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Sample records for air oxidation process

  1. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Behroz; Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan; Ebrahimi, Asghar; Mokhtari, Mehdi

    2013-01-02

    Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300° as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency) for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter.

  2. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300° as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency) for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter. PMID:23369258

  3. Uranium Metal to Oxide Conversion by Air Oxidation –Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A

    2001-12-31

    Published technical information for the process of metal-to-oxide conversion of uranium components has been reviewed and summarized for the purpose of supporting critical decisions for new processes and facilities for the Y-12 National Security Complex. The science of uranium oxidation under low, intermediate, and high temperature conditions is reviewed. A process and system concept is outlined and process parameters identified for uranium oxide production rates. Recommendations for additional investigations to support a conceptual design of a new facility are outlined.

  4. Wet air oxidation of table olive processing wastewater: determination of key operating parameters by factorial design.

    PubMed

    Katsoni, Athanasia; Frontistis, Zaharias; Xekoukoulotakis, Nikolaos P; Diamadopoulos, Evan; Mantzavinos, Dionissios

    2008-08-01

    The wet air oxidation of an effluent from edible olive processing was investigated. Semibatch experiments were conducted with 0.3L of effluent loaded into an autoclave and pure oxygen fed continuously to maintain an oxygen partial pressure of 2.5MPa. The effect of operating conditions, such as initial organic loading (from 1240 to 5150mg/L COD), reaction time (from 30 to 120min), temperature (from 140 to 180 degrees C), initial pH (from 3 to 7) and the use of 500mg/L H(2)O(2) as an additional oxidant, on treatment efficiency was assessed implementing a factorial experimental design. All five parameters had a statistically considerable effect on COD removal, alongside second order interactions of COD with reaction temperature, contact time and effluent pH. In most cases, high levels of phenols degradation (up to 100%) and decolorization (up to 90%) were achieved followed by low to moderate mineralization (up to 70%). The oxidation of phenols was affected to a considerable level by the initial COD, reaction temperature and contact time, as well as the second order interaction between COD and temperature, while all other effects were insignificant.

  5. Treatment of biomass gasification wastewater using a combined wet air oxidation/activated sludge process

    SciTech Connect

    English, C.J.; Petty, S.E.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1983-02-01

    A lab-scale treatability study for using thermal and biological oxidation to treat a biomass gasification wastewater (BGW) having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 46,000 mg/l is described. Wet air oxidation (WA0) at 300/sup 0/C and 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) was used to initially treat the BGW and resulted in a COD reduction of 74%. This was followed by conventional activated sludge treatment using operating conditions typical of municipal sewage treatment plants. This resulted in an additional 95% COD removal. Overall COD reduction for the combined process was 99%. A detailed chemical analysis of the raw BGW and thermal and biological effluents was performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These results showed a 97% decrease in total extractable organics with WA0 and a 99.6% decrease for combined WA0 and activated sludge treatment. Components of the treated waters tended to be fewer in number and more highly oxidized. An experiment was conducted to determine the amount of COD reduction caused by volatilization during biological treatment. Unfortunately, this did not yield conclusive results. Treatment of BGW using WA0 followed by activated sludge appears to be very effective and investigations at a larger scale are recommended.

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of phenol degradation by a non-catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Sébastien; Boutin, Olivier; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Malleret, Laure; Faucherand, Rémy; Viand, Alain

    2011-08-01

    This work is dedicated to an accurate evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetics aspects of phenol degradation using wet air oxidation process. Phenol is a well known polluting molecule and therefore it is important having data of its behaviour during this process. A view cell is used for the experimental study, with an internal volume of 150 mL, able to reach pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 350°C. Concerning the thermodynamic phase equilibria, experimental and modelling results are obtained for different binary systems (water/nitrogen, water/air) and ternary system (water/nitrogen/phenol). The best model is the Predictive Soave Redlich Kwong one. This information is necessary to predict the composition of the gas phase during the process. It is also important for an implementation in a process simulation. The second part is dedicated to kinetics evaluation of the degradation of phenol. Different compounds have been detected using GC coupled with a MS. A kinetic scheme is deduced, taking into account the evolution of phenol, hydroquinones, catechol, resorcinol and acetic acid. The kinetic parameters are calculated for this scheme. These data are important to evaluate the evolution of the concentration of the different polluting molecules during the process. A simplified kinetic scheme, which can be easily implemented in a process simulation, is also determined for the direct degradation of phenol into H(2)O and CO(2). The Arrhenius law data obtained for the phenol disappearance are the following: k=1.8×10(6)±3.9×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) (pre-exponential factor) and E(a)=77±8 kJ mol(-1) (activation energy).

  7. Fast oxidation processes from emission to ambient air introduction of aerosol emitted by residential log wood stoves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalin, Federica; Golly, Benjamin; Besombes, Jean-Luc; Pelletier, Charles; Aujay-Plouzeau, Robin; Verlhac, Stéphane; Dermigny, Adrien; Fievet, Amandine; Karoski, Nicolas; Dubois, Pascal; Collet, Serge; Favez, Olivier; Albinet, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the impact of post-combustion processes, condensation and dilution, on the aerosol concentration and chemical composition from residential wood combustion. The evolution of aerosol emitted by two different residential log wood stoves (old and modern technologies) from emission until it is introduced into ambient air was studied under controlled "real" conditions. The first objective of this research was to evaluate the emission factors (EF) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitrated and oxygenated derivatives from wood combustion. These toxic substances are poorly documented in the literature. A second objective was to evaluate the oxidation state of the wood combustion effluent by studying these primary/secondary compounds. EFs of Σ37PAHs and Σ27Oxy-PAHs were in the same range and similar to those reported in literature (4-240 mg kg-1). Σ31Nitro-PAH EFs were 2-4 orders of magnitude lower (3.10-2-8.10-2 mg kg-1) due to the low temperature and low emission of NO2 from wood combustion processes. An increase of equivalent EF of PAH derivatives was observed suggesting that the oxidation state of the wood combustion effluent from the emission point until its introduction in ambient air changed in a few seconds. These results were confirmed by the study of both, typical compounds of SOA formation from PAH oxidation and, PAH ratio-ratio plots commonly used for source evaluation.

  8. Catalytic process for formaldehyde oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); D'Ambrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing formaldehyde to carbon dioxide and water without the addition of energy. A mixture of formaldehyde and an oxidizing agent (e.g., ambient air containing formaldehyde) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  9. Degradation of the insecticide propoxur by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes using a boron-doped diamond/air-diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Guelfi, Diego Roberto Vieira; Gozzi, Fábio; Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric; Machulek, Amílcar; de Oliveira, Silvio César

    2016-03-17

    A solution with 0.38 mM of the pesticide propoxur (PX) at pH 3.0 has been comparatively treated by electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). The trials were carried out with a 100-mL boron-doped diamond (BDD)/air-diffusion cell. The EO-H2O2 process had the lowest oxidation ability due to the slow reaction of intermediates with (•)OH produced from water discharge at the BDD anode. The EF treatment yielded quicker mineralization due to the additional (•)OH formed between added Fe(2+) and electrogenerated H2O2. The PEF process was the most powerful since it led to total mineralization by the combined oxidative action of hydroxyl radicals and UVA irradiation. The PX decay agreed with a pseudo-first-order kinetics in EO-H2O2, whereas in EF and PEF, it obeyed a much faster pseudo-first-order kinetics followed by a much slower one, which are related to the oxidation of its Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes, respectively. EO-H2O2 showed similar oxidation ability within the pH range 3.0-9.0. The effect of current density and Fe(2+) and substrate contents on the performance of the EF process was examined. Two primary aromatic products were identified by LC-MS during PX degradation.

  10. Removal of salicylic acid on perovskite-type oxide LaFeO3 catalyst in catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Xu, Aihua; Du, Hongzhang; Sun, Chenglin; Li, Can

    2007-01-02

    It has been found that salicylic acid can be removal effectively at the lower temperature of 140 degrees C on perovskite-type oxide LaFeO3 catalyst in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Under the same condition, the activities for the CWAO of phenol, benzoic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid have been also investigated. The results indicated that, with compared to the very poor activities for phenol and benzoic acid, the activities for salicylic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid were very high, which are attributed to their same intramolecular H-bonding structures. With the role of hard acidity of intramolecular H-bonding, salicylic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid can be adsorbed effectively on the basic center of LaFeO3 catalyst and are easy to take place the total oxidation reaction. However, at temperatures higher than 140 degrees C, the intramolecular H-bonding structure of salicylic acid was destroyed and the activities at 160 and 180 degrees C decreased greatly, which confirms further the key role of intramolecular H-bonding in the CWAO. Moreover, the LaFeO3 catalyst also indicated a superior stability of activity and structure in CWAO of salicylic acid.

  11. Wet air oxidation of resorcinol as a model treatment for refractory organics in wastewaters from the wood processing industry.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bernd; Chavez, Alma; Morales-Mejia, Julio; Eichenauer, Sabrina; Stadlbauer, Ernst A; Almanza, Rafael

    2015-09-15

    Wastewater treatment systems are important tools to enhance sustainability in terms of reducing environmental impact and complying with sanitary requirements. This work addresses the wet air oxidation (WAO) process for pre-treatment of phenolic wastewater effluents. The aim was to increase biodegradability prior to a subsequent anaerobic stage. In WAO laboratory experiments using a micro-autoclave, the model compound resorcinol was degraded under different oxygen availability regims within the temperature range 150 °C-270 °C. The activation energy was determined to be 51.5 kJ/mol. Analysis of the products revealed that after 3 h of reaction at 230 °C, 97.5% degradation of resorcinol was achieved. At 250 °C and the same reaction time complete removal of resorcinol was observed. In this case the total organic carbon content was reduced down to 29%, from 118.0 mg/L down to 34.4 mg/L. Under these process conditions, the pollutant was only partially mineralized and the ratio of the biological oxygen demand relative to the chemical oxygen demand, which is 0.07 for resorcinol, was increased to a value exceeding 0.5. The main by-product acetic acid, which is a preferred compound for methanogenic bacteria, was found to account for 33% of the total organic carbon.

  12. Wafer scale integration of reduced graphene oxide by novel laser processing at room temperature in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Anagh; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    Physical properties of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) strongly depend on the ratio of sp2 to sp3 hybridized carbon atoms, the presence of different functional groups, and the characteristics of the substrates. This research for the very first time illustrates successful wafer scale integration of 2D rGO with Cu/TiN/Si, employing pulsed laser deposition followed by laser annealing of carbon-doped copper layers using nanosecond excimer lasers. The XRD, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy measurements indicate the presence of large area rGO onto Si having Raman active vibrational modes: D, G, and 2D. A high resolution SEM depicts the morphology and formation of rGO from zone-refined carbon formed after nanosecond laser annealing. Temperature-dependent resistance data of rGO thin films follow the Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping (VRH) model in the low-temperature region and Arrhenius conduction in the high-temperature regime. The photoluminescence spectra also reveal a less intense and broader blue fluorescence spectra, indicating the presence of miniature sized sp2 domains in the near vicinity of π* electronic states which favor the VRH transport phenomena. This wafer scale integration of rGO with Si employing a laser annealing technique will be useful for multifunctional integrated electronic devices and will open a new frontier for further extensive research in these functionalized 2D materials.

  13. Process air quality data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C. M.; Hogge, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Air quality sampling was conducted. Data for air quality parameters, recorded on written forms, punched cards or magnetic tape, are available for 1972 through 1975. Computer software was developed to (1) calculate several daily statistical measures of location, (2) plot time histories of data or the calculated daily statistics, (3) calculate simple correlation coefficients, and (4) plot scatter diagrams. Computer software was developed for processing air quality data to include time series analysis and goodness of fit tests. Computer software was developed to (1) calculate a larger number of daily statistical measures of location, and a number of daily monthly and yearly measures of location, dispersion, skewness and kurtosis, (2) decompose the extended time series model and (3) perform some goodness of fit tests. The computer program is described, documented and illustrated by examples. Recommendations are made for continuation of the development of research on processing air quality data.

  14. Air Quality Management Process Cycle

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Air quality management are activities a regulatory authority undertakes to protect human health and the environment from the harmful effects of air pollution. The process of managing air quality can be illustrated as a cycle of inter-related elements.

  15. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. Glazkova, Elena A. Svarovskaya, Natalia V. Bakina, Olga V. Kazantsev, Sergey O. Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-27

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  16. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  17. Assessment of the impact of oxidation processes on indoor air pollution using the new time-resolved INCA-Indoor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Maxence; Blond, Nadège; Blondeau, Patrice; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Hauglustaine, Didier A.

    2015-12-01

    INCA-Indoor, a new indoor air quality (IAQ) model, has been developed to simulate the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and oxidants considering indoor air specific processes such as: emission, ventilation, surface interactions (sorption, deposition, uptake). Based on the detailed version of SAPRC-07 chemical mechanism, INCA-Indoor is able to analyze the contribution of the production and loss pathways of key chemical species (VOCs, oxidants, radical species). The potential of this model has been tested through three complementary analyses: a comparison with the most detailed IAQ model found in the literature, focusing on oxidant species; realistic scenarios covering a large range of conditions, involving variable OH sources like HONO; and the investigation of alkenes ozonolysis under a large range of indoor conditions that can increase OH and HO2 concentrations. Simulations have been run changing nitrous acid (HONO) concentrations, NOx levels, photolysis rates and ventilation rates, showing that HONO can be the main source of indoor OH. Cleaning events using products containing D-limonene have been simulated at different periods of the day. These scenarios show that HOX concentrations can significantly increase in specific conditions. An assessment of the impact of indoor chemistry on the potential formation of secondary species such as formaldehyde (HCHO) and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) has been carried out under various room configuration scenarios and a study of the HOx budget for different realistic scenarios has been performed. It has been shown that, under the simulation conditions, formaldehyde can be affected by oxidant concentrations via chemical production which can account for more than 10% of the total production, representing 6.5 ppb/h. On the other hand, acetaldehyde production is affected more by oxidation processes. When the photolysis rates are high, chemical processes are responsible for about 50% of the total production of

  18. Application of sludge-based carbonaceous materials in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation.

    PubMed

    Julcour Lebigue, Carine; Andriantsiferana, Caroline; N'Guessan Krou; Ayral, Catherine; Mohamed, Elham; Wilhelm, Anne-Marie; Delmas, Henri; Le Coq, Laurence; Gerente, Claire; Smith, Karl M; Pullket, Suangusa; Fowler, Geoffrey D; Graham, Nigel J D

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a preliminary evaluation of the performance of carbonaceous materials prepared from sewage sludges (SBCMs) in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation; phenol was used as the model pollutant. Three different sewage sludges were treated by either carbonisation or steam activation, and the physico-chemical properties of the resultant carbonaceous materials (e.g. hardness, BET surface area, ash and elemental content, surface chemistry) were evaluated and compared with a commercial reference activated carbon (PICA F22). The adsorption capacity for phenol of the SBCMs was greater than suggested by their BET surface area, but less than F22; a steam activated, dewatered raw sludge (SA_DRAW) had the greatest adsorption capacity of the SBCMs in the investigated range of concentrations (<0.05 mol L(-1)). In batch oxidation tests, the SBCMs demonstrated catalytic behaviour arising from their substrate adsorptivity and metal content. Recycling of SA_DRAW in successive oxidations led to significant structural attrition and a hardened SA_DRAW was evaluated, but found to be unsatisfactory during the oxidation step. In a combined adsorption-oxidation sequence, both the PICA carbon and a selected SBCM showed deterioration in phenol adsorption after oxidative regeneration, but a steady state performance was reached after 2 or 3 cycles.

  19. NEPTUNIUM OXIDE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J; Watkins, R; Hensel, S

    2009-05-27

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a campaign in which fifty nine cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. The neptunium campaign was divided into two parts: Part 1 which consisted of oxide made from H-Canyon neptunium solution which did not require any processing prior to conversion into an oxide, and Part 2 which consisted of oxide made from additional H-Canyon neptunium solutions which required processing to purify the solution prior to conversion into an oxide. The neptunium was received as a nitrate solution and converted to oxide through ion-exchange column extraction, precipitation, and calcination. Numerous processing challenges were encountered in order make a final neptunium oxide product that could be shipped in a 9975 shipping container. Among the challenges overcome was the issue of scale: translating lab scale production into full facility production. The balance between processing efficiency and product quality assurance was addressed during this campaign. Lessons learned from these challenges are applicable to other processing projects.

  20. Oxidative Stress and Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lodovici, Maura; Bigagli, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of air pollution-induced health effects involve oxidative stress and inflammation. As a matter of fact, particulate matter (PM), especially fine (PM2.5, PM < 2.5 μm) and ultrafine (PM0.1, PM < 0.1 μm) particles, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and transition metals, are potent oxidants or able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress can trigger redox-sensitive pathways that lead to different biological processes such as inflammation and cell death. However, it does appear that the susceptibility of target organ to oxidative injury also depends upon its ability to upregulate protective scavenging systems. As vehicular traffic is known to importantly contribute to PM exposure, its intensity and quality must be strongly relevant determinants of the qualitative characteristics of PM spread in the atmosphere. Change in the composition of this PM is likely to modify its health impact. PMID:21860622

  1. Analysis of modified wet-air oxidation for soil detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Unterberg, W.; Willms, R.S.; Balinsky, A.M.; Reible, D.D.; Wetzel, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    This report presents the results of research on wet-air oxidation as a method for the destruction of hazardous wastes. For organics in the presence of large amounts of water, the water need not be vaporized during wet-air oxidation, an attractive characteristic for energy conservation. The feasibility of using wet-air oxidation was investigated in terms of the effects of temperature, pressure, and the presence or absence of soil on the oxidation rate of three model compounds. Wet-air oxidation is a semi-commercial process that has been used to treat a variety of weakly toxic chemical wastes and for the regeneration of activated carbon. In the study, wet-air oxidation research was carried out in a 1-liter batch reactor at temperatures from 130 to 275/sup 0/C and pressures from 703-1760 x 10/sup 3/ kg/sq m on three substances: m-xylene, tetrachloroethylene (TCE), and malathion, both with and without addition of soil. Any attempt to balance the effect of residence time and the cost of energy requires an accurate description of the oxidation kinetics for the compound or waste stream in question. Due to the sampling technique used during the investigation and the inherent nature of the wet-air oxidation process, a variety of potential problems with the interpretation and analysis of the raw concentration-time data were encountered during the study.

  2. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Colin P. Horwitz; Dr. Terrence J. Collins

    2003-11-04

    The removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from automotive fuels is an integral component in the development of cleaner burning and more efficient automobile engines. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein the dibenzothiophene derivative is converted to its corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone is an attractive approach to sulfur removal because the oxidized species are easily extracted or precipitated and filtered from the hydrocarbon phase. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) catalytically convert dibenzothiophene and its derivatives rapidly and effectively at moderate temperatures (50-60 C) and ambient pressure to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones. The oxidation process can be performed in both aqueous systems containing alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol, and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system containing tert-butanol or acetonitrile. In the biphasic system, essentially complete conversion of the DBT to its oxidized products can be achieved using slightly longer reaction times than in homogeneous solution. Among the key features of the technology are the mild reaction conditions, the very high selectivity where no over oxidation of the sulfur compounds occurs, the near stoichiometric use of hydrogen peroxide, the apparent lack of degradation of sensitive fuel components, and the ease of separation of oxidized products.

  3. Reengineering the Air Travel Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (FROM - TO) xx-xx-1999 to xx-xx-1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reengineering the Air Travel Process Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT...RELEASE , 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Every year, Department of Defense (DOD) travelers make thousands of trips that include air transportation

  4. Thermal and sonochemical synthesis of porous (Ce,Zr)O2 mixed oxides from metal β-diketonate precursors and their catalytic activity in wet air oxidation process of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Cau, Camille; Guari, Yannick; Chave, Tony; Larionova, Joulia; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2014-07-01

    Porous (Ce0.5Zr0.5)O2 solid solutions were prepared by thermolysis (T=285 °C) or sonolysis (20 kHz, I=32 W cm(-2), Pac=0.46 W mL(-1), T=200 °C) of Ce(III) and Zr(IV) acetylacetonates in oleylamine or hexadecylamine under argon followed by heat treatment of the precipitates obtained in air at 450 °C. Transmission Electron Microscopy images of the samples show nanoparticles of ca. 4-6 nm for the two synthetic approaches. The powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and μ-Raman spectroscopy of solids obtained after heat treatment indicate the formation of (Ce0.5Zr0.5)O2 solid solutions with a metastable tetragonal crystal structure for the two synthetic routes. The specific surface area of the samples varies between 78 and 149 m(2) g(-1) depending on synthesis conditions. The use of Barrett-Joyner-Halenda and t-plot methods reveal the formation of mixed oxides with a hybrid morphology that combines mesoporosity and microporosity regardless of the method of preparation. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of the mixed oxides by sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV). It was found that the materials prepared by sonochemistry exhibit better resistance to dissolution during the deposition process of platinum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows the presence of Pt(0) and Pt(II) on the surface of mixed oxides. Porous (Ce0.5Zr0.5)O2 mixed oxides loaded with 1.5%wt. platinum exhibit high activity in catalytic wet air oxidation of formic acid at 40 °C.

  5. Sulfur oxides scrubbing process

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, P.E.

    1986-07-15

    A process is described for removing sulfur oxides and solid particulates from a gaseous effluent. The steps of the process consist of: contacting within a venturi structure a gaseous effluent containing sulfur oxides with a liquid scrubbing mixture; passing the admixture of the gaseous effluent and liquid scrubbing mixture through a constricted passage of the venturi structure to increase the velocity thereof; separating the admixture into a liquid portion and a gas portion; delivering the gas portion of the separation step to a packed tower beneath the packed section thereof; contacting the gas portion with liquid scrubbing mixture in the packed section of the tower to form a gaseous overhead effluent substantially free of sulfur oxides and a bottoms liquid; combining the bottom liquid from the packed section of the tower with the liquid portion from the separating step to form a combined liquid bottoms; adjusting the pH of the combined liquid bottoms with a basic solution to form a liquid scrubbing mixture, the basic solution selected from the group consisting of alkali metal hydroxides, ammonium hydroxide, and ammonia; and dividing the liquid scrubbing mixture into a tower bottoms products, a first recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the first contacting step, and a second recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the second contacting step.

  6. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook summarizes commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced photochemical oxidation (APO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and solids. Similar information from pilot- and bench-scale evaluations of APO processes is also included to supplement the...

  7. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED NONPHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this handbook is to summarize commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced nonphotochemical oxidation (ANPO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and soil. Similar information from pilot-and bench-scale evaluations of ANPO processes is also inclu...

  8. Colour, lipid and protein stability of Rhea americana meat during air- and vacuum-packaged storage: influence of muscle on oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Filgueras, R S; Gatellier, P; Aubry, L; Thomas, A; Bauchart, D; Durand, D; Zambiazi, R C; Santé-Lhoutellier, V

    2010-11-01

    Physicochemical characteristics and oxidative stability during storage were determined in Gastrocnemius pars interna (GN) and Iliofiburalis (IF) muscles of Rhea americana. Glycolytic potential (GP) and pH decline of muscles were measured within the first 24 h post mortem. Colour, lipid and protein stability were determined during storage of meat, i.e. 5 days under air-packaging at 4°C, or 28 days under vacuum-packaging at 4°C. In parallel, anti-oxidant status of muscles was estimated by measuring α-tocopherol content and anti-oxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and catalase), while pro-oxidant status was evaluated by determining haeminic iron and long chain fatty acids (especially polyunsaturated fatty acids). The ultimate pH was similar in both muscles, but the GP value was significantly higher in IF than in GN muscle. Haeminic iron and alpha-tocopherol content differed between muscles, with 30% more haeminic iron (p<0.05) and 134% more alpha-tocopherol (p<0.001) in IF than GN muscle. The IF muscle presented higher lipid content and lower PUFA/SFA ratio (polyunsaturated fatty acids/saturated fatty acids) than GN muscle. With storage under air-packaging, lipid and protein oxidation of rhea muscles increased up to 275% and 30%, respectively. This increase was more rapidly and marked in IF muscle. The IF also showed high level of metmyoglobin accumulation after 3 days of storage (47%) and was rejected by 1 consumer out of 2 in sensorial analysis. Under vacuum-packaging, both muscles showed a high stability of colour and no oxidation of lipids and proteins.

  9. Degradation process analysis of the azo dyes by catalytic wet air oxidation with catalyst CuO/γ-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Hua, Li; Ma, Hongrui; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Three azo dyes (Methyl Orange, Direct Brown and Direct Green) were treated by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with the catalysts CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) prepared by consecutive impregnation. The relationship of decolorization extent, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal extent and total organic carbon (TOC) in dye solution were investigated. The results indicated that the CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst had excellent catalytic activity in treating azo dyes. Almost 99% of color and 70% of TOC were removed in 2h. The high removal extent of color and TOC indicated that the CWAO obtained perfect decomposition for pollutants. The degradation pathway of azo dyes was analyzed by UV-Vis, FTIR and MS. According to the examined results, the hydroxyl ((·)OH) radicals induced strong oxidizing effects in the target solution and destroyed the chromophoric groups of azo-benzene conjugated of the molecular structure. Considering characteristics of the dye structure, the azo bond (-N=N-) would first be attacked by the hydroxyl radical and other free radicals. With the continuous oxidization and the long reaction time at high temperature, these intermediates could be oxidized to the final oxidation products, such as water and carbon dioxide.

  10. Study on mechanism of wet air oxidation of emulsification wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen W; Zeng, Xin P; Xiao, Yao M; Gu, Guo W

    2009-04-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) can effectively be used to treat high-concentration, non-biodegradable emulsification wastewater that contains nonionic matters. Gas chromatograph analysis of emulsification wastewater after oxidation indicated that a catalyst increased production of fatty acids but could not promote its oxidation between 160 and 180 degrees C. When the temperature was greater than or equal to 220 degrees C, the catalyst not only increased production of fatty acids initially but effectively promoted its oxidation in later stages and significantly reduced the concentration of residual surfactants. Experiments proved that fatty acids (especially acetic acid) were the primary intermediate products and that oxidation of these acids was the rate-limiting step. During the process of catalytic WAO of emulsification wastewater, active oxygen molecules attacked organic matters resulting in production of fatty acids, ketone, alcohol, hydrocarbon, and oligo-polyether through radical chain reactions.

  11. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels using air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Ramanathan

    Conventional approaches to oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons involve use of high-purity, expensive water soluble peroxide for oxidation of sulfur compounds followed by post-treatment for removal of oxidized sulfones by extraction. Both are associated with higher cost due to handling, storage of oxidants and yield loss with extraction and water separation, making the whole process more expensive. This thesis explores an oxidative desulfurization process using air as an oxidant followed by catalytic decomposition of sulfones thereby eliminating the aforementioned issues. Oxidation of sulfur compounds was realized by a two step process in which peroxides were first generated in-situ by catalytic air oxidation, followed by catalytic oxidation of S compounds using the peroxides generated in-situ completing the two step approach. By this technique it was feasible to oxidize over 90% of sulfur compounds present in real jet (520 ppmw S) and diesel (41 ppmw S) fuels. Screening of bulk and supported CuO based catalysts for peroxide generation using model aromatic compound representing diesel fuel showed that bulk CuO catalyst was more effective in producing peroxides with high yield and selectivity. Testing of three real diesel fuels obtained from different sources for air oxidation over bulk CuO catalyst showed different level of effectiveness for generating peroxides in-situ which was consistent with air oxidation of representative model aromatic compounds. Peroxides generated in-situ was then used as an oxidant to oxidize sulfur compounds present in the fuel over MoO3/SiO2 catalyst. 81% selectivity of peroxides for oxidation of sulfur compounds was observed on MoO3/SiO2 catalyst at 40 °C and under similar conditions MoO3/Al2O3 gave only 41% selectivity. This difference in selectivity might be related to the difference in the nature of active sites of MoO3 on SiO2 and Al2O 3 supports as suggested by H2-TPR and XRD analyses. Testing of supported and bulk Mg

  12. Catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation process

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Huff, Marylin

    2002-01-01

    A process for the production of a mono-olefin from a gaseous paraffinic hydrocarbon having at least two carbon atoms or mixtures thereof comprising reacting said hydrocarbons and molecular oxygen in the presence of a platinum catalyst. The catalyst consist essentially of platinum supported on alumina or zirconia monolith, preferably zirconia and more preferably in the absence of palladium, rhodium and gold.

  13. Air pollution, oxidative stress, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Paula Valencia; Yang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting millions of people worldwide and will continue to affect millions more with population aging on the rise. AD causality is multifactorial. Known causal factors include genetic predisposition, age, and sex. Environmental toxins such as air pollution (AP) have also been implicated in AD causation. Exposure to AP can lead to chronic oxidative stress (OS), which is involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Whereas AP plays a role in AD pathology, the epidemiological evidence for this association is limited. Given the significant prevalence of AP exposure combined with increased population aging, epidemiological evidence for this link is important to consider. In this paper, we examine the existing evidence supporting the relationship between AP, OS, and AD and provide recommendations for future research on the population level, which will provide evidence in support of public health interventions.

  14. Wet air and catalytic wet air oxidation of several azodyes from wastewaters: the beneficial role of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; García, J; Ovejero, G; Mestanza, M

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of several azo dyes, Acid Orange 7 (AO7), Acid Orange 74 (AO74), Direct Blue 71 (DB71), Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Eriochrome Blue Black B (EBBB), well-known non-biodegradable mono, di and tri azo dyes has been studied using, wet-air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO). The efficiency of substrate decolorization and mineralization in each process has been comparatively discussed by evolution concentration, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon content and toxicity of dyes solutions. The most efficient method on decolorization and mineralization (TOC) was observed to be CWAO process. Mineralization efficiency with wet air and catalytic wet air oxidation essays was observed in the order of mono-azo > di-azo > tri-azo dye. Final solutions of CWAO applications after 180 min treatment can be disposed safely to environment.

  15. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR OZONE AND RELATED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act requires periodic (5-year) update revision of criteria and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone. The previous revision of the criteria contained in the Air Quality Criteria Document (AQCD) for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants was co...

  16. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenwei; Al-Jawhari, Hala A.; Nayak, Pradipta K.; Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Wei, Nini; Hedhili, M. N.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field. PMID:25892711

  17. Air pollution and circulating biomarkers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Staimer, Norbert; Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical components of air pollutant exposures that induce oxidative stress and subsequent inflammation may be partly responsible for associations of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with airborne particulate matter and combustion-related pollutant gasses. However, epidemiologic evidence regarding this is limited. An exposure-assessment approach is to measure the oxidative potential of particle mixtures because it is likely that hundreds of correlated chemicals are involved in overall effects of air pollution on health. Oxidative potential likely depends on particle composition and size distribution, especially ultrafine particle concentration, and on transition metals and certain semivolatile and volatile organic chemicals. For health effects, measuring systemic oxidative stress in the blood is one feasible approach, but there is no universal biomarker of oxidative stress and there are many potential target molecules (lipids, proteins, DNA, nitric oxide, etc.), which may be more or less suitable for specific study goals. Concurrent with the measurement of oxidative stress, it is important to measure gene and/or protein expression of endogenous antioxidant enzymes because they can modify relations between oxidative stress biomarkers and air pollutants. Conversely, the expression and activities of these enzymes are modified by oxidative stress. This interplay will likely determine the observed effects of air pollutants on systemic inflammatory and thrombotic mediators and related clinical outcomes. Studies are needed to assess the reliability and validity of oxidative stress biomarkers, evaluate differences in associations between oxidative stress biomarkers and various pollutant measurements (mass, chemical components, and oxidative potential), and evaluate impacts of antioxidant responses on these relations. PMID:23626660

  18. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  19. USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K; Daniel McCabe, D; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-04

    A bench-scale feasibility study on the use of a Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) process to destroy a slurry laden with tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds has been undertaken. WAO is an aqueous phase process in which soluble and/or insoluble waste constituents are oxidized using oxygen or oxygen in air at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 C and 1 MPa to 320 C and 22 MPa. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). Test results indicate WAO is a feasible process for destroying TPB, its primary daughter products [triphenylborane (3PB), diphenylborinic acid (2PB), and phenylboronic acid (1PB)], phenol, and most of the biphenyl byproduct. The required conditions are a temperature of 300 C, a reaction time of 3 hours, 1:1 feed slurry dilution with 2M NaOH solution, the addition of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O solution (500 mg/L Cu) as catalyst, and the addition of 2000 mL/L of antifoam. However, for the destruction of TPB, its daughter compounds (3PB, 2PB, and 1PB), and phenol without consideration for biphenyl destruction, less severe conditions (280 C and 1-hour reaction time with similar remaining above conditions) are adequate.

  20. Processing AIRS Scientific Data Through Level 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, Stephanie; Oliphant, Robert; Manning, Evan

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder (AIRS) Science Processing System (SPS) is a collection of computer programs, known as product generation executives (PGEs). The AIRS SPS PGEs are used for processing measurements received from the AIRS suite of infrared and microwave instruments orbiting the Earth onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft. Early stages of the AIRS SPS development were described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article: Initial Processing of Infrared Spectral Data (NPO-35243), Vol. 28, No. 11 (November 2004), page 39. In summary: Starting from Level 0 (representing raw AIRS data), the AIRS SPS PGEs and the data products they produce are identified by alphanumeric labels (1A, 1B, 2, and 3) representing successive stages or levels of processing. The previous NASA Tech Briefs article described processing through Level 2, the output of which comprises geo-located atmospheric data products such as temperature and humidity profiles among others. The AIRS Level 3 PGE samples selected information from the Level 2 standard products to produce a single global gridded product. One Level 3 product is generated for each day s collection of Level 2 data. In addition, daily Level 3 products are aggregated into two multiday products: an eight-day (half the orbital repeat cycle) product and monthly (calendar month) product.

  1. Catalytic wet air oxidation of high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Wei; Wang, Xiaocong; Li, Daosheng; Ren, Yongzheng; Liu, Dongqi; Kang, Jianxiong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pretreatment of a high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Different experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the catalyst type, operating temperature, initial system pH, and oxygen partial pressure on the oxidation of the wastewater. Results show that the catalysts prepared by the co-precipitation method have better catalytic activity compared to others. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) conversion increased with the increase in temperature from 160 to 220 °C and decreased with the increase in pH. Moreover, the effect of the oxygen partial pressure on the COD conversion was significant only during the first 20 min of the reaction. Furthermore, the biodegradability of the wastewater improved greatly after CWAO, the ratio of BOD5/COD increased less than 0.1-0.75 when treated at 220 °C (BOD: biochemical oxygen demand).

  2. Kinetics of wet air oxidation (WAO) of alcaloide factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kunukcu, Y Kaçar

    2005-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) of Afyon alcaloide factory wastewater, a typical high strength industrial wastewater, was carried out. The process was performed in a specifically designed titanium bubble reactor at temperatures in the range of 140-160 degrees C. The kinetics of WAO of alcaloide factory wastewater was modeled by assuming two distinct steps. The rates of destruction were measured with respect to reduction in COD. The oxidation reaction was found to be first order with respect to COD concentration and also second order with respect to oxygen concentration in both steps. The values of activation energies were found to be in the range of 4.93 x 10(4)-7.85 x 10(4) kJ/kmol.

  3. Exergy parametric study of carbon monoxide oxidation in moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souidi, Ferhat; Benmalek, Toufik; Yesaad, Billel; Baik, Mouloud

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to analyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide in moist air from the second thermodynamic law aspect. A mathematical model of laminar premixed flame in a stagnation point flow has been achieved by numerical solution of the boundary layer equation using a self-made code. The chemical kinetic mechanism for flameless combustion of fuel, which is a mixture of carbon monoxide, oxygen, and water vapor, is modeled by 34 elementary reactions that incorporate (09) nine chemical species: CO, O, CO2, O2, H2O, H, H2, HO2, and OH. The salient point is that for all the parameters we considered, the exergy of the process is completely destroyed by irreversibilities. From the chemical viewpoint, the OH radical plays an essential role in CO oxidation. This latter point has already been mentioned by previous investigators.

  4. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, James R.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus

    1999-01-01

    Considerable effort has been concentrated on the synthesis and characterization of high T(sub c) oxide superconducting materials. The YBaCuO system has received the most intense study, as this material has shown promise for the application of both thin film and bulk materials. There are many problems with the application of bulk materials- weak links, poor connectivity, small coherence length, oxygen content and control, environmental reactivity, phase stability, incongruent melting behavior, grain boundary contamination, brittle mechanical behavior, and flux creep. The extent to which these problems are intrinsic or associated with processing is the subject of controversy. This study seeks to understand solidification processing of these materials, and to use this knowledge for alternative processing strategies, which, at the very least, will improve the understanding of bulk material properties and deficiencies. In general, the phase diagram studies of the YBaCuO system have concentrated on solid state reactions and on the Y2BaCuO(x) + liquid yields YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) peritectic reaction. Little information is available on the complete melting relations, undercooling, and solidification behavior of these materials. In addition, rare earth substitutions such as Nd and Gd affect the liquidus and phase relations. These materials have promising applications, but lack of information on the high temperature phase relations has hampered research. In general, the understanding of undercooling and solidification of high temperature oxide systems lags behind the science of these phenomena in metallic systems. Therefore, this research investigates the fundamental melting relations, undercooling, and solidification behavior of oxide superconductors with an emphasis on improving ground based synthesis of these materials.

  5. Air separation by the Moltox process

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D. C.

    1981-04-01

    The report describes results of a development program on a new and energy saving process for air separation. The Moltox process involves reversibly reacting oxygen in air with a recirculating salt solution, such that oxygen is extracted without depressurizing the remaining nitrogen. Energy savings of approximately 50% are indicated for this process compared to conventional cryogenic air separation. The development program consisted of design, construction, and operation of a 6 liter/minute pilot plant; optimization of the process flowsheet through computer modelling; investigation of engineering aspects of the process including corrosion, safety, and NO/sub x/ generation; and an economic comparison to conventional cryogenic practice. All objectives were satisfactorily achieved except for continuous operation of the pilot plant, and the modifications necessary to achieve that have been identified. Economically the Moltox process shows a substantial advantage over large scale cryogenic plants which are powered by fuel vice electricity.

  6. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus; McCallum, William; Peters, Palmer (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the microstructures which develop under the nonequilibrium solidification conditions achieved by melt processing in copper oxide superconductor systems. More specifically, to define the liquidus at the Y- 1:2:3 composition, the Nd-1:2:3 composition, and several intermediate partial substitution points between pure Y-1:2:3 and Nd-1:2:3. A secondary goal has been to understand resultant solidification morphologies and pathways under a variety of experimental conditions and to use this knowledge to better characterize solidification phenomena in these systems.

  7. Oxidation and Volatilization of TZM Alloy in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Petti, David Andrew; Schuetz, Stanley Thomas

    1999-10-01

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal base alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases, and molybdenum alloys are susceptible to losses from highly volatile molybdenum trioxide (MoOsub3) species. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of MoO3 during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. We have experimentally measured the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800°C. Calculations using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures over pure MoOsub3 and a vaporization mass transfer model correlate well with experimental data between 600 and 800°C. Partial saturation of (MoOsub3) gas species account for influences of flow rate at 700°C. Some anomalies in oxidation rate below 650°C, suggesting that other phases, e.g., MoOsub2 or other non-stoichiometric oxides may influence oxidation and volatilization processes under some limited conditions.

  8. Oxidation and volatilization of TZM alloy in air

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Smolik; D.A. Petti; S.T. Schuetz

    1999-10-10

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal base alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases, and molybdenum alloys are susceptible to losses from highly volatile molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) species. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of MoO{sub 3} during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. The authors have experimentally measured the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800 C. Calculations using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures over pure MoO{sub 3} and a vaporization mass transfer model correlate well with experimental data between 600 and 800 C. Partial saturation of MoO{sub 3} gas species account for influences of flow rate at 700 C. Some anomalies in oxidation rate below 650 C, suggesting that other phases, e.g., MoO{sub 2} or other non-stoichiometric oxides may influence oxidation and volatilization processes under some limited conditions.

  9. Oxidation and volatilization of TZM alloy in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolik, G. R.; Petti, D. A.; Schuetz, S. T.

    2000-12-01

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal-base alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases, and molybdenum alloys are susceptible to losses from highly volatile molybdenum trioxide (MoO 3) species. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration and re-deposition of MoO 3 during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. We have experimentally measured the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400°C and 800°C. Calculations using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures over pure MoO 3 and a vaporization mass transfer model correlate well with the experimental data between 600°C and 800°C. Partial saturation of (MoO 3) gas species accounts for influences of flow rate at 700°C. Some anomalies in oxidation rate below 650°C suggest that other phases, e.g., MoO 2 or other non-stoichiometric oxides may influence oxidation and volatilization processes under some limited conditions.

  10. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  11. AIRS Maps from Space Processing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Charles K.; Licata, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    This software package processes Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Level 2 swath standard product geophysical parameters, and generates global, colorized, annotated maps. It automatically generates daily and multi-day averaged colorized and annotated maps of various AIRS Level 2 swath geophysical parameters. It also generates AIRS input data sets for Eyes on Earth, Puffer-sphere, and Magic Planet. This program is tailored to AIRS Level 2 data products. It re-projects data into 1/4-degree grids that can be combined and averaged for any number of days. The software scales and colorizes global grids utilizing AIRS-specific color tables, and annotates images with title and color bar. This software can be tailored for use with other swath data products for the purposes of visualization.

  12. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  13. Process for producing metal compounds from graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen This intermediary product can be flier processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon, metal carbonate, and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide; b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  14. Process for Producing Metal Compounds from Graphite Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon. metal. chloride. and oxygen This intermediary product can be flier processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon. metal carbonate. and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide: b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate: c) in a reducing environment. to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  15. Fluidized-bed copper oxide process

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.P.; Takahashi, G.S.; Leshock, D.G.

    1991-10-14

    The fluidized-bed copper oxide process was developed to simultaneously remove sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide contaminants from the flue gas of coal-fired utility boilers. This dry and regenerable process uses a copper oxide sorbent in a fluidized-bed reactor. Contaminants are removed without generating waste material. (VC)

  16. Processing AIRS Scientific Data Through Level 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliphant, Robert; Lee, Sung-Yung; Chahine, Moustafa; Susskind, Joel; arnet, Christopher; McMillin, Larry; Goldberg, Mitchell; Blaisdell, John; Rosenkranz, Philip; Strow, Larrabee

    2007-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Spectrometer (AIRS) Science Processing System (SPS) is a collection of computer programs, denoted product generation executives (PGEs), for processing the readings of the AIRS suite of infrared and microwave instruments orbiting the Earth aboard NASA s Aqua spacecraft. AIRS SPS at an earlier stage of development was described in "Initial Processing of Infrared Spectral Data' (NPO-35243), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 11 (November 2004), page 39. To recapitulate: Starting from level 0 (representing raw AIRS data), the PGEs and their data products are denoted by alphanumeric labels (1A, 1B, and 2) that signify the successive stages of processing. The cited prior article described processing through level 1B (the level-2 PGEs were not yet operational). The level-2 PGEs, which are now operational, receive packages of level-1B geolocated radiance data products and produce such geolocated geophysical atmospheric data products such as temperature and humidity profiles. The process of computing these geophysical data products is denoted "retrieval" and is quite complex. The main steps of the process are denoted microwave-only retrieval, cloud detection and cloud clearing, regression, full retrieval, and rapid transmittance algorithm.

  17. Wet air oxidation induced enhanced biodegradability of distillery effluent.

    PubMed

    Malik, S N; Saratchandra, T; Tembhekar, P D; Padoley, K V; Mudliar, S L; Mudliar, S N

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the feasibility of Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a pretreatment option for enhanced biodegradation of complex distillery effluent. Initially, the distillery effluent was pretreated by WAO at different process conditions (pressure, temperature and time) to facilitate enhancement in the biodegradability index (BI = BOD5: COD ratio). The biodegradability of WAO pretreated effluent was evaluated by subjecting it to aerobic biodegradation and anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation. Aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent with enhanced biodegradability index (BI = 0.4-0.8) showed enhanced COD reduction of up to 67.7%, whereas the untreated effluent (BI = 0.17) indicated poor COD reduction of only 22.5%. Anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent has shown up to 87.9% COD reduction, while the untreated effluent has shown only 43.1% COD reduction. Bio-kinetic parameters also confirmed the increased rate of bio-oxidation at enhanced BIs. The results indicate that the WAO pretreatment facilitates enhanced bio-oxidation/bio-degradation of complex effluents like the distillery spent wash.

  18. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  19. A review of wet air oxidation and Thermal Hydrolysis technologies in sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Hii, Kevin; Baroutian, Saeid; Parthasarathy, Raj; Gapes, Daniel J; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2014-03-01

    With rapid world population growth and strict environmental regulations, increasingly large volumes of sludge are being produced in today's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) with limited disposal routes. Sludge treatment has become an essential process in WWTP, representing 50% of operational costs. Sludge destruction and resource recovery technologies are therefore of great ongoing interest. Hydrothermal processing uses unique characteristics of water at elevated temperatures and pressures to deconstruct organic and inorganic components of sludge. It can be broadly categorized into wet oxidation (oxidative) and thermal hydrolysis (non-oxidative). While wet air oxidation (WAO) can be used for the final sludge destruction and also potentially producing industrially useful by-products such as acetic acid, thermal hydrolysis (TH) is mainly used as a pre-treatment method to improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion. This paper reviews current hydrothermal technologies, roles of wet air oxidation and thermal hydrolysis in sludge treatment, and challenges faced by these technologies.

  20. AIR POLLUTION, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased incidents of classic and variant forms of neurodegenerative diseases suggest that environmental chemicals and susceptibility factors (e.g., genetics, diseased states, obesity, etc.) may be contributory. Particulate matter (PM) is a type of air pollution that is associat...

  1. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  2. Environmental Analysis of the Air Bending Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellens, Karel; Dewulf, Wim; Duflou, Joost R.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a data collection effort, allowing to assess the overall environmental impact of the air bending process using the CO2PE!-Methodology. First the different modes of the air bending process are investigated, including both productive and non-productive modes. In particular consumption of electric power is recorded for the different modes. Subsequently, time studies allow determining the importance of productive and nonproductive modes of the involved process. The study demonstrates that the influence of standby losses can be substantial. In addition to life cycle analysis, in depth process analysis also provides insight in achievable environmental impact reducing measures towards machine tool builders and eco-design recommendations for product developers. The energy consumption of three different machine tool architectures are analysed and compared within this paper.

  3. Effect of microstructure on air oxidation resistance of nuclear graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Guldan, Tyler R; Wang, Peng; Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation resistance in air of three grades of nuclear graphite with different structures was compared using a standard thermogravimetric method. Differences in the oxidation behavior have been identified with respect to both (i) the rate of oxidation in identical conditions and the derived apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factor and (ii) the penetration depth of the oxidant and the development of the oxidized layer. These differences were ascribed to structural differences between the three graphite grades, in particular the grain size and shape of the graphite filler, and the associated textural properties, such as total BET surface area and porosity distribution in the un-oxidized material. It was also found that the amount of strongly bonded surface oxygen complexes measured by thermodesorption significantly exceeds the amount afforded by the low BET surface area, and therefore low temperature oxygen chemisorption is not a reliable method for determining the amount of surface sites (re)active during air oxidation. The relationship between nuclear graphite microstructure and its oxidation resistance demonstrated in this work underlines the importance of performing comprehensive oxidation characterization studies of the new grades of nuclear graphite considered as candidates for very high temperature gas-cooled reactors.

  4. PROCESSES OF CHLORINATION OF URANIUM OXIDES

    DOEpatents

    Rosenfeld, S.

    1958-09-16

    An improvement is described in the process fur making UCl/sub 4/ from uranium oxide and carbon tetrachloride. In that process, oxides of uranium are contacted with carbon tetrachloride vapor at an elevated temperature. It has been fuund that the reaction product and yield are improved if the uranlum oxide charge is disposed in flat trays in the reaction zone, to a depth of not more than 1/2 centimeter.

  5. Accelerated oxidation processes is biodiesel

    SciTech Connect

    Canakci, M.; Monyem, A.; Van Gerpen, J.

    1999-12-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines that can be produced from renewable feedstocks such as vegetable oil and animal fats. These feedstocks are reacted with an alcohol to produce alkyl monoesters that can be used in conventional diesel engines with little or no modification. Biodiesel, especially if produced from highly unsaturated oils, oxidizes more rapidly than diesel fuel. This article reports the results of experiments to track the chemical and physical changes that occur in biodiesel as it oxidizes. These results show the impact of time, oxygen flow rate, temperature, metals, and feedstock type on the rate of oxidation. Blending with diesel fuel and the addition of antioxidants are explored also. The data indicate that without antioxidants, biodiesel will oxidize very quickly at temperatures typical of diesel engines. This oxidation results in increases in peroxide value, acid value, and viscosity. While the peroxide value generally reaches a plateau of about 350 meq/kg ester, the acid value and viscosity increase monotonically as oxidation proceeds.

  6. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  7. Creep Performance of Oxide Ceramic Fiber Materials at Elevated Temperature in Air and in Steam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    performance in harsh environments are prime candidates for such applications . Oxide ceramic materials have been used as constituents in CMCs...since 1965, when the United States Air Force led the effort to bring high performance fiber composites to practical applications [26]. Today...bulk polycrystalline alumina cubes were performed in air and steam at 1100 and 1300°C. Both the bulk alumina and YAG specimens were processed in two

  8. Thermally grown oxide and diffusions for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1979-01-01

    A totally automated facility for semiconductor oxidation and diffusion was developed using a state-of-the-art diffusion furnace and high temperature grown oxides. Major innovations include: (1) a process controller specifically for semiconductor processing; (2) an automatic loading system to accept wafers from an air track, insert them into a quartz carrier and then place the carrier on a paddle for insertion into the furnace; (3) automatic unloading of the wafers back onto the air track, and (4) boron diffusion using diborane with plus or minus 5 percent uniformity. Processes demonstrated include Wet and dry oxidation for general use and for gate oxide, boron diffusion, phosphorous diffusion, and sintering.

  9. INTEGRATION OF PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION WITH AIR STRIPPING OF CONTAMINATED AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale laboratory studies and pilot scale studies in a simulated field-test situation were performed to evaluate the integration of gas-solid ultaviolet (UV) photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) downstream if an air stripper unit as a technology for cost-effectively treating water...

  10. HOMOGENEOUS AIR OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS UTILIZING MN AND CO CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Homogeneous Air Oxidation of Hydrocarbons Utilizing Mn and Co Catalysts

    Thomas M. Becker and Michael A. Gonzalez*, Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Mail Sto...

  11. Processing of Mixed Oxide Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    UROUP SUB-GROUP High Temperature Superconductivity , critical current -- 7-- 0superconductor, ceramic, magnetism 20 ’ I 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on...large intragrain currents and small intergrain currents . Magnetic separation works well for YBCO in liquid nitrogen. The technique can certainly be...between the intergrain and intragrain currents and that the short coherence length of oxide superconductors is not the main problem. The closest

  12. Air-Impregnated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Layers for Enhancing the Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chanyoung; Lee, Junghoon; Sheppard, Keith; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2015-10-13

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layers were fabricated on aluminum substrates with systematically varied pore diameters (20-80 nm) and oxide thicknesses (150-500 nm) by controlling the anodizing voltage and time and subsequent pore-widening process conditions. The porous nanostructures were then coated with a thin (only a couple of nanometers thick) Teflon film to make the surface hydrophobic and trap air in the pores. The corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate was evaluated by a potentiodynamic polarization measurement in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution (saltwater). Results showed that the hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate compared to a hydrophilic oxide layer of the same nanostructures, to bare (nonanodized) aluminum with only a natural oxide layer on top, and to the latter coated with a thin Teflon film. The hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer with the largest pore diameter and the thickest oxide layer (i.e., the maximized air fraction) resulted in the best corrosion resistance with a corrosion inhibition efficiency of up to 99% for up to 7 days. The results demonstrate that the air impregnating the hydrophobic nanopores can effectively inhibit the penetration of corrosive media into the pores, leading to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance.

  13. Process for recovering organic vapors from air

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for recovering and concentrating organic vapor from a feed stream of air having an organic vapor content of no more than 20,000 ppm by volume. A thin semipermeable membrane is provided which has a feed side and a permeate side, a selectivity for organic vapor over air of at least 50, as measured by the ratio of organic vapor permeability to nitrogen permeability, and a permeability of organic vapor of at least 3.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.3 (STP) cm/cm.sup.2 sec.cm Hg. The feed stream is passed across the feed side of the thin semipermeable membrane while providing a pressure on the permeate side which is lower than the feed side by creating a partial vacuum on the permeate side so that organic vapor passes preferentially through the membrane to form an organic vapor depleted air stream on the feed side and an organic vapor enriched stream on the permeate side. The organic vapor which has passed through the membrane is compressed and condensed to recover the vapor as a liquid.

  14. Process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexene

    DOEpatents

    Mizuno, Noritaka; Lyon, David K.; Finke, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexenes, to form a variety of oxygenates. The catalyst used in the process is a covalently bonded iridium-heteropolyanion species. The process uses the catalyst in conjunction with a gaseous oxygen containing gas to form 2-cyclohexen-1-ol and also 2-cyclohexen-1-one.

  15. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  16. Process for removing sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A

    1989-05-16

    This patent describes a process for reducing at least one of (1) the sulfur oxide content of a sulfur oxide-containing gas and (2) the nitrogen oxide content of a nitrogen oxide-containing gs which includes contacting the gas with a material at conditions to reduce at least one of (1) the sulfur oxide content of the gas and (2) the nitrogen oxide of the gas, the improvement comprising utilizing as at least a portion of the material the spinel/clay composition produced in accordance with the process comprising: (a) combining (1) an acidic, aluminum-containing composition in which the aluminum is present in a positively charged species, and (2) a basic alkaline earth metal-containing composition to form a gel mixture; and (b) mixing the gel with kaolin clay to form a co-gel mixture; and (c) calcinating the co-gel mixture to form the alkaline earth metal, aluminum-containing spinel composition, in a kaolin clay matrix.

  17. Oxidation of fine aluminum powders with water and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipina, S. A.; Zmanovskii, S. V.; Gromov, A. A.; Konovalov, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Fine aluminum powders (RA20-RA60 grades, SUAL-PM) with specific surface area from 0.37 to 0.73 m2/g and high aluminum contents (95-98 wt %) are studied. The powders are found to be waterwettable without additions of surfactants and characterized by high rates of gas liberation in reacting with a calcium hydroxide solution under normal conditions. All RA20-RA60 powders are shown to be highly reactive upon oxidation with air and close to aluminum nanopowders in the parameters of their activity when heated in air. Their stability in water could prevent active (metallic) aluminum losses during their storage.

  18. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazines: Environmental chamber studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of fuel hydrazines were studied in a 6500-liter fluorocarbon-film chamber at 80 to 100 ppm concentrations. First-order rate constants for the reactions catalyzed by aluminum, water-damaged aluminum (Al/Al2O3), stainless steel 304L, galvanized steel and titanium plates with surface areas of 2 to 24 sq m were determined. With 23.8 sq m of Al/Al2O3 the surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazine had a half-life of 2 hours, diimide (N2H2) was observed as an intermediate and traces of ammonia were present in the final product mixture. The Al/Al2O3 catalyzed oxidation of monomethylhydrazine yielded methyldiazine (HN = NCH3) as an intermediate and traces of methanol. Unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine gave no detectable products. The relative reactivities of hydrazine, MMH and UDMH were 130 : 7.3 : 1.0, respectively. The rate constants for Al/Al2O3-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and MMH were proportional to the square of the surface area of the plates. Mechanisms for the surface-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and diimide and the formation of ammonia are proposed.

  19. Biodegradation of air-oxidized Illinois No. 6 coal

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Wilson, B.W.; Bean, R.M.; Stewart, D.L.; Thomas, B.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Franz, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    We have found that Illinois No. 6 coal, after an air-oxidation pretreatment, can be substantially biodegraded by Penicillium sp. to a product largely soluble in dilute base. It is the purpose of this paper to describe the chemical nature of the biotreated Illinois No. 6 coal and to compare it with the corresponding material from leonardite biosolubilization. 12 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  1. Reduction of metal oxides through mechanochemical processing

    DOEpatents

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Senkov, Oleg N.

    2000-01-01

    The low temperature reduction of a metal oxide using mechanochemical processing techniques. The reduction reactions are induced mechanically by milling the reactants. In one embodiment of the invention, titanium oxide TiO.sub.2 is milled with CaH.sub.2 to produce TiH.sub.2. Low temperature heat treating, in the range of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., can be used to remove the hydrogen in the titanium hydride.

  2. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

  3. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Ginley, David S.

    1994-01-01

    An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

  4. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.; Ruka, R.J.; Singhal, S.C.

    1999-08-03

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO{sub 3}. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell. 3 figs.

  5. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell.

  6. Cyclic Oxidation of High-Temperature Alloy Wires in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2004-01-01

    High-temperature alloy wires are proposed for use in seal applications for future re-useable space vehicles. These alloys offer the potential for improved wear resistance of the seals. The wires must withstand the high temperature environments the seals are subjected to as well as maintain their oxidation resistance during the heating and cooling cycles of vehicle re-entry. To model this, the wires were subjected to cyclic oxidation in stagnant air. of this layer formation is dependent on temperature. Slow growing oxides such as chromia and alumina are desirable. Once the oxide is formed it can prevent the metal from further reacting with its environment. Cyclic oxidation models the changes in temperature these wires will undergo in application. Cycling the temperature introduces thermal stresses which can cause the oxide layer to break off. Re-growth of the oxide layer consumes more metal and therefore reduces the properties and durability of the material. were used for cyclic oxidation testing. The baseline material, Haynes 188, has a Co base and is a chromia former while the other two alloys, Kanthal A1 and PM2000, both have a Fe base and are alumina formers. Haynes 188 and Kanthal A1 wires are 250 pm in diameter and PM2000 wires are 150 pm in diameter. The coiled wire has a total surface area of 3 to 5 sq cm. The wires were oxidized for 11 cycles at 1204 C, each cycle containing a 1 hour heating time and a minimum 20 minute cooling time. Weights were taken between cycles. After 11 cycles, one wire of each composition was removed for analysis. The other wire continued testing for 70 cycles. Post-test analysis includes X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for phase identification and morphology.

  7. Treatment of high-strength industrial wastewater by wet air oxidation--A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Ho, S.J.

    1997-12-31

    Treatment of high concentration chemical wastewater obtained from a petrochemical company by wet air oxidation (WAO) is studied. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the mixer speed, operating pressure, initial pH of wastewater and temperature on the pollutant (chemical oxygen demand or COD) removal. Both air and oxygen were tested to determine their respective effect on the COD removal. Results showed that over 50% of COD removal can be easily realized in an hour of WAO treatment. Also considered in the present study was the catalytic WAO treatment of the high concentration wastewater. Copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}), cobalt oxide (Co{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and zinc oxide (ZnO) were employed as the catalysts. The COD removal efficiency of the catalytic WAO process was found to vary significantly with the catalyst utilized with CuSO{sub 4} being the most effective.

  8. Impact of Air Pollutants on Oxidative Stress in Common Autophagy-Mediated Aging Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Numan, Mohamed Saber; Brown, Jacques P.; Michou, Laëtitia

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution-induced cellular oxidative stress is probably one of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in most of the common autophagy-mediated aging diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s, disease, as well as Paget’s disease of bone with or without frontotemporal dementia and inclusion body myopathy. Oxidative stress has serious damaging effects on the cellular contents: DNA, RNA, cellular proteins, and cellular organelles. Autophagy has a pivotal role in recycling these damaged non-functional organelles and misfolded or unfolded proteins. In this paper, we highlight, through a narrative review of the literature, that when autophagy processes are impaired during aging, in presence of cumulative air pollution-induced cellular oxidative stress and due to a direct effect on air pollutant, autophagy-mediated aging diseases may occur. PMID:25690002

  9. Hydrothermal processing of cellulose: A comparison between oxidative and non-oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Yousefifar, Azadeh; Baroutian, Saeid; Farid, Mohammed M; Gapes, Daniel J; Young, Brent R

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates oxidative and non-oxidative hydrothermal processing of cellulose at five different temperatures (180-260°C). Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration, total suspended solid (TSS) degradation, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were measured and compared in both processes. Moreover, the existence of hydrogen peroxide in both oxidative and non-oxidative processes was confirmed experimentally for the first time in literature. At temperatures ⩽220°C the amount of H2O2 produced in the oxidative process was higher (50 fold) than that of in the non-oxidative while at higher temperatures (⩾240°C) it was more for non-oxidative (3.5-5 fold). The concentration of VFAs in the non-oxidative process was lower than 10% of that in oxidative process. In both processes soluble COD increased with time and temperature, however at 260°C after reaching a maximum, it decreased with time due to conversion of some soluble intermediates to CO2 and water.

  10. DESCRIPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Key differences among many types of air quality models are the way atmospheric advection and turbulent diffusion processes are treated. Gaussian models use analytical solutions of the advection-diffusion equations. Lagrangian models use a hypothetical air parcel concept effecti...

  11. Clean Air Act Standards and Guidelines for Mineral Processing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the stationary sources of air pollution for the mineral processing industries, and their corresponding air pollution regulations. To learn more about the regulations for each industry, just click on the links below.

  12. Solid oxide electrochemical cell fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Dollard, Walter J.; Folser, George R.; Pal, Uday B.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1992-01-01

    A method to form an electrochemical cell (12) is characterized by the steps of thermal spraying stabilized zirconia over a doped lanthanum manganite air electrode tube (14) to provide an electrolyte layer (15), coating conductive particles over the electrolyte, pressurizing the outside of the electrolyte layer, feeding halide vapors of yttrium and zirconium to the outside of the electrolyte layer and feeding a source of oxygen to the inside of the electrolyte layer, heating to cause oxygen reaction with the halide vapors to close electrolyte pores if there are any and to form a metal oxide coating on and between the particles and provide a fuel electrode (16).

  13. Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Combining Advanced Oxidation Processes: Assessment Of Process Additivity, Synergism, And Antagonism

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Robert W.; Sharma, M.P.; Gbadebo Adewuyi, Yusuf

    2007-07-01

    This paper addresses the process interactions from combining integrated processes (such as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), biological operations, air stripping, etc.). AOPs considered include: Fenton's reagent, ultraviolet light, titanium dioxide, ozone (O{sub 3}), hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), sonication/acoustic cavitation, among others. A critical review of the technical literature has been performed, and the data has been analyzed in terms of the processes being additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Predictions based on the individual unit operations are made and compared against the behavior of the combined unit operations. The data reported in this paper focus primarily on treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. (authors)

  15. Thermal imaging of solid oxide fuel cell anode processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomfret, Michael B.; Steinhurst, Daniel A.; Kidwell, David A.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    A Si-charge-coupled device (CCD), camera-based, near-infrared imaging system is demonstrated on Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) fragments and the anodes of working solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). NiO reduction to Ni by H 2 and carbon deposition lead to the fragment cooling by 5 ± 2 °C and 16 ± 1 °C, respectively. When air is flowed over the fragments, the temperature rises 24 ± 1 °C as carbon and Ni are oxidized. In an operational SOFC, the decrease in temperature with carbon deposition is only 4.0 ± 0.1 °C as the process is moderated by the presence of oxides and water. Electrochemical oxidation of carbon deposits results in a Δ T of +2.2 ± 0.2 °C, demonstrating that electrochemical oxidation is less vigorous than atmospheric oxidation. While the high temperatures of SOFCs are challenging in many respects, they facilitate thermal imaging because their emission overlaps the spectral response of inexpensive Si-CCD cameras. Using Si-CCD cameras has advantages in terms of cost, resolution, and convenience compared to mid-infrared thermal cameras. High spatial (∼0.1 mm) and temperature (∼0.1 °C) resolutions are achieved in this system. This approach provides a convenient and effective analytical technique for investigating the effects of anode chemistry in operating SOFCs.

  16. Mathematical Modelling to Predict Oxidative Behaviour of Conjugated Linoleic Acid in the Food Processing Industry.

    PubMed

    Ojanguren, Aitziber; Ayo, Josune

    2013-06-20

    Industrial processes that apply high temperatures in the presence of oxygen may compromise the stability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) bioactive isomers. Statistical techniques are used in this study to model and predict, on a laboratory scale, the oxidative behaviour of oil with high CLA content, controlling the limiting factors of food processing. This modelling aims to estimate the impact of an industrial frying process (140 °C, 7 L/h air) on the oxidation of CLA oil for use as frying oil instead of sunflower oil. A factorial design was constructed within a temperature (80-200 °C) and air flow (7-20 L/h) range. Oil stability index (Rancimat method) was used as a measure of oxidation. Three-level full factorial design was used to obtain a quadratic model for CLA oil, enabling the oxidative behaviour to be predicted under predetermined process conditions (temperature and air flow). It is deduced that temperatures applied in food processes affect the oxidation of CLA to a greater extent than air flow. As a result, it is estimated that the oxidative stability of CLA oil is less resistant to industrial frying than sunflower oil. In conclusion, thanks to the mathematical model, a good choice of the appropriate industrial food process can be selected to avoid the oxidation of the bioactive isomers of CLA, ensuring its functionality in novel applications.

  17. Novel imazethapyr detoxification applying advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Stathis, Ioannis; Hela, Dimitra G; Scrano, Laura; Lelario, Filomena; Emanuele, Lucia; Bufo, Sabino A

    2011-01-01

    Different degradation methods have been applied to assess the suitability of advanced oxidation process (AOPs) to promote mineralization of imazethapyr [(RS)-5-ethyl-2-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)nicotinic acid], a widely used imidazolinone class herbicide, the persistence of which has been demonstrated in surface and ground waters destined to human uses. Independent of the oxidation process assessed, the decomposition of imazethapyr always followed a pseudo-first order kinetic. The direct UV-irradiation (UV) of the herbicide as well as its oxidation with ozone (O₃), and hydrogen peroxide tied to UV-irradiation (H₂O₂/UV) were sufficiently slow to permit the identification of intermediate products, the formation pathway of which has been proposed. Ozonation joined to UV-irradiation (O₃/UV), ozonation joined to titanium dioxide photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV+O₃), sole photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV), and photo-catalysis reinforced with hydrogen peroxide-oxidation (TiO₂/UV+H₂O₂) were characterized by a faster degradation and rapid formation of a lot of small molecules, which were quickly degraded to complete mineralization. The most effective oxidation methods were those using titanium dioxide photo-catalysis enhanced either by ozonation or hydrogen peroxide. Most of all, these last processes were useful to avoid the development of dangerous by-products.

  18. 75 FR 11877 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability of draft... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: First External Review Draft... (welfare-based) NAAQS for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) and oxides of sulfur (SO X ). Because NO X , SO...

  19. 75 FR 57463 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability of draft... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft... for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) and oxides of sulfur (SO X ). Because NO X , SO X , and...

  20. Air processed organic photovoltaic devices incorporating a MoOx anode buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovill, Edward S. R.; Griffin, Jonathan; Wang, Tao; Kingsley, James W.; Yi, Hunan; Iraqi, Ahmed; Buckley, Alastair R.; Lidzey, David G.

    2013-05-01

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOx) has been shown to act as an efficient hole extraction layer in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. However, exposing MoOx films to air is problematic as it is hygroscopic; the uptake of moisture having a negative impact on its electronic properties. Here, we use spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterise the uptake of water, and fabricate PCDTBT:PC70BM based OPVs to determine its effects on device performance. We then show that thermally annealing MoOx reduces its hygroscopicity, permitting it to be processed in air. Using this process, we create air-processsed OPVs having PCEs (power conversion efficiencies) of up to 5.36%.

  1. Investigation of ammonia air-surface exchange processes in a ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Recent assessments of atmospheric deposition in North America note the increasing importance of reduced (NHx = NH3 + NH4+) forms of nitrogen (N) relative to oxidized forms. This shift in in the composition of inorganic nitrogen deposition has both ecological and policy implications. Deposition budgets developed from inferential models applied at the landscape scale, as well as regional and global chemical transport models, indicate that NH3 dry deposition contributes a significant portion of inorganic N deposition in many areas. However, the bidirectional NH3 flux algorithms employed in these models have not been extensively evaluated for North American conditions (e.g, atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, biogeochemistry). Further understanding of the processes controlling NH3 air-surface exchange in natural systems is critically needed. Based on preliminary results from the Southern Appalachian Nitrogen Deposition Study (SANDS), this presentation examines processes of NH3 air-surface exchange in a deciduous montane forest at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in western North Carolina. A combination of measurements and modeling are used to investigate net fluxes of NH3 above the forest and sources and sinks of NH3 within the canopy and forest floor. Measurements of biogeochemical NH4+ pools are used to characterize emission potential and NH3 compensation points of canopy foliage (i.e., green vegetation), leaf litter, and soil and their relation to NH3 fluxes

  2. Degradation of formaldehyde by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, José Roberto; Farah, Carolina Rittes Turato; Maniero, Milena Guedes; Fadini, Pedro Sérgio

    2012-09-30

    The degradation of formaldehyde in an aqueous solution (400 mg L(-1)) was studied using photolysis, peroxidation and advanced oxidation processes (UV/H(2)O(2), Fenton and photo-Fenton). Photolysis was the only process tested that did not reduce formaldehyde concentration; however, only advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) significantly decreased dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UV/H(2)O(2) and photo-Fenton AOPs were used to degrade formaldehyde at the highest concentrations (1200-12,000 mg L(-1)); the processes were able to reduce CH(2)O by 98% and DOC by 65%. Peroxidation with ultraviolet light (UV/H(2)O(2)) improved the efficiency of treatment of effluent from an anatomy laboratory. The effluent's CH(2)O content was reduced by 91%, DOC by 48%, COD by 46% and BOD by 53% in 420 min of testing.

  3. Heterogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters: a review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Hun; Ihm, Son-Ki

    2011-02-15

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is one of the most economical and environmental-friendly advanced oxidation process. It makes a promising technology for the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters. Various heterogeneous catalysts including noble metals and metal oxides have been extensively studied to enhance the efficiency of CWAO. The present review is concerned about the literatures published in this regard. Phenolics, carboxylic acids, and nitrogen-containing compounds were taken as model pollutants in most cases, and noble metals such as Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt as well as oxides of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, and Ce were applied as heterogeneous catalysts. Reports on their characterization and catalytic performances for the CWAO of aqueous pollutants are reviewed. Discussions are also made on the reaction mechanisms and kinetics proposed for heterogeneous CWAO and also on the typical catalyst deactivations in heterogeneous CWAO, i.e. carbonaceous deposits and metal leaching.

  4. Work function recovery of air exposed molybdenum oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Irfan; James Turinske, Alexander; Bao, Zhenan; Gao, Yongli

    2012-08-01

    We report substantial work function (WF) recovery of air exposed molybdenum oxide thin films with vacuum annealing. We observed a sharp reduction in the MoOx WF (from 6.8 eV to 5.6 eV) as well as a very thin layer of oxygen rich adsorbate on the MoOx film after an hour of air exposure. The WF of the exposed MoOx film started to gradually recover with increasing annealing temperature in vacuum, and the saturation in the WF recovery was observed at 450 °C with WF ˜6.4 eV. We further studied the interface formation between the annealed MoOx and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc). The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level of CuPc was observed to be almost pinned to the Fermi level, strongly suggesting the possibility of efficient hole injection with the vacuum annealed MoOx film.

  5. Correlation between the microstructures of graphite oxides and their catalytic behaviors in air oxidation of benzyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Geng, Longlong; Wu, Shujie; Zou, Yongcun; Jia, Mingjun; Zhang, Wenxiang; Yan, Wenfu; Liu, Gang

    2014-05-01

    A series of graphite oxide (GO) materials were obtained by thermal treatment of oxidized natural graphite powder at different temperatures (from 100 to 200 °C). The microstructure evolution (i.e., layer structure and surface functional groups) of the graphite oxide during the heating process is studied by various characterization means, including XRD, N2 adsorption, TG-DTA, in situ DRIFT, XPS, Raman, TEM and Boehm titration. The characterization results show that the structures of GO materials change gradually from multilayer sheets to a transparent ultrathin 2D structure of the carbon sheets. The concentration of surface COH and HOCO groups decrease significantly upon treating temperature increasing. Benzyl alcohol oxidation with air as oxidant source was carried out to detect the catalytic behaviors of different GO materials. The activities of GO materials decrease with the increase of treating temperatures. It shows that the structure properties, including ultrathin sheets and high specific surface area, are not crucial factors affecting the catalytic activity. The type and amount of surface oxygen-containing functional groups of GO materials tightly correlates with the catalytic performance. Carboxylic groups on the surface of GO should act as oxidative sites for benzyl alcohol and the reduced form could be reoxidized by molecular oxygen.

  6. Process for preparing active oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Berard, Michael F.; Hunter, Jr., Orville; Shiers, Loren E.; Dole, Stephen L.; Scheidecker, Ralph W.

    1979-02-20

    An improved process for preparing active oxide powders in which cation hydroxide gels, prepared in the conventional manner are chemically dried by alternately washing the gels with a liquid organic compound having polar characteristics and a liquid organic compound having nonpolar characteristics until the mechanical water is removed from the gel. The water-free cation hydroxide is then contacted with a final liquid organic wash to remove the previous organic wash and speed drying. The dried hydroxide treated in the conventional manner will form a highly sinterable active oxide powder.

  7. Improving abiotic reducing ability of hydrothermal biochar by low temperature oxidation under air.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunfeng; Lou, Zhenjun; Yi, Peng; Chen, Junyu; Ma, Xianlong; Wang, Yang; Li, Mi; Chen, Wen; Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhi; Zhang, Jia; Qian, Guangren

    2014-11-01

    Oxidized hydrothermal biochar was prepared by hydrothermal carbonization of Spartina alterniflora biomass (240°C for 4h) and subsequent oxidization (240°C for 10min) under air. Oxidized hydrochar achieved a Fe(III) reducing capacity of 2.15mmol/g at pH 2.0 with 120h, which is 1.2 times higher than un-oxidized hydrochar. Low temperature oxidization increases the contents of carboxyl and carbonyl groups on hydrochar surface. It is supposed that carboxyl groups provide bonding sites for soluble Fe species and carbonyl groups are responsible for Fe(3+) reduction. A Fenton-like process was established with Fe(2+) replaced by oxidized hydrochar and tested for methylene blue (MB) decoloration. Oxidized hydrochar achieved a MB decolorization (200mg/L, pH 7.0) rate of 99.21% within 3h and demonstrates prominent prevail over H2O2 absent control test. This study reveals low temperature oxidization is an effective way to improve and restore abiotic reducing ability of hydrochar.

  8. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  9. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  10. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  11. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  12. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  13. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  14. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  15. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  16. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  17. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  18. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  19. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  20. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  1. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  2. Integrated catalytic wet air oxidation and biological treatment of wastewater from Vitamin B 6 production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jianxiong; Zhan, Wei; Li, Daosheng; Wang, Xiaocong; Song, Jing; Liu, Dongqi

    This study investigated the feasibility of coupling a catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO), with CuO/Al 2O 3 as catalyst, and an anaerobic/aerobic biological process to treat wastewater from Vitamin B 6 production. Results showed that the CWAO enhanced the biodegradability (BOD 5/COD) from 0.10 to 0.80. The oxidized effluents with COD of 10,000 mg l -1 was subjected to subsequent continuous anaerobic/aerobic oxidation, and 99.3% of total COD removal was achieved. The quality of the effluent obtained met the discharge standards of water pollutants for pharmaceutical industry Chemical Synthesis Products Category (GB21904-2008), and thereby it implies that the integrated CWAO and anaerobic/aerobic biological treatment may offer a promising process to treat wastewater from Vitamin B 6 production.

  3. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-02-07

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields.

  4. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-02-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields.

  5. Wet air oxidation of epoxy acrylate monomer industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaoxia; Liu, Zhengqian; Huang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Beiping

    2010-06-15

    Epoxy acrylate monomer industrial wastewater contained highly concentrated and toxic organic compounds. The wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were used to eliminate pollutants in order to examine the feasibility of the WAO/CWAO as a pre-treatment method for the industrial wastewater. The results showed that in the WAO 63% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 41% total organic carbon (TOC) removals were achieved and biological oxygen demand (BOD(5))/COD ratio increased from 0.13 to 0.72 after 3h reaction at 250 degrees C, 3.5MPa and the initial concentration of 100g(COD)/L. Among homogenous catalysts (Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+) salts), Cu(2+) salt exhibited better performance. CuO catalyst was used in the CWAO of the wastewater, COD and TOC conversion were 77 and 54%, and good biodegradability was achieved. The results proved that the CWAO was an effective pre-treatment method for the epoxy acrylate monomer industrial wastewater.

  6. Amine-Oxide Hybrid Materials for CO2 Capture from Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Didas, Stephanie A; Choi, Sunho; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-10-20

    Oxide supports functionalized with amine moieties have been used for decades as catalysts and chromatographic media. Owing to the recognized impact of atmospheric CO2 on global climate change, the study of the use of amine-oxide hybrid materials as CO2 sorbents has exploded in the past decade. While the majority of the work has concerned separation of CO2 from dilute mixtures such as flue gas from coal-fired power plants, it has been recognized by us and others that such supported amine materials are also perhaps uniquely suited to extract CO2 from ultradilute gas mixtures, such as ambient air. As unique, low temperature chemisorbents, they can operate under ambient conditions, spontaneously extracting CO2 from ambient air, while being regenerated under mild conditions using heat or the combination of heat and vacuum. This Account describes the evolution of our activities on the design of amine-functionalized silica materials for catalysis to the design, characterization, and utilization of these materials in CO2 separations. New materials developed in our laboratory, such as hyperbranched aminosilica materials, and previously known amine-oxide hybrid compositions, have been extensively studied for CO2 extraction from simulated ambient air (400 ppm of CO2). The role of amine type and structure (molecular, polymeric), support type and structure, the stability of the various compositions under simulated operating conditions, and the nature of the adsorbed CO2 have been investigated in detail. The requirements for an effective, practical air capture process have been outlined and the ability of amine-oxide hybrid materials to meet these needs has been discussed. Ultimately, the practicality of such a "direct air capture" process is predicated not only on the physicochemical properties of the sorbent, but also how the sorbent operates in a practical process that offers a scalable gas-solid contacting strategy. In this regard, the utility of low pressure drop monolith

  7. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  8. Composition of air pollution particles modifies oxidative stress in cells, tissues, and living systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate an association between increased levels of ambient air pollution particles and human morbidity and mortality. Production of oxidants, either directly by the air pollution particles or by the host response to the particles, appears to be fundame...

  9. Advanced oxidation process sanitization of eggshell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gottselig, Steven M; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Woodring, Kristy S; Coufal, Craig D; Duong, Tri

    2016-06-01

    The microbial quality of eggs entering the hatchery represents an important critical control point for biosecurity and pathogen reduction programs in integrated poultry production. The development of safe and effective interventions to reduce microbial contamination on the surface of eggs will be important to improve the overall productivity and microbial food safety of poultry and poultry products. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet (UV) light advanced oxidation process is a potentially important alternative to traditional sanitizers and disinfectants for egg sanitation. The H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process was demonstrated previously to be effective in reducing surface microbial contamination on eggs. In this study, we evaluated treatment conditions affecting the efficacy of H2O2/UV advanced oxidation in order to identify operational parameters for the practical application of this technology in egg sanitation. The effect of the number of application cycles, UV intensity, duration of UV exposure, and egg rotation on the recovery of total aerobic bacteria from the surface of eggs was evaluated. Of the conditions evaluated, we determined that reduction of total aerobic bacteria from naturally contaminated eggs was optimized when eggs were sanitized using 2 repeated application cycles with 5 s exposure to 14 mW cm(-2) UV light, and that rotation of the eggs between application cycles was unnecessary. Additionally, using these optimized conditions, the H2O2/UV process reduced Salmonella by greater than 5 log10 cfu egg(-1) on the surface of experimentally contaminated eggs. This study demonstrates the potential for practical application of the H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process in egg sanitation and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella on eggshell surfaces.

  10. Pretreatment of Afyon alcaloide factory's wastewater by wet air oxidation (WAO).

    PubMed

    Kaçar, Y; Alpay, E; Ceylan, V K

    2003-03-01

    In this study, pretreatment of Afyon (Turkey) alcaloide factory wastewater, a typical high strength industrial wastewater (chemical oxygen demand (COD)=26.65 kgm(-3), biological oxygen demand (BOD(5))=3.95 kgm(-3)), was carried out by wet air oxidation process. The process was performed in a 0.75 litre specially designed bubble reactor. Experiments were conducted to see the advantages of one-stage and two-stage oxidation and the effects of pressure, pH, temperature, catalyst type, catalyst loading and air or oxygen as gas source on the oxidation of the wastewater. In addition, BOD(5)/COD ratios of the effluents, which are generally regarded as an important index of biodegradability of a high-strength industrial wastewater, were determined at the end of some runs. After a 2h oxidation (T=150 degrees C, P=0.65 MPa, airflowrate=1.57 x 10(-5)m(3)s(-1), pH=7.0), the BOD(5)/COD ratio was increased from 0.15 to above 0.5 by using the salts of metals such as Co(2+),Fe(2+),Fe(2+)+Ni(2+),Cu(2+)+Mn(2+) as catalyst.

  11. Experimental coupling and modelling of wet air oxidation and packed-bed biofilm reactor as an enhanced phenol removal technology.

    PubMed

    Minière, Marine; Boutin, Olivier; Soric, Audrey

    2017-01-25

    Experimental coupling of wet air oxidation process and aerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor is presented. It has been tested on phenol as a model refractory compound. At 30 MPa and 250 °C, wet air oxidation batch experiments led to a phenol degradation of 97% and a total organic carbon removal of 84%. This total organic carbon was mainly due to acetic acid. To study the interest of coupling processes, wet air oxidation effluent was treated in a biological treatment process. This step was made up of two packed-bed biofilm reactors in series: the first one acclimated to phenol and the second one to acetic acid. After biological treatment, phenol and total organic carbon removal was 99 and 97% respectively. Thanks to parameters from literature, previous studies (kinetic and thermodynamic) and experimental data from this work (hydrodynamic parameters and biomass characteristics), both treatment steps were modelled. This modelling allows the simulation of the coupling process. Experimental results were finally well reproduced by the continuous coupled process model: relative error on phenol removal efficiency was 1 and 5.5% for wet air oxidation process and packed-bed biofilm reactor respectively.

  12. Hybrid process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sprague, B.N.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes a process for reducing the nitrogen oxide concentration in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing into the effluent a first treatment agent comprising a nitrogenous composition selected from the group consisting of urea, ammonia, hexamethylenetetramine, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, NH{sub 4}-lignosulfonate, fur-furylamine, tetrahydrofurylamine, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, biuret, 1.1{prime}-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, calcium cyanamide, and mixtures thereof under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides concentration and ensure the presence of ammonia in the effluent; introducing into the effluent a second treatment agent comprising an oxygenated hydrocarbon at an effluent temperature of about 500{degrees} F. to about 1600{degrees} F. under conditions effective to oxidize nitric oxide in the effluent to nitrogen dioxide and ensure the presence of ammonia at a weight ratio of ammonia to nitrogen dioxide of about 1:5 to about 5:1; and contacting the effluent with an aqueous scrubbing solution having a pH of 12 or lower under conditions effective to cause nitrogen dioxide to be absorbed therein.

  13. Catalytic wet air oxidation with Ni- and Fe-doped mixed oxides derived from hydrotalcites.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; Gómez, P; García, J

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation of Basic Yellow 11 (BY11), a basic dye, was studied in a batch reactor. Layered double hydroxides with the hydrotalcite-like structure containing nickel or iron cations have been prepared by coprecipitation and subsequently calcined leading to Ni- and Fe-doped mixed oxides, respectively. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of BY11, these catalysts showed high activity for total organic carbon (TOC), toxicity and dye removal at 120 degrees C and 50 bars after 120 min. It has been demonstrated that the activity depended strongly on the presence of catalyst. The results show that catalysts containing nickel provide a higher extent of oxidation of the dye whereas the reaction carried out with the iron catalyst is faster. The Ni and Fe dispersion determined from the TPR results was higher for the catalysts with a lower Ni or Fe content and decreased for higher Ni or Fe contents. On the basis of activity and selectivity, the Ni containing catalyst with the medium (3%) Ni content was found to be the best catalyst. Finally, a relationship between metal content of the catalyst and reaction rate has been established.

  14. Graphene oxide as an effective catalyst for wet air oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaoxia; Cui, Yuhong; Sun, Yu; Yang, Hongwei

    2014-09-15

    The graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxides, used as catalysts in absence of any metals, were investigated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol in a batch reactor. The characterization of the materials was measured with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The carbon materials exhibited good phenol and total organic compounds (TOC) removals in the CWAO of phenol. The GO had the highest catalytic activity, total phenol removal was achieved after 40 min, and ca. 84% TOC removal was obtained after 120 min at reaction temperature of 155°C, total pressure of 2.5 MPa and catalyst loading of 0.2 gL(-1).

  15. SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

    2009-10-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

  16. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  17. Formation and growth of indoor air aerosol particles as a result of D-limonene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartiainen, E.; Kulmala, M.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Taipale, R.; Rinne, J.; Vehkamäki, H.

    Oxidation of D-limonene, which is a common monoterpene, can lead to new aerosol particle formation in indoor environments. Thus, products containing D-limonene, such as citrus fruits, air refresheners, household cleaning agents, and waxes, can act as indoor air aerosol particle sources. We released D-limonene into the room air by peeling oranges and measured the concentration of aerosol particles of three different size ranges. In addition, we measured the concentration of D-limonene, the oxidant, and the concentration of ozone, the oxidizing gas. Based on the measurements we calculated the growth rate of the small aerosol particles, which were 3-10 nm in diameter, to be about 6300nmh-1, and the losses of the aerosol particles that were due to the coagulation and condensation processes. From these, we further approximated the concentration of the condensable vapour and its source rate and then calculated the formation rate of the small aerosol particles. For the final result, we calculated the nucleation rate and the maximum number of molecules in a critical cluster. The nucleation rate was in the order of 105cm-3s-1 and the number of molecules in a critical-sized cluster became 1.2. The results were in agreement with the activation theory.

  18. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques.

  19. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.

    1994-05-03

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

  20. Air contamination with nitric oxide: effect on exhaled nitric oxide response.

    PubMed

    Therminarias, A; Flore, P; Favre-Juvin, A; Oddou, M F; Delaire, M; Grimbert, F

    1998-03-01

    This study examines the response of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) concentration (ECNO) and quantity of exhaled NO over time (EVNO) in 10 healthy subjects breathing into five polyethylene bags, one in which synthetic air was free of NO and four in which NO was diluted to concentrations of 20 +/- 0.6, 49 +/- 0.8, 98 +/- 2, and 148 +/- 2 ppb, respectively. Each subject was connected to each bag for 10 min at random. Minute ventilation and ECNO were measured continuously, and EVNO was calculated continuously. ECNO and EVNO values were significantly higher for an inhaled NO concentration of 20 ppb than for NO-free air. Above 20 ppb, ECNO and EVNO increased linearly with inhaled NO concentration. It is reasonable to assume that a share of the quantity of inspired NO over time (InspVNO) because of air contamination by pollution is rejected by the ventilatory pathway. Insofar as InspVNO does not affect endogenous production or the metabolic fate of NO in the airway, this share may be estimated as being approximately one third of InspVNO, the remainder being taken by the endogenous pathway. Thus, air contamination by the NO resulting from pollution greatly increases the NO response in exhaled air.

  1. Air trichloroethylene oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The oxidative decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE; 300 ppm) by non-thermal corona plasma was investigated in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, both in the absence and presence of catalysts including MnOx, CoOx. The catalysts were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the catalysts were characterized by BET surface area measurement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) methods. Decomposition of TCE and distribution of products were evaluated by a gas chromatograph (GC) and an FTIR. In the absence of the catalyst, TCE removal is increased with increases in the applied voltage and current intensity. Higher TCE removal and CO2 selectivity is observed in presence of the corona and catalysts, as compared to those with the plasma alone. The results show that MnOx and CoOx catalysts can dissociate the in-plasma produced ozone to oxygen radicals, which enhances the TCE decomposition.

  2. Effects of operational conditions on sludge degradation and organic acids formation in low-critical wet air oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jinwook; Lee, Mikyung; Ahn, Jaehwan; Bae, Wookeun; Lee, Yong-Woo; Shim, Hojae

    2009-02-15

    Wet air oxidation processes are to treat highly concentrated organic compounds including refractory materials, sludge, and night soil, and usually operated at supercritical water conditions of high temperature and pressure. In this study, the effects of operational conditions including temperature, pressure, and oxidant dose on sludge degradation and conversion into subsequent intermediates such as organic acids were investigated at low critical wet oxidation conditions. The reaction time and temperature in the wet air oxidation process was shown an important factor affecting the liquefaction of volatile solids, with more significant effect on the thermal hydrolysis reaction rather than the oxidation reaction. The degradation efficiency of sludge and the formation of organic acids were improved with longer reaction time and higher reaction temperature. For the sludge reduction and the organic acids formation under the wet air oxidation, the optimal conditions for reaction temperature, time, pressure, and oxidant dose were shown approximately 240 degrees C, 30min, 60atm, and 2.0L/min, respectively.

  3. Air Stripping Designs and Reactive Water Purification Processes for the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2010-01-01

    Air stripping designs are considered to reduce the presence of volatile organic compounds in the purified water. Components of the wastewater streams are ranked by Henry's Law Constant and the suitability of air stripping in the purification of wastewater in terms of component removal is evaluated. Distillation processes are modeled in tandem with air stripping to demonstrate the potential effectiveness and utility of these methods in recycling wastewater on the Moon. Scaling factors for distillation and air stripping columns are presented to account for the difference in the lunar gravitation environment. Commercially available distillation and air stripping units which are considered suitable for Exploration Life Support are presented. The advantages to the various designs are summarized with respect to water purity levels, power consumption, and processing rates. An evaluation of reactive distillation and air stripping is presented with regards to the reduction of volatile organic compounds in the contaminated water and air. Among the methods presented, an architecture is presented for the evaluation of the simultaneous oxidation of organics in air and water. These and other designs are presented in light of potential improvements in power consumptions and air and water purities for architectures which include catalytic activity integrated into the water processor. In particular, catalytic oxidation of organics may be useful as a tool to remove contaminants that more traditional distillation and/or air stripping columns may not remove. A review of the current leading edge at the commercial level and at the research frontier in catalytically active materials is presented. Themes and directions from the engineering developments in catalyst design are presented conceptually in light of developments in the nanoscale chemistry of a variety of catalyst materials.

  4. Treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater by wet air oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yan, Xiuyi; Zhou, Jinghui; Ma, Jiuli

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production is characterized by high salinity and high chemical oxygen demand (COD). We applied a combination of flocculation and wet air oxidation technology to optimize the reduction of COD in the treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater. The experiments used different values of flocculant, coagulant, and oxidizing agent added to the wastewater, as well as different reaction times and treatment temperatures. The use of flocculants for the pretreatment of fracturing wastewater was shown to improve treatment efficiency. The addition of 500 mg/L of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and 20 mg/L of anionic polyacrylamide (APAM) during pretreatment resulted in a COD removal ratio of 8.2% and reduced the suspended solid concentration of fracturing wastewater to 150 mg/L. For a solution of pretreated fracturing wastewater with 12 mL of added H2O2, the COD was reduced to 104 mg/L when reacted at 300 °C for 75 min, and reduced to 127 mg/L when reacted at the same temperature for 45 min while using a 1 L autoclave. An optimal combination of these parameters produced treated wastewater that met the GB 8978-1996 'Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard' level I emission standard.

  5. Air Force research in optical processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, J.

    1981-01-01

    Optical and optical electronic hybrid processing especially in the application area of image processing are emphasized. Real time pattern recognition processors for such airborne missions as target recognition, tracking, and terminal guidance are studied.

  6. Oxidation behavior of U-Si compounds in air from 25 to 1000 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby Wood, E.; White, J. T.; Nelson, A. T.

    2017-02-01

    The air oxidation behavior of U3Si2, USi, and U3Si5 is studied from room temperature to 1000 C. The onsets of breakaway oxidation for each compound are identified during synthetic air ramps to 1000 C using thermogravimetric analysis. Isothermal air oxidation tests are performed below and above the breakaway oxidation onset to discern the oxidation kinetic behavior of these candidate accident tolerant fuel forms. Uranium metal is tested in the same manner to provide a reference for the oxidation behavior. Thermogravimetric, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy analysis are presented here along with a discussion of the oxidation behavior of these materials and the impact of the lack of oxidation resistance to their deployment as accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  7. Oxalic acid mineralization by electrochemical oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Hui; Shih, Yu-Jen; Liu, Cheng-Hong

    2011-04-15

    In this study, two electrochemical oxidation processes were utilized to mineralize oxalic acid which was a major intermediate compound in the oxidation of phenols and other aromatic compounds. The anode rod and cathode net were made of a titanium coated with RuO(2)/IrO(2) (Ti-DSA) and stainless steel (S.S. net, SUS304), respectively. First, the Fered-Fenton process, which used H(2)O(2) and Fe(2+) as additive reagents, achieved 85% of TOC removal. It proceeded with ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT), which was evidenced by the accumulation of metallic foil on the selected cathode. However, in the absence of H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+), it showed a higher TOC removal efficiency while using Cl(-) only as an additive reagent due to the formation of hypochlorite on the anode. It was also found that the mineralization of oxalic acid by electrolysis generated hypochlorite better than the dosage of commercial hypochlorite without electricity. Also, pH value was a major factor that affected the mineralization efficiency of the oxalic acid due to the chlorine chemistry. 99% TOC removal could be obtained by Cl(-) electrolysis in an acidic environment.

  8. Characterization of process air emissions in automotive production plants.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, J B; Dasch, J M; Gundrum, A B; Rivera, J L; Johnson, J H; Carlson, D H; Sutherland, J W

    2016-01-01

    During manufacturing, particles produced from industrial processes become airborne. These airborne emissions represent a challenge from an industrial hygiene and environmental standpoint. A study was undertaken to characterize the particles associated with a variety of manufacturing processes found in the auto industry. Air particulates were collected in five automotive plants covering ten manufacturing processes in the areas of casting, machining, heat treatment and assembly. Collection procedures provided information on air concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition of the airborne particulate matter for each process and insight into the physical and chemical processes that created those particles.

  9. Effect of nitrogen doping on wetting and photoactive properties of laser processed zinc oxide-graphene oxide nanocomposite layers

    SciTech Connect

    György, E.; Pérez del Pino, A.; Logofatu, C.; Duta, A.; Isac, L.

    2014-07-14

    Zinc oxide-graphene oxide nanocomposite layers were submitted to laser irradiation in air or controlled nitrogen atmosphere using a frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG (λ = 266 nm, τ{sub FWHM} ≅ 3 ns, ν = 10 Hz) laser source. The experiments were performed in air at atmospheric pressure or in nitrogen at a pressure of 2 × 10{sup 4} Pa. The effect of the irradiation conditions, incident laser fluence value, and number of subsequent laser pulses on the surface morphology of the composite material was systematically investigated. The obtained results reveal that nitrogen incorporation improves significantly the wetting and photoactive properties of the laser processed layers. The kinetics of water contact angle variation when the samples are submitted to laser irradiation in nitrogen are faster than that of the samples irradiated in air, the surfaces becoming super-hydrophilic under UV light irradiation.

  10. Oxidation resistance of selected mechanical carbons at 650 deg C in dry flowing air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted with several experimental mechanical carbons at 650 C in air flowing at 28 cu cm/sec (STP). Experiments indicate that boron carbide addition and zinc phosphate treatment definitely improved oxidation resistance. Impregnation with coal tar pitch before final graphitization had some beneficial effect on oxidation resistance and it markedly improved flexure strength and hardness. Graphitization temperature alone did not affect oxidation resistance, but with enough added boron carbide the oxidation resistance was increased although the hardness greatly decreased.

  11. Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation(UVPCO)/Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Fisk,William J.

    2007-02-01

    We previously reported that gas-phase byproducts of incomplete oxidation were generated when a prototype ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaner was operated in the laboratory with indoor-relevant mixtures of VOCs at realistic concentrations. Under these conditions, there was net production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two important indoor air toxicants. Here, we further explore the issue of byproduct generation. Using the same UVPCO air cleaner, we conducted experiments to identify common VOCs that lead to the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and to quantify their production rates. We sought to reduce the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to acceptable levels by employing different chemisorbent scrubbers downstream of the UVPCO device. Additionally, we made preliminary measurements to estimate the capacity and expected lifetime of the chemisorbent media. For most experiments, the system was operated at 680-780 m{sup 3}/h (400-460 cfm). A set of experiments was conducted with common VOCs introduced into the UVPCO device individually and in mixture. Compound conversion efficiencies and the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were determined by comparison of compound concentrations upstream and downstream of the reactor. There was general agreement between compound conversions efficiencies determined individually and in the mixture. This suggests that competition among compounds for active sites on the photocatalyst surface will not limit the performance of the UVPCO device when the total VOC concentration is low. A possible exception was the very volatile alcohols, for which there were some indications of competitive adsorption. The results also showed that formaldehyde was produced from many commonly encountered VOCs, while acetaldehyde was generated by specific VOCs, particularly ethanol. The implication is that formaldehyde concentrations are likely to increase when an effective UVPCO air cleaner is used in

  12. High-temperature processing of oxide superconductors and superconducting oxide-silver oxide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M. K.; Loo, B. H.; Peters, P. N.; Huang, C. Y.

    1988-01-01

    High temperature processing was found to partially convert the green 211 phase oxide to 123 phase. High Tc superconductivity was observed in Bi-Sr-Cu-O and Y-Sr-Cu-O systems prepared using the same heat treatment process. High temperature processing presents an alternative synthetic route in the search for new high Tc superconductors. An unusual magnetic suspension with enhancement in critical current density was observed in the 123 and AgO composite.

  13. Electrochemical characterization of Fe-air rechargeable oxide battery in planar solid oxide cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qingping; Berger, Cornelius M.; Menzler, Norbert H.; Bram, Martin; Blum, Ludger

    2016-12-01

    Iron-air rechargeable oxide batteries (ROB) comprising solid oxide cells (SOC) as energy converters and Fe/metal-oxide redox couples were characterized using planar SOC stacks. The charge and discharge of the battery correspond to the operations in the electrolysis and fuel cell modes, respectively, but with a stagnant atmosphere consisting of hydrogen and steam. A novel method was employed to establish the stagnant atmosphere for battery testing during normal SOC operation without complicated modification to the test bench and stack/battery concept. Manipulation of the gas compositions during battery operation was not necessary, but the influence of the leakage current from the testing system had to be considered. Batteries incorporating Fe2O3/8YSZ, Fe2O3/CaO and Fe2O3/ZrO2 storage materials were characterized at 800 °C. A maximum charge capacity of 30.4 Ah per layer (with an 80 cm2 active cell area) with ∼0.5 mol Fe was reached with a current of 12 A. The charge capacity lost 11% after ∼130 ROB cycles due to the increased agglomeration of active materials and formation of a dense oxide layer on the surface. The round trip efficiencies of the tested batteries were ≤84% due to the large internal resistance. With state-of-the-art cells, the round trip efficiency can be further improved.

  14. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Final Report, 2006)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In February 2006, EPA released the final document, Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Other Photochemical Oxidants. Tropospheric or surface-level ozone (O3) is one of six major air pollutants regulated by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) under the U.S...

  15. Processing and Oxidation Behavior of Nb-Si-B Intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Y.LIU; A.J. Thom; M.J. Kramer; M. Akinc

    2004-09-30

    Single phase materials of {alpha}-Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Nb{sub 5}(Si,B){sub 3} (T2) and Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} (D8{sub 8}) in the Nb-Si-B system were prepared by powder metallurgy processing. T2 was almost fully dense, while {alpha}-Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and D8{sub 8} were porous after sintering at 1900 C for 2 hours. The lattice parameters of T2 decreased linearly with the substitution of B for Si. Isothermal oxidation testing at 1000 C in flowing air indicated that the oxidation resistances of T2 and D8{sub 8} are much better than {alpha}-Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, but still extremely poor compared to the boron-modified Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Extensive cracking in the oxide scale and matrix were observed and arose from the volume expansion associated with the formation of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and boron-containing silica glass.

  16. Nitrogen and carbon oxides chemistry in the HRS retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.G.

    1993-11-12

    The HRS Oil Shale Retort process consists of a pyrolysis section which converts kerogen of the shale to liquid and gaseous products, and a combustion section which burns residual carbon on the shale to heat the process. Average gas concentrations of selected gas phase species were determined from data measured at several placed on the combustion system of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycled-Solids Retort Pilot Plant for representative rich and lean shale runs. The data was measured on-line and in real time by on-line meters (CO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 2}), mass spectrometry (CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NO, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and Ar), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, NO, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and HCN). For both the rich and leans shale runs, the Lift-Pipe Combustor (LFT) exhibited gas concentrations (sampled at the exit of the LFT) indicative of incomplete combustion and oxidation; the Delayed-Fall Combustor (DFC) exhibited gas concentrations (sampled at the annulus and the exit of the DFC) indicative of much more complete combustion and oxidation. The Fluidized-Bed Combustor exhibited gas concentrations which were controlled to a large extent by the injection atmosphere of the FBC. High levels of nitrogen oxides and low levels of CO were detected when full air injection was used, while high levels of CO and low levels of nitrogen-oxides were detected with partial N{sub 2} injection. Sequential sampling limitations and nitrogen balances are also discussed.

  17. Laser processing of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hong, Ming Hui; Lu, Yong Feng; Chong, Tow Chong

    2003-02-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (non-flammable, anti-adhesive, heat-resistant and bio-compatible). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of Teflon by Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs), Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 7 ns) and CO2 laser (10.6 μm, 10 μs) has been investigated. For femtosecond laser processing, clear ablation takes place and provides high-quality groove on Teflon surface. Both the groove depth and the width increase as the laser fluence increase, and decrease almost linearly as the scanning speed increase for laser fluence below 5.0 J/cm2. For Nd:YAG processing, Teflon surface roughness is improved but no clean ablation is accessible, which makes it difficult to micromachine Teflon by Nd:YAG laser. For CO2 laser processing, laser-induced bumps were formed on Teflon surface with controlled laser parameters. The physics mechanisms for different pulse duration laser processing of Teflon are also discussed.

  18. Air separation by the Moltox process. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.C.

    1981-04-01

    Results are described of a development program on a new and energy-saving process for air separation. The Moltox process involves reversibly reacting oxygen in air with a recirculating salt solution, such that oxygen is extracted without depressurizing the remaining nitrogen. Energy savings of approximately 50% are indicated for this process compared to conventional cryogenic air separation. The development program consisted of design, construction, and operation of a 6 liter/minute pilot plant; optimization of the process flowsheet through computer modelling; investigation of engineering aspects of the process including corrosion, safety, and NO/sub x/ generation; and an economic comparison to conventional cryogenic practice. All objectives were satisfactorily achieved except for continuous operation of the pilot plant, and the modifications necessary to achieve that have been identified. Economically the Moltox process shows a substantial advantage over large scale cryogenic plants which are powered by fuel vice electricity.

  19. Process for fabrication of metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

    1990-07-17

    This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

  20. Wet air oxidation as a pretreatment option for selective biodegradability enhancement and biogas generation potential from complex effluent.

    PubMed

    Padoley, K V; Tembhekar, P D; Saratchandra, T; Pandit, A B; Pandey, R A; Mudliar, S N

    2012-09-01

    This study looks at the possibility of wet air oxidation (WAO) based pretreatment of complex effluent to selectively enhance the biodegradability (without substantial COD destruction) and facilitate biogas generation potential. A lab-scale wet air oxidation reactor with biomethanated distillery wastewater (B-DWW) as a model complex effluent (COD 40,000 mg L(-1)) was used to demonstrate the proof-of-concept. The studies were conducted using a designed set of experiments and reaction temperature (150-200°C), air pressure (6-12 bar) and reaction time (15-120 min) were the main process variables of concern for WAO process optimization. WAO pretreatment of B-DWW enhanced the biodegradability of the complex wastewater by the virtue of enhancing its biodegradability index (BI) from 0.2 to 0.88, which indicate favorable Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) for biogas generation. The kinetics of COD destruction and BI enhancement has also been reported.

  1. Air feed tube support system for a solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Doshi, Vinod B.; Ruka, Roswell J.; Hager, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator (12), containing tubular fuel cells (36) with interior air electrodes (18), where a supporting member (82) containing a plurality of holes (26) supports oxidant feed tubes (51), which pass from an oxidant plenum (52") into the center of the fuel cells, through the holes (26) in the supporting member (82), where a compliant gasket (86) around the top of the oxidant feed tubes and on top (28) of the supporting member (82) helps support the oxidant feed tubes and center them within the fuel cells, and loosen the tolerance for centering the air feed tubes.

  2. 76 FR 46083 - Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No... RIN 2060-AO72 Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur... nitrogen and oxides of sulfur. Based on its review, EPA proposes to retain the current nitrogen dioxide...

  3. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). Link to an... to or greater than 0.005 ppm shall be rounded up). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the...

  4. Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

    2013-11-26

    Cr oxidation front (depth to which soluble Cr was detected) for the Cast Stone sample exposed for 68 days to ambient outdoor temperatures and humid air (total age of sample was 131 days) was determined to be about 35 mm below the top sample surface exposed. The Tc oxidation front, depth at which Tc was insoluble, was not determined. Interpretation of the results indicates that the oxidation front is at least 38 mm below the exposed surface. The sample used for this measurement was exposed to ambient laboratory conditions and humid air for 50 days. The total age of the sample was 98 days. Technetium appears to be more easily oxidized than Cr in the Cast Stone matrix. The oxidized forms of Tc and Cr are soluble and therefore leachable. Longer exposure times are required for both the Cr and Tc spiked samples to better interpret the rate of oxidation. Tc spiked subsamples need to be taken further from the exposed surface to better define and interpret the leachable Tc profile. Finally Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV) appears to occur relatively fast. Results demonstrated that about 95 percent of the Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) during the setting and very early stage setting for a Cast Stone sample cured 10 days. Additional testing at longer curing times is required to determine whether additional time is required to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII) in Cast Stone or whether the Tc loading exceeded the ability of the waste form to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII). Additional testing is required for samples cured for longer times. Depth discrete subsampling in a nitrogen glove box is also required to determine whether the 5 percent Tc extracted from the subsamples was the result of the sampling process which took place in air. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method) performed on depth discrete samples could not be correlated with the amount of chromium or technetium leached from the depth discrete subsamples or with the oxidation front inferred from soluble

  5. Joining Mixed Conducting Oxides Using an Air-Fired Electrically Conductive Braze

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Weil, K. Scott

    2004-10-01

    Due to their mixed oxygen ion and electron conducting properties, ceramics such as lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrites (LSCF) are attractive materials for use in active electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and oxygen separation membranes. However, to take full advantage of the unique properties of these materials, reliable joining techniques need to be developed. If such a joining technique yields a ceramic-to-metal junction that is also electrically conductive, the hermetic seals in the device could provide the added function of either drawing current from the mixed conducting oxide, in the case of SOFC applications, or carrying it to the oxide to initate ionic conduction, in the case of oxygen separation and electrocatalysis applications. This would greatly reduce the need for complex interconnect design, thereby simplifying one of the major challenges faced in SOFC development. A process referred to as reactive air brazing (RAB) has been developed in which firing a Ag-CuO filler material in air creates a functional ceramic-to-metal junction, in which the silver-based matrix of the braze affords both metallic ductility and conductivity in the joint. Investigating a range of Ag-CuO alloy combinations determined that compositions containing between 1.4 and 16 mol% CuO appear to offer the best combination of wettability, joint strength, and electrical conductivity.

  6. Catalytic wet air oxidation of chlorophenols over supported ruthenium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Descorme, Claude; Besson, Michèle

    2007-07-31

    A series of noble metal (Pt, Pd, Ru) loaded zirconia catalysts were evaluated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of mono-chlorophenols (2-CP, 3-CP, 4-CP) under relatively mild reaction conditions. Among the investigated noble metals, Ru appeared to be the best to promote the CWAO of CPs as far as incipient-wetness impregnation was used to prepare all the catalysts. The position of the chlorine substitution on the aromatic ring was also shown to have a significant effect on the CP reactivity in the CWAO over 3wt.% Ru/ZrO(2). 2-CP was relatively easier to degradate compared to 3-CP and 4-CP. One reason could be the higher adsorption of 2-CP on the catalyst surface. Further investigations suggested that 3wt.% Ru/ZrO(2) is a very efficient catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP as far as high 2-CP conversion and TOC abatement could still be reached at even lower temperature (393K) and lower total pressure (3MPa). Additionally, the conversion of 2-CP was demonstrated to increase with the initial pH of the 2-CP solution. The dechlorination reaction is promoted at higher pH. In all cases, the adsorption of the reactants and the reaction intermediates was shown to play a major role. All parameters that would control the molecule speciation in solution or the catalyst surface properties would have a key effect.

  7. Sludge thermal oxidation processes: mineral recycling, energy impact, and greenhouse effect gases release.

    PubMed

    Guibelin, E

    2004-01-01

    Different treatment routes have been studied for a mixed sludge: the conventional agricultural use is compared with the thermal oxidation processes, including incineration (in gaseous phase) and wet air oxidation (in liquid phase). The interest of a sludge digestion prior to the final treatment has been also considered according to the two major criteria, which are the fossil energy utilisation and the greenhouse effect gases (CO2, CH4, N2O) release. Thermal energy has to be recovered on thermal processes to make these processes environmentally friendly, otherwise their main interest is to extract or destroy micropollutants and pathogens from the carbon cycle. In case of continuous energy recovery, incineration can produce more energy than it consumes. Digestion is especially interesting for agriculture: according to these two schemes, the energy final balance can also be in excess. As to wet air oxidation, it is probably one of the best ways to minimize greenhouse effect gases emission.

  8. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  9. Reactive nitrogen oxides in the southeast United States national parks: source identification, origin, and process budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Daniel Quansong; Kang, Daiwen; Aneja, Viney P.; Ray, John D.

    2005-01-01

    We present in this study both measurement-based and modeling analyses for elucidation of source attribution, influence areas, and process budget of reactive nitrogen oxides at two rural southeast United States sites (Great Smoky Mountains national park (GRSM) and Mammoth Cave national park (MACA)). Availability of nitrogen oxides is considered as the limiting factor to ozone production in these areas and the relative source contribution of reactive nitrogen oxides from point or mobile sources is important in understanding why these areas have high ozone. Using two independent observation-based techniques, multiple linear regression analysis and emission inventory analysis, we demonstrate that point sources contribute a minimum of 23% of total NOy at GRSM and 27% at MACA. The influence areas for these two sites, or origins of nitrogen oxides, are investigated using trajectory-cluster analysis. The result shows that air masses from the West and Southwest sweep over GRSM most frequently, while pollutants transported from the eastern half (i.e., East, Northeast, and Southeast) have limited influence (<10% out of all air masses) on air quality at GRSM. The processes responsible for formation and removal of reactive nitrogen oxides are investigated using a comprehensive 3-D air quality model (Multiscale Air Quality SImulation Platform (MAQSIP)). The NOy contribution associated with chemical transformations to NOz and O3, based on process budget analysis, is as follows: 32% and 84% for NOz, and 26% and 80% for O3 at GRSM and MACA, respectively. The similarity between NOz and O3 process budgets suggests a close association between nitrogen oxides and effective O3 production at these rural locations.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  14. Application of hydrogen injection and oxidation to low temperature solution-processed oxide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Masashi; Nakata, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Fujisaki, Yoshihide; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Solution-processed oxide semiconductors are promising candidates for the low cost, large scale fabrication of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). In this work, a method using hydrogen injection and oxidation (HIO) that allows the low temperature solution processing of oxide semiconductors was demonstrated. We found that this method significantly decreases the concentration of residual species while improving the film densification. Additionally, enhanced TFT performance was confirmed following the use of processing temperatures as low as 300 °C. The proposed process is potentially applicable to the fabrication of a wide variety of solution-processed oxide semiconductors.

  15. PROCESS OF PRODUCING REFRACTORY URANIUM OXIDE ARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, N.E.

    1957-12-01

    A method is presented for fabricating uranium oxide into a shaped refractory article by introducing a uranium halide fluxing reagent into the uranium oxide, and then mixing and compressing the materials into a shaped composite mass. The shaped mass of uranium oxide and uranium halide is then fired at an elevated temperature so as to form a refractory sintered article. It was found in the present invention that the introduction of a uraninm halide fluxing agent afforded a fluxing action with the uranium oxide particles and that excellent cohesion between these oxide particles was obtained. Approximately 90% of uranium dioxide and 10% of uranium tetrafluoride represent a preferred composition.

  16. Process-based modeling of ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from open lot beef and dairy facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air emissions, such as ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O), vary considerably among beef and dairy open lot operations as influenced by the climate and manure pack conditions. Because of the challenges with direct measurement, process-based modeling is a recommended approach for estimating air emi...

  17. Leaf photosynthetic and water-relations responses for 'Valencia' orange trees exposed to oxidant air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Takemoto, B.K.; Poe, M.

    1991-01-01

    Leaf responses were measured to test a hypothesis that reduced photosynthetic capacity and/or altered water relations were associated with reductions in yield for 'Valencia' orange trees (Citrus sinensis (L.), Osbeck) exposed to ambient oxidant air pollution. Exposures were continuous for 4 years to three levels of oxidants (in charcoal-filtered, half-filtered, and non-filtered air). Oxidants had no effect on net leaf photosynthetic rates or on photosynthetic pigment concentrations. A single set of measurements indicated that oxidants increased leaf starch concentrations (24%) prior to flowering, suggesting a change in photosynthate allocation. Leaves exposed to oxidants had small, but consistent, changes in water relations over the summer growing season, compared to trees growing in filtered air. Other changes included decreased stomatal conductance (12%) and transpiration (9%) rates, and increased water pressure potentials (5%). While all responses were subtle, their cumulative impact over 4 years indicated that 'Valencia' orange trees were subject to increased ambient oxidant stress.

  18. Remediation of a winery wastewater combining aerobic biological oxidation and electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Francisca C; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-05-15

    Apart from a high biodegradable fraction consisting of organic acids, sugars and alcohols, winery wastewaters exhibit a recalcitrant fraction containing high-molecular-weight compounds as polyphenols, tannins and lignins. In this context, a winery wastewater was firstly subjected to a biological oxidation to mineralize the biodegradable fraction and afterwards an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) was applied in order to mineralize the refractory molecules or transform them into simpler ones that can be further biodegraded. The biological oxidation led to above 97% removals of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), but was inefficient on the degradation of a bioresistant fraction corresponding to 130 mg L(-1) of DOC, 380 mg O2 L(-1) of COD and 8.2 mg caffeic acid equivalent L(-1) of total dissolved polyphenols. Various EAOPs such as anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) and solar PEF (SPEF) were then applied to the recalcitrant effluent fraction using a 2.2 L lab-scale flow plant containing an electrochemical cell equipped with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-PTFE air-diffusion cathode and coupled to a photoreactor with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs). The influence of initial Fe(2+) concentration and current density on the PEF process was evaluated. The relative oxidative ability of EAOPs increased in the order AO-H2O2 < EF < PEF ≤ SPEF. The SPEF process using an initial Fe(2+) concentration of 35 mg L(-1), current density of 25 mA cm(-2), pH of 2.8 and 25 °C reached removals of 86% on DOC and 68% on COD after 240 min, regarding the biologically treated effluent, along with energy consumptions of 45 kWh (kg DOC)(-1) and 5.1 kWh m(-3). After this coupled treatment, color, odor, COD, BOD5, NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) parameters complied with the legislation targets and, in addition, a total

  19. [Degradation of beta-naphthol by catalytic wet air oxidation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Yu, Chao-Ying; Zhao, Pei-Qing; Chen, Ge-Xin

    2012-11-01

    A series of MnO(x)/nano-TiO2 catalysts were prepared and their application in degradation of beta-naphthol by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated. The catalysts preparation conditions, reaction conditions and its stability were tested. The catalysts had been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) measurements. The results showed that the decrease of the COD removal for the degradation of beta-naphthol at high Mn loading was due to the aggregation of the highly dispersed Mn species and the formation of the correlated crystals. The decline of the COD removal at high calcination temperature was probably attributed to the weak electron transfer between Mn2O3 and MnO2 and the formation of the inactive Mn2O3. The COD removal had been falling slightly when the catalyst was used 6 times, and this was likely related to the decrease of the diffraction peaks. The catalyst had a high activity when the Mn loading (mass fraction) was 4% and the calcination temperature was 450 degrees C. The COD removal was up to 96.4% at 110 degrees C and 0.5 MPa with this catalyst. The COD removal of 92.4% could be obtained with the MnO(x)/nano-TiO2 catalyst was recycled 6 times. The Mn leaching at 50, 80, 110 and 150 degrees C were all less than 9.3 mg x L(-1) by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The probable degradation pathway was proposed according to some publications.

  20. Pressurized solid oxide fuel cell integral air accumular containment

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Basel, Richard A.

    2004-02-10

    A fuel cell generator apparatus contains at least one fuel cell subassembly module in a module housing, where the housing is surrounded by a pressure vessel such that there is an air accumulator space, where the apparatus is associated with an air compressor of a turbine/generator/air compressor system, where pressurized air from the compressor passes into the space and occupies the space and then flows to the fuel cells in the subassembly module, where the air accumulation space provides an accumulator to control any unreacted fuel gas that might flow from the module.

  1. Determination of dispersion parameters for oxidizing air and the oxidation rate of calcium sulfites in a pilot desulfurization plant

    SciTech Connect

    Burenkov, D.K.; Derevich, I.V.; Rzaev, A.I.

    1995-10-01

    In the effort to remove sulfur oxides from waste gases, the widest use is gained by desulfurization plants based on wet collection of sulfur dioxide in empty absorbers in which a limestone-gypsum suspension is sprayed, with gypsum being produced as a commodity product. Dispersion of oxidizing air in a model liquid and the oxidation rate of calcium sulfites in a suspension contained in the sump of a pilot desulfurization plant absorber are studied experimentally. Flow velocities, bubble trajectories, and oxidation rates were determined and are presented.

  2. Oxidation Ditches. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelsen, David

    The textual material for a two-lesson unit on oxidation ditches is presented in this student manual. Topics discussed in the first lesson (introduction, theory, and components) include: history of the oxidation ditch process; various designs of the oxidation ditch; multi-trench systems; carrousel system; advantages and disadvantages of the…

  3. Review of solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si Joon; Yoon, Seokhyun; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-02-01

    In this review, we summarize solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) researches based on our fulfillments. We describe the fundamental studies of precursor composition effects at the beginning in order to figure out the role of each component in oxide semiconductors, and then present low temperature process for the adoption of flexible devices. Moreover, channel engineering for high performance and reliability of solution-processed oxide TFTs and various coating methods: spin-coating, inkjet printing, and gravure printing are also presented. The last topic of this review is an overview of multi-functional solution-processed oxide TFTs for various applications such as photodetector, biosensor, and memory.

  4. Durable rechargeable zinc-air batteries with neutral electrolyte and manganese oxide catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumboja, Afriyanti; Ge, Xiaoming; Zheng, Guangyuan; Goh, F. W. Thomas; Hor, T. S. Andy; Zong, Yun; Liu, Zhaolin

    2016-11-01

    Neutral chloride-based electrolyte and directly grown manganese oxide on carbon paper are used as the electrolyte and air cathode respectively for rechargeable Zn-air batteries. Oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions on manganese oxide show dependence of activities on the pH of the electrolyte. Zn-air batteries with chloride-based electrolyte and manganese oxide catalyst exhibit satisfactory voltage profile (discharge and charge voltage of 1 and 2 V at 1 mA cm-2) and excellent cycling stability (≈90 days of continuous cycle test), which is attributed to the reduced carbon corrosion on the air cathode and decreased carbonation in neutral electrolyte. This work describes a robust electrolyte system that improves the cycle life of rechargeable Zn-air batteries.

  5. Catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline with nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Levi, R; Milman, M; Landau, M V; Brenner, A; Herskowitz, M

    2008-07-15

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of aqueous solution containing 1000 ppm aniline was conducted in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a novel nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst (surface area of 300 m2/g) prepared using SBA-15 silica as a hard template. A range of liquid hourly space velocities (5-20 h(-1)) and temperatures (110-140 degrees C) at 10 bar of oxygen were tested. The experiments were conducted to provide the intrinsic performance of the catalysts. Complete aniline conversion, 90% TOC conversion, and 80% nitrogen mineralization were achieved at 140 degrees C and 5 h(-1). Blank experiments yielded relatively low homogeneous aniline (<35%) and negligible TOC conversions. Fast deactivation of the catalysts was experienced due to leaching caused by complexation with aniline. Acidification of the solution with HCI (molar HCI to aniline ratio of 1.2) was necessary to avoid colloidization and leaching of the nanoparticulate catalyst components. The catalyst displayed stable performance for over 200 h on stream.

  6. Statistical analysis of oxidation rates for K Basin fuel in dry air

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, D.J.

    1998-02-06

    Test data from oxidation of K Basin fuel (SNF) samples in dry air were reviewed, and linear reaction rates were derived on a time-average basis. The derived rates were compared to literature data for unirradiated uranium in dry air using rate law of the form log(rate) = a + b (I/T). The analyses found differences between the SNF data and the literature data. Oxidation rate below 150 C was higher for K Basin fuel than for unirradiated uranium.

  7. Effect of Process Variables During the Head-End Treatment of Spent Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    K.J. Bateman; C.D. Morgan; J.F. Berg; D.J. Brough; P.J. Crane; D.G. Cummings; J.J. Giglio; M.W. Huntley; M.J. Rodriquez; J.D. Sommers; R.P. Lind; D.A. Sell

    2006-08-01

    The development of a head-end processing step for spent oxide fuel that applies to both aqueous and pyrometallurgical technologies is being performed by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute through a joint International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. The processing step employs high temperatures and oxidative gases to promote the oxidation of UO2 to U3O8. Potential benefits of the head-end step include the removal or reduction of fission products as well as separation of the fuel from cladding. The effects of temperature, pressure, oxidative gas, and cladding have been studied with irradiated spent oxide fuel to determine the optimum conditions for process control. Experiments with temperatures ranging from 500oC to 1250oC have been performed on spent fuel using either air or oxygen gas for the oxidative reaction. Various flowrates and applications have been tested with the oxidative gases to discern the effects on the process. Tests have also been performed under vacuum conditions, following the oxidation cycle, at high temperatures to improve the removal of fission products. The effects of cladding on fission product removal have also been investigated with released fuel under vacuum and high temperature conditions. Results from these experiments will be presented as well as operating conditions based on particle size and decladding characteristics.

  8. Kinetics of Passive Oxidation of Hi-Nicalon-S SiC Fibers in Wet Air: Relationships between Si02 Scale Thickness, Crystallization, and Fiber Strength (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Temperature Oxidation of Multilayered SiC Processed by Tape Casting and Sintering . J. Eur. Ceram . Soc. 2002;22:2017-79. 6 Approved for public release...earths, that increase oxidation rates, reduce scale viscosity, and lower temperatures for scale crystallization.2-3 Moisture has similar effects .4-9... temperature (24°C). Water saturation at this temperature yields a water/air molar ratio of 0.03. Fibers were oxidized in an alumina muffle tube

  9. Creep performance of oxide ceramic fiber materials at elevated temperature in air and in steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armani, Clinton J.

    comparisons with experimental results. Additionally, the utility of the Monkman-Grant relationship to predicting creep-rupture life of the fiber tows at elevated temperature in air and in steam was demonstrated. Furthermore, the effects of steam on the compressive creep performance of bulk ceramic materials were also studied. Performance of fine grained, polycrystalline alumina (Al2O3) was investigated at 1100 and 1300°C in air and in steam. To evaluate the effect of silica doping during material processing both undoped and silica doped polycrystalline alumina specimens were tested. Finally, compressive creep performance of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG, Y3Al5O12) was evaluated at 1300°C in air and in steam. Both undoped and silica doped YAG specimens were included in the study. YAG is being considered as the next-generation oxide fiber material. However, before considerable funding and effort are invested in a fiber development program, it is necessary to evaluate the creep performance of YAG at elevated temperature in steam. Results of this research demonstrated that both the undoped YAG and the silica doped YAG exhibited exceptional creep resistance at 1300°C in steam for grain sizes ˜1 microm. These results supplement the other promising features of YAG that make it a strong candidate material for the next generation ceramic fiber.

  10. Physico-chemical Modification of the Fibrous Filter Nozzles for Purification Processes of Water and Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordunov, S. V.; Galtseva, O. V.; Natalinova, N. M.; Rogachev, A. A.; Zhang, Ruizhi

    2017-01-01

    A set of experiments to study physical and chemical modification of the surface of fibers is conducted to expand the area of their application for purification of water, gas and air (including that in conditions of space). The possibility of modification of filter nozzles in the process of fiber formation by particles of coal of BAU type, copper sulfide and silver chloride is experimentally shown. The fraction of the copper sulfide powder less than 50 microns in size was crushed in a spherical mill; it was deposited on fiber at air temperature of 50° C and powder consumption of 0.5 g/l of air. The resulting material contained 6–18 CuS particles per 1 cm of the fiber length. An effective bactericidal fibrous material can be produced using rather cheap material – CuS and relatively cheap natural compounds of sulphides and oxides of heavy metals.

  11. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Second External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This second external review draft of the Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants, Volumes I-III (Ozone Criteria Document) is being released for public comment and for review by EPA's Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) r...

  12. Experimental Air Pressure Tank Systems for Process Control Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Christopher E.; Holland, Charles E.; Gatzke, Edward P.

    2006-01-01

    In process control education, particularly in the field of chemical engineering, there is an inherent need for industrially relevant hands-on apparatuses that enable one to bridge the gap between the theoretical content of coursework and real-world applications. At the University of South Carolina, two experimental air-pressure tank systems have…

  13. Effect of fuel-air-ratio nonuniformity on emissions of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1981-01-01

    The inlet fuel-air ratio nonuniformity is studied to deterine how nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions are affected. An increase in NOx emissions with increased fuel-air ratio nonuniformity for average equivalence ratios less than 0.7 and a decrease in NOx emissions for average equivalence ratios near stoichiometric is predicted. The degree of uniformityy of fuel-air ratio profiles that is necessary to achieve NOx emissions goals for actual engines that use lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion systems is determined.

  14. Combustion Technology for Incinerating Wastes from Air Force Industrial Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    Conservation and Recovery Act and are properly disposed at cost to the Air Force. Onsite incineration with heat recovery is being considered as a...the heat released during thermal processing could reduce the costs of waste incineration. 0 * Normally, relatively small amounts of individual wastes...wastes. Task 3: Combustion Analysis. Determine and quantify the essential combustion parameters of industrial process wastes with respect to heat

  15. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Barringer, E.A.; Fegley, M.B. Jr.; Bowen, H.K.

    1985-09-24

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 microns can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed. 6 figs.

  16. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Barringer, Eric A.; Fegley, Jr., M. Bruce; Bowen, H. Kent

    1985-01-01

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 micron can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed.

  17. Heterogeneous photochemical reactions of a propylene-nitrogen dioxide-metal oxide-dry air system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Ibusuki, Takashi

    Photochemical reactions of a C 3H 6-NO 2-air system in the presence of metal oxide were investigated. The metal oxides showing strong photooxidation activity were found to be n-type semiconductor oxides with the energy band gap around 3 eV. Formation of cyano-compounds (HCN and CH 3CN) was also observed and the activity can be explained in terms of the adsorptivity of NO onto metal oxides. Coalfired fly ash as a model of mixed metal oxides was also examined and their photocatalytic action was discussed.

  18. Nitrogen oxide removal dynamic process through 15 Ns DBD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Lianshui; Lai, Weidong; Liu, Fengliang

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen oxides exhaust gas assumes the important responsibility on air pollution by forming acid rain. This paper discusses the NO removal mechanism in 15 ns pulse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma through experimental and simulating method. Emission spectra collected from plasma are evaluated as sourced from N+ and O(3P). The corresponding zero-dimensional model is established and verified through comparing the simulated concentration evolution and the experimental time-resolved spectra of N+. The electron impact ionization plays major role on NO removal and the produced NO+ are further decomposed into N+ and O(3P) through electron impact dissociative excitation rather than the usual reported dissociative recombination process. Simulation also indicates that the removal process can be accelerated by NO inputted at lower initial concentration or electrons streamed at higher concentration, due to the heightened electron impact probability on NO molecules. The repetitive pulse discharge is a benefit for improving the NO removal efficiency by effectively utilizing the radicals generated from the previous pulse under the condition that the pulse period should be shorter enough to ignore the spatial diffusion of radicals. Finally, slight attenuation on NO removal has been experimentally and simulatively observed after N2 mixed, due to the competitive consumption of electrons.

  19. Air-Driven Potassium Iodide-Mediated Oxidative Photocyclization of Stilbene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Watanabe, Soichiro

    2016-09-02

    A new method has been developed for the potassium iodide-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives. Compared with conventional iodine-mediated oxidative photocyclization reactions, this new method requires shorter reaction times and affords cyclized products in yields of 45-97%. This reaction proceeds with a catalytic amount of potassium iodide and works in an air-driven manner without the addition of an external scavenger. The radical-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives using TEMPO was also investigated.

  20. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  1. Process to manufacture effervescent tablets: air forced oven melt granulation.

    PubMed

    Yanze, F M; Duru, C; Jacob, M

    2000-12-01

    In the present study we apply melt granulation in an air forced oven, called "are forced oven melt granulation" to the single-stage manufacture of effervescent granules consisting of anhydrous citric acid (43.2%) and sodium bicarbonate (56.8%) in order to make tablets. This study established that process parameters such as concentration of PEG 6000, residence time in the air forced oven, fineness of PEG 6000, fineness of the initial effervescent mix and efficiency of two lubricants markedly influenced several granule and tablet characteristics. The granules ready to be compressed into tablets were stable for 7 days at 60% RH/18 degrees C. It is a dry, simple, rapid, effective, economical, reproducible process particularly well suited to the manufacture of effervescent granules which are easily compressed into effervescent tablets. Of all the formulations tested, only formulations B2 and E2 melt granulated for 30 minutes gave tablets which had optimum compression characteristics without processing problems during compression.

  2. Materials, design and processing of air encapsulated MEMS packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Nathan T.

    This work uses a three-dimensional air cavity technology to improve the fabrication, and functionality of microelectronics devices, performance of on-board transmission lines, and packaging of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). The air cavity process makes use of the decomposition of a patterned sacrificial polymer followed by the diffusion of its by-products through a curing polymer overcoat to obtain the embedded air structure. Applications and research of air cavities have focused on simple designs that concentrate on the size and functionality of the particular device. However, a lack of guidelines for fabrication, materials used, and structural design has led to mechanical stability issues and processing refinements. This work investigates improved air gap cavities for use in MEMS packaging processes, resulting in fewer fabrication flaws and lower cost. The identification of new materials, such as novel photo-definable organic/inorganic hybrid polymers, was studied for increased strength and rigidity due to their glass-like structure. A novel epoxy polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) material was investigated and characterized for use as a photodefineable, permanent dielectrics with improved mechanical properties. The POSS material improved the air gap fabrication because it served as a high-selectivity etch mask for patterning sacrificial materials as well as a cavity overcoat material with improved rigidity. An investigation of overcoat thickness and decomposition kinetics provided a fundamental understanding of the properties that impart mechanical stability to cavities of different shape and volume. Metallization of the cavities was investigated so as to provide hermetic sealing and improved cavity strength. The improved air cavity, wafer-level packages were tested using resonator-type devices and chip-level lead frame packaging. The air cavity package was molded under traditional lead frame molding pressures and tested for mechanical

  3. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION CREATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  4. 77 FR 63827 - Request for Nominations of Experts for the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... of Nitrogen Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Review Panel AGENCY: Environmental... the chartered CASAC on primary (human health-based) air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (NO X... six ``criteria'' air pollutants, including oxides of nitrogen. As a Federal Advisory Committee,...

  5. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  6. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  7. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  8. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  9. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  10. 76 FR 48073 - Public Hearing for Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Announcement... titled ``Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur'' which was... ``Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur'' proposed rule should...

  11. Surface etching and roughening in integrated processing of thermal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offenberg, M.; Liehr, M.; Rubloff, G. W.

    1991-04-01

    A multichamber UHV processing and analysis system has been used to study integrated thermal oxide processing, in which the final precleaning process and the thermal oxidation process are integrated by employing transfer of the wafers through ultraclean, inert ambients (purified, dry N2 and then ultrahigh vacuum). The Al-gate MOS capacitors show high breakdown fields (approximately 12 MV/cm) when a thin oxide passivation layer is present prior to oxidation, but low fields (less than 6 MV/cm) when the Si surface is initially oxygen free. This contrasting behavior is caused by the etching of Si surfaces which occurs at elevated temperature in the presence of trace concentration (approximately 100 ppb) of oxygen (e.g., 2 Si + O2 yields 2SiO2), leading to surface roughening and then field enhancement at asperities in the structure. Oxide surface passivation prevents etching and assures the dielectric integrity of the structure.

  12. Homogeneous catalytic wet-air oxidation for the treatment of textile wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, L. Chen, G.; Hu, X.; Yue, P.L.

    2000-04-01

    An extensive series of experiments was performed to identify suitable catalysts to increase the reaction rate of wet-air oxidation of textile wastewater t relatively mild temperatures an pressures. Wastewater types treated included natural-fiber desizing wastewater, synthetic-fiber desizing wastewater, and printing and dyeing wastewater. Experimental results indicated that all catalysts tested in this investigation significantly increased the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) removal rates and total COD and TOC removals. Of all catalysts tested, copper salts were the most effective. Anions in the slat solutions played a role in the catalytic process. Nitrate ions were more effective than sulfate ions. Similarly, copper nitrates were more effective than copper sulfates. A mixture of salts containing different metals performed better than any single salt.

  13. Integrated processes for produced water polishing: Enhanced flotation/sedimentation combined with advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Silvia; Micó, María M; Arnaldos, Marina; Ferrero, Enrique; Malfeito, Jorge J; Medina, Francisco; Contreras, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    In this study, bench scale dissolved air flotation (DAF) and settling processes have been studied and compared to a novel flotation technology based on the use of glass microspheres of limited buoyancy and its combination with conventional DAF, (Enhanced DAF or E-DAF). They were evaluated as pretreatments for advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to polish produced water (PW) for reuse purposes. Settling and E-DAF without air injection showed adequate turbidity and oil and grease (O&G) removals, with eliminations higher than 87% and 90% respectively, employing 70 mg L(-1) of FeCl3 and 83 min of settling time, and 57.9 mg L(-1) of FeCl3, 300 mg L(-1) of microspheres and a flocculation rate of 40 rpm in the E-DAF process. A linear correlation was observed between final O&G concentration and turbidity after E-DAF. In order to polish the O&G content of the effluent even further, to remove soluble compounds as phenol and to take advantage of residual iron after these treatments, Fenton and photo-Fenton reactions were essayed. After 6 h of the Fenton reaction at pH 3, the addition of 1660 mg L(-1) of H2O2 and 133 mg L(-1) of iron showed a maximum O&G elimination of 57.6% and a phenol removal up to 80%. Photo-Fenton process showed better results after 3 h, adding 600 mg L(-1) of H2O2 and 300 mg L(-1) of iron, at pH 3, with a higher fraction of elimination of the O&G content (73.7%) and phenol (95%) compared to the conventional Fenton process.

  14. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Ward, J.W.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Major Phytochemicals in Orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis), Oxidized under Compressed Air Environment.

    PubMed

    Panda, Brajesh Kumar; Datta, Ashis Kumar

    2016-04-01

    This study describes major changes in phytochemical composition of orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis var. Assamica) oxidized under compressed air (CA). The experiments for oxidation were conducted under air pressure (101, 202, and 303 kPa) for 150 min. Relative change in the concentrations of caffeine, catechins, theaflavins (TF), and thearubigins (TR) were analyzed. Effect of CA pressure was found to be nonsignificant in regulating caffeine concentration during oxidation. But degradation in different catechins as well as formation of different TF was significantly affected by CA pressure. At high CA pressure, TF showed highest peak value. TR was found to have slower rate of formation during initial phase of oxidation than TF. Even though the rate of TR formation was significantly influenced by CA, a portion of catechins remained unoxidized at end of oxidation. Except caffeine, the percent change in rate of formation or degradation were more prominent at 202 kPa.

  16. Conversion of Sulfur by Wet Oxidation in the Bayer Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhanwei; Li, Wangxing; Ma, Wenhui; Yin, Zhonglin; Wu, Guobao

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, oxidation time, and oxygen concentration on the conversion of sulfur by wet oxidation in the Bayer process were investigated at length. The results show that active sulfur S2- and S2O3 2- in sodium aluminate solution can be converted completely by wet oxidation during the digestion process, thus the effects of S2- and S2O3 2- on alumina product quality are eliminated; increased temperature, oxidation time, and oxygen concentration are conducive to conversion of S2- and S2O3 2-. At the same time, part of the organic carbon in the sodium aluminate solution is also oxidized by wet oxidation, and the color of the sodium aluminate solution noticeably fades.

  17. Oxidation Behaviors of Inconel 740H in Air and Dynamic Steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jintao; Yang, Zhen; Xu, Songqian; Zhao, Haiping; Gu, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Inconel 740H alloy is a candidate material for 700°C advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal-fired power plants application as superheater/reheater tube. In this work, oxidation behavior of Inconel 740H alloy was studied in static air at 750°C and 850°C, and in dynamic pure steam at 750°C, respectively. The alloy was oxidized approximately following a parabolic law in three test environment. In the static air, the oxidation rate at 850°C was about 50 times of that at the 750°C. More NiCrMn spinal and TiO2 were detected after oxidation at 850°C. Cr2O3, however, was the main oxidation product at 750°C. In the pure steam, Cr2O3 was still the main oxidation product. The oxidation rate was about 2.6 times of that in static air, but the surface roughness was much smaller and edges of oxide particles were more blurred. There was no evidence of cracks or spallation in three test environments.

  18. Elemental Metals or Oxides Distributed on a Carbon Substrate or Self-Supported and the Manufacturing Process Using Graphite Oxide as Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen. This intermediary product can be further processed by direct exposure to carbonate-solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon, metal carbonate, and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide; b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  19. Elemental Metals or Oxides Distributed on a Carbon Substrate or Self-Supported and the Manufacturing Process Using Graphite Oxide as Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Chen (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a percursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen. This intermediary product can be further processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon, metal carbonate, and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide; b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  20. Oxidation of artificial sweetener sucralose by advanced oxidation processes: a review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; Oturan, Mehmet; Kim, Hyunook

    2014-01-01

    Sucralose, a chlorinated carbohydrate, has shown its increased use as an artificial sweetener and persistently exists in wastewater treatment plant effluents and aquatic environment. This paper aims to review possible degradation of sucralose and related carbohydrates by biological, electrochemical, chemical, and advanced oxidation processes. Biodegradation of sucralose in waterworks did not occur significantly. Electrochemical oxidation of carbohydrates may be applied to seek degradation of sucralose. The kinetics of the oxidation of sucralose and the related carbohydrates by different oxidative species is compared. Free chlorine, ozone, and ferrate did not show any potential to degrade sucralose in water. Advanced oxidation processes, generating highly strong oxidizing agent hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH), have demonstrated effectiveness in transforming sucralose in water. The mechanism of oxidation of sucralose by (•)OH is briefly discussed.

  1. The role of oxidation in the fretting wear process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Fretting experiments were conducted on titanium, a series of Ni-Cr-Al alloys and on some high temperature turbine alloys at room temperature and at elevated temperatures in air and in various inert environments. It was found that, depending on temperature and environment, the fretting behavior of the materials examined could be classified according to four general types of behavior. Briefly, these types of behavior were: (1) the complete absence of oxidation, as in inert environments, generally leading to low rates of fretting wear but high fretting friction; (2) gradual attrition of surface oxide with each fretting stroke, found in these experiments to operate in concert with other dominating mechanisms; (3) rapid oxidation at surface fatigue damage sites, resulting in undermining and rapid disintegration of the load bearing surface; and (4) the formation of coherent, protective oxide film, resulting in low rates of fretting wear. An analytical model predicting conditions favorable to the fourth type of behavior was outlined.

  2. Word Processing: The Air Force Administrators’ Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    LEYEL > WORD PROCESSING ERRORCOP Qis 4 pL THE? ~ AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATOR$.! ’--s..HANDBOOK 400 Zi LUPRED F~ Fiir [rLT The views and opinions...INSTRUCTIONSBEFORE COMPLETING FORM I. REPORT NUMBER .O.Vk Er.;. NO. R CIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. ’TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED WORD ...Accession No. ADB 040882 L 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse aide it necessary and identify by block number) Administration / / Administrative Systems

  3. Fabrication and characterization of oxide-based thin film transistors, and process development for oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wantae

    2009-12-01

    This dissertation is focused on the development of thin film transistors (TFTs) using oxide materials composed of post-transitional cations with (n-1)d 10ns0 (n≥4). The goal is to achieve high performance oxide-based TFTs fabricated at low processing temperature on either glass or flexible substrates for next generation display applications. In addition, etching mechanism and Ohmic contact formation for oxide heterostructure (ZnO/CuCrO 2) system is demonstrated. The deposition and characterization of oxide semiconductors (In 2O3-ZnO, and InGaZnO4) using a RF-magnetron sputtering system are studied. The main influence on the resistivity of the films is found to be the oxygen partial pressure in the sputtering ambient. The films remained amorphous and transparent (> 70%) at all process conditions. These films showed good transmittance at suitable conductivity for transistor fabrication. The electrical characteristics of both top- and bottom-gate type Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) and Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide (InGaZnO4)-based TFTs are reported. The InZnO films were favorable for depletion-mode TFTs due to their tendency to form oxygen vacancies, while enhancement-mode devices were realized with InGaZnO4 films. The InGaZnO4-based TFTs fabricated on either glass or plastic substrates at low temperature (<100°C) exhibit good electrical properties: the saturation mobility of 5--12 cm2.V-1.s-1 and threshold voltage of 0.5--2.5V. The devices are also examined as a function of aging time in order to verify long-term stability in air. The effect of gate dielectric materials on electrical properties of InGaZnO 4-based TFTs was investigated. The use of SiNx film as a gate dielectric reduces the trap density and the roughness at the channel/gate dielectric interface compared to SiO2 gate dielectric, resulting in an improvement of device parameters by reducing scattering of trapped charges at the interface. The quality of interface is shown to have large effect on TFT performance

  4. Investigation of oxidation process of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, E. N.; Nikolaev, E. V.; Vlasov, V. A.; Zhuravkov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders was studied using X- ray powder diffraction and thermogravimetric analyzes. The powders with average particles size of 100 nm were made by the electric explosion of wire, and were subjected to mechanical activation in planetary ball mill for 15 and 40 minutes. It was shown that a certain amount of FeO phase is formed during mechanical activation of ultrafine iron powders. According to thermogravimetric analysis, the oxidation process of non-milled ultrafine iron powders is a complex process and occurs in three stages. The preliminary mechanical activation of powders considerably changes the nature of the iron powders oxidation, leads to increasing in the temperature of oxidation onset and shifts the reaction to higher temperatures. For the milled powders, the oxidation is more simple process and occurs in a single step.

  5. Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yingyu; Ye, Liu; Pan, Yuting; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from wastewater treatment plants vary substantially between plants, ranging from negligible to substantial (a few per cent of the total nitrogen load), probably because of different designs and operational conditions. In general, plants that achieve high levels of nitrogen removal emit less N2O, indicating that no compromise is required between high water quality and lower N2O emissions. N2O emissions primarily occur in aerated zones/compartments/periods owing to active stripping, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, rather than heterotrophic denitrifiers, are the main contributors. However, the detailed mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, despite strong evidence suggesting that both nitrifier denitrification and the chemical breakdown of intermediates of hydroxylamine oxidation are probably involved. With increased understanding of the fundamental reactions responsible for N2O production in wastewater treatment systems and the conditions that stimulate their occurrence, reduction of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment systems through improved plant design and operation will be achieved in the near future. PMID:22451112

  6. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy Observation of Air-Processed GdBa2Cu3O7-δ Superconductors Doped with Metal Oxide Nanoparticles (Metal = Zr, Zn, and Sn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Caixuan; Hu, Anming; Ichihara, Masaki; Izumi, Mitsuru; Xu, Yan; Sakai, Naomichi; Hirabayashi, Izumi

    2009-02-01

    Single-domain, c-axis-oriented 30-mm-diameter GdBa2Cu3O7-δ (Gd123) melt-textured bulk superconductors have been successfully grown by the top-seeded melt growth method from precursors of Gd123, Gd2BaCuO5, and Ag2O in air with doping of nanosized ZrO2, ZnO, or SnO2. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) unveils a large amount of BaZrO3 or BaSnO3 particles with an average diameter of approximately 50 nm respectively embedded in ZrO2 or SnO2 doped samples, while no Zn-rich nanoparticles are observed in the ZnO-doped samples. The critical temperature Tc is almost unchanged up to a doping amount of 10 mol % for ZrO2- or SnO2-doped Gd123 melt-textured bulks, while ZnO-doped Gd123 becomes non-superconductive at this doping level. By atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanostripes with a wavelength of 15 nm are observed in the ZnO-doped Gd123 sample. Nanoscale particles in the grown Gd123 single domain, together with the micro-defects induced by nanoparticle doping, can account for the enhanced superconducting properties.

  7. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  8. In situ aeration: Air sparging, bioventing, and related remediation process

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchee, R.E.; Miller, R.N.; Johnson, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    This volume is part of a ten volume set of papers derived from the Third International In Situ and On-Site Bioreclamation Symposium which was held in San Diego, California, in April 1995. The purpose of the conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on bioremediation. This volume focuses on the use of air sparging, bioventing, and other aeration processes to remediate hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  9. A study of mercuric oxide and zinc-air battery life in hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, C; Lacey, N K

    1997-09-01

    The requirement to phase out mercuric oxide (mercury) batteries on environmental grounds has led to the widespread introduction of zinc-air technology. The possibility arises that high drain hearing aids may not be adequately catered for by zinc-air cells, leading to poor performance. This study investigated the hearing aid user's ability to perceive differences between zinc-air and mercury cells in normal everyday usage. The data was collected for 100 experienced hearing aid users in field trials. Users report 50 per cent greater life for zinc-air cells in high power aids and 28 per cent in low power aids. The average life of the zinc-air cells range from 15 days in high power to 34 days in low power aids. Users are able to perceive a difference in sound quality in favour of zinc-air cells for low and medium power aids. The hearing aid population is not disadvantaged by phasing out mercury cells.

  10. Supporting the Future Air Traffic Control Projection Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, Hayley J.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    In air traffic control, projecting what the air traffic situation will be over the next 30 seconds to 30 minutes is a key process in identifying conflicts that may arise so that evasive action can be taken upon discovery of these conflicts. A series of field visits in the Boston and New York terminal radar approach control (TRACON) facilities and in the oceanic air traffic control facilities in New York and Reykjavik, Iceland were conducted to investigate the projection process in two different ATC domains. The results from the site visits suggest that two types of projection are currently used in ATC tasks, depending on the type of separation minima and/or traffic restriction and information display used by the controller. As technologies improve and procedures change, care should be taken by designers to support projection through displays, automation, and procedures. It is critical to prevent time/space mismatches between interfaces and restrictions. Existing structure in traffic dynamics could be utilized to provide controllers with useful behavioral models on which to build projections. Subtle structure that the controllers are unable to internalize could be incorporated into an ATC projection aid.

  11. Porosity control in nanoporous carbide-derived carbon by oxidation in air and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Osswald, S.; Portet, C.; Gogotsi, Y.; Laudisio, G.; Singer, J.P.; Fischer, J.E.; Sokolov, V.V.; Kukushkina, J.A.; Kravchik, A.E.

    2009-07-15

    Carbide-derived carbons (CDC) allow a precise control over the pore size through the selection of the carbide precursor and varying of the synthesis conditions. However, their pore volume is limited by the carbide stoichiometry. While activation of carbons derived from various organic precursors has been widely studied, this process may similarly be able to increase the pore volume and specific surface area of CDC. Oxidation of carbide-derived carbon in air and CO{sub 2} at different temperatures and times allows for significant increase in pore volume and specific surface area as well as control over average pore size with subnanometer accuracy. The effect of activation and associated changes in the pore volume and surface area on the hydrogen uptake are also discussed. - Graphical abstract: Carbide-derived carbons (CDC) provide great potential for sorption of toxicants and gas storage applications. Activation of CDC in air and CO{sub 2} at different temperatures and times is applied in order to maximize pore volume and specific surface area, and control the average pore size with subnanometer accuracy.

  12. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  13. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  14. Process study and exergy analysis of a novel air separation process cooled by LNG cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wendong; Duan, Jiao; Mao, Wenjun

    2014-02-01

    In order to resolve the problems of the current air separation process such as the complex process, cumbersome operation and high operating costs, a novel air separation process cooled by LNG cold energy is proposed in this paper, which is based on high-efficiency heat exchanger network and chemical packing separation technology. The operating temperature range of LNG cold energy is widened from 133K-203K to 113K-283K by high-efficiency heat exchanger network and air separation pressure is declined from 0.5MPa to about 0.35MPa due to packing separation technology, thereby greatly improve the energy efficiency. Both the traditional and novel air separation processes are simulated with air handling capacity of 20t·h-1. Comparing with the traditional process, the LNG consumption is reduced by 44.2%, power consumption decrease is 211.5 kWh per hour, which means the annual benefit will be up to 1.218 million CNY. And the exergy efficiency is also improved by 42.5%.

  15. Changes in young's modulus and electrical conductivity of nuclear grade graphites oxidized with air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Hisashi; Fujii, Kimio; Kurosawa, Takeshi; Nomura, Shinzo

    1983-10-01

    Five kinds of nuclear grade graphites were oxidized to study thermal oxidation effects on Young's modulus and electrical conductivity. The property changes were measured on specimens which were oxidized uniformly throughout their whole volume in the temperature range 500-600°C in air. The following relations were derived as a function of the bulk density of the graphites: E/ E0 = ( ρ/ ρ0) nE and R0/ R = ( ρ/ ρ0) nR, where E, R and ρ are Young's modulus, specific electrical resistivity and bulk density, respectively, and subscript zero refers to the initial unoxidized condition. The exponents nE and nR were found to be dependent on both the kind of graphite and the oxidation temperature, and the dependences were discussed in connection with selective oxidation in the graphite texture. It was also tried to relate the property changes with oxidation rate.

  16. Effect of Gadolinium Doping on the Air Oxidation of Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, Randall D.; Hanson, Brady D.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2004-12-04

    Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigated the effects of gadolinia concentration on the air oxidization of gadolinia-doped uranium dioxide using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry to determine if such doping could improve uranium dioxide's stability as a nuclear fuel during potential accident scenarios in a nuclear reactor or during long-term disposal. We undertook this study to determine whether the resistance of the uranium dioxide to oxidation to the orthorhombic U3O8 with its attendant crystal expansion could be prevented by addition of gadolinia. Our studies found that gadolinium has little effect on the thermal initiation of the first step of the reported two-step air oxidation of UO2; however, increasing gadolinia content does stabilize the initial tetragonal or cubic product allowing significant oxidation before the second expansive step to U3O8 begins.

  17. A green process to prepare chromic oxide green pigment.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Xu, Hong-Bin; Zheng, Shi-Li; Zhang, Yi; Li, Zuo-Hu; Bai, Yu-Lan

    2008-10-01

    A hydrogen reduction and activated sintering process was proposed to prepare chromic oxide green pigment. Through ICP, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV, and CIE-L*a*b* colorimetric analysis, key factors and mechanism that influenced preparation of chromic oxide green pigment were studied. The results revealed that lower hydrogen reduction temperature, suitable addition of Al and Ba, were beneficial to obtaining the high quality chromic oxide green pigment. Typically, when the hydrogen reduction temperature was kept at 450-500 degrees C, physicochemical properties and color performance of the prepared chromic oxide green pigment doped with about 0.1-0.2 wt % Al and 0.2-0.5 wt % Ba conformed to commercial pigment standards. Additionally, characteristics of the green process were discussed. About 90 wt % KOH was reused directly and about 90 wt % Cr(VI) was conversed to Cr(III) directly from potassium chromate to chromic oxide green pigment. Integrating the proprietary green metallurgical process from chromite ore to potassium chromate of this laboratory, more than 99 wt % Cr(VI) could be conversed to Cr(III) compounds and about 99 wt % KOH could be recycled to use. The whole green process, ranging from chromite ore to chromic oxide green pigment, eventually not only provided the possibility for producing the high quality chromic oxide green pigment, but could reach comprehensive utilization of resources, inner recycle of KOH, and zero emission of Cr(VI).

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Matthew Ellis [Morgantown, WV; Bayless, David J [Athens, OH; Trembly, Jason P [Durham, NC

    2011-11-15

    Conveying gas containing sulfur through a sulfur tolerant planar solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC) stack for sulfur scrubbing, followed by conveying the gas through a non-sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack. The sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack utilizes anode materials, such as LSV, that selectively convert H.sub.2S present in the fuel stream to other non-poisoning sulfur compounds. The remaining balance of gases remaining in the completely or near H.sub.2S-free exhaust fuel stream is then used as the fuel for the conventional PSOFC stack that is downstream of the sulfur-tolerant PSOFC. A broad range of fuels such as gasified coal, natural gas and reformed hydrocarbons are used to produce electricity.

  19. The role of oxidative processes in emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Janoff, A.; Carp, H.; Laurent, P.; Raju, L.

    1983-02-01

    Elastase/elastase inhibitor imbalance in the lung has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In light of this, it may be significant that the activity of two major elastase inhibitors, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1Pi) and bronchial mucous proteinase inhibitor, can be decreased by oxidizing agents. The effect can be observed with ozone, substances present in cigarette smoke, and oxygen metabolites generated by lung macrophages as well as peroxidative systems released by other phagocytic cells. Thus alpha 1Pi recovered from lung washings of cigarette smokers has only half the predicted normal activity per mg inhibitor and contains 4 moles of methionine sulfoxide (oxidized methionine) per mole of inactive inhibitor. By contrast, alpha 1Pi purified from nonsmokers' lung washings is fully active and contains only native methionine. At the same time, lung washes from some smokers show significantly greater hydrolytic activity against a specific synthetic elastase substrate than do lung washes of nonsmokers. These findings suggest that some smokers may develop an acquired imbalance between elastase and elastase inhibitor in their lungs, favoring activity of the enzyme. In addition to the potential effect of cigarette smoking on lung elastase/elastase inhibitor balance, smoking also may interfere with elastin repair mechanisms. Specifically, acidic water-soluble gas phase components of cigarette smoke prevent synthesis of desmosine cross-links during elastinogenesis in vitro. This report will attempt to correlate the foregoing information on biochemical changes in the lung induced by cigarette smoking with the development of emphysema in the smoker.

  20. Air quality criteria for ozone and other photochemical oxidants. External Review Draft No. 2. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Horstman, D.H.; Horvath, S.M.; Raub, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    Scientific information is presented and evaluated relative to the health and welfare effects associated with exposure to ozone and other photochemical oxidants. Although not intended as a complete and detailed literature review, the document covers pertinent literature through early 1985. Data on health and welfare effects are emphasized, but additional information is provided for understanding the nature of the oxidant pollution problem and for evaluating the reliability of effects data as well as their relevance to potential exposures to ozone and other oxidants at concentrations occurring in ambient air. Information is presented on the following exposure-related topics: nature, source, measurement, and concentrations of precursors to ozone and other photochemical oxidants; formation of ozone and other photochemical oxidants and their transport once formed; properties, chemistry, and measurement of ozone and other photochemical oxidants; and concentrations of ozone and other photochemical oxidants typically found in ambient air. Chapters on health and welfare effects address the toxicological effects of ozone and other oxidants; effects observed in controlled human exposures; effects observed in field and epidemiological studies; effects on vegetation seen in field and controlled exposures; effects on natural and agroecosystems; and effects on nonbiological materials observed in field and chamber studies.

  1. Induction of CCR2-Dependent Macrophage Accumulation by Oxidized Phospholipids in the Air-Pouch Model of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kadl, Alexandra; Galkina, Elena; Leitinger, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Objective Macrophages are key players in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid synovitis as well as in atherosclerosis. To determine whether atherogenic oxidized phospholipids potentially contribute to synovial inflammation and subsequent monocyte/macrophage recruitment, we examined the effects of oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-3-glycero-phosphorylcholine (OxPAPC) on chemokine expression and leukocyte recruitment in a facsimile synovium in vivo using the murine air-pouch model. Methods Air pouches were raised by 2 injections of sterile air, and inflammation was induced by injecting either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or OxPAPC into the pouch lumen. Inflammation was assessed by analysis of inflammatory gene expression using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction or immunohistochemical analysis, and leukocytes were quantified in the lavage fluid and in the pouch wall after staining with Giemsa or after enzymatic digestion followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. Results Application of OxPAPC resulted in selective recruitment of monocyte/macrophages into the air-pouch wall, but not in the lumen. In contrast, LPS induced both monocyte and neutrophil accumulation in the pouch lumen as well as in the wall. LPS, but not OxPAPC, induced the expression of adhesion molecules E-selectin, P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. OxPAPC increased the expression of the CCR2 ligands monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), MCP-3, and MCP-5, as well as RANTES and growth-related oncogene α (GROα), while it down-regulated the expression of CCR2 on macrophages. Moreover, oxidized phospholipid–induced macrophage accumulation was abrogated in CCR2−/− mice. Conclusion These data demonstrate that oxidized phospholipids trigger a type of inflammatory response that leads to selective macrophage accumulation in vivo, a process relevant for the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:19404946

  2. Nano-textured copper oxide nanofibers for efficient air cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Seongpil; Jo, Hong Seok; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; Yarin, Alexander L.; Yoon, Sam S.

    2016-02-01

    Ever decreasing of microelectronics devices is challenged by overheating and demands an increase in heat removal rate. Herein, we fabricated highly efficient heat-removal coatings comprised of copper oxide-plated polymer nanofiber layers (thorny devil nanofibers) with high surface-to-volume ratio, which facilitate heat removal from the underlying hot surfaces. The electroplating time and voltage were optimized to form fiber layers with maximal heat removal rate. The copper oxide nanofibers with the thorny devil morphology yielded a superior cooling rate compared to the pure copper nanofibers with the smooth surface morphology. This superior cooling performance is attributed to the enhanced surface area of the thorny devil nanofibers. These nanofibers were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and a thermographic camera.

  3. Processing, compatibility and oxidation of diboride-reinforced oxide matrix composites for ultrahigh-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.

    1990-01-01

    Promising results for the development of a ceramic/ceramic composite to be used for structural applications in the ultra high temperature range (1650 to 1850 C) were obtained for alumina reinforced with titanium or zirconium diboride coated with molybdenum disilicide. Calculations of the compatibility and stability of oxide matrices with the diborides in vacuum showed positive energies of formation, indicating suitability of reinforcement of alumina under vacuum conditions. Stability and chemical compatibility of the particulate and ternary composites in their as hot pressed states and following their vacuum and air oxidation treatment were characterized.

  4. Effects of ambient oxidant air pollution in the San Joaquin Valley on Thompson seedless grapes

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, R.F.; Ashcroft, R.

    1984-01-01

    Mature Thompson seedless grape vines were enclosed in specially constructed plastic covered chambers supplied with carbon filtered and non-filtered (ambient) air from time of bud break through leaf drop. Effects on vegetative growth and fruiting were determined for three seasons. No effects on fruit production were measured the first season after covering but vegetative growth increased 12% in chambers supplied with filtered air. By the third season fruit yields were 27.5% higher in the filtered as compared with ambient chambers. The only visible symptoms associated with exposure to the oxidants was accelerated senescence which appeared 3 weeks to 1 month earlier on vines receiving ambient or nonfiltered air.

  5. Ozone Generation in Air during Electron Beam Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Galloway, Richard A.

    Ozone, the triatomic form of oxygen, can be generated by exposing normal diatomic oxygen gas to energetic electrons, X-rays, nuclear gamma rays, short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UV) and electrical discharges. Ozone is toxic to all forms of life, and governmental regulations have been established to protect people from excessive exposures to this gas. The human threshold limit values (TLV) vary from 60 to 100 parts per billion (ppb) in air, depending on the agency or country involved. Much higher concentrations can be produced inside industrial electron beam (EB) facilities, so methods for ozone removal must be provided. Equations for calculating the ozone yield vs absorbed energy, the production rate vs absorbed power, and the concentration in the air of an EB facility are presented in this paper. Since the production rate and concentration are proportional to the EB power dissipated in air, they are dependent on the design and application of the irradiation facility. Examples of these calculations are given for a typical EB process to cross-link insulated electrical wire or plastic tubing. The electron energy and beam power are assumed to be 1.5 MeV and 75 kW.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant having a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section of a multi-section cathode air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Lin, Yao

    2015-02-17

    The multi-section cathode air heat exchanger (102) includes at least a first heat exchanger section (104), and a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section (126) secured adjacent each other in a stack association. Cool cathode inlet air flows through cool air channels (110) of the at least first (104) and oxidation catalyzed sections (126). Hot anode exhaust flows through hot air channels (124) of the oxidation catalyzed section (126) and is combusted therein. The combusted anode exhaust then flows through hot air channels (112) of the first section (104) of the cathode air heat exchanger (102). The cool and hot air channels (110, 112) are secured in direct heat exchange relationship with each other so that temperatures of the heat exchanger (102) do not exceed 800.degree. C. to minimize requirements for using expensive, high-temperature alloys.

  7. Atomic structure and thermophysical properties of molten silver-copper oxide air braze alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, John Steven

    The Ag-CuOx materials system is the basis for a family of filler alloys used in a recently developed ceramic-metal joining technique referred to as air brazing, which is a brazing process that can be carried out in ambient air rather than under the vacuum or inert to reducing gas conditions required for conventional brazing methods. This research was conducted to elucidate the atomic coordination and selected thermophysical properties of these materials as a function of temperature when they are in the salient liquid state in air, since this is when the critical steps of wetting and spreading occur in the joining process. A series of alloys was selected spanning the entire length of the phase diagram including the pure end members, Ag and CuOx; alloys that form the two constituent single phase liquids; and alloys for which the two liquid phases coexist in the miscibility gap of the phase diagram. The oxygen content of the liquid alloys in air was measured using thermogravimetry. The oxidative weight gain of 99.999% pure metallic precursors was measured while simultaneously accounting for the concurrent silver volatility using a method that was developed in the course of the study. The surface tension and mass density were measured using the maximum bubble pressure method. The number density was calculated based on the information gained from the oxygen content and mass density measurements. For compositions that were amenable to laser heating, containerless high energy x-ray scattering measurements of the liquid atomic coordination were performed using a synchrotron beamline, an aerodynamic levitator, and laser heating. For the remaining compositions x-ray scattering measurements were performed in a beamline-compatible furnace. The two liquid phases that form in this materials system have distinct atomic coordinations characterized by an average of nearly two-fold coordinated ionic metal-oxygen pairs in the CuOx-rich liquid and nearly eight-fold coordinated atomic

  8. Preparation, certification and interlaboratory analysis of workplace air filters spiked with high-fired beryllium oxide.

    PubMed

    Oatts, Thomas J; Hicks, Cheryl E; Adams, Amy R; Brisson, Michael J; Youmans-McDonald, Linda D; Hoover, Mark D; Ashley, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Occupational sampling and analysis for multiple elements is generally approached using various approved methods from authoritative government sources such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as well as consensus standards bodies such as ASTM International. The constituents of a sample can exist as unidentified compounds requiring sample preparation to be chosen appropriately, as in the case of beryllium in the form of beryllium oxide (BeO). An interlaboratory study was performed to collect analytical data from volunteer laboratories to examine the effectiveness of methods currently in use for preparation and analysis of samples containing calcined BeO powder. NIST SRM(®) 1877 high-fired BeO powder (1100 to 1200 °C calcining temperature; count median primary particle diameter 0.12 μm) was used to spike air filter media as a representative form of beryllium particulate matter present in workplace sampling that is known to be resistant to dissolution. The BeO powder standard reference material was gravimetrically prepared in a suspension and deposited onto 37 mm mixed cellulose ester air filters at five different levels between 0.5 μg and 25 μg of Be (as BeO). Sample sets consisting of five BeO-spiked filters (in duplicate) and two blank filters, for a total of twelve unique air filter samples per set, were submitted as blind samples to each of 27 participating laboratories. Participants were instructed to follow their current process for sample preparation and utilize their normal analytical methods for processing samples containing substances of this nature. Laboratories using more than one sample preparation and analysis method were provided with more than one sample set. Results from 34 data sets ultimately received from the 27 volunteer laboratories were subjected to applicable statistical analyses. The observed

  9. Corrosion study in the chemical air separation (MOLTOX trademark ) process

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Doohee; Wong, Kai P.; Archer, R.A.; Cassano, A.A.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents the results of studies aimed at solving the corrosion problems encountered during operation of the MOLTOX{trademark} pilot plant. These studies concentrated on the screening of commercial and developmental alloys under conditions simulating operation conditions in this high temperature molten salt process. Process economic studies were preformed in parallel with the laboratory testing to ensure that an economically feasible solution would be achieved. In addition to the above DOE co-funded studies, Air Products and Chemicals pursued proprietary studies aimed at developing a less corrosive salt mixture which would potentially allow the use of chemurgically available alloys such as stainless steels throughout the system. These studies will not be reported here; however, the results of corrosion tests in the new less corrosive salt mixtures are reported. Because our own studies on salt chemistry impacts heavily on the overall process and thereby has an influence on the experimental work conducted under this contract, some of the studies discussed here were impacted by our own proprietary data. Therefore, the reasons behind some of the experiments presented herein will not be explained because that information is proprietary to Air Products. 14 refs., 42 figs., 21 tabs.

  10. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  11. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  12. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  13. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i

  14. Study of Nanodispersed Iron Oxides Produced in Steel Drilling by Contracted Electric-Arc Air Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, P.; Galanov, D.; Vissokov, G.; Paneva, D.; Kunev, B.; Mitov, I.

    2008-06-01

    The optimal conditions on the plasma-forming gas flowrate, discharge current and voltage, distance between the plasma-torch nozzle and the metal plate surface for the process of penetration in and vaporization of steel plates by the contracted electric-arc air plasma torch accompanied by water quenching, were determined. The X-ray structural and phase studies as well as Mössbauer and electron microscope studies on the samples treated were performed. It was demonstrated that the vaporized elemental iron was oxidized by the oxygen present in the air plasma jet to form iron oxides (wüstite, magnetite, hematite), which, depending on their mass ratios, determined the color of the iron oxide pigments, namely, beginning from light yellow, through deep yellow, light brown, deep brown, violet, red-violet, to black. A high degree of dispersity of the iron oxides is thus produced, with an averaged diameter of the particles below 500 nm, and their defective crystal structure form the basis of their potential application as components of iron-containing catalysts and pigments.

  15. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  16. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  17. Surface activation of air oxidation of hydrazine on kaolinite. 2. Consideration of oxidizing/reducing entities in relationship to other compositional, structural, and energetic factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Summers, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    The rates (previously reported) for the air oxidation of hydrazine on kaolinite and substituent oxides of kaolinite showed a complex dependence on the relative amounts of several structural oxidizing/reducing entities within the reaction-promoting solids. The rates indicated an important role of the clay but no dominant role of any one of the oxidizing/reducing entities. In this paper we review (a) the reaction-promoting activity of these centers as studied in other systems, (b) various spectroscopic results showing interaction between these entities in clays, and (c) reported spectroscopic studies of the complexation between hydrazine and aluminosilicate surfaces as a whole, in an effort to propose a mechanism for the reaction. Whereas some uncertainties remain, the present synthesis concludes that a mechanism operating through single electron/hole transfers and hydrogen atom transfers by discrete centers is adequate to explain the observed rate behaviors including the observed second order dependence of the oxidation rate on catalyst amount. The effects of these operations on the catalyst can result in no alteration of, or complete or partial electronic relaxation of its contingent of trapped separated charge pairs. The degree to which surface complexation as a whole, intercalation, or luminescent processes may also be associated with the reaction cannot be adequately assessed with the information in hand.

  18. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation of an air plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1996-08-01

    Thermogravimetric methods for evaluating bond coat oxidation in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were assessed by high-temperature testing of TBC systems with air plasma-sprayed (APS) Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and yttria-stabilized zirconia top coatings. High-mass thermogravimetric analysis (at 1150{sup degrees}C) was used to measure bond coat oxidation kinetics. Furnace cycling was used to evaluate APS TBC durability. This paper describes the experimental methods and relative oxidation kinetics of the various specimen types. Characterization of the APS TBCs and their reaction products is discussed.

  19. Downscaled anodic oxidation process for aluminium in oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, M.; Morgenstern, R.; Kuhn, D.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Schubert, A.; Lampke, T.

    2017-03-01

    The increasing multi-functionality of parts and assemblies in several fields of engineering demands, amongst others, highly functionalised surfaces. For the different applications, on the one hand, there is a need to scale up surface modification processes originating in the nano- and micro-scale. On the other hand, conventional macro-scale surface refinement methods offer a huge potential for application in the said nano- and micro-scale. The anodic oxidation process, which is established especially for aluminium and its alloys, allows the formation of oxide ceramic layers on the surface. The build-up of an oxide ceramic coating comes along with altered chemical, tribological and electrical surface properties. As a basis for further investigations regarding the use of the anodic oxidation process for micro-scale-manufacturing, the scale effects of oxalic acid anodising on commercially pure aluminium as well as on the AlZn5.5MgCu alloy are addressed in the present work. The focus is on the amount of oxide formed during a potentiostatic process in relation to the exchanged amount of charge. Further, the hardness of the coating as an integral measure to assess the porous oxide structure is approached by nano-indentation technique.

  20. Process for preparing zinc oxide-based sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh Kumar; Turk, Brian Scott; Gupta, Raghubir Prasad

    2011-06-07

    The disclosure relates to zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

  1. Catechol oxidation by ozone and hydroxyl radicals at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pillar, Elizabeth A; Camm, Robert C; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2014-12-16

    Anthropogenic emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons promptly react with hydroxyl radicals undergoing oxidation to form phenols and polyphenols (e.g., catechol) typically identified in the complex mixture of humic-like substances (HULIS). Because further processing of polyphenols in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) can continue mediated by a mechanism of ozonolysis at interfaces, a better understanding about how these reactions proceed at the air-water interface is needed. This work shows how catechol, a molecular probe of the oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons present in SOA, can contribute interfacial reactive species that enhance the production of HULIS under atmospheric conditions. Reactive semiquinone radicals are quickly produced upon the encounter of 40 ppbv-6.0 ppmv O3(g) with microdroplets containing [catechol] = 1-150 μM. While the previous pathway results in the instantaneous formation of mono- and polyhydroxylated aromatic rings (PHA) and chromophoric mono- and polyhydroxylated quinones (PHQ), a different channel produces oxo- and dicarboxylic acids of low molecular weight (LMW). The cleavage of catechol occurs at the 1,2 carbon-carbon bond at the air-water interface through the formation of (1) an ozonide intermediate, (2) a hydroperoxide, and (3) cis,cis-muconic acid. However, variable [catechol] and [O3(g)] can affect the ratio of the primary products (cis,cis-muconic acid and trihydroxybenzenes) and higher order products observed (PHA, PHQ, and LMW oxo- and dicarboxylic acids). Secondary processing is confirmed by mass spectrometry, showing the production of crotonic, maleinaldehydic, maleic, glyoxylic, and oxalic acids. The proposed pathway can contribute precursors to aqueous SOA (AqSOA) formation, converting aromatic hydrocarbons into polyfunctional species widely found in tropospheric aerosols with light-absorbing brown carbon.

  2. COST ANALYSIS OF ACTIVATED CARBON VERSUS PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION FOR REMOVING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A cost comparison has been conducted of 1 m3/s indoor air cleaners using granular activated carbon (GAC) vs. photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) for treating a steady-state inlet volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration of 0.3 mg/m3. The commercial GAC unit was costed assuming t...

  3. IN VITRO CARDIOTOXICITY OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: ROLE OF BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CARDIOTOXICITY OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: ROLE OF BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION.

    T. L. Knuckles1 R. Jaskot2, J. Richards2, and K.Dreher2.
    1Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicin...

  4. 78 FR 47253 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maine; Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Nitrogen Exemption and Ozone Transport Region Restructuring AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... exemption from the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) emissions control requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act... from Stephen D. Page, Director, OAQPS, dated January 14, 2005, entitled ``Guidance on Limiting...

  5. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (First External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This first external review draft of the Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Ozone Criteria Document) is being released in January 2005 for public comment and for review by EPA's Clean A...

  6. AIR PARTICULATE POLLUTION EXPOSURE INDUCES SYSTEMIC OXIDATIVE STRESS IN HEALTHY MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air particulate pollution exposure induces systemic oxidative stress in healthy mice

    Elizabeth S Roberts1 and Kevin L Dreher2. 1 College or Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC , 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC

    Epidemiological s...

  7. OXIDATION OF CYCLOHEXANE WITH AIR CATALYZED BY A STERICALLY HINDERED IRON (II) COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of Cyclohexane with Air Catalyzed by a Sterically Hindered Iron(II) Complex.


    Thomas M. Becker, Michael A. Gonzalez*

    United States Environmental Protection Agency; National Risk Management Research Laboratory; Sustainable Technology Division; Clean Pr...

  8. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA... FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section is a checklist format of processing steps and...

  9. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA... FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section is a checklist format of processing steps and...

  10. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA... FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section is a checklist format of processing steps and...

  11. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA... FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section is a checklist format of processing steps and...

  12. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA... FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section is a checklist format of processing steps and...

  13. Wet air oxidation for the treatment of industrial wastes. Chemical aspects, reactor design and industrial applications in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Debellefontaine, H.; Foussard, J.N.

    2000-07-01

    Aqueous wastes containing organic pollutants can be efficiently treated by wet air oxidation (WAO), i.e., oxidation (or combustion) by molecular oxygen in the liquid phase, at high temperature (200--325 C) and pressure (up to 175 bar). This method is suited to the elimination of special aqueous wastes from the chemical industry as well as to the treatment of domestic sludge. It is an enclosed process, with a limited interaction with the environment, as opposed to incineration. Usually, the operating cost is lower than 95 Euro M{sup {minus}3} and the preferred COD load ranges from 10 to 80 kg m{sup {minus}3}. Only a handful of industrial reactors are in operation world-wide, mainly because of the high capital investment they require. This paper reviews the major results obtained with the WAO process and assess its field of possible application to industrial wastes. In addition, as only a very few studies have been devoted to the scientific design of such reactors (bubble columns), what needs to be known for this scientific design is discussed. At present, a computer program aimed at determining the performance of a wet air oxidation reactor depending on the various operating parameters has been implemented at the laboratory. Some typical results are presented, pointing out the most important parameters and the specific behavior of these units.

  14. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  15. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  16. Development of techniques for processing metal-metal oxide systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques for producing model metal-metal oxide systems for the purpose of evaluating the results of processing such systems in the low-gravity environment afforded by a drop tower facility are described. Because of the lack of success in producing suitable materials samples and techniques for processing in the 3.5 seconds available, the program was discontinued.

  17. Advanced oxidation processes with coke plant wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Krzywicka, A; Kwarciak-Kozłowska, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the most efficient method of coke wastewater treatment. This research examined two processes - advanced oxidation with Fenton and photo-Fenton reaction. It was observed that the use of ultraviolet radiation with Fenton process had a better result in removal of impurities.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of carbon black/manganese oxide air cathodes for zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Po-Chieh; Hu, Chi-Chang; Lee, Tai-Chou; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Tsin Hai

    2014-12-01

    Due to the poor electric conductivity but the excellent catalytic ability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), manganese dioxide in the α phase (denoted as α-MnO2) anchored onto carbon black powders (XC72) has been synthesized by the reflux method. The specific surface area and electric conductivity of the composites are generally enhanced by increasing the XC72 content while the high XC72 content will induce the formation of MnOOH which shows a worse ORR catalytic ability than α-MnO2. The ORR activity of such air cathodes have been optimized at the XC72/α-MnO2 ratio equal to 1 determined by the thermogravimetric analysis. By using this optimized cathode under the air atmosphere, the quasi-steady-state full-cell discharge voltages are equal to 1.353 and 1.178 V at 2 and 20 mA cm-2, respectively. Due to the usage of ambient air rather than pure oxygen, this Zn-air battery shows a modestly high discharge peak power density (67.51 mW cm-2) meanwhile the power density is equal to 47.22 mW cm-2 and the specific capacity is more than 750 mAh g-1 when this cell is operated at 1 V.

  19. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  20. COLUMBIC OXIDE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IONS

    DOEpatents

    Beaton, R.H.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for separating plutonium ions from a solution of neutron irradiated uranium in which columbic oxide is used as an adsorbert. According to the invention the plutonium ion is selectively adsorbed by Passing a solution containing the plutonium in a valence state not higher than 4 through a porous bed or column of granules of hydrated columbic oxide. The adsorbed plutonium is then desorbed by elution with 3 N nitric acid.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF A NOVEL AIR BRAZING COMPOSITION FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE, OXIDATION-RESISTANT CERAMIC JOINING

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.; Darsell, Jens T.

    2004-01-30

    One of the challenges in developing a useful ceramic joining technique is in producing a joint that offers good strength under high temperature and highly oxidizing operating conditions. Unfortunately many of the commercially available active metal ceramic brazing alloys exhibit oxidation behaviors which are unacceptable for use in a high temperature application. We have developed a new approach to ceramic brazing, referred to as air brazing, that employs an oxide wetting agent dissolved in a molten noble metal solvent, in this case CuO in Ag, such that acceptable wetting behavior occurs on a number of ceramic substrates. In an effort to explore how to increase the operating temperature of this type of braze, we have investigated the effect of ternary palladium additions on the wetting characteristics of our standard Ag-CuO air braze composition

  2. Development Studies for a Novel Wet Oxidation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Delphi Research

    1999-09-30

    DETOX is a catalyzed wet oxidation process that destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase III effort for this project is fabrication, assembly, and installation of the DETOX demonstration unit, preparation of documentation and training to meet site requirements for operation, followed by system run-in and shakedown testing of the unit prior to demonstration testing. The Title III design was completed and the unit was fabricated according to standards set forth by OSHA, EPA, the American Petroleum Institute (i.e., chemical and petroleum industry standards), and the ASME B-313 Piping Code requirements as agreed to in preliminary design meetings with primary stakeholders. The unit was assembled in three modules and two trailers and then shipped to the TNX facility at the Savannah River Site in September and october of 1996. On-going site integration tasks were address while delays in installation arose due to funding sources and costs. In March of 1997, Delphi was authorized to proceed with the installation of the unit, making electrical and mechanical connections necessary to operate the unit. All installation tasks were completed in August of 1997. Results of an Operational Readiness Review conducted in August 1997 verified that Delphi's procedures and documentation met the necessary requirements to operate the unit at SRS. Completion of the final checklist of WSRC requirements was then addressed including the Owner's Independent Inspection Report, verifying all components of the unit met B-31.3 standards. Final hydraulic and pneumatic tests were completed in November to satisfy the B-31

  3. 32 CFR 806.27 - Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents. 806.27 Section 806.27 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.27 Samples of Air Force FOIA...

  4. 32 CFR 806.27 - Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents. 806.27 Section 806.27 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.27 Samples of Air Force FOIA...

  5. 32 CFR 806.27 - Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents. 806.27 Section 806.27 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.27 Samples of Air Force FOIA...

  6. Effect of naturally occurring ozone air pollution episodes on pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Cheryl; Sturrock, Anne; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Greene, Tom; Scholand, Mary Beth; Kanner, Richard; Paine, Robert

    2015-05-12

    This study aimed to determine if naturally occurring episodes of ozone air pollution in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, USA, during the summer are associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, increased respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared to controls. We measured biomarkers (nitrite/nitrate (NOx), 8-isoprostane) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), spirometry, and respiratory symptoms in 11 former smokers with moderate-to-severe COPD and nine former smokers without airflow obstruction during periods of low and high ozone air pollution. High ozone levels were associated with increased NOx in EBC in both COPD (8.7 (±8.5) vs. 28.6 (±17.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p < 0.01) and control participants (7.6 (±16.5) vs. 28.5 (±15.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p = 0.02). There was no difference in pollution effect between COPD and control groups, and no difference in EBC 8-isoprostane, pulmonary function, or respiratory symptoms between clean air and pollution days in either group. Former smokers both with and without airflow obstruction developed airway oxidative stress and inflammation in association with ozone air pollution episodes.

  7. Effect of Naturally Occurring Ozone Air Pollution Episodes on Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pirozzi, Cheryl; Sturrock, Anne; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Greene, Tom; Scholand, Mary Beth; Kanner, Richard; Paine, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if naturally occurring episodes of ozone air pollution in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, USA, during the summer are associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, increased respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared to controls. We measured biomarkers (nitrite/nitrate (NOx), 8-isoprostane) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), spirometry, and respiratory symptoms in 11 former smokers with moderate-to-severe COPD and nine former smokers without airflow obstruction during periods of low and high ozone air pollution. High ozone levels were associated with increased NOx in EBC in both COPD (8.7 (±8.5) vs. 28.6 (±17.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p < 0.01) and control participants (7.6 (±16.5) vs. 28.5 (±15.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p = 0.02). There was no difference in pollution effect between COPD and control groups, and no difference in EBC 8-isoprostane, pulmonary function, or respiratory symptoms between clean air and pollution days in either group. Former smokers both with and without airflow obstruction developed airway oxidative stress and inflammation in association with ozone air pollution episodes. PMID:25985308

  8. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.; Brandel, B.P.; Lanagan, M.T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D.J.; Sengupta, S.; Parker, J.C.; Ali, M.N.; Chen, Nan

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O{sub 2} above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density (J{sub c}) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35--50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J{sub c}, probably because of inducing a depresion of the transition temperature.

  9. Interim results from UO/sub 2/ fuel oxidation tests in air

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, T.K.; Gilbert, E.R.; Thornhill, C.K.; White, G.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Griffin, C.W.j

    1987-08-01

    An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to extend the characterization of spent fuel oxidation in air. To characterize oxidation behavior of irradiated UO/sub 2/, fuel oxidation tests were performed on declad light-water reactor spent fuel and nonirradited UO/sub 2/ pellets in the temperature range of 135 to 250/sup 0/C. These tests were designed to determine the important independent variables that might affect spent fuel oxidation behavior. The data from this program, when combined with the test results from other programs, will be used to develop recommended spent fuel dry-storage temperature limits in air. This report describes interim test results. The initial PNL investigations of nonirradiated and spent fuels identified the important testing variables as temperature, fuel burnup, radiolysis of the air, fuel microstructure, and moisture in the air. Based on these initial results, a more extensive statistically designed test matrix was developed to study the effects of temperature, burnup, and moisture on the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Oxidation tests were initiated using both boiling-water reactor and pressurized-water reactor fuels from several different reactors with burnups from 8 to 34 GWd/MTU. A 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field was applied to the test ovens to simulate dry storage cask conditions. Nonirradiated fuel was included as a control. This report describes experimental results from the initial tests on both the spent and nonirradiated fuels and results to date on the tests in a 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field. 33 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Oxygen vacancy promoted methane partial oxidation over iron oxide oxygen carriers in the chemical looping process.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Qin, Lang; Guo, Mengqing; Xu, Mingyuan; Fan, Jonathan A; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2016-11-30

    We perform ab initio DFT+U calculations and experimental studies of the partial oxidation of methane to syngas on iron oxide oxygen carriers to elucidate the role of oxygen vacancies in oxygen carrier reactivity. In particular, we explore the effect of oxygen vacancy concentration on sequential processes of methane dehydrogenation, and oxidation with lattice oxygen. We find that when CH4 adsorbs onto Fe atop sites without neighboring oxygen vacancies, it dehydrogenates with CHx radicals remaining on the same site and evolves into CO2via the complete oxidation pathway. In the presence of oxygen vacancies, on the other hand, the formed methyl (CH3) prefers to migrate onto the vacancy site while the H from CH4 dehydrogenation remains on the original Fe atop site, and evolves into CO via the partial oxidation pathway. The oxygen vacancies created in the oxidation process can be healed by lattice oxygen diffusion from the subsurface to the surface vacancy sites, and it is found that the outward diffusion of lattice oxygen atoms is more favorable than the horizontal diffusion on the same layer. Based on the proposed mechanism and energy profile, we identify the rate-limiting steps of the partial oxidation and complete oxidation pathways. Also, we find that increasing the oxygen vacancy concentration not only lowers the barriers of CH4 dehydrogenation but also the cleavage energy of Fe-C bonds. However, the barrier of the rate-limiting step cannot further decrease when the oxygen vacancy concentration reaches 2.5%. The fundamental insight into the oxygen vacancy effect on CH4 oxidation with iron oxide oxygen carriers can help guide the design and development of more efficient oxygen carriers and CLPO processes.

  11. Mechanical and tribological properties of oxide layers obtained on titanium in the thermal oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniołek, K.; Kupka, M.; Barylski, A.; Dercz, G.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of tests concerning a modification to the surface of titanium Grade 2 in the thermal oxidation process. It describes the oxidation kinetics of the tested material in the temperature range of 600-800 °C, with a duration from 20 min to 72 h. The greatest increase in mass was found in specimens oxidised at a temperature of 800 °C. The morphology of the obtained oxide layers was determined. The particles of oxides formed were noticeably larger after oxidation at a temperature of 600 °C. Raising temperature resulted in the formation of fine compact particles in the oxide layer. A phase analysis of oxidation products showed that TiO2 in the crystallographic form of rutile and Ti3O are the prevalent types of oxide at a temperature of 600 and 700 °C. On the other hand, only rutile formed at a temperature of 800 °C. Tribological tests showed that the presence of an oxide layer on the surface of titanium significantly improved resistance to abrasive wear. It was found that volumetric wear had decreased by 48% for a specimen oxidised at a temperature of 600 °C and by more than 60% for a specimen subjected to isothermal soaking at a temperature of 700 °C.

  12. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS Pt. 50, App. S Appendix S to Part 50—Interpretation of the Primary... be submitted to EPA's Air Quality System (AQS), or otherwise available to EPA, meeting...

  13. Air-broadened linewidths of nitrous oxide: An improved calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacome, Nelly; Levy, Armand; Boulet, Christian

    1983-01-01

    The semiclassical theory developed by Robert and Bonamy was used to obtain the linewidths of N 2O broadened by itself, by N 2 and by O 2. The main features of the formalism are as follows: (a) The anisotropic potential is expressed by using, besides the quadrupole-quadrupole contribution, an atom-atom interaction model (without any adjustable parameter) which takes both long- and short-range forces into account. (b) The geometry of the collision is described through the so-called "equivalent" straight path, more appropriate than the usual one. (c) The matrix elements of the relaxation operator are computed by means of the linked-cluster theorem, so that the treatment remains nonperturbative and no resort to cutoff precedures is needed. In addition to being more realistic the present formalism has the advantage of making the computation tractable for complex molecular systems such as linear-linear ones. Careful comparison was made with the available experimental results. For self-broadened N 2O very satisfactory agreement is obtained both at 300 and 204 K. This is also the case for nitrogen broadening at room temperature. Regarding oxygen-broadened linewidths, very few experimental data exist. Anyway, the present results reveal substantial improvement as compared to the usual calculations based upon Anderson-Tsao-Curnutte model. From these results a predictive tabulation was obtained for the values of air-broadened N 2O linewidths at 300 and 204 K.

  14. Value enhancement of olivine process dust through air classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiv, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    As a result of the production of dry olivine sand products at A/S Olivin's production plant at Åheim in western Norway, an annual quantity of some 20000-30000 t of process dust is produced. The bulk of this material is currently being sold as a slag conditioner at a relatively low price; hence, alternative uses of the process dust are now being sought. Information regarding the chemical composition of the material as a function of particle size facilitates product modifications through exclusion or mixing of individual size fractions. This paper demonstrates how such information can be obtained from air classification experiments when these are combined with chemical analysis of the produced size fractions. The classification and subsequent analysis of the olivine process dust revealed that the finer size fractions had high loss on ignition (LOI) values and were relatively low in MgO when compared with the bulk analysis. Removal of the finer fractions resulted in a remaining coarse product of significantly higher quality. The coarse material could be used as a raw material for further processing; it could be recycled or it could constitute a new product in itself.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of carbon black/manganese oxide air cathodes for zinc-air batteries: Effects of the crystalline structure of manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Po-Chieh; Hu, Chi-Chang; Noda, Hiroyuki; Habazaki, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Manganese oxides (MnOx) in α-, β-, γ-, δ-MnO2 phases, Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnOOH are synthesized for systematically comparing their electrocatalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the Zn-air battery application. The optimal MnOx/XC-72 mass ratio for the ORR is equal to 1 and the oxide crystalline structure effect on the ORR is compared. The order of composites with respect to decreasing the ORR activity is: α-MnO2/XC-72 > γ-MnO2/XC-72 > β-MnO2/XC-72 > δ-MnO2/XC-72 > Mn2O3/XC-72 > Mn3O4/XC-72 > MnOOH/XC-72. The textural properties of MnOx are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Electrochemical studies include linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry, and the full-cell discharge test. The discharge peak power density of Zn-air batteries varies from 61.5 mW cm-2 (α-MnO2/XC-72) to 47.1 mW cm-2 (Mn3O4/XC-72). The maximum peak power density is 102 mW cm-2 for the Zn-air battery with an air cathode containing α-MnO2/XC-72 under an oxygen atmosphere when the carbon paper is 10AA. The specific capacity of all full-cell tests is higher than 750 mAh g-1 at all discharge current densities.

  16. Soot Oxidation in Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, propylene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2,C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962), because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  17. Soot Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, proplyene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, 02, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable, because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  18. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

  19. Sliding durability of two carbide-oxide candidate high temperature fiber seal materials in air to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    A test program to determine the friction and wear properties of two complex carbide oxide ceramic fibers for high temperature sliding seal applications is described. The fibers are based on Si, C, O, and Ti or Si, C, N, and O ceramic systems. Pin on disk tests using ceramic fiber covered pins and Inconel 718 disks, were conducted in air from 25 to 900 C to evaluate potential seal materials. This testing procedure was used in a previous study of oxide ceramic fibers which were found to exhibit wear behavior based predominantly on their mechanical properties. Like the oxide fibers tested previously, these carbide oxide ceramic fibers, show an increase in friction and wear with increased test temperature. At room temperature, the wear behavior seems to be based upon mechanical properties, namely tensile strength. At 500 and especially 900 C, the fibers wear by both mechanical fracture and by oxidative type wear. Based upon post test microscopic and x ray analyses, interaction between the fiber constituents and elements transferred from the counterface, namely Ni and Cr, may have occurred enhancing the tribochemical wear process. These results are interpreted.

  20. Conversion and Estrogenicity of 17β-estradiol During Photolytic/Photocatalytic Oxidation and Catalytic Wet-air Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bistan, Mirjana; Tišler, Tatjana; Pintar, Albin

    2012-06-01

    Estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2), produced by human body and excreted into municipal wastewaters, belongs to the group of endocrine disrupting compounds that are resistant to biological degradation. The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of E2 removal from aqueous solutions by means of catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) and photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation. CWAO experiments were conducted in a trickle-bed reactor at temperatures up to 230 °C and oxygen partial pressure of 10 bar over TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 solids. Photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation was carried out in a batch slurry reactor employing a TiO2 P-25 (Degussa) catalyst under visible or UV light. HPLC analysis and yeast estrogen screen assay were used to evaluate the removal of E2 and estrogenicity of treated samples. The latter was completely removed during photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation under UV (365 nm) light and photocatalytic oxidation under visible light. In CWAO experiments, complete removal of both E2 and estrogenicity from the feed solution were noticed in the presence of TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 catalysts.

  1. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  2. Process for combined control of mercury and nitric oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C. D.; Mendelsohn, M. H.

    1999-11-03

    Continuing concern about the effects of mercury in the environment may lead to requirements for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. If such controls are mandated, the use of existing flue-gas cleanup systems, such as wet scrubbers currently employed for flue-gas desulfurization, would be desirable, Such scrubbers have been shown to be effective for capturing oxidized forms of mercury, but cannot capture the very insoluble elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) that can form a significant fraction of the total emissions. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have proposed and tested a concept for enhancing removal of Hg{sup 0}, as well as nitric oxide, through introduction of an oxidizing agent into the flue gas upstream of a scrubber, which readily absorbs the soluble reaction products. Recently, we developed a new method for introducing the oxidizing agent into the flue-gas stream that dramatically improved reactant utilization. The oxidizing agent employed was NOXSORB{trademark}, which is a commercial product containing chloric acid and sodium chlorate. When a dilute solution of this agent was introduced into a gas stream containing Hg{sup 0} and other typical flue-gas species at 300 F, we found that about 100% of the mercury was removed from the gas phase and recovered in process liquids. At the same time, approximately 80% of the nitric oxide was removed. The effect of sulfur dioxide on this process was also investigated and the results showed that it slightly decreased the amount of Hg{sup 0} oxidized while appearing to increase the removal of nitric oxide from the gas phase. We are currently testing the effects of variations in NOXSORB{trademark} concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, nitric oxide concentration, and reaction time (residence time). Preliminary economic projections based on the results to date indicate that the chemical cost for nitric oxide oxidation could be less than $5,000/ton removed, while for Hg{sup 0} oxidation it

  3. Nitrogen removal with the anaerobic ammonium oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ziye; Lotti, Tommaso; van Loosdrecht, Mark; Kartal, Boran

    2013-08-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria convert ammonium to N2 with nitrite as the terminal electron acceptor in the absence of O2. Nitritation-anammox bioreactors provide a cost-effective and environment-friendly alternative to conventional nitrification/denitrification nitrogen removal systems. Currently, this process is only applied for ammonium removal from wastewater with high ammonium load and temperature. Nevertheless, recent results obtained with laboratory-scale bioreactors suggest new possible routes of application of the Nitritation-anammox technology including (1) municipal wastewater treatment, removal of (2) methane in combination with nitrite-reducing methane-oxidizing bacteria, (3) nitrate coupled to organic acid oxidation and (4) nitrogen oxides. The current review summarizes the state-of-the-art of the application of Nitritation-anammox systems and discusses the possibilities of utilizing these recent results for wastewater treatment.

  4. 76 FR 59599 - Extension of Comment Period for Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... comment period for the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur... Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur'' proposed rule should be addressed to Rich Scheffe, U.S....

  5. Mechanism of the Initial Oxidation of Hydrogen andHalogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shiyu; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-08-23

    The initial stage of the oxidation of Ge(111) surfaces etched by HF, HCl and HBr solutions is systematically studied using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES). We perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different oxidation factors. SR-PES results show that both moisture and oxygen contribute to the oxidation of the surfaces; however, they play different roles in the oxidation process. Moisture effectively replaces the hydrogen and halogen termination layers with hydroxyl (OH), but hardly oxidizes the surfaces further. On the other hand, dry oxygen does not replace the termination layers, but breaks the Ge-Ge back bonds and oxidizes the substrates with the aid of moisture. In addition, room light enhances the oxidation rate significantly.

  6. Oxidation of acetovanillone by photochemical processes and hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Benitez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; Acero, Juan L; Leal, Ana I; Cotilla, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    Acetovanillone [Ethanone, 1-(4-hydroxy-3-metoxyphenyl)] is one of the major pollutants that is present in the wastewater produced during the boiling of raw material in the cork industry. The oxidation of its aqueous solutions by monochromatic UV radiation alone and combined with hydrogen peroxide, Fenton's reagent and the photo-Fenton system has been investigated. In the single UV radiation process, the apparent rate constants and the quantum yields are determined, and in the UV/H2O2 combination, the additional efficiency in the oxidation process due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide is established. The influence of some operating variables, such as initial concentrations of H2O2 and Fe(II), as well as the pH, is discussed in the Fenton and photo-Fenton systems, and the partial contribution of the radical pathways to the global oxidation rates are evaluated. The rate constant for the reaction of acetovanillone with hydroxyl radicals is also determined by means of a competition kinetics model, its value being 5.62 x 10(9) M(-1)s(-1). Finally, chemical oxidation experiments of wastewaters generated in this industry were carried out by using the same advanced oxidation processes. Specifically, the elimination of acetovanillone in these effluents was determined, and the removal of the global organic pollutant content was also evaluated.

  7. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  8. Air Oxidation Behavior of Two Ti-Base Alloys Synthesized by HIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Guo, Q. Q.; Liu, L. L.; Xu, L.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn and Ti-6Al-4V produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been studied at 650-850°C in air for 24 h. The oxidation kinetics of both alloys followed the parabolic law with good approximation, except for Ti-5Al-2.5Sn oxidized at 850°C. Multi-layered scales formed on both alloys at 750°C and 850°C. Ternary additions of Sn and V accounted for the different morphology of the scales formed on these two alloys. In addition, the oxidation behavior of HIP alloys is compared with that of the corresponding cast alloys and the scaling mechanism is discussed.

  9. Development of High-Temperature Air Braze Filler Metals for Use in Two-Step Joining and Sealing Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2006-11-02

    Reactive air brazing (RAB) creates metallic braze joints between oxide surfaces. RAB can be performed in air and can undergo subsequent operation at temperatures up to 900ºC in oxidizing environments. This makes RAB an attractive joining method for creating seals in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) which operate at temperatures between 700 and 850ºC and comprise cathode materials which are intolerant of reducing environments. Many planar SOFC designs require a two-step sealing process. Thus the seal formed during the first step must not melt or soften at the firing temperature of the second step, otherwise its integrity could be compromised. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of adding Pd to a Ag-CuO RAB to produce a braze composition with a melting temperature high enough that it might be used in the first step of a two-step sealing process with unmodified Ag-CuO RAB used in the second step, thereby making possible a two step reactive air brazing process. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the substrate of choice in this study in order to simulate the initial sealing step in planar SOFCs which often involves sealing a yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte to a metallic support frame. RAB compositions containing a 15 mol% Pd : 85 mol% Ag alloy with 8 mol% Cu added were found to provide the best combination of wettability, mechanical strength, and melting characteristics for brazing YSZ.

  10. The Measurement of Fuel-air Ratio by Analysis of the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memm, J. Lawrence, Jr.

    1943-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy Fuel Specification, No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs or the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124

  11. The Measurement of Fuel-Air Ratio by Analysis for the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C.; Meem, J. Lawrence, Jr.

    1943-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy fuel Specification No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs for the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124.

  12. Methods to protect and recover work function of air exposed transition metal oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Irfan; Wang, Chenggong; Turinske, Alexander J.; Gao, Yongli

    2012-09-01

    Insertion of high work function (WF) transition metal oxide (TMO) layers between the anode and the hole transport layer is established to substantially enhance the performance of organic light emitting diodes (OLED). The high WF of transition metal oxide layer has been demonstrated to be the most crucial for the enhancement. The WF of a TMO layer decreases substantially with air exposure, and noticeably by the ambient even inside a low vacuum system. In the present work we discuss various methods to protect and recover the high WF after a TMO thin film has been exposed to air. We report covering a thin organic layer on top of MoOx to protect the high work function. We found that a thin layer of 1-2 nm organic layer was sufficient to protect the work function of MoOx thin film underneath. We further report methods to recover already decreased TMO WF due to air exposure. We performed oxygen plasma cleaning of air exposed MoOx film and found out that oxygen plasma could substantially recover the WF of as deposited MoOx film. We also performed annealing of air exposed MoOx film inside an ultra high vacuum system and observed a thin layer of oxygenrich adsorbate layer, which desorbed upon annealing that in turn substantially recovered the MoOx WF. We discuss the vacuum annealing and the effect of resulting surface on the interface energy level alignment.

  13. Degradation of p-nitrophenol in aqueous solution by microwave assisted oxidation process through a granular activated carbon fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Bo, Longli; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Huimin; Zhao, Yazhi

    2006-09-01

    A microwave (MW) assisted oxidation process was investigated for degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) from aqueous solution. The process consisted of a granular activated carbon (GAC) fixed bed reactor, a MW source, solution and air supply system, and a heat exchanger. The process was operated in continuous flow mode. Air was applied for oxygen supply. GAC acted as a MW energy absorption material as well as the catalyst for PNP degradation. MW power, air flow, GAC dose, and influent flow proved to be major factors which influenced PNP degradation. The results showed that PNP was degraded effectively by this new process. Under a given condition (PNP concentration 1330mg/L, MW power 500 W, influent flow 6.4 mL/min, air flow 100 mL/min), PNP removed 90%, corresponding to 80% of TOC removal. The pathway of PNP degradation was deduced based on GC-MS identification of course products. PNP experienced sequential oxidation steps and mineralized ultimately. Nitro-group of PNP converted to nitrite and nitrate. Biodegradability of the solution was improved apparently after treatment by MW assisted oxidation process, which benefit to further treatment of the solution using biochemical method.

  14. Effect of the iron oxide catalyst on o-toluidine oxidation by the fluidized-bed fenton process.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Chi; Fan, Chun-Cheng; Anotai, Jin; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the Fe2+ concentration and synthetic iron oxide catalysts on o-toluidine degradation using a fluidized-bed Fenton process. The mineralization ofo-toluidine in the synthetic catalyst system is also examined. The H3.5 and H7.3 Fe/SiO2 and A7.8 and A 12.5 Fe/SiO2 catalysts were successfully synthesized by adding H202 and injecting air process, respectively. The optimum initial ferrous ion concentration for degradation of 1 mM o-toluidine was 1 mM. Experimental results reveal that 1 mM o-toluidine can be 100% degraded at 60 and 120 min in the modified fluidized-bed Fenton process with A7.8 Fe/SiO2 and the conventional fluidized-bed Fenton process with SiO2 carrier, respectively, when the optimum conditions of 1mM Fe2+ and 17mM H202 at pH 3 were used. The A7.8 Fe/SiO2 catalyst had a stronger oxidation ability than the H3.5 Fe/SiO2, H7.3 Fe/SiO2 and A12.5 Fe/SiO2 catalysts, and was attributed to the high iron content on the surface of the SiO2 support. The Fenton and Fenton-like reactions occurred in the A7.8 Fe/SiO2 catalyst system. Degradation of o-toluidine in the Fenton-like process follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. The A7.8 Fe/SiO2 catalyst efficiently enhanced o-toluidine oxidation under the pH range of 2-4.

  15. Effects of arginine on hair damage via oxidative coloring process.

    PubMed

    Oshimura, Eiko; Ino, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the protective effects of arginine in oxidative coloring or bleaching process. Contact angle measurement, tensile measurement and amino acid analysis were employed. As the first step, it was shown that oxidative coloring or bleaching process decreases hair surface hydrophobicity and tensile strength in wet condition. Next the study has been conducted with coloring agents in which part of the ammonia was replaced with arginine, to find that arginine reduced the oxidative change in contact angle and tensile strength. These results suggest that arginine prevents the undesirable attack by hydrogen peroxide on hair proteins and hair surface lipids. Furthermore, it is also suggested from amino acid analysis that a considerable amount of arginine is deposited on, or in hair fibers from coloring agents.

  16. Fact Sheet - Final Air Toxics Rule for Gold Mine Ore Processing and Production

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact sheet summarizing main points of National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for gold ore processing and production facilities, the seventh largest source of mercury air emission in the United States.

  17. Review of research results for the photocatalytic oxidation of hazardous wastes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M R; Wolfrum, E J; Gratson, D A; Watt, A S; Jacoby, W A; Turchi, C

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory experiments of gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) at NREL have focused on measurements that can help commercialize this technology for treating gaseous air streams. This effort proceeds earlier NREL work and studies conducted elsewhere which demonstrated the general applicability of PCO. The more recent work has concentrated on: (1) the kinetics of the PCO process; (2) the formation and destruction of intermediates; and (3) possible enhancements to improve the destruction rates. The results from these studies will be used to help design large scale PCO equipment and they will be used to evaluate the economics of the PCO process. For trichloroethylene and ethanol, extensive studies of the rates of destruction have yielded kinetic parameters for the destruction of intermediates as well as the substrate. The kinetics of intermediates is essential for sizing a large scale reactor, as complete conversion to carbon dioxide is often desired. The kinetic data from these laboratory studies has been used for analyzing IT`s pilot PCO reactor and has been used to suggest modifications to this unit. For compounds that are more difficult to destroy (such as the components of BTEX), rate enhancement experiments have been conducted. These compounds represent a very large market for this technology and improvement of the rate of the process should make it competitive. Towards this goal, the enhancement of the destruction of BTEX components have been studied. Experiments have demonstrated that there is a significant increase in the rates of destruction of BTEX with the addition of ozone. Preliminary economic assessments have shown that PCO with ozone may be cost competitive. Future laboratory experiments of PCO will focus on refinements of what has been learned. Rate measurements will also be expanded to include other compounds representing significant markets for the PCO technology.

  18. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) modulates oxidative burst and nitric oxide production in carrageenan-elicited granulocytes from rat air pouch.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Stanojević, Stanislava; Mićić, Stana; Vujić, Vesna; Kovacević-Jovanović, Vesna; Mitić, Katarina; von Hörsten, Stephan; Kosec, Dusko

    2006-12-01

    We studied the effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and NPY-related receptor specific peptides on functions of carrageenan-elicited granulocytes in vitro and ability of NPY to modulate carrageenan-induced air pouch inflammation in rats in vivo. Anti-inflammatory effect of NPY comprises reduced granulocyte accumulation into the air pouch, to some extent attenuation of phagocytosis, attained via Y1 receptor, and considerable decrease in peroxide production, albeit mediated via Y2 and Y5 receptors activation. Conversely, NPY increases nitric oxide production and this potentiation is mediated via Y1 receptor. It is concluded that NPY Y1 and Y2/Y5 receptors' interaction participates in NPY-induced modulation of granulocyte functions related to inflammation.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix T to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) T Appendix T to Part 50 Protection of... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) 1. General (a) This appendix explains... ambient air quality standards for Oxides of Sulfur as measured by Sulfur Dioxide (“SO2 NAAQS”)...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix T to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) T Appendix T to Part 50 Protection of... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) 1. General (a) This appendix explains... ambient air quality standards for Oxides of Sulfur as measured by Sulfur Dioxide (“SO2 NAAQS”)...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix T to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) T Appendix T to Part 50 Protection of... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) 1. General (a) This appendix explains... ambient air quality standards for Oxides of Sulfur as measured by Sulfur Dioxide (“SO2 NAAQS”)...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix T to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) T Appendix T to Part 50 Protection of... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) 1. General (a) This appendix explains... ambient air quality standards for Oxides of Sulfur as measured by Sulfur Dioxide (“SO2 NAAQS”)...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix T to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) T Appendix T to Part 50 Protection of... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Sulfur (Sulfur Dioxide) 1. General (a) This appendix explains... ambient air quality standards for Oxides of Sulfur as measured by Sulfur Dioxide (“SO2 NAAQS”)...

  4. GREENING OF OXIDATION CATALYSIS THROUGH IMPROVED CATALYST AND PROCESS DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory


    Greening of Oxidation Catalysis Through Improved Catalysts and Process Design
    Michael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas Becker, and Raymond Smith

    United State Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W...

  5. Better End-Cap Processing for Oxidation-Resistant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2004-01-01

    A class of end-cap compounds that increase the thermo-oxidative stab ility of polyimides of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PM R) type has been extended. In addition, an improved processing proto col for this class of end-cap compounds has been invented.

  6. Electrochemical advanced oxidation processes: today and tomorrow. A review.

    PubMed

    Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric; Oturan, Mehmet A; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Panizza, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, new advanced oxidation processes based on the electrochemical technology, the so-called electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), have been developed for the prevention and remediation of environmental pollution, especially focusing on water streams. These methods are based on the electrochemical generation of a very powerful oxidizing agent, such as the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) in solution, which is then able to destroy organics up to their mineralization. EAOPs include heterogeneous processes like anodic oxidation and photoelectrocatalysis methods, in which (•)OH are generated at the anode surface either electrochemically or photochemically, and homogeneous processes like electro-Fenton, photoelectro-Fenton, and sonoelectrolysis, in which (•)OH are produced in the bulk solution. This paper presents a general overview of the application of EAOPs on the removal of aqueous organic pollutants, first reviewing the most recent works and then looking to the future. A global perspective on the fundamentals and experimental setups is offered, and laboratory-scale and pilot-scale experiments are examined and discussed.

  7. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  8. Design and processing of all-oxide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, R.; Eckerbom, L.

    1995-12-01

    All-oxide ceramic composites as a material with potential for long life-time applications at temperatures in the 1400-1600{degrees}C range in combustion environments were studied. The properties of available polycrystalline and single crystal oxide fibres were summarised. The literature on stable weak interfaces in all-oxide composites was reviewed. Composites with single crystal fibres, a polycrystalline matrix of the same material as the fibres, and a compatible high temperature stable weak oxide interphase was suggested to be the most promising approach. Processing of all-oxide composites was performed. ZrO{sub 2}-coated sapphire fibres in reaction bonded alumina and in hot pressed alumina showed crack deflection and fibre pull-out. In reaction bonded mullite crack deflection and pull-out was observed even for un-coated sapphire fibres. This was attributed to thermal expansion mismatch. A recently started European project aiming at development, scale-up and property evaluation of all-oxide composites is briefly outlined.

  9. Process and Equipment for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: (1) directing a vapor stream containing at least nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; (2) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen- containing oxidizing agent; (3) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; (4) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrite form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; (5) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; (6) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level on hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1% by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; (7) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and (8) removing sais solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  10. Mobile Air Monitoring Data Processing Strategies and Effects on Spatial Air Pollution Trends

    EPA Science Inventory

    The collection of real-time air quality measurements while in motion (i.e., mobile monitoring) is currently conducted worldwide to evaluate in situ emissions, local air quality trends, and air pollutant exposure. This measurement strategy pushes the limits of traditional data an...

  11. Oxidation of spent fuel in air at 175{degree} to 195{degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R.E.; Buchanan, H.C.; Thomas, L.E.; Stout, R.B.

    1992-04-01

    Oxidation tests in dry air were conducted on four LWR spent fuels at 175{degrees} and 195{degrees}C to determine the effect of the fuel characteristics on the oxidation state likely to exist at the time leaching occurs in a potential repository. Weight changes were measured and samples were examined by XRD, ceramography, TEM, and TGA. Despite local variations in the grain boundary susceptibility to oxidation, all four fuels progressed toward an apparent endpoint at an oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio of 2.4. The sole oxidation product was U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x,} a cubic phase structurally related to UO{sub 2} but with a slightly smaller lattice constant. The growth of the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} from the grain boundaries into the UO{sub 2} grains followed parabolic kinetics and had an activation energy of 26.6 kcal/mol. Based on the kinetics, the time required at 95{degrees}C to completely oxidize LWR spent fuel to U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} would be at least 2000 yr. The next oxidation product to form after the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} phase may be U{sub 3}O{sub 8,} but no U{sub 3}O{sub 8} or other dilatational oxidation product has been detected in these accelerated tests conducted up to 25,000 h.

  12. Oxidation of spent fuel in air at 175 degree to 195 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R.E.; Buchanan, H.C.; Thomas, L.E. ); Stout, R.B. )

    1992-04-01

    Oxidation tests in dry air were conducted on four LWR spent fuels at 175{degrees} and 195{degrees}C to determine the effect of the fuel characteristics on the oxidation state likely to exist at the time leaching occurs in a potential repository. Weight changes were measured and samples were examined by XRD, ceramography, TEM, and TGA. Despite local variations in the grain boundary susceptibility to oxidation, all four fuels progressed toward an apparent endpoint at an oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio of 2.4. The sole oxidation product was U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x,} a cubic phase structurally related to UO{sub 2} but with a slightly smaller lattice constant. The growth of the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} from the grain boundaries into the UO{sub 2} grains followed parabolic kinetics and had an activation energy of 26.6 kcal/mol. Based on the kinetics, the time required at 95{degrees}C to completely oxidize LWR spent fuel to U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} would be at least 2000 yr. The next oxidation product to form after the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} phase may be U{sub 3}O{sub 8,} but no U{sub 3}O{sub 8} or other dilatational oxidation product has been detected in these accelerated tests conducted up to 25,000 h.

  13. Wintertime air-sea interaction processes across the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bane, John M.; Osgood, Kenric E.

    1989-08-01

    Aircraft, buoy and satellite measurements have been used to study the wintertime air-sea interaction processes across the Gulf Stream during January 25-30, 1986. The turbulent flux regime in the marine atmospheric boundary layer exhibited considerable spatial and temporal variability during this 6-day period, which was related to both the evolution of the synoptic scale atmospheric conditions and the sea surface temperature (SST) field. During the pre-storm conditions prior to January 25, the spatial structure of the SST field played an important role in generating a shallow atmospheric frontal zone along the Gulf Stream front by causing differential heating of the marine atmospheric boundary layer over the stream versus over the cooler shelf waters. As this front moved shoreward on January 25, the warm, moist, maritime air flowing northwestward behind the front induced moderate ocean-to-atmosphere heat fluxes (˜300 W m-2 total heat flux measured over the core of the Gulf Stream). The subsequent outbreak of eastward flowing cold, dry, continental air over the ocean on January 27 and 28 generated high total heat fluxes (˜1060 W m-2 over the core of the Stream), as did a second, somewhat weaker outbreak which followed on January 30 (˜680 W2 over the core of the Stream). During each of these outbreaks, with air flowing from land out over the continental shelf, Gulf Stream and Sargasso Sea waters, the SST field again affected the spatial structure of the flux fields. The near-surface fluxes of both sensible and latent heat were found to be relatively low over the cool continental shelf waters, while higher fluxes were seen over the Gulf Stream and Sargasso Sea. Similar spatial structure was seen in the near-surface momentum flux values, but relative changes were typically smaller from one location to another on a particular day. The most noticeable responses of the Gulf Stream to these surface fluxes were the deepening of its mixed layer and a loss of upper layer

  14. Evaluation of advanced oxidation process for the treatment of groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, S.B. II ); Peyton, G.R. ); Rice, L.E. . Kansas City Div.)

    1990-01-01

    An advanced oxidation process utilizing ozone, ultraviolet radiation, and hydrogen peroxide was selected for the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons, particularly trichlorethene and 1,2-dichlorethene, from groundwater underlying the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant. Since the performance of this process for the removal of organics from groundwater is not well-documented, an evaluation was initiated to determine the performance of the treatment plant, document the operation and maintenance costs experience, and evaluate contaminant removal mechanisms. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1995-12-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. There is a need for non-combustion processes with a wide application range to treat the large majority of these waste forms. The non-combustion process should also be safe, effective, cost-competitive, permit-able, and preferrably mobile. This paper describes the DETOX process of organic waste oxidation.

  16. Mineralization of the biocide chloroxylenol by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Skoumal, Marcel; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Brillas, Enric

    2008-04-01

    Electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) are environmentally friendly methods based on the destruction of organic pollutants in wastewaters with in situ electrogenerated hydroxyl radical. This species is formed in anodic oxidation (AO) from water oxidation at the anode and in indirect electro-oxidation methods like electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) also from reaction between catalytic Fe2+ and H2O2 continuously produced at the O2-diffusion cathode. The PEF method involves the irradiation of the treated solution with UVA light to enhance the photolysis of organics including Fe(III) complexes. In this work, the oxidation power of such EAOPs to decontaminate synthetic wastewaters of the biocide chloroxylenol (4-chloro-3,5-dimethylphenol) at pH 3.0 is comparatively examined with an undivided electrolytic cell containing a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a stainless steel or O2-diffusion cathode. The initial chlorine is released as Cl(-) ion, which remains stable in the medium using Pt or is oxidized to Cl2 on BDD. The biocide solutions can be completely decontaminated using AO with a BDD anode, as well as PEF with a Pt or BDD anode. The PEF procedure with a BDD anode is the most powerful method leading to total mineralization in about 300 min, practically independent of current density. When current density rises, the degradation rate of processes increases, but they become less efficient due to the larger enhancement of waste reactions of oxidants. Chloroxylenol is much more rapidly removed in EF and PEF than in AO. 2,6-dimethylhydroquinone, 2,6-dimethyl-p-benzoquinone and 3,5-dimethyl-2-hydroxy-p-benzoquinone are identified as aromatic by-products, and maleic, malonic, pyruvic, acetic and oxalic acids are found as generated carboxylic acids. A general pathway for chloroxylenol mineralization by all EAOPs including the above by-products is proposed.

  17. Processing, Structure and High Temperature Oxidation Properties of Polymer-Derived and Hafnium Oxide Based Ceramic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terauds, Kalvis

    Demands for hypersonic aircraft are driving the development of ultra-high temperature structural materials. These aircraft, envisioned to sustain Mach 5+, are expected to experience continuous temperatures of 1200--1800°C on the aircraft surface and temperatures as high as 2800°C in combustion zones. Breakthroughs in the development of fiber based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are opening the door to a new class of high-tech UHT structures for aerospace applications. One limitation with current carbon fiber or silicon carbide fiber based CMC technology is the inherent problem of material oxidation, requiring new approaches for protective environmental barrier coatings (EBC) in extreme environments. This thesis focuses on the development and characterization of SiCN-HfO2 based ceramic composite EBC systems to be used as a protective layer for silicon carbide fiber based CMCs. The presented work covers three main architectures for protection (i) multilayer films, (ii) polymer-derived HfSiCNO, and (iii) composite SiCN-HfO 2 infiltration. The scope of this thesis covers processing development, material characterization, and high temperature oxidation behavior of these three SiCN-HfO2 based systems. This work shows that the SiCN-HfO 2 composite materials react upon oxidation to form HfSiO4, offering a stable EBC in streaming air and water vapor at 1600°C.

  18. Oxidation Behavior of In-Flight Molten Aluminum Droplets in the Twin-Wire Electric Arc Thermal Spray Process

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Brian G. Williams

    2005-05-01

    This paper examines the in-flight oxidation of molten aluminum sprayed in air using the twin-wire electric arc (TWEA) thermal spray process. The oxidation reaction of aluminum in air is highly exothermic and is represented by a heat generation term in the energy balance. Aerodynamic shear at the droplet surface enhances the amount of in-flight oxidation by: (1) promoting entrainment and mixing of the surface oxides within the droplet, and (2) causing a continuous heat generation effect that increases droplet temperature over that of a droplet without internal circulation. This continual source of heat input keeps the droplets in a liquid state during flight. A linear rate law based on the Mott-Cabrera theory was used to estimate the growth of the surface oxide layer formed during droplet flight. The calculated oxide volume fraction of an average droplet at impact agrees well with the experimentally determined oxide content for a typical TWEA-sprayed aluminum coating, which ranges from 3.3 to 12.7%. An explanation is provided for the elevated, nearly constant surface temperature (~ 2000 oC) of the droplets during flight to the substrate and shows that the majority of oxide content in the coating is produced during flight, rather than after deposition.

  19. Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-08-05

    This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation from photo-oxidation of toluene with NOx and SO2: Chamber simulation with purified air versus urban ambient air as matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei; Liu, Tengyu; Zhang, Yanli; Situ, Shuping; Hu, Qihou; He, Quanfu; Zhang, Zhou; Lü, Sujun; Bi, Xinhui; Wang, Xuemei; Boreave, Antoinette; George, Christian; Ding, Xiang; Wang, Xinming

    2017-02-01

    Chamber studies on the formation of secondary aerosols are mostly performed with purified air as matrix, it is of wide concern in what extent they might be different from the situations in ambient air, where a variety of gaseous and particulate components preexist. Here we compared the photo-oxidation of "toluene + NOx + SO2" combinations in a smog chamber in real urban ambient air matrix with that in purified air matrix. The secondary organic aerosols (SOA) mass concentrations and yields from toluene in the ambient air matrix, after subtracted ambient air background primary and secondary organic aerosols, were 9.0-34.0 and 5.6-12.9 times, respectively, greater than those in purified air matrix. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 were enhanced in ambient air matrix experiments with observed 2.0-7.5 times higher SO2 degradation rates and 2.6-6.8 times faster sulfate formation than that in purified air matrix, resulting in higher in-situ particle acidity and consequently promoting acid-catalyzed SOA formation. In the ambient air experiments although averaged OH radical levels were elevated probably due to heterogeneous formation of OH on particle surface and/or ozonolysis of alkenes, non-OH oxidation pathways of SO2 became even more dominating. Under the same organic aerosol mass concentration, the SOA yields of toluene in purified air matrix experiments matched very well with the two-product model curve by Ng et al. (2007), yet the yields in ambient air on average was over two times larger. The results however were much near the best fit curve by Hildebrandt et al. (2009) with the volatility basis set (VBS) approach.

  1. A comparison of single oxidants versus advanced oxidation processes as chlorine-alternatives for wild blueberry processing (Vaccinium angustifolium).

    PubMed

    Crowe, Kristi M; Bushway, Alfred A; Bushway, Rodney J; Davis-Dentici, Katherine; Hazen, Russell A

    2007-05-01

    Advanced oxidation processes and single chemical oxidants were evaluated for their antimicrobial efficacy against common spoilage bacteria isolated from lowbush blueberries. Predominant bacterial flora were identified using biochemical testing with the assessment of relative abundance using non-selective and differential media. Single chemical oxidants evaluated for postharvest processing of lowbush blueberries included 1% hydrogen peroxide, 100 ppm chlorine, and 1 ppm aqueous ozone while advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) included combinations of 1% hydrogen peroxide/UV, 100 ppm chlorine/UV, and 1 ppm ozone/1% hydrogen peroxide/UV. Enterobacter agglomerans and Pseudomonas fluorescens were found to comprise 90-95% of the bacterial flora on lowbush blueberries. Results of inoculation studies reveal significant log reductions (p< or 5) in populations of E. agglomerans and P. fluorescens on all samples receiving treatment with 1% hydrogen peroxide, 1% hydrogen peroxide/UV, 1 ppm ozone, or a combined ozone/hydrogen peroxide/UV treatment as compared to chlorine treatments and unwashed control berries. Although population reductions approached 2.5 log CFU/g, microbial reductions among these treatments were not found to be significantly different (p< or 5) from each other despite the synergistic potential that should result from AOPs; furthermore, as a single oxidant, UV inactivation of inoculated bacteria was minimal and did not prove effective as a non-aqueous bactericidal process for fresh pack blueberries. Overall, results indicate that hydrogen peroxide and ozone, as single chemical oxidants, are as effective as AOPs and could be considered as chlorine-alternatives in improving the microbiological quality of lowbush blueberries.

  2. The degradation of Isophorone by catalytic wet air oxidation on Ru/TiZrO4.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huangzhao; Yan, Xiaomiao; Li, Xianru; He, Songbo; Sun, Chenglin

    2013-01-15

    The catalyst Ru/TiZrO(4) was applied in the degradation of Isophorone by catalytic wet air oxidation. Mathematical models for the effects of reaction conditions on the Isophorone degradation by catalytic wet air oxidation were developed using a response surface methodology. A model was obtained for each response with multiple regression analysis and then was refined. Analysis of variance revealed that the models developed were adequate. The validity of the models was also verified by experimental data. Analysis of response surface showed that total organic carbon removal and Isophorone conversion were significantly affected (P≤0.01) by reaction time, temperature and their interactions, and affected (P≤0.05) by the square of reaction time. The point of zero charge of Ru/TiZrO(4) catalyst was about 1.72. The total organic carbon removal and Isophorone conversion had a great association with the zeta potential of Ru/TiZrO(4) catalyst. Finally, the degradation pathway of Isophorone in catalytic wet air oxidation was proposed. Within 410 h, the total organic carbon removal remained above 95%, indicating that the Ru/TiZrO(4) catalyst had a good stability.

  3. Continuous Process Improvement at Tinker Air Logistics Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Abstract The Air Logistics Complexes (ALC) represent the Air Force’s largest Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul ( MRO ) Operations. The ALCs strive to...this problem is important to the ALCs because it provides a roadmap for how to sustain Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul ( MRO ) actions with less...ALC) represent the Air Force’s largest Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul ( MRO ) Operations. The ALCs strive to become leaner by reducing Work In

  4. Oxidative stress and air pollution exposure during pregnancy: A molecular assessment.

    PubMed

    Nagiah, S; Phulukdaree, A; Naidoo, D; Ramcharan, K; Naidoo, R N; Moodley, D; Chuturgoon, A

    2015-08-01

    Chronic air pollution exposure during pregnancy can cause oxidative stress leading to adverse birth outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess and compare oxidative stress response in peripheral lymphocytes isolated from pregnant women from a highly industrialized locale (south Durban (SD); n = 50) and a control with lower air pollutant levels (north Durban (ND); n = 50). Oxidative stress response was measured by quantifying malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and a SuperArray gene panel. Mitochondrial function (adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels and mitochondrial depolarization), DNA integrity (comet assay and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) viability) and DNA repair (OGG1) were assessed. Antioxidant response was assessed by quantification of glutathione (GSH) and SOD2, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Levels of MDA (p = 0.9), mitochondrial depolarization (p = 0.88), ATP (1.89-fold), SOD2 (1.23-fold) and UCP2 (1.58-fold) gene expression were elevated in the SD group with significantly higher UCP2 protein levels (p = 0.05) and longer comet tail length (p = 0.0004). The expression of Nrf2 protein (p = 0.03) and mRNA levels (-1.37-fold), GSH concentration (p < 0.0001), mtDNA amplification (-2.04-fold) and OGG1 mRNA (-2.78-fold) activity were decreased in the SD group. Of the 84 oxidative stress-related genes evaluated, 26 were differentially regulated. Pregnant women exposed to higher air pollutant levels showed increased markers for oxidative stress and compromised DNA integrity and repair.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J.L.

    1992-09-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, a' is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, b' is from 0.3 to 0.5 and c' is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1[minus]d)ZrO[sub 2]-(d)Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] where d' is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO[sub 2], where X' is an elemental metal. 5 figs.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J. Lambert

    1992-01-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, "a" is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, "b" is from 0.3 to 0.5 and "c" is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1-d)ZrO.sub.2 -(d)Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 where "d" is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO.sub.2, where "X" is an elemental metal.

  7. Evaluation of Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation for Indoor AirApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Sullivan, D.P.; Fisk, W.J.

    2006-02-01

    Acceptable indoor air quality in office buildings may be achieved with less energy by combining effective air cleaning systems for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with particle filtration then by relying solely on ventilation. For such applications, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) systems are being developed for VOC destruction. An experimental evaluation of a UVPCO system is reported. The evaluation was unique in that it employed complex mixtures of VOCs commonly found in office buildings at realistically low concentrations. VOC conversion efficiencies varied over a broad range, usually exceeded 20%, and were as high as {approx}80%. Conversion efficiency generally diminished with increased air flow rate. Significant amounts of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were produced due to incomplete mineralization. The results indicate that formaldehyde and acetaldehyde production rates may need to be reduced before such UVPCO systems can be deployed safely in occupied buildings.

  8. Integration between chemical oxidation and membrane thermophilic biological process.

    PubMed

    Bertanza, G; Collivignarelli, M C; Crotti, B M; Pedrazzani, R

    2010-01-01

    Full scale applications of activated sludge thermophilic aerobic process for treatment of liquid wastes are rare. This experimental work was carried out at a facility, where a thermophilic reactor (1,000 m(3) volume) is operated. In order to improve the global performance of the plant, it was decided to upgrade it, by means of two membrane filtration units (ultrafiltration -UF-, in place of the final sedimentation, and nanofiltration -NF-). Subsequently, the integration with chemical oxidation (O(3) and H(2)O(2)/UV processes) was taken into consideration. Studied solutions dealt with oxidation of both the NF effluents (permeate and concentrate). Based on experimental results and economic evaluation, an algorithm was proposed for defining limits of convenience of this process.

  9. Comparison of different advanced oxidation processes for phenol degradation.

    PubMed

    Esplugas, Santiago; Giménez, Jaime; Contreras, Sandra; Pascual, Esther; Rodríguez, Miguel

    2002-02-01

    Advanced Oxidation Processes (O3, O3/H2O2, UV, UV/O3, UV/H2O2, O3/UV/H2O2, Fe2+ /H2O2 and photocatalysis) for degradation of phenol in aqueous solution have been studied in earlier works. In this paper, a comparison of these techniques is undertaken: pH influence, kinetic constants, stoichiometric coefficient and optimum oxidant/pollutant ratio. Of the tested processes, Fenton reagent was found to the fastest one for phenol degradation. However, lower costs were obtained with ozonation. In the ozone combinations, the best results were achieved with single ozonation. As for the UV processes, UV/H2O2 showed the highest degradation rate.

  10. One-dimensional analytical model for oxide thin film growth on Ti metal layers during laser heating in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Pérez, J. L.; Sakanaka, P. H.; Algatti, M. A.; Mendoza-Alvarez, J. G.; Cruz Orea, A.

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents the theoretical and experimental results for oxide thin film growth on titanium films previously deposited over glass substrate. Ti films of thickness 0.1 μm were heated by Nd:YAG laser pulses in air. The oxide tracks were created by moving the samples with a constant speed of 2 mm/s, under the laser action. The micro-topographic analysis of the tracks was performed by a microprofiler. The results taken along a straight line perpendicular to the track axis revealed a Gaussian profile that closely matches the laser's spatial mode profile, indicating the effectiveness of the surface temperature gradient on the film's growth process. The sample's micro-Raman spectra showed two strong bands at 447 and 612 cm -1 associated with the TiO 2 structure. This is a strong indication that thermo-oxidation reactions took place at the Ti film surface that reached an estimated temperature of 1160 K just due to the action of the first pulse. The results obtained from the numerical integration of the analytical equation which describes the oxidation rate (Wagner equation) are in agreement with the experimental data for film thickness in the high laser intensity region. This shows the partial accuracy of the one-dimensional model adopted for describing the film growth rate.

  11. Oxidation mechanisms of CF2Br2 and CH2Br2 induced by air nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Schiorlin, Milko; Marotta, Ester; Dal Molin, Marta; Paradisi, Cristina

    2013-01-02

    Oxidation mechanisms in air nonthermal plasma (NTP) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure were investigated in a corona reactor energized by +dc, -dc, or +pulsed high voltage.. The two bromomethanes CF(2)Br(2) and CH(2)Br(2) were chosen as model organic pollutants because of their very different reactivities with OH radicals. Thus, they served as useful mechanistic probes: they respond differently to the presence of humidity in the air and give different products. By FT-IR analysis of the postdischarge gas the following products were detected and quantified: CO(2) and CO in the case of CH(2)Br(2), CO(2) and F(2)C ═ O in the case of CF(2)Br(2). F(2)C ═ O is a long-lived oxidation intermediate due to its low reactivity with atmospheric radicals. It is however removed from the NTP processed gas by passage through a water scrubber resulting in hydrolysis to CO(2) and HF. Other noncarbon containing products of the discharge were also monitored by FT-IR analysis, including HNO(3) and N(2)O. Ozone, an important product of air NTP, was never detected in experiments with CF(2)Br(2) and CH(2)Br(2) because of the highly efficient ozone depleting cycles catalyzed by BrOx species formed from the bromomethanes. It is concluded that, regardless of the type of corona applied, CF(2)Br(2) reacts in air NTP via a common intermediate, the CF(2)Br radical. The possible reactions leading to this radical are discussed, including, for -dc activation, charge exchange with O(2)(-), a species detected by APCI mass spectrometry.

  12. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  13. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  14. A novel wire mesh "cell" for studying lipid oxidative processes by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    García-González, Diego L; van de Voort, Frederik R

    2009-05-01

    A novel infrared (IR) sample handling accessory has been developed to monitor and study oxidation processes of edible oils under moderate temperature conditions by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. A reusable stainless steel mesh IR "cell" was designed and evaluated from the standpoint of mesh size, transmission characteristics, its ability to entrap oil, and techniques to apply sample and normalize path length so as to obtain good quality, reproducible spectra. The concept is to entrap oil within the mesh by means of its inherent surface tension and to take advantage of the high surface area provided by the mesh to facilitate rapid oxidation of the oil by air at ambient or slightly elevated temperatures without having to resort to more extreme temperature conditions to track oxidative changes in real time. Changes taking place in canola oil at room temperature, in the dark and exposed to light, as well as at 50 degrees C are presented to illustrate the performance of the cell in monitoring oxidative changes in real time (e.g., formation of hydroperoxides, loss of cis and formation of trans double bonds). The mesh cell should be useful for comparing the relative performance of antioxidants as well as evaluating the oxidative stability of oils, among other applications.

  15. Decolorization and mineralization of Allura Red AC aqueous solutions by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdoulaye; Sirés, Ignasi; Garrido, José A; Rodríguez, Rosa M; Brillas, Enric

    2015-06-15

    The decolorization and mineralization of solutions containing 230 mg L(-1) of the food azo dye Allura Red AC at pH 3.0 have been studied upon treatment by electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). Experiments were performed with a stirred tank reactor containing a boron-doped diamond (BDD) or Pt anode and an air-diffusion cathode to generate H2O2. The main oxidants were hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The oxidation ability increased in the sequence EO-H2O2 < EF < PEF and faster degradation was always obtained using BDD. PEF process with BDD yielded almost total mineralization following similar trends in SO4(2-), ClO4(-) and NO3(-) media, whereas in Cl(-) medium, mineralization was inhibited by the formation of recalcitrant chloroderivatives. GC-MS analysis confirmed the cleavage of the −N=N− bond with formation of two main aromatics in SO4(2-) medium and three chloroaromatics in Cl(-) solutions. The effective oxidation of final oxalic and oxamic acids by BDD along with the photolysis of Fe(III)-oxalate species by UVA light accounted for the superiority of PEF with BDD. NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) ions were released during the mineralization.

  16. Anodic oxidation with doped diamond electrodes: a new advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Alexander; Stadelmann, Manuela; Blaschke, Manfred

    2003-10-31

    Boron-doped diamond anodes allow to directly produce OH* radicals from water electrolysis with very high current efficiencies. This has been explained by the very high overvoltage for oxygen production and many other anodic electrode processes on diamond anodes. Additionally, the boron-doped diamond electrodes exhibit a high mechanical and chemical stability. Anodic oxidation with diamond anodes is a new advanced oxidation process (AOP) with many advantages compared to other known chemical and photochemical AOPs. The present work reports on the use of diamond anodes for the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from several industrial wastewaters and from two synthetic wastewaters with malic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA) acid. Current efficiencies for the COD removal between 85 and 100% have been found. The formation and subsequent removal of by-products of the COD oxidation has been investigated for the first time. Economical considerations of this new AOP are included.

  17. Advanced oxidation processes in azo dye wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Papić, Sanja; Koprivanac, Natalija; Bozić, Ana Loncarić; Vujević, Dinko; Dragicević, Savka Kusar; Kusić, Hrvoje; Peternel, Igor

    2006-06-01

    The chemical degradation of synthetic azo dyes color index (C.I.) Acid Orange 7, C.I. Direct Orange 39, and C.I. Mordant Yellow 10 has been studied by the following advanced oxidation processes: Fenton, Fenton-like, ozonation, peroxone without or with addition of solid particles, zeolites HY, and NH4ZSM5. Spectrophotometric (UV/visible light spectrum) and total organic carbon measurements were used for determination of process efficiency and reaction kinetics. The degradation rates are evaluated by determining their rate constants. The different hydroxyl radical generation processes were comparatively studied, and the most efficient experimental conditions for the degradation of organic azo dyes solutions were determined.

  18. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

  19. Air oxidation method employed for the disulfide bond formation of natural and synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Calce, Enrica; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Amodeo, Pietro; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-08-01

    Among the available protocols, chemically driven approaches to oxidize cysteine may not be required for molecules that, under the native-like conditions, naturally fold in conformations ensuring an effective pairing of the right disulfide bridge pattern. In this contest, we successfully prepared the distinctin, a natural heterodimeric peptide, and some synthetic cyclic peptides that are inhibitors of the CXCR4 receptor. In the first case, the air oxidation reaction allowed to connect two peptide chains via disulfide bridge, while in the second case allowed the cyclization of rationally designed peptides by an intramolecular disulfide bridge. Computational approaches helped to either drive de-novo design or suggest structural modifications and optimal oxidization protocols for disulfide-containing molecules. They are able to both predict and to rationalize the propensity of molecules to spontaneously fold in suitable conformations to achieve the right disulfide bridges.

  20. The oxidation behavior of several Ti-Al alloys at 900 C in air

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz-Niederau, M.

    1999-10-01

    Ti-23Al, Ti-50Al and Ti-50Al-2Nb (at.%) were oxidized in air at 900 C for times up to 1130 hr. The resulting oxide scale structures were analyzed in great detail by metallographic and microprobe investigations and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} structures in the complex oxide scales were correlated with the course of the thermogravimetric curves. It appears that in order to achieve long-term protective behavior of the scale, it is necessary to stimulate the formation of a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier at the scale-metal interface and not at a position in the outer part of the scale. The Nb effect seems to be mostly due to this stimulation of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the interface.

  1. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-09-01

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am2 kg-1 is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications.

  2. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-09-15

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am(2) kg(-1) is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications.

  3. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am2 kg–1 is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications. PMID:27628898

  4. Solution processed metal oxide thin film hole transport layers for high performance organic solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Steirer, K. Xerxes; Berry, Joseph J.; Chesin, Jordan P.; Lloyd, Matthew T.; Widjonarko, Nicodemus Edwin; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.

    2017-01-10

    A method for the application of solution processed metal oxide hole transport layers in organic photovoltaic devices and related organic electronics devices is disclosed. The metal oxide may be derived from a metal-organic precursor enabling solution processing of an amorphous, p-type metal oxide. An organic photovoltaic device having solution processed, metal oxide, thin-film hole transport layer.

  5. EMISSIONS PROCESSING FOR THE ETA/ CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA and EPA have created an Air Quality Forecast (AQF) system. This AQF system links an adaptation of the EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality Model with the 12 kilometer ETA model running operationally at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Predication (NCEP). One of the...

  6. Fracture process of nonstoichiometric oxide based solid oxide fuel cell under oxidizing/reducing gradient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazuhisa; Yashiro, Keiji; Kawada, Tatsuya; Yugami, Hiroo; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Mizusaki, Junichiro

    The influence of chemically induced expansion on the fracture damage of a nonstoichiometric oxide (ceria) based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) single cell laminate was investigated by using numerical stress analyses under oxidizing/reducing gradient condition. The single cell examined in this study was composed of electrolyte (Ce 0.8Sm 0.2O 2- δ), anode (Cermets of Ni-Ce 0.8Sm 0.2O 2- δ), and cathode (La 0.6Sr 0.4Co 0.2Fe 0.8O 3- δ), respectively. The finite element method (FEM) was employed to calculate the residual stress, thermal stresses, and chemically induced expansion stresses for the single cell. The residual and thermal stresses were calculated much smaller than the fracture strength of the individual components of the single cell. On the other hand, the chemically induced expansion stresses were shown to remarkably increase for the temperature range greater than 973 K and accounted their magnitude for primary part of the induced stress. It was shown from the FEM that the maximum circumferential stress induced in the single cell exceeded the fracture strength of the individual components at the onset of the fracture damage detect by acoustic emission (AE) method.

  7. Reduction of nitrous oxide emissions from biological nutrient removal processes by thermal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Pedros, Philip B; Askari, Omid; Metghalchi, Hameed

    2016-12-01

    During the last decade municipal wastewater treatment plants have been regulated with increasingly stringent nutrient removal requirements including nitrogen. Typically biological treatment processes are employed to meet these limits. Although the nitrogen in the wastewater stream is reduced, certain steps in the biological processes allow for the release of gaseous nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas (GHG). A comprehensive study was conducted to investigate the potential to mitigate N2O emissions from biological nutrient removal (BNR) processes by means of thermal decomposition. The study examined using the off gases from the biological process, instead of ambient air, as the oxidant gas for the combustion of biomethane. A detailed analysis was done to examine the concentration of N2O and 58 other gases that exited the combustion process. The analysis was based on the assumption that the exhaust gases were in chemical equilibrium since the residence time in the combustor is sufficiently longer than the chemical characteristics. For all inlet N2O concentrations the outlet concentrations were close to zero. Additionally, the emission of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and ten commonly occurring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also examined as a means of odor control for biological secondary treatment processes or as potential emissions from an anaerobic reactor of a BNR process. The sulfur released from the H2S formed sulfur dioxide (SO2) and eight of the ten VOCs were destroyed.

  8. DETECTION AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION INDUCED CARDIOPULMONARY OXIDATIVE STRESS USING A TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODEL AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Identification of particle characteristics and biological mechanism(s) responsible for the adverse pulmonary and cardiovascular responses associated with particulate air pollution exposure remains a critical research activity. We have employed an oxidative stress sensitive an...

  9. Flow mechanism for the long-range transport of air pollutants by the sea breeze causing inland nighttime high oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, H.; Mitsumoto, S.; Kurita, H.

    1988-02-01

    Flow mechanism causing nightttime smog was investigated by analyzing 1) continuous records of meteorological data and concentration of oxidants (Ox) for 15 days and 2) aircraft data along the transportation route of a polluted air mass.

  10. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines.

  11. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  12. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1995-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  13. Planar solid oxide fuel cell with staged indirect-internal air and fuel preheating and reformation

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A; Williams, Mark C

    2003-10-21

    A solid oxide fuel cell arrangement and method of use that provides internal preheating of both fuel and air in order to maintain the optimum operating temperature for the production of energy. The internal preheat passes are created by the addition of two plates, one on either side of the bipolar plate, such that these plates create additional passes through the fuel cell. This internal preheat fuel cell configuration and method reduce the requirements for external heat exchanger units and air compressors. Air or fuel may be added to the fuel cell as required to maintain the optimum operating temperature through a cathode control valve or an anode control valve, respectively. A control loop comprises a temperature sensing means within the preheat air and fuel passes, a means to compare the measured temperature to a set point temperature and a determination based on the comparison as to whether the control valves should allow additional air or fuel into the preheat or bypass manifolds of the fuel cell.

  14. Osteoconductivity and Hydrophilicity of TiO(2) Coatings on Ti Substrates Prepared by Different Oxidizing Processes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Dai; Kawai, Ikki; Kuroda, Kensuke; Ichino, Ryoichi; Okido, Masazumi; Seki, Azusa

    2012-01-01

    Various techniques for forming TiO(2) coatings on Ti have been investigated for the improvement of the osteoconductivity of Ti implants. However, it is not clear how the oxidizing process affects this osteoconductivity. In this study, TiO(2) coatings were prepared using the following three processes: anodizing in 0.1 M H(3)PO(4) or 0.1 M NaOH aqueous solution; thermal oxidation at 673 K for 2 h in air; and a two-step process of anodizing followed by thermal oxidation. The oxide coatings were evaluated using SEM, XRD, and XPS. The water contact angle on the TiO(2) coatings was measured as a surface property. The osteoconductivity of these samples was evaluated by measuring the contact ratio of formed hard tissue on the implanted samples (defined as the R(B-I) value) after 14 d implantation in rats' tibias. Anatase was formed by anodizing and rutile by thermal oxidation, but the difference in the TiO(2) crystal structure did not influence the osteoconductivity. Anodized TiO(2) coatings were hydrophilic, but thermally oxidized TiO(2) coatings were less hydrophilic than anodized TiO(2) coatings because they lacked in surface OH groups. The TiO(2) coating process using anodizing without thermal oxidation gave effective improvement of the osteoconductivity of Ti samples.

  15. Osteoconductivity and Hydrophilicity of TiO2 Coatings on Ti Substrates Prepared by Different Oxidizing Processes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Dai; Kawai, Ikki; Kuroda, Kensuke; Ichino, Ryoichi; Okido, Masazumi; Seki, Azusa

    2012-01-01

    Various techniques for forming TiO2 coatings on Ti have been investigated for the improvement of the osteoconductivity of Ti implants. However, it is not clear how the oxidizing process affects this osteoconductivity. In this study, TiO2 coatings were prepared using the following three processes: anodizing in 0.1 M H3PO4 or 0.1 M NaOH aqueous solution; thermal oxidation at 673 K for 2 h in air; and a two-step process of anodizing followed by thermal oxidation. The oxide coatings were evaluated using SEM, XRD, and XPS. The water contact angle on the TiO2 coatings was measured as a surface property. The osteoconductivity of these samples was evaluated by measuring the contact ratio of formed hard tissue on the implanted samples (defined as the RB-I value) after 14 d implantation in rats' tibias. Anatase was formed by anodizing and rutile by thermal oxidation, but the difference in the TiO2 crystal structure did not influence the osteoconductivity. Anodized TiO2 coatings were hydrophilic, but thermally oxidized TiO2 coatings were less hydrophilic than anodized TiO2 coatings because they lacked in surface OH groups. The TiO2 coating process using anodizing without thermal oxidation gave effective improvement of the osteoconductivity of Ti samples. PMID:23316128

  16. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1988-09-13

    A process is described for reducing the concentration of nitrogen oxides in an effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel, which process comprises injecting into the effluent ammonia and an enhancer selected from the group consisting of hexamethylenetetramine, a lower carbon alcohol, a hydroxyl amino hydrocarbon, sugar, furfural, furfural derivatives, an amino acid, a protein-containing composition, mixtures of ortho-, meta-, and para-methyl phenols, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, calcium cyanamide, biuret, 1,1'-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, and mixtures thereof, at an effluent temperature above about 1300/sup 0/F and a molar ratio of nitrogen in the ammonia and enhancer to the baseline nitrogen oxides level of about 1:5 to about 6:1 wherein the excess of oxygen in the effluent is no greater than about 6%.

  17. Effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas-turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen from a gas-turbine combustor. Combustor inlet-air temperature ranged from 450 F to 1050 F. The tests were run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NO sub x emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet-air humidity at a constant exponential rate of 19 percent per mass percent water vapor in the air. This decrease of NO sub x emission index with increasing humidity was found to be independent of inlet-air temperature.

  18. High performance air electrode for solid oxide regenerative fuel cells fabricated by infiltration of nano-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-il; Kim, Jeonghee; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook; Je, Hae-June; Lee, Hae-Weon; Song, Huesup; Yoon, Kyung Joong

    2014-03-01

    A high performance air electrode fabricated by infiltration of highly active nano-catalysts into a porous scaffold is demonstrated for high-temperature solid oxide regenerative fuel cells (SORFCs). The nitrate precursor solution for Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3 (SSC) catalyst is impregnated into a porous La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF)-gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) composite backbone, and extremely fine SSC nano-particles are uniformly synthesized by in-situ crystallization at the initial stage of SORFC operation via homogeneous nucleation induced by urea decomposition. The SSC nano-catalysts are in the size range of 40-80 nm and stable against coarsening upon the SORFC operation at 750 °C. The electrochemical performance is significantly improved by incorporation of SSC nano-catalysts in both power generation and hydrogen production modes. Systematic analysis on the impedance spectra reveals that the surface modification of the air electrode with nano-catalysts remarkably accelerates the chemical surface exchange reactions for both O2 reduction and O2- oxidation, which are the major limiting processes for SORFC performance.

  19. OXIDATION OF INCONEL 718 IN AIR AT TEMPERATURES FROM 973K TO 1620K.

    SciTech Connect

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2000-10-01

    As part of the APT project, it was necessary to quantify the release of tungsten from the APT spallation target during postulated accident conditions in order to develop accident source terms for accident consequence characterization. Experiments with tungsten rods at high temperatures in a flowing steam environment characteristic of postulated accidents revealed that considerable vaporization of the tungsten occurred as a result of reactions with the steam and that the aerosols which formed were readily transported away from the tungsten surfaces, thus exposing fresh tungsten to react with more steam. The resulting tungsten release fractions and source terms were undesirable and it was decided to clad the tungsten target with Inconel 718 in order to protect it from contact with steam during an accident and mitigate the accident source term and the consequences. As part of the material selection criteria, experiments were conducted with Inconel 718 at high temperatures to evaluate the rate of oxidation of the proposed clad material over as wide a temperature range as possible, as well as to determine the high-temperature failure limit of the material. Samples of Inconel 718 were inserted into a preheated furnace at temperatures ranging from 973 K to 1620 K and oxidized in air for varying periods of time. After oxidizing in air at a constant temperature for the prescribed time and then being allowed to cool, the samples would be reweighed to determine their weight gain due to the uptake of oxygen. From these weight gain measurements, it was possible to identify three regimes of oxidation for Inconel 718: a low-temperature regime in which the samples became passivated after the initial oxidation, an intermediate-temperature regime in which the rate of oxidation was limited by diffusion and exhibited a constant parabolic rate dependence, and a high-temperature regime in which material deformation and damage accompanied an accelerated oxidation rate above the parabolic

  20. Process for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: a) directing a vapor stream containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; b) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent; c) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; d) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrate form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; e) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; f) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level of hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1 % by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; g) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and h) removing said solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  1. Lipid oxidation volatiles absent in milk after selected ultrasound processing.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Pablo; Torkamani, Amir Ehsan; Leong, Thomas; Kolb, Veronika; Watkins, Peter; Ajlouni, Said; Singh, Tanoj Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic processing can suit a number of potential applications in the dairy industry. However, the impact of ultrasound treatment on milk stability during storage has not been fully explored under wider ranges of frequencies, specific energies and temperature applications. The effect of ultrasonication on lipid oxidation was investigated in various types of milk. Four batches of raw milk (up to 2L) were sonicated at various frequencies (20, 400, 1000, 1600 and 2000kHz), using different temperatures (4, 20, 45 and 63°C), sonication times and ultrasound energy inputs up to 409kJ/kg. Pasteurized skim milk was also sonicated at low and high frequency for comparison. In selected experiments, non-sonicated and sonicated samples were stored at 4°C and were drawn periodically up to 14days for SPME-GCMS analysis. The cavitational yield, characterized in all systems in water, was highest between 400kHz and 1000kHz. Volatile compounds from milk lipid oxidation were detected and exceeded their odor threshold values at 400kHz and 1000kHz at specific energies greater than 271kJ/kg in raw milk. However, no oxidative volatile compounds were detected below 230kJ/kg in batch systems at the tested frequencies under refrigerated conditions. Skim milk showed a lower energy threshold for oxidative volatile formation. The same oxidative volatiles were detected after various passes of milk through a 0.3L flow cell enclosing a 20kHz horn and operating above 90kJ/kg. This study showed that lipid oxidation in milk can be controlled by decreasing the sonication time and the temperature in the system depending on the fat content in the sample among other factors.

  2. Multiphase Processing of Isoprene Oxidation Products - Kinetic and Product Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Schoene, L.; Schindelka, J.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Isoprene represents a significant fraction of NMHC in the troposphere with recently estimated emission rates of 500-750 TgC yr-1 (1). Due to its enormous source strength, the fate of isoprene and its degradation products is important in atmospheric processes. Possible ascendancies of such oxidation processes are the regional ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Some aspects of SOA formation from isoprene and its degradation products have already been studied by chamber studies (2,3). Aqueous phase oxidation processes which may occur after phase transfer of ‘early’ oxidation products are often neglected. But these processes provide a potentially important source for organic particle mass constituents such as carboxylic acids. The majority of existing aqueous phase modelling studies focus only on ‘later’ products such as methylglyoxal and oxalic acid. Yet, a recent field study reports much higher aqueous phase concentrations of some ‘earlier’ isoprene oxidation products including methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) than expected (4). This indicates a possibly underestimated importance of multiphase chemical processes in the course of the isoprene oxidation as a source for the production of organic particle mass together with known ‘heterogeneous processes’ such as the direct condensation of low-volatility products from gas phase processes onto existing particle surfaces. In order to implement the isoprene multiphase chemistry in atmospheric models detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies are needed. Hence, the temperature dependence of MACR, MVK, methacrylic acid and acrylic acid exposed to NO3, SO4- and OH radicals in the aqueous phase was investigated. The measurements were performed using a laser-photolysis laser long path absorption technique. The analysis confirmed in all cases the much higher reactivity of the OH radical in comparison to SO4- and NO3 radicals. The temperature dependence is most distinct for NO3

  3. Gas chromatograph analysis on closed air and nitrogen oxide storage atmospheres of recalcitrant seeds of Quercus Alba

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage of recalcitrant seeds remains an unsolved problem. This study investigated the quantitative gas analysis of nitrous oxide (N2O) and air atmospheres on the recalcitrant seeds of Quercus alba by using gas chromatograph. Ten seeds were placed in each sealed atmospheric system of air and 98/2% N...

  4. Using indium tin oxide material to implement the imaging of microwave plasma ignition process

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Hou, Lingyun; Zhang, Guixin Zhang, Boya; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Zhi; Huang, Jian

    2014-02-17

    In this paper, a method is introduced to get global observation of microwave plasma ignition process at high pressure. A microwave resonator was designed with an indium tin oxide coated glass at bottom. Microwave plasma ignition was implemented in methane and air mixture at 10 bars by a 2 ms-3 kW-2.45 GHz microwave pulse, and the high speed images of the ignition process were obtained. The images visually proved that microwave plasma ignition could lead to a multi-point ignition. The system may also be applied to obtain Schlieren images, which is commonly used to observe the development of flame kernel in an ignition process.

  5. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.; Sprague, B.N.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of the concentration of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. The process comprises introducing a treatment agent which comprises a composition selected from the group consisting of NH/sub 4/-lignosulfonate, calcium lignosulfonate, 2-furoic acid, 1,3 dioxolane, tetrahydrofuran, furfurylamine, furfurylalcohol, gluconic acid, citric acid, n-butyl acetate, 1,3 butylene glycol, methylal, tetrahydrofuryl alcohol, furan, fish oil, coumalic acid, furfuryl acetate, tetrahydrofuran 2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid, tetrahydrofurylamine, furylacrylic acid, tetrahydropyran, 2,5-furandimethanol, mannitol, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, acetic anhydride, oxalic acid, mucic acid and d-galactose.

  6. Application of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes to the mineralization of the herbicide diuron.

    PubMed

    Pipi, Angelo R F; Sirés, Ignasi; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Brillas, Enric

    2014-08-01

    Here, solutions with 0.185mM of the herbicide diuron of pH 3.0 have been treated by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) like electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) or solar PEF (SPEF). Trials were performed in stirred tank reactors of 100mL and in a recirculation flow plant of 2.5L using a filter-press reactor with a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air-diffusion cathode for H2O2 electrogeneration. Oxidant hydroxyl radicals were formed from water oxidation at the anode and/or in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between added Fe(2+) and generated H2O2. In both systems, the relative oxidation ability of the EAOPs increased in the sequence EO-H2O2processes were more powerful due to the photolysis of intermediates by UV radiation. In the stirred tank reactor, the PEF treatment with BDD was the most potent method, yielding 93% mineralization after 360 min at 100 mA cm(-2). In the flow plant, the SPEF process attained a maximum mineralization of 70% at 100 mA cm(-2). Lower current densities slightly reduced the mineralization degree in SPEF, enhancing the current efficiency and dropping the energy consumption. The diuron decay always obeyed a pseudo-first-order kinetics, with a much greater apparent rate constant in EF and SPEF compared to EO-H2O2. Oxalic and oxamic acids were detected as final carboxylic acids. Ammonium and chloride ions were also released, the latter ion being partially converted into chlorate and perchlorate ions at the BDD surface.

  7. Characterization of air pollutants from an activated sludge process

    SciTech Connect

    Scheff, P.A.; Holden, J.A.; Wadden, R.A.

    1981-02-01

    An eight-month monitoring study was conducted to characterize air pollutants near a large activated sludge plant in a Chicago suburb. Air pollutants detected include aerobic bacteria-containing particles, total suspended particulates, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, chloride, hydrogen sulfides, and trace elements. The wastewater treatment plant is concluded to be a significant source of total coliforms and atmospheric bacteria-containing particles. (6 maps, 23 references, 6 tables)

  8. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  9. Thermal Behavior Study of the MoVTeNb Oxide Catalyst for Selective Oxidation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Idris, R.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.

    2009-06-01

    Several parameters involved in preparing the multi metal oxide (MMO) catalysts (Mo{sub 1}V{sub 0.3}Te{sub 0.23}Nb{sub 0.12}O{sub x}) for selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid (AA) were investigated. These included the proper pre-calcined and calcinations atmosphere effect on the performance of the catalysts. It was found that each metal element plays a critical role to the performance of an effective catalyst and also the calcinations under a non-flow inert atmosphere. The characterization results from XRD, SEM, TG and DSC show the important differences depending on the activation procedures of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst. The XRD analysis is used to identify the phase inventory of the MoVTeNb oxide catalysts. The structure of orthorhombic M1, M2, TeMo{sub 5}O{sub 16}, V{sub 0.95}Mo{sub 0.97}O{sub 5} and Mo{sub 5}O{sub 14} phase was investigated. The orthorhombic M1 phase is the most active and selective phase and is responsible for the major of the efficiently of the best catalyst for selective oxidation process. TGA and DTG allow the identification of the number and types, of reactions involving evaporation of small molecules from removal of ligands and water to condensation or drying processes. From all these analyses it was proven that the activation procedures would affect the performance of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst.

  10. Oxidation-reduction catalyst and its process of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a ruthenium stabilized oxidation-reduction catalyst useful for oxidizing carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds, and reducing nitrogen oxide species in oxidizing environments, substantially without the formation of toxic and volatile ruthenium oxide species upon said oxidizing environment being at high temperatures.

  11. Conversion of the refractory ammonia and acetic acid in catalytic wet air oxidation of animal byproducts.

    PubMed

    Fontanier, Virginie; Zalouk, Sofiane; Barbati, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of slaughtered animal byproducts (ABPs) were investigated. Two step experiment was carried out consisting of a non-catalysed WAO run followed by a CWAO run at 170-275 degrees C, 20 MPa, and reaction time 180 min. The WAO (1st step) of sample (5 g/L total organic carbon (TOC)) yielded (82.0 +/- 4)% TOC removal and (78.4 +/- 13.2)% conversion of the initial organic-N into NH4(+)-N. Four metal catalysts (Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru) supported over alumina have been tested in catalytic WAO (2nd step) at elevated pH to enhance ammonia conversion and organic matter removal, particularly acetic acid. It was found that the catalysts Ru, Pt, and Rh had significant effects on the TOC removal (95.1%, 99.5% and 96.7%, respectively) and on the abatement of ammonia (93.4%, 96.7% and 96.3%, respectively) with high nitrogen selectivity. The catalyst Pd was found to have the less activity while Pt had the best performance. The X-Ray diffraction analysis showed that the support of catalyst was not stable under the experimental conditions since it reacted with phosphate present in solution. Nitrite and nitrate ions were monitored during the oxidation reaction and it was concluded that CWAO of ammonia in real waste treatment framework was in good agreement with the results obtained from the literature for ideal solutions of ammonia.

  12. Gas diffusion-type oxygen electrode using perovskite-type oxides for metal-air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hyodo, Takeo; Miura, Norio; Yamazoe, Noboru

    1995-12-31

    In order to develop an air cathode of metal-air batteries, oxygen reduction behavior of gas diffusion-type carbon electrodes loaded with perovskite-type oxides, La{sub 1{minus}x}A{prime}{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (A{prime} = Ca, Sr, Ba, 0 {le} x {le} 1.0), was examined in 8 M KOH at 60 C. Among the oxide catalysts tested, La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} (specific surface area: 21.5 m{sup 2}{center_dot}g{sup {minus}1}) gave the highest electrode performance. On the basis of electrode reaction kinetics, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition rates, and temperature programmed desorption of oxygen, it was concluded that such a performance was attributable to the active sites of the oxide for the direct 4-electron reduction of oxygen. Moreover, the electrode using La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} was found to be rather stable in a short-term operation for 90 h at 300 mA{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}.

  13. The first commercial supercritical water oxidation sludge processing plant.

    PubMed

    Griffith, James W; Raymond, Dennis H

    2002-01-01

    Final disposal of sludge continues to be one of the more pressing problems for the wastewater treatment industry. Present regulations for municipal sludge have favored beneficial use, primarily in land application. However, several agencies and entities have warned of potential health risks associated with these methods. Hydrothermal oxidation provides an alternative method that addresses the health concerns associated with sludge disposal by completely converting all organic matter in the sludge to carbon dioxide, water, and other innocuous materials. A hydrothermal oxidation system using HydroProcessing, L.L.C.'s HydroSolids process has been installed at Harlingen, Texas to process up to 9.8 dry tons per day of sludge. Based on a literature review, this system is the largest hydrothermal oxidation system in the world, and the only one built specifically to process a sludge. Start up of Unit 1 of two units of the HTO system began in April 2001. Early results have indicated COD conversion rates in excess of 99.9%. Harlingen Waterworks System estimates that the HydroSolids system will cost less than other alternatives such as autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion and more traditional forms of digestion that still require dewatering and final disposal. The Waterworks intends to generate income from the sale of energy in the form of hot water and the use of carbon dioxide from the HydroSolids process for neutralization of high pH industrial effluent. The Waterworks also expects to generate income from the treatment of septage and grease trap wastes.

  14. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Peng, Zhe; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-03-01

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen-Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4-1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic

  15. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; ...

    2016-03-08

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen–Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed formore » semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of

  16. Processing, Microstructure, and Oxidation Behavior of Iron Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeji; Noh, Yoonsook; Choi, Hyelim; Hong, Kicheol; Kwon, Kyungjung; Choe, Heeman

    2016-09-01

    With its historically long popularity in major structural applications, the use of iron (Fe) has also recently begun to be explored as an advanced functional material. For this purpose, it is more advantageous to use Fe as a porous structure, simply because it can provide a greater surface area and a higher reaction rate. This study uses a freeze-casting method, which consists of simple and low-cost processing steps, to produce Fe foam with a mean pore size of 10 μm. We examine the influences of various parameters ( i.e., mold bottom temperature, powder content, and sintering time) on the processing of Fe foam, along with its oxidation kinetics at 823 K (550 °C) with various heat-treatment times. We confirm that Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 oxide layers are successfully formed on the surface of Fe foam. With the Fe oxide layers as an active anode material, the Fe foam can potentially be used as a three-dimensional anode current collector for an advanced lithium-ion battery.

  17. Effects of high temperature and exposure to air on mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Lmk 1819) hemocyte phagocytosis: modulation of spreading and oxidative response.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Francesco; Narcisi, Valeria; Calzetta, Angela; Gioia, Luisa; Finoia, Maria G; Latini, Mario; Tiscar, Pietro G

    2013-06-01

    Hemocytes are a critical component of the mussel defense system and the present study aims at investigating their spreading and oxidative properties during phagocytosis under in vivo experimental stress conditions. The spreading ability was measured by an automated cell analyzer on the basis of the circularity, a parameter corresponding to the hemocyte roundness. The oxidative activity was investigated by micromethod assay, measuring the respiratory burst as expression of the fluorescence generated by the oxidation of specific probe. Following the application of high temperature and exposure to air, there was evidence of negative modulation of spreading and oxidative response, as revealed by a cell roundness increase and fluorescence generation decrease. Therefore, the fall of respiratory burst appeared as matched with the inhibition of hemocyte morphological activation, suggesting a potential depression of the phagocytosis process and confirming the application of the circularity parameter as potential stress marker, both in experimental and field studies.

  18. PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM FROM ITS OXIDES

    DOEpatents

    Weissman, S.I.; Perlman, M.L.; Lipkin, D.

    1959-10-13

    A method is described for obtaining a carbide of plutonium and two methods for obtaining plutonium metal from its oxides. One of the latter involves heating the oxide, in particular PuO/sub 2/, to a temperature of 1200 to 1500 deg C with the stoichiometrical amount of carbon to fornn CO in a hard vacuum (3 to 10 microns Hg), the reduced and vaporized plutonium being collected on a condensing surface above the reaction crucible. When an excess of carbon is used with the PuO/sub 2/, a carbide of plutonium is formed at a crucible temperature of 1400 to 1500 deg C. The process may be halted and the carbide removed, or the reaction temperature can be increased to 1900 to 2100 deg C at the same low pressure to dissociate the carbide, in which case the plutonium is distilled out and collected on the same condensing surface.

  19. Novel fibrous catalyst in advanced oxidation of photographic processing effluents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuxian; Ishtchenko, Vera V; Huddersman, Katherine D

    2006-01-01

    A novel fibrous catalyst was used to destroy the pollutants in Kodak Non-Silver-Bearing (NSB) photographic processing effluents with high chemical oxygen demand (COD) value. The oxidation activity of the catalyst was evaluated in terms of COD reduction of the effluent. The effects of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and effluent, amount of catalyst, reaction time and temperature on the COD reduction were studied. In addition, the combination of catalysis with UV treatment on the COD reduction of the effluent was also investigated. Based on the experimental results, room temperature is preferred for the catalytic oxidation of NSB effluent. It was found that COD reduction of the effluent depends on the amount of hydrogen peroxide added to the feed in relation to the mass of catalyst used. Significant COD reduction (up to 52%) is achieved after 4 hours of catalytic treatment. Extending the duration of catalysis up to 24 hours gives further slight decrease in COD value.

  20. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Kuo, L.; Li, B.

    1999-06-29

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO[sub 3]. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La[sub w]Ca[sub x]Ln[sub y]Ce[sub z]MnO[sub 3], wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics. 10 figs.

  1. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Kuo, Lewis; Li, Baozhen

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La.sub.w Ca.sub.x Ln.sub.y Ce.sub.z MnO.sub.3, wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics.

  2. Processing and Characterization of Sol-Gel Cerium Oxide Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, Zachary D.; Padilla Cintron, Cristina

    2016-09-27

    Of interest to space exploration and power generation, Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) can provide long-term power to remote electronic systems without the need for refueling or replacement. Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) remains one of the more promising materials for thermoelectric power generation due to its high power density, long half-life, and low gamma emissions. Traditional methods for processing Pu-238 include ball milling irregular precipitated powders before pressing and sintering into a dense pellet. The resulting submicron particulates of Pu-238 quickly accumulate and contaminate glove boxes. An alternative and dust-free method for Pu-238 processing is internal gelation via sol-gel techniques. Sol-gel methodology creates monodisperse and uniform microspheres that can be packed and pressed into a pellet. For this study cerium oxide microspheres were produced as a surrogate to Pu-238. The similar electronic orbitals between cerium and plutonium make cerium an ideal choice for non-radioactive work. Before the microspheres can be sintered and pressed they must be washed to remove the processing oil and any unreacted substituents. An investigation was performed on the washing step to find an appropriate wash solution that reduced waste and flammable risk. Cerium oxide microspheres were processed, washed, and characterized to determine the effectiveness of the new wash solution.

  3. Retrieval of the Nitrous Oxide Profiles using the AIRS Data in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Ma, P.; Tao, J.; Li, X.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Li, S.; Xiong, X.

    2014-12-01

    As an important greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance, the 100-year global warming potential of Nitrous Oxide (N2O) is almost 300 times higher than that of carbon dioxide. However, there are still large uncertainties about the quantitative N2O emission and its feedback to climate change due to the coarse ground-based network. This approach attempts to retrieve the N2O profiles from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) data. First, the sensitivity of atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles and surface parameters between two spectral absorption bands were simulated by using the radiative transfer model. Second, the eigenvector regression algorithm is used to construct a priori state. Third, an optimal estimate method was developed based on the band selection of N2O. Finally, we compared our retrieved AIRS profiles with HIPPO data, and analyzed the seasonal and annual N2O distribution in China from 2004 to 2013.

  4. Microleakage on Class V glass ionomer restorations after cavity preparation with aluminum oxide air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Rocha, Renata Andréa Salvitti de Sá; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2005-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the marginal microleakage on class V cavities prepared with aluminum oxide air abrasion and restored with different glass ionomer cements. The cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 15 sound third molars with an air- abrasion device (Kreativ Mach 4.1; New Image) using a 27.5-microm aluminum oxide particle stream, and were assigned to 3 groups of 10 cavities each. The restorative materials were: group I, a conventional glass ionomer cement (Ketac-Fil); groups II and III, resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Vitremer R and Fuji II LC, respectively). After placement of the restorations, the teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, polished and then submitted to a thermocycling regimen of 500 cycles, isolated, immersed in 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 24 h, included and serially sectioned. Microleakage was assessed by viewing the specimens under an optical microscope connected to a color video camera and a computer. The images obtained were digitized and analyzed for microleakage using software that allows for a standard quantitative assessment of dye penetration in millimeters. Statistical analysis was done using the Kruskall-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests. Means of dye penetration (%) were: occlusal - I: 25.76 +/- 34.35, II: 20.00 +/- 42.16, III: 28.25 +/- 41.67; cervical - I: 23.72 +/- 41.84; II: 44.22 +/- 49.69, III: 39.27 +/- 50.74. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were observed among either the glass ionomer cements or the margins. In conclusion, class V cavities restored with either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cements after preparation with aluminum oxide air abrasion did not show complete sealing at the enamel and dentin/cementum margins.

  5. 76 FR 54528 - Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) of the Aircraft Certification Service (AIR) Process for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... (AIR) Process for the Sequencing of Certification and Validation Projects AGENCY: Federal Aviation...) standard operating procedure (SOP) describing the process used to sequence certification projects that are... Procedure--Aircraft Certification Service Project Sequencing to: Federal Aviation Administration,...

  6. Application of an adsorptive-thermocatalytic process for BTX removal from polluted air flow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Zero valent iron and copper oxide nanoparticles (30-60 nm) were coated on a bed of natural zeolite (Clinoptilolite) with 1-2 mm grains and arranged as a dual filter in a stainless steel cylindrical reactor (I.D 4.5 cm and L = 30 cm) to investigating the coated bed removal efficiency for BTX. The experiments were conducted in three steps. First, with an air flow of 1.5 L/min and temperature range of 38 (ambient temperature) to 600°C the BTX removal and mineralization was surveyed. Then, in an optimized temperature the effect of flow rate and pollution loading rate were surveyed on BTX removal. Results The BTX removal at 300 and 400°C were respectively up to 87.47% and 94.03%. Also in these temperatures respectively 37.21% and 90.42% of BTX mineralization were achieved. In the retention times of 14.1 s and 7.05 s, respectively 96.18% and 78.42% of BTX was removed. Conclusions According to the results, this adsorptive-thermocatalytic process with using Clinoptilolite as an adsorbent bed and combined Fe0 and Cu2O nanoparticles as catalysts can be an efficient and competitive process in the condition of high flow rate and high pollution loading rate with an adequate process temperature of 350°C. PMID:24955244

  7. Oxidative Nitration of Styrenes for the Recycling of Low-Concentrated Nitrogen Dioxide in Air.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Dagmar; de Salas, Cristina; Heinrich, Markus R

    2015-09-21

    The oxidative nitration of styrenes in ethyl acetate represents a metal-free, environmentally friendly, and sustainable technique to recover even low concentrations of NO2 in air. Favorable features are that the product mixture comprising nitroalcohols, nitroketones, and nitro nitrates simplifies at lower concentrations of NO2 . Experiments in a miniplant-type 10 L wet scrubber demonstrated that the recycling technique is well applicable on larger scales at which initial NO2 concentrations of >10 000 ppm were reliably reduced to less than 40 ppm.

  8. Formation of calcium in the products of iron oxide-aluminum thermite combustion in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, A. A.; Gromov, A. M.; Popenko, E. M.; Sergienko, A. V.; Sabinskaya, O. G.; Raab, B.; Teipel, U.

    2016-10-01

    The composition of condensed products resulting from the combustion of thermite mixtures (Al + Fe2O3) in air is studied by precise methods. It is shown that during combustion, calcium is formed and stabilized in amounts of maximal 0.55 wt %, while is missing from reactants of 99.7 wt % purity. To explain this, it is hypothesized that a low-energy nuclear reaction takes place alongside the reactions of aluminum oxidation and nitridation, resulting in the formation of calcium (Kervran-Bolotov reaction).

  9. Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of organics for air purification by near UV irradiated titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hager, S; Bauer, R

    1999-03-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of high concentrations of various organic pollutants (acetone, 2-propanol and toluene) in dry and humid air streams was carried out using a specially designed photoreactor based on the UV-TiO2 principle. The influence of several parameters which control the destruction efficiency (flow rate, initial contaminant and water vapour concentration, temperature and light intensity) has been studied. The conversion was maximal at room temperature, low flow rates and low initial contaminant concentrations. The presence of water in the inlet stream strongly affected the performance of the catalyst. The primary oxidation product of 2-propanol was acetone.

  10. A technique of purification process of single-walled carbon nanotubes with air.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Fang, Yan

    2007-07-01

    A technique of purifying SWCNTs has been developed by means of oxidizing carbonaceous particles with air using fluidized-bed. Air was introduced into the fluidized-bed by pump with controllable flux. The powders were "boiling" at a temperature of 550 degrees C for 50 min. With this technique, the flux can be controlled simply. The fluidized-bed was applied as the heating apparatus instead of rotated quartz tubes. The air and the powders can be mixed with each other more sufficiently. Characteristics of the raw and purified powder were presented using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), revealing that the purified powder is free from carbonaceous particles.

  11. Indefinitely stable iron(IV) cage complexes formed in water by air oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomyn, Stefania; Shylin, Sergii I.; Bykov, Dmytro; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Gumienna-Kontecka, Elzbieta; Bon, Volodymyr; Fritsky, Igor O.

    2017-01-01

    In nature, iron, the fourth most abundant element of the Earth's crust, occurs in its stable forms either as the native metal or in its compounds in the +2 or +3 (low-valent) oxidation states. High-valent iron (+4, +5, +6) compounds are not formed spontaneously at ambient conditions, and the ones obtained synthetically appear to be unstable in polar organic solvents, especially aqueous solutions, and this is what limits their studies and use. Here we describe unprecedented iron(IV) hexahydrazide clathrochelate complexes that are assembled in alkaline aqueous media from iron(III) salts, oxalodihydrazide and formaldehyde in the course of a metal-templated reaction accompanied by air oxidation. The complexes can exist indefinitely at ambient conditions without any sign of decomposition in water, nonaqueous solutions and in the solid state. We anticipate that our findings may open a way to aqueous solution and polynuclear high-valent iron chemistry that remains underexplored and presents an important challenge.

  12. One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries. PMID:25563733

  13. One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries.

  14. Electrochemical destruction of trans-cinnamic acid by advanced oxidation processes: kinetics, mineralization, and degradation route.

    PubMed

    Flores, Nelly; Thiam, Abdoulaye; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Centellas, Francesc; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Garrido, José Antonio; Brillas, Enric; Sirés, Ignasi

    2016-01-14

    Acidic solutions of trans-cinnamic acid at pH 3.0 have been comparatively treated by anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). The electrolytic experiments were carried out with a boron-doped diamond (BDD)/air-diffusion cell. The substrate was very slowly abated by AO-H2O2 because of its low reaction rate with oxidizing (•)OH produced from water discharge at the BDD anode. In contrast, its removal was very rapid and at similar rate by EF and PEF due to the additional oxidation by (•)OH in the bulk, formed from Fenton's reaction between cathodically generated H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The AO-H2O2 treatment yielded the lowest mineralization. The EF process led to persistent final products like Fe(III) complexes, which were quickly photolyzed upon UVA irradiation in PEF to give an almost total mineralization with 98 % total organic carbon removal. The effect of current density and substrate concentration on all the mineralization processes was examined. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of electrolyzed solutions allowed identifying five primary aromatics and one heteroaromatic molecule, whereas final carboxylic acids like fumaric, acetic, and oxalic were quantified by ion exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). From all the products detected, a degradation route for trans-cinnamic acid is proposed.

  15. Copper silicide formation by rapid thermal processing and induced room-temperature Si oxide growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setton, M.; Van der Spiegel, J.; Rothman, B.

    1990-07-01

    The growth of copper silicide has been studied by rapid thermal processing (RTP) of 500 Å of Cu on Si substrates. Interaction between the diffusing metal and Si starts at 250-300 °C. Annealing at higher temperatures yields complete silicidation to Cu3Si. This leads to strong modifications of the Auger line shapes of both Si and Cu. A plasmon peak located 20 eV below the main peak is the fingerprint in the Cu spectrum. Strong features at 80, 85.6, 89.2, and 93.2 eV as well as a 1 eV shift of the 90.4 eV peak appear in the Si L2,3VV spectrum. Whether for Cu films annealed in nitrogen or in vacuum, exposure of the silicide to air results in the growth of silicon oxide at room temperature and continues until the silicide layer is totally converted. This repeatable and controllable oxidation of silicon is accompanied by changes in resistivity and color reflecting the extent of the process. For Cu/CoSi2/Si structures, the cobalt silicide acts as a transport medium for the growth of the copper silicide and also serves as a cap preventing the oxidation of the final CoSi2/Cu3Si/Si contacts

  16. Thermal decomposition of pyrometallurgical copper slag by oxidation in synthetic air.

    PubMed

    Gyurov, Stoyko; Kostova, Yoanna; Klitcheva, Galina; Ilinkina, Anna

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of separating pyrometallurgical copper (fayalite) slag by oxidation in a synthetic air atmosphere into ferrous and silicate phases suitable for resources to be recovered from them. Isothermal oxidation kinetics and the most probable reaction models are studied in the temperature range of 773 to 1173 K using thermogravimetric analysis data and the classical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Yerofeev-Kolmogorov (JMAYK) equation. Depending on the model applied, the activation energies of fayalite slag oxidation in the temperature range of 773-973 K were: D1: 37.55 kJ mol(-1); D2: 43.27 kJ mol(-1); D3: 50.52 kJ mol(-1); and D4: 45.65 kJ mol(-1). Depending on the model applied, the activation energies of fayalite slag oxidation in the temperature range of 1073-1173 K were: F1: 20.48 kJ mol(-1); R2: 20.45 kJ mol(-1); R3: 20.18 kJ mol(-1); A2: 21.54 kJ mol( -1) and A3: 22.34 kJ mol(-1). The transformation of fayalite to hematite and amorphous silica was completed after 1435, 1350 and 1080 s at temperatures of 1073, 1123 and 1173 K, respectively. The following oxidation products were identified by X-ray diffraction: (1) fayalite, hematite and magnesioferrite (Fe(2)MgO(4)) in the temperature range 773 to 973 K; and (2) hematite and magnesium iron oxide (Mg(1.55)Fe( 1.6)O(4)) in the temperature range of 1073 to 1173 K.

  17. Empirical study of classification process for two-stage turbo air classifier in series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuan; Liu, Jiaxiang; Li, Gang

    2013-05-01

    The suitable process parameters for a two-stage turbo air classifier are important for obtaining the ultrafine powder that has a narrow particle-size distribution, however little has been published internationally on the classification process for the two-stage turbo air classifier in series. The influence of the process parameters of a two-stage turbo air classifier in series on classification performance is empirically studied by using aluminum oxide powders as the experimental material. The experimental results show the following: 1) When the rotor cage rotary speed of the first-stage classifier is increased from 2 300 r/min to 2 500 r/min with a constant rotor cage rotary speed of the second-stage classifier, classification precision is increased from 0.64 to 0.67. However, in this case, the final ultrafine powder yield is decreased from 79% to 74%, which means the classification precision and the final ultrafine powder yield can be regulated through adjusting the rotor cage rotary speed of the first-stage classifier. 2) When the rotor cage rotary speed of the second-stage classifier is increased from 2 500 r/min to 3 100 r/min with a constant rotor cage rotary speed of the first-stage classifier, the cut size is decreased from 13.16 μm to 8.76 μm, which means the cut size of the ultrafine powder can be regulated through adjusting the rotor cage rotary speed of the second-stage classifier. 3) When the feeding speed is increased from 35 kg/h to 50 kg/h, the "fish-hook" effect is strengthened, which makes the ultrafine powder yield decrease. 4) To weaken the "fish-hook" effect, the equalization of the two-stage wind speeds or the combination of a high first-stage wind speed with a low second-stage wind speed should be selected. This empirical study provides a criterion of process parameter configurations for a two-stage or multi-stage classifier in series, which offers a theoretical basis for practical production.

  18. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with functionalized carbon materials as catalysts: reaction mechanism and pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbing; Fu, Wantao; He, Xuwen; Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2014-08-01

    The development of highly active carbon material catalysts in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) has attracted a great deal of attention. In this study different carbon material catalysts (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers and graphite) were developed to enhance the CWAO of phenol in aqueous solution. The functionalized carbon materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the CWAO of phenol. After 60 min reaction, the removal of phenol was nearly 100% over the functionalized multi-walled carbon, while it was only 14% over the purified multi-walled carbon under the same reaction conditions. Carboxylic acid groups introduced on the surface of the functionalized carbon materials play an important role in the catalytic activity in CWAO. They can promote the production of free radicals, which act as strong oxidants in CWAO. Based on the analysis of the intermediates produced in the CWAO reactions, a new reaction pathway for the CWAO of phenol was proposed in this study. There are some differences between the proposed reaction pathway and that reported in the literature. First, maleic acid is transformed directly into malonic acid. Second, acetic acid is oxidized into an unknown intermediate, which is then oxidized into CO2 and H2O. Finally, formic acid and oxalic acid can mutually interconvert when conditions are favorable.

  19. Microstructure Sensitive Design and Processing in Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Hamid Garmestani; Dr. Stephen Herring

    2009-06-12

    The aim of this study was to develop and inexpensive manufacturing process for deposition of functionally graded thin films of LSM oxides with porosity graded microstructures for use as IT-SOFCs cathode. The spray pyrolysis method was chosen as a low-temperature processing technique for deposition of porous LSM films onto dense YXZ substrates. The effort was directed toward the optimization of the processing conditions for deposition of high quality LSM films with variety of morphologies in the range of dense to porous microstructures. Results of optimization studies of spray parameters revealed that the substrate surface temperature is the most critical parameter influencing the roughness and morphology, porosity, cracking and crystallinity of the film.

  20. The Role of Ultrasound on Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Babu, Sundaram Ganesh; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Neppolian, Bernaurdshaw

    2016-10-01

    This chapter describes the use of ultrasound in remediation of wastewater contaminated with organic pollutants in the absence and presence of other advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as sonolysis, sono-ozone process, sonophotocatalysis, sonoFenton systems and sonophoto-Fenton methods in detail. All these methods are explained with the suitable literature illustrations. In most of the cases, hybrid AOPs (combination of ultrasound with one or more AOPs) resulted in superior efficacy to that of individual AOP. The advantageous effects such as additive and synergistic effects obtained by operating the hybrid AOPs are highlighted with appropriate examples. It is worth to mention here that the utilization of ultrasound is not only restricted in preparation of modern active catalysts but also extensively used for the wastewater treatment. Interestingly, ultrasound coupled AOPs are operationally simple, efficient, and environmentally benign, and can be readily applied for large scale industrial processes which make them economically viable.

  1. Measurement of inflammation and oxidative stress following drastic changes in air pollution during the Beijing Olympics: a panel study approach.

    PubMed

    Kipen, Howard; Rich, David; Huang, Wei; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Guangfa; Hu, Min; Lu, Shou-en; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yuedan; Zhang, Jim Junfeng

    2010-08-01

    Ambient air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory morbidity and mortality in epidemiology studies. Frequently, oxidative and nitrosative stress are hypothesized to mediate these pollution effects, however precise mechanisms remain unclear. This paper describes the methodology for a major panel study to examine air pollution effects on these and other mechanistic pathways. The study took place during the drastic air pollution changes accompanying the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, China. After a general description of air pollution health effects, we provide a discussion of panel studies and describe the unique features of this study that make it likely to provide compelling results. This study should lead to a clearer and more precise definition of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress, as well as other mechanisms, in determining acute morbidity and mortality from air pollution exposure.

  2. Measurement of inflammation and oxidative stress following drastic changes in air pollution during the Beijing Olympics: a panel study approach

    PubMed Central

    Kipen, Howard; Rich, David; Huang, Wei; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Guangfa; Hu, Min; Lu, Shou-en; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yuedan; Zhang, Jim (Junfeng)

    2014-01-01

    Ambient air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory morbidity and mortality in epidemiology studies. Frequently, oxidative and nitrosative stress are hypothesized to mediate these pollution effects, however precise mechanisms remain unclear. This paper describes the methodology for a major panel study to examine air pollution effects on these and other mechanistic pathways. The study took place during the drastic air pollution changes accompanying the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, China. After a general description of air pollution health effects, we provide a discussion of panel studies and describe the unique features of this study that make it likely to provide compelling results. This study should lead to a clearer and more precise definition of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress, as well as other mechanisms, in determining acute morbidity and mortality from air pollution exposure. PMID:20716299

  3. Processing, Compatibility and Oxidation of Diboride - Oxide Matrix Composites for Ultrahigh-Temperature Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abada, Ahmed

    1990-01-01

    Promising results for the development of a ceramic/ceramic composite to be used for structural applications in the ultra high temperature range (1650-1850^ circC) have been obtained for alumina reinforced with titanium or zirconium diboribe coated with molybdenum disilicide. Prior to this achievement, several theoretical and experimental studies of particulate composites with (TiB_2 or ZrB_2) imbedded in (ZrO_2, Y_2 O_3 or Al_2 O_3) were conducted. Calculations of the compatibility and stability of oxide matrices with the diborides in vacuum showed positive energies of formation, indicating suitability of reinforcement of alumina under vacuum conditions. Also, since the sublimation of vapor species at ultra high temperatures is very critical to the stability of substances still existing in their condensed states, a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the metal -oxygen systems, was carried out using elemental data of the TiB_2, ZrB_2 , ZrO_2, Y_2 O_3, Al_2 O_3, MoSi_2 and their combinations (TiB_2 or ZrB_2)/(ZrO_2 , Y_2O_3 or Al_2O_3) for comparison, at 1650, 1850 and 2050^ circC. A comparison of the combination TiB _2 and ZrB_2 in MoSi_2/(Al_2O _3 or ZrO_2) at 1650^circC was also made. A stability analysis using equilibrium oxygen partial pressures for the TiB_2 and ZrB_2 decomposition at 1650, 1850 and 2050^ circC was carried out. A detailed characterization of the powders used for the oxide matrices, the diborides and the molybdenum disilicide are presented. The effects of the powder characteristics and the vacuum hot pressing parameters on the densification of the composites are discussed. Stability and chemical compatibility of the particulate and ternary composites in their as hot pressed states and following their vacuum and air oxidation treatments were characterized. Interdiffusion of elemental species across diboride/disilicide and oxide/disilicide interfaces was studies by EDS dot mapping. It is proposed that the growth of the Mo _5Si_3 is interface

  4. Transfer Processes at the Air--Sea Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guymer, T. H.; Businger, J. A.; Katsaros, K. B.; Shaw, W. J.; Taylor, P. K.; Large, W. G.; Payne, R. E.

    1983-02-01

    Near-surface data from ships, buoys, aircraft and a microwave remote-sensing satellite have been used to estimate the fluxes of momentum, heat and water vapour at the sea surface over a 200 km × 200 km area during the Joint Air--Sea Interaction Experiment of 1978. In particular, daily means of the surface heat balance and the wind stress are presented. Generally, the sensible heat flux was found to be less than 25% of the latent heat flux. Over periods of a day the total upward heat flux was about a third of the net radiation, implying that a significant proportion of the available energy went into heating the ocean. The Ekman pumping accounted for most of the divergence in the atmospheric boundary layer but only 10% at most of that in the upper ocean. Some case studies of the horizontal variation of the fluxes in relation to larger scales are also discussed and it is suggested that the fluxes are modulated by mesoscale patterns in sea-surface temperature. Surface turbulent fluxes and SST have been examined on scales from several kilometres to 200 km and for days to weeks by using a combination of ships, buoys, aircraft and microwave remote sensing. The net radiative flux had been obtained at the corners of the 200 km meteorological triangle either by direct measurements of the shortwave and longwave components or by parametrization techniques. This has enabled the surface heat budget to be examined on a daily basis. About 70% of the net flux (typically 100 W m-2 in phase 1 and 70 W m-2 in phase 2) is available for heating the ocean and, of the remainder, over 75% goes into the atmosphere as latent heat. In these near-neutral conditions the mean surface wind speed across the triangle was 77% of the geostrophic wind speed and the cross-isobar flow angle was 11 degrees (down-gradient). Significant variations in the thermodynamic fluxes across the area were found, associated partly with the SST distribution and also with the fact that the coldest and driest air was

  5. Processing of Non-PFP Plutonium Oxide in Hanford Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Susan A.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2011-03-10

    Processing of non-irradiated plutonium oxide, PuO2, scrap for recovery of plutonium values occurred routinely at Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in glovebox line operations. Plutonium oxide is difficult to dissolve, particularly if it has been high-fired; i.e., calcined to temperatures above about 400°C and much of it was. Dissolution of the PuO2 in the scrap typically was performed in PFP’s Miscellaneous Treatment line using nitric acid (HNO3) containing some source of fluoride ion, F-, such as hydrofluoric acid (HF), sodium fluoride (NaF), or calcium fluoride (CaF2). The HNO3 concentration generally was 6 M or higher whereas the fluoride concentration was ~0.5 M or lower. At higher fluoride concentrations, plutonium fluoride (PuF4) would precipitate, thus limiting the plutonium dissolution. Some plutonium-bearing scrap also contained PuF4 and thus required no added fluoride. Once the plutonium scrap was dissolved, the excess fluoride was complexed with aluminum ion, Al3+, added as aluminum nitrate, Al(NO3)3•9H2O, to limit collateral damage to the process equipment by the corrosive fluoride. Aluminum nitrate also was added in low quantities in processing PuF4.

  6. An advanced oxidation process using ionized gas for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Ju; Chung, Paul Gene; Kwak, Dong Heui; Kim, Lee Hyung; Kim, Min Jeong

    2010-01-01

    This study on removing non-degradable materials in wastewater focused primarily on advanced oxidation methods such as ozone, ozone/UV and ozone/H2O2. Wastewater treatment using an ionized gas from plasma has been actively progressing. The ionized gas involves reactive species such as O2+, O2- cluster, O radical and OH radical. Since the ionized gas method has such outstanding characteristics as relatively simple structures, non-calorification, non-toxicity and low electricity consumption, it evidently of interest as a new process. A series of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of ionized gas as a useful element for the diminution of nondegradable organic matters. On the other hand, a large amount of organic matters were changed to hydrophilic and the compounds containing aromatic functional group gradually decreased. The results implied that the ionized gas has been able to degrade the non-biodegradable organic matters. Therefore, the oxidation process by using an ionized gas process could be considered as an effective alternative unit in water and wastewater treatment plants.

  7. Unexpected toxicity to aquatic organisms of some aqueous bisphenol A samples treated by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Tišler, Tatjana; Erjavec, Boštjan; Kaplan, Renata; Şenilă, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, photocatalytic and catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) processes were used to examine removal efficiency of bisphenol A from aqueous samples over several titanate nanotube-based catalysts. Unexpected toxicity of bisphenol A (BPA) samples treated by means of the CWAO process to some tested species was determined. In addition, the CWAO effluent was recycled five- or 10-fold in order to increase the number of interactions between the liquid phase and catalyst. Consequently, the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis indicated higher concentrations of some toxic metals like chromium, nickel, molybdenum, silver, and zinc in the recycled samples in comparison to both the single-pass sample and the photocatalytically treated solution. The highest toxicity of five- and 10-fold recycled solutions in the CWAO process was observed in water fleas, which could be correlated to high concentrations of chromium, nickel, and silver detected in tested samples. The obtained results clearly demonstrated that aqueous samples treated by means of advanced oxidation processes should always be analyzed using (i) chemical analyses to assess removal of BPA and total organic carbon from treated aqueous samples, as well as (ii) a battery of aquatic organisms from different taxonomic groups to determine possible toxicity.

  8. Removal of pharmaceutical residue in municipal wastewater by DAF (dissolved air flotation)-MBR (membrane bioreactor) and ozone oxidation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Miyoung; Choi, Dong Whan; Lee, Jung Yeol; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Bun Su; Lee, Byoung Ho

    2012-01-01

    Growing attention is given to pharmaceutical residue in the water environment. It is known that pharmaceuticals are able to survive from a series of wastewater treatment processes. Concerns regarding pharmaceutical residues are attributed to the fact that they are being detected in water and sediment environment ubiquitously. Pharmaceutical treatment using a series of wastewater treatment processes of the DAF (dissolved air flotation)-MBR (membrane bioreactor)-ozone oxidation was conducted in the study. DAF, without addition of coagulant, could remove COD(cr) (chemical oxygen demand by Cr) up to over 70%, BOD 73%, SS 83%, T-N 55%, NH₄(+) 23%, and T-P 65% in influent of municipal wastewater. Average removal rates of water quality parameters by the DAF-MBR system were very high, e.g. COD(cr) 95.88%, BOD₅ 99.66%, COD(mn) (chemical oxygen demand by Mn) 93.63%, T-N 69.75%, NH₄-N 98.46%, T-P 78.23%, and SS 99.51%, which satisfy effluent water quality standards. Despite the high removal rate of the wastewater treatment system, pharmaceuticals were eliminated to be about 50-99% by the MBR system, depending on specific pharmaceuticals. Ibuprofen was well removed by MBR system up to over 95%, while removal rate of bezafibrate ranged between 50 and 90%. With over 5 mg/l of ozone oxidation, most pharmaceuticals which survived the DAF-MBR process were removed completely or resulted in very low survival rate within the range of few micrograms per litre. However, some pharmaceuticals such as bezafibrate and naproxen tended to be resistant to ozone oxidation.

  9. Process for depositing epitaxial alkaline earth oxide onto a substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1996-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilize molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and/or electron beam evaporation methods and an ultra-high vacuum facility to grow a layup of epitaxial alkaline earth oxide films upon the substrate surface. By selecting metal constituents for the oxides and in the appropriate proportions so that the lattice parameter of each oxide grown closely approximates that of the substrate or base layer upon which oxide is grown, lattice strain at the film/film or film/substrate interface of adjacent films is appreciably reduced or relieved. Moreover, by selecting constituents for the oxides so that the lattice parameters of the materials of adjacent oxide films either increase or decrease in size from one parameter to another parameter, a graded layup of films can be grown (with reduced strain levels therebetween) so that the outer film has a lattice parameter which closely approximates that of, and thus accomodates the epitaxial growth of, a pervoskite chosen to be grown upon the outer film.

  10. Increasing the Upper Temperature Oxidation Limit of Alumina Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Unocic, Kinga A; Lance, Michael J; Santella, Michael L; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Walker, Larry R

    2011-01-01

    A family of alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels is under development for use in aggressive oxidizing conditions from {approx}600-900 C. These alloys exhibit promising mechanical properties but oxidation resistance in air with water vapor environments is currently limited to {approx}800 C due to a transition from external protective alumina scale formation to internal oxidation of aluminum with increasing temperature. The oxidation behavior of a series of AFA alloys was systematically studied as a function of Cr, Si, Al, C, and B additions in an effort to provide a basis to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit. Oxidation exposures were conducted in air with 10% water vapor environments from 800-1000 C, with post oxidation characterization of the 900 C exposed samples by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and photo-stimulated luminescence spectroscopy (PSLS). Increased levels of Al, C, and B additions were found to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit in air with water vapor to between 950 and 1000 C. These findings are discussed in terms of alloy microstructure and possible gettering of hydrogen from water vapor at second phase carbide and boride precipitates.

  11. Oxidation, volatilization, and redistribution of molybdenum from TZM alloy in air

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, G.R.; Petti, D.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Schuetz, S.T.

    2000-01-01

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases. Oxidized molybdenum in turn is susceptible to losses from volatile molybdenum trioxide species, MoO{sub 3}(m), in air and the hydroxide, MoO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, formed from water vapor. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of these volatile species during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. In this report the authors present experimental results on the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800 C. These results are compared with calculations obtained from a vaporization mass transfer model using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures of MoO{sub 3}(g) over pure solid MoO{sub 3} and an expression for the vapor pressures of MoO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} from the literature. Calculations correlate well with experimental data.

  12. Alkaline peroxide assisted wet air oxidation pretreatment approach to enhance enzymatic convertibility of rice husk.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumita; Sen, Ramkrishna; Mudliar, Sandeep; Pandey, R A; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Satpute, Dewanand

    2011-01-01

    Pretreatment of rice husk by alkaline peroxide assisted wet air oxidation (APAWAO) approach was investigated with the aim to enhance the enzymatic convertibility of cellulose in pretreated rice husk. Rice husk was presoaked overnight in 1% (w/v) H(2)O(2) solution (pH adjusted to 11.5 using NaOH) (equivalent to 16.67 g H(2)O(2) and 3.63 g NaOH per 100 g dry, untreated rice husk) at room temperature, followed by wet air oxidation (WAO). APAWAO pretreatment resulted in solubilization of 67 wt % of hemicellulose and 88 wt % of lignin initially present in raw rice husk. Some amount of oligomeric glucose (˜8.3 g/L) was also observed in the APAWAO liquid fraction. APAWAO pretreatment resulted in 13-fold increase in the amount of glucose that could be obtained from otherwise untreated rice husk. Up to 86 wt % of cellulose in the pretreated rice husk (solid fraction) could be converted into glucose within 24 hours, yielding over 21 g glucose per 100 g original rice husk. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to visualize changes in biomass structure following the APAWAO pretreatment. Enzymatic cellulose convertibility of the pretreated slurry at high dry matter loadings was also investigated.

  13. Fractal titanium oxide under inverse 10-ns laser deposition in air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Aifei; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong; Lin, Qijing; Cui, Jianlei; Wang, Kedian; Zhai, Zhaoyang

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the preparation of different kinds of titanium oxide fractal structures on the surface of titanium by inverse pulsed laser deposition (IPLD) in air and water. In air, two-dimensional fractal structures are obtained with a low pulse energy. However, their branches units are aggregated and nanoscale branches disappear due to the high substrate temperature, causing the low fractal dimension of structure. When a higher laser energy is applied, the preformed deposited material forms a porous film, which reduces heat transfer from substrate. Therefore, three-dimensional and one-dimensional fractal structures with nanoscale branches on the topside of the film can be obtained. Then the desired two-dimensional fractal structures with nano-branches are obtained in water due to the water-induced rapid cooling of substrate temperature and plasma shock wave-induced particle's expansion along the surface of substrate. Meanwhile, the asymmetry of fractal structure units analyzed by diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model is caused by the difference of the distance between the initial deposited particles. In addition, when the pulse energy goes up to 111 mJ, the branches of two-dimensional fractal structure units are also aggregated and form isolated particles. The idea about modification of substrate temperature and water can guide the preparation of the desired titanium oxide fractal structures in pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is also applicable to other materials.

  14. Oxidation, Volatilization, and Redistribution of Molybdenum from TZM Alloy in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Petti, David Andrew; Mccarthy, Kathryn Ann; Schuetz, Stanley Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases. Oxidized molybdenum in turn is susceptible to losses from volatile molybdenum trioxide species, (MoO3)m, in air and the hydroxide, MoO2(OH)2, formed from water vapor. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of these volatile species during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. In this report we present experimental results on the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800°C. These results are compared with calculations obtained from a vaporization mass transfer model using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures of MoO3(g) over pure solid MoO3 and an expression for the vapor pressures of MoO2(OH)2 from the literature. Calculations correlate well with experimental data.

  15. OXIDATION OF CYCLOHEXANE WITH AIR CATALYZED BY A STERICALLY HINDERED IRON(II) COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the USEPA, the pursuit for "Green" processes is ongoing in order to develop new, cost-effective, environmentally benign systems to produce desired products and eliminate or reduce unwanted by-products and wastes. One area of interest is the design of new catalysts for the oxid...

  16. Creep Behavior of Oxide/Oxide Composites with Monazite Fiber Coating at 1100 deg C in Air and in Steam Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    noticeably degraded in steam. The presence of steam accelerated creep rates and significantly reduced creep lifetimes. In air, creep run-out, defined as...environmentally stable ox- ide constituents [23, 26, 27, 31, 35, 36, 45, 46, 48]. Oxide/Oxide CMCs were developed to combat the environmental degradation ...thermal shock tolerance until last several decades [37]. Most metallic alloys ex- hibit significant deformation in tension prior to failure. Ceramics

  17. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  18. Heat-transfer processes in air-cooled engine cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, Benjamin

    1938-01-01

    From a consideration of heat-transfer theory, semi-empirical expressions are set up for the transfer of heat from the combustion gases to the cylinder of an air-cooled engine and from the cylinder to the cooling air. Simple equations for the average head and barrel temperatures as functions of the important engine and cooling variables are obtained from these expressions. The expressions involve a few empirical constants, which may be readily determined from engine tests. Numerical values for these constants were obtained from single-cylinder engine tests for cylinders of the Pratt & Whitney 1535 and 1340-h engines. The equations provide a means of calculating the effect of the various engine and cooling variables on the cylinder temperatures and also of correlating the results of engine cooling tests. An example is given of the application of the equations to the correlation of cooling-test data obtained in flight.

  19. Improved thermal oxidation stability of solution-processable silver nanowire transparent electrode by reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Youngu

    2012-12-01

    Solution-processable silver nanowire-reduced graphene oxide (AgNW-rGO) hybrid transparent electrode was prepared in order to replace conventional ITO transparent electrode. AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited high optical transmittance and low sheet resistance, which is comparable to ITO transparent electrode. In addition, it was found that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited highly enhanced thermal oxidation and chemical stabilities due to excellent gas-barrier property of rGO passivation layer onto AgNW film. Furthermore, the organic solar cells with AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode showed good photovoltaic behavior as much as solar cells with AgNW transparent electrode. It is expected that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode can be used as a key component in various optoelectronic application such as display panels, touch screen panels, and solar cells.

  20. Oxidative decomposition of p-nitroaniline in water by solar photo-Fenton advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Hui; Sun, Sheng-Peng; Fan, Mao-Hong; Guo, Hui-Qin; Lee, Yi-Fan; Sun, Rui-Xia

    2008-05-01

    The degradation of p-nitroaniline (PNA) in water by solar photo-Fenton advanced oxidation process was investigated in this study. The effects of different reaction parameters including pH value of solutions, dosages of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ion, initial PNA concentration and temperature on the degradation of PNA have been studied. The optimum conditions for the degradation of PNA in water were considered to be: the pH value at 3.0, 10 mmol L(-1) H(2)O(2), 0.05 mmol L(-1) Fe(2+), 0.072-0.217 mmol L(-1) PNA and temperature at 20 degrees C. Under the optimum conditions, the degradation efficiencies of PNA were more than 98% within 30 min reaction. The degradation characteristic of PNA showed that the conjugated pi systems of the aromatic ring in PNA molecules were effectively destructed. The experimental results indicated solar photo-Fenton process has more advantages compared with classical Fenton process, such as higher oxidation power, wider working pH range, lower ferrous ion usage, etc. Furthermore, the present study showed the potential use of solar photo-Fenton process for PNA containing wastewater treatment.

  1. Exposure to Fine Particulate Air Pollution Causes Vascular Insulin Resistance by Inducing Pulmonary Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to ambient air fine particulate matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects of PM2.5 remain unclear. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that PM2.5 exposure decreases vascular insulin sensitivity by inducing pulmonary oxidative stress. Methods: Mice fed control (10–13% kcal fat) and high-fat (60% kcal fat, HFD) diets, treated with 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) or mice overexpressing lung-specific extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) were exposed to HEPA-filtered air or to concentrated PM2.5 (CAP) for 9 or 30 days, and changes in systemic and organ-specific insulin sensitivity and inflammation were measured. Results: In control diet–fed mice, exposure to CAP for 30 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in lung, heart, and aorta but not in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver and did not affect adiposity or systemic glucose tolerance. In HFD-fed mice, 30-day CAP exposure suppressed insulin-stimulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and increased adipose tissue inflammation and systemic glucose intolerance. In control diet–fed mice, a 9-day CAP exposure was sufficient to suppress insulin-stimulated Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and to decrease IκBα (inhibitor of the transcription factor NF-κB levels in the aorta. Treatment with the antioxidant TEMPOL or lung-specific overexpression of ecSOD prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and inflammation. Conclusions: Short-term exposure to PM2.5 induces vascular insulin resistance and inflammation triggered by a mechanism involving pulmonary oxidative stress. Suppression of vascular insulin signaling by PM2.5 may accelerate the progression to systemic insulin resistance, particularly in the context of diet-induced obesity. Citation: Haberzettl P, O

  2. The asymptotic structure of nonpremixed methane-air flames with oxidizer leakage of order unity

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, K.; Ilincic, N.

    1995-04-01

    The asymptotic structure of nonpremixed methane-air flames is analyzed using a reduced three-step mechanism. The three global steps of this reduced mechanism are similar to those used in a previous analysis. The rates of the three steps are related to the rates of the elementary reactions appearing in the C{sub 1}-mechanism for oxidation of methane. The present asymptotic analysis differs from the previous analysis in that oxygen is presumed to leak from the reaction zone to the leading order. Chemical reactions are presumed to occur in three asymptotically thin layers: the fuel-consumption layer, the nonequilibrium layer for the water-gas shift reaction and the oxidation layer. The structure of the fuel-consumption layer is presumed to be identical to that analyzed previously and in this layer the fuel reacts with the radicals to form primarily CO and H{sub 2} and some CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O In the oxidation layer the CO and H{sub 2} formed in the fuel-consumption layer are oxidized to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The present analysis of the oxidation layer is simpler than the previous analysis because the variation in the values of the concentration of oxygen can be neglected to the leading order and this is a better representation of the flame structure in the vicinity of the critical conditions of extinction. The predictions of the critical conditions of extinction of the present model are compared with the predictions of previous models. It is anticipated that the present simple model can be easily extended to more complex problems such as pollutant formation in flames or chemical inhibition of flames.

  3. Recent advances in improvement of forecast skill and understanding climate processes using AIRS Version-5 products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susskind, Joel; Molnar, Gyula; Iredell, Lena; Rosenberg, Robert

    2012-10-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) generates products derived from AIRS/AMSU-A observations, starting from September 2002 when the AIRS instrument became stable, using the AIRS Science Team Version-5 retrieval algorithm. This paper shows results of some of our research using Version-5 products from the points of view of improving forecast skill as well as aiding in the understanding of climate processes.

  4. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  5. Final report on the oxidation of energetic materials in supercritical water. Final Air Force report

    SciTech Connect

    Buelow, S.J.; Allen, D.; Anderson, G.K.

    1995-04-03

    The objective of this project was to determine the suitability of oxidation in supercritical fluids (SCO), particularly water (SCWO), for disposal of propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics (PEPs). The SCO studies of PEPs addressed the following issues: The efficiency of destruction of the substrate. The products of destruction contained in the effluents. Whether the process can be conducted safely on a large scale. Whether energy recovery from the process is economically practicable. The information essential for process development and equipment design was also investigated, including issues such as practical throughput of explosives through a SCWO reactor, reactor materials and corrosion, and models for process design and optimization.

  6. Oxidative potential and inflammatory impacts of source apportioned ambient air pollution in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyang; Baumgartner, Jill; Zhang, Yuanxun; Liu, Yanju; Sun, Yongjun; Zhang, Meigen

    2014-11-04

    Air pollution exposure is associated with a range of adverse health impacts. Knowledge of the chemical components and sources of air pollution most responsible for these health effects could lead to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of such effects and more targeted risk reduction strategies. We measured daily ambient fine particulate matter (<2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5) for 2 months in peri-urban and central Beijing, and assessed the contribution of its chemical components to the oxidative potential of ambient air pollution using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. The composition data were applied to a multivariate source apportionment model to determine the PM contributions of six sources or factors: a zinc factor, an aluminum factor, a lead point factor, a secondary source (e.g., SO4(2-), NO3(2-)), an iron source, and a soil dust source. Finally, we assessed the relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity-related PM sources and inflammatory responses in human bronchial epithelial cells. In peri-urban Beijing, the soil dust source accounted for the largest fraction (47%) of measured ROS variability. In central Beijing, a secondary source explained the greatest fraction (29%) of measured ROS variability. The ROS activities of PM collected in central Beijing were exponentially associated with in vivo inflammatory responses in epithelial cells (R2=0.65-0.89). We also observed a high correlation between three ROS-related PM sources (a lead point factor, a zinc factor, and a secondary source) and expression of an inflammatory marker (r=0.45-0.80). Our results suggest large differences in the contribution of different PM sources to ROS variability at the central versus peri-urban study sites in Beijing and that secondary sources may play an important role in PM2.5-related oxidative potential and inflammatory health impacts.

  7. Interaction between graphene oxide and Pluronic F127 at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanghao; Guo, Jingru; Patel, Ravi A; Dadlani, Anup L; Leblanc, Roger M

    2013-05-14

    Triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 (PF127) has previously been demonstrated to disperse graphene oxide (GO) in electrolyte solution and block the hydrophobic interaction between GO and l-tryptophan and l-tyrosine. However, the nature of this interaction between PF127 and GO remains to be characterized and elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to characterize and understand the interaction between GO and PF127 using a 2-dimensional Langmuir monolayer methodology at the air-water interface by surface pressure-area isotherm measurement, stability, adsorption, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. Based on the observation of surface pressure-area isotherms, adsorption, and stability of PF127 and PF127/GO mixture at the air-water interface, GO is suggested to change the conformation of PF127 at the air-water interface and also drag PF127 from the interface to the bulk subphase. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) image supports this assumption, as GO and PF127 can be observed by spreading the subphase solution outside the compressing barriers, as shown in the TOC graphic.

  8. Interaction of Ambient Air Pollution With Asthma Medication on Exhaled Nitric Oxide Among Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhengmin; Lin, Hung-Mo; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Lehman, Erik B.; Duan, Yinkang; Craig, Timothy J.; Wilson, William E.; Liao, Duanping; Lazarus, Stephen C.; Bascom, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between ambient air pollution and asthma medication remains unclear. The authors compared airway inflammation response to air pollution among asthmatics. Increases of 10 ppb of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and of 10 μg/m3 of particulate matter < 10 micron in diameter (PM10) daily concentrations were associated with an increase in exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) of 0.13 ppb (95% confidence interval = 0.06, 0.19) and of 0.07 ppb (95% confidence interval = 0.02, 0.12), respectively, in models adjusted for important covariates. The results show that the medication could not counteract airway inflammation effects of air pollution. Specifically, the patients on triamcinolone decreased the sensitivity to PM10 but increased the sensitivity to NO2. The patients on salmeterol were more vulnerable to both NO2 and PM10. This study indicates that the current pollution levels may still enhance airway inflammation among patients with persistent asthma even when they are on asthma medications. PMID:19864219

  9. Particulate matter air pollution causes oxidant-mediated increase in gut permeability in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution may be an important environmental factor leading to exacerbations of inflammatory illnesses in the GI tract. PM can gain access to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract via swallowing of air or secretions from the upper airways or mucociliary clearance of inhaled particles. Methods We measured PM-induced cell death and mitochondrial ROS generation in Caco-2 cells stably expressing oxidant sensitive GFP localized to mitochondria in the absence or presence of an antioxidant. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a very high dose of urban PM from Washington, DC (200 μg/mouse) or saline via gastric gavage and small bowel and colonic tissue were harvested for histologic evaluation, and RNA isolation up to 48 hours. Permeability to 4kD dextran was measured at 48 hours. Results PM induced mitochondrial ROS generation and cell death in Caco-2 cells. PM also caused oxidant-dependent NF-κB activation, disruption of tight junctions and increased permeability of Caco-2 monolayers. Mice exposed to PM had increased intestinal permeability compared with PBS treated mice. In the small bowel, colocalization of the tight junction protein, ZO-1 was lower in the PM treated animals. In the small bowel and colon, PM exposed mice had higher levels of IL-6 mRNA and reduced levels of ZO-1 mRNA. Increased apoptosis was observed in the colon of PM exposed mice. Conclusions Exposure to high doses of urban PM causes oxidant dependent GI epithelial cell death, disruption of tight junction proteins, inflammation and increased permeability in the gut in vitro and in vivo. These PM-induced changes may contribute to exacerbations of inflammatory disorders of the gut. PMID:21658250

  10. Study of both sunflower oil and its headspace throughout the oxidation process. Occurrence in the headspace of toxic oxygenated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Guillén, María D; Cabo, Nerea; Ibargoitia, María L; Ruiz, Ainhoa

    2005-02-23

    The static headspace composition of sunflower oil throughout the oxidation process at 70 degrees C with circulating air is studied by means of solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS); at the same time the liquid phase of the same oil is studied by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Each technique provides complementary information about the process; FITR spectroscopy detects changes in the functional groups of the liquid matrix in a global way and SPME/GC-MS provides information about the different components present in the volatile phase during the oxidation process. Concordance between the timing of the changes produced in both liquid and gaseous phases is observed, as well as agreement and complementarity in the results obtained from both phases. The formation of some well-known genotoxic and cytotoxic oxygenated aldehydes in this process and their presence in the oil headspace are proved.

  11. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of a chemical plant wastewater over platinum-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, Andrzej; Trawczyński, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    Catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) of wastewater (chemical oxygen demand [COD] = 1800 mg O2/dm3) from a fine chemicals plant was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor at T = 393-473 K under total pressure of 5.0 or 8.0 MPa. Catalysts containing 0.3% wt. of platinum deposited on two supports, mixed silica-titania (SM1) and carbon black composites (CBC) were used. The CBC-supported catalyst appeared to be more active than the SM1-supported one. A slow decrease of activity of the platinum on SM1 (Pt-SM1) during the long-term operation is attributed to recrystallization of titania and leaching of a support component, while the Pt-CBC catalyst is deteriorated, owing to combustion of the support component. The power-law-kinetic equations were used to describe the rate of COD removal at CWAO over the catalysts. The kinetic parameters of COD reduction for the wastewater were determined and compared with the kinetic parameters describing phenol oxidation over the same catalysts. Rates of COD removal for the wastewater were found higher than those for phenol oxidation over the same catalysts and under identical operating conditions.

  12. Treatment of desizing wastewater containing poly(vinyl alcohol) by wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Lei, L.; Yue, P.L.; Cen, P.

    2000-05-01

    The effectiveness of wet air oxidation (WAO) is studied in a 2-L autoclave for the treatment of desizing wastewater from man-made fiber textile plants. At an oxygen pressure of less than 2 MPa, over 30-min, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was found to increase from 15 to 65% when the temperature was raised from 150 to 250 C. The biodegradability of the wastewater was also simultaneously increased. Up to 90% of the COD could be removed within 120 min. A simplified reaction mechanism is proposed which involves a direct mineralization step in parallel with a step in which an intermediate is formed prior to mineralization. A kinetic model for COD removal was developed based on this reaction mechanism. The model was tested with experimental COD results over the temperature range of the experiments. The dependence of the specific reaction rate constants was found to follow the Arrhenius type of equation. The direct oxidation of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) to carbon dioxide and water is the dominant reaction step. The intermediates formed are not likely to be the acetic acid but may be short segments of PVA that are easily oxidized.

  13. Study on emission characteristics and reduction strategy of nitrous oxide during wastewater treatment by different processes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shichang; Bao, Zhiyuan; Sun, Dezhi

    2015-03-01

    Given the inexorable increase in global wastewater treatment, increasing amounts of nitrous oxide are expected to be emitted from wastewater treatment plants and released to the atmosphere. It has become imperative to study the emission and control of nitrous oxide in the various wastewater treatment processes currently in use. In the present investigation, the emission characteristics and the factors affecting the release of nitrous oxide were studied via full- and pilot-scale experiments in anoxic-oxic, sequencing batch reactor and oxidation ditch processes. We propose an optimal treatment process and relative strategy for nitrous oxide reduction. Our results show that both the bio-nitrifying and bio-denitrifying treatment units in wastewater treatment plants are the predominant sites for nitrous oxide production in each process, while the aerated treatment units are the critical sources for nitrous oxide emission. Compared with the emission of nitrous oxide from the anoxic-oxic (1.37% of N-influent) and sequencing batch reactor (2.69% of N-influent) processes, much less nitrous oxide (0.25% of N-influent) is emitted from the oxidation ditch process, which we determined as the optimal wastewater treatment process for nitrous oxide reduction, given the current technologies. Nitrous oxide emissions differed with various operating parameters. Controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration at a proper level during nitrification and denitrification and enhancing the utilization rate of organic carbon in the influent for denitrification are the two critical methods for nitrous oxide reduction in the various processes considered.

  14. Air plasma processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) micro-beads: Surface characterisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaozong; Cui, Nai-Yi; Osbeck, Susan; Liang, He

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports the surface processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) micro-beads by using a rotary air plasma reactor, and its effects on surface properties. The surface properties, including surface wettability, surface chemistry and textures of the PMMA beads, were characterised. It was observed that the air plasma processing can improve the surface wettability of the PMMA microbeads significantly. A 15 min plasma processing can reduce the surface water contact angle of PMMA beads to about 50° from its original value of 80.3°. This was accompanied by about 8% increase in surface oxygen concentration as confirmed by XPS analysis. The optical profilometry examination revealed the air plasma processing resulted in a rougher surface that has a “delicate” surface texture. It is concluded that the surface chemistry and texture, induced by air plasma processing, co-contributed to the surface wettability improvement of PMMA micro-beads.

  15. Simultaneous constraint and phase conversion processing of oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qi; Thompson, Elliott D.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Hellstrom, Eric E.; Larbalestier, David C.; DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Parrell, Jeffrey A.; Reeves, Jodi L.

    2003-04-29

    A method of making an oxide superconductor article includes subjecting an oxide superconductor precursor to a texturing operation to orient grains of the oxide superconductor precursor to obtain a highly textured precursor; and converting the textured oxide superconducting precursor into an oxide superconductor, while simultaneously applying a force to the precursor which at least matches the expansion force experienced by the precursor during phase conversion to the oxide superconductor. The density and the degree of texture of the oxide superconductor precursor are retained during phase conversion. The constraining force may be applied isostatically.

  16. Carbon oxides free fuel processing for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Tushar V.

    Fuel processing represents a very important aspect of fuel cell technology. The widespread utilization of fuel cells will only be possible if CO x-free hydrogen producing technologies are developed. Towards this objective, step-wise reforming of hydrocarbons and catalytic decomposition of ammonia were investigated for hydrogen production. Also, novel Au-based catalysts were synthesized for preferentially eliminating CO in the presence of excess hydrogen. The step-wise reforming of hydrocarbons was investigated for production of CO-free hydrogen for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Proof of concept pulse reactor experiments employing Ni-based catalysts clearly showed the feasibility of the cyclic step-wise reforming process for clean hydrogen production. Under optimum conditions the CO content in the hydrogen was found to be less than 20 ppm by this process (a large amount of CO is obtained as a by-product from conventional methods of hydrogen production). The step-wise reforming process thus greatly simplifies fuel reforming, as expensive and circuitous post-reforming hydrogen purification processes are eliminated. The process was profoundly influenced by the operating temperature, space velocity and nature of the catalyst support. Catalytic ammonia decomposition was investigated for COx-free hydrogen production for alkaline fuel cells. These studies revealed that Ru, Ir and Ni-based catalysts were active for the process with Ru being the most active and Ni the least. The catalyst supports played a decisive role in determining the ammonia decomposition activity. Partial pressure dependence studies of the reaction rate on model Ir (100) catalysts yielded a positive order (0.9 +/- 0.l) with respect to ammonia and negative order (-0.7 +/- 0.l) with respect to hydrogen. The negative order with respect to hydrogen was attributed to the enhancement in the reverse of the ammonia decomposition reaction in the presence of surface hydrogen atoms. Novel nano-Au catalysts

  17. Air Vehicle Technology Integration Program (AVTIP). Delivery Order 0004: Advanced Sol-Gel Adhesion Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    AFRL-ML-WP-TR-2003-4173 AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0004: Advanced Sol-Gel Adhesion Processes Kay Y...2001 – 03/31/2002 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F33615-00-D-3052 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM

  18. Effect of Carbon Deposition on the Oxidation Rate of Copper/Bentonite in the Chemical Looping Process

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, Esmail R.; Breault, Ronald W.; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Carpenter, Stephen

    2012-10-31

    The presented work is part of the Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI) on the development of metal oxide oxygen carriers for use in the chemical looping combustion process. An oxygen carrier, CuO/bentonite (60:40%), was reacted with methane gas and then oxidized in air. The change in weight and reaction gas concentrations were measured using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) equipped with a real-time gas analyzer. The reduction–oxidation cycle was conducted within the temperature range of 750–900 °C for 10 cycles, using 20, 50, and100% CH{sub 4} concentrations in N{sub 2} for the reduction segment and dry air for the oxidation segment. Several analysis methods were evaluated to fit the oxidation of reduced CuO (i.e., Cu) data over the complete conversion range with suitable rate expressions derived from existing models for oxidation, including the shrinking core model (diffusion and reaction control), first- and second-order reaction rates, parallel and series reaction mechanisms, and Johnson–Mehl–Avrami (JMA) rate. The best agreement between the experimental data and the models of the Cu oxidation was accomplished using the JMA model. The reactivity of the oxygen carrier during the oxidation reactions was affected by the CH{sub 4} concentration as well as the temperature. The rate of fractional uptake of oxygen onto the carrier decreased as the temperature increased, contrary to expectations and indicative that the mechanism is changing during the test. Analysis of the exit gas provided evidence of carbon deposition on the reduced sorbent particle and resulted in the CO{sub 2} product upon oxidation. The oxidation of this carbon releases significant heat that is capable of changing the particle morphology (Zhu, Y.; Mimura, K.; Isshiki, M. Oxid. Met. 2004, 62, 207-222). On the basis of experimental results, the overall reaction process in the fuel reactor may be considered to consist of the decomposition of CH{sub 4} into C and H{sub 2} and

  19. Chemical composition and direct electrochemical oxidation of table olive processing wastewater using high oxidation power anodes.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Gargouri, Olfa Dridi; Khmakhem, Ibtihel; Ammar, Sonda; Abdelhèdi, Ridha; Bouaziz, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Table olive processing wastewater (TOW) is a notoriously polluting due to its high organic and phenol content. To reduce them, an electrochemical process has been studied for the treatment of this effluent. Experiments were performed with a cell equipped with lead dioxide (PbO2) or boron-doped diamond (BDD) as anode and platinum as cathode, where Table Olive Wastewater (TOW) were destroyed by hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation. The comparative study of both systems shows the performance of the BDD anode compared to PbO2, explained by the large amounts of hydroxyl radicals generated effective at BDD anode and its synthesis characteristics. Using LC/MS analysis, it was possible to determine hydroxytyrosol, as major phenolic compounds, in table olive processing wastewater and its concentration reach 890 mg L(-1). A possible reaction mechanism oxidation for hydroxytyrosol was proposed. The kinetics decays for hydroxytyrosol degradation on PbO2 anode follows a pseudo-first order reaction with a rate constant 0.9 h(-1) for japp value 20 mA cm(-2).

  20. Process for making surfactant capped metal oxide nanocrystals, and products produced by the process

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Rockenberger, Joerg

    2006-01-10

    Disclosed is a process for making surfactant capped nanocrystals of metal oxides which are dispersable in organic solvents. The process comprises decomposing a metal cupferron complex of the formula MXCupX, wherein M is a metal, and Cup is a N-substituted N-Nitroso hydroxylamine, in the presence of a coordinating surfactant, the reaction being conducted at a temperature ranging from about 150 to about 400.degree. C., for a period of time sufficient to complete the reaction. Also disclosed are compounds made by the process.

  1. Building Sustainability into the Air Force Remediation Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    Technology  GSR Through Optimization  In-depth Case Study : Travis AFB  Necessary  Optimization  GSR Treatment Train  In situ Bioreactor...y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Case Study : Travis AFB 12 Goals  Out of necessity  Reduce energy consumption, air emissions, material... Phytoremediation Biobarrier  Wrap-up  Future Direction 2 I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e AF Environmental Restoration

  2. Detection and removal of impurities in nitric oxide generated from air by pulsed electrical discharge.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binglan; Blaesi, Aron H; Casey, Noel; Raykhtsaum, Grigory; Zazzeron, Luca; Jones, Rosemary; Morrese, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil; Malhotra, Rajeev; Bloch, Donald B; Goldstein, Lee E; Zapol, Warren M

    2016-11-30

    Inhalation of nitric oxide (NO) produces selective pulmonary vasodilation without dilating the systemic circulation. However, the current NO/N2 cylinder delivery system is cumbersome and expensive. We developed a lightweight, portable, and economical device to generate NO from air by pulsed electrical discharge. The objective of this study was to investigate and optimize the purity and safety of NO generated by this device. By using low temperature streamer discharges in the plasma generator, we produced therapeutic levels of NO with very low levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone. Despite the low temperature, spark generation eroded the surface of the electrodes, contaminating the gas stream with metal particles. During prolonged NO generation there was gradual loss of the iridium high-voltage tip (-90 μg/day) and the platinum-nickel ground electrode (-55 μg/day). Metal particles released from the electrodes were trapped by a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Quadrupole mass spectroscopy measurements of effluent gas during plasma NO generation showed that a single HEPA filter removed all of the metal particles. Mice were exposed to breathing 50 parts per million of electrically generated NO in air for 28 days with only a scavenger and no HEPA filter; the mice did not develop pulmonary inflammation or structural changes and iridium and platinum particles were not detected in the lungs of these mice. In conclusion, an electric plasma generator produced therapeutic levels of NO from air; scavenging and filtration effectively eliminated metallic impurities from the effluent gas.

  3. Markers of lipid oxidative damage among office workers exposed intermittently to air pollutants including nanoTiO2 particles.

    PubMed

    Pelclova, Daniela; Zdimal, Vladimir; Kacer, Petr; Komarc, Martin; Fenclova, Zdenka; Vlckova, Stepanka; Zikova, Nadezda; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Makes, Otakar; Navratil, Tomas; Zakharov, Sergey; Bello, Dhimiter

    2017-03-01

    Nanoscale titanium dioxide (nanoTiO2) is a commercially important nanomaterial used in numerous applications. Experimental studies with nanotitania have documented lung injury and inflammation, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity. Production workers in TiO2 manufacturing with a high proportion of nanoparticles and a mixture of other air pollutants, such as gases and organic aerosols, had increased markers of oxidative stress, including DNA and protein damage, as well as lipid peroxidation in their exhaled breath condensate (EBC) compared to unexposed controls. Office workers were observed to get intermittent exposures to nanoTiO2 during their process monitoring. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of such short-term exposures on the markers of health effects in office workers relative to production workers from the same factory. Twenty-two office employees were examined. They were occupationally exposed to (nano)TiO2 aerosol during their daily visits of the production area for an average of 14±9 min/day. Median particle number concentration in office workers while in the production area was 2.32×104/cm3. About 80% of the particles were <100 nm in diameter. A panel of biomarkers of lipid oxidation, specifically malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-trans-hexenal (HHE), 4-hydroxy-trans-nonenal (HNE), 8-isoprostaglandin F2α (8-isoprostane), and aldehydes C6-C12, were studied in the EBC and urine of office workers and 14 unexposed controls. Nine markers of lipid oxidation were elevated in the EBC of office employees relative to controls (p<0.05); only 8-isoprostane and C11 were not increased. Significant association was found in the multivariate analysis between their employment in the TiO2 production plant and EBC markers of lipid oxidation. No association was seen with age, lifestyle factors, or environmental air contamination. The EBC markers in office employees reached about 50% of the levels measured in production workers, and the difference between

  4. Identification of transformation products during advanced oxidation of diatrizoate: Effect of water matrix and oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Gilboa, Maayan; Schulz, Manoj; Ternes, Thomas; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2016-10-15

    Removal of micropollutants from reverse osmosis (RO) brines of wastewater desalination by oxidation processes is influenced by the scavenging capacity of brines components, resulting in the accumulation of transformation products (TPs) rather than complete mineralization. In this work the iodinated contrast media diatrizoate (DTZ) was used as model compound due to its relative resistance to oxidation. Identification of TPs was performed in ultrapure water (UPW) and RO brines applying nonthermal plasma (NTP) and UVA-TiO2 as oxidation techniques. The influence of main RO brines components in the formation and accumulation of TPs, such as chloride, bicarbonate alkalinity and humic acid, was also studied during UVA-TiO2. DTZ oxidation pattern in UPW resulted similar in both UVA-TiO2 and NTP achieving 66 and 61% transformation, respectively. However, DTZ transformation in RO brines was markedly lower in UVA-TiO2 (9%) than in NTP (27%). These differences can be attributed to the synergic effect of RO brines components during NTP. Moreover, reactive species other than hydroxyl radical contributed to DTZ transformation, i.e., direct photolysis in UVA-TiO2 and direct photolysis + O3 in NTP accounted for 16 and 23%, respectively. DTZ transformation led to iodide formation in both oxidation techniques but it further oxidized to iodate by ozone in NTP. In total 14 transformation products were identified in UPW of which 3 were present only in UVA-TiO2 and 2 were present exclusively in NTP; 5 of the 14 TPs were absent in RO brines. Five of them were new and were denoted as TP-474A/B, TP-522, TP-586, TP-602, TP-628. TP-522 (mono-chlorinated) was elucidated only in presence of high chloride titer-synthetic water matrix in NTP, most probably formed by active chlorine species generated in situ. TPs accumulation in RO brines was markedly different in comparison to UPW. This denotes the influence of RO brines components in the formation of reactive species that could further attack

  5. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ambient Air in an Oxidation Flow Reactor at GoAmazon2014/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Brett B.; de Sa, Suzane S.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Hu, Weiwei; Seco, Roger; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Guenther, Alex; Kim, Saewung; Brito, Joel; Wurm, Florian; Artaxo, Paulo; Yee, Lindsay; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabrial; Goldstein, Allen; Newburn, Matt K.; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Martin, Scot T.; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    During GoAmazon2014/5, ambient air was exposed to controlled concentrations of OH or O3 in situ using an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). Oxidation ranged from hours-several weeks of aging. Oxidized air was sampled by several instruments (e.g., HR-AMS, ACSM, PTR-TOF-MS, SMPS, CCN) at both the T3 site (IOP1: Feb 1-Mar 31, 2014, and IOP2: Aug 15-Oct 15, 2014) and T2 site (between IOPs and into 2nd IOP). The oxidation of ambient air in the OFR led to substantial and variable secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from any SOA-precursor gases, known and unknown, that entered the OFR. In general, more SOA was produced during the nighttime than daytime, suggesting that SOA-precursor gases were found in relatively higher concentrations at night. Similarly, more SOA was formed in the dry season (IOP2) than wet season (IOP1). The maximum amount of SOA produced during nighttime from OH oxidation ranged from less than 1 μg/m3 on some nights to greater than 10 μg/m3 on other nights. O3 oxidation of ambient air also led to SOA formation, although several times less than from OH oxidation. The amount of SOA formation sometimes, but not always, correlated with measured gas-phase biogenic and/or anthropogenic SOA precursors (e.g., SV-TAG sesquiterpenes, PTR-TOFMS aromatics, isoprene, and monoterpenes). The SOA mass formed in the OFR from OH oxidation was up to an order of magnitude larger than could be explained from aerosol yields of measured primary VOCs. This along with measurements from previous campaigns suggests that most SOA was formed from intermediate S/IVOC sources (e.g., VOC oxidation products, evaporated POA, or direct emissions). To verify the SOA yields of VOCs under OFR experimental conditions, atmospherically-relevant concentrations of several VOCs were added individually into ambient air in the OFR and oxidized by OH or O3. SOA yields in the OFR were similar to published chamber yields. Preliminary PMF factor analysis showed production of secondary factors in

  6. The effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on serum oxidative stress levels.

    PubMed

    Turan, Mehmet Nuri; Aslan, Mehmet; Bolukbas, Filiz Fusun; Bolukbas, Cengiz; Selek, Sahbettin; Sabuncu, Tevfik

    2016-12-01

    Some authors have investigated the effects of oxidative stress in some process such as undergoing laparoscopic. However, the effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on oxidative stress is unclear. We evaluated the short-term effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on oxidative stress. Thirty patients who underwent endoscopy process and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the prospective study. Serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status measurements were measured before and after endoscopy process. The ratio percentage of total oxidant status to total antioxidant capacity was regarded as oxidative stress index. Before endoscopy process, serum total antioxidant capacity levels were higher, while serum total oxidant status levels and oxidative stress index values were lower in patients than controls, but this difference was not statistically significant (all, p > 0.05). After endoscopy process, serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status levels were significantly higher in patients than before endoscopy process (both, p < 0.05). However, oxidative stress index values were slight higher in patients but this difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). We observed that serum TAC and TOS levels were increased in patients who underwent endoscopy process after endoscopy process. However, short-time upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process did not cause an important change in the oxidative stress index. Further studies enrolling a larger number of patients are required to clarify the results obtained here.

  7. FINAL REPORT on Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Hee C. NO; Nam Z. Cho

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Generation IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking studies to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification & validation are of very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air ingress will occur through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. This study indicates that depending on the location and the size of the pipe break, the air ingress phenomena are different. In an effort to estimate the proper safety margin, experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model are required. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation, eventually. This 3-year project (FY 2008–FY 2010) is focused on various issues related to the VHTR air-ingress accident, including (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) structural tests of the oxidized core bottom structures, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

  8. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaofei Guan; Peter A. Zink; Uday B. Pal; Adam C. Powell

    2012-01-01

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.% Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the magnesium content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapor. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium.

  9. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap Through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaofei; Zink, Peter; Pal, Uday

    2012-03-11

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.%Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the Mg content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapors in a separate condenser. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium; could not collect and weigh all of the magnesium recovered.

  10. Combined hydrolysis acidification and bio-contact oxidation system with air-lift tubes and activated carbon bioreactor for oilfield wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunmei; Chen, Yi; Chen, Jinfu; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Guangqing; Wang, Jingxiu; Cui, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigated the enhancement of the COD reduction of an oilfield wastewater treatment process by installing air-lift tubes and adding an activated carbon bioreactor (ACB) to form a combined hydrolysis acidification and bio-contact oxidation system with air-lift tubes (HA/air-lift BCO) and an ACB. Three heat-resistant bacterial strains were cultivated and subsequently applied in above pilot plant test. Installing air-lift tubes in aerobic tanks reduced the necessary air to water ratio from 20 to 5. Continuous operation of the HA/air-lift BCO system for 2 months with a hydraulic retention time of 36 h, a volumetric load of 0.14 kg COD/(m(3)d) (hydrolysis-acidification or anaerobic tank), and 0.06 kg COD/(m(3)d) (aerobic tanks) achieved an average reduction of COD by 60%, oil and grease by 62%, total suspended solids by 75%, and sulfides by 77%. With a COD load of 0.56 kg/(m(3)d), the average COD in the ACB effluent was 58 mg/L.

  11. Process for removal of sulfur oxides from waste gases

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, T.; Kawamata, N.; Takahashi, N.

    1980-03-18

    Sulfur oxides are removed from a waste gas containing SO/sub 2/ by: scrubbing the gas with an aqueous slurry containing Mg(OH)/sub 2/ as well as gypsum thereby to transform the SO/sub 2/ into MgSO/sub 3/ and to fix the same in this slurry; oxidizing the MgSO/sub 3/ in this slurry to convert the same into MgSO/sub 4/; filtering the slurry containing an aqueous solution of the MgSO4 thus formed and gypsum thereby to recover the gypsum; and adding Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to the aqueous solution of the MgSO/sub 4/ of the filtrate thereby to convert, by double decomposition reaction, at least the greater part of the MgSO/sub 4/ into Mg(OH)/sub 2/ and, at the same time, the Ca(OH)/sub 2/ into gypsum, the resulting aqueous slurry containing the Mg(OH/sub 2/ thus formed as well as the gypsum being used for the above mentioned scrubbing of the waste gas. The double decomposition reaction in this process is carried out in the presence of seed crystals of gypsum to obtain gypsum of good quality.

  12. Involvement of nitric oxide in learning & memory processes

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Vanaja; Ekambaram, Perumal

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized from the amino acid, L-arginine by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has received attention as a neurotransmitter in the brain. NO has been found to induce cognitive behaviour in experimental animals. In order to show evidence for the involvement of NO in learning and memory processes, the reports indicating the effects of its precursor, donors, and inhibitors of its synthesis in mammals, birds, fishes and invertebrates have been reviewed. Further, learning and memory impairment occurring in man and animals due to defective NO activity in the brain due to pathological conditions such as epilepsy, stress, diabetes and side effects of therapeutic agents and reversal of this condition by L-arginine and NO donors have been included. In addition, the reports that indicate ageing-induced impairment of cognition that is known to occur in Alzheimer's disease due to deposition of the toxic protein, beta amyloid and the effect of L-arginine and NO donors in preventing dementia in these patients have been reviewed. PMID:21623030

  13. Single-Step Process toward Achieving Superhydrophobic Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Tang, Xiu-Zhi; Zhu, Wenyu; Thompson, Brianna C; Huang, Mingyue; Yang, Jinglei; Hu, Xiao; Khor, Khiam Aik

    2016-05-04

    We report the first use of spark plasma sintering (SPS) as a single-step process to achieve superhydrophobic reduced graphene oxide (rGO). It was found that SPS was capable of converting smooth and electrically insulating graphene oxide (GO) sheets into highly electrically conductive rGO with minimum residual oxygen and hierarchical roughness which could be well retained after prolonged ultrasonication. At a temperature of 500 °C, which is lower than the conventional critical temperature for GO exfoliation, GO was successfully exfoliated, reduced, and hierarchically roughened. rGO fabricated by only 1 min of treatment at 1050 °C was superhydrophobic with a surface roughness (Ra) 10 times as large as that of GO as well as an extraordinarily high C:O ratio of 83.03 (atom %) and water contact angle of 153°. This demonstrates that SPS is a superior GO reduction technique, which enabled superhydrophobic rGO to be quickly and effectively achieved in one single step. Moreover, the superhydrophobic rGO fabricated by SPS showed an impressive bacterial antifouling and inactivation effect against Escherichia coli in both aqueous solution and the solid state. It is envisioned that the superhydrophobic rGO obtained in this study can be potentially used for a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications, such as the fabrication of self-cleaning and antibacterial surfaces.

  14. GENERATION, TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTEN-OXIDE AEROSOLS AT 1000 C IN FLOWING AIR-STEAM MIXTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the rates of oxidation and vaporization of pure tungsten rods in flowing air, steam and air-steam mixtures in laminar flow. Also measured were the downstream transport of tungsten-oxide condensation aerosols and their region of deposition, including plateout in the superheated flow tube, rainout in the condenser and ambient discharge which was collected on an array of sub-micron aerosol filters. The nominal conditions of the tests, with the exception of the first two tests, were tungsten temperatures of 1000 C, gas mixture temperatures of 200 C and wall temperatures of 150 C to 200 C. It was observed that the tungsten oxidation rates were greatest in all air and least in all steam, generally decreasing non-linearly with increasing steam mole fraction. The tungsten oxidation rates in all air were more than five times greater than the tungsten oxidation rates in all steam. The tungsten vaporization rate was zero in all air and increased with increasing steam mole fraction. The vaporization rate became maximum at a steam mole fraction of 0.85 and decreased thereafter as the steam mole fraction was increased to unity. The tungsten-oxide was transported downstream as condensation aerosols, initially flowing upwards from the tungsten rod through an 18-inch long, one-inch diameter quartz tube, around a 3.5-inch radius, 90{sup o} bend and laterally through a 24-inch horizontal run. The entire length of the quartz glass flow path was heated by electrical resistance clamshell heaters whose temperatures were individually controlled and measured. The tungsten-oxide plateout in the quartz tube was collected, nearly all of which was deposited at the end of the heated zone near the entrance to the condenser which was cold. The tungsten-oxide which rained out in the condenser as the steam condensed was collected with the condensate and weighed after being dried. The aerosol smoke which escaped the condenser was collected on the sub

  15. Decomposition of nitric oxide in a hot nitrogen stream to synthesize air for hypersonic wind tunnel combustion testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumdieck, J. F.; Zlatarich, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    A clean source of high enthalpy air was obtained from the exothermic decomposition of nitric oxide in the presence of strongly heated nitrogen. A nitric oxide jet was introduced into a confined coaxial nitrogen stream. Measurements were made of the extent of mixing and reaction. Experimental results are compared with one- and two-dimensional chemical kinetics computations. Both analyses predict much lower reactivity than was observed experimentally. Inlet nitrogen temperatures above 2400 K were sufficient to produce experimentally a completely reacted gas stream of synthetic air.

  16. Oxidation rate of nuclear-grade graphite IG-110 in the kinetic regime for VHTR air ingress accident scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jo Jo; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2014-03-01

    The oxidation rates of nuclear-grade graphite IG-110 in the kinetically-controlled temperature regime of graphite oxidation were predicted and compared in Very High Temperature Reactor air ingress accident scenarios. The oxidative mass loss of graphite was measured thermogravimetrically from 873 to 1873 K in 100% air (21 mol%). The activation energy was found to be 222.07 kJ/mol, and the order of reaction with respect to oxygen concentration is 0.76. The surfaces of the samples were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy before and after oxidation. These results are compared with those available in the literature, and our recently reported results for NBG-18 nuclear-grade graphite using the same technique.

  17. Evaluating Membrane Processes for Air Conditioning; Highlights in Research and Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This NREL Highlight discusses a recent state-of-the-art review of membrane processes for air conditioning that identifies future research opportunities. This highlight is being developed for the June 2015 S&T Alliance Board meeting.

  18. Fluidized-bed copper oxide process. Proof-of-concept unit design

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.P.; Takahashi, G.S.; Leshock, D.G.

    1991-10-14

    The fluidized-bed copper oxide process was developed to simultaneously remove sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide contaminants from the flue gas of coal-fired utility boilers. This dry and regenerable process uses a copper oxide sorbent in a fluidized-bed reactor. Contaminants are removed without generating waste material. (VC)

  19. Influence of the different oxidation treatment on the performance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaoxia; Wang, Xingang; Yang, Hongwei; Sun, Yu; Liu, Yunxia

    2012-09-30

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by different oxidants (HNO(3)/H(2)SO(4), H(2)O(2), O(3) and air) have been used as catalysts for the wet air oxidation of phenol. To investigate the effect of the oxidation conditions on the structure of the functionalized MWCNTs, various characterization techniques, e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used. The MWCNTs treated with O(3) and H(2)O(2) show higher amounts of oxygen-containing functional groups and carboxylic acid groups, and a weaker acidic nature, in comparison with those treated with other oxidizing agents. All the functionalized MWCNTs exhibit good activity in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol. However, the MWCNTs treated with O(3) show the highest activity with desirable stability in comparison with other functionalized MWCNTs, indicating that the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with O(3) is a very promising strategy in synthesizing efficient catalysts for CWAO.

  20. Antioxidant and oxidative stress parameters in brain of Heteropneustes fossilis under air exposure condition; role of mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Many fishes are exposed to air in their natural habitat or during their commercial handling. In natural habitat or during commercial handling, the cat fish Heteropneustes fossilis is exposed to air for >24h. Data on its oxidative metabolism in the above condition are not available. Oxidative stress (OS) indices (lipid and protein oxidation), toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS: H2O2) generation, antioxidative status (levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reductase, ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl) and activities of electron transport chain (ETC) enzymes (complex I-IV) were investigated in brain tissue of H. fossilis under air exposure condition (0, 3, 6, 12 and 18 h at 25°C). Decreased activities of antioxidant (except catalase) and ETC enzymes (except complex II) with increased H2O2 and OS levels were observed in the tissue under water deprivation condition. Positive correlation was observed for complex II activity and non-protein thiol groups with time period of air exposure. The critical time period to induce OS and to reduce most of the studied antioxidant level in brain was found to be 3-6h air exposure. The data can be useful to minimize the stress generated during commercial handling of the live fishes those exposed to air in general and H. fossilis in particular.

  1. Pro-oxidant and antioxidant processes in aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Canesi, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Most aquatic organisms behave as conformers with respect to environmental variables, including changes in O2 availability. Aquatic species that show tolerance to hypoxia/anoxia or hyperoxia can be excellent models for investigating physiological and biochemical adaptations that deal with changing O2 and consequent changes in metabolic rate and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, I summarize selected data on ROS production and antioxidant defenses in a model marine invertebrate, the bivalve Mytilus, under different environmental and physiological conditions. An example of other bivalves adapted to particular environments (the Antarctic Sea) is also reported. These studies contributed to the knowledge on pro-oxidant and antioxidant processes in aquatic invertebrates from comparative and environmental perspectives. A common role for metallothioneins in antioxidant protection in mammals and aquatic invertebrates is underlined in different conditions, from human disease to responses to environmental exposure to heavy metals.

  2. Cobalt-based nanocatalysts for green oxidation and hydrogenation processes.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, Rajenahally V; Stemmler, Tobias; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Bauer, Matthias; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Radnik, Jörg; Junge, Kathrin; Junge, Henrik; Brückner, Angelika; Beller, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    This protocol describes the preparation of cobalt-based nanocatalysts and their applications in environmentally benign redox processes for fine chemical synthesis. The catalytically active material consists of nanoscale Co3O4 particles surrounded by nitrogen-doped graphene layers (NGrs), which have been prepared by pyrolysis of phenanthroline-ligated cobalt acetate on carbon. The resulting materials have been found to be excellent catalysts for the activation of both molecular oxygen and hydrogen; in all tested reactions, water was the only by-product. By applying these catalysts, green oxidations of alcohols and hydrogenation of nitroarenes for the synthesis of nitriles, esters and amines are demonstrated. The overall time required for catalyst preparation and for redox reactions is 35 h and 10-30 h, respectively.

  3. Reactive Distillation and Air Stripping Processes for Water Recycling and Trace Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin E.; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Reactive distillation designs are considered to reduce the presence of volatile organic compounds in the purified water. Reactive distillation integrates a reactor with a distillation column. A review of the literature in this field has revealed a variety of functional reactive columns in industry. Wastewater may be purified by a combination of a reactor and a distiller (e.g., the EWRS or VPCAR concepts) or, in principle, through a design which integrates the reactor with the distiller. A review of the literature in reactive distillation has identified some different designs in such combinations of reactor and distiller. An evaluation of reactive distillation and reactive air stripping is presented with regards to the reduction of volatile organic compounds in the contaminated water and air. Among the methods presented, an architecture is presented for the evaluation of the simultaneous oxidation of organics in air and water. These and other designs are presented in light of potential improvements in power consumptions and air and water purities for architectures which include catalytic activity integrated into the water processor. In particular, catalytic oxidation of organics may be useful as a tool to remove contaminants that more traditional distillation and/or air stripping columns may not remove. A review of the current leading edge at the commercial level and at the research frontier in catalytically active materials is presented. Themes and directions from the engineering developments in catalyst design are presented conceptually in light of developments in the nanoscale chemistry of a variety of catalyst materials.

  4. Cleaner production in a remanufacturing process of air compressors.

    PubMed

    Esquer, Javier; Arvayo, Jose Angel; Alvarez-Chavez, Clara Rosalia; Munguia-Vega, Nora Elba; Velazquez, Luis

    2017-03-01

    This article provides relevant results of a cleaner production program conducted in a company dedicated to remanufacturing air compressors in the city of Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. The overall study design was based on an integration of acknowledged cleaner production and pollution prevention programs. Although this kind of program also involves environmental issues, this study focused on occupational health and safety by addressing different aspects of the work environment: ergonomic, physical (noise and lighting), and chemical. Particularly, ergonomic aspects were evaluated through the Modular Arrangement of Predetermined Time Standards (MODAPTS) method. For physical aspects, noise and lighting were addressed through Standard No. NOM-011-STPS-2001 and Standard No. NOM-025-STPS-2008 respectively. In addition, chemical aspects were analyzed through material safety data sheets and different search tools. Root causes of each risk were identified, and options to prevent, eliminate, and/or reduce each risk have been provided.

  5. Uniting Gradual and Abrupt set Processes in Resistive Switching Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, Karsten; La Torre, Camilla; Aslam, Nabeel; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Böttger, Ulrich; Menzel, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    Identifying limiting factors is crucial for a better understanding of the dynamics of the resistive switching phenomenon in transition-metal oxides. This improved understanding is important for the design of fast-switching, energy-efficient, and long-term stable redox-based resistive random-access memory devices. Therefore, this work presents a detailed study of the set kinetics of valence change resistive switches on a time scale from 10 ns to 104 s , taking Pt /SrTiO3/TiN nanocrossbars as a model material. The analysis of the transient currents reveals that the switching process can be subdivided into a linear-degradation process that is followed by a thermal runaway. The comparison with a dynamical electrothermal model of the memory cell allows the deduction of the physical origin of the degradation. The origin is an electric-field-induced increase of the oxygen-vacancy concentration near the Schottky barrier of the Pt /SrTiO3 interface that is accompanied by a steadily rising local temperature due to Joule heating. The positive feedback of the temperature increase on the oxygen-vacancy mobility, and thereby on the conductivity of the filament, leads to a self-acceleration of the set process.

  6. Creep deformation in an alumina-silicon carbide composite produced via a directed metal oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.T.; Breder, K.

    1996-08-01

    Flexural creep studies were conducted in a commercially available alumina matrix composite reinforced with SiC particulates (SiC{sub p}) and aluminum metal at temperatures from 1,200 to 1,300 C under selected stress levels in air. The alumina composite (5 to 10 {micro}m alumina grain size) containing 48 vol% SiC particulates and 13 vol% aluminum alloy was fabricated via a directed metal oxidation process (DIMOX{trademark}) and had an external 15 {micro}m oxide coating. Creep results indicated that the DIMOX Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC{sub p} composite exhibited creep rates that were comparable to alumina composites reinforced with 10 vol% (8 {micro}m grain size) and 50 vol% (1.5 {micro}m grain size) SiC whiskers under the employed test conditions. The DIMOX Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC{sub p} composite exhibited a stress exponent of 2 at 1,200 C and a higher exponent value (2.6) at {ge}1,260 C, which is associated with the enhanced creep cavitation. The creep mechanism in the DIMOX alumina composite was attributed to grain boundary sliding accommodated by diffusional processes. Creep damage observed in the DIMOX Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC{sub p} composite resulted from the cavitation at alumina two-grain facets and multiple-grain junctions where aluminum alloy was present.

  7. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  8. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide includes heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  9. Graphene oxide electrocatalyst on MnO2 air cathode as an efficient electron pump for enhanced oxygen reduction in alkaline solution

    PubMed Central

    Basirun, Wan Jeffrey; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Endut, Zulkarnain; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza; Ebadi, Mehdi; Yousefi, Ramin; Ghadimi, Hanieh; Ahmed, Sohail

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited on the surface of a MnO2 air cathode by thermal evaporation at 50°C from a GO colloidal suspension. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of GO on the MnO2 air cathode (GO-MnO2). Voltammetry and chrono-amperometry showed increased currents for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 6 M KOH solution for GO-MnO2 compared to the MnO2 cathode. The GO-MnO2 was used as an air cathode in an alkaline tin-air cell and produced a maximum power density of 13 mW cm−2, in contrast to MnO2, which produced a maximum power density of 9.2 mW cm−2. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggest that the chemical step for the ORR is the rate determining step, as proposed earlier by different researchers. It is suggested that the presence of GO and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on the MnO2 surface are responsible for the increased rate of this step, whereby GO and ERGO accelerate the process of electron donation to the MnO2 and to adsorbed oxygen atoms. PMID:25765731

  10. Graphene oxide electrocatalyst on MnO2 air cathode as an efficient electron pump for enhanced oxygen reduction in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirun, Wan Jeffrey; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Endut, Zulkarnain; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza; Ebadi, Mehdi; Yousefi, Ramin; Ghadimi, Hanieh; Ahmed, Sohail

    2015-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited on the surface of a MnO2 air cathode by thermal evaporation at 50°C from a GO colloidal suspension. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of GO on the MnO2 air cathode (GO-MnO2). Voltammetry and chrono-amperometry showed increased currents for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 6 M KOH solution for GO-MnO2 compared to the MnO2 cathode. The GO-MnO2 was used as an air cathode in an alkaline tin-air cell and produced a maximum power density of 13 mW cm-2, in contrast to MnO2, which produced a maximum power density of 9.2 mW cm-2. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggest that the chemical step for the ORR is the rate determining step, as proposed earlier by different researchers. It is suggested that the presence of GO and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on the MnO2 surface are responsible for the increased rate of this step, whereby GO and ERGO accelerate the process of electron donation to the MnO2 and to adsorbed oxygen atoms.

  11. Graphene oxide electrocatalyst on MnO₂ air cathode as an efficient electron pump for enhanced oxygen reduction in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Basirun, Wan Jeffrey; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Endut, Zulkarnain; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza; Ebadi, Mehdi; Yousefi, Ramin; Ghadimi, Hanieh; Ahmed, Sohail

    2015-03-13

    Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited on the surface of a MnO2 air cathode by thermal evaporation at 50°C from a GO colloidal suspension. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of GO on the MnO2 air cathode (GO-MnO2). Voltammetry and chrono-amperometry showed increased currents for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 6 M KOH solution for GO-MnO2 compared to the MnO2 cathode. The GO-MnO2 was used as an air cathode in an alkaline tin-air cell and produced a maximum power density of 13 mW cm(-2), in contrast to MnO2, which produced a maximum power density of 9.2 mW cm(-2). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggest that the chemical step for the ORR is the rate determining step, as proposed earlier by different researchers. It is suggested that the presence of GO and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on the MnO2 surface are responsible for the increased rate of this step, whereby GO and ERGO accelerate the process of electron donation to the MnO2 and to adsorbed oxygen atoms.

  12. 75 FR 61486 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability of... Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft (75 FR 57463, September... (summary of options for elements of the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and sulfur oxides (SO X ) standard)....

  13. 75 FR 20595 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of extension of comment... for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: First External Review Draft (75 FR 11877; March 12, 2010... a proposal addressing the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and sulfur oxides (SO X ) secondary...

  14. Controls Over the Air Force Contract Augmentation Program Payment Process Need Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-28

    No. DODIG-2015-075 J A N U A R Y 2 8 , 2 0 1 5 Controls Over the Air Force Contract Augmentation Program Payment Process Need Improvement Report...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Controls Over the Air Force Contract Augmentation Program...Controls Over the Air Force Contract Augmentation Program Payment Process Need Improvement Visit us at www.dodig.mil Objective To determine whether DoD was

  15. Wear and friction of oxidation-resistant mechanical carbon graphites at 650 C in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisnader, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the friction and wear properties of experimental carbon-graphites. Hemispherically tipped carbon-graphite rider specimens were tested in sliding contact with rotating Inconel X-750 disks in air. A surface speed of 1.33 m/sec, a load of 500 g, and a specimen temperature of 650 C were used. Results indicate: (1) hardness is not a major factor in determining friction and wear under the conditions of these studies. (2) Friction and wear as low as or lower than those observed for a good commercial seal material were attained with some of the experimental materials studied. (3) The inclusion of boron carbide (as an oxidation inhibitor) has a strong influence on wear rate. (4) Phosphate treatment reduces the friction coefficient when boron carbide is not present in the base material.

  16. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Application to Air Quality Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Khan, Maudood; Biazar, Arastoo; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are discussed. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark)(NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NO(x) (= NO + NO2). The latest LNOM estimates of lightning channel length distributions, lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and the vertical profile of lightning NO(x) are presented. The primary improvement to the LNOM is the inclusion of non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: (1) hot core stepped and dart leaders, (2) stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NO(x) for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  17. Oxidation effects on cleaved multiple quantum well surfaces in air observed by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, S.; Gallagher, M. J.; Chen, T.; Pax, P.; Sarid, D.

    1992-08-01

    The paper presents the first atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of cleaved InGaAs/InP multiple quantum wells and compares them with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images taken of the same heterostructure. The images were stable in air for over a day. Based on these results, it is proposed that the mechanism for contrast in the images is due to an oxide layer that grows primarily on the InGaAs wells and not on the InP barriers. Both STM and AFM clearly resolve the individual wells of the heterostructure, although STM measured a larger corrugation than an AFM. STM also exhibited superior lateral resolution of about 2 nm, while AFM had a lateral resolution of approximately 6 nm.

  18. Investigation of hydrogen-air ignition sensitized by nitric oxide and by nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, M.; Grillo, A.

    1977-01-01

    The sensitization of stoichiometric hydrogen-air ignition by NO, NO2 and a mixture of NO and NO2 was investigated behind reflected shock waves in a shock tube. Induction times were measured in pressure range 0.27 to 2.0 atm, temperature range 800 to 1500 K, and for NO or NO2 mole percent between 0.0 and 4.5. Addition of both NO and NO2 reduced the measured induction times. The experimental data are interpreted in terms of H2-O2-NO(x) oxidation reaction mechanisms. The influence of NO(x) upon a supersonic combustion ramjet combustor test, conducted in an arc-heated facility, is assessed.

  19. Graphene oxide membranes with high permeability and selectivity for dehumidification of air

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Wei; Schwenzer, Birgit; Manandhar, Sandeep; Chase-Woods, Dylan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Devanathan, Ram; Fifield, Leonard S.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Ginovska, Bojana; Gotthold, David W.

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchically stacked 2D graphene oxide (GO) membranes are a fascinating and promising new class of materials with the potential for radically improved water vapor/gas separation with excellent selectivity and high permeability. This paper details dehumidification results from flowing gas mixtures through free-standing GO membrane samples prepared by a casting method. The first demonstrated use of free-standing GO membranes for water vapor separation reveals outstanding water vapor permeability and H2O/N2 selectivity. Free-standing GO membranes exhibit extremely high water vapor permeability of 1.82 x 105 Barrer and a water vapor permeance of 1.01 x 10-5 mol/m2sPa, while the nitrogen permeability was below the system’s detection limit, yielding a selectivity >104 in 80% relative humidity (RH) air at 30.8 °C. The results show great potential for a range of energy conversion and environmental applications

  20. Degradation of phenylamine by catalytic wet air oxidation using metal catalysts with modified supports.

    PubMed

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Escudero, Gabriel O; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acid treatments with HCl and HNO3 on the surface area and surface chemistry of three granular activated carbons was studied. These supports were characterized and the hydrochloric acid treatment leads to the best activated carbon support (AC2-C). The catalytic behavior of Pt, Ru and Fe (1 wt.%) supported on granular activated carbon treated with HCl was tested in the phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation in a three-phase, high-pressure catalytic reactor over a range of reaction temperatures 130-170ºC and total pressure of 1.0-3.0 MPa at LHSV = 0.4-1 h(-1), whereas the phenylamine concentration range and the catalyst loading were 5-16 mol.m(-3) and 0.5-1.5 g, respectively. Activity as well as conversion varied as a function of the metal, the catalyst preparation method and operation conditions. Higher activities were obtained with Pt incorporated on hydrochloric acid -treated activated carbon by the ion exchange method. In steady state, approximately 98% phenylamine conversion, 77% of TOC and 94% of COD removal, was recorded at 150ºC, 11 mol m(-3) of phenylamine concentration and 1.5 g of catalyst, and the selectivity to non-organic compounds was 78%. Several reaction intermediaries were detected. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood model gave an excellent fit of the kinetic data of phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation over the catalysts of this work.