperature, and moisture on nitrogen mineralization from a tussock tundra soil were examined with laboratory soil incubations utilizing both air-dried samples and field-moist intact cores. The potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN) was highly correlated to both total soil nitrogen (positively) and the carbon/nitrogen ratio (negatively). All soil horizons exhibited a net nitrogen mineralization even at a high carbon/nitrogen ratio of 92. It was concluded that field-moist intact soil cores provide a more reliable estimate than the air-dried samples of both PMN and the mineralization rate under standard laboratory conditions. There was no significant effect of moisture tension (0.0 to 0.4 bars) on net nitrogen mineralization. The average Q/sub 10/ (temperature effect) for net nitrogen mineralization was 2.5. Based on this study and others, it was concluded that temperature through its effect on nitrogen mineralization plays an important role in controlling plant productivity in these naturally nitrogen-deficient tundra ecosystems.

  18. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    HEBNER,GREGORY A.; MILLER,PAUL A.

    1999-12-07

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4}, in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s{sub 5} level is metastable and the 1s{sub 4} level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the discharge while the density at the edge of the discharge was unaffected. The spatially resolved excited state density measurements were combined with previous line integrated measurements in the same discharge geometry to derive spatially resolved, absolute densities of the 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4} argon excited states and gas temperature spatial distributions. Fluorescence lifetime was a strong fi.mction of the rf power, pressure, argon fraction and spatial location. Increasing the power or pressure resulted in a factor of two decrease in the fluorescence lifetime while adding Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} increased the fluorescence lifetime. Excited state quenching rates are derived from the data. When Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} was added to the plasma, the maximum argon metastable density depended on the gas and ratio. When chlorine was added to the argon plasma, the spatial density profiles were independent of chlorine fraction. While it is energetically possible for

  19. Soil Carbon Storage and N{sub 2}O Emissions from Wheat Agroecosystems as Affected by Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) and Nitrogen Treatments. Annual Progress Report - Year 1: August 1, 1996 to July 31, 1997 [Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, S.W.; Matthias, A.; Thompson, T.L.

    1999-02-17

    Rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have prompted concern about response of plants and crops to future elevated CO{sub 2} levels, and particularly the extent to which ecosystems will sequester carbon and thus impact the rate of rise of CO{sub 2} concentrations. Free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) experimentation was used with wheat agroecosystems for two growing seasons to assess effects of CO{sub 2} and soil nitrogen. Over 20 researchers on this experiment variously examined plant production and grow yield, phenology, length of growing season, water-use efficiency, ecosystem productivity, below ground processes (root and microbial activity, carbon and nitrogen cycling), etc.

  20. Application of gas chromatographic method in simultaneous measurements of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, J.; Bielewski, J.; Sliwka, I.

    2012-04-01

    Helium concentration in groundwater is a fine indicator in water dating in a range from a hundred to tens of thousands of years. Gas chromatography (GC) measurements of helium can be used as an alternative to mass spectrometry (MS) determinations of 4He for groundwater dating [1]. Argon and neon concentrations mainly serve for determining the temperature of recharge and the air excess which is needed to correct measured values of helium concentration [2] . A chromatographic measurement system of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwater is presented [3]. Water samples are taken from groundwater with a precise procedure without contamination with air in a special stainless steel vessels of volume equal to 2900 cm3. Helium is extracted from water samples using the head-space method. After enrichment by cryotrap method helium is analyzed in the gas chromatograph equipped with the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) with detection limit of about 2.8 ng He. The helium limit of detection of presented method is 1,2·10-8 cm3STP/gH2O [4]. We are currently working on adapting the method of cryogenic enrichment of helium concentration for simultaneous measurements of the concentration of helium, argon and neon using single sample of groundwater. Neon will be measured with the thermal conductivity detector and capillary column filled with molecular sieve 5A. Argon will be analyzed also with the thermal conductivity detector and packed column filled with molecular sieve 5A. This work was supported by grant No. N N525 3488 38 from the polish National Science Centre. [1] A. Zuber, W. Ciężkowski, K. Różański (red.), Tracer methods in hydrogeological studies - a methodological guide. Wroclaw University of Technology Publishing House, Wroclaw, 2007 (in polish). [2] P. Mochalski, Chromatographic method for the determination of Ar, Ne and N2 in water, Ph.D. thesis, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow, 2003 (in polish). [3] A. Żurek, P

  1. Assessment of the roles of various inactivation agents in an argon-based direct current atmospheric pressure cold plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qian; Wang Ruixue; Sun Peng; Feng Hongqing; Liang Yongdong; Zhu Weidong; Becker, Kurt H.; Zhang Jue; Fang Jing

    2012-06-15

    Three types of gases, pure argon (99.999%), argon with 2% oxygen, and argon with 2% oxygen and 10% nitrogen were used as operating gases of a direct current atmospheric pressure cold plasma jet to inactivate Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) suspended in a liquid. The inactivation efficacies for the plasma jets operating in the three gases decrease from Ar/O{sub 2}(2%) to Ar/O{sub 2}(2%)/N{sub 2}(10%) to pure Ar. Optical emission spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry were employed to identify and monitor the reactive species in the plasma-liquid system for the three operating gases and revealed the presence of O, {sup 1}O{sub 2}, OH, NO, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and NO{sub 3}{sup -}/NO{sub 2}{sup -} as well as Cu{sup +}/Cu{sup 2+}. The S. aureus inactivation results indicate that atomic oxygen (O) is the key inactivation agent, while other species play a lesser role in the inactivation progress studied here.

  2. Evolution of Martian atmospheric argon: Implications for sources of volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Kevin S.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    We have examined processes affecting isotopes of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, 40Ar) in order to determine important atmospheric sources and sinks. Our simple model for argon evolution incorporates production of radiogenic argon in the mantle, outgassing of all argon species by extrusive and intrusive volcanism, and loss to space by knock-on sputtering above the exobase. Sputtering has been shown previously to be an important loss process for atmospheric species, especially isotopes of noble gases, which have few other mechanisms of escape. The integrated evolution of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, and 40Ar, respectively) is modeled in terms of these variables: (1) the planetary concentration of potassium, (2) the fraction of juvenile argon released catastrophically during the first 600 Myr., (3) potential variation in the time-history of sputtering loss from that suggested by Luhmann et al. [1992], and (4) the volume of total outgassing to the surface as compared to outgassing contributed by volcanic release. Our results indicate that Mars has lost between 85-95% of 36Ar and 70-88% of outgassed 40Ar. Due to this substantial loss, the planet must have outgassed the equivalent of between 10 and 100 times the total volume of gases released by extrusive and intrusive volcanics. This indicates that volcanic outgassing, alone, is insufficient to explain the present-day abundances of 36Ar and 40Ar in the Martian atmosphere. Similar calculations for 20Ne suggest outgassed volumes of between 100 and 1800 times in excess of that due to volcanism. This results in a distinct Ne/Ar elemental fractionation, with a preference for outgassing argon, of the order of 10 to 17. Although the results must be evaluated within the model uncertainties, the results are compelling in that they unequivocally show the existence of additional sources of atmospheric volatiles and helps define a means to identify them.

  3. Contrast in air pollution components between major streets and background locations: Particulate matter mass, black carbon, elemental composition, nitrogen oxide and ultrafine particle number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogaard, Hanna; Kos, Gerard P. A.; Weijers, Ernie P.; Janssen, Nicole A. H.; Fischer, Paul H.; van der Zee, Saskia C.; de Hartog, Jeroen J.; Hoek, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Policies to reduce outdoor air pollution concentrations are often assessed on the basis of the regulated pollutants. Whether these are the most appropriate components to assess the potential health benefits is questionable, as other health-relevant pollutants may be more strongly related to traffic. The aim of this study is to compare the contrast in concentration between major roads and (sub)urban background for a large range of pollutants and to analyze the magnitude of the measured difference in the street - background for major streets with different street configurations. Measurements of PM 10, PM 2.5, particle number concentrations (PNC), black carbon (BC), elemental composition of PM 10 and PM 2.5 and NO x were conducted simultaneously in eight major streets and nine (sub)urban background locations in the Netherlands. Measurements were done six times for a week during a six month period in 2008. High contrasts between busy streets and background locations in the same city were found for chromium, copper and iron (factor 2-3). These elements were especially present in the coarse fraction of PM. In addition, high contrasts were found for BC and NO x (factor 1.8), typically indicators of direct combustion emissions. The contrast for PNC was similar to BC. NO 2 contrast was lower (factor 1.5). The largest contrast was found for two street canyons and two streets with buildings at one side of the street only. The contrast between busy streets and urban background in NO 2 was less than the contrast found for BC, PNC and elements indicative of non-exhaust emissions, adding evidence that NO 2 is not representing (current) traffic well. The study supports a substantial role for non-exhaust emissions including brake- and tyre wear and road dust in addition to direct combustion emissions. Significant underestimation of disease burden may occur when relying too much on the regulated components.

  4. Air Pollution, Causes and Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manufacturing Chemists Association, Washington, DC.

    This commentary on sources of air pollution and air purification treatments is accompanied by graphic illustrations. Sources of carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and hydrocarbons found in the air are discussed. Methods of removing these pollutants at their source are presented with cut-away diagrams of the facilities and technical…

  5. 40 CFR 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    1998-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 1998-07-01 1998-07-01 false 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. Section 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. AIR PROGRAMS-(CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois § 52.728Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  6. 40 CFR 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1997-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 1997-07-01 1997-07-01 false 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. Section 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. AIR PROGRAMS-(CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois § 52.728Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  7. 40 CFR 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    1996-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 1996-07-01 1996-07-01 false 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. Section 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois § 52.728Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  8. Nitrogen transfers and air-sea N2O fluxes in the upwelling off Namibia within the oxygen minimum zone: a 3-D model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, E.; Dadou, I.; Le Vu, B.; Cambon, G.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Machu, E.; Rixen, T.; Kock, A.; Flohr, A.; Paulmier, A.; Lavik, G.

    2011-04-01

    As regions of high primary production and being often associated to Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs), Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle. Indeed, by exporting the Organic Matter (OM) and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. Losses of fixed inorganic N, through denitrification and anammox processes and through nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to the atmosphere, take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and alleviate the role of these regions as a source of N. In the present study, we developed a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical (ROMS/BioBUS) model for investigating the full N budget in the Namibian sub-system of the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). The different state variables of a climatological experiment have been compared to different data sets (satellite and in situ observations) and show that the model is able to represent this biogeochemical oceanic region. The N transfer is investigated in the Namibian upwelling system using this coupled model, especially in the Walvis Bay area between 22° S and 24° S where the OMZ is well developed (O2 < 0.5 ml O2 l-1). The upwelling process advects 24.2 × 1010 mol N yr-1 of nitrate enriched waters over the first 100 m over the slope and over the continental shelf. The meridional advection by the alongshore Benguela current brings also nutrient-rich waters with 21.1 × 1010 mol N yr-1. 10.5 × 1010 mol N yr-1 of OM are exported outside of the continental shelf (between 0 and 100-m depth). 32.4% and 18.1% of this OM are exported by advection in the form of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matters (DOM and POM), respectively, however vertical sinking of POM represents the main contributor (49.5%) to OM export outside of the first 100-m depth of the water column on the continental shelf. The continental slope also represents a net N export

  9. Determination of thicknesses of oxide films grown on titanium under argon irradiation by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Ngoc-Long; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Bérerd, Nicolas; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Gorse-Pomonti, Dominique

    2014-04-01

    In this article we present a study of the oxidation of pure titanium bulk samples under argon ion irradiation at 500 °C under rarefied air. In particular we follow the dependence of the oxide thickness as a function of the energy of argon ions. The novelty of this study consists in the range of ion energy explored, from 1 to 9 MeV. Until very recently it was commonly accepted that metal surfaces were transparent to ion beams in this low energy range (few MeV), and no surface modifications were expected. In a previous paper by the authors of this work, the formation of shallow craters in the surface of titanium was reported as a result of argon ion bombardment with energies of 2, 4 and 9 MeV under the same environmental conditions. We show here that around 3 MeV the oxide growth is unexpectedly enhanced. We think that an interplay of electronic excitations and nuclear ballistic collisions could possibly explain this enhanced oxide growth. We have used spectroscopic visible ultraviolet ellipsometry and XPS to determine the thickness of the oxide layers and characterize their optical properties. From the optical properties of the oxides we observed that for ion energies below 3-4 MeV the oxides show a dielectric-like behavior, whereas for ion energies above 3-4 MeV the oxides show a metal-like behavior. These findings indicate also that ion bombardment in this energy range may change substantially the oxygen-to-titanium ratio in the oxide films grown under irradiation leading to the formation of titanium sub-oxides.

  10. Liquid-Nitrogen Test for Blocked Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.

    1984-01-01

    Nondestructive test identifies obstructed tube in array of parallel tubes. Trickle of liquid nitrogen allowed to flow through tube array until array accumulates substantial formation of frost from moisture in air. Flow stopped and warm air introduced into inlet manifold to heat tubes in array. Tubes still frosted after others defrosted identified as obstructed tubes. Applications include inspection of flow systems having parallel legs.

  11. 136. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER IN LIQUID NITROGEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    136. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER IN LIQUID NITROGEN CONTROL ROOM (115), LSB (BLDG. 770), FROM FUEL APRON WITH BAY DOOR OPEN - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. Argon-40: Excess in submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Moore, J.G.

    1968-01-01

    Submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano contain excess radiogenic argon-40 and give anomalously high potassium-argon ages. Glassy rims of pillows show a systematic increase in radiogenic argon-40 with depth, and a pillow from a depth of 2590 meters shows a decrease in radiogenic argon-40 inward from the pillow rim. The data indicate that the amount of excess radiogenic argon-40 is a direct function of both hydrostatic pressure and rate of cooling, and that many submarine basalts are not suitable for potassium-argon dating.

  13. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  14. Microwave Spectrum and Molecular Structure of the ARGON-(E)-1-CHLORO-1,2-DIFLUOROETHYLENE Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Mark D.; Leung, Helen O.; Tandon, Hannah K.; Messinger, Joseph P.; Mlaver, Eli

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies of argon complexes with fluoroethylenes have revealed a preference for a geometry that maximizes the contact of the argon atom with heavy atoms on the fluoroethylene. We have observed a continuation of this trend when one of the fluorine atoms is replaced by chlorine. The argon-(E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene complex provides two competing heavy atom cavities, FCCF and FCCl, and the opportunity to examine whether the number of heavy atoms or the associated increase in polarizability is determinative of structure. The 5.6 -- 18.1 GHz chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrum of this species provides initial assignments and predictions for spectra obtained in a more sensitive and higher precision Balle-Flygare instrument. Transitions for both the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopologues are observed and analyzed to provide geometric parameters for this non-planar complex. The spectrum is consistent with the argon atom located in the FCCl cavity, and the structure agrees well with ab initio predictions. Comparisons are made with Ar-1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene, (Z)-1-chloro-2-fluoroethylene, and Ar-vinyl chloride. Z. Kisiel, P.W. Fowler, and A.C. Legon, J. Chem. Phys. 95, 2283 (1991).

  15. Superconductivity of compressed solid argon from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Asano, Masamichi; Suzuki, Naoshi; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-02-01

    We present first-principles calculations on the superconductivity of solid argon under high pressure. Solid argon is found to take the double hexagonal close-packed structure in pressure range from 420 to 690 GPa, where an insulator-to-metal transition occurs at around 590 GPa. The crystal structure transforms into the hexagonal close-packed structure at 690 GPa and into the face-centered cubic structure at 2300 GPa. The superconducting critical temperature is gradually increased with the successive phase transitions and reaches the maximum value of 12 K at 2600 GPa due to the enhancement of the Fermi surface nesting.

  16. Study of fluid mechanical helium argon ion laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An approach to an argon ion laser based on gasdynamic techniques is presented. Improvement in efficiency and power output are achieved by eliminating high heat rejection problems and plasma confinement of the seal-off conventional lasers. The process of producing population inversion between the same energy levels, as in the conventional argon ion laser, has been divided into two phases by separating each other from the processes of ionization and subsequent excitation. Line drawings and graphs are included to amplify the theoretical presentation.

  17. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  18. Common Blepharitis Related to Phthiriasis Palpebrarum: Argon Laser Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Sundu, Cem; Dinç, Erdem; Kurtuluş, Umut Can; Yıldırım, Özlem

    2015-09-01

    A 42-year-old woman was admitted to Mersin University, Department of Ophthalmology Clinic with itching and burning sensation of the right eye for 3 weeks. In her slit-lamp examination, nits and lice, attached to the upper and lower eyelashes of her right eye, were observed. Lice and nits were destroyed by argon laser phototherapy and were removed with the help of a fine forceps thereafter. Argon laser phototherapy is a quick, effective, and safe treatment modality for phthiriasis palpebrarum. PMID:26470938

  19. Methane and Nitrogen Abundances on Eris and Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegler, Stephen C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Grundy, W. M.; Romanishin, W.; Abernathy, M.; Bovyn, M.; Burt, J.; Evans, D.; Maleszewski, C.; Thompson, Z.; Vilas, F.

    2010-10-01

    We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 meter telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700 - 9800 angstroms; 5 angstroms per pixel) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 meter telescope and Boller and Chivens spectrograph (7100 - 9400 angstroms; 2 angstroms per pixel) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis with the methane-nitrogen phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich (1983), and comparing methane bands in our Eris spectrum and methane bands in our laboratory spectra, we are able to make a quantitative estimate of Eris' methane and nitrogen abundances. Our analysis suggests the surface ice consists of about 10% methane and about 90% nitrogen. By using the same analysis techniques on our Pluto spectrum, we find the anti-Charon facing hemisphere of Pluto has a methane abundance of about 3% and a nitrogen abundance of about 97%. Such abundances are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with an ice consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. So, until someone detects an absorption attributable to nitrogen ice in the spectrum of Eris, it would be prudent to keep an open mind about the identity of ice components on Eris. We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA Planetary Astronomy and NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics. We thank Steward Observatory for the consistent allocation of telescope time.

  20. Nanopillar ITO electrodes via argon plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dijken, Jaron G.; Brett, Michael J.

    2012-07-15

    The authors demonstrate the formation of vertically aligned indium tin oxide (ITO) nanopillars by exposing planar ITO films to Ar plasma, the conditions of which determine the size, spacing, and aspect ratio of the pillars. Annealing in air and forming gas is used to recover and optimize the optical transmittance and electrical conductivity of the nanopillar films. The final product is an ITO film whose superior optical transmittance and strong electrical conductivity combine with its robust columnar morphology and processing scalability to make it suitable for use in highly absorbing organic solar cells.