Science.gov

Sample records for air oxidation resistance

  1. Effect of microstructure on air oxidation resistance of nuclear graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Guldan, Tyler R; Wang, Peng; Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation resistance in air of three grades of nuclear graphite with different structures was compared using a standard thermogravimetric method. Differences in the oxidation behavior have been identified with respect to both (i) the rate of oxidation in identical conditions and the derived apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factor and (ii) the penetration depth of the oxidant and the development of the oxidized layer. These differences were ascribed to structural differences between the three graphite grades, in particular the grain size and shape of the graphite filler, and the associated textural properties, such as total BET surface area and porosity distribution in the un-oxidized material. It was also found that the amount of strongly bonded surface oxygen complexes measured by thermodesorption significantly exceeds the amount afforded by the low BET surface area, and therefore low temperature oxygen chemisorption is not a reliable method for determining the amount of surface sites (re)active during air oxidation. The relationship between nuclear graphite microstructure and its oxidation resistance demonstrated in this work underlines the importance of performing comprehensive oxidation characterization studies of the new grades of nuclear graphite considered as candidates for very high temperature gas-cooled reactors.

  2. Oxidation resistance of selected mechanical carbons at 650 deg C in dry flowing air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted with several experimental mechanical carbons at 650 C in air flowing at 28 cu cm/sec (STP). Experiments indicate that boron carbide addition and zinc phosphate treatment definitely improved oxidation resistance. Impregnation with coal tar pitch before final graphitization had some beneficial effect on oxidation resistance and it markedly improved flexure strength and hardness. Graphitization temperature alone did not affect oxidation resistance, but with enough added boron carbide the oxidation resistance was increased although the hardness greatly decreased.

  3. Air-Impregnated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Layers for Enhancing the Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chanyoung; Lee, Junghoon; Sheppard, Keith; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2015-10-13

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layers were fabricated on aluminum substrates with systematically varied pore diameters (20-80 nm) and oxide thicknesses (150-500 nm) by controlling the anodizing voltage and time and subsequent pore-widening process conditions. The porous nanostructures were then coated with a thin (only a couple of nanometers thick) Teflon film to make the surface hydrophobic and trap air in the pores. The corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate was evaluated by a potentiodynamic polarization measurement in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution (saltwater). Results showed that the hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate compared to a hydrophilic oxide layer of the same nanostructures, to bare (nonanodized) aluminum with only a natural oxide layer on top, and to the latter coated with a thin Teflon film. The hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer with the largest pore diameter and the thickest oxide layer (i.e., the maximized air fraction) resulted in the best corrosion resistance with a corrosion inhibition efficiency of up to 99% for up to 7 days. The results demonstrate that the air impregnating the hydrophobic nanopores can effectively inhibit the penetration of corrosive media into the pores, leading to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance.

  4. Resistance Measurements and Activation Energies Calculations of Pure and Platinum Doped Stannic Oxide Ceramics in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Zuhairi; Othman, Zulkafli; Karim, Mohd Mustamam Abd; Holland, Diane

    2007-05-09

    Pure SnO2 and Pt-SnO2 ceramics were fabricated by the dry pressing method using a pressure of 40 Mpa and sintered at 1000 deg. C. Electrical resistance measurements were made using an impedance analyzer, in air and temperatures between 25 deg. C and 450 deg. C. The change in resistance in both pure and platinum-doped stannic oxide ceramics was discussed.

  5. Oxidation resistance in LBE and air and tensile properties of ODS ferritic steels containing Al/Zr elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Xia, L. L.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of Al and Zr addition on improvement of oxidation resistance in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and in air as well as the tensile properties were investigated for the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. The 16Cr-4Al-0.8Zr-ODS steel samples were fabricated by a sol-gel method combining with spark plasma sintering technique. The tests in LBE at 600 °C for 1000 h indicate the good oxidation resistance comparing with the specimens without Zr/Al elements. The samples also exhibit superior oxidation resistance in air due to formation of dense and continuous aluminum oxide film. Minor Zr addition prevents the Al element induced coarsening of the oxide particles in ODS steels and significantly improves the ultimate tensile stress and total elongation of the samples.

  6. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  7. Temperature-modulated graphene oxide resistive humidity sensor for indoor air quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luca, A.; Santra, S.; Ghosh, R.; Ali, S. Z.; Gardner, J. W.; Guha, P. K.; Udrea, F.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) micro-hotplate technology for the monitoring and control of indoor air quality (IAQ). GO powder is obtained by chemical exfoliation, dispersed in water and deposited via ink-jet printing onto a low power micro-hotplate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show the typical layered and wrinkled morphology of the GO. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that the GO flakes possess a significant number of oxygen containing functional groups (epoxy, carbonyl, hydroxyl) extremely attractive for humidity detection. Electro-thermal characterisation of the micro-hotplates shows a thermal efficiency of 0.11 mW per °C, resulting in a sensor DC power consumption of only 2.75 mW at 50 °C. When operated in an isothermal mode, the sensor response is detrimentally affected by significant drift, hysteretic behaviour, slow response/recovery times and hence poor RH level discrimination. Conversely, a temperature modulation technique coupled with a differential readout methodology results in a significant reduction of the sensor drift, improved linear response with a sensitivity of 0.14 mV per %, resolution below 5%, and a maximum hysteresis of +/-5% response and recovery times equal to 189 +/- 49 s and 89 +/- 5 s, respectively. These performance parameters satisfy current IAQ monitoring requirements. We have thus demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating GO on a micro-hotplate CMOS-compatible platform enabling temperature modulation schemes to be easily applied in order to achieve compact, low power, low cost humidity IAQ monitoring.In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary-metal-oxide

  8. Temperature-modulated graphene oxide resistive humidity sensor for indoor air quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Santra, S; Ghosh, R; Ali, S Z; Gardner, J W; Guha, P K; Udrea, F

    2016-02-28

    In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) micro-hotplate technology for the monitoring and control of indoor air quality (IAQ). GO powder is obtained by chemical exfoliation, dispersed in water and deposited via ink-jet printing onto a low power micro-hotplate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show the typical layered and wrinkled morphology of the GO. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that the GO flakes possess a significant number of oxygen containing functional groups (epoxy, carbonyl, hydroxyl) extremely attractive for humidity detection. Electro-thermal characterisation of the micro-hotplates shows a thermal efficiency of 0.11 mW per °C, resulting in a sensor DC power consumption of only 2.75 mW at 50 °C. When operated in an isothermal mode, the sensor response is detrimentally affected by significant drift, hysteretic behaviour, slow response/recovery times and hence poor RH level discrimination. Conversely, a temperature modulation technique coupled with a differential readout methodology results in a significant reduction of the sensor drift, improved linear response with a sensitivity of 0.14 mV per %, resolution below 5%, and a maximum hysteresis of ±5%; response and recovery times equal to 189 ± 49 s and 89 ± 5 s, respectively. These performance parameters satisfy current IAQ monitoring requirements. We have thus demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating GO on a micro-hotplate CMOS-compatible platform enabling temperature modulation schemes to be easily applied in order to achieve compact, low power, low cost humidity IAQ monitoring. PMID:26842731

  9. Temperature-modulated graphene oxide resistive humidity sensor for indoor air quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Santra, S; Ghosh, R; Ali, S Z; Gardner, J W; Guha, P K; Udrea, F

    2016-02-28

    In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) micro-hotplate technology for the monitoring and control of indoor air quality (IAQ). GO powder is obtained by chemical exfoliation, dispersed in water and deposited via ink-jet printing onto a low power micro-hotplate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show the typical layered and wrinkled morphology of the GO. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that the GO flakes possess a significant number of oxygen containing functional groups (epoxy, carbonyl, hydroxyl) extremely attractive for humidity detection. Electro-thermal characterisation of the micro-hotplates shows a thermal efficiency of 0.11 mW per °C, resulting in a sensor DC power consumption of only 2.75 mW at 50 °C. When operated in an isothermal mode, the sensor response is detrimentally affected by significant drift, hysteretic behaviour, slow response/recovery times and hence poor RH level discrimination. Conversely, a temperature modulation technique coupled with a differential readout methodology results in a significant reduction of the sensor drift, improved linear response with a sensitivity of 0.14 mV per %, resolution below 5%, and a maximum hysteresis of ±5%; response and recovery times equal to 189 ± 49 s and 89 ± 5 s, respectively. These performance parameters satisfy current IAQ monitoring requirements. We have thus demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating GO on a micro-hotplate CMOS-compatible platform enabling temperature modulation schemes to be easily applied in order to achieve compact, low power, low cost humidity IAQ monitoring.

  10. Oxidation Resistance of Materials Based on Ti3AlC2 Nanolaminate at 600 °C in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivasyshyn, Andrij; Ostash, Orest; Prikhna, Tatiana; Podhurska, Viktoriya; Basyuk, Tatiana

    2016-08-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ti3AlC2-based materials had been investigated at 600 °C in static air for 1000 h. It was shown that the intense increase of weight gain per unit surface area for sintered material with porosity of 22 % attributed to oxidation of the outer surface of the specimen and surfaces of pores in the bulk material. The oxidation kinetics of the hot-pressed Ti3AlC2-based material with 1 % porosity remarkably increased for the first 15 h and then slowly decreased. The weight gain per unit surface area for this material was 1.0 mg/cm2 after exposition for 1000 h. The intense initial oxidation of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be eliminated by pre-oxidation treatment at 1200 °C in air for 2 h. As a result, the weight gain per unit surface area for the pre-oxidized material did not exceed 0.11 mg/cm2 after 1000 h of exposition at 600 °C in air. It was demonstrated that the oxidation resistance of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be significantly improved by niobium addition.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF A NOVEL AIR BRAZING COMPOSITION FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE, OXIDATION-RESISTANT CERAMIC JOINING

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.; Darsell, Jens T.

    2004-01-30

    One of the challenges in developing a useful ceramic joining technique is in producing a joint that offers good strength under high temperature and highly oxidizing operating conditions. Unfortunately many of the commercially available active metal ceramic brazing alloys exhibit oxidation behaviors which are unacceptable for use in a high temperature application. We have developed a new approach to ceramic brazing, referred to as air brazing, that employs an oxide wetting agent dissolved in a molten noble metal solvent, in this case CuO in Ag, such that acceptable wetting behavior occurs on a number of ceramic substrates. In an effort to explore how to increase the operating temperature of this type of braze, we have investigated the effect of ternary palladium additions on the wetting characteristics of our standard Ag-CuO air braze composition

  12. Wear and friction of oxidation-resistant mechanical carbon graphites at 650 C in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisnader, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the friction and wear properties of experimental carbon-graphites. Hemispherically tipped carbon-graphite rider specimens were tested in sliding contact with rotating Inconel X-750 disks in air. A surface speed of 1.33 m/sec, a load of 500 g, and a specimen temperature of 650 C were used. Results indicate: (1) hardness is not a major factor in determining friction and wear under the conditions of these studies. (2) Friction and wear as low as or lower than those observed for a good commercial seal material were attained with some of the experimental materials studied. (3) The inclusion of boron carbide (as an oxidation inhibitor) has a strong influence on wear rate. (4) Phosphate treatment reduces the friction coefficient when boron carbide is not present in the base material.

  13. Oxidation Resistance of Materials Based on Ti3AlC2 Nanolaminate at 600 °C in Air.

    PubMed

    Ivasyshyn, Andrij; Ostash, Orest; Prikhna, Tatiana; Podhurska, Viktoriya; Basyuk, Tatiana

    2016-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ti3AlC2-based materials had been investigated at 600 °C in static air for 1000 h. It was shown that the intense increase of weight gain per unit surface area for sintered material with porosity of 22 % attributed to oxidation of the outer surface of the specimen and surfaces of pores in the bulk material. The oxidation kinetics of the hot-pressed Ti3AlC2-based material with 1 % porosity remarkably increased for the first 15 h and then slowly decreased. The weight gain per unit surface area for this material was 1.0 mg/cm(2) after exposition for 1000 h. The intense initial oxidation of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be eliminated by pre-oxidation treatment at 1200 °C in air for 2 h. As a result, the weight gain per unit surface area for the pre-oxidized material did not exceed 0.11 mg/cm(2) after 1000 h of exposition at 600 °C in air. It was demonstrated that the oxidation resistance of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be significantly improved by niobium addition.

  14. Oxidation Resistance of Materials Based on Ti3AlC2 Nanolaminate at 600 °C in Air.

    PubMed

    Ivasyshyn, Andrij; Ostash, Orest; Prikhna, Tatiana; Podhurska, Viktoriya; Basyuk, Tatiana

    2016-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ti3AlC2-based materials had been investigated at 600 °C in static air for 1000 h. It was shown that the intense increase of weight gain per unit surface area for sintered material with porosity of 22 % attributed to oxidation of the outer surface of the specimen and surfaces of pores in the bulk material. The oxidation kinetics of the hot-pressed Ti3AlC2-based material with 1 % porosity remarkably increased for the first 15 h and then slowly decreased. The weight gain per unit surface area for this material was 1.0 mg/cm(2) after exposition for 1000 h. The intense initial oxidation of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be eliminated by pre-oxidation treatment at 1200 °C in air for 2 h. As a result, the weight gain per unit surface area for the pre-oxidized material did not exceed 0.11 mg/cm(2) after 1000 h of exposition at 600 °C in air. It was demonstrated that the oxidation resistance of Ti3AlC2-based materials can be significantly improved by niobium addition. PMID:27506531

  15. Design for Oxidation Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Schaeffer, Jon C.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    Alloys intended for use in high-temperature environment rely on the formation of a continuous, compact, slow-growing oxide layer for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. To be protective, this oxide layer must be chemically, thermodynamically stable. Successful alloy design for oxidative environment is best achieved by developing alloys that are capable of forming adherent scales of either alumina (Al2O3), chromia (Cr2O3), or silica (SiO2). In this article, emphasis has been placed on the issue related to high-temperature oxidation of superalloys used in gas turbine engine application. Despite the complexity of these alloys, optimal performance has been associated with protective alumina scale formation. As will be described below, both compositional makeup and protective coatings play key role in providing oxidation protection. Other high-temperature materials described include nickel and titanium aluminide intermetallics, refractory metal, and ceramics.

  16. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  17. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  18. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  19. Oxidation-Reduction Resistance of Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.; Humphrey, D. L.; Setlock, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to oxidation and blanching is a key issue for advanced copper alloys under development for NASA's next generation of reusable launch vehicles. Candidate alloys, including dispersion-strengthened Cu-Cr-Nb, solution-strengthened Cu-Ag-Zr, and ODS Cu-Al2O3, are being evaluated for oxidation resistance by static TGA exposures in low-p(O2) and cyclic oxidation in air, and by cyclic oxidation-reduction exposures (using air for oxidation and CO/CO2 or H2/Ar for reduction) to simulate expected service environments. The test protocol and results are presented.

  20. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Windes, William; Smith, Rebecca; Carroll, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  1. Bodies Falling with Air Resistance: Computer Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Floyd

    1982-01-01

    Two models are presented. The first assumes that air resistance is proportional to the velocity of the falling body. The second assumes that air resistance is proportional to the square of the velocity. A program written in BASIC that simulates the second model is presented. (MP)

  2. High temperature oxidation resistant cermet compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Cermet compositions are designed to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on stainless steel or molybdenum substrates. A ceramic mixture of chromium oxide and aluminum oxide form a coating of chromium oxide as an oxidation barrier around the metal particles, to provide oxidation resistance for the metal particles.

  3. High-Temperature Oxidation Resistance of a Nanoceria Spray-Coated 316L Stainless Steel Under Short-Term Air Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hugo F.; Mendoza, Humberto; Church, Ben

    2013-10-01

    Nanoceria coatings using a spray method were implemented on a 316L stainless steel (SS). Coated and uncoated coupons were exposed to dry air at 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C) for short time periods (up to 24 hours) and in situ measurements of oxidation were carried out using a highly sensitive thermogravimetric balance. From the experimental outcome, activation energies were determined in both, coated and uncoated 316 SS coupons. The estimated exhibited activation energies for oxidation in the coated and uncoated conditions were 174 and 356 kJ/mol, respectively. In addition, the developed scales were significantly different. In the coated steel, the dominant oxide was an oxide spinel (Fe, Mn)3O4 and the presence of Fe2O3 was sharply reduced, particularly at 1273 K (1000 °C). In contrast, no spinel was found in the uncoated 316L SS, and Fe2O3 was always present in the scale at all the investigated oxidation temperatures. The coated steels developed a highly adherent fine-grained scale structure. Apparently, the nanoceria particles enhanced nucleation of the newly formed scale while restricting coarsening. Coarse grain structures were found in the uncoated steels with scale growth occurring at grain ledges. Moreover, the oxidation rates for the coated 316L SS were at least an order of magnitude lower than those exhibited by the steel in the uncoated condition. The reduction in oxidation rates is attributed to a shift in the oxidation mechanism from outward cation diffusion to inward oxygen diffusion.

  4. Measuring Air Resistance in a Computerized Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Ken; Thompson, D.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an activity that involves dropping spherical party balloons onto a sonic motion sensor to show that the force associated with the air resistance is proportional to both the square of the velocity and the cross-sectional area of the balloon. (Author/WRM)

  5. Effect of chlorine purification on oxidation resistance of some mechanical carbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.; Allen, G. P.

    1974-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted with some experimental and commercial mechanical carbons at 650 C in dry air flowing at 28 cc/sec (STP). In general, purification of these carbon-graphites with chlorine at 2800 C improved oxidation resistance. Additional improvements in oxidation resistance were obtained from purification followed by an antioxidant (zinc phosphate) treatment. For the commercial materials, purification alone gave greater oxidation resistance than the antioxidant treatment alone. The reverse, however, was the case for the experimental materials.

  6. Wet air oxidation of propellant wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, T.L.; Copa, W.M.; Deitrich, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Wet Air Oxidation studies have been conducted on a number of propellant wastewaters, to assess destruction levels of specific propellant components. OTTO fuel, used as a torpedo propellant, and hydrazine based rocket fuels were propellants of interest. OTTO fuel wastewaters contain substantial amounts of propylene glycol dinitrate. Hydrazine based rocket fuel wastewaters contain hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine. Laboratory Wet Air Oxidation studies on OTTO fuel wastewaters indicated that a 99+ percent destruction of propylene glycol dinitrate can be achieved at an oxidation temperature of 280/sup 0/C.

  7. Air friction and rolling resistance during cycling.

    PubMed

    de Groot, G; Sargeant, A; Geysel, J

    1995-07-01

    To calculate the power output during actual cycling, the air friction force Fa and rolling resistance Fr have to be known. Instead of wind tunnel experiments or towing experiments at steady speed, in this study these friction forces were measured by coasting down experiments. Towing experiments at constant acceleration (increasing velocity) were also done for comparison. From the equation of motion, the velocity-time curve v(t) was obtained. Curve-fitting procedures on experimental data of the velocity v yielded values of the rolling resistance force Fr and of the air friction coefficient k = Fa/v2. For the coasting down experiments, the group mean values per body mass m (N = 7) were km = k/m = (2.15 +/- 0.32) x 10(-3)m-1 and ar = Fr/m = (3.76 +/- 0.18) x 10(-2)ms-2, close to other values from the literature. The curves in the phase plane (velocity vs acceleration) and the small residual sum of squares indicated the validity of the theory. The towing experiments were not congruent with the coasting down experiments. Higher values of the air friction were found, probably due to turbulence of the air.

  8. Oxidation resistance of iron and copper foils coated with reduced graphene oxide multilayers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwoo; Kwon, Jee Youn; Cho, Hyun; Sim, Jae-Hyoung; Hwang, Hyun Sick; Kim, Chul Su; Kim, Yong Jung; Ruoff, Rodney S; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2012-09-25

    Protecting the surface of metals such as Fe and Cu from oxidizing is of great importance due to their widespread use. Here, oxidation resistance of Fe and Cu foils was achieved by coating them with reduced graphene oxide (rG-O) sheets. The rG-O-coated Fe and Cu foils were prepared by transferring rG-O multilayers from a SiO(2) substrate onto them. The oxidation resistance of these rG-O-coated metal foils was investigated by Raman spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy after heat treatment at 200 °C in air for 2 h. The bare metal surfaces were severely oxidized, but the rG-O-coated metal surfaces were protected from oxidation. This simple solution process using rG-O is one advantage of the present study.

  9. An investigation of oxidation-resistant solid lubricant materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Recent research at NASA-Lewis on solid lubricants for use at high temperatures in air and other gaseous environments is presented. The characteristics of oxide and fluoride lubricants at temperatures to 1700 F are described. Data is presented for fluoride coatings with silicate and other additives incorporated to give improved wear life and better oxidation protection to the substrate metal. Experience is described for fluoride-metal self-lubricating composites with improved metal oxidation resistance to 1700 F. The concept of cast, self-lubricating ceramics is also explored.

  10. Surface modification of nickel based alloys for improved oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2005-02-01

    The present research is aimed at the evaluation of a surface modification treatment to enhance the high temperature stability of nickel-base superalloys. A low Coefficient Thermal Expansion (CTE ~12.5x10-6/°C) alloy based on the composition (in weight %) of Ni-22Mo-12.5Cr was produced by Vacuum Induction Melting and Vacuum Arc Melting and reduced to sheet by conventional thermal-mechanical processing. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the oxidation resistance of the alloys at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in dry and wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted 800°C to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the alloys. The results were compared to the behavior of Haynes 230 (Ni-22Cr) in the treated and untreated conditions. The treatment was not very effective for Haynes 230, as this alloy had similar oxidation behavior in both the treated and untreated conditions. However, the treatment had a significant effect on the behavior of the low CTE alloy. At 800°C, the untreated Ni-12.5Cr alloy was 5 times less oxidation resistant than Haynes 230. However, in the treated condition, the Ni-12.5Cr alloy had comparable oxidation resistance to the Haynes 230 alloy.

  11. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Homopolymers, copolymers and terpolymers of a styrene based monomer are prepared by polymerizing at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer or by polymerizing p-diphenylphosphinestyrene and then oxidizing the polymerized monomer with an organoazide. Copolymers can also be prepared by copolymerizing styrene with at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer. Flame resistant vinyl based polymers whose degradation products are non toxic and non corrosive are obtained.

  12. Oxidative Stress and Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lodovici, Maura; Bigagli, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of air pollution-induced health effects involve oxidative stress and inflammation. As a matter of fact, particulate matter (PM), especially fine (PM2.5, PM < 2.5 μm) and ultrafine (PM0.1, PM < 0.1 μm) particles, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and transition metals, are potent oxidants or able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress can trigger redox-sensitive pathways that lead to different biological processes such as inflammation and cell death. However, it does appear that the susceptibility of target organ to oxidative injury also depends upon its ability to upregulate protective scavenging systems. As vehicular traffic is known to importantly contribute to PM exposure, its intensity and quality must be strongly relevant determinants of the qualitative characteristics of PM spread in the atmosphere. Change in the composition of this PM is likely to modify its health impact. PMID:21860622

  13. Cyclic Oxidation of High-Temperature Alloy Wires in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2004-01-01

    High-temperature alloy wires are proposed for use in seal applications for future re-useable space vehicles. These alloys offer the potential for improved wear resistance of the seals. The wires must withstand the high temperature environments the seals are subjected to as well as maintain their oxidation resistance during the heating and cooling cycles of vehicle re-entry. To model this, the wires were subjected to cyclic oxidation in stagnant air. of this layer formation is dependent on temperature. Slow growing oxides such as chromia and alumina are desirable. Once the oxide is formed it can prevent the metal from further reacting with its environment. Cyclic oxidation models the changes in temperature these wires will undergo in application. Cycling the temperature introduces thermal stresses which can cause the oxide layer to break off. Re-growth of the oxide layer consumes more metal and therefore reduces the properties and durability of the material. were used for cyclic oxidation testing. The baseline material, Haynes 188, has a Co base and is a chromia former while the other two alloys, Kanthal A1 and PM2000, both have a Fe base and are alumina formers. Haynes 188 and Kanthal A1 wires are 250 pm in diameter and PM2000 wires are 150 pm in diameter. The coiled wire has a total surface area of 3 to 5 sq cm. The wires were oxidized for 11 cycles at 1204 C, each cycle containing a 1 hour heating time and a minimum 20 minute cooling time. Weights were taken between cycles. After 11 cycles, one wire of each composition was removed for analysis. The other wire continued testing for 70 cycles. Post-test analysis includes X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for phase identification and morphology.

  14. Oxidation-Resistant Ag Nanostructures for Ultrastable Plasmonic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, R; Ramos, V; Malasi, Abhinav; Yadavali, S; Bartley, B.; Duscher, Gerd; Kalyanaraman, Ramki

    2013-01-01

    Although Ag is considered a noble metal, its surface oxidizes relatively quickly on exposure to ambient air. On the nanos- cale, this degradation is especially deleterious to applications pertaining to its plasmonic behavior, such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing. In this Communication we show that oxidation of Ag nanoparticles under ambient conditions can be significantly suppressed by contacting Ag with immis- cible Co nanoparticles. As a consequence, while the plasmonic characteristic of pure Ag degrades by 25% within 500 h, Ag-Co nanoparticles take almost ten times longer to show a similar magnitude of decay in air, thus showing ultrastable plasmonics. We attribute this oxidation-resistance to a cathodic protection arising from galvanic coupling.

  15. Air Resistance on Falling Balls and Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Studying the effect of air resistance on falling objects in an introductory mechanics course has the merit of relevance to a considerable part of our everyday experience: Leaves, parachutes, raindrops, or soot particles do not keep accelerating as they fall. This topic has been discussed in this and other journals many times,1-7 ranging from theoretical treatments to various experimental investigations, mostly for coffee filters, depending on the apparatus at the disposal of the writers (video clips, graphic calculators, and so on). We report here a sequence of activities for our 11th-grade high school students dealing with this topic. The analysis of data emphasizes points that do not seem to have been done in previous articles.

  16. Oxidation and sulfidation resistant alloys with silicon additions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.; Poston, J.A., Jr.; Siriwardane, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has considerable experience in developing lean chromium, austenitic stainless steels with improved high temperature oxidation resistance. Using basic alloy design principles, a baseline composition of Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo alloys with Si and Al addition at a maximum of 5 weight percent was selected for potential application at temperatures above 700ºC for supercritical and ultra-supercritical power plant application. The alloys were fully austenitic. Cyclic oxidation tests in air for 1000 hours were carried out on alloys with Si only or combined Si and Al additions in the temperature range 700ºC to 800ºC. Oxidation resistances of alloys with Si only additions were outstanding, particularly at 800ºC (i.e., these alloys possessed weight gains 4 times less than a standard type-304 alloy). In addition, Si alloys pre-oxidized at 800ºC, showed a zero weight gain in subsequent testing for 1000 hours at 700ºC. Similar improvements were observed for Si only alloy after H2S exposure at 700ºC compared with type 304 stainless steel. SEM and ESCA analysis of the oxide films and base material at the oxide/base metal interface were conducted to study potential rate controlling mechanisms at ARC. Depth profile analysis and element concentration profiles (argon ion etching/x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) were conducted on oxidized specimens and base material at the National Energy Technology Laboratory.

  17. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  18. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  19. Resistance switching memory in perovskite oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.B. Liu, J.-M.

    2015-07-15

    The resistance switching behavior has recently attracted great attentions for its application as resistive random access memories (RRAMs) due to a variety of advantages such as simple structure, high-density, high-speed and low-power. As a leading storage media, the transition metal perovskite oxide owns the strong correlation of electrons and the stable crystal structure, which brings out multifunctionality such as ferroelectric, multiferroic, superconductor, and colossal magnetoresistance/electroresistance effect, etc. The existence of rich electronic phases, metal–insulator transition and the nonstoichiometric oxygen in perovskite oxide provides good platforms to insight into the resistive switching mechanisms. In this review, we first introduce the general characteristics of the resistance switching effects, the operation methods and the storage media. Then, the experimental evidences of conductive filaments, the transport and switching mechanisms, and the memory performances and enhancing methods of perovskite oxide based filamentary RRAM cells have been summarized and discussed. Subsequently, the switching mechanisms and the performances of the uniform RRAM cells associating with the carrier trapping/detrapping and the ferroelectric polarization switching have been discussed. Finally, the advices and outlook for further investigating the resistance switching and enhancing the memory performances are given.

  20. Resistance switching in oxides with inhomogeneous conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Da-Shan; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen; Wuttig, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    Electric-field-induced resistance switching (RS) phenomena have been studied for over 60 years in metal/dielectrics/metal structures. In these experiments a wide range of dielectrics have been studied including binary transition metal oxides, perovskite oxides, chalcogenides, carbon- and silicon-based materials, as well as organic materials. RS phenomena can be used to store information and offer an attractive performance, which encompasses fast switching speeds, high scalability, and the desirable compatibility with Si-based complementary metal—oxide—semiconductor fabrication. This is promising for nonvolatile memory technology, i.e., resistance random access memory (RRAM). However, a comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanism is still lacking. This impedes faster product development as well as accurate assessment of the device performance potential. Generally speaking, RS occurs not in the entire dielectric but only in a small, confined region, which results from the local variation of conductivity in dielectrics. In this review, we focus on the RS in oxides with such an inhomogeneous conductivity. According to the origin of the conductivity inhomogeneity, the RS phenomena and their working mechanism are reviewed by dividing them into two aspects: interface RS, based on the change of contact resistance at metal/oxide interface due to the change of Schottky barrier and interface chemical layer, and bulk RS, realized by the formation, connection, and disconnection of conductive channels in the oxides. Finally the current challenges of RS investigation and the potential improvement of the RS performance for the nonvolatile memories are discussed.

  1. Oxidation Resistance of Reactive Atoms in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, Matthew F; Duscher, Gerd; Windl, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We have found that reactive elements that are normally oxidized at room temperature are present as individual atoms or clusters on and in graphene. Oxygen is present in these samples but it is only detected in the thicker amorphous carbon layers present in the graphene specimens we have examined. However, we have seen no evidence that oxygen reacts with the impurity atoms and small clusters of these normally reactive elements when they are incorporated in the graphene layers. First principles calculations suggest that the oxidation resistance is due to kinetic effects such as preferential bonding of oxygen to nonincorporated atoms and H passivation. The observed oxidation resistance of reactive atoms in graphene may allow the use of these incorporated metals in catalytic applications. It also opens the possibility of designing and producing electronic, opto-electronic, and magnetic devices based on these normally reactive atoms.

  2. Oxidative Stress Resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans†

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Dea; Radman, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Deinococcus radiodurans is a robust bacterium best known for its capacity to repair massive DNA damage efficiently and accurately. It is extremely resistant to many DNA-damaging agents, including ionizing radiation and UV radiation (100 to 295 nm), desiccation, and mitomycin C, which induce oxidative damage not only to DNA but also to all cellular macromolecules via the production of reactive oxygen species. The extreme resilience of D. radiodurans to oxidative stress is imparted synergistically by an efficient protection of proteins against oxidative stress and an efficient DNA repair mechanism, enhanced by functional redundancies in both systems. D. radiodurans assets for the prevention of and recovery from oxidative stress are extensively reviewed here. Radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacteria such as D. radiodurans have substantially lower protein oxidation levels than do sensitive bacteria but have similar yields of DNA double-strand breaks. These findings challenge the concept of DNA as the primary target of radiation toxicity while advancing protein damage, and the protection of proteins against oxidative damage, as a new paradigm of radiation toxicity and survival. The protection of DNA repair and other proteins against oxidative damage is imparted by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant defense systems dominated by divalent manganese complexes. Given that oxidative stress caused by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species is associated with aging and cancer, a comprehensive outlook on D. radiodurans strategies of combating oxidative stress may open new avenues for antiaging and anticancer treatments. The study of the antioxidation protection in D. radiodurans is therefore of considerable potential interest for medicine and public health. PMID:21372322

  3. The New Interpretation of the Laws of Air Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl, L

    1923-01-01

    A closer examination of Newton's formula for air resistance shows that it is well to consider the air as an ordinary fluid, and, indeed for most of the velocities considered, as a non-compressible fluid, so long as the dimensions of the moving body are large in comparison with the mean free path of the particles of air.

  4. Compound oxidized styrylphosphine. [flame resistant vinyl polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for preparing flame resistant, nontoxic vinyl polymers which contain phosphazene groups and which do not emit any toxic or corrosive products when they are oxidatively degraded. Homopolymers, copolymers, and terpolymers of a styrene based monomer are prepared by polymerizing at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer from a group of organic azides, or by polymerizing p-diphenylphosphinestyrene and then oxidizing that monomer with an organoazide from the group of (C6H5)2P(O)N3, (C6H5O)2P(O)N3, (C6H5)2C3N3(N3), and C6H5C3N3(N3)2. Copolymers can also be prepared by copolymerizing styrene with at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer.

  5. Novel concept of functional oxide coatings providing enhanced oxidation resistance to Ni-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pedraza, F. Balmain, J. Bonnet, G. Bouchaud, B.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • New concept for providing extended oxidation resistance to Ni-based superalloys. • Oxygen-defective nanostructured oxide coatings reduce the oxygen partial pressure at the substrate interface. • Pre-oxidation of the substrate during annealing with the formation of alpha-alumina. • Growth of CeAlO{sub 3} perovskite enhancing the adherence of the ceria top coat. • Microstructural stability of the coating system with no SRZ formation upon exposure. - Abstract: Aluminide-coated Ni-based superalloys are prone to microstructural instabilities during long-term exposure at high temperature with the growth of a secondary reaction zone (SRZ) detrimental from a mechanical viewpoint. This has been since overcome by the use of thermodynamically stable coatings (γ-Ni/γ′-Ni{sub 3}Al). However, additions of Pt and Hf are required to provide the formation of an exclusive α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale and improved oxidation resistance in cyclic and isothermal regimes. The present work proposes a new coating system that relies on the use of a superficial nanostructured functional oxide providing the establishment of a stable alumina while avoiding SRZ formation. Tailored oxygen-defective and multi-cracked coatings were designed for 2nd generation Ni-based superalloys and generated by electrosynthesis using a water-based solution. Cyclic oxidation tests were carried out at 1100 °C in air and the oxidation properties and the microstructural stability of the coating system were demonstrated.

  6. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. Glazkova, Elena A. Svarovskaya, Natalia V. Bakina, Olga V. Kazantsev, Sergey O. Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-27

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  7. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Glazkova, Elena A.; Svarovskaya, Natalia V.; Bakina, Olga V.; Kazantsev, Sergey O.; Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-01

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  8. When Does Air Resistance Become Significant in Free Fall?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2011-02-01

    In introductory physics laboratories, students who experiment with freely falling objects frequently attribute any error in their experimental results to the presence of air resistance. It is, therefore, important to realize when and at what point during a free fall air resistance begins to play a significant role in the motion of the falling object. In this paper we address this question, and we show that blaming air resistance for errors in free-fall experiments in introductory physics laboratories is almost never justified.

  9. Using CrAlN multilayer coatings to improve oxidation resistance of steel interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, A.; Ramana, C. V.; Kayani, A.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, D. S.

    2004-06-01

    The requirements of low-cost and high-temperature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. The performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings, consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAlN for oxidation resistance, was investigated. The coatings were deposited using large area filtered arc deposition technology, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 °C. The composition, structure, and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reaction analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

  10. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Richard J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

    2004-06-01

    The requirements of low cost and high-tempurature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigatedt he performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAIN for oxidation resistance. The coatings were deposited usin large area filterd arc deposition technolgy, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 degrees celsius. The composition, structer and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, AFM and TEM techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitute. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

  11. Oxidation resistance and electrical properties of anodically electrodeposited Mn-Co oxide coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Weifeng; Chen, Weixing; Ivey, Douglas G.

    Co-rich and crack-free Mn-Co oxide coatings were deposited on AISI 430 substrates by anodic electrodeposition from aqueous solutions. The as-deposited Mn-Co oxide coatings, with nano-scale fibrous morphology and a metastable rock salt-type structure, evolved into a (Cr,Mn,Co) 3O 4 spinel layer due to the outward diffusion of Cr from the AISI 430 substrates when pretreated in air. The Mn-Co oxide coatings were reduced into metallic Co and Mn 3O 4 phases when annealed in a reducing atmosphere of 5% H 2-95% N 2. In contrast to the degraded oxidation resistance and electrical properties observed for the air-pretreated Mn-Co oxide coated samples, the H 2-pretreated Mn-Co oxide coatings not only acted as a protective barrier to reduce the Cr outward diffusion, but also improved the electrical performance of the steel interconnects. The improvement in electronic conductivity can be ascribed to the higher electronic conductivity of the Co-rich spinel layer and better adhesion of the scale to the steel substrate, thereby eliminating scale spallation.

  12. Reengineering of subtilisin Carlsberg for oxidative resistance.

    PubMed

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Despotovic, Dragana; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Zacharias, Martin; Bocola, Marco; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Mild bleaching conditions by in situ production of hydrogen peroxide or peroxycarboxylic acid is attractive for pulp, textile, and cosmetics industries. The enzymatic generation of chemical oxidants is often limited by enzyme stability. The subtilisin Carlsberg variant T58A/L216W/M221 is a promiscuous protease that was improved in producing peroxycarboxylic acids. In the current article, we identified two amino acid positions (Trp216 and Met221) that are important for the oxidative resistance of subtilisin Carlsberg T58A/L216W/M221. Site-saturation mutagenesis at positions Trp216 and Met221, which are located close to the active site, resulted in variants M4 (T58/W216M/M221) and M6 (T58A/W216L/M221C). Variants M4 (T58/W216M/M221) and M6 (T58A/W216L/M221C) have a 2.6-fold (M4) and 1.5-fold (M6) increased oxidative resistance and 1.4-fold increased kcat values for peroxycarboxylic acid formation, compared with wild-type subtilisin Carlsberg. PMID:23096572

  13. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR OZONE AND RELATED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act requires periodic (5-year) update revision of criteria and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone. The previous revision of the criteria contained in the Air Quality Criteria Document (AQCD) for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants was co...

  14. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  15. High efficiency, oxidation resistant radio frequency susceptor

    DOEpatents

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Klett, James W.

    2004-10-26

    An article and method of producing an article for converting energy from one form to another having a pitch-derived graphitic foam carbon foam substrate and a single layer coating applied to all exposed surfaces wherein the coating is either silicon carbide or carbides formed from a Group IVA metal. The article is used as fully coated carbon foam susceptors that more effectively absorb radio frequency (RF) band energy and more effectively convert the RF energy into thermal band energy or sensible heat. The essentially non-permeable coatings also serve as corrosion or oxidation resistant barriers.

  16. Metal Oxide CICC for Radiation Resistant Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, A. F.; DeKamp, J. C.; DeLauter, J.; Ghosh, A.

    2006-03-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator and other high beam current machines have requirements that superconducting magnets operate in a high radiation environment. One solution to both the continuous heat deposition and susceptibility of the insulation to radiation damage are solved with a radiation resistant CICC. Several metal oxide insulated CICC designs have been fabricated and tested. Engineering current densities of 55 A/mm2 at 7 T and 80 A/mm2 at 2 T have been achieved using Nb3Sn. Different insulation systems and conduit material allow many choices in coil design.

  17. Thermogravimetric Study of Oxidation-Resistant Alloys for High-Temperature Solar Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Rene I.; Stein, Wes; Marvig, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Three special alloys likely to be suitable for high-temperature solar receivers were studied for their resistance to oxidation up to a temperature of 1050°C in dry atmospheres of CO2 and air. The alloys were Haynes HR160, Hastelloy X, and Haynes 230, all nickel-based alloys with greater than 20% chromium content. The oxidation rate of specimens cut from sample master alloys was followed by thermogravimetry by continuously monitoring the weight change with a microbalance for a test duration of 10 h. The corrosion resistance was deduced from the total weight increase of the specimens and the morphology of the oxide scale. The surface oxide layer formed (scale) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and in all cases was found to be chromia. Oxidation was analyzed by means of parabolic rate law, albeit in some instances linear breakaway corrosion was also observed. For the temperature range investigated, all alloys corroded more in CO2 than in air due to the formation of a stronger and more protective oxide scale in the presence of air. At 1000°C, the most resistant alloy to corrosion in CO2 was Haynes 230. Alloy Haynes HR160 was the most oxidized alloy at 1000°C in both CO2 and air. Hastelloy X oxidized to a similar extent in CO2 at both 900°C and 1000°C, but in air, it resisted oxidation better at 1000°C than either at 900°C or 1000°C.

  18. Oxidation Resistance of Low Carbon Stainless Steel for Applications in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Matthes, Steven A.; Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.; Singh, P.

    2003-10-01

    Alloys protected from corrosion by Cr2O3 (chromia) are recognized as potential replacements for LaCrO3–based ceramic materials currently used as bipolar separators (interconnects) in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Stainless steels gain their corrosion resistance from the formation of chromia, when exposed to oxygen at elevated temperatures. Materials for interconnect applications must form uniform conductive oxide scales at 600–800o C while simultaneously exposed to air on the cathode side and mixtures of H2 - H2O, and, possibly, CHx and CO - CO2 on the anode side. In addition, they must possess good physical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Type 316L stainless steel was selected for the baseline study and development of an understanding of corrosion processes in complex gas environments. This paper discusses the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel exposed to dual SOFC environment for ~100 hours at ~900oK. The dual environment consisted of dry air on the cathode side of the specimen and a mixture of H2 and 3% H2O on the anode side. Post - corrosion surface evaluation involved the use of optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses.

  19. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  20. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  1. Resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys to cyclic oxidation at 1100 C and 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-rich alloys in the Ni-Cr-Al system were evaluated for cyclic oxidation resistance in still air at 1,100 and 1,200 C. A first approximation oxidation attack parameter Ka was derived from specific weight change data involving both a scaling growth constant and a spalling constant. An estimating equation was derived with Ka as a function of the Cr and Al content by multiple linear regression and translated into countour ternary diagrams showing regions of minimum attack. An additional factor inferred from the regression analysis was that alloys melted in zirconia crucibles had significantly greater oxidation resistance than comparable alloys melted otherwise.

  2. CVD diamond film oxidation resistance research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Longwei; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Lijun; Pan, Xiufang; Sun, Yiqing; Wang, Jinye; Sun, Hongtao

    2013-12-01

    Diamond films were deposited on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system, and its oxidation experiments were carried out in atmospheric environmental condition by using a muffle furnace. Inatmospheric environment (the temperature is from 400°C to 900°C) the oxidation resistance of diamond thin films was investigated. The results indicate that under the atmospheric environment diamond thin film surface morphology did not change after 6 hours at 400°C. Diamond thin film surface morphology began to change after 2 hours at 600°C, and when time was extended to 4 hours, the diamond thin film surface morphology changed significantly. The surface morphology of diamond films began to change after 15 minutes at a 700°C condition and when time was extended to 6 hours diamond films were all destroyed. All the diamond films on the silicon substrate disappeared completely in 20 minutes at 900°C. The intact crystal face is the reason that natural diamond has stable chemical property. The crystal face of synthetic diamond film has a lot of defects, especially on the side. Oxidation of the diamond films begin with the grain boundary and defects.

  3. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  4. Recent researches on the air resistance of spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachsbart, O

    1928-01-01

    The following conclusions on air resistance of spheres are drawn: 1) disturbances in front of the sphere and even single fine wires affect the critical Reynolds Number; 2) disturbances around the sphere increased the drag of the sphere without martially affecting the value of the Reynolds Number(sub crith); 3) great disturbances of the boundary layer of the sphere likewise change R.N.(sub crith); 4) turbulence of the approaching air stream lowers critical R.N.

  5. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300° as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency) for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter. PMID:23369258

  6. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A flame resistant, nontoxic polymer which may be used safely in confined locations where there is inadequate ventilation is prepared either by polymerizing compounds having the formula R-N=P(C6H5)2(C6H4)CH=CH2 where R is an organic moeity selected from the group of (C6H5)2P(O)-, (C6H5O)2P(O)-, (C6H5)2 C3N3-, or their mixtures, or by reacting a polymer with an organic azide such as diphenylphosphinylazide, diphenyl-phosphorylazide, 2-azido-4,6-diphenly-5-triazine, 2,4-diazido-6-phenyl-s-triazine, trimethylsilyoazide, triphenylsilylazine, and phenylazine. The reaction of the styrylphosphine with the organozaide results in the oxidation of the trivalent phosphorus atom to the pentavalent state in the form of an unsaturated P=N linkage known as a phosphazene group.

  7. 75 FR 57463 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... AGENCY Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft... for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) and oxides of sulfur (SO X ). Because NO X , SO X , and...

  8. 75 FR 11877 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... AGENCY Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: First External Review Draft... (welfare-based) NAAQS for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) and oxides of sulfur (SO X ). Because NO X , SO...

  9. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  10. Sulfide-oxidizing bacteria: Their role during air-stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Dell`Orco, M.J.; Chadik, P.A.; Bitton, G.; Neumann, R.P.

    1998-10-01

    Air-stripping, used to remove hydrogen sulfide naturally present in many groundwater supplies, commonly causes sulfide-oxidizing bacteria to proliferate. The role of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria during air-stripping was investigated in a diffused-air pilot reactor modeled after an existing treatment facility. Visible bacterial filaments and biofilm developed within a few days and increased both the sulfide removed from and turbidity in the effluent. Total sulfide, dissolved oxygen, pH, and electrode potential were monitored at eight locations in the reactor to characterize the process.

  11. AIR POLLUTION, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased incidents of classic and variant forms of neurodegenerative diseases suggest that environmental chemicals and susceptibility factors (e.g., genetics, diseased states, obesity, etc.) may be contributory. Particulate matter (PM) is a type of air pollution that is associat...

  12. Laser Cladding to Improve Oxidation Behavior of Air Plasma-Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, M. Mudassar; Shahid, Muhammad; Nusair Khan, A.; Mehmood, K.

    2015-09-01

    Air plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr coating on stainless steel (AISI-304) substrate was re-melted using CO2 laser to remove the inherent defects, i.e., porosity, splat boundaries, and oxides of air plasma-sprayed coating. The (1) uncoated, (2) air plasma-sprayed, and (3) laser-re-melted specimens were exposed to cyclic oxidation at 900 °C for a hundred cycles run. The oxidation products were characterized using XRD and SEM. Weight changes were determined after every 4th cycle; Uncoated samples showed severe oxidation indicated by substantial weight loss, whereas air plasma-coated samples demonstrated noticeable weight gain. However, oxidation resistance of laser-cladded samples was found to be significantly improved as the samples showed negligible weight change; porosity within the coating was minimized with an improvement in interface quality causing reduction in delamination damage.

  13. Air side contamination in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stack testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, J. Andreas; Gehrig, Christian; Wuillemin, Zacharie; Schuler, Albert J.; Wochele, Joerg; Ludwig, Christian; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Van herle, Jan

    This work aimed to quantify air side contaminants during Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) testing in stack configuration. Post-analyses of a long-term test have shown that performance degradation was mainly due to cathode pollutants originated upstream of the cell, therefore their source identification is crucial. The compressed air system, feeding the airflow to the cathode, was investigated by filtering and subsequent chemical analysis of the filters. Hot-air-sampling was redone in situ at the cathode air entry during a new test run to assess the contaminant concentrations in air in SOFC test conditions. In addition, the behavior of SOFC proximal system components, i.e. alloy oxidation, was characterized separately. Besides the investigation of silicon and sulfur contamination, the present work focused on chromium from high-temperature alloys used in Balance-of-Plant (BoP) components in direct contact with the airflow. Concentrations of volatile Cr-species under SOFC testing conditions were compared to Cr-accumulation on the tested cell as well as to Cr-evaporation rates from BoP alloys, which were individually characterized regarding oxidation behavior. Evaporated Cr quantities were found to saturate the air with Cr-vapors at the cathode air-inlet, as confirmed by the in-situ measurement of volatile species in the hot airflow, and correlate well to accumulated Cr in the cell after long term testing. The results of this study suggest guidelines to reduce air side contamination from exogenous sources in SOFC stacks.

  14. Oxidation-Resistant Coating For Bipolar Lead/Acid Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolstad, James J.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode side of bipolar substrate coated with nonoxidizable conductive layer. Coating prepared as water slurry of aqueous dispersion of polyethylene copolymer plus such conductive fillers as tin oxide, titanium, tantalum, or tungsten oxide. Applied easily to substrate of polyethylene carbon plastic. As slurry dries, conductive, oxidation-resistant coating forms on positive side of substrate.

  15. Plant resistance mechanisms to air pollutants: rhythms in ascorbic acid production during growth under ozone stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between ozone (O3) tolerance and leaf ascorbic acid concentrations in O3-susceptible (O3-S) 'Hark' and O3-resistant (O3-R) 'Hood' soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., cultivars were examined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Leaf samples were analyzed at 4 intervals during a 24 h period. Soybean cultivars grown in the greenhouse with charcoal filtered (CF) and nonfiltered (NF) air showed daily oscillations in ascorbic acid production. Highest ascorbic acid levels in leaves during light coincided with highest concentrations of photochemical oxidants in the atmosphere at 2:00 p.m. The resistant genotype produced more ascorbic acid in its trifoliate leaves than did the corresponding susceptible genotype. Under CF air (an O3-reduced environment) O3-S and O3-R cultivars showed rhythms in ascorbic acid production. In NF air (an O3 stress environment) the O3-R cultivar alone showed rhythms in ascorbic acid production. Results indicated that superior O3 tolerance in the Hood soybean cultivar (compared with Hark) was associated with a greater increase in endogenous levels of ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid may scavenge free radicals and thereby protect cells from injury by O3 or other oxyradical products. Plants defend themselves against photochemical oxidant stress, such as O3, by several mechanisms. Experimental evidence indicates that antioxidant defense systems existing in plant tissues may function to protect cellular components from deleterious effects of photochemical oxidants through endogenous and exogenous controls.

  16. Protein oxidation at the air-lung interface.

    PubMed

    Kelly, F J; Mudway, I S

    2003-12-01

    Whilst performing its normal functions the lung is required to deal with a range of toxic insults. Whether these are infectious agents, allergens or air pollutants they subject the lung to a range of direct and indirect oxidative stresses. In many instances these challenges lead to oxidative alterations of peptides and proteins within the lung. Measurement of protein oxidation products permits the degree of oxidative stress to be assessed and indicates that endogenous antioxidant defences are overwhelmed. The range of protein oxidation products observed is diverse and the nature and extent of specific oxidation products may inform us about the nature of the damaging ROS and NOS. Recently, there has been a significant shift away from the measurement of these oxidation products simply to establish the presence of oxidative stress, to a focus on identifying specific proteins sensitive to oxidation and establishing the functional consequences of these modifications. In addition the identification of specific enzyme systems to repair these oxidative modifications has lead to the belief that protein function may be regulated through these oxidation reactions. In this review we focus primarily on the soluble protein components of within the surface liquid layer in the lung and the consequence of their undue oxidation.

  17. Effect of fuel/air nonuniformity on nitric oxide emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1979-01-01

    A flame tube combustor holding jet A fuel was used in experiments performed at a pressure of .3 Mpa and a reference velocity of 25 meters/second for three inlet air temperatures of 600, 700, and 800 K. The gas sample measurements were taken at locations 18 cm and 48 cm downstream of the perforated plate flameholder. Nonuniform fuel/air profiles were produced using a fuel injector by separately fueling the inner five fuel tubes and the outer ring of twelve fuel tubes. Six fuel/air profiles were produced for nominal overall equivalence ratios of .5 and .6. An example of three of three of these profiles and their resultant nitric oxide NOx emissions are presented. The uniform fuel/air profile cases produced uniform and relatively low profile levels. When the profiles were either center-peaked or edge-peaked, the overall mass-weighted nitric oxide levels increased.

  18. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and

  19. Alloying effects on the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Alloying effects on the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb were examined on the basis of isothermal exposures to air at 950 C. Additions of either Re and Al or Fe, Ni, and Al had relatively little effect on weight gains relative to the Cr-6% Nb binary alloy. One alloying element that improved the mechanical behavior of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys substantially increased the oxidation rates and spallation susceptibilities of Cr-6 and -12% Nb alloys. However, the addition of another element completely offset these deleterious effects. The presence of this latter element resulted in the best overall oxidation behavior (in terms of both weight gains and spallation tendencies) of all Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb compositions. Its beneficial effect can be attributed to improvement in the oxidation resistance of the Cr-rich phase.

  20. Can an Egg-Dropping Race Enhance Students' Conceptual Understanding of Air Resistance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung; Kwok, Ping Wai

    2009-01-01

    Children are familiar with situations in which air resistance plays an important role, such as parachuting. However, it is not known whether they have any understanding about the concept of air resistance, how air resistance affects falling objects, and the differential effect it has on different objects. The literature reveals that there are…

  1. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  2. INTEGRATION OF PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION WITH AIR STRIPPING OF CONTAMINATED AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale laboratory studies and pilot scale studies in a simulated field-test situation were performed to evaluate the integration of gas-solid ultaviolet (UV) photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) downstream if an air stripper unit as a technology for cost-effectively treating water...

  3. HOMOGENEOUS AIR OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS UTILIZING MN AND CO CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Homogeneous Air Oxidation of Hydrocarbons Utilizing Mn and Co Catalysts

    Thomas M. Becker and Michael A. Gonzalez*, Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Mail Sto...

  4. 75 FR 20595 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: First External Review Draft (75 FR 11877; March 12, 2010... AGENCY Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides... a proposal addressing the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and sulfur oxides (SO X ) secondary...

  5. Challenges in Developing Oxidation-Resistant Chromium-Based Alloys for Applications Above 900°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorcheh, Ali S.; Galetz, Mathias C.

    2016-08-01

    Chromium-based alloys are potential candidates for high-temperature structural applications. This article reviews the challenges of chromium and Cr-alloys used at temperatures higher than 900°C with the focus on their oxidation behavior. First, latest findings on the key environmental factors affecting the oxidation resistance such as volatilization and the impact of nitrogen in air are summarized. Oxidation resistance is addressed with regards to the effects of major alloying elements and reactive elements as well as its correlation with microstructure in multi-phase alloys. Secondly, the existing challenges to develop chromium alloys with enhanced high-temperature oxidation resistance are discussed. It is shown that volatilization and nitridation, the two major obstacles for the use of chromium alloys in air, can be significantly improved by alloy design.

  6. Thermoelectric Seebeck effect in oxide-based resistive switching memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming; Bi, Chong; Li, Ling; Long, Shibing; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Lu, Nianduan; Sun, Pengxiao; Liu, Ming

    2014-08-01

    Reversible resistive switching induced by an electric field in oxide-based resistive switching memory shows a promising application in future information storage and processing. It is believed that there are some local conductive filaments formed and ruptured in the resistive switching process. However, as a fundamental question, how electron transports in the formed conductive filament is still under debate due to the difficulty to directly characterize its physical and electrical properties. Here we investigate the intrinsic electronic transport mechanism in such conductive filament by measuring thermoelectric Seebeck effects. We show that the small-polaron hopping model can well describe the electronic transport process for all resistance states, although the corresponding temperature-dependent resistance behaviours are contrary. Moreover, at low resistance states, we observe a clear semiconductor-metal transition around 150 K. These results provide insight in understanding resistive switching process and establish a basic framework for modelling resistive switching behaviour.

  7. Thermoelectric Seebeck effect in oxide-based resistive switching memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Bi, Chong; Li, Ling; Long, Shibing; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Lu, Nianduan; Sun, Pengxiao; Liu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Reversible resistive switching induced by an electric field in oxide-based resistive switching memory shows a promising application in future information storage and processing. It is believed that there are some local conductive filaments formed and ruptured in the resistive switching process. However, as a fundamental question, how electron transports in the formed conductive filament is still under debate due to the difficulty to directly characterize its physical and electrical properties. Here we investigate the intrinsic electronic transport mechanism in such conductive filament by measuring thermoelectric Seebeck effects. We show that the small-polaron hopping model can well describe the electronic transport process for all resistance states, although the corresponding temperature-dependent resistance behaviours are contrary. Moreover, at low resistance states, we observe a clear semiconductor-metal transition around 150 K. These results provide insight in understanding resistive switching process and establish a basic framework for modelling resistive switching behaviour.

  8. Skin frictional resistance of plane surfaces in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W S

    1922-01-01

    Given here is the most recent research on skin frictional resistance of plane surfaces in air that was conducted by Dr. Wieselsberger under the direction of Dr. Prandtl of Gottingen University. In all, 16 models were tested. These were divided into four groups, as follows: 1) cloth, in the original condition; 2) cloth, with the nap singed off; 3) cloth, with three coats of dope; and 4) cloth, with six coats of dope. Each group consisted of four models of uniform width, 1 meter, and of lengths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 meters. Tests were made on each model at speeds varying from 7.0 to 50 meters per second. The observed total resistance was corrected for the form resistance which was obtained from the pressure distribution on the end of the model. Previous tests had shown that the form resistance due to the rounded front edge used on the models was negligible. The results are expressed in terms of the absolute coefficient of frictionless resistance, C(sub F).

  9. The role of water in resistive switching in graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rogala, M.; Kowalczyk, P. J.; Dabrowski, P.; Wlasny, I.; Kozlowski, W.; Busiakiewicz, A.; Pawlowski, S.; Dobinski, G.; Smolny, M.; Klusek, Z.; Lipinska, L.; Kozinski, R.; Librant, K.; Jagiello, J.; Grodecki, K.; Baranowski, J. M.; Szot, K.

    2015-06-29

    The resistive switching processes are investigated at the nano-scale in graphene oxide. The modification of the material resistivity is driven by the electrical stimulation with the tip of atomic force microscope. The presence of water in the atmosphere surrounding graphene oxide is found to be a necessary condition for the occurrence of the switching effect. In consequence, the switching is related to an electrochemical reduction. Presented results suggest that by changing the humidity level the in-plane resolution of data storage process can be controlled. These findings are essential when discussing the concept of graphene based resistive random access memories.

  10. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  11. Copper oxide resistive switching memory for e-textile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-09-01

    A resistive switching memory suitable for integration into textiles is demonstrated on a copper wire network. Starting from copper wires, a Cu/CuxO/Pt sandwich structure is fabricated. The active oxide film is produced by simple thermal oxidation of Cu in atmospheric ambient. The devices display a resistance switching ratio of 102 between the high and low resistance states. The memory states are reversible and retained over 107 seconds, with the states remaining nondestructive after multiple read operations. The presented device on the wire network can potentially offer a memory for integration into smart textile.

  12. The role of water in resistive switching in graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, M.; Kowalczyk, P. J.; Dabrowski, P.; Wlasny, I.; Kozlowski, W.; Busiakiewicz, A.; Pawlowski, S.; Dobinski, G.; Smolny, M.; Karaduman, I.; Lipinska, L.; Kozinski, R.; Librant, K.; Jagiello, J.; Grodecki, K.; Baranowski, J. M.; Szot, K.; Klusek, Z.

    2015-06-01

    The resistive switching processes are investigated at the nano-scale in graphene oxide. The modification of the material resistivity is driven by the electrical stimulation with the tip of atomic force microscope. The presence of water in the atmosphere surrounding graphene oxide is found to be a necessary condition for the occurrence of the switching effect. In consequence, the switching is related to an electrochemical reduction. Presented results suggest that by changing the humidity level the in-plane resolution of data storage process can be controlled. These findings are essential when discussing the concept of graphene based resistive random access memories.

  13. High-Temperature, Oxidation-Resistant Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Gedwill, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum substituted for rhodium, which is scarce and expensive. Electromotive force increases with aluminum content in Pt/Al leg of Pt(Pt/Al) thermocouple. Wires baked longer in aluminizing bed produce larger voltages. Thermocouples containing platinum/aluminum legs used instead of thermocouples of type R in furnaces, heat engines, and chemical reactors. Expecially suited to high-velocity oxidizing environments. Constructed as thin-film sensors on turbine blades and vanes, where pre-oxidation provides insulating film needed between thermocouple legs. Because aluminum content slowly depleted by oxidation, long-term use recommended only where maximum temperature is 1,200 degrees C or less.

  14. Initial oxidation of brass induced by humidified air

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ping; Leygraf, Christofer

    2011-01-01

    Complementary surface and near-surface analytical techniques have been used to explore a brass (Cu–20Zn) surface before, during, and after exposure in air at 90% relative humidity. Volta potential variations along the unexposed surface are attributed to variations in surface composition and resulted in an accelerated localized growth of ZnO and a retarded more uniform growth of an amorphous Cu2O-like oxide. After 3 days the duplex oxide has a total mass of 1.3 μg/cm2, with improved corrosion protective properties compared to the oxides grown on pure Cu or Zn. A schematic model for the duplex oxide growth on brass is presented. PMID:23471205

  15. Initial oxidation of brass induced by humidified air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ping; Leygraf, Christofer

    2011-11-01

    Complementary surface and near-surface analytical techniques have been used to explore a brass (Cu-20Zn) surface before, during, and after exposure in air at 90% relative humidity. Volta potential variations along the unexposed surface are attributed to variations in surface composition and resulted in an accelerated localized growth of ZnO and a retarded more uniform growth of an amorphous Cu2O-like oxide. After 3 days the duplex oxide has a total mass of 1.3 μg/cm2, with improved corrosion protective properties compared to the oxides grown on pure Cu or Zn. A schematic model for the duplex oxide growth on brass is presented.

  16. Improvement of Oxidation Resistance of Ultrafine Copper Powders by Phosphating Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bin; Liu, Zhijie; Zhang, Zongtao; Hu, Liming

    1997-04-01

    Ultrafine copper powders with mean diameters of about 0.05 and 1 μm were prepared by the chemical reduction method. The powders were treated with phosphating solution to improve their oxidation resistance. Nanometer-sized copper powders are unstable in air at room temperature and the treated nanometer-sized powders have an oxidation temperature of about 220°C, which is very stable in air. The treated micrometer-sized copper powders have an oxidation temperature of about 350°C, 100°C higher than that of untreated micrometer-sized copper powder. The phosphating mechanism of copper powders also suggested that insoluble phosphates are deposited on the surface of copper particles and that the surface corrosion of copper powders is carried out by NO-3under acidic conditions. H+ions were provided by phosphoric acid and dihydrogen orthophosphate in the phosphating solution.

  17. Projectile paths corrected for recoil and air resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, H. R.

    1986-01-01

    The angle of projection of a bullet is not the same as the angle of the bore of the firearm just before firing. This is because recoil alters the direction of the barrel as the bullet moves along the barrel. Neither is the angle of projection of an arrow the same as the direction of the arrow just before it is projected. The difficulty in obtaining the angle of projection limits the value of the standard equation for trajectories relative to a horizontal plane. Furthermore, air resistance makes this equation unrealistic for all but short ranges.

  18. Graphene-passivated nickel as an oxidation-resistant electrode for spintronics.

    PubMed

    Dlubak, Bruno; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Weatherup, Robert S; Yang, Heejun; Deranlot, Cyrile; Blume, Raoul; Schloegl, Robert; Fert, Albert; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Hofmann, Stephan; Seneor, Pierre; Robertson, John

    2012-12-21

    We report on graphene-passivated ferromagnetic electrodes (GPFE) for spin devices. GPFE are shown to act as spin-polarized oxidation-resistant electrodes. The direct coating of nickel with few layer graphene through a readily scalable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process allows the preservation of an unoxidized nickel surface upon air exposure. Fabrication and measurement of complete reference tunneling spin valve structures demonstrate that the GPFE is maintained as a spin polarizer and also that the presence of the graphene coating leads to a specific sign reversal of the magneto-resistance. Hence, this work highlights a novel oxidation-resistant spin source which further unlocks low cost wet chemistry processes for spintronics devices.

  19. Performance evaluations of oxidation-resistant carbon-carbon composites in simulated hypersonic vehicle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, D. M.; Maahs, H. G.; Ohlhorst, C. W.; Vaughn, W. L.; Martin, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the oxidation-protection requirements of carbon-carbon composite (CCC) structural components in a hypersonic vehicle aerothermodynamic environment, where maximum test temperatures in air are of the order of 2800 F, and pressures range from 0.03 to 1.0 atm. The specimens were exposed to high humidity between tests. Attention was given to the effects of coating composition and thickness, and of substrate architecture and surface preparation, on the oxidation resistance of CCCs. Both surface preparation and coating chemistry have a profound effect on coating adherence and longevity.

  20. Oxidation Behavior of Germanium- and/or Silicon-Bearing Near-α Titanium Alloys in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitashima, Tomonori; Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko

    2015-06-01

    The effect of germanium (Ge) and/or silicon (Si) addition on the oxidation behavior of the near-α alloy Ti-5Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo was investigated in air at 973 K (700 °C). Ge addition decreased the oxidation resistance because of the formation of a Ge-rich layer in the substrate at the TiO2/substrate interface, enhancing Sn segregation at the interface. In addition, a small amount of Ge dissolved in the external Al2O3 layer. These results reduced the aluminum activity at the interface, suppressed the formation of Al2O3, and increased the diffusivity of oxygen in the oxide scales. The addition of 0.2 and 0.9 wt pct Si was beneficial for improving oxidation resistance. The effect of germanide and silicide precipitates in the matrix on the oxide growth process was also discussed.

  1. "A New Class of Creep Resistant Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites"

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mohit Jain, Dr. Ganesh Skandan, Prof. Roger Cannon, Rutgers University

    2007-03-30

    Despite recent progress in the development of SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), their application in industrial gas turbines for distributed energy (DE) systems has been limited. The poor oxidation resistance of the non-oxide ceramics warrants the use of envrionmental barrier coatings (EBCs), which in turn lead to issues pertaining to life expectancy of the coatings. On the other hand, oxide/oxide CMCs are potential replacements, but their use has been limited until now due to the poor creep resistance at high temperatures, particularly above 1200 oC: the lack of a creep resistant matrix has been a major limiting factor. Using yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) as the matrix material system, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in oxide/oxide CMCs by introducing innovations in both the structure and composition of the matrix material, thereby leading to high temperature matrix creep properties not achieved until now. An array of YAG-based powders with a unique set of particle characteristics were produced in-house and sintered to full density and compressive creep data was obtained. Aided in part by the composition and the microstructure, the creep rates were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially. Even after accounting for porosity and a smaller matrix grain size in a practical CMC component, the YAG-based matrix material was found to creep slower than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially.

  2. Effect of W and WC on the oxidation resistance of yttria-doped silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of W and WC contamination on the oxidation and cracking in air of sintered Si3N4 - 8 w/o Y2O3 ceramics at 500, 750, and 1350 C is examined. A mixture of Si3N4 - 8Y2O3, milled with alumina balls, was divided into four portions. Three portions were doped with 2 w/o WC W, and 4 w/o W respectively, in order to simulate contamination during milling. The fourth portion was undoped and used on a control. The addition of W or WC did not affect the phase relationships in the system, as all bars with or without additions contained melilite as the major Si-Y-O-N phase after sintering. At 750 C, instability (rapid oxidation and cracking) of W-doped bars appears to have occurred as a result of oxidation of the tungsten containing melilite phase. No intermediate temperature instability was observed in bars containing 2 w/o WC or in bars with no additive. Specimens exposed at 1350 C had good oxidation resistance due to the formation of a protective siliceous oxide layer. A specimen containing 4 w/o W which was preoxidized at 1350 C had improved oxidation resistance at 750 C. The tendency towards oxidation and cracking of Si3N4 - 8 Y2O3 at 750 C is concluded to be related to tungsten content of the sintered bars.

  3. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell.

  4. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.; Ruka, R.J.; Singhal, S.C.

    1999-08-03

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO{sub 3}. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell. 3 figs.

  5. Experimental study of resistive bistability in metal oxide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhongkui; Patel, Vijay; Likharev, Konstantin K.; Su, Dong; Zhu, Yimei

    2011-05-01

    We have studied resistive bistability (memory) effects in junctions based on metal oxides, with a focus on sample-to-sample reproducibility, which is necessary for the use of such junctions as crosspoint devices of hybrid CMOS/nanoelectronic circuits. Few-nm-thick layers of NbO x , CuO x and TiO x have been formed by thermal and plasma oxidation, at various deposition and oxidation conditions, both with and without rapid thermal post-annealing. The resistive bistability effect has been observed for all these materials, with particularly high endurance (over 103 switching cycles) obtained for single-layer TiO2 junctions, and the best reproducibility reached for multi-layer junctions of the same material. Fabrication optimization has allowed us to improve the OFF/ON resistance ratio to about 103, but the sample-to-sample reproducibility is so far lower than that required for large-scale integration.

  6. Effect of La2O3 on High-Temperature Oxidation Resistance of Electrospark Deposited Ni-BASED Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuxin; Yi, Jian; Fang, Zhigang; Cheng, Hu

    2014-08-01

    The oxidation tests of electrospark deposited Ni-based coatings without and with 2.5 wt.% La2O3 were conducted at 960°C in air for 100 h. The oxidation kinetic of the coatings was studied by testing the weight gain. The phase structures and morphologies of the oxidized coatings were investigated by XRD and SEM. The experimental results show that the coatings with 2.5 wt.% La2O3 exhibits excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance including low oxidation rate and improved spallation resistance, due to the formation of a denser and more adherent oxide scale compared with that without La2O3. The effects of La2O3 on the oxidation resistance include the following two aspects: First, refinement of the coating grains promotes the selective oxidation of Cr, leading to the formation of protective chromia scale in a short time, and second, refinement of the oxide grains enhances the high-temperature creep rate, resulting in decrease of inner stress and improvement of spallation resistance of the oxide layer.

  7. Mechanism of Air Oxidation of the Fragrance Terpene Geraniol.

    PubMed

    Bäcktorp, Carina; Hagvall, Lina; Börje, Anna; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Norrby, Per-Ola; Nyman, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    The fragrance terpene geraniol autoxidizes upon air exposure and forms a mixture of oxidation products, some of which are skin sensitizers. Reactions of geraniol with O2 have been studied with DFT (B3LYP) and the computational results compared to experimentally observed product ratios. The oxidation is initiated by hydrogen abstraction, forming an allylic radical which combines with an O2 molecule to yield an intermediate peroxyl radical. In the subsequent step, geraniol differs from previously studied cases, in which the radical chain reaction is propagated through intermolecular hydrogen abstraction. The hydroxy-substituted allylic peroxyl radical prefers an intramolecular rearrangement, producing observable aldehydes and the hydroperoxyl radical, which in turn can propagate the radical reaction. Secondary oxidation products like epoxides and formates were also considered, and plausible reaction pathways for formation are proposed. PMID:26619983

  8. Oxidation resistance of Y-implanted steel using accelerator based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noli, F.; Lagoyannis, A.; Misaelides, P.

    2008-05-01

    The thermal oxidation behavior in air of Y-implanted (fluence 2 × 1017 ions/cm2) and non-implanted stainless steel AISI-321 samples was investigated using the 16O(d,p)17O nuclear reaction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). The oxidation temperature was 650 and 900 °C and the duration of the thermal treatment 48 hours. The influence of the implantation energy (40, 55 and 80 keV) on the oxidation behavior of stainless steel was also studied. An improvement of the oxidation resistance of the Y-implanted samples with increasing implantation energy was observed. Additional secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements of the samples implanted by 40 keV Y-ions also indicated a slight chromium depletion of their near-surface layers. Mechanisms attempting to explain the experimental results are proposed.

  9. New Creep-Resistant Cast Alloys with Improved Oxidation Resistance in Water Vapor at 650–800°C

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2015-08-13

    Cast stainless steel CF8C-Plus (19wt%Cr/12%Ni) has excellent creep properties, but limited oxidation resistance above 700 C in environments containing H2O. One strategy to improve the alloy oxidation performance is to increase the Cr and Ni concentration. Two new alloys, with, respectively, 21wt%Cr 15wt%Ni and 22wt%Cr 17.5wt%Ni were therefore developed and their long-term oxidation behaviors in humid air were compared with the oxidation behavior of five other cast alloys. Also, at 650 C and 700 C, all the alloys formed internal Cr-rich nodules, and outer nodules or layers rich in Fe and Ni, but they grew a protective Cr-rich inner layer over time. At 750 C, the lower alloyed steels such as CF8C-Plus showed large metal losses, but the two new alloys still exhibited a protective oxidation behavior. The 21Cr 15Ni alloy was severely oxidized in locations at 800 C, but that was not the case for the 22Cr 17.5Ni alloy. Thus, the two new modified alloys represent a potential operating temperature gain of, respectively, 50 C and 100 C in aggressive environments compared with the CF8C-Plus alloy.

  10. New Creep-Resistant Cast Alloys with Improved Oxidation Resistance in Water Vapor at 650–800°C

    DOE PAGES

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2015-08-13

    Cast stainless steel CF8C-Plus (19wt%Cr/12%Ni) has excellent creep properties, but limited oxidation resistance above 700 C in environments containing H2O. One strategy to improve the alloy oxidation performance is to increase the Cr and Ni concentration. Two new alloys, with, respectively, 21wt%Cr 15wt%Ni and 22wt%Cr 17.5wt%Ni were therefore developed and their long-term oxidation behaviors in humid air were compared with the oxidation behavior of five other cast alloys. Also, at 650 C and 700 C, all the alloys formed internal Cr-rich nodules, and outer nodules or layers rich in Fe and Ni, but they grew a protective Cr-rich inner layermore » over time. At 750 C, the lower alloyed steels such as CF8C-Plus showed large metal losses, but the two new alloys still exhibited a protective oxidation behavior. The 21Cr 15Ni alloy was severely oxidized in locations at 800 C, but that was not the case for the 22Cr 17.5Ni alloy. Thus, the two new modified alloys represent a potential operating temperature gain of, respectively, 50 C and 100 C in aggressive environments compared with the CF8C-Plus alloy.« less

  11. New creep resistant cast alloys with improved oxidation resistance in water vapor at 650-800°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Pint, Bruce; Maziasz, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Cast stainless steel CF8C-Plus (19wt.%Cr/12%Ni) has excellent creep properties, but limited oxidation resistance above 700ºC in environments containing H2O. One strategy to improve the alloy oxidation performance is to increase the Cr and Ni concentration. Two new alloys, with respectively 21wt%Cr-15wt%Ni and 22wt%Cr-17.5wt%Ni were therefore developed and their long-term oxidation behavior in humid air were compared with the oxidation behavior of five other cast alloys. At 650 and 700ºC, all the alloys formed internal Cr-rich nodules, and outer nodules or layers rich in Fe and Ni, but they grew a protective Cr-rich inner layer over time. At 750ºC, the lower alloyed steels such as CF8C-Plus showed large metal losses, but the two new alloys still exhibited a protective oxidation behavior. The 21Cr-15Ni alloy was severely oxidized in locations at 800ºC, but that was not the case for the 22Cr-17.5Ni alloy. Therefore, the two new modified alloys represent a potential operating temperature gain of respectively 50 and 100ºC in aggressive environments compared with the CF8C-Plus alloy.

  12. Tantalum Addition to Zirconium Diboride for Improved Oxidation Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Opila, Eliizabeth J.

    2003-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature ceramics have performed unreliably due to material flaws and attachment design. These deficiencies are brought to the fore by the low fracture toughness and thermal shock resistance of UHTCs. If these deficiencies are overcome, we are still faced with poor oxidation resistance as a limitation on UHTC applicability to reusable launch vehicles. We have been addressing the deficiencies of UHTCs with our focus on composite constructions and functional grading to address the mechanical issues, and on composition modification to address the oxidation issue. The approaches and progress toward the latter are reported.

  13. Combinatorial measurements of Hall effect and resistivity in oxide films.

    PubMed

    Clayhold, J A; Kerns, B M; Schroer, M D; Rench, D W; Logvenov, G; Bollinger, A T; Bozovic, I

    2008-03-01

    A system for the simultaneous measurement of the Hall effect in 31 different locations as well as the measurement of the resistivity in 30 different locations on a single oxide thin film grown with a composition gradient is described. Considerations for designing and operating a high-throughput system for characterizing highly conductive oxides with Hall coefficients as small as 10(-10) m3/C are discussed. Results from measurements on films grown using combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy show the usefulness of characterizing combinatorial libraries via both the resistivity and the Hall effect. PMID:18377026

  14. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  15. Oxidation resistant carbon-carbon composite for Space Shuttle application.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Seeger, J. W.; Shuford, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    An oxidation resistant carbon-carbon composite has been developed for use on the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter Vehicle which can function on the high temperature surfaces to satisfy the 100 mission reuse capability requirement. This paper describes the design requirements, materials and processes developed, and the successful testing of simulated full-scale prototype hardware. Materials considerations are illustrated, including strength and oxidation testing, along with physical property determinations, characterizing the material over the predicted temperature range of use.

  16. Can an egg-dropping race enhance students' conceptual understanding of air resistance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yeung Chung; Kwok, Ping Wai

    2009-03-01

    Children are familiar with situations in which air resistance plays an important role, such as parachuting. However, it is not known whether they have any understanding about the concept of air resistance, how air resistance affects falling objects, and the differential effect it has on different objects. The literature reveals that there are misconceptions even among undergraduate physics students about how air resistance is affected by the mass and size of falling objects. A study was carried out in Hong Kong to explore Grade 6 students' (aged 11-12) conceptions of air resistance with respect to falling objects of different size and mass, and whether the subjects showed any change in their conceptual understanding after participating in an egg-dropping race. The findings show that students had a wide range of conceptions, which could be characterized into different levels. Their conceptions seem rather robust, and more structured interventions are required to bring about changes in students' conceptual understanding of air resistance.

  17. Resistance of human tumor cells in vitro to oxidative cytolysis.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell-Tormey, J; DeBoer, C J; Nathan, C F

    1985-07-01

    Nine human cell types, six of them malignant, displayed a marked resistance to lysis by hydrogen peroxide (LD50, 2-20 mM). Of the reactive oxygen intermediates generated extracellularly, only H2O2 lysed all the cell types. OH was lytic to one of four, OI- to one of one, and O-2 to none of four cell types tested. Resistance to oxidative lysis did not correlate with specific activity of catalase, glutathione (GSH) peroxidase, other peroxidases, or glutathione disulfide reductase, or with specific content of GSH. Resistance to H2O2 seemed to occur via mechanisms distinct from those responsible for cellular consumption of H2O2. Consumption was inhibitable by azide and was probably due to catalase in each cell type. In contrast, resistance to oxidative lysis occurred via distinct routes in different cells. One cell type used the GSH redox cycle as the primary defense against H2O2, like murine tumors previously studied. Other cells seemed to utilize catalase as the major defense against H2O2. Nonetheless, with both catalase and the GSH redox cycle inhibited, all the human cells tested exhibited an inherent resistance to oxidative lysis, that is, resistance independent of detectable degradation of H2O2. PMID:2991343

  18. Evaluation of the intrinsic photocatalytic oxidation kinetics of indoor air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Salvadó-Estivill, Ignasi; Hargreaves, David M; Puma, Gianluca Li

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents a methodology for the evaluation of the intrinsic photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) kinetics of indoor air pollutants. It combines computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the fluid flow in the reactor with radiation field modeling and photocatalytic reaction kinetics to yield a rigorous model of a flat-plate, single-pass, flow-through photocatalytic reactor for indoor air purification. This method was applied to model the PCO of trichloroethylene (TCE) in humidified air and to derive kinetic parameters directly from kinetic data in an integral flow reactor. Steady-state PCO experiments of TCE over irradiated TiO2 (Degussa P25) thin films immobilized on glass supports were carried out at different radiation intensities, flow rates, and inlet substrate concentrations. The oxidation rate of TCE was found to be first-order on the incident photon flux and to follow a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type reaction kinetics rate law. Mass transfer resistances were observed at Reynolds numbers less than 46. Apparent quantum yields were found to be up to 0.97 mol Einstein(-1). A comparison of the model prediction with the experimental results in an integral reactor yielded pollutant-specific kinetic rate parameters which were independent of reactor geometry, radiation field, and fluid-dynamics. The kinetic parameters would,therefore, be more universally applicable to the design and scale-up of photocatalytic reactors for indoor air purification.

  19. Air-nitric acid destructive oxidation of organic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    Many organic materials have been completely oxidized to CO{sub 2}, CO, and inorganic acids in a 0.1M HNO{sub 3}/14.8M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution with air sparging. Addition of 0.001M Pd{sub +2} reduces the CO to near 1% of the released carbon gases. To accomplish complete oxidation the solution temperature must be maintained above 130--150{degrees}C. Organic materials quantitatively destroyed include neoprene, cellulose, EDTA, TBP, tartaric acid, and nitromethane. The oxidation is usually complete in a few hours for soluble organic materials. The oxidation rate for non-aliphatic organic solids is moderately fast and surface area dependent. The rate for aliphatic organic compounds (polyethylene, PVC, and n-dodecane) is relatively very slow. This is due to the large energy required to abstract a hydrogen atom from these compounds, 99 kcal/mole. The combination of NO{sub 2}{center_dot} and H{center_dot} to produce HNO{sub 2} releases only 88 kcal/mole. Under conditions of high NO{sub 2}{center_dot} concentration it should be possible to oxidize these aliphatic compounds.

  20. Effect of W and WC on the oxidation resistance of yttria-doped silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of tungsten and tungsten carbide contamination on the oxidation and cracking in air of yttria-doped silicon nitride ceramics is investigated. Silicon nitride powder containing 8 wt % Y2O3 was doped with 2 wt % W, 4 wt % W, 2 wt % WC or left undoped, and sintered in order to simulate contamination during milling, and specimens were exposed in air to 500, 750 and 1350 C for various lengths of time. Scanning electron and optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction of the specimens in the as-sintered state reveals that the addition of W or WC does not affect the phase relationships in the system, composed of alpha and beta Si3N4, melilite and an amorphous phase. Catastrophic oxidation is observed at 750 C in specimens containing 2 and 4 wt % W, accompanied by the disappearance of alpha Si3N4 and melilite from the structure. At 1350 C, the formation of a protective glassy oxide layer was observed on all specimens without catastrophic oxidation, and it is found that pre-oxidation at 1350 C also improved the oxidation resistance at 750 C of bars doped with 4 wt % W. It is suggested that tungsten contamination from WC grinding balls may be the major cause of the intermediate-temperature cracking and instability frequently observed in Si3N4-8Y2O3.

  1. An evaluation of candidate oxidation resistant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon; Banks, Bruce; Mirtich, Michael; Difilippo, Frank; Hotes, Deborah; Labed, Richard; Dever, Terese; Kussmaul, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Ground based testing of materials considered for Kapton solar array blanket protection, graphite epoxy structural member protection, and high temperature radiators was performed in an RF plasma asher. Ashing rates for Kapton were correlated with rates measured on STS-8 to determine the exposure time equivalent to one year in low Earth orbit (LEO) at a constant density space station orbital flux. Protective coatings on Kapton from Tekmat, Andus Corporation, and LeRC were evaluated in the plasma asher and mass loss rates per unit area were measured for each sample. All samples evaluated provided some protection to the underlying surface but ion beam sputter deposited samples of SiO2 and SiO2 with 8% polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) showed no evidence of degradation after 47 hours of exposure. Mica paint was evaluated as a protective coating for graphite epoxy structural members. Mica appears to be resistant to attack by atomic oxygen but only offers some limited protection as a paint because the paint vehicles evaluated to date were not resistant to atomic oxygen. Four materials were selected for evaluation as candidate radiator materials: stainless steel, copper, niobium-1% zirconium, and titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium. These materials were surface textured by various means to improve their emittance. Emittances as high as 0.93 at 2.5 microns for stainless steel and 0.89 at 2.5 microns for Nb-1 Zr were obtained from surface texturing. There were no significant changes in emittance after asher exposure.

  2. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Z. X.; Zhang, C.; Huang, X. F.; Liu, W. B.; Yang, Z. G.

    2015-01-01

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surface layer, which causes the fast oxidation in the initial oxidation stage. The formation of (Fe,Cr)2O3 inner layer would inhabit fast diffusion of alloy elements in the nanocrystalline surface layer of P91 steel in the later oxidation stage, and it causes a decrease in the parabolic oxidation rate compared with conventional specimens. This study provides a novel approach to improve the oxidation resistance of heat resistant steel without changing its Cr content. PMID:26269034

  3. Development of MgO-C Refractory Having High Oxidation Resistance by Metal Coating Process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Cho, Geon-Ho; Lim, Hyung-Tea; Byeun, Yun-Ki; Jung, Yeon-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Graphite has been modified with a coating reagent, which can form coating layer of a metal on the surface of graphite, to effectively prevent the oxidation of graphite used as a carbon source, compared to common antioxidants. The oxidation of graphite is resisted by the high oxidation reactivity of metal and the oxygen barrier effect of coating layer. Therefore, the metal layer should be homogeneously and continuously coated on the surface of graphite and the coating efficiency of metal should be increased. The metal layer was formed with a metal precursor existed only with a ion phase in an aqueous solution. The unmodified graphite was totally degraded and oxidized after the combustion test at 1000 degrees C in air. However, as graphite was modified by the metal precursor, the color of carbon was not changed after the heat treatment. These results mean that the coating layer is individually and uniformly formed on a surface of graphite, delaying the oxidation of graphite. Consequently, MgO-C refractory with the high oxidation resistance could be successfully fabricated by the modification of graphite with the metal precursor. PMID:26328392

  4. Effect of blowing agents on the oxidation resistance of carbon foams prepared from molten sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimman, R.; Prabhakaran, K.

    2013-06-01

    We have prepared low density carbon foams from molten sucrose using aluminium nitrate and boric acid blowing agents. A comparative study of the oxidation resistance of the carbon foams prepared using the two blowing agents are reported in the present paper. Oxidation of the carbon foams was evaluated under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions in air atmosphere using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). We have observed that the alumina produced from the aluminium nitrate blowing agent acts as a catalyst whereas the boron produced from boric acid inhibits the oxidation of the carbon foams. The oxidation resistance of carbon foams increases with boron concentration. The oxidation onset temperature for the carbon foams prepared using boric acid blowing agent was nearly 60°C higher than that prepared using aluminium nitrate blowing agent. Carbon foams prepared using aluminium nitrate blowing agent undergoes complete oxidation at temperature less than 700°C. Whereas that prepared using boric acid blowing agent leave ˜ 50 wt.% residue at 900°C. Further evidence is provided by the kinetic analysis of the TGA using Coats-Redfern (CR) equation.

  5. Increasing the Upper Temperature Oxidation Limit of Alumina Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Unocic, Kinga A; Lance, Michael J; Santella, Michael L; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Walker, Larry R

    2011-01-01

    A family of alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels is under development for use in aggressive oxidizing conditions from {approx}600-900 C. These alloys exhibit promising mechanical properties but oxidation resistance in air with water vapor environments is currently limited to {approx}800 C due to a transition from external protective alumina scale formation to internal oxidation of aluminum with increasing temperature. The oxidation behavior of a series of AFA alloys was systematically studied as a function of Cr, Si, Al, C, and B additions in an effort to provide a basis to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit. Oxidation exposures were conducted in air with 10% water vapor environments from 800-1000 C, with post oxidation characterization of the 900 C exposed samples by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and photo-stimulated luminescence spectroscopy (PSLS). Increased levels of Al, C, and B additions were found to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit in air with water vapor to between 950 and 1000 C. These findings are discussed in terms of alloy microstructure and possible gettering of hydrogen from water vapor at second phase carbide and boride precipitates.

  6. Vacuum-arc chromium-based coatings for protection of zirconium alloys from the high-temperature oxidation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprin, A. S.; Belous, V. A.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Bryk, V. V.; Vasilenko, R. L.; Ovcharenko, V. D.; Reshetnyak, E. N.; Tolmachova, G. N.; V'yugov, P. N.

    2015-10-01

    Multilayer Cr-Zr/Cr/Cr-N coatings for protection of zirconium alloys from the high-temperature oxidation in air have been obtained by the vacuum-arc evaporation technique with application of filters for plasma cleaning from macroparticles. The effect of the coatings on the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys at test temperatures between 660 and 1100 °C for 3600 s has been investigated. The thickness, structure, phase composition, mechanical properties of the coatings and oxide layers before and after oxidation tests were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and nanoindentation technique. It is shown that the hard multilayer coating effectively protects zirconium from the oxidation in air for 1 h at test temperatures. As a result of the oxidation in the coating the CrO and Cr2O3 oxides are formed which reduce the oxygen penetration through the coating. At maximum test temperature of 1100 °C the oxide layer thickness in the coating is about 5 μm. The tube shape remains unchanged independent of alloy type. It has been found that uncoated zirconium oxidizes rapidly throughout the temperature range under study. At 1100 °C a porous monoclinic ZrO2 oxide layer of ≥120 μm is formed that leads to the deformation of the samples, cracking and spalling of the oxide layer.

  7. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  8. The Resistance of Spheres in Wind Tunnels and In Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, D L; Reid, E G

    1924-01-01

    To supplement the standardization tests now in progress at several laboratories, a broad investigation of the resistance of spheres in wind tunnels and free air has been carried out by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The subject has been classed in aerodynamic research, and in consequence there is available a great mass of data from previous investigations. This material was given careful consideration in laying out the research, and explanation of practically all the disagreement between former experiments has resulted. A satisfactory confirmation of Reynolds law has been accomplished, the effect of means of support determined, the range of experiment greatly extended by work in the new variable density wind tunnel, and the effects of turbulence investigated by work in the tunnels and by towing and dropping tests in free air. It is concluded that the erratic nature of most of the previous work is due to support interference and differing turbulence conditions. While the question of support has been investigated thoroughly, a systematic and comprehensive study of the effects of scale and quality of turbulence will be necessary to complete the problem, as this phase was given only general treatment.

  9. Physiologically acceptable resistance of an air purifying respirator.

    PubMed

    Shykoff, Barbara E; Warkander, Dan E

    2011-12-01

    Physiologically acceptable limits of inspiratory impediment for air purifying respirators (APRs) were sought.Measurements on 30 subjects included pressure in, and flow through, an APR, and respiratory and cardiovascular variables. Exercise with and without APR included ladder climbing, load lift and transfer, incremental running and endurance running, with endurance at 85% peak oxygen uptake. Resistance that did not alter minute ventilation (VE) was judged acceptable long-term. Acceptable short-term impediments were deduced from end exercise conditions. Proposed long-term limits are inspiratory work of breathing per tidal volume (WOBi/VT) ≤ 0.9 kPa and peak inspiratory pressure (P (i) peak) ≤1.2 kPa. Proposed short-term limits are: for VE ≤110 L min(-1), WOBi/VT ≤1.3 kPa and P (i) peak ≤ 1.8 kPa; and for VE >130 L min(-1), WOBi/VT ≤1.6 kPa. A design relation among VE, pressure–flow coefficients of an APR, and WOBi/VT is proposed. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This work generalises results from one APR by considering the altered physiological parameters related to factors inhibiting exercise. Simple expressions are proposed to connect bench-test parameters to the relation between ventilation and work of breathing. Population-based recommendations recognise that those who need more air flow can also generate higher pressures. PMID:22103726

  10. The Effect of Silicon and Aluminum Additions on the Oxidation Resistance of Lean Chromium Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, J.S.; Alman, D.E.; Rawers, J.C.

    2001-09-01

    The effect of Si and Al additions on the oxidation of lean chromium austenitic stainless steels has been studied. A baseline composition of Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo was selected to allow combined Si and Al additions of up to 5 wt. pct. in a fully austenitic alloy. The baseline composition was selected using a net Cr equivalent equation to predict the onset of G-ferrite formation in austenite. Cyclic oxidation tests in air for 1000 hours were carried out on alloys with Si only or combined Si and Al additions in the temperature range 700 C to 800 C. Oxidation resistance of alloys with Si only additions were outstanding, particularly at 800 C. It was evident that different rate controlling mechanisms for oxidation were operative at 700 C and 800 C in the Si alloys. In addition, Si alloys pre-oxidized at 800 C, showed a zero weight gain in subsequent testing for 1000 hours at 700 C. The rate controlling mechanism in alloys with combined Si and Al addition for oxidation at 800 C was also different than alloys with Si only. SEM and ESCA analysis of the oxide films and base material at the oxide/base metal interface were conducted to study potential rate controlling mechanisms.

  11. The cyclic oxidation resistance at 1200 C of beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl alloys with selected third element additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The intermetallic compounds Beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl were tested in cyclic oxidation with selected third element alloy additions. Tests in static air for 200 1-hr cycles at 1200 C indicated by specific weight change/time data and x-ray diffraction analysis that the 5 at percent alloy additions did not significantly improve the oxidation resistance over the alumina forming baseline alloys without the additions. Many of the alloy additions were actually deleterious. Ta and Nb were the only alloy additions that actually altered the nature of the oxide(s) formed and still maintained the oxidation resistance of the protective alumina scale.

  12. Exergy parametric study of carbon monoxide oxidation in moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souidi, Ferhat; Benmalek, Toufik; Yesaad, Billel; Baik, Mouloud

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to analyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide in moist air from the second thermodynamic law aspect. A mathematical model of laminar premixed flame in a stagnation point flow has been achieved by numerical solution of the boundary layer equation using a self-made code. The chemical kinetic mechanism for flameless combustion of fuel, which is a mixture of carbon monoxide, oxygen, and water vapor, is modeled by 34 elementary reactions that incorporate (09) nine chemical species: CO, O, CO2, O2, H2O, H, H2, HO2, and OH. The salient point is that for all the parameters we considered, the exergy of the process is completely destroyed by irreversibilities. From the chemical viewpoint, the OH radical plays an essential role in CO oxidation. This latter point has already been mentioned by previous investigators.

  13. Catalytic wet air oxidation of high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Wei; Wang, Xiaocong; Li, Daosheng; Ren, Yongzheng; Liu, Dongqi; Kang, Jianxiong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pretreatment of a high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Different experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the catalyst type, operating temperature, initial system pH, and oxygen partial pressure on the oxidation of the wastewater. Results show that the catalysts prepared by the co-precipitation method have better catalytic activity compared to others. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) conversion increased with the increase in temperature from 160 to 220 °C and decreased with the increase in pH. Moreover, the effect of the oxygen partial pressure on the COD conversion was significant only during the first 20 min of the reaction. Furthermore, the biodegradability of the wastewater improved greatly after CWAO, the ratio of BOD5/COD increased less than 0.1-0.75 when treated at 220 °C (BOD: biochemical oxygen demand). PMID:23676399

  14. Catalytic wet air oxidation of high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Wei; Wang, Xiaocong; Li, Daosheng; Ren, Yongzheng; Liu, Dongqi; Kang, Jianxiong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pretreatment of a high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Different experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the catalyst type, operating temperature, initial system pH, and oxygen partial pressure on the oxidation of the wastewater. Results show that the catalysts prepared by the co-precipitation method have better catalytic activity compared to others. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) conversion increased with the increase in temperature from 160 to 220 °C and decreased with the increase in pH. Moreover, the effect of the oxygen partial pressure on the COD conversion was significant only during the first 20 min of the reaction. Furthermore, the biodegradability of the wastewater improved greatly after CWAO, the ratio of BOD5/COD increased less than 0.1-0.75 when treated at 220 °C (BOD: biochemical oxygen demand).

  15. Oxide impurities in silicon oxide intermetal dielectrics and their potential to elevate via-resistances.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wentao; Alldredge, Donavan; Heleotes, Douglas; Elkind, Alexander; Theodore, N David; Fejes, Peter; Vadipour, Mostafa; Godek, Bill; Lerner, Norman

    2014-08-01

    Silicon oxide used as an intermetal dielectric (IMD) incorporates oxide impurities during both its formation and subsequent processing to create vias in the IMD. Without a sufficient degassing of the IMD, oxide impurities released from the IMD during the physical vapor deposition (PVD) of the glue layer of the vias had led to an oxidation of the glue layer and eventual increase of the via resistances, which correlated with the O-to-Si atomic ratio of the IMD being ~10% excessive as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. A vacuum bake of the IMD was subsequently implemented to enhance outgassing of the oxide impurities in the IMD before the glue layer deposition. The implementation successfully reduced the via resistances to an acceptable level.

  16. The relationship between air layers and evaporative resistance of male Chinese ethnic clothing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the air layer distribution and evaporative resistances of 39 sets of male Chinese ethnic clothing were investigated using a sweating thermal manikin and the three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique. Relationships between the evaporative resistance and air layers (i.e., air gap thickness and air volume) were explored. The results demonstrated that the clothing total evaporative resistance increases with the increasing air gap size/air volume, but the rate of increase gradually decreases as the mean air gap size or the total air volume becomes larger. The clothing total evaporative resistance reaches its maximum when the average air gap size and the total air volume are 41.6 mm and 69.9 dm(3), respectively. Similar general trends were also found between local mean air gap size and clothing local evaporative resistance at different body parts. However, different body parts show varied rates of increase and decrease in the local evaporative resistance. The research findings provide a comprehensive database for predicting overall and local human thermal comfort while wearing male Chinese ethnic clothing.

  17. The relationship between air layers and evaporative resistance of male Chinese ethnic clothing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the air layer distribution and evaporative resistances of 39 sets of male Chinese ethnic clothing were investigated using a sweating thermal manikin and the three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique. Relationships between the evaporative resistance and air layers (i.e., air gap thickness and air volume) were explored. The results demonstrated that the clothing total evaporative resistance increases with the increasing air gap size/air volume, but the rate of increase gradually decreases as the mean air gap size or the total air volume becomes larger. The clothing total evaporative resistance reaches its maximum when the average air gap size and the total air volume are 41.6 mm and 69.9 dm(3), respectively. Similar general trends were also found between local mean air gap size and clothing local evaporative resistance at different body parts. However, different body parts show varied rates of increase and decrease in the local evaporative resistance. The research findings provide a comprehensive database for predicting overall and local human thermal comfort while wearing male Chinese ethnic clothing. PMID:27184328

  18. Effects of air resistance on AT-cut quartz thickness-shear resonators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangyang; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Zhang, Weiping; Yang, Jiashi

    2013-02-01

    We study theoretically the effects of air resistance on an AT-cut quartz plate thickness-shear mode resonator. Mindlin's two-dimensional equations for coupled thickness-shear and flexural motions of piezoelectric plates are employed for the crystal resonator. The equations of a Newtonian fluid and the equations of linear acoustics are used for the shear and compressive waves in the air surrounding the resonator, respectively. Solutions for free and electrically forced vibrations are obtained. The impedance of the resonator is calculated. The effects of air resistance are examined. It is found that air viscosity causes a relative frequency shift of the order of ppm. When the material quality factor of quartz Q = 10(5), the air viscosity and compressibility both have significant effects on resonator impedance. For resonators with larger aspect ratios the effects of air resistance are weaker, and the effect of air compressibility is weaker than air viscosity.

  19. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  20. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  1. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  2. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  3. Surface modification of alloys for improved oxidation resistance in SOFC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Kung, S.C.

    2006-11-01

    This research is aimed at improving the oxidation behavior of metallic alloys for SOFC application, by the incorporation of rare earths through surface treatments. This paper details the effect of such surface modification on the behavior of Crofer 22 APU, a ferritic steel designed specifically for SOFC application, and Type 430 stainless steel. Two pack cementation like treatments were used to incorporate Ce into the surface of the alloys. After 4000 hours of exposure at 800oC to air+3%H2O, the weight gain of Crofer 22APU samples that were Ce surface modified were less than half that of an unmodified sample, revealing the effectiveness of the treatments on enhancing oxidation resistance. For Type-430, the treatment prevented scale spalling that occurred during oxidation of the unmodified alloy.

  4. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  5. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  6. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  7. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  8. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  9. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  10. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  11. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  12. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  13. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  14. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  15. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  16. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  17. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  18. Coatings for directional eutectics. [for corrosion and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, E. J.; Strangman, T. E.; Ulion, N. E.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven coating systems based on MCrAlY overlay and diffusion aluminide prototypes were evaluated to determine their capability for protecting the gamma/gamma prime-delta directionally solidified eutectic alloy (Ni-20Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) in gas turbine engine applications. Furnace oxidation and hot corrosion, Mach 0.37 burner-rig, tensile ductility, stress-rupture and thermomechanical fatigue tests were used to evaluate the coated gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy. The diffusion aluminide coatings provided adequate oxidation resistance at 1144 K (1600 F) but offered very limited protection in 114 K (1600 F) hot corrosion and 1366 K (2000 F) oxidation tests. A platinum modified NiCrAlY overlay coating exhibited excellent performance in oxidation testing and had no adverse effects upon the eutectic alloy.

  19. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  20. USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K; Daniel McCabe, D; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-04

    A bench-scale feasibility study on the use of a Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) process to destroy a slurry laden with tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds has been undertaken. WAO is an aqueous phase process in which soluble and/or insoluble waste constituents are oxidized using oxygen or oxygen in air at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 C and 1 MPa to 320 C and 22 MPa. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). Test results indicate WAO is a feasible process for destroying TPB, its primary daughter products [triphenylborane (3PB), diphenylborinic acid (2PB), and phenylboronic acid (1PB)], phenol, and most of the biphenyl byproduct. The required conditions are a temperature of 300 C, a reaction time of 3 hours, 1:1 feed slurry dilution with 2M NaOH solution, the addition of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O solution (500 mg/L Cu) as catalyst, and the addition of 2000 mL/L of antifoam. However, for the destruction of TPB, its daughter compounds (3PB, 2PB, and 1PB), and phenol without consideration for biphenyl destruction, less severe conditions (280 C and 1-hour reaction time with similar remaining above conditions) are adequate.

  1. Oxidative Allylic Esterification of Alkenes by Cooperative Selenium-Catalysis Using Air as the Sole Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Ortgies, Stefan; Depken, Christian; Breder, Alexander

    2016-06-17

    A new metal-free catalysis protocol for the oxidative coupling of nonactivated alkenes with simple carboxylic acids has been established. This method is predicated on the cooperative interaction of a diselane and a photoredox catalyst, which allows for the use of ambient air or pure O2 as the terminal oxidant. Under the title conditions, a range of both functionalized and nonfunctionalized alkenes can be readily converted into the corresponding allylic ester products with good yields (up to 89%) and excellent regioselectivity as well as good functional group tolerance.

  2. Oxidative Allylic Esterification of Alkenes by Cooperative Selenium-Catalysis Using Air as the Sole Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Ortgies, Stefan; Depken, Christian; Breder, Alexander

    2016-06-17

    A new metal-free catalysis protocol for the oxidative coupling of nonactivated alkenes with simple carboxylic acids has been established. This method is predicated on the cooperative interaction of a diselane and a photoredox catalyst, which allows for the use of ambient air or pure O2 as the terminal oxidant. Under the title conditions, a range of both functionalized and nonfunctionalized alkenes can be readily converted into the corresponding allylic ester products with good yields (up to 89%) and excellent regioselectivity as well as good functional group tolerance. PMID:27257803

  3. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  4. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  5. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken; Baxter, David J.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  6. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  7. Air- and water-resistant noble metal coated ferromagnetic cobalt nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Tan, Reasmey P; Garcia-Marcelot, Cécile; Altantzis, Thomas; Fazzini, Pier-Francesco; Hungria, Teresa; Cormary, Benoit; Gallagher, James R; Miller, Jeffrey T; Martinez, Herve; Schrittwieser, Stefan; Schotter, Joerg; Respaud, Marc; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Gatel, Christophe; Soulantica, Katerina

    2015-03-24

    Cobalt nanorods possess ideal magnetic properties for applications requiring magnetically hard nanoparticles. However, their exploitation is undermined by their sensitivity toward oxygen and water, which deteriorates their magnetic properties. The development of a continuous metal shell inert to oxidation could render them stable, opening perspectives not only for already identified applications but also for uses in which contact with air and/or aqueous media is inevitable. However, the direct growth of a conformal noble metal shell on magnetic metals is a challenge. Here, we show that prior treatment of Co nanorods with a tin coordination compound is the crucial step that enables the subsequent growth of a continuous noble metal shell on their surface, rendering them air- and water-resistant, while conserving the monocrystallity, metallicity and the magnetic properties of the Co core. Thus, the as-synthesized core-shell ferromagnetic nanorods combine high magnetization and strong uniaxial magnetic anisotropy, even after exposure to air and water, and hold promise for successful implementation in in vitro biodiagnostics requiring probes of high magnetization and anisotropic shape.

  8. Low-Temperature CO Oxidation over a Ternary Oxide Catalyst with High Resistance to Hydrocarbon Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Binder, Andrew J; Toops, Todd J; Unocic, Raymond R; Parks, James E; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are the current standard for control of pollutants in automotive exhaust streams. Aside from their high cost, PGM catalysts struggle with CO oxidation at low temperatures (<200 °C) due to inhibition by hydrocarbons in exhaust streams. Here we present a ternary mixed oxide catalyst composed of copper oxide, cobalt oxide, and ceria (dubbed CCC) that outperforms synthesized and commercial PGM catalysts for CO oxidation in simulated exhaust streams while showing no signs of inhibition by propene. Diffuse reflectance IR (DRIFTS) and light-off data both indicate low interaction between propene and the CO oxidation active site on this catalyst, and a separation of adsorption sites is proposed as the cause of this inhibition resistance. This catalyst shows great potential as a low-cost component for low temperature exhaust streams that are expected to be a characteristic of future automotive systems.

  9. Low-temperature CO oxidation over a ternary oxide catalyst with high resistance to hydrocarbon inhibition

    DOE PAGES

    Binder, Andrew J.; Toops, Todd J.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Parks, II, James E.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-11

    Platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are the current standard for control of pollutants in automotive exhaust streams. Aside from their high cost, PGM catalysts struggle with CO oxidation at low temperatures (<200 °C) due to inhibition by hydrocarbons in exhaust streams. Here we present a ternary mixed oxide catalyst composed of copper oxide, cobalt oxide, and ceria (dubbed CCC) that outperforms synthesized and commercial PGM catalysts for CO oxidation in simulated exhaust streams while showing no signs of inhibition by propene. Diffuse reflectance IR (DRIFTS) and light-off data both indicate low interaction between propene and the CO oxidation active sitemore » on this catalyst, and a separation of adsorption sites is proposed as the cause of this inhibition resistance. In conclusion, this catalyst shows great potential as a low-cost component for low temperature exhaust streams that are expected to be a characteristic of future automotive systems.« less

  10. Low-temperature CO oxidation over a ternary oxide catalyst with high resistance to hydrocarbon inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Andrew J.; Toops, Todd J.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Parks, II, James E.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-11

    Platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are the current standard for control of pollutants in automotive exhaust streams. Aside from their high cost, PGM catalysts struggle with CO oxidation at low temperatures (<200 °C) due to inhibition by hydrocarbons in exhaust streams. Here we present a ternary mixed oxide catalyst composed of copper oxide, cobalt oxide, and ceria (dubbed CCC) that outperforms synthesized and commercial PGM catalysts for CO oxidation in simulated exhaust streams while showing no signs of inhibition by propene. Diffuse reflectance IR (DRIFTS) and light-off data both indicate low interaction between propene and the CO oxidation active site on this catalyst, and a separation of adsorption sites is proposed as the cause of this inhibition resistance. In conclusion, this catalyst shows great potential as a low-cost component for low temperature exhaust streams that are expected to be a characteristic of future automotive systems.

  11. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  12. Composition of air pollution particles modifies oxidative stress in cells, tissues, and living systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate an association between increased levels of ambient air pollution particles and human morbidity and mortality. Production of oxidants, either directly by the air pollution particles or by the host response to the particles, appears to be fundame...

  13. An Oxidation-Resistant Coating Alloy for Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P.; Smialek, James L.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium aluminides based on the g-phase (TiAl) offer the potential for component weight savings of up to 50 percent over conventional superalloys in 600 to 850 C aerospace applications. Extensive development efforts over the past 10 years have led to the identification of "engineering" gamma-alloys, which offer a balance of room-temperature mechanical properties and high-temperature strength retention. The gamma class of titanium aluminides also offers oxidation and interstitial (oxygen and nitrogen) embrittlement resistance superior to that of the alpha(sub 2) (Ti3Al) and orthorhombic (Ti2AlNb) classes of titanium aluminides. However, environmental durability is still a concern, especially at temperatures above 750 to 800 C. Recent work at the NASA Lewis Research Center led to the development of an oxidation-resistant coating alloy that shows great promise for the protection of gamma titanium aluminides.

  14. Controlled-expansion superalloy resists oxidation at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, E.A.; DeAntonio, D.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Controlled-thermal-expansion superalloys are vital materials for aircraft gas turbine engines, where their dimensional stability over a wide temperature range permits small clearances between rotating and stationary components. However, they must be coated for service at temperatures above 540 C (1,000 F) because they lack oxidation resistance. In Carpenter's new Thermo-Span superalloy, chromium is added to the composition, providing oxidation resistance without the need for a protective coating. Although its composition is otherwise similar to conventional controlled-expansion superalloys, the Co/Ni ratio in the matrix was rebalanced, and other small changes were made. As a result, the physical and mechanical properties of Thermo-Span alloy differ slightly from those of conventional alloys such as Carpenter's CTX-909 alloy.

  15. Oxidation resistant slurry coating for carbon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Rybicki, G. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating is produced on carbon-base materials, and the same processing step effects an infiltration of the substrate with silicon containing material. The process comprises making a slurry of nickel and silicon powders in a nitrocellulose lacquer, spraying onto the graphite or carbon-carbon substrate, and sintering in vacuum to form a fused coating that wets and covers the surface as well as penetrates into the pores of the substrate. Optimum wetting and infiltration occurs in the range of Ni-60 w/o Si to Ni-90 w/o Si with deposited thicknesses of 25-100 mg/sq. cm. Sintering temperatures of about 1200 C to about 1400 C are used, depending on the melting point of the specific coating composition. The sintered coating results in Ni-Si intermetallic phases and SiC, both of which are highly oxidation resistant.

  16. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-02-02

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air.

  17. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air. PMID:26831205

  18. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-02-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air.

  19. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air. PMID:26831205

  20. Asymmetric spin absorption across a low-resistance oxide barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shuhan; Qin, Chuan; Ji, Yi

    2015-07-21

    An unconventional method of nonlocal spin detection is demonstrated in mesoscopic lateral spin valves at room temperature. Clear nonlocal spin signals are detected between the two ends of an extended ferromagnetic spin detector. This is different from the conventional method in which the nonlocal voltage is measured between the spin detector and the nonmagnetic channel. The results can be understood as spatially non-uniform absorption of a pure spin current into the spin detector across a low-resistance oxide interface.

  1. Experimental Study of Resistive Bistability in Metal Oxide Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, D.; Tan, Z.; Patel, V.; Likharev, K.K.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-05-01

    We have studied resistive bistability (memory) effects in junctions based on metal oxides, with a focus on sample-to-sample reproducibility, which is necessary for the use of such junctions as crosspoint devices of hybrid CMOS/nanoelectronic circuits. Few-nm-thick layers of NbO{sub x}, CuO{sub x} and TiO{sub x} have been formed by thermal and plasma oxidation, at various deposition and oxidation conditions, both with and without rapid thermal post-annealing. The resistive bistability effect has been observed for all these materials, with particularly high endurance (over 10{sup 3} switching cycles) obtained for single-layer TiO{sub 2} junctions, and the best reproducibility reached for multi-layer junctions of the same material. Fabrication optimization has allowed us to improve the OFF/ON resistance ratio to about 10{sup 3}, but the sample-to-sample reproducibility is so far lower than that required for large-scale integration.

  2. Nanoscale assembly of high-temperature oxidation-resistant nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao

    2010-02-01

    Structural considerations for designing a high-temperature oxidation-resistant metallic material are proposed, based on the dependence of the material structure on a promotion of the development of a protective scale of chromia or alumina. The material should have numerous sites on its surface for nucleating the protective oxides at the onset of oxidation and abundant grain boundaries in deeper areas for simultaneously supplying sufficient flux of the protective-oxide-forming elements toward the surface for a rapid linkage of the oxide nuclei through their lateral growth. Based on these considerations, we fabricated, using an electrochemical deposition method, novel nanocomposites which have a nanocrystalline metal matrix containing Cr and/or Al nanoparticles dispersed at the nano length scale. The validity of the design considerations is verified by comparing the high-temperature oxidation of a typical Ni-Cr nanocomposite system with two types of conventional Ni-Cr materials having similar or higher Cr content but different structure: one is a composite having a nanocrystalline Ni matrix containing Cr microparticles dispersed at the microscale and the other are micron-grained Ni-Cr alloys with the Cr distribution at the atomic length scale. PMID:20644803

  3. Current research in oxidation-resistant carbon-carbon composites at NASA. Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Barrett, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The significant potential of carbon-carbon composites for high-temperature structural applications is well established. For hypersonic vehicle applications, desirable properties include low density, high specific strength and stiffness, low coefficients of thermal expansion, and retention of mechanical properties above 3000 F. A significant problem associated with carbon materials, however, is that they oxidize rapidly in air at temperatures above about 800 F, and therefore must be protected from oxidation. Successful development of effective methods of oxidation protection is key to the eventual utilization of carbon-carbon composites on hypersonic vehicles such as NASP. In this presentation, the basic elements of an oxidation-protection system are described. Results from oxidation-performance evaluations of state-of-the-art ACC-4 type material in simulated airframe vehicle environments (temperature, pressure, and time) conducted at NASA Langley are also presented. NASA Langley has an active research effort to improve the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon materials for airframe structural and vehicle thermal protection applications. Conversion coating and sealant development research is highlighted.

  4. Synthesis and Oxidation Resistance of h-BN Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, David; Meulenberg, Robert; Lad, Robert

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an exciting 2D material for use in sensors and other electronic devices that operate in harsh, high temperature environments. Not only is h-BN a wide band gap material with excellent wear resistance and high temperature stability, but recent reports indicate that h-BN can prevent metallic substrates from oxidizing above 600°C in low O2 pressures. However, the PVD of highly crystalline h-BN films required for this oxidation protection has proven challenging. In this work, we have explored the growth of h-BN thin films by reactive RF magnetron sputtering from an elemental B target in an Ar/N2 atmosphere. The film growth rate is extremely slow and the resulting films are atomically smooth and homogeneous. Using DC biasing during deposition and high temperature annealing treatments, the degree of film crystallinity can be controlled. The oxidation resistance of h-BN films deposited on inert sapphire and reactive metal substrates such as Zr and ZrB2 has been examined by techniques such as XPS, XRD, and SEM after oxidation between 600 and 1200°C under varying oxygen pressures. The success of h-BN as a passivation layer for metallic substrates in harsh environments is shown to depend greatly on its crystalline quality and defects. Supported by the NSF SusChEM program.

  5. Improved oxidation-resistant carbon and graphite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muir, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    A variety of silicon-carbide treated carbon and graphite products were prepared, and oxidation and strength properties determined. Carbon and graphite materials used in the preliminary study include fiber, tape, felt, foam, bulk, and laminar configurations. The silicon-carbide treatment used in preparing the oxidation resistant specimens employs either vacuum or ultrasonic impregnation of various silicone-silicon mixtures into the matrix material. The impregnation phase is followed by controlled thermal reaction at which time the silicon carbide is synthesized and takes the form of an integral protective boundary layer. Thickness of the layer ranges from a fraction of a mil to 10 mils, depending on the matrix material and processing parameters. Oxidation resistance of all the silicon-carbide-treated specimens investigated was found to be significantly improved. Mechanical strengths of the laminar composites were also found to be somewhat improved. At room temperature the specific strength of the silicon-carbide treated fibers and tapes was degraded to some extent; however, their relative strengths were significantly increased at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmosphere.

  6. Chlorination treatment to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrani, Vikas; Thom, Andrew J.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Akinc, Mufit

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the quaternary Nb-Mo-Si-B system is not oxidation resistant. The difference in oxidation resistance between Mo-Si-B and Nb-Mo-Si-B may be interpreted in terms of the volatility of the metal oxide that forms. MoO3 evaporates from the surface scale at about 650 °C, leaving a porous borosilicate glassy scale. Nb2O5 persists as a rapidly growing condensed phase that overwhelms the ability of the borosilicate glass to form a protective layer. In the present work, a novel chlorination process was employed to selectively remove Nb2O5 from the scale of the quaternary alloy as volatile NbCl5. A Nb-Mo-Si-B alloy was studied with a nominal composition of 63(Nb,Mo)-30Si-7B (at. pct) with Nb/Mo = 1:1. The alloy consisted of a three-phase microstructure of (Nb,Mo)5Si3B x (T1)-(Nb,Mo)5(Si,B)3 (T2)-(Nb,Mo)5Si3B x (D88). The oxidation behavior of these alloys in air was studied both before and after chlorination. Results showed that Nb2O5 can be selectively removed from the scale to leave a borosilicate-rich scale, which then forms a dense scale after heat treatment at 1100 °C in argon. The oxidation rate of the chlorinated alloy was about one-third that of the unchlorinated alloy under identical conditions. Alloy oxidation during heating to the test temperature was studied, and a plausible mechanism for the formation of porosity in the oxide scale has been offered.

  7. Photocatalyzed oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde in humidified air

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, M.L.; Ollis, D.F.

    1996-02-01

    Photocatalysis is considered as a potential air treatment and purification technology. Photocatalyzed oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde in humidified air was carried out to establish a first complete kinetic model for a photocatalyzed multispecies network. Two photocatalysts were examined in a batch, recirculation reactor, near-UV illuminated TiO{sub 2} (anatase) coated (i) on the surface of a nonporous quartz glass plate and (ii) on a porous ceramic honeycomb monolith. The former contained only illuminated (active) surfaces, the latter consisted of substantial {open_quotes}dark{close_quotes} surfaces coated with a thin layer of illuminated (active) catalyst. Ethanol was photooxidized to acetaldehyde and formaldehyde intermediates, and eventually to carbon dioxide and water products. The catalyst and monolith surfaces adsorbed appreciable fractions of the trace ethanol, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, carbon dioxide and water present. Ethanol, acetaldehyde, and carbon dioxide adsorption isotherms were measured on both catalysts; the formaldehyde adsorption isotherms were assumed identical to those of acetaldehyde. On the fully illuminated glass plate reactor, all four species were accounted for, and closure of a transient carbon mass balance was demonstrated. Completion of a transient carbon mass balance on the monolith reactor required inclusion of additional reaction intermediates (acetic and formic acids), which appear to reversibly accumulate on only the dark surfaces. The ethanol and acetaldehyde photocatalyzed oxidation kinetic networks were modeled using Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate forms combined with adsorption isotherms for reactant, intermediates, and product CO{sub 2}. For both the quartz plate and monolith catalysts, satisfactory kinetic models were developed to predict the entire time course of ethanol and acetaldehyde multicomponent batch conversions. 43 refs., 16 figs.

  8. Traffic-related air pollution is related to interrupter resistance in 4-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Eenhuizen, Esther; Gehring, Ulrike; Wijga, Alet H; Smit, Henriette A; Fischer, Paul H; Brauer, Michael; Koppelman, Gerard H; Kerkhof, Marjan; de Jongste, Johan C; Brunekreef, Bert; Hoek, Gerard

    2013-06-01

    Outdoor air pollution has been associated with decrements in lung function and growth of lung function in school-age children. Lung function effects have not been examined in preschoolers, with the exception of one study on minute ventilation in newborns. Our goal was to assess the relationship between long- and short-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and interrupter resistance in 4-year-old children. Lung function was measured using the interrupter resistance method in children participating in a Dutch birth cohort study. Long-term average air pollution concentrations of fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and soot at the residential address at birth were assessed using land-use regression models. Daily average air pollution concentrations on the day of clinical examination were obtained from the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network. Significant associations were found between long-term average air pollution concentrations and interrupter resistance. Interrupter resistance increased by 0.04 kPa·s·L(-1) (95% CI 0.01-0.07) per interquartile range increase (3.3 μg·m(-3)) in fine particle concentration. Short-term exposure was not associated with interrupter resistance. Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution was associated with increased interrupter resistance in 4-year-old children, supporting previous birth cohort studies reporting effects of air pollution on subjectively reported respiratory symptoms in preschool children.

  9. Model of current-limited negative differential resistance in oxide-based resistance-switching devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Frederick T.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance-switching devices such as resistive random access memories (RRAMs) exhibit the ability to rapidly reduce resistance upon exceeding a threshold voltage, as part of the SET operation. For oxide-based RRAMs, the progressive generation of defects during SET requires strict regulation of the current, e.g., by a transistor, in order to avoid irreversible breakdown. In doing so, the current-limiting device itself takes some voltage burden. The observed negative differential resistance for both the initial (forming) and regular SET operations can be analytically explained with a basic circuit model for the current-limited switching element, linking the voltage transfer to the current-limiting device with the degree of current rise. Consequently, it is found that RRAM operation current is a vital consideration for the reliability of the current-limiting device.

  10. Treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater by wet air oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yan, Xiuyi; Zhou, Jinghui; Ma, Jiuli

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production is characterized by high salinity and high chemical oxygen demand (COD). We applied a combination of flocculation and wet air oxidation technology to optimize the reduction of COD in the treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater. The experiments used different values of flocculant, coagulant, and oxidizing agent added to the wastewater, as well as different reaction times and treatment temperatures. The use of flocculants for the pretreatment of fracturing wastewater was shown to improve treatment efficiency. The addition of 500 mg/L of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and 20 mg/L of anionic polyacrylamide (APAM) during pretreatment resulted in a COD removal ratio of 8.2% and reduced the suspended solid concentration of fracturing wastewater to 150 mg/L. For a solution of pretreated fracturing wastewater with 12 mL of added H2O2, the COD was reduced to 104 mg/L when reacted at 300 °C for 75 min, and reduced to 127 mg/L when reacted at the same temperature for 45 min while using a 1 L autoclave. An optimal combination of these parameters produced treated wastewater that met the GB 8978-1996 'Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard' level I emission standard. PMID:26942530

  11. Catalytic wet air oxidation for the treatment of emulsifying wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Fu; Chen, Ling; Lu, Yi-Cheng; Tang, Wen-Wei

    2005-01-01

    The wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic WAO (CWAO) of the high strength emulsifying wastewater containing nonionic surfactants have been investigated in terms of COD and TOC removal. The WAO and homogeneous CWAO processes were carried out at the temperature from 433 K to 513 K, with initial oxygen pressure 1.2 MPa. It was found that homogeneous catalyst copper(Cu(NO3)2) had an fairly good catalytic activity for the WAO process, and the oxidation was catalyzed when the temperature was higher than 473 K. Moreover, several heterogeneous catalysts were proved to be effective for the WAO process. At the temperature 473 K, after 2 h reaction, WAO process could achieve about 75% COD removal and 66% TOC removal, while catalysts Cu/Al2O3 and Mn-Ce/Al2O3 elevated the COD removal up to 86%--89% and that of TOC up to 82%. However, complete elimination of COD and TOC was proved to be difficult even the best non-noble catalyst was used. Therefore, the effluent from WAO or CWAO process need to be further disposed. The bioassay proved that the effluent from WAO process was amenable to the biochemical method. PMID:16158582

  12. High performance of graphene oxide-doped silicon oxide-based resistance random access memory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, a double active layer (Zr:SiO x /C:SiO x ) resistive switching memory device with outstanding performance is presented. Through current fitting, hopping conduction mechanism is found in both high-resistance state (HRS) and low-resistance state (LRS) of double active layer RRAM devices. By analyzing Raman and FTIR spectra, we observed that graphene oxide exists in C:SiO x layer. Compared with single Zr:SiO x layer structure, Zr:SiO x /C:SiO x structure has superior performance, including low operating current, improved uniformity in both set and reset processes, and satisfactory endurance characteristics, all of which are attributed to the double-layer structure and the existence of graphene oxide flakes formed by the sputter process. PMID:24261454

  13. Nanomaterial resistant microorganism mediated reduction of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Raghuraj S; Pandey, Ashish; Qureshi, Anjum; Ozguz, Volkan; Niazi, Javed H

    2016-10-01

    In this study, soil bacteria were isolated from nanomaterials (NMs) contaminated pond soil and enriched in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) in mineral medium to obtain NMs resistant bacteria. The isolated resistant bacteria were biochemically and genetically identified as Fontibacillus aquaticus. The resistant bacteria were allowed to interact with engineered GO in order to study the biotransformation in GO structure. Raman spectra of GO extracted from culture medium revealed decreased intensity ratio of ID/IG with subsequent reduction of CO which was consistent with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results. The structural changes and exfoliatied GO nanosheets were also evident from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and current-voltage measurements confirmed the reduction of GO after the interaction with resistant bacteria. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of biotransformed GO revealed reduction of oxygen-containing species on the surface of nanosheets. Our results demonstrated that the presented method is an environment friendly, cost effective, simple and based on green approaches for the reduction of GO using NMs resistant bacteria.

  14. GENERATION, TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTEN-OXIDE AEROSOLS AT 1000 C IN FLOWING AIR-STEAM MIXTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the rates of oxidation and vaporization of pure tungsten rods in flowing air, steam and air-steam mixtures in laminar flow. Also measured were the downstream transport of tungsten-oxide condensation aerosols and their region of deposition, including plateout in the superheated flow tube, rainout in the condenser and ambient discharge which was collected on an array of sub-micron aerosol filters. The nominal conditions of the tests, with the exception of the first two tests, were tungsten temperatures of 1000 C, gas mixture temperatures of 200 C and wall temperatures of 150 C to 200 C. It was observed that the tungsten oxidation rates were greatest in all air and least in all steam, generally decreasing non-linearly with increasing steam mole fraction. The tungsten oxidation rates in all air were more than five times greater than the tungsten oxidation rates in all steam. The tungsten vaporization rate was zero in all air and increased with increasing steam mole fraction. The vaporization rate became maximum at a steam mole fraction of 0.85 and decreased thereafter as the steam mole fraction was increased to unity. The tungsten-oxide was transported downstream as condensation aerosols, initially flowing upwards from the tungsten rod through an 18-inch long, one-inch diameter quartz tube, around a 3.5-inch radius, 90{sup o} bend and laterally through a 24-inch horizontal run. The entire length of the quartz glass flow path was heated by electrical resistance clamshell heaters whose temperatures were individually controlled and measured. The tungsten-oxide plateout in the quartz tube was collected, nearly all of which was deposited at the end of the heated zone near the entrance to the condenser which was cold. The tungsten-oxide which rained out in the condenser as the steam condensed was collected with the condensate and weighed after being dried. The aerosol smoke which escaped the condenser was collected on the sub

  15. Catalysis of propane oxidation and premixed propane-air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiswall, James T.

    Improvements in deriving energy from hydrocarbon fuels will have a large impact on our efforts to transition to sustainable and renewable energy resources. The hypothesis for this work is that catalysis can extend the useful operating conditions for hydrocarbon oxidation and combustion, improve device efficiencies, and reduce pollutants. Catalysis of propane oxidation and premixed propane-air flames are examined experimentally, using a stagnation-flow reactor to identify the important physical and chemical mechanisms over a range of flow catalyst, and temperature conditions. The propane oxidation studies consider five catalyst materials: platinum, palladium, SnO2, 90% SnO2 -- 10% Pt (by mass), and quartz. The volume fractions of CO2, O2, C 3H8, CO, NO and the electric power required to control the catalyst temperature quantify the activity of each catalyst for the equivalence ratios of φ = 0.67, 1.00, and 1.50, and over the catalyst temperature range 23-800°C. Quartz is used as a baseline and confirmed to be non-reactive at all conditions. 100% SnO2 has minimal reactivity. Platinum, palladium, and 90% SnO2 -- 10% Pt show similar trends and have the highest catalytic activity at φ = 1.50. Palladium and 90% SnO 2 -- 10% Pt show an increasing catalyst-activation temperature (Tsa) for decreasing φ, and platinum shows an approximately constant catalyst-activation temperature for decreasing φ (Tsa = 310°C). Of these the 90% SnO2 -- 10% Pt catalyst shows the lowest Tsa, occurring for the φ = 1.5 mixture (Tsa = 250°C). The studies of premixed propane-air flames consider platinum and quartz stagnation surfaces for fuel-mixture velocities from 0.6-1.6 m/s. Five flame structures are observed: cool core envelope, cone, envelope, disk and ring flames. The lean-extinction limit, disk-to-ring flame transition φ, and the disk-flame to stagnation-plane distance are reported. Platinum inhibits the ring flame structure. The lean-extinction limit and disk-flame to stagnation

  16. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  17. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  18. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  19. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  20. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  1. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  2. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  3. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  4. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  5. Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation(UVPCO)/Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Fisk,William J.

    2007-02-01

    We previously reported that gas-phase byproducts of incomplete oxidation were generated when a prototype ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaner was operated in the laboratory with indoor-relevant mixtures of VOCs at realistic concentrations. Under these conditions, there was net production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two important indoor air toxicants. Here, we further explore the issue of byproduct generation. Using the same UVPCO air cleaner, we conducted experiments to identify common VOCs that lead to the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and to quantify their production rates. We sought to reduce the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to acceptable levels by employing different chemisorbent scrubbers downstream of the UVPCO device. Additionally, we made preliminary measurements to estimate the capacity and expected lifetime of the chemisorbent media. For most experiments, the system was operated at 680-780 m{sup 3}/h (400-460 cfm). A set of experiments was conducted with common VOCs introduced into the UVPCO device individually and in mixture. Compound conversion efficiencies and the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were determined by comparison of compound concentrations upstream and downstream of the reactor. There was general agreement between compound conversions efficiencies determined individually and in the mixture. This suggests that competition among compounds for active sites on the photocatalyst surface will not limit the performance of the UVPCO device when the total VOC concentration is low. A possible exception was the very volatile alcohols, for which there were some indications of competitive adsorption. The results also showed that formaldehyde was produced from many commonly encountered VOCs, while acetaldehyde was generated by specific VOCs, particularly ethanol. The implication is that formaldehyde concentrations are likely to increase when an effective UVPCO air cleaner is used in

  6. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  7. Obesity, insulin resistance, and skeletal muscle nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Raymond M.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Kraus, William E.; Tanner, Charles J.; Pierce, Joseph R.; Choi, Myung Dong

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for impaired insulin action have yet to be fully identified. Rodent models demonstrate a strong relationship between insulin resistance and an elevation in skeletal muscle inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression; the purpose of this investigation was to explore this potential relationship in humans. Sedentary men and women were recruited to participate (means ± SE: nonobese, body mass index = 25.5 ± 0.3 kg/m2, n = 13; obese, body mass index = 36.6 ± 0.4 kg/m2, n = 14). Insulin sensitivity was measured using an intravenous glucose tolerance test with the subsequent modeling of an insulin sensitivity index (SI). Skeletal muscle was obtained from the vastus lateralis, and iNOS, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) content were determined by Western blot. SI was significantly lower in the obese compared with the nonobese group (∼43%; P < 0.05), yet skeletal muscle iNOS protein expression was not different between nonobese and obese groups. Skeletal muscle eNOS protein was significantly higher in the nonobese than the obese group, and skeletal muscle nNOS protein tended to be higher (P = 0.054) in the obese compared with the nonobese group. Alternative analysis based on SI (high and low tertile) indicated that the most insulin-resistant group did not have significantly more skeletal muscle iNOS protein than the most insulin-sensitive group. In conclusion, human insulin resistance does not appear to be associated with an elevation in skeletal muscle iNOS protein in middle-aged individuals under fasting conditions. PMID:22797309

  8. Resistive switching characteristics and mechanisms in silicon oxide memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Wu, Xiaohan; Chen, Yen-Ting; Wang, Yanzhen; Xue, Fei; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic unipolar SiOx-based resistance random access memories (ReRAM) characterization, switching mechanisms, and applications have been investigated. Device structures, material compositions, and electrical characteristics are identified that enable ReRAM cells with high ON/OFF ratio, low static power consumption, low switching power, and high readout-margin using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS)-compatible SiOx-based materials. These ideas are combined with the use of horizontal and vertical device structure designs, composition optimization, electrical control, and external factors to help understand resistive switching (RS) mechanisms. Measured temperature effects, pulse response, and carrier transport behaviors lead to compact models of RS mechanisms and energy band diagrams in order to aid the development of computer-aided design for ultralarge-v scale integration. This chapter presents a comprehensive investigation of SiOx-based RS characteristics and mechanisms for the post-CMOS device era.

  9. Oxidation resistance of Ru-capped EUV multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Dai, Z; Nelson, E J; Wall, M A; Alameda, J; Nguyen, N; Baker, S; Robinson, J C; Taylor, J S; Clift, M; Aquila, A; Gullikson, E M; Edwards, N G

    2005-02-23

    Differently prepared Ru-capping layers, deposited on Mo/Si EUV multilayers, have been characterized using a suite of metrologies to establish their baseline structural, optical, and surface properties in as-deposited state. Same capping layer structures were tested for their thermal stability and oxidation resistance. Post-mortem characterization identified changes due to accelerated tests. The best performing Ru-capping layer structure was studied in detail with transmission electron microscopy to identify the grain microstructure and texture. This information is essential for modeling and performance optimization of EUVL multilayers.

  10. Air/water oxidative desulfurization of coal and sulfur-containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warzinski, R. P.; Freidman, S.; LaCount, R. B.

    1981-02-01

    Air/water Oxydesulfurization has been demonstrated in autoclave experiments at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for various coals representative of the major U. S. coal basins. The applicability at present of this treatment for producing an environmentally acceptable coal has been restricted by recently proposed SO2 emission standards for utility boilers. The product would, however, be attractive to the many smaller industrial coal users who cannot afford to operate and maintain flue gas desulfurization systems. It is also possible that the utility industry could realize a benefit by using chemically cleaned coal with partial flue gas scrubbing. The higher cost of the cleaned coal would be offset by the reduction in capital and operating costs resulting from decreased FGD requirements. The susceptibility of sulfur in coal to oxidative removal varies with the nature of the sulfur-containing species. The inorganic sulfur compounds, primarily pyrite, marcasite, and iron sulfate, are more amenable to treatment than the organically bound sulfur which exhibits varying degrees of resistance depending on its chemical environment. Air/water Oxydesulfurization consistently removes in excess of 90 percent of the pyritic sulfur; the extent and efficiency of organic sulfur removal however, depends on the type of coal and severity of treatment used. In general, the organic sulfur of the higher rank coals exhibits more resistance to treatment than that of the lower rank coals; however, the accompanying heating value is greater for the latter. Similar treatment of sulfur-containing model compounds further illustrates the relative susceptibilities of different chemical species to oxidation. Application of these data to the understanding of the complex chemistry involved in the treatment of coal is a preliminary step toward improving the efficiency of Oxydesulfurization.

  11. Hybrid Copper-Silver Conductive Tracks for Enhanced Oxidation Resistance under Flash Light Sintering.

    PubMed

    Yim, Changyong; Sandwell, Allen; Park, Simon S

    2016-08-31

    We developed a simple method to prepare hybrid copper-silver conductive tracks under flash light sintering. The developed metal nanoparticle-based ink is convenient because its preparation process is free of any tedious washing steps. The inks were composed of commercially available copper nanoparticles which were mixed with formic acid, silver nitrate, and diethylene glycol. The role of formic acid is to remove the native copper oxide layer on the surface of the copper nanoparticles. In this way, it facilitates the formation of a silver outer shell on the surface of the copper nanoparticles through a galvanic replacement. In the presence of formic acid, the copper nanoparticles formed copper formate, which was present in the unsintered tracks. However, under illumination by a xenon flash light, the copper formate was then converted to copper. Moreover, the resistance of the copper-only films increased by 6 orders of magnitude when oxidized at high temperatures (∼220 °C). However, addition of silver nitrate to the inks suppressed the oxidation of the hybrid copper-silver films, and the resistance changes in these inks at high temperatures were greatly reduced. In addition, the hybrid inks proved to be advantageous for use in electrical circuits as they demonstrated a stable electrical conductivity after exposure to ambient air at 180 °C. PMID:27514569

  12. Nanostructured WS2-Ni composite films for improved oxidation, resistance and tribological performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shusheng; Gao, Xiaoming; Hu, Ming; Sun, Jiayi; Jiang, Dong; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin; Weng, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    WS2 films were prepared by radio frequency sputtering. In order to improve its mechanical properties and oxidation resistance, Ni was used as the dopant and the effect of Ni content on the microstructure, anti-oxidation capability, mechanical and tribological properties of composite films were studied by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), nano-indentation tester, scratch tester and ball-on-disk tribometer. WS2 existed in nanocrystalline 2H-WS2 structure and Ni an amorphous phase. Increasing the Ni content resulted in a microstructural change from columnar platelet structure of pure WS2 film to a fiber-like structure of the composite film at low Ni content (5.0 at%), and to a featureless structure at high Ni content (>10 at%). Meanwhile, the films became more and more compact and showed improved anti-oxidation capability. The films represented an increase in hardness with Ni content ranging from 0 to 10.3 at% due to the microstructure being densified, but exhibited high brittleness as the Ni content higher than 10 at%. The composite film at low Ni content of about 5.0 at% showed much better wear resistance than pure WS2 film, but became brittle and had poor wear resistances at high Ni content of above 10.3 at%. The WS2-5.0 at% Ni composite film exhibited the longest wear life of 5.8 × 105 cycles about sevenfold better than that of pure WS2 film in humid air. The wear mechanism was discussed in terms of the anti-oxidation capability of the films, morphology of the wear track and formation of transfer film.

  13. Catalytic air oxidation of biomass-derived carbohydrates to formic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Ding, Dao-Jun; Deng, Li; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2012-07-01

    An efficient catalytic system for biomass oxidation to form formic acid was developed. The conversion of glucose to formic acid can reach up to 52% yield within 3 h when catalyzed by 5 mol% of H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) at only 373 K using air as the oxidant. Furthermore, the heteropolyacid can be used as a bifunctional catalyst in the conversion of cellulose to formic acid (yield=35%) with air as the oxidant. PMID:22499553

  14. Catalytic air oxidation of biomass-derived carbohydrates to formic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Ding, Dao-Jun; Deng, Li; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2012-07-01

    An efficient catalytic system for biomass oxidation to form formic acid was developed. The conversion of glucose to formic acid can reach up to 52% yield within 3 h when catalyzed by 5 mol% of H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) at only 373 K using air as the oxidant. Furthermore, the heteropolyacid can be used as a bifunctional catalyst in the conversion of cellulose to formic acid (yield=35%) with air as the oxidant.

  15. The effect of variations of cobalt content on the cyclic oxidation resistance of selected Ni-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    Cobalt levels were systematically varied in the Ni-base turbine alloys U-700 (cast), U-700m (PM/HIP), Waspaloy, Mar-M-247, In-738, Nimonic-115, U-720, and SX-R-150. the cobalt levels ranged from 0 wt pct to the nominal commercial content in each alloy. the alloys were tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at 1000, 1100 and 1150 C for 500, 200, and 100 hr, respectively. An oxidation attack parameter, Ka, derived from the specific weight change versus time data was used to evaluate the oxidation behavior of the alloys along with X-ray diffraction analysis of the surface oxides. The alloys tend to form either Cr2O3/chromite spinel or Al2O3/aluminate spinel depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloys. Alloys with a ratio of 3.5 or higher tend to favor the Cr oxides while those under 3.0 form mostly Al oxides. In general the Al2O3/aluminate spinel forming alloys have the better oxidation resistance. Increased cobalt content lowers the scaling resistance of the higher Cr allys while a 5.0 wt pct Co content is optimum for the Al controlling alloys. The refractory metals, particularly Ta, appear beneficial to both types of oxides, perhaps due to the formation of the omnipresent trirutile Ni(Ta, Cb, Mo, W)2O6. Both scales break down as increasing amounts of NiO are formed.

  16. The effect of variations of cobalt content on the cyclic oxidation resistance of selected Ni-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Cobalt levels were systematically varied in the Ni-base turbine alloys U-700 (cast), U-700m(PM/HIP), Waspaloy, Mar-M-247, In-738, Nimonic-115, U-720, and SX-R-150. The cobalt levels ranged from 0 wt % to the nominal commercial content in each alloy. The alloys were tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at 1000, 1100 and 1150 C for 500, 200 and 100 hr respectively. An oxidation attack parameter, Ka derived from the specific weight change versus time data was used to evaluate the oxidation behavior of the alloys along with X-ray diffraction analysis of the surface oxides. The alloys tend to form either Cr2O3/chromite spinel or Al2O3/aluminate spinel depending on the CR/Al ratio in the alloys. Alloys with a ratio of 3.5 or higher tend to favor the Cr oxides while those under 3.0 form mostly Al oxides. In general the Al2O3/aluminate spinel forming alloys have the better oxidation resistance. Increased cobalt content lowers the scaling resistance of the higher Cr alloys while a 5.0 wt % Co content is optimum for the Al controlling alloys. The refractory metals, particularly Ta, appear beneficial to both types of oxides perhaps due to the formation of the omni-present trirutile Ni(Ta,Cb,Mo,W)2O6. Both scales break down as increasing amounts of NiO is formed.

  17. Oxidation-resistive copper nanoparticles: photoreduction synthesis and their oxidation state measurements by XAFS and HRTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Aoki, T.; Yonemura, M.; Miyagawa, M.; Okumura, K.

    2016-05-01

    We examined the synthesis of copper nanoparticles by photoreduction, and characterized them using optical spectroscopy, XAFS measurement, and electron microscopy. Ethanol solution of copper acetate with TiO2 nanoparticles was photoirradated. Optical absorption observation indicated that copper nanoparticles were formed in the solution. XAFS measurement indicated that the nanoparticles were metallic, not oxidized. Electron microscopy observation exhibited that the nanoparticles kept metallic even under exposure to air.

  18. Air feed tube support system for a solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Doshi, Vinod B.; Ruka, Roswell J.; Hager, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator (12), containing tubular fuel cells (36) with interior air electrodes (18), where a supporting member (82) containing a plurality of holes (26) supports oxidant feed tubes (51), which pass from an oxidant plenum (52") into the center of the fuel cells, through the holes (26) in the supporting member (82), where a compliant gasket (86) around the top of the oxidant feed tubes and on top (28) of the supporting member (82) helps support the oxidant feed tubes and center them within the fuel cells, and loosen the tolerance for centering the air feed tubes.

  19. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). Link to an... to or greater than 0.005 ppm shall be rounded up). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the...

  20. Catalytic wet air oxidation of chlorophenols over supported ruthenium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Descorme, Claude; Besson, Michèle

    2007-07-31

    A series of noble metal (Pt, Pd, Ru) loaded zirconia catalysts were evaluated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of mono-chlorophenols (2-CP, 3-CP, 4-CP) under relatively mild reaction conditions. Among the investigated noble metals, Ru appeared to be the best to promote the CWAO of CPs as far as incipient-wetness impregnation was used to prepare all the catalysts. The position of the chlorine substitution on the aromatic ring was also shown to have a significant effect on the CP reactivity in the CWAO over 3wt.% Ru/ZrO(2). 2-CP was relatively easier to degradate compared to 3-CP and 4-CP. One reason could be the higher adsorption of 2-CP on the catalyst surface. Further investigations suggested that 3wt.% Ru/ZrO(2) is a very efficient catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP as far as high 2-CP conversion and TOC abatement could still be reached at even lower temperature (393K) and lower total pressure (3MPa). Additionally, the conversion of 2-CP was demonstrated to increase with the initial pH of the 2-CP solution. The dechlorination reaction is promoted at higher pH. In all cases, the adsorption of the reactants and the reaction intermediates was shown to play a major role. All parameters that would control the molecule speciation in solution or the catalyst surface properties would have a key effect. PMID:17513043

  1. Development of oxidation/corrosion-resistant composite materials and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Shanmugham, S.

    1995-06-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed for high temperature structural applications, many of which are in oxidative environments. Such composites are attractive since they are light-weight and possess the desired mechanical properties at elevated temperature and in aggressive environments. The most significant advantage is their toughness and their non-catastrophic failure behavior. The mechanical properties of CFCCs have been characteristically linked with the nature of the interfacial bond between the fibers and the matrix. Weakly bonded fiber-matrix intefaces allow an impinging matrix crack to be deflected such that the fracture process occurs through several stages: Crack deflection, debonding at the interface, fiber slip and pull-out, and ultimately fiber failure. Such a composite will fail in a graceful manner and exhibit substantial fracture toughness. Currently, carbon interface coatings are used to appropriately tailor interface properties, however their poor oxidation resistance has required a search of an appropriate replacement. Generally, metal oxides are inherently stable to oxidation and possess thermal expansion coefficients relatively close to those of Nicalon and SiC. However, the metal oxides must also be chemically compatible with the fiber and matrix. If the fiber/interface/matrix system is chemically compatible, then the interfacial bonding stress is influenced by the thermal residual stresses that are generated as the composite is cooled from processing to room temperature. In the current work, thermomechanical computational results were obtained from a finite element model (FEM) for calculating the thermal residual stresses. This was followed by experimental evaluation of Nicalon/SiC composites with carbon, alumina, and mullite interfacial coatings.

  2. 75 FR 70258 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft (75 FR 57463, September 21, 2010). The EPA... a later date (75 FR 61486, October 5, 2010). The supplementary materials were: an errata sheet for... AGENCY Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and...

  3. Laboratory flammability studies of mixtures of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and air

    SciTech Connect

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Zlochower, I A; Lucci, C E; Green, G M; Thomas, R A

    1992-06-26

    At the request of the Department of Energy and the Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the flammability of mixtures of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and air. This work is relevant to the possible hazards of flammable gas generation from nuclear waste tanks at Hanford, WA. The tests were performed in a 120-L spherical chamber under both quiescent and turbulent conditions using both electric spark and pyrotechnic ignition sources. The data reported here for binary mixtures of hydrogen in air generally confirm the data of previous investigators, but they are more comprehensive than those reported previously. The results clarify to a greater extent the complications associated with buoyancy, turbulence, and selective diffusion. The data reported here for ternary mixtures of hydrogen and nitrous oxide in air indicate that small additions of nitrous oxide (relative to the amount of air) have little effect, but that higher concentrations of nitrous oxide (relative to air) significantly increase the explosion hazard.

  4. Improved reaction sintered silicon nitride. [protective coatings to improve oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processing treatments were applied to as-nitrided reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) with the purposes of improving strength after processing to above 350 MN/m2 and improving strength after oxidation exposure. The experimental approaches are divided into three broad classifications: sintering of surface-applied powders; impregnation of solution followed by further thermal processing; and infiltration of molten silicon and subsequent carburization or nitridation of the silicon. The impregnation of RSSN with solutions of aluminum nitrate and zirconyl chloride, followed by heating at 1400-1500 C in a nitrogen atmosphere containing silicon monoxide, improved RSSN strength and oxidation resistance. The room temperature bend strength of RSSN was increased nearly fifty percent above the untreated strength with mean absolute strengths up to 420 MN/m2. Strengths of treated samples that were measured after a 12 hour oxidation exposure in air were up to 90 percent of the original as-nitrided strength, as compared to retained strengths in the range of 35 to 60 percent for untreated RSSN after the same oxidation exposure.

  5. Method to measure ethylene oxide/propylene oxide surfactants in resist developers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Rodica; Oberlander, Joseph E.; Calindas, Maria Fides Y.; Gonzalez, Eleazar; Ranque, Pilarcita L.

    1998-06-01

    Controlling the exact level of surfactants in resist developers is critical. Surfactant concentrations can influence parameters such as photospeed, resolution, and linearity. Too much or too little surfactant can have a significant impact on the performance of the developer. In our laboratory an analytical procedure was developed to quantitate an Ethylene Oxide/Propylene Oxide (EO/PO) surfactant in an aqueous Tetra Alkyl Ammonium Hydroxide developer. The procedure takes advantage of the chemical property of the EO/PO surfactant to complex with aqueous cobalt thiocyanate solution to form a blue cobalt containing dye. The coupled dye is soluble in methylene chloride and visible at lambda 620 nm. The amount of dye formation is directly proportional to the amount of EO/PO surfactant present in the sample, over an established range. The analytical method provides precise and accurate quantitation of the EO/PO surfactant in the resist developers. It is relatively easy to perform and enables the user to qualify a resist developer with respect to its surfactant content. Also, the method developed is sufficiently general and can be applied to other types of nonionic surfactants presented in resist developers.

  6. Air stripping & photocatalytic oxidation: A winning team for groundwater remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Kittrell, J.R.; Quinlan, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    The Dover AFB Groundwater Reclamation Project demonstrated advanced technologies to control groundwater contamination, including comparisons of traditional countercurrent air atrippers to a crossflow air stripping technology. Another demonstration involved an advanced photocatalytic VOC destruction technology, which operates on the effluent air from the stripper. The combination of air stripping and photocatalytic destruction was shown to be effective for remediation of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds, both because of its low cost and its ability to prevent toxic air emissions. A detailed performance comparison of stripper designs shows that the crossflow air stripper design was comparable in effectiveness to the conventional countercurrent air stripper at high air-to-water ratios, but at a substantially lower pressure drop.

  7. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  12. Leaf photosynthetic and water-relations responses for 'Valencia' orange trees exposed to oxidant air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Takemoto, B.K.; Poe, M.

    1991-01-01

    Leaf responses were measured to test a hypothesis that reduced photosynthetic capacity and/or altered water relations were associated with reductions in yield for 'Valencia' orange trees (Citrus sinensis (L.), Osbeck) exposed to ambient oxidant air pollution. Exposures were continuous for 4 years to three levels of oxidants (in charcoal-filtered, half-filtered, and non-filtered air). Oxidants had no effect on net leaf photosynthetic rates or on photosynthetic pigment concentrations. A single set of measurements indicated that oxidants increased leaf starch concentrations (24%) prior to flowering, suggesting a change in photosynthate allocation. Leaves exposed to oxidants had small, but consistent, changes in water relations over the summer growing season, compared to trees growing in filtered air. Other changes included decreased stomatal conductance (12%) and transpiration (9%) rates, and increased water pressure potentials (5%). While all responses were subtle, their cumulative impact over 4 years indicated that 'Valencia' orange trees were subject to increased ambient oxidant stress.

  13. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, Carleton H.; Evans, Jr., Joseph Tate

    1998-01-01

    A method for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100.degree. C. and 300.degree. C. for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer.

  14. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, C.H.; Evans, J.T. Jr.

    1998-11-24

    A method is described for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100 C and 300 C for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer. 1 fig.

  15. [Degradation of beta-naphthol by catalytic wet air oxidation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Yu, Chao-Ying; Zhao, Pei-Qing; Chen, Ge-Xin

    2012-11-01

    A series of MnO(x)/nano-TiO2 catalysts were prepared and their application in degradation of beta-naphthol by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated. The catalysts preparation conditions, reaction conditions and its stability were tested. The catalysts had been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) measurements. The results showed that the decrease of the COD removal for the degradation of beta-naphthol at high Mn loading was due to the aggregation of the highly dispersed Mn species and the formation of the correlated crystals. The decline of the COD removal at high calcination temperature was probably attributed to the weak electron transfer between Mn2O3 and MnO2 and the formation of the inactive Mn2O3. The COD removal had been falling slightly when the catalyst was used 6 times, and this was likely related to the decrease of the diffraction peaks. The catalyst had a high activity when the Mn loading (mass fraction) was 4% and the calcination temperature was 450 degrees C. The COD removal was up to 96.4% at 110 degrees C and 0.5 MPa with this catalyst. The COD removal of 92.4% could be obtained with the MnO(x)/nano-TiO2 catalyst was recycled 6 times. The Mn leaching at 50, 80, 110 and 150 degrees C were all less than 9.3 mg x L(-1) by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The probable degradation pathway was proposed according to some publications.

  16. Pressurized solid oxide fuel cell integral air accumular containment

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Basel, Richard A.

    2004-02-10

    A fuel cell generator apparatus contains at least one fuel cell subassembly module in a module housing, where the housing is surrounded by a pressure vessel such that there is an air accumulator space, where the apparatus is associated with an air compressor of a turbine/generator/air compressor system, where pressurized air from the compressor passes into the space and occupies the space and then flows to the fuel cells in the subassembly module, where the air accumulation space provides an accumulator to control any unreacted fuel gas that might flow from the module.

  17. Approaches to New Endcaps for Improved Oxidation Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1999-01-01

    Norbornenyl-end capped PMR polyimide resins are widely used as polymer matrix composite materials for aircraft engine applications, since they combine ease of processing with good oxidative stability up to 300 C. PMR resins are prepared by a two-step approach involving the initial formation of oligomeric pre-polymers capped at both ends by a latent reactive end cap. The end cap undergoes cross-linking during higher temperature processing, producing the desired low density, high specific strength materials, for PMR- 15. The end cap facilitates processing by controlling the molecular weight of the oligomer and allowing flow before it cross-links. However, after cross-linking, this very end cap accounts for much of the weight loss in the polymer on aging in air at elevated temperatures. Understanding this degradation provides clues for designing new end caps to slow down degradation, and prolong the lifetime of the material.

  18. Increase in whole-body peripheral vascular resistance during three hours of air or oxygen prebreathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Conkin, J.; Dierlam, J. J.; Stanford, J., Jr.; Riddle, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Male and female subjects prebreathed air or 100% oxygen through a mask for 3.0 hours while comfortably reclined. Blood pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output were collected before and after the prebreathe. Peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) was calculated from these parameters and increased by 29% during oxygen prebreathing and 15% during air prebreathing. The oxygen contributed substantially to the increase in PVR. Diastolic blood pressure increased by 18% during the oxygen prebreathe while stystolic blood pressure showed no change under either procedure. The increase in PVR during air prebreathing was attributed to procedural stress common to air and oxygen prebreathing.

  19. Projectile Paths Corrected for Recoil and Air Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, H. R.

    1986-01-01

    Shows that the angle of projection of a bullet is not the same as the angle of the bore of the firearm just before firing. Includes an equation that is useful when considering the firing of bullets and arrows in the air. (JN)

  20. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will be... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type...

  1. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will be... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type...

  2. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will be... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type...

  3. Role of Y in the oxidation resistance of CrAlYN coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Meister, S.; El Mrabet, S.; Escobar-Galindo, R.; Mariscal, A.; Jiménez de Haro, M. C.; Justo, A.; Brizuela, M.; Rojas, T. C.; Sánchez-López, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    CrAlYN coatings with different aluminum (4-12 at.%) and yttrium (2-5 at.%) contents are deposited by d.c. reactive magnetron sputtering on silicon and M2 steel substrates using metallic targets and Ar/N2 mixtures. The influence of the nanostructure and chemical elemental distribution on the oxidation resistance after heating in air at 1000 °C is studied by means of cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (X-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES). The sequential exposure to the metallic targets during the synthesis leads to a multilayer structure where concentration of metallic elements (Cr, Al and Y) is changing periodically. A good oxidation resistance is observed when Al- and Y-rich regions are separated by well-defined CrN layers, maintaining crystalline coherence along the columnar structure. This protective behavior is independent of the type of substrate and corresponds to the formation of a thin mixed (Al, Cr)-oxide scale that protects the film underneath. The GD-OES and XRD analysis have demonstrated that Y acts as a reactive element, blocking the Fe and C atoms diffusion from the steel and favoring higher Al/Cr ratio in the passivation layer after heating. The coating with Y content around 4 at.% exhibited the best performance with a thinner oxide scale, a delay in the CrN decomposition and transformation to Cr2N, and a more effective Fe and C blocking.

  4. Effect of SO2 Addition on Air Oxidation Behavior of CM247 and CMSX-4 at 1050°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalowicka, A.; Nowak, W. J.; Naumenko, D.; Quadakkers, W. J.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, the oxidation behavior of two commercial Ni-base superalloys, CMSX-4 and CM247, in synthetic air with and without 2 vol.% SO2 at 1050°C has been studied. The corrosion reactions in the presence of SO2 could not be explained simply in terms of the contents of the main scale-forming alloying elements, Cr and Al. The far better resistance of CMSX-4 is related to the formation of a rather pure and dense alumina scale after a very short period of transient oxidation. Rapid development of an alumina scale prevents access of molecular SO2 to the metal surface thus effectively suppressing internal sulfidation. In contrast, CM247 with a similar Al-content formed an Al-rich oxide scale with local intrusions and/or inhomogeneities caused by the underlying alloy microstructure, which deteriorated its resistance to internal sulfidation and resulted in rapid failure in synthetic air + 2% SO2.

  5. Materials selection for oxide-based resistive random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-12-01

    The energies of atomic processes in resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are calculated for four typical oxides, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, to define a materials selection process. O vacancies have the lowest defect formation energy in the O-poor limit and dominate the processes. A band diagram defines the operating Fermi energy and O chemical potential range. It is shown how the scavenger metal can be used to vary the O vacancy formation energy, via controlling the O chemical potential, and the mean Fermi energy. The high endurance of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} RRAM is related to its more stable amorphous phase and the adaptive lattice rearrangements of its O vacancy.

  6. Oxidation resistant coatings for ceramic matrix composite components

    SciTech Connect

    Vaubert, V.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Hirschfeld, D.A.

    1998-11-01

    Corrosion resistant Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CMZP) and Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CS-50) coatings for fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchanger tubes have been developed. Aqueous slurries of both oxides were prepared with high solids loading. One coating process consisted of dipping the samples in a slip. A tape casting process has also been created that produced relatively thin and dense coatings covering a large area. A processing technique was developed, utilizing a pre-sintering step, which produced coatings with minimal cracking.

  7. Formation of Oxidation-Resistant Cu-Mg Coatings on (001) Cu for Oxide Superconducting Tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Norton, David P.; Christen, David K; Budai, John D

    2008-01-01

    The formation of oxidation-resistant buffer layers on (001) oriented Cu for coated high-temperature superconducting tape applications was investigated. The approach employed Cu/Mg multilayer precursor films that were subsequently annealed to form either Mg-doped fcc Cu or intermetallic Cu2 Mg. The precursor consisted of an Mg/Cu multilayer stack with 5 each of 25 nm thick Mg and 25 nm thick Cu layers which were grown at room temperature by sputter deposition. At annealing temperature of 400 C, formation of the intermetallic Cu2 Mg was observed. X-ray diffraction showed that the Cu2 Mg (100) oriented grains were epitaxial with respect to the underlying Cu film, possessing a cube-on-cube orientation. In order to test oxidation resistance, CeO2 films were deposited at elevated temperature on Ni/(Cu,Mg)/Cu/MgO structures. In case of the CeO2 film on Ni/Cu/MgO, significant surface roughness due to the metal oxidation is observed. In contrast, no surface roughness is observed in the SEM images for the CeO2/Ni/(Cu,Mg)/Cu/MgO structure.

  8. REGULATION OF OBESITY AND INSULIN RESISTANCE BY NITRIC OXIDE

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has quickly become a world-wide pandemic with few tangible and safe treatment options. While it is generally accepted that the primary cause of obesity is energy imbalance, i.e., the calories consumed are greater than are utilized, understanding how caloric balance is regulated has proven a challenge. Many “distal” causes of obesity, such as the structural environment, occupation, and social influences, are exceedingly difficult to change or manipulate. Hence, molecular processes and pathways more proximal to the origins of obesity—those that directly regulate energy metabolism or caloric intake—appear to be more feasible targets for therapy. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as a central regulator of energy metabolism and body composition. NO bioavailability is decreased in animal models of diet-induced obesity and in obese and insulin resistant patients, and increasing NO output has remarkable effects on obesity and insulin resistance. This review discusses the role of NO in regulating adiposity and insulin sensitivity and places its modes of action into context with the known causes and consequences of metabolic disease. PMID:24878261

  9. Compartmentalized nitric oxide signaling in the resistance vasculature.

    PubMed

    Mutchler, Stephanie M; Straub, Adam C

    2015-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) was first described as a bioactive molecule through its ability to stimulate soluble guanylate cyclase, but the revelation that NO was the endothelium derived relaxation factor drove the field to its modern state. The wealth of research conducted over the past 30 years has provided us with a picture of how diverse NO signaling can be within the vascular wall, going beyond simple vasodilation to include such roles as signaling through protein S-nitrosation. This expanded view of NO's actions requires highly regulated and compartmentalized production. Importantly, resistance arteries house multiple proteins involved in the production and transduction of NO allowing for efficient movement of the molecule to regulate vascular tone and reactivity. In this review, we focus on the many mechanisms regulating NO production and signaling action in the vascular wall, with a focus on the control of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the enzyme responsible for synthesizing most of the NO within these confines. We also explore how cross talk between the endothelium and smooth muscle in the microcirculation can modulate NO signaling, illustrating that this one small molecule has the capability to produce a plethora of responses.

  10. FOXO transcription factors support oxidative stress resistance in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Akasaki, Yukio; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Saito, Masahiko; Caramés, Beatriz; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Lotz, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A major signaling pathway that regulates cellular aging is the Insulin/IGF-1/Pl3k/Akt/forkhead-box class O (FOXO) transcription factor axis. Previously, we observed that FOXO factors are dysregulated in aged and OA cartilage. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of downregulated FOXOs on chondrocytes. Methods Small interference RNAs (siRNAs) for FOXO1 and FOXO3 were transfected into human articular chondrocytes. Cell viability following treatment with the oxidant tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) was measured by MTT assay. Caspase-3/7 activation and apoptotic cell were examined. Gene and protein expression of antioxidant proteins and autophagy related proteins and changes in inflammatory mediators following treatment with IL-1β were analyzed. Cells transfected with FOXO plasmids were also analyzed. Results Cell viability was significantly reduced by siFOXO under treatment with t-BHP. Apoptosis accompanied by caspase activation was significantly induced in FOXO-siRNA transfected chondrocytes. Knock-down of FOXO1 and FOXO1+3 resulted in significant reductions of GPX-1, catalase, LC3, Beclin1, and SIRT1 proteins following treatment with t-BHP. In contrast, constitutive active form of FOXO 3 increased cell viability while inducing GPX1, Beclin1, and LC3 in response to t-BHP. Expression and production of ADAMTS-4 and Chemerin were significantly increased in FOXO-siRNA transfected chondrocytes. Conclusions Reduced expression of FOXO transcription factors in chondrocytes increased susceptibility to cell death induced by oxidative stress. This was associated with reduced antioxidant proteins and autophagy related proteins. Our data provide evidence for a key role of FOXO transcription factors as regulators of chondrocyte oxidative stress resistance and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25186470

  11. Reaction rate constant for dry air oxidation of K Basin fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, D.J.

    1998-04-29

    The rate of oxidation of spent nuclear fuel stored in the K Basin water is an important parameter when assessing the processes and accident scenarios for preparing the fuel for dry storage. The literature provides data and rate laws for the oxidation of unirradiated uranium in various environments. Measurement data for the dry air oxidation of K Basin fuel is compared to the literature data for linear oxidation in dry air. Equations for the correlations and statistical bounds to the K Basin fuel data and the literature data are selected for predicting nominal and bounding rates for the dry air oxidation of the K Basin fuel. These rate equations are intended for use in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Technical Data book.

  12. Synthesis of oxidation resistant lead nanoparticle films by modified pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Eunsung; Murray, P. Terrence; Subramanyam, Guru; Malik, Hans K.; Schwartz, Kenneth L.

    2012-07-30

    Thin layers of lead nanoparticles have been produced by a modified pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process in which smaller nanoparticles were swept out of the ablation chamber by a stream of flowing Ar. Large ({mu}m-sized) particles, which are usually deposited during the standard PLA process, were successfully eliminated from the deposit. The nanoparticles deposited on room temperature substrates were well distributed, and the most probable particle diameter was in the order of 30 nm. Since lead is highly reactive, the nanoparticles formed in Ar were quickly oxidized upon exposure to air. A small partial pressure of H{sub 2}S gas was subsequently added to the effluent, downstream from the ablation chamber, and this resulted in the formation of nanoparticle deposits that were surprisingly oxidation resistant. The properties of the nanoparticle films (as determined by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and conductivity measurements) are reported, and the mechanism of the oxidation retardation process is discussed.

  13. Producing nitric oxide by pulsed electrical discharge in air for portable inhalation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binglan; Muenster, Stefan; Blaesi, Aron H; Bloch, Donald B; Zapol, Warren M

    2015-07-01

    Inhalation of nitric oxide (NO) produces selective pulmonary vasodilation and is an effective therapy for treating pulmonary hypertension in adults and children. In the United States, the average cost of 5 days of inhaled NO for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is about $14,000. NO therapy involves gas cylinders and distribution, a complex delivery device, gas monitoring and calibration equipment, and a trained respiratory therapy staff. The objective of this study was to develop a lightweight, portable device to serve as a simple and economical method of producing pure NO from air for bedside or portable use. Two NO generators were designed and tested: an offline NO generator and an inline NO generator placed directly within the inspiratory line. Both generators use pulsed electrical discharges to produce therapeutic range NO (5 to 80 parts per million) at gas flow rates of 0.5 to 5 liters/min. NO was produced from air, as well as gas mixtures containing up to 90% O2 and 10% N2. Potentially toxic gases produced in the plasma, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), were removed using a calcium hydroxide scavenger. An iridium spark electrode produced the lowest ratio of NO2/NO. In lambs with acute pulmonary hypertension, breathing electrically generated NO produced pulmonary vasodilation and reduced pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance index. In conclusion, electrical plasma NO generation produces therapeutic levels of NO from air. After scavenging to remove NO2 and O3 and filtration to remove particles, electrically produced NO can provide safe and effective treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26136478

  14. Producing nitric oxide by pulsed electrical discharge in air for portable inhalation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binglan; Muenster, Stefan; Blaesi, Aron H; Bloch, Donald B; Zapol, Warren M

    2015-07-01

    Inhalation of nitric oxide (NO) produces selective pulmonary vasodilation and is an effective therapy for treating pulmonary hypertension in adults and children. In the United States, the average cost of 5 days of inhaled NO for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is about $14,000. NO therapy involves gas cylinders and distribution, a complex delivery device, gas monitoring and calibration equipment, and a trained respiratory therapy staff. The objective of this study was to develop a lightweight, portable device to serve as a simple and economical method of producing pure NO from air for bedside or portable use. Two NO generators were designed and tested: an offline NO generator and an inline NO generator placed directly within the inspiratory line. Both generators use pulsed electrical discharges to produce therapeutic range NO (5 to 80 parts per million) at gas flow rates of 0.5 to 5 liters/min. NO was produced from air, as well as gas mixtures containing up to 90% O2 and 10% N2. Potentially toxic gases produced in the plasma, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), were removed using a calcium hydroxide scavenger. An iridium spark electrode produced the lowest ratio of NO2/NO. In lambs with acute pulmonary hypertension, breathing electrically generated NO produced pulmonary vasodilation and reduced pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance index. In conclusion, electrical plasma NO generation produces therapeutic levels of NO from air. After scavenging to remove NO2 and O3 and filtration to remove particles, electrically produced NO can provide safe and effective treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  15. Oxidation Behavior and Chlorination Treatment to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Behrani, Vikas

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is written in an alternate format. The thesis is composed of a general introduction, two original manuscripts, and a general conclusion. References cited within each chapter are given at the end of each chapter. The general introduction starts with the driving force behind this research, and gives an overview of previous work on boron doped molybdenum silicides, Nb/Nb5Si3 composites, boron modified niobium silicides and molybdenum niobium silicides. Chapter 2 focuses on the oxidation behavior of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 3 contains studies on a novel chlorination technique to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 4 summarizes the important results in this study.

  16. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  17. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  18. Effects of oxides of nitrogen on California air quality. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The report was written because of California Air Resources Board concerns about the multiple effects of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions on California air quality. The deleterious effects are expected to increase because NOx emissions are expected to increase in 1990's. The report discusses six major products of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions: nitrogen dioxide, ozone, particulate nitrates, acid deposition, visibility impairment, other nitrogen compounds. For each product, the report describes health and welfare effects, atmospheric chemistry by which NOx emissions are transformed into various air pollutants, relevant ambient air quality standards, ambient concentrations measured in California, and status in attaining ambient air standards. Because ozone is California's most severe air pollution problem, the report discusses in depth the relationship of NOx and ozone. In most areas of California, ozone strategies have reduced hydrocarbon emissions while maintaining NOx emissions. Evidence is increasing that reduction of NOx emissions also reduces ozone.

  19. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Second External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This second external review draft of the Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants, Volumes I-III (Ozone Criteria Document) is being released for public comment and for review by EPA's Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) r...

  20. Air pollution effects on the guard cells of the injury resistant leaf of Laurus nobilis L

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulakis, N.S. )

    1993-09-01

    The need for cleaner air has led to detailed investigations not only on the sources and types of air pollutants but also on the effect that these compounds have on various life forms. The plants are the first [open quotes]victims[close quotes] of the air pollutants. Extensive literature exists on the structural damages and functional problems that plants suffer after being exposed to air pollutants. Many investigators prefer to deal with damages, caused to various organs, in plants growing in non polluted environments, after being fumigated with certain air pollutants. Others investigate the problems in plants growing in polluted areas thus being subject to long-term exposure to air pollutants. Generally it seems that primary producers suffer injuries, most of the time serious, that finally lead to the suppression of photosynthesis with all the undesirable consequences that this situation has for the ecosystem. Unfortunately Athens is not only the most polluted city in Greece but also an example to be avoided among the most polluted cities in the world. Serious problems occur in plants living in this environment. One exception is Laurus nobilis, introduced as an injury resistant species. These researchers studied the plant cells and the structure of their organelles, focusing on the guard cells of the leaves. They occur on the underside of leaves and they are directly affected by polluted air. Studies show that the air pollution injury resistance of Laurus is genetic. 25 refs., 21 figs

  1. Effect of fuel-air-ratio nonuniformity on emissions of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1981-01-01

    The inlet fuel-air ratio nonuniformity is studied to deterine how nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions are affected. An increase in NOx emissions with increased fuel-air ratio nonuniformity for average equivalence ratios less than 0.7 and a decrease in NOx emissions for average equivalence ratios near stoichiometric is predicted. The degree of uniformityy of fuel-air ratio profiles that is necessary to achieve NOx emissions goals for actual engines that use lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion systems is determined.

  2. Measurement of the resistivity of porous materials with an alternating air-flow method.

    PubMed

    Dragonetti, Raffaele; Ianniello, Carmine; Romano, Rosario A

    2011-02-01

    Air-flow resistivity is a main parameter governing the acoustic behavior of porous materials for sound absorption. The international standard ISO 9053 specifies two different methods to measure the air-flow resistivity, namely a steady-state air-flow method and an alternating air-flow method. The latter is realized by the measurement of the sound pressure at 2 Hz in a small rigid volume closed partially by the test sample. This cavity is excited with a known volume-velocity sound source implemented often with a motor-driven piston oscillating with prescribed area and displacement magnitude. Measurements at 2 Hz require special instrumentation and care. The authors suggest an alternating air-flow method based on the ratio of sound pressures measured at frequencies higher than 2 Hz inside two cavities coupled through a conventional loudspeaker. The basic method showed that the imaginary part of the sound pressure ratio is useful for the evaluation of the air-flow resistance. Criteria are discussed about the choice of a frequency range suitable to perform simplified calculations with respect to the basic method. These criteria depend on the sample thickness, its nonacoustic parameters, and the measurement apparatus as well. The proposed measurement method was tested successfully with various types of acoustic materials.

  3. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION CREATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  4. INCONEL{reg_sign} alloy 783: An oxidation-resistant, low expansion superalloy for gas turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Heck, K.A.; Smith, J.S.; Smith, R.

    1998-04-01

    INCONEL{reg_sign} alloy 783 is an oxidation-resistant low coefficient of thermal expansion (low CTE) superalloy developed for gas turbine applications. Turbine efficiency can be increased through the use of low-CTE shrouds and case components that maintain tight blade tip clearances at different turbine operating temperatures. To achieve low CTE, alloys based on Ni-Fe-Co compositions require Cr content be maintained at low levels. Added Cr lowers the Curie temperature and thereby increases thermal expansion rate over a wider temperature range. The necessary lack of Cr minimizes resistance to both general oxidation and stress-accelerated grain boundary oxygen enhanced cracking (SAGBO). Increased amounts of Al in alloys strengthened by {gamma}{prime} alone also promotes SAGBO. Alloy 783 is the culmination in the development of an alloy system with very high aluminum content that, in addition to forming {gamma}{prime}, causes {beta} aluminide phase precipitation in the austenitic matrix. It was discovered that this type of structure can be processed to resist both SAGBO and general oxidation, while providing low thermal expansion and useful mechanical properties up to 700 C. The high Al content also reduces density to 5% below that of superalloys such as INCONEL alloy 718. Key aspects of the alloy development are presented, including the assessment of SAGBO resistance by evaluating elevated temperature crack growth in air. The alloy, now commercially available, has been successfully fabricated and welded into gas turbine engine components.

  5. Systematic investigation of the synthesis, characterization and switching mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticle resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siauw, Meiliana; Du, Ke; Valade, David; Trefonas, Peter; Thackeray, James W.; Whittaker, Andrew; Blakey, Idriss

    2016-03-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticle resists have recently emerged as next generation photoresist materials which exhibit promising performance for extreme ultraviolet lithography. In this present work, we are able to show our ability to synthesize and well characterize small uniform metal oxide nanoparticles, to present stability study of the nanoparticles in the resist solvent over time, to pattern ~20 nm features by electron beam lithography, and to provide an insight into the insolubilization mechanism of the resist system.

  6. Thermal Stabilization of Polycubes by Air Oxidation Results of Testing Unirradiated Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY, G.S.

    2000-05-01

    Polystyrene samples were tested to determine if the polycubes stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant could be stabilized safely by a thermal air oxidation process using existing production furnaces. Polycubes are compression-molded mixtures of plutonium oxide and/or uranium oxide in a polystyrene matrix. The irradiated polystyrene that forms the matrix of the polycubes will be high and crosslinked because of radiolysis. The behavior of the crosslinked polystyrene used in most of the tests reported here (polystyrene--8% divinyl benzene) appears to imitate polystyrene crosslinked by radiation. This material is more stable toward pyrolysis, is more reactive with oxygen, and produces more carbonaceous char and less flammable gas during oxidation than non-crosslinked polystyrene. The testing showed that air oxidation of polystyrene begins when it is heated to about 200 C in air. The more highly crosslinked polystyrene is oxidized more complete, and at lower temperatures. Pyrolysis is first observed at about 350 C in air and both oxidation and pyrolysis reactions occur simultaneously until about 420 C is reached, where the remaining carbonaceous chnr begins to oxidize. Oxidation is essentially complete in air at about 550 C. The gases evolved in the early stages of heating are mainly oxidation products (water, carbon dioxide, and benzaldehyde). When pyrolysis begins, a mixture of these oxidation products and hydrocarbon pyrolysis products (styrene, benzene, toluene, and indane) are evolved. The char oxidation step yields only carbon dioxide and water. The overall yields of gas were about 87% by weight oxidation products and 13% pyrolysis products. Concentrations of flammable hydrocarbon pyrolysis gases under normal operating conditions are estimated to be less than 5% of the lower Flammability limit. Benzaldehyde concentrations could be as high as 46% of the lower flammability limit, depending on the heating rate and the number of polycubes being processed. These

  7. Generation and annihilation of traps in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices after negative air corona charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ila; Srivastava, R. S.

    1993-07-01

    Surface and bulk traps along with positive oxide charge accumulation have been found to be generated in metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors, when subjected to negative air corona discharge at slightly reduced pressure (≂10-1 Torr). The effects are neutralized and device quality improved when annealed at 200 °C in air. The bulk traps and a fraction of oxide charges were annealable when kept at room temperature for several months. The results have been analyzed by Nicollian-Goetzberger's conductance technique and a plausible explanation is given.

  8. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  9. Higher in vitro resistance to oxidative stress in extra-pair offspring.

    PubMed

    Losdat, S; Helfenstein, F; Saladin, V; Richner, H

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to act as a universal physiological constraint in life-history evolution of animals. This should be of interest for extra-pair paternity behaviour, and we tested here the prediction that offspring arising from extra-pair matings of female great tits show higher resistance to oxidative stress than within-pair offspring. Resistance to oxidative stress, measured as the whole blood resistance to a controlled free-radical attack, was significantly higher for extra-pair offspring as predicted although these were not heavier or in better body condition than within-pair offspring. Since resistance to oxidative stress has been suggested to enhance survival and reproductive rates, extra-pair offspring with superior resistance to oxidative stress, be it through maternal effects or paternal inheritance, may achieve higher fitness and thus provide significant indirect fitness benefits to their mothers. In addition, because oxidative stress affects colour signals and sperm traits, females may also gain fitness benefits by producing sons that are more attractive (sexy-sons hypothesis) and have sperm of superior quality (sexy-sperm hypothesis). Heritability of resistance to oxidative stress as well as maternal effects may both act as proximate mechanisms for the observed result. Disentangling these two mechanisms would require an experimental approach. Future long-term studies should also aim at experimentally testing whether higher resistance to oxidative stress of EP nestlings indeed translates into fitness benefits to females.

  10. Higher in vitro resistance to oxidative stress in extra-pair offspring.

    PubMed

    Losdat, S; Helfenstein, F; Saladin, V; Richner, H

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to act as a universal physiological constraint in life-history evolution of animals. This should be of interest for extra-pair paternity behaviour, and we tested here the prediction that offspring arising from extra-pair matings of female great tits show higher resistance to oxidative stress than within-pair offspring. Resistance to oxidative stress, measured as the whole blood resistance to a controlled free-radical attack, was significantly higher for extra-pair offspring as predicted although these were not heavier or in better body condition than within-pair offspring. Since resistance to oxidative stress has been suggested to enhance survival and reproductive rates, extra-pair offspring with superior resistance to oxidative stress, be it through maternal effects or paternal inheritance, may achieve higher fitness and thus provide significant indirect fitness benefits to their mothers. In addition, because oxidative stress affects colour signals and sperm traits, females may also gain fitness benefits by producing sons that are more attractive (sexy-sons hypothesis) and have sperm of superior quality (sexy-sperm hypothesis). Heritability of resistance to oxidative stress as well as maternal effects may both act as proximate mechanisms for the observed result. Disentangling these two mechanisms would require an experimental approach. Future long-term studies should also aim at experimentally testing whether higher resistance to oxidative stress of EP nestlings indeed translates into fitness benefits to females. PMID:21899636

  11. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated in a Buenos Aires hospital].

    PubMed

    Cejas, D; Almuzara, M; Santella, G; Tuduri, A; Palombarani, S; Figueroa, S; Gutkind, G; Radice, M

    2008-01-01

    From 129 P. aeruginosa isolated at a health care centre located in Buenos Aires (Hospital "Eva Perón"), 14% produced IMP-13. Although 18 isolates were metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL) producers, only those isolates that displayed altered outer membrane protein profiles correlated with the resistant category according to CLSI or even Subcomisión de Antimicrobianos, SADEBAC, AAM. Phenotypic screening of metallo-beta-lactamases proved to be appropriate for detecting MBL producing isolates. IMP-13 producing isolates corresponded to at least five different clonal types, which not only suggests the dissemination of the resistant strain but also of the resistant marker.

  12. 77 FR 63827 - Request for Nominations of Experts for the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... of Nitrogen Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Review Panel AGENCY: Environmental... the chartered CASAC on primary (human health-based) air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (NO X... six ``criteria'' air pollutants, including oxides of nitrogen. As a Federal Advisory Committee,...

  13. An error-resistant linguistic protocol for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushing, Steven

    1989-01-01

    The research results described here are intended to enhance the effectiveness of the DATALINK interface that is scheduled by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to be deployed during the 1990's to improve the safety of various aspects of aviation. While voice has a natural appeal as the preferred means of communication both among humans themselves and between humans and machines as the form of communication that people find most convenient, the complexity and flexibility of natural language are problematic, because of the confusions and misunderstandings that can arise as a result of ambiguity, unclear reference, intonation peculiarities, implicit inference, and presupposition. The DATALINK interface will avoid many of these problems by replacing voice with vision and speech with written instructions. This report describes results achieved to date on an on-going research effort to refine the protocol of the DATALINK system so as to avoid many of the linguistic problems that still remain in the visual mode. In particular, a working prototype DATALINK simulator system has been developed consisting of an unambiguous, context-free grammar and parser, based on the current air-traffic-control language and incorporated into a visual display involving simulated touch-screen buttons and three levels of menu screens. The system is written in the C programming language and runs on the Macintosh II computer. After reviewing work already done on the project, new tasks for further development are described.

  14. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  15. Resistive Switching and Memory effects in Silicon Oxide Based Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun

    Silicon oxide (SiOx 1 < x ≦2) has long been used and considered as a passive and insulating component in the construction of electronic devices. In contrast, here the active role of SiOx in constructing a type of resistive switching memory is studied. From electrode-independent electrical behaviors to the visualization of the conducting filament inside the SiOx matrix, the intrinsic switching picture in SiOx is gradually revealed. The thesis starts with the introduction of some similar phenomenological switching behaviors in different electronic structures (Chapter 1), and then generalizes the electrode-material-independent electrical behaviors on SiOx substrates, providing indirect evidence to the intrinsic SiOx switching (Chapter 2). From planar nanogap systems to vertical sandwiched structures, Chapter 3 further discusses the switching behaviors and properties in SiOx. By localization of the switching site, the conducting filament in SiOx is visualized under transmission electron microscope using both static and in situ imaging methods (Chapter 4). With the intrinsic conduction and switching in SiO x largely revealed, Chapter 5 discusses its impact and implications to the molecular electronics and nanoelectronics where SiOx is constantly used. As comparison, another type of memory effect in semiconductors (carbon nanotubes) based on charge trapping at the semiconductor/SiO x interface is discussed (Chapter 6).

  16. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  17. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  18. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  19. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  20. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  1. Increasing trends in primary NNRTI resistance among newly HIV-1-diagnosed individuals in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Duran, Adriana; Bouzas, María Belen; Zapiola, Ines; Vila, Marcelo; Indyk, Debbie; Bissio, Emiliano; Salomon, Horacio; Dilernia, Dario A

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to estimate primary resistance in an urban setting in a developing country characterized by high antiretroviral (ARV) coverage over the diagnosed population and also by an important proportion of undiagnosed individuals, in order to determine whether any change in primary resistance occurred in the past five years. Design We carried out a multi-site resistance surveillance study according to WHO HIV resistance guidelines, using a weighted sampling technique based on annual HIV case reports per site. Methods Blood samples were collected from 197 drug-naive HIV-1-infected individuals diagnosed between March 2010 and August 2011 at 20 HIV voluntary counselling and testing centres in Buenos Aires. Clinical records of enrolled patients at the time of diagnosis were compiled. Viral load and CD4 counts were performed on all samples. The pol gene was sequenced and the resistance profile determined. Phylogenetic analysis was performed by neighbour-joining (NJ) trees and bootscanning analysis. Results We found that 12 (7.9%) of the 152 successfully sequenced samples harboured primary resistance mutations, of which K103N and G190A were the most prevalent. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) resistance mutations were largely the most prevalent (5.9%), accounting for 75% of all primary resistance and exhibiting a significant increase (p=0.0072) in prevalence during the past 10 years as compared to our previous study performed in 1997–2000 and in 2003–2005. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and protease inhibitor primary resistance were low and similar to the one previously reported. Conclusions Levels of primary NNRTI resistance in Buenos Aires appear to be increasing in the context of a sustained ARV coverage and a high proportion of undiagnosed HIV-positive individuals. PMID:24093951

  2. A review of wet air oxidation and Thermal Hydrolysis technologies in sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Hii, Kevin; Baroutian, Saeid; Parthasarathy, Raj; Gapes, Daniel J; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2014-03-01

    With rapid world population growth and strict environmental regulations, increasingly large volumes of sludge are being produced in today's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) with limited disposal routes. Sludge treatment has become an essential process in WWTP, representing 50% of operational costs. Sludge destruction and resource recovery technologies are therefore of great ongoing interest. Hydrothermal processing uses unique characteristics of water at elevated temperatures and pressures to deconstruct organic and inorganic components of sludge. It can be broadly categorized into wet oxidation (oxidative) and thermal hydrolysis (non-oxidative). While wet air oxidation (WAO) can be used for the final sludge destruction and also potentially producing industrially useful by-products such as acetic acid, thermal hydrolysis (TH) is mainly used as a pre-treatment method to improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion. This paper reviews current hydrothermal technologies, roles of wet air oxidation and thermal hydrolysis in sludge treatment, and challenges faced by these technologies.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Major Phytochemicals in Orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis), Oxidized under Compressed Air Environment.

    PubMed

    Panda, Brajesh Kumar; Datta, Ashis Kumar

    2016-04-01

    This study describes major changes in phytochemical composition of orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis var. Assamica) oxidized under compressed air (CA). The experiments for oxidation were conducted under air pressure (101, 202, and 303 kPa) for 150 min. Relative change in the concentrations of caffeine, catechins, theaflavins (TF), and thearubigins (TR) were analyzed. Effect of CA pressure was found to be nonsignificant in regulating caffeine concentration during oxidation. But degradation in different catechins as well as formation of different TF was significantly affected by CA pressure. At high CA pressure, TF showed highest peak value. TR was found to have slower rate of formation during initial phase of oxidation than TF. Even though the rate of TR formation was significantly influenced by CA, a portion of catechins remained unoxidized at end of oxidation. Except caffeine, the percent change in rate of formation or degradation were more prominent at 202 kPa.

  4. Air Oxidation of Activated Carbon to Synthesize a Biomimetic Catalyst for Hydrolysis of Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Shrotri, Abhijit; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Oxygenated carbon catalyzes the hydrolysis of cellulose present in lignocellulosic biomass by utilizing the weakly acidic functional groups on its surface. Here we report the synthesis of a biomimetic carbon catalyst by simple and economical air-oxidation of a commercially available activated carbon. Air- oxidation at 450-500 °C introduced 2000-2400 μmol g(-1) of oxygenated functional groups on the material with minor changes in the textural properties. Selectivity towards the formation of carboxylic groups on the catalyst surface increased with the increase in oxidation temperature. The degree of oxidation on carbon catalyst was found to be proportional to its activity for hydrolysis of cellulose. The hydrolysis of eucalyptus in the presence of carbon oxidized at 475 °C afforded glucose yield of 77 % and xylose yield of 67 %.

  5. Oxidation Behaviors of Inconel 740H in Air and Dynamic Steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jintao; Yang, Zhen; Xu, Songqian; Zhao, Haiping; Gu, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Inconel 740H alloy is a candidate material for 700°C advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal-fired power plants application as superheater/reheater tube. In this work, oxidation behavior of Inconel 740H alloy was studied in static air at 750°C and 850°C, and in dynamic pure steam at 750°C, respectively. The alloy was oxidized approximately following a parabolic law in three test environment. In the static air, the oxidation rate at 850°C was about 50 times of that at the 750°C. More NiCrMn spinal and TiO2 were detected after oxidation at 850°C. Cr2O3, however, was the main oxidation product at 750°C. In the pure steam, Cr2O3 was still the main oxidation product. The oxidation rate was about 2.6 times of that in static air, but the surface roughness was much smaller and edges of oxide particles were more blurred. There was no evidence of cracks or spallation in three test environments.

  6. Preparation, certification and interlaboratory analysis of workplace air filters spiked with high-fired beryllium oxide.

    PubMed

    Oatts, Thomas J; Hicks, Cheryl E; Adams, Amy R; Brisson, Michael J; Youmans-McDonald, Linda D; Hoover, Mark D; Ashley, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Occupational sampling and analysis for multiple elements is generally approached using various approved methods from authoritative government sources such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as well as consensus standards bodies such as ASTM International. The constituents of a sample can exist as unidentified compounds requiring sample preparation to be chosen appropriately, as in the case of beryllium in the form of beryllium oxide (BeO). An interlaboratory study was performed to collect analytical data from volunteer laboratories to examine the effectiveness of methods currently in use for preparation and analysis of samples containing calcined BeO powder. NIST SRM(®) 1877 high-fired BeO powder (1100 to 1200 °C calcining temperature; count median primary particle diameter 0.12 μm) was used to spike air filter media as a representative form of beryllium particulate matter present in workplace sampling that is known to be resistant to dissolution. The BeO powder standard reference material was gravimetrically prepared in a suspension and deposited onto 37 mm mixed cellulose ester air filters at five different levels between 0.5 μg and 25 μg of Be (as BeO). Sample sets consisting of five BeO-spiked filters (in duplicate) and two blank filters, for a total of twelve unique air filter samples per set, were submitted as blind samples to each of 27 participating laboratories. Participants were instructed to follow their current process for sample preparation and utilize their normal analytical methods for processing samples containing substances of this nature. Laboratories using more than one sample preparation and analysis method were provided with more than one sample set. Results from 34 data sets ultimately received from the 27 volunteer laboratories were subjected to applicable statistical analyses. The observed

  7. Preparation, certification and interlaboratory analysis of workplace air filters spiked with high-fired beryllium oxide.

    PubMed

    Oatts, Thomas J; Hicks, Cheryl E; Adams, Amy R; Brisson, Michael J; Youmans-McDonald, Linda D; Hoover, Mark D; Ashley, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Occupational sampling and analysis for multiple elements is generally approached using various approved methods from authoritative government sources such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as well as consensus standards bodies such as ASTM International. The constituents of a sample can exist as unidentified compounds requiring sample preparation to be chosen appropriately, as in the case of beryllium in the form of beryllium oxide (BeO). An interlaboratory study was performed to collect analytical data from volunteer laboratories to examine the effectiveness of methods currently in use for preparation and analysis of samples containing calcined BeO powder. NIST SRM(®) 1877 high-fired BeO powder (1100 to 1200 °C calcining temperature; count median primary particle diameter 0.12 μm) was used to spike air filter media as a representative form of beryllium particulate matter present in workplace sampling that is known to be resistant to dissolution. The BeO powder standard reference material was gravimetrically prepared in a suspension and deposited onto 37 mm mixed cellulose ester air filters at five different levels between 0.5 μg and 25 μg of Be (as BeO). Sample sets consisting of five BeO-spiked filters (in duplicate) and two blank filters, for a total of twelve unique air filter samples per set, were submitted as blind samples to each of 27 participating laboratories. Participants were instructed to follow their current process for sample preparation and utilize their normal analytical methods for processing samples containing substances of this nature. Laboratories using more than one sample preparation and analysis method were provided with more than one sample set. Results from 34 data sets ultimately received from the 27 volunteer laboratories were subjected to applicable statistical analyses. The observed

  8. Preparation and oxidation resistance of single crystalline β-Zn4Sb3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-xia; Deng, Shu-ping; Li, De-cong; Shen, Lan-xian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Jin-song; Deng, Shu-kang

    2016-11-01

    This study prepared a Zn-rich single crystal β-Zn4Sb3 using a Sn flux method based on the stoichiometric ratios of Zn4.4Sb3Sn3. The oxidation resistance of the sample was determined by exploring the effects of heat treatment in air on electrical transport properties and thermal stability, which is of practical importance in the application of the material at high temperatures. Results showed that the prepared sample possessed high electrical transport properties, with a high power factor of 1.67×10-3 W m-1 K-2 at 563 K. The heat treatment in air weakened the electrical conductivity of the single crystalline β-Zn4Sb3, whereas the Seebeck coefficients were rarely independent of the annealing condition. Eventually, the power factor obtained after the first heating at 523 K for 4 h became comparable to that of the as-prepared sample, although it decreased after the second heating at 573 K for 5 h. Nevertheless, the single crystalline β-Zn4Sb3 still possessed a good thermal stability after the heat treatment process.

  9. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... exceed 50 millimeters (2 inches) of water at an air flow of 115 liters (4 cubic feet) per minute. (b) The exhalation resistance to a flow of air at a rate of 85 liters (3 cubic feet) per minute shall not exceed 25... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C...

  10. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84.153 Section 84.153 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  11. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84.153 Section 84.153 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  12. Investigating the air oxidation of V(II) ions in a vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamsai, Kittima; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2015-11-01

    The air oxidation of vanadium (V(II)) ions in a negative electrolyte reservoir is a major side reaction in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRB), which leads to electrolyte imbalance and self-discharge of the system during long-term operation. In this study, an 80% charged negative electrolyte solution is employed to investigate the mechanism and influential factors of the reaction in a negative-electrolyte reservoir. The results show that the air oxidation of V(II) ions occurs at the air-electrolyte solution interface area and leads to a concentration gradient of vanadium ions in the electrolyte solution and to the diffusion of V(II) and V(III) ions. The effect of the ratio of the electrolyte volume to the air-electrolyte solution interface area and the concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid in an electrolyte solution is investigated. A higher ratio of electrolyte volume to the air-electrolyte solution interface area results in a slower oxidation reaction rate. The high concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid solution also retard the air oxidation of V(II) ions. This information can be utilized to design an appropriate electrolyte reservoir for the VRB system and to prepare suitable ingredients for the electrolyte solution.

  13. Enhanced high temperature oxidization resistance of silica coated γ-Ce2S3 red pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shun-Guo; Li, Yue-Ming; Wang, Zhu-Mei; Shen, Zong-Yang; Xie, Zhi-Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Silica layer coated γ-Ce2S3 red pigments were successfully prepared based on a Stober method followed by a hydrogen-argon atmosphere heat treatment at 700 °C. The effect of water/ethanol volume ratio and tetraethoxysilane concentration on the microstructure of the coating layer and its high temperature oxidizing protection to pigments was investigated. A transparent silica coating layer with dense microstructure and about 60 nm thickness can provide a favorable protection for the red hue of the γ-Ce2S3 pigments. The oxidization resistant temperature was enhanced to 550 °C for the dense silica layer coated γ-Ce2S3 pigments as compared to ≤350 °C for the uncoated ones. A red color (L* = 29.59, a* = 27.53 and b* = 27.66) was still remained for such silica coated γ-Ce2S3 pigments after heated treated at 550 °C in air, indicating its potential for high temperature industrial applications.

  14. Emodin mitigates diesel exhaust particles-induced increase in airway resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Al-Salam, Suhail; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-08-15

    Clinical and experimental studies have reported that short-term exposure to particulate air pollution is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and impairment of lung function. Emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone) has a strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the possible ameliorative effect of emodin on diesel exhaust particles (DEP)-induced impairment of lung function, inflammation and oxidative stress in mice. Mice were intratracheally instilled with DEP (20 μg/mouse) or saline (control). Emodin was administered intraperitoneally 1h before and 7h after pulmonary exposure to DEP. Twenty-four hours following DEP exposure, we evaluated airway resistance measured by forced oscillation technique, lung inflammation and oxidative stress. Emodin treatment abated the DEP-induced increase in airway resistance, and prevented the influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Similarly, lung histopathology confirmed the protective effect of emodin on DEP-induced lung inflammation. DEP induced a significant increase of proinflammatory cytokines in the lung including tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6 and interleukin 1β. The latter effect was significantly ameliorated by emodin. DEP caused a significant increase in lung lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species and a significant decrease of reduced glutathione concentration. These effects were significantly mitigated by emodin. We conclude that emodin significantly mitigated DEP-induced increase of airway resistance, lung inflammation and oxidative stress. Pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, emodin may be considered a potentially useful pulmonary protective agent against particulate air pollution-induced lung toxicity.

  15. Crystal structure of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Mickaël; Alsarraf, Husam M A B; Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Laroche, Fabrice; Schack, Lotte; Spaink, Herman; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren

    2012-06-01

    The oxidation resistance proteins (OXR) help to protect eukaryotes from reactive oxygen species. The sole C-terminal domain of the OXR, named TLDc is sufficient to perform this function. However, the mechanism by which oxidation resistance occurs is poorly understood. We present here the crystal structure of the TLDc domain of the oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish. The structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to atomic resolution (0.97Å) and adopts an overall globular shape. Two antiparallel β-sheets form a central β-sandwich, surrounded by two helices and two one-turn helices. The fold shares low structural similarity to known structures. PMID:22434723

  16. Oxidation characteristics of 440 C CRES in gaseous oxygen (GOX) environments. [Corrosion Resistant Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennies, Daniel P.; Parsons, Terry D.

    1986-01-01

    The oxidation characteristics of 440 C corrosion-resistant steel are evaluated. The dependence of oxide color, type, and thickness, material hardness, and microstructure on temperature is examined. The effects of exposure time, passivation layer, and oxygen pressure on the oxide formation are investigated. A direct relationship between temperature and oxide color, formation, and thickness is detected. It is observed that the exposure time does not affect the microstructure or oxide color, type, or thickness; however, the passivation layer does affect oxide color and type.

  17. Crossflow air stripping with catalytic oxidation. Final report, 1 October 1990-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.C.; Gavaskar, A.R.; Ong, S.K.; Rosansky, S.H.; Cummings, C.A.

    1994-09-30

    A novel air stripping technique was tested on a pilot scale at Dover Air Force Base. Groundwater contaminated with 1,2-dichloroethane was subjected to air stripping in two towers: the novel crossflow tower and the conventional countercurrent tower. The crossflow tower was found to require higher airflow rates but much lower pressure drops to effect the same removal efficiency. The airstream from the towers was directed into bench-scale and pilot-scale commercial catalytic units. An innovative photocatalytic unit also was tested. Five of the six catalysts tested performed well. Air stripping in conjunction with catalytic oxidation was found to be a good technique for remediation of groundwater containing low levels of organics. However the crossflow air stripper did not offer any cost advantages over conventional counterflow air stripping.

  18. Oxidation and Ablation Resistance of Low Pressure Plasma-Sprayed ZrB2-Si Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yaran; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Liping; Li, Hong; Liu, Xuanyong; Zheng, Xuebin; Ding, Chuanxian

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, ZrB2-based coating containing Si additive was prepared by low pressure plasma spray process. The chemical composition and microstructure of the ZrB2-Si coating were characterized by XRD, EDS and SEM. The oxidation behavior of the coating was investigated in ambient air for different duration time. The ablation-resistant property of the coating was carried out using a plasma flame. The results obtained indicate that the ZrB2-Si composite coating exhibited compact lamellar microstructure with a porosity less than 5%. The silicon phase was uniformly distributed in the ZrB2 matrix. The composite coating presented excellent oxidation-resistance at high temperature of 1500 °C, which resulted from the formed continuous and dense glassy silicon oxide film on its surface. The ablation resistance of the ZrB2-Si coating has been proved to be excellent, which could withstand the plasma flame (above 2000 °C, atmosphere) for 10 min.

  19. A new diffusion-inhibited oxidation-resistant coating for superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Glasgow, T. K.; Levine, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for enhanced protection of superalloys consists of adding an oxidation- and diffusion-resistant cermet layer between the superalloy and the outer oxidation-resistant metallic alloy coating. Such a duplex coating was compared with a physical-vapor-deposited (PVD) NiCrAlY coating in cyclic oxidation at 1150 C. The substrate alloy was MA 754 - an oxide-dispersion-strengthened superalloy that is difficult to coat. The duplex coating, applied by plasma spraying, outperformed the PVD coating on the basis of weight change and both macroscopic and metallographic observations.

  20. The fragrance chemical beta-caryophyllene-air oxidation and skin sensitization.

    PubMed

    Sköld, Maria; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Matura, Mihaly; Börje, Anna

    2006-04-01

    Fragrances are common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. beta-Caryophyllene is a sesquiterpene that is used as a fragrance chemical. Analogous to the monoterpenes R-limonene and linalool, it can be expected to autoxidize when air exposed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the autoxidation of beta-caryophyllene and to evaluate the effect on the contact allergenic activity. beta-Caryophyllene started to oxidize immediately when air exposed and after 5 weeks almost 50% of the original compound was consumed. Caryophyllene oxide was found to be the major oxidation product. Hydroperoxides of beta-caryophyllene could not be detected in the oxidation mixture. Caryophyllene oxide was shown to be an allergen of moderate strength and beta-caryophyllene air exposed for 10 weeks showed a weak sensitizing capacity in the local lymph node assay. The study reveals that the allergenic activity of beta-caryophyllene is affected by autoxidation, but to a lesser extent when compared to R-limonene and linalool. The present findings support our results in clinical studies showing oxidized beta-caryophyllene to be a rather rare sensitizer compared to oxidized R-limonene and linalool.

  1. Isolation of airborne oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from culturable air samples of urban residences.

    PubMed

    Perez, Hernando R; Johnson, Rachel; Gurian, Patrick L; Gibbs, Shawn G; Taylor, Jennifer; Burstyn, Igor

    2011-02-01

    Culturable single-stage impactor samples were collected onto nutrient agar in kitchen and bedroom areas of eight urban and four suburban residences in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Staphylococcus aureus colonies were identified by replica plating of the original impactor samples onto Chapman Stone medium followed by isolation of up to eight colonies for coagulase testing. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was utilized to evaluate S. aureus resistance to both oxacillin and cefaclor. The median concentrations of total culturable bacteria observed in bedrooms and trash areas were 300 CFU/m(3) and 253 CFU/m(3), respectively. Median culturable Staphylococcus spp. concentrations in bedrooms and trash areas were 142 CFU/m(3) and 204 CFU/m(3), respectively. A total of 148 individual S. aureus colonies were isolated and tested for antibiotic resistance. Cefaclor resistance was encountered among only 6 of the 148 (4%) colonies. Nearly one-quarter of all S. aureus isolates tested displayed resistance (n = 30) or intermediate resistance (n = 5) to oxacillin. Twenty-six percent (n = 20) of trash area isolates and 21% (n = 15) of bedroom isolates displayed resistance or intermediate resistance to oxacillin. The median difference in percent resistance between trash and bedroom areas was 10% (p = 0.1). Results suggest that there may be a systematic difference in bacterial populations between downtown and suburban residences. Storage of household waste and handling of food may contribute to presence of the organism in the air of residences.

  2. Significant blood resistance to nitric oxide transfer in the lung.

    PubMed

    Borland, Colin D R; Dunningham, Helen; Bottrill, Fiona; Vuylsteke, Alain; Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, D Merrill; Hsia, Connie C W

    2010-05-01

    Lung diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DLNO) is used to measure alveolar membrane conductance (DMNO), but disagreement remains as to whether DMNO=DLNO, and whether blood conductance (thetaNO)=infinity. Our previous in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that thetaNOresistance to alveolar-capillary NO uptake. DLNO is sensitive to dynamic hematological factors and is not a pure index of conductance of the alveolar tissue membrane. With successive exchange transfusion, the estimated in vivo thetaNO [5.1 ml NO.(ml blood.min.Torr)(-1)] approached 4.5 ml NO.(ml blood.min.Torr)(-1), which was derived from in vitro measurements by Carlsen and Comroe (J Gen Physiol 42: 83-107, 1958). Therefore, we suggest use of thetaNO=4.5 ml NO.(min.Torr.ml blood)(-1) for calculation of DM(NO) and pulmonary capillary blood volume from DLNO and DLCO.

  3. Continuous measurements of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane from air scrubbers at pig housing facilities.

    PubMed

    Van der Heyden, C; Brusselman, E; Volcke, E I P; Demeyer, P

    2016-10-01

    Ammonia, largely emitted by agriculture, involves a great risk for eutrophication and acidification leading to biodiversity loss. Air scrubbers are widely applied to reduce ammonia emission from pig and poultry housing facilities, but it is not always clear whether their performance meets the requirements. Besides, there is a growing international concern for the livestock related greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide but hardly any data concerning their fate in air scrubbers are available. This contribution presents the results from measurement campaigns conducted at a chemical, a biological and a two-stage biological air scrubber installed at pig housing facilities in Flanders. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane at the inlet and outlet of the air scrubbers were monitored on-line during one week using a photoacoustic gas monitor, which allowed to investigate diurnal fluctuations in the removal performance of air scrubbers. Additionally, the homogeneity of the air scrubbers, normally checked by gas detection tubes, was investigated in more detail using the continuous data. The biological air scrubber with extra nitrification tank performed well in terms of ammonia removal (86 ± 6%), while the two-stage air scrubber suffered from nitrifying bacteria inhibition. In the chemical air scrubber the pH was not kept constant, lowering the ammonia removal efficiency. A lower ammonia removal efficiency was found during the day, when the ventilation rate was the highest. Nitrous oxide was produced inside the biological and two-stage scrubber, resulting in an increased outlet concentration of more than 200%. Methane could not be removed in the different air scrubbers because of its low water solubility. PMID:27341376

  4. Continuous measurements of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane from air scrubbers at pig housing facilities.

    PubMed

    Van der Heyden, C; Brusselman, E; Volcke, E I P; Demeyer, P

    2016-10-01

    Ammonia, largely emitted by agriculture, involves a great risk for eutrophication and acidification leading to biodiversity loss. Air scrubbers are widely applied to reduce ammonia emission from pig and poultry housing facilities, but it is not always clear whether their performance meets the requirements. Besides, there is a growing international concern for the livestock related greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide but hardly any data concerning their fate in air scrubbers are available. This contribution presents the results from measurement campaigns conducted at a chemical, a biological and a two-stage biological air scrubber installed at pig housing facilities in Flanders. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane at the inlet and outlet of the air scrubbers were monitored on-line during one week using a photoacoustic gas monitor, which allowed to investigate diurnal fluctuations in the removal performance of air scrubbers. Additionally, the homogeneity of the air scrubbers, normally checked by gas detection tubes, was investigated in more detail using the continuous data. The biological air scrubber with extra nitrification tank performed well in terms of ammonia removal (86 ± 6%), while the two-stage air scrubber suffered from nitrifying bacteria inhibition. In the chemical air scrubber the pH was not kept constant, lowering the ammonia removal efficiency. A lower ammonia removal efficiency was found during the day, when the ventilation rate was the highest. Nitrous oxide was produced inside the biological and two-stage scrubber, resulting in an increased outlet concentration of more than 200%. Methane could not be removed in the different air scrubbers because of its low water solubility.

  5. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  6. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. 84.155 Section... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type... shall not exceed 25 mm. (1 inch) of water-column height when the air flow into the...

  7. High Temperature Thermal Stability and Oxidation Resistance of Magnetron-sputtered Homogeneous CrAlON Coatings on 430 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayani, A.; Wickey, K. J.; Nandasiri, M. I.; Moore, A.; Garratt, E.; AlFaify, S.; Gao, X.; Smith, R. J.; Buchanan, T. L.; Priyantha, W.; Kopczyk, M.; Gannon, P. E.; Gorokhovsky, V. I.

    2009-03-01

    The requirements of low cost and high-temperature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigated the performance of steel plates with homogenous coatings of CrAlON (oxynitrides). The coatings were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering, with Ar as a sputtering gas. Oxygen in these coatings was not intentionally added. Oxygen might have come through contaminated nitrogen gas bottle, leak in the chamber or from the partial pressure of water vapors. Nitrogen was added during the growth process to get oxynitride coating. The Cr/Al composition ratio in the coatings was varied in a combinatorial approach. The coatings were subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800° C. The composition of the coated plates and the rate of oxidation were characterized using Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). From our results, we conclude that Al rich coatings are more susceptible to oxidation than Cr rich coatings.

  8. High temperature oxidation resistance of magnetron-sputtered homogeneous CrAlON coatings on 430 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garratt, E.; Wickey, K. J.; Nandasiri, M. I.; Moore, A.; AlFaify, S.; Gao, X.; Kayani, A.; Smith, R. J.; Buchanan, T. L.; Priyantha, W.; Kopczyk, M.; Gannon, P. E.

    2009-11-01

    The requirements of low cost and high-temperature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigated the performance of steel plates with homogenous coatings of CrAlON (oxynitrides). The coatings were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering, with Ar as a sputtering gas. Oxygen in these coatings was not intentionally added. Oxygen might have come through contaminated nitrogen gas bottle, leak in the chamber or from the partial pressure of water vapors. Nitrogen was added during the growth process to get oxynitride coating. The Cr/Al composition ratio in the coatings was varied in a combinatorial approach. The coatings were subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 oC. The composition of the coated plates and the rate of oxidation were characterized using Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Surface characterization was carried out using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and surfaces of the coatings were found smooth on submicron scale. From our results, we conclude that Al rich coatings are more susceptible to oxidation than Cr rich coatings.

  9. New approach to the air oxidation of alkenes employing metal nitro complexes as catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.A.; Chang, T.C.T.; Cheng, C.W.F.; Kelley, K.P.

    1984-01-01

    Alkenes are stoichiometrically and, in the presence of air, catalytically oxidized by cis-bis(aceto-nitrile) chloronitropalladium(II). Oxidation of monosubstituted terminal alkenes and trans-cyclooctene yields the corresponding ketone, oxidation of cyclopentene and cyclohexene the corresponding allyl alcohol, and oxidation of bicyclic alkenes the corresponding epoxide, each with good selectivity for the respective product. Other alkenes give varying mixtures of the above products together with, in some cases, the ..cap alpha..,..beta..-unsaturated ketone. Vinyl ethers yield the corresponding ester while (trimethylsily)ethylene yields (trimethylsilyl)acetaldehyde. The selectivities are rationalized on the basis of ease of ..beta..-hydrogen elimination in observed intermediate heterometallacyclopentane complexes formed by nucleophilic attack of the nitro oxygen atom on the coordinated alkene in alkene nitro complexes. The general role of metallacycles in metal-mediated alkene oxidations and the advantages and disadvantages of intra-vs. intermolecular metal nitro catalyzed alkene oxidations are discussed. 50 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Oxidation and corrosion resistance of candidate Stirling engine heater-head-tube alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen candidate iron base Stirling engine heater head tube alloys are evaluated in a diesel fuel fired simulator materials test rig to determine their oxidation and corrosion resistance. Sheet specimens are tested at 820 C for 3500 hr in 5 hr heating cycles. Specific weight change data and an attack parameter are used to categorize the alloys into four groups; 10 alloys show excellent for good oxidation and corrosion resistance and six alloys exhibit poor or catastrophic resistance. Metallographic, X-ray, and electron microprobe analyses aid in further characterizing the oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. Alloy compositions, expecially the reactive elements aluminum, titanium, and chromium, play a major role in the excellent oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. The best oxidation resistance is associated with the formation of an iron nickel aluminum outer oxide scale, an intermediate oxide scale rich in chromium and titanium, and an aluminum outer oxide scale adjacent to the metallic substrate, which exhibits a zone of internal oxidation of aluminum and to some extent titanium.

  11. Air-adapted Methanosarcina acetivorans shows high methane production and develops resistance against oxygen stress.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Belmont-Díaz, Javier; Encalada, Rusely; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans, considered a strict anaerobic archaeon, was cultured in the presence of 0.4-1% O2 (atmospheric) for at least 6 months to generate air-adapted cells; further, the biochemical mechanisms developed to deal with O2 were characterized. Methane production and protein content, as indicators of cell growth, did not change in air-adapted cells respect to cells cultured under anoxia (control cells). In contrast, growth and methane production significantly decreased in control cells exposed for the first time to O2. Production of reactive oxygen species was 50 times lower in air-adapted cells versus control cells, suggesting enhanced anti-oxidant mechanisms that attenuated the O2 toxicity. In this regard, (i) the transcripts and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase significantly increased; and (ii) the thiol-molecules (cysteine + coenzyme M-SH + sulfide) and polyphosphate contents were respectively 2 and 5 times higher in air-adapted cells versus anaerobic-control cells. Long-term cultures (18 days) of air-adapted cells exposed to 2% O2 exhibited the ability to form biofilms. These data indicate that M. acetivorans develops multiple mechanisms to contend with O2 and the associated oxidative stress, as also suggested by genome analyses for some methanogens.

  12. Air-Adapted Methanosarcina acetivorans Shows High Methane Production and Develops Resistance against Oxygen Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Santiago-Martínez, M. Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Belmont-Díaz, Javier; Encalada, Rusely; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans, considered a strict anaerobic archaeon, was cultured in the presence of 0.4–1% O2 (atmospheric) for at least 6 months to generate air-adapted cells; further, the biochemical mechanisms developed to deal with O2 were characterized. Methane production and protein content, as indicators of cell growth, did not change in air-adapted cells respect to cells cultured under anoxia (control cells). In contrast, growth and methane production significantly decreased in control cells exposed for the first time to O2. Production of reactive oxygen species was 50 times lower in air-adapted cells versus control cells, suggesting enhanced anti-oxidant mechanisms that attenuated the O2 toxicity. In this regard, (i) the transcripts and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase significantly increased; and (ii) the thiol-molecules (cysteine + coenzyme M-SH + sulfide) and polyphosphate contents were respectively 2 and 5 times higher in air-adapted cells versus anaerobic-control cells. Long-term cultures (18 days) of air-adapted cells exposed to 2% O2 exhibited the ability to form biofilms. These data indicate that M. acetivorans develops multiple mechanisms to contend with O2 and the associated oxidative stress, as also suggested by genome analyses for some methanogens. PMID:25706146

  13. Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Jantzen, Kim; Roursgaard, Martin; Klingberg, Henrik; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Cao, Yi; Loft, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Generation of oxidatively damaged DNA by particulate matter (PM) is hypothesized to occur via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing ROS production, inflammation and oxidatively damaged DNA in different experimental systems investigating air pollution particles. There is substantial evidence indicating that exposure to air pollution particles was associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged nucleobases in circulating blood cells and urine from humans, which is supported by observations of elevated levels of genotoxicity in cultured cells exposed to similar PM. Inflammation is most pronounced in cultured cells and animal models, whereas an elevated level of oxidatively damaged DNA is more pronounced than inflammation in humans. There is non-congruent data showing corresponding variability in effect related to PM sampled at different locations (spatial variability), times (temporal variability) or particle size fraction across different experimental systems of acellular conditions, cultured cells, animals and humans. Nevertheless, there is substantial variation in the genotoxic, inflammation and oxidative stress potential of PM sampled at different locations or times. Small air pollution particles did not appear more hazardous than larger particles, which is consistent with the notion that constituents such as metals and organic compounds also are important determinants for PM-generated oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, the results indicate that PM-mediated ROS production is involved in the generation of inflammation and activated inflammatory cells can increase their ROS production. The observations indicate that air pollution particles generate oxidatively damaged DNA by promoting a milieu of oxidative stress and inflammation.

  14. Oxidative stress and antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens: state of the art, methodologies, and future trends.

    PubMed

    Marrakchi, Mouna; Liu, Xiaobo; Andreescu, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant advances of modern medicine and the availability of a wide variety of antibiotics for the treatment of microbial infections, there is an alarming increase of multiresistant bacterial pathogens. This chapter discusses the status of bacterial resistance mechanisms and the relationship with oxidative stress and provides an overview of the methods used to assess oxidative conditions and their contribution to the antibiotic resistance. PMID:24952198

  15. Oxidation resistance of eight heat-resistant alloys at 870, 980, 1,095, and 1,150 C

    SciTech Connect

    Rundell, G.; McConnell, J. )

    1991-10-01

    Oxidation testing of heat-resistant alloys is described. The testing procedure utilized weight-gain measurements using one specimen, which was withdrawn and weighted at intervals of 1 week, for 10-18 weeks. The specimen was placed in a porcelain cup during exposure and covered upon cooling to retain spalled oxide. Weight gain was used to determine the kinetics of oxidation and was extrapolated to 3,000 hr. The specimen was withdrawn at the end of the exposure, weighed, cathodically descaled, and reweighed. The ratio of oxygen ions to metal ions was determined for each alloy and test temperature. This ratio approaches the stoichiometric ratio for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} or Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The ratio for each test is used to convert weight gain to weight loss. The amount of adherent oxide was determined as well as the total amount of oxide, leading to an expression for oxide adherency. The oxidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys increased with increasing Cr and Ni, with Cr being the most critical element. Additions of Si, Al, or Ce were shown to extend the usefulness of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys.

  16. Effects of ambient oxidant air pollution in the San Joaquin Valley on Thompson seedless grapes

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, R.F.; Ashcroft, R.

    1984-01-01

    Mature Thompson seedless grape vines were enclosed in specially constructed plastic covered chambers supplied with carbon filtered and non-filtered (ambient) air from time of bud break through leaf drop. Effects on vegetative growth and fruiting were determined for three seasons. No effects on fruit production were measured the first season after covering but vegetative growth increased 12% in chambers supplied with filtered air. By the third season fruit yields were 27.5% higher in the filtered as compared with ambient chambers. The only visible symptoms associated with exposure to the oxidants was accelerated senescence which appeared 3 weeks to 1 month earlier on vines receiving ambient or nonfiltered air.

  17. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is the achille's heel of melanoma cells resistant to Braf-mutant inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    André, Fanny; Jonneaux, Aurélie; Scalbert, Camille; Garçon, Guillaume; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Balayssac, Stéphane; Rocchi, Stephane; Savina, Ariel; Formstecher, Pierre; Mortier, Laurent; Kluza, Jérome; Marchetti, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Vemurafenib/PLX4032, a selective inhibitor of mutant BRAFV600E, constitutes a paradigm shift in melanoma therapy. Unfortunately, acquired resistance, which unavoidably occurs, represents one major limitation to clinical responses. Recent studies have highlighted that vemurafenib activated oxidative metabolism in BRAFV600E melanomas expressing PGC1α. However, the oxidative state of melanoma resistant to BRAF inhibitors is unknown. We established representative in vitro and in vivo models of human melanoma resistant to vemurafenib including primary specimens derived from melanoma patients. Firstly, our study reveals that vemurafenib increased mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in BRAFV600E melanoma cell lines regardless the expression of PGC1α. Secondly, melanoma cells that have acquired resistance to vemurafenib displayed intrinsically high rates of mitochondrial respiration associated with elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress irrespective of the presence of vemurafenib. Thirdly, the elevated ROS level rendered vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cells prone to cell death induced by pro-oxidants including the clinical trial drug, elesclomol. Based on these observations, we propose that the mitochondrial oxidative signature of resistant melanoma constitutes a novel opportunity to overcome resistance to BRAF inhibition. PMID:24161908

  18. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i

  19. Evaluation of the TCE catalytic oxidation unit at Wurtsmith Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, T.D. ); Marchand, E.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Remediation of VOC-contaminated groundwater is frequently performed by air stripping, a process that transfers the contaminants from the water phase to the air phase by contacting the phases countercurrently through a packed-bed column. Air stripping has proven to be effective and economic for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from groundwater; in many cases, however, the states require the use of an emissions control device, such as a catalytic oxidation unit or a catalytic incinerator, in conjunction with the air stripping unit. Incineration is an attractive choice for emissions control since the contaminants are destroyed on site. Wurtsmith Air Force Base is the site of an air-stripping-with-emissions-control system to remove VOCs, chiefly trichloroethylene (TCE), from groundwater. A fluidized-bed catalytic oxidation unit treats the air stream to destroy the organic contaminants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of this unit and its catalyst for destroying halogenated organics with respect to catalyst bed temperature and operating time. The objectives included identification of any products of incomplete combustion formed and determination of the utility costs for the unit. Samples were collected over a period of {approximately}19 months with volatile organic sampling trains according to EPA Method 30. Samples were taken at catalyst bed temperatures of 315, 370, 425, and 480{degree}C. The results indicate that the incinerator was destroying the TCE with >97% efficiency when operated at 370{degree}C or greater. 6 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  1. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  2. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of carbon black/manganese oxide air cathodes for zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Po-Chieh; Hu, Chi-Chang; Lee, Tai-Chou; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Tsin Hai

    2014-12-01

    Due to the poor electric conductivity but the excellent catalytic ability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), manganese dioxide in the α phase (denoted as α-MnO2) anchored onto carbon black powders (XC72) has been synthesized by the reflux method. The specific surface area and electric conductivity of the composites are generally enhanced by increasing the XC72 content while the high XC72 content will induce the formation of MnOOH which shows a worse ORR catalytic ability than α-MnO2. The ORR activity of such air cathodes have been optimized at the XC72/α-MnO2 ratio equal to 1 determined by the thermogravimetric analysis. By using this optimized cathode under the air atmosphere, the quasi-steady-state full-cell discharge voltages are equal to 1.353 and 1.178 V at 2 and 20 mA cm-2, respectively. Due to the usage of ambient air rather than pure oxygen, this Zn-air battery shows a modestly high discharge peak power density (67.51 mW cm-2) meanwhile the power density is equal to 47.22 mW cm-2 and the specific capacity is more than 750 mAh g-1 when this cell is operated at 1 V.

  4. Significant blood resistance to nitric oxide transfer in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Dunningham, Helen; Bottrill, Fiona; Vuylsteke, Alain; Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, D. Merrill; Hsia, Connie C. W.

    2010-01-01

    Lung diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DlNO) is used to measure alveolar membrane conductance (DmNO), but disagreement remains as to whether DmNO = DlNO, and whether blood conductance (θNO) = ∞. Our previous in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that θNO < ∞. We now show in a membrane oxygenator model perfused with whole blood that addition of a cell-free bovine hemoglobin (Hb) glutamer-200 solution increased diffusing capacity of the circuit (D) for NO (Dno) by 39%, D for carbon monoxide (Dco) by 24%, and the ratio of Dno to Dco by 12% (all P < 0.001). In three anesthetized dogs, DlNO and DlCO were measured by a rebreathing technique before and after three successive equal volume-exchange transfusions with bovine Hb glutamer-200 (10 ml/kg each, total exchange 30 ml/kg). At baseline, DlNO/DlCO = 4.5. After exchange transfusion, DlNO rose 57 ± 16% (mean ± SD, P = 0.02) and DlNO/DlCO = 7.1, whereas DlCO remained unchanged. Thus, in vitro and in vivo data directly demonstrate a finite θNO. We conclude that the erythrocyte and/or its immediate environment imposes considerable resistance to alveolar-capillary NO uptake. DlNO is sensitive to dynamic hematological factors and is not a pure index of conductance of the alveolar tissue membrane. With successive exchange transfusion, the estimated in vivo θNO [5.1 ml NO·(ml blood·min·Torr)−1] approached 4.5 ml NO·(ml blood·min·Torr)−1, which was derived from in vitro measurements by Carlsen and Comroe (J Gen Physiol 42: 83–107, 1958). Therefore, we suggest use of θNO = 4.5 ml NO·(min·Torr·ml blood)−1 for calculation of DmNO and pulmonary capillary blood volume from DlNO and DlCO. PMID:20150569

  5. Enhanced oxidative stress resistance through activation of a zinc deficiency transcription factor in Brachypodium distachyon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of viable strategies to increase stress resistance of crops will become increasingly important for the goal of global food security as our population increases and our climate changes. Considering that resistance to oxidative stress is oftentimes an indicator of health and longevity i...

  6. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Air-Driven Potassium Iodide-Mediated Oxidative Photocyclization of Stilbene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Watanabe, Soichiro

    2016-09-01

    A new method has been developed for the potassium iodide-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives. Compared with conventional iodine-mediated oxidative photocyclization reactions, this new method requires shorter reaction times and affords cyclized products in yields of 45-97%. This reaction proceeds with a catalytic amount of potassium iodide and works in an air-driven manner without the addition of an external scavenger. The radical-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives using TEMPO was also investigated. PMID:27508401

  8. Effects of oxidation and roughness on Cu contact resistance from 4 to 290 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilles, M. J.; van Sciver, S. W.

    Knowledge of the factors influencing contact resistance is important for optimizing system design in cryogenic applications. In space cryogenics, indirect cooling of infrared components is the primary concern. The presence of bolted joints results in contact resistances which can dominate all other contributions to the overall heat transfer rate. Here, thermal and electrical contact resistances measured between 4 K and 290 K for a series of bolted OFHC Cu contacts are reported. Surface roughness is found to have little effect on the overall contact resistance within the experimental limits, while oxidation can increase the contact resistance by as much as a factor of 100. Thermal and electrical contact resistances measured on the same contact show that the contact resistance temperature dependence does not follow the bulk dependence. For example, the residual resistance ratio (RRR) of the OFHC Cu is 110, but for contacts made from this material, the RRR is about two.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant having a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section of a multi-section cathode air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Lin, Yao

    2015-02-17

    The multi-section cathode air heat exchanger (102) includes at least a first heat exchanger section (104), and a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section (126) secured adjacent each other in a stack association. Cool cathode inlet air flows through cool air channels (110) of the at least first (104) and oxidation catalyzed sections (126). Hot anode exhaust flows through hot air channels (124) of the oxidation catalyzed section (126) and is combusted therein. The combusted anode exhaust then flows through hot air channels (112) of the first section (104) of the cathode air heat exchanger (102). The cool and hot air channels (110, 112) are secured in direct heat exchange relationship with each other so that temperatures of the heat exchanger (102) do not exceed 800.degree. C. to minimize requirements for using expensive, high-temperature alloys.

  10. Effects of ovariectomy and resistance training on oxidative stress markers in the rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Fernanda Cury; Stotzer, Uliana Sbeguen; Domingos, Mateus Moraes; Deminice, Rafael; Shiguemoto, Gilberto Eiji; Tomaz, Luciane Magri; de Sousa, Nuno Manuel Frade; Ferreira, Fabiano Candido; Leite, Richard Diego; Selistre-de-Araújo, Heloisa Sobreiro; Jordão-Júnior, Alceu Afonso; Baldissera, Vilmar; de Andrade Perez, Sérgio Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the effects of resistance training on oxidative stress markers in the livers of ovariectomized rats. METHOD: Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the following four groups (n = 8 per group): sham-operated sedentary, ovariectomized sedentary, sham-operated resistance training, and ovariectomized resistance training. During the resistance training period, the animals climbed a 1.1-m vertical ladder with weights attached to their tails; the sessions were conducted 3 times per week, with 4-9 climbs and 8-12 dynamic movements per climb. The oxidative stress was assessed by measuring the levels of reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione, the enzymatic activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase, lipid peroxidation, vitamin E concentrations, and the gene expression of glutathione peroxidase. RESULTS: The results showed significant reductions in the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio (4.11±0.65 nmol/g tec), vitamin E concentration (55.36±11.11 nmol/g), and gene expression of glutathione peroxidase (0.49±0.16 arbitrary units) in the livers of ovariectomized rats compared with the livers of unovariectomized animals (5.71±0.71 nmol/g tec, 100.14±10.99 nmol/g, and 1.09±0.54 arbitrary units, respectively). Moreover, resistance training for 10 weeks was not able to reduce the oxidative stress in the livers of ovariectomized rats and induced negative changes in the hepatic anti-oxidative/oxidative balance. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the resistance training program used in this study was not able to attenuate the hepatic oxidative damage caused by ovariectomy and increased the hepatic oxidative stress. PMID:24141842

  11. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  12. AIR PARTICULATE POLLUTION EXPOSURE INDUCES SYSTEMIC OXIDATIVE STRESS IN HEALTHY MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air particulate pollution exposure induces systemic oxidative stress in healthy mice

    Elizabeth S Roberts1 and Kevin L Dreher2. 1 College or Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC , 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC

    Epidemiological s...

  13. COST ANALYSIS OF ACTIVATED CARBON VERSUS PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION FOR REMOVING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A cost comparison has been conducted of 1 m3/s indoor air cleaners using granular activated carbon (GAC) vs. photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) for treating a steady-state inlet volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration of 0.3 mg/m3. The commercial GAC unit was costed assuming t...

  14. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (First External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This first external review draft of the Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Ozone Criteria Document) is being released in January 2005 for public comment and for review by EPA's Clean A...

  15. IN VITRO CARDIOTOXICITY OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: ROLE OF BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CARDIOTOXICITY OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: ROLE OF BIOAVAILABLE CONSTITUENTS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION.

    T. L. Knuckles1 R. Jaskot2, J. Richards2, and K.Dreher2.
    1Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicin...

  16. OXIDATION OF CYCLOHEXANE WITH AIR CATALYZED BY A STERICALLY HINDERED IRON (II) COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of Cyclohexane with Air Catalyzed by a Sterically Hindered Iron(II) Complex.


    Thomas M. Becker, Michael A. Gonzalez*

    United States Environmental Protection Agency; National Risk Management Research Laboratory; Sustainable Technology Division; Clean Pr...

  17. Differential oxidative metabolism and 5-ketoclomazone accumulation are involved in Echinochloa phyllopogon resistance to clomazone.

    PubMed

    Yasuor, Hagai; Zou, Wei; Tolstikov, Vladimir V; Tjeerdema, Ronald S; Fischer, Albert J

    2010-05-01

    Echinochloa phyllopogon (late watergrass) is a major weed of California rice (Oryza sativa) that has evolved cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic resistance to different herbicides with multiple modes of action. E. phyllopogon populations from Sacramento Valley rice fields have also recently shown resistance to the herbicide clomazone. Clomazone is a proherbicide that must be metabolized to 5-ketoclomazone, which is the active compound that inhibits deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase, a key enzyme of the nonmevalonate isoprenoid pathway. This study evaluated the differential clomazone metabolism within strains of the same species to investigate whether enhanced oxidative metabolism also confers clomazone resistance in E. phyllopogon. Using reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry techniques in the multireaction monitoring mode, we elucidated that oxidative biotransformations are involved as a mechanism of clomazone resistance in this species. E. phyllopogon plants hydroxylated mostly the isoxazolidinone ring of clomazone, and clomazone hydroxylation activity was greater in resistant than in susceptible plants. The major clomazone metabolites resulted from monohydroxylation and dihydroxylation of the isoxazolidinone ring. Resistant plants accumulated 6- to 12-fold more of the monohydroxylated metabolite than susceptible plants, while susceptible plants accumulated 2.5-fold more of the phytotoxic metabolite of clomazone, 5-ketoclomazone. Our results demonstrate that oxidative metabolism endows multiple-herbicide-resistant E. phyllopogon with cross-resistance to clomazone through enhanced herbicide degradation and lower accumulation of the toxic metabolite in resistant versus susceptible plants.

  18. Long-term oxidation of candidate cast iron and stainless steel exhaust system alloys from 650 to 800 °C in air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan .; Haynes, James A.; Weldon, R. G.; England, R. D.

    2014-08-29

    Here, the oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 °C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 °C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 °C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remained adherent from 700-800 °C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 °C compared to 650-700 °C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.

  19. Long-term oxidation of candidate cast iron and stainless steel exhaust system alloys from 650 to 800 °C in air with water vapor

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Michael P.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan .; Haynes, James A.; Weldon, R. G.; England, R. D.

    2014-08-29

    Here, the oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 °C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 °C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 °C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remainedmore » adherent from 700-800 °C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 °C compared to 650-700 °C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.« less

  20. Multimode resistive switching in nanoscale hafnium oxide stack as studied by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Celano, U.; Goux, L.; Liu, L.; Degraeve, R.; Cheng, Y.; Kang, J.; Jurczak, M.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-07-01

    The nanoscale resistive switching in hafnium oxide stack is investigated by the conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The initial oxide stack is insulating and electrical stress from the C-AFM tip induces nanometric conductive filaments. Multimode resistive switching can be observed in consecutive operation cycles at one spot. The different modes are interpreted in the framework of a low defect quantum point contact theory. The model implies that the optimization of the conductive filament active region is crucial for the future application of nanoscale resistive switching devices.

  1. Niobium-aluminum base alloys having improved, high temperature oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G. (Inventor); Stephens, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A niobium-aluminum base alloy having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 48%-52% niobium, 36%-42% aluminum, 4%-10% chromium, 0%-2%, more preferably 1%-2%, silicon and/or tungsten with tungsten being preferred, and 0.1%-2.0% of a rare earth selected from the group consisting of yttrium, ytterbium and erbium. Parabolic oxidation rates, k.sub.p, at 1200.degree. C. range from about 0.006 to 0.032 (mg/cm.sup.2).sup.2 /hr. The new alloys also exhibit excellent cyclic oxidation resistance.

  2. Enhanced reversibility and durability of a solid oxide Fe-air redox battery by carbothermic reaction derived energy storage materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuan; Li, Xue; Gong, Yunhui; Huang, Kevin

    2014-01-18

    The recently developed solid oxide metal-air redox battery is a new technology capable of high-rate chemistry. Here we report that the performance, reversibility and stability of a solid oxide iron-air redox battery can be significantly improved by nanostructuring energy storage materials from a carbothermic reaction.

  3. Correlation between the microstructures of graphite oxides and their catalytic behaviors in air oxidation of benzyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Geng, Longlong; Wu, Shujie; Zou, Yongcun; Jia, Mingjun; Zhang, Wenxiang; Yan, Wenfu; Liu, Gang

    2014-05-01

    A series of graphite oxide (GO) materials were obtained by thermal treatment of oxidized natural graphite powder at different temperatures (from 100 to 200 °C). The microstructure evolution (i.e., layer structure and surface functional groups) of the graphite oxide during the heating process is studied by various characterization means, including XRD, N2 adsorption, TG-DTA, in situ DRIFT, XPS, Raman, TEM and Boehm titration. The characterization results show that the structures of GO materials change gradually from multilayer sheets to a transparent ultrathin 2D structure of the carbon sheets. The concentration of surface COH and HOCO groups decrease significantly upon treating temperature increasing. Benzyl alcohol oxidation with air as oxidant source was carried out to detect the catalytic behaviors of different GO materials. The activities of GO materials decrease with the increase of treating temperatures. It shows that the structure properties, including ultrathin sheets and high specific surface area, are not crucial factors affecting the catalytic activity. The type and amount of surface oxygen-containing functional groups of GO materials tightly correlates with the catalytic performance. Carboxylic groups on the surface of GO should act as oxidative sites for benzyl alcohol and the reduced form could be reoxidized by molecular oxygen.

  4. Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. From particles to patients: oxidative stress and the cardiovascular effects of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark R; Shaw, Catherine A; Langrish, Jeremy P

    2012-07-01

    Air pollution, especially airborne particulate matter (PM), is associated with an increase in both morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely established. The one consistent observation that links the pulmonary and cardiovascular effects of inhaled PM is oxidative stress. This article examines the evidence for the role of oxidative stress in the cardiovascular effects of air pollution, beginning with observations from epidemiological and controlled exposure studies and then exploring potential mechanistic pathways involving free radical generation from PM itself, to effects of PM on cell cultures, isolated organs, healthy animals and animal models of disease. Particular emphasis is placed on the vascular and atherosclerotic effects of urban air pollution and diesel exhaust emissions as rich sources of environmental ultrafine particles.

  6. Efficiencies for production of nitrogen oxides by proton impact in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Cooray, Vernon; Possnert, Göran

    2013-03-01

    We present the first laboratory measurements of nitrogen oxides generated by proton impact in air. Experiments were conducted at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University. A proton beam with known current and energy was injected into an air tight ionising chamber for a fixed time duration and the resulting nitrogen oxides were measured by the method of chemiluminescence. The data are presented in terms of number of produced NOX (NO+NO2) molecules for different proton energy, proton beam current and duration. The efficiency for NOX production by proton impact in air can on average be estimated to about 0.2 NOX molecules per ion-pair based on 1 cm diameter proton beam with energies from 2 to 4 MeV and varied currents from 0.1 to 10 nA.

  7. Association of Oxidative Stress and Obesity with Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Das, P; Biswas, S; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, S K

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs due to delicate imbalance between pro-oxidant and anti oxidant forces in our system. It has been found to be associated with many morbidities but its association with obesity and insulin resistance is still controversial. Here in our study we examined 167 patients of recent onset type 2 diabetes mellitus and 60 age sex matched non-diabetic control. Body Mass Index (BMI), abdominal circumference, fasting blood glucose, serum insulin and plasma Malondealdehyde (MDA, marker for oxidative stress) were measured in them. On the basis of BMI, subjects were divided into obese (BMI≥25) and non obese (BMI<25) groups. Insulin resistance scores were calculated by Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) method. Physical parameters (BMI, abdominal circumference) as well as levels of insulin and MDA were found to be significantly higher in subjects with diabetes than their non diabetic controls. The said parameters also showed significant difference in obese and non-obese sub groups. Insulin resistance score showed positive correlation with BMI, abdominal circumference, and plasma MDA, strength of association being highest with abdominal circumference. Plasma MDA was found to have positive correlation with physical parameters. Study concludes that, obesity mainly central type may predispose to insulin resistance and oxidative stress may be a crucial factor in its pathogenesis. Thus, oxidative stress may be the connecting link between obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, two on going global epidemics.

  8. Treatment of high-strength industrial wastewater by wet air oxidation--A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Ho, S.J.

    1997-12-31

    Treatment of high concentration chemical wastewater obtained from a petrochemical company by wet air oxidation (WAO) is studied. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the mixer speed, operating pressure, initial pH of wastewater and temperature on the pollutant (chemical oxygen demand or COD) removal. Both air and oxygen were tested to determine their respective effect on the COD removal. Results showed that over 50% of COD removal can be easily realized in an hour of WAO treatment. Also considered in the present study was the catalytic WAO treatment of the high concentration wastewater. Copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}), cobalt oxide (Co{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and zinc oxide (ZnO) were employed as the catalysts. The COD removal efficiency of the catalytic WAO process was found to vary significantly with the catalyst utilized with CuSO{sub 4} being the most effective.

  9. Impact of Air Pollutants on Oxidative Stress in Common Autophagy-Mediated Aging Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Numan, Mohamed Saber; Brown, Jacques P.; Michou, Laëtitia

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution-induced cellular oxidative stress is probably one of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in most of the common autophagy-mediated aging diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s, disease, as well as Paget’s disease of bone with or without frontotemporal dementia and inclusion body myopathy. Oxidative stress has serious damaging effects on the cellular contents: DNA, RNA, cellular proteins, and cellular organelles. Autophagy has a pivotal role in recycling these damaged non-functional organelles and misfolded or unfolded proteins. In this paper, we highlight, through a narrative review of the literature, that when autophagy processes are impaired during aging, in presence of cumulative air pollution-induced cellular oxidative stress and due to a direct effect on air pollutant, autophagy-mediated aging diseases may occur. PMID:25690002

  10. High hardness and superlative oxidation resistance in a pseudo-icosahehdral Cr-Al binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, J. W.; Rosa, R.; Antonacci, A. K.; He, H.; Bender, A. D.; Pabla, J.; Adrip, W.; McNally, D. E.; Zebro, A.; Kamenov, P.; Geschwind, G.; Ghose, S.; Dooryhee, E.; Ibrahim, A.; Aronson, M. C.

    Improving the efficiency of fossil fuel plants is a practical option for decreasing carbon dioxide emissions from electrical power generation. Present limits on the operating temperatures of exposed steel components, however, restrict steam temperatures and therefore energy efficiency. Even as a new generation of creep-resistant, high strength steels retain long term structural stability to temperatures as high as ~ 973 K, the low Cr-content of these alloys hinders their oxidation resistance, necessitating the development of new corrosion resistant coatings. We report here the nearly ideal properties of potential coating material Cr55Al229, which exhibits high hardness at room temperature as well as low thermal conductivity and superlative oxidation resistance at 973 K, with an oxidation rate at least three times smaller than those of benchmark materials. These properties originate from a pseudo-icosahedral crystal structure, suggesting new criteria for future research.

  11. Effects of process parameters on sheet resistance uniformity of fluorine-doped tin oxide thin films

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An alternative indium-free material for transparent conducting oxides of fluorine-doped tin oxide [FTO] thin films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate [PET] was prepared by electron cyclotron resonance - metal organic chemical vapor deposition [ECR-MOCVD]. One of the essential issues regarding metal oxide film deposition is the sheet resistance uniformity of the film. Variations in process parameters, in this case, working and bubbler pressures of ECR-MOCVD, can lead to a change in resistance uniformity. Both the optical transmittance and electrical resistance uniformity of FTO film-coated PET were investigated. The result shows that sheet resistance uniformity and the transmittance of the film are affected significantly by the changes in bubbler pressure but are less influenced by the working pressure of the ECR-MOCVD system. PMID:22221518

  12. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  13. Effect of naturally occurring ozone air pollution episodes on pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Cheryl; Sturrock, Anne; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Greene, Tom; Scholand, Mary Beth; Kanner, Richard; Paine, Robert

    2015-05-12

    This study aimed to determine if naturally occurring episodes of ozone air pollution in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, USA, during the summer are associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, increased respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared to controls. We measured biomarkers (nitrite/nitrate (NOx), 8-isoprostane) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), spirometry, and respiratory symptoms in 11 former smokers with moderate-to-severe COPD and nine former smokers without airflow obstruction during periods of low and high ozone air pollution. High ozone levels were associated with increased NOx in EBC in both COPD (8.7 (±8.5) vs. 28.6 (±17.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p < 0.01) and control participants (7.6 (±16.5) vs. 28.5 (±15.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p = 0.02). There was no difference in pollution effect between COPD and control groups, and no difference in EBC 8-isoprostane, pulmonary function, or respiratory symptoms between clean air and pollution days in either group. Former smokers both with and without airflow obstruction developed airway oxidative stress and inflammation in association with ozone air pollution episodes.

  14. Fabrication of Oxidation-Resistant Metal Wire Network-Based Transparent Electrodes by a Spray-Roll Coating Process.

    PubMed

    Kiruthika, S; Gupta, Ritu; Anand, Aman; Kumar, Ankush; Kulkarni, G U

    2015-12-16

    Roll and spray coating methods have been employed for the fabrication of highly oxidation resistant transparent and conducting electrodes (TCEs) by a simple solution process using crackle lithography technique. We have spray-coated a crackle paint-based precursor to produce highly interconnected crackle network on PET roll mounted on a roll coater with web speed of 0.6 m/min. Ag TCE with a transmittance of 78% and sheet resistance of ∼20 Ω/□ was derived by spraying Ag precursor ink over the crackle template followed by lift-off and annealing under ambient conditions. The Ag wire mesh was stable toward bending and sonication tests but prone to oxidation in air. When electrolessly coated with Pd, its robustness toward harsh oxidation conditions was enhanced. A low-cost transparent electrode has also been realized by using only small amounts of Ag as seed layer and growing Cu wire mesh by electroless method. Thus, made Ag/Cu meshes are found to be highly stable for more than a year even under ambient atmosphere. PMID:26580415

  15. Interim results from UO/sub 2/ fuel oxidation tests in air

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, T.K.; Gilbert, E.R.; Thornhill, C.K.; White, G.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Griffin, C.W.j

    1987-08-01

    An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to extend the characterization of spent fuel oxidation in air. To characterize oxidation behavior of irradiated UO/sub 2/, fuel oxidation tests were performed on declad light-water reactor spent fuel and nonirradited UO/sub 2/ pellets in the temperature range of 135 to 250/sup 0/C. These tests were designed to determine the important independent variables that might affect spent fuel oxidation behavior. The data from this program, when combined with the test results from other programs, will be used to develop recommended spent fuel dry-storage temperature limits in air. This report describes interim test results. The initial PNL investigations of nonirradiated and spent fuels identified the important testing variables as temperature, fuel burnup, radiolysis of the air, fuel microstructure, and moisture in the air. Based on these initial results, a more extensive statistically designed test matrix was developed to study the effects of temperature, burnup, and moisture on the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Oxidation tests were initiated using both boiling-water reactor and pressurized-water reactor fuels from several different reactors with burnups from 8 to 34 GWd/MTU. A 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field was applied to the test ovens to simulate dry storage cask conditions. Nonirradiated fuel was included as a control. This report describes experimental results from the initial tests on both the spent and nonirradiated fuels and results to date on the tests in a 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field. 33 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Oxidation-resistant hybrid metal oxides/metal nanodots/silver nanowires for high performance flexible transparent heaters.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Young; Kim, Min Kyu; Hudaya, Chairul; Park, Ji Hun; Byun, Dongjin; Lim, Jong Choo; Lee, Joong Kee

    2016-02-14

    Despite its excellent optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal performances, a silver nanowire (AgNW)-based transparent conducting heater (TCH) still demonstrates several drawbacks such as facile nanowire breakdown on application of a high DC voltage, easy oxidation when exposed to harsh environments, leading to increased surface resistivity, and high resistance among wire junctions causing nonhomogeneous temperature profiles. To overcome these issues, the AgNW was hybridized with other transparent heating materials made of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) thin films and NiCr nanodots (FTO/NiCr/AgNW). The dispersed NiCr nanodots (∼50 nm) and FTO thin films (∼20 nm) electrically bridge the nanowire junctions leading to a decreased sheet resistance and uniform temperature profiles. The hybrid transparent heater shows excellent optical transmittance (>90%) and high saturation temperature (162 °C) at low applied DC voltage (6 V). Moreover, the FTO/NiCr/AgNW heater exhibits a stable sheet resistance in a hostile environment, hence highlighting the excellent oxidation-resistance of the heating materials. These results indicate that the proposed hybrid transparent heaters could be a promising approach to combat the inherent problems associated with AgNW-based transparent heaters for various functional applications. PMID:26515282

  17. An evaluation of candidate oxidation resistant materials for space applications in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon; Banks, Bruce; Difilippo, Frank; Brady, Joyce; Dever, Therese; Hotes, Deborah

    1986-01-01

    Ground based testing of materials considered for polyimide (Kapton) solar array blanket protection and graphite-epoxy stroctural member protection was performed in an RF plasma asher. Protective coatings on Kapton from various commercial sources and from NASA Lewis Research Center were exposed to the air plasma; and mass loss per unit area was measured for each sample. All samples evaluated provided some protection to the underlying surface, but metal-oxide-fluoropolymer coatings provided the best protection by exhibiting very little degradation after 47 hr of asher exposure. Mica paint was evaluated as a protective coating for graphite-epoxy structural members. Mica appeared to be resistant to attack by atomic oxygen, but only offered limited protection as a paint. this is believed to be due to the paint vehicle ashing underneath the mica leaving unattached mica flakes lying on the surface. The protective coatings on Kapton evaluated so far are promising but further research on protection of graphite-epoxy support structures is needed.

  18. Chemical Interactions of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Oxidation Resistant Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary ); Stevenson, Jeffry W. ); Meinhardt, Kerry D. )

    2003-04-04

    In most planar SOFC stack designs, the interconnect, which is typically made from an oxidation resistant alloy, potentially including austenitic chromia-forming, ferritic chromia-forming, and alumina-forming alloys, has to be hermitically sealed to its adjacent components, usually by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass must be chemically compatible with the alloy used for the interconnect. In this work, Nicrofer6025, AISI446 and a Fecralloy were selected as examples of austenitic chromia-forming, ferritic chromia-forming, and alumina-forming alloys, respectively. Their chemical compatibility with a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, was evaluated. It was found that the BCAS sealing glass interacted chemically with both the chromia-forming alloys and the alumina-forming alloys. The extent and nature of the interactions and their final products depended on the matrix alloy compositions, the exposure conditions and/or proximity of the glass/alloy interface to the ambient air. These interactions and their mechanisms will be discussed with the assistance of thermodynamic modeling.

  19. Uranium Metal to Oxide Conversion by Air Oxidation –Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A

    2001-12-31

    Published technical information for the process of metal-to-oxide conversion of uranium components has been reviewed and summarized for the purpose of supporting critical decisions for new processes and facilities for the Y-12 National Security Complex. The science of uranium oxidation under low, intermediate, and high temperature conditions is reviewed. A process and system concept is outlined and process parameters identified for uranium oxide production rates. Recommendations for additional investigations to support a conceptual design of a new facility are outlined.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of carbon black/manganese oxide air cathodes for zinc-air batteries: Effects of the crystalline structure of manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Po-Chieh; Hu, Chi-Chang; Noda, Hiroyuki; Habazaki, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Manganese oxides (MnOx) in α-, β-, γ-, δ-MnO2 phases, Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnOOH are synthesized for systematically comparing their electrocatalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the Zn-air battery application. The optimal MnOx/XC-72 mass ratio for the ORR is equal to 1 and the oxide crystalline structure effect on the ORR is compared. The order of composites with respect to decreasing the ORR activity is: α-MnO2/XC-72 > γ-MnO2/XC-72 > β-MnO2/XC-72 > δ-MnO2/XC-72 > Mn2O3/XC-72 > Mn3O4/XC-72 > MnOOH/XC-72. The textural properties of MnOx are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Electrochemical studies include linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry, and the full-cell discharge test. The discharge peak power density of Zn-air batteries varies from 61.5 mW cm-2 (α-MnO2/XC-72) to 47.1 mW cm-2 (Mn3O4/XC-72). The maximum peak power density is 102 mW cm-2 for the Zn-air battery with an air cathode containing α-MnO2/XC-72 under an oxygen atmosphere when the carbon paper is 10AA. The specific capacity of all full-cell tests is higher than 750 mAh g-1 at all discharge current densities.

  1. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  2. Soot Oxidation in Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, propylene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2,C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962), because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  3. Soot Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, proplyene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, 02, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable, because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  4. Mechanically reliable surface oxides for high-temperature corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Veal, B.W.; Grimsditch, M.; Renusch, D.; Paulikas, A.P.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion is widely recognized as being important, but an understanding of the underlying phenomena involves factors such as the chemistry and physics of early stages of oxidation, chemistry and bonding at the substrate/oxide interface, role of segregants on the strength of that bond, transport processes through scale, mechanisms of residual stress generation and relief, and fracture behavior at the oxide/substrate interface. Because of this complexity a multilaboratory program has been initiated under the auspices of the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, with strong interactions and cross-leveraging with DOE Fossil Energy and US industry. Objective is to systematically generate the knowledge required to establish a scientific basis for designing and synthesizing improved protective oxide scales/coatings (slow-growing, adherent, sound) on high-temperature materials without compromising the requisite properties of the bulk materials. The objectives of program work at Argonne are to (1) correlate actual corrosion performance with stresses, voids, segregants, interface roughness, initial stages of oxidation, and microstructures; (2) study such behavior in growing or as-grown films; and (3) define prescriptive design and synthesis routes to mechanically reliable surface oxides. Several techniques, such as Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray grazing incidence reflectance, grazing-angle X-ray fluorescence, optical fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy, are used in the studies. Tne project has selected Fe-25 wt.% Cr-20 wt.% Ni and Fe-Cr-Al alloys, which are chromia- and alumina-formers respectively, for the studies. This paper presents some of the results on early stages of oxidation and on surface segregation of elements.

  5. Eumelanin- and pheomelanin-based colour advertise resistance to oxidative stress in opposite ways.

    PubMed

    Roulin, A; Almasi, B; Meichtry-Stier, K S; Jenni, L

    2011-10-01

    The control mechanisms and information content of melanin-based colourations are still debated among evolutionary biologists. Recent hypotheses contend that molecules involved in melanogenesis alter other physiological processes, thereby generating covariation between melanin-based colouration and other phenotypic attributes. Interestingly, several molecules such as agouti and glutathione that trigger the production of reddish-brown pheomelanin have an inhibitory effect on the production of black/grey eumelanin, whereas other hormones, such as melanocortins, have the opposite effect. We therefore propose the hypothesis that phenotypic traits positively correlated with the degree of eumelanin-based colouration may be negatively correlated with the degree of pheomelanin-based colouration, or vice versa. Given the role played by the melanocortin system and glutathione on melanogenesis and resistance to oxidative stress, we examined the prediction that resistance to oxidative stress is positively correlated with the degree of black colouration but negatively with the degree of reddish colouration. Using the barn owl (Tyto alba) as a model organism, we swapped eggs between randomly chosen nests to allocate genotypes randomly among environments and then we measured resistance to oxidative stress using the KRL assay in nestlings raised by foster parents. As predicted, the degree of black and reddish pigmentations was positively and negatively correlated, respectively, with resistance to oxidative stress. Our results reveal that eumelanin- and pheomelanin-based colourations can be redundant signals of resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:21745253

  6. Oxidant air pollution: estimated effects on US vegetation in 1969 and 1974

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Morris, S.C.; Coveney, E.A.

    1980-11-01

    In February 1979, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) revised the primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for photochemical oxidants. This revision of the standards, based principally on critical review of health effects data, engendered considerable controversy. Several research efforts were subsequently initiated by EPA to develop data to support promulgation of future standards. Effects of air pollutants on vegetation are now being studied by the National Crop Loss Assessment Network (NCLAN) program. An initial element of the NCLAN effort was critical evaluation and preliminary quantitative economic estimation of oxidant effects on vegetation using the Benedict model. This report gives estimates of vegetation value and of loss caused by oxidants in 1969 and 1974 for 687 counties. Losses are estimated to be $1.3 x 10/sup 8/ and $2.9 x 10/sup 8/ in 1969 and 1974, respectively. These losses represent $1.5% of the total value of vegetation in the counties examined. Ornamentals in 1969 and Field Crops in 1974 dominated the total loss estimates. For agricultural crops, loss appeared to increase in the following order: Seed Crops, Citrus, Fruits and Nuts, Vegetables, and Field Crops. Geographic disaggregation of the estimates suggests that for both 1969 and 1974 oxidant loss was greatest in Federal Region IX, especially within the state of California. These estimates should be used with caution because they are based on subjective dose-response damage functions and on air quality measures that may be inaccurate.

  7. Oxygen intake in track and treadmill running with observations on the effect of air resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, L. G. C. E.

    1970-01-01

    1. The relation of V̇O2 and speed was measured on seven athletes running on a cinder track and an all-weather track. The results were compared with similar observations on four athletes running on a treadmill. 2. In treadmill running the relation was linear and the zero intercept coincided with resting V̇O2. 3. In track running the relation was curvilinear, but was adequately represented by a linear regression over a range of speeds extending from 8·0 km/hr (2·2 m/sec) to 21·5 km/hr (6·0 m/sec). The slope of this line was substantially steeper than the regression line slope for treadmill running. 4. The influence of air resistance in running was estimated from measurements of V̇O2 on a subject running on a treadmill at constant speed against wind of varying velocity. 5. The extra O2 intake (ΔV̇O2) associated with wind increased as the square of wind velocity. If wind velocity and running velocity are equal, as in running on a track in calm air, ΔV̇O2 will increase as the cube of velocity. 6. It was estimated that the energy cost of overcoming air resistance in track running is about 8% of total energy cost at 21·5 km/hr (5000 m races) and 16% for sprinting 100 m in 10·0 sec. ImagesFig. 4 PMID:5532903

  8. Oxygen intake in track and treadmill running with observations on the effect of air resistance.

    PubMed

    Pugh, L G

    1970-05-01

    1. The relation of V(O2) and speed was measured on seven athletes running on a cinder track and an all-weather track. The results were compared with similar observations on four athletes running on a treadmill.2. In treadmill running the relation was linear and the zero intercept coincided with resting V(O2).3. In track running the relation was curvilinear, but was adequately represented by a linear regression over a range of speeds extending from 8.0 km/hr (2.2 m/sec) to 21.5 km/hr (6.0 m/sec). The slope of this line was substantially steeper than the regression line slope for treadmill running.4. The influence of air resistance in running was estimated from measurements of V(O2) on a subject running on a treadmill at constant speed against wind of varying velocity.5. The extra O(2) intake (DeltaV(O2)) associated with wind increased as the square of wind velocity. If wind velocity and running velocity are equal, as in running on a track in calm air, DeltaV(O2) will increase as the cube of velocity.6. It was estimated that the energy cost of overcoming air resistance in track running is about 8% of total energy cost at 21.5 km/hr (5000 m races) and 16% for sprinting 100 m in 10.0 sec.

  9. Lichen communities on conifers in Southern California mountains: an ecological survey relative to oxidant air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, L.L.; Nash T.H. III

    1983-01-01

    In comparison with collections from the early 1900's when oxidant air pollution was essentially absent, 50% fewer lichen species were found on conifers during 3 yr (1976-1979) of collecting and sampling in the mountains of Southern California. Among the five mountain ranges studied, the San Bernardino Mountains, the region with the highest oxidant levels, had lower lichen frequency and cover values. Within the San Bernardino study sites, lichen cover was inversely related to estimated oxidant doses. Furthermore, at sites with high oxidant levels, marked morphological deterioration of the common species Hypogymnia enteromorpha was documented. Transplants of this species from the relatively unpolluted Cuyamaca Rancho State Park in the San Bernardino Mountains exhibited similar deterioration after a year's exposure.

  10. Lichen communities on conifers in Southern California mountains: an ecological survey relative to oxidant air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, L.L.; Nash, T.H. III

    1983-01-01

    In comparison with collections from the early 1900's when oxidant air pollution was essentially absent, 50% fewer lichen species were found on conifers during 3 yr (1976-1979) of collecting and sampling in the mountains of Southern California. Among the five mountain ranges studied, the San Bernardino Mountains, the region with the highest oxidant levels, had lower lichen frequency and cover values. Within the San Bernardino study sites, lichen cover was inversely related to estimated oxidant doses. Furthermore, at sites with high oxidant levels, marked morphological deterioration of the common species Hypogymnia enteromorpha was documented. Transplants of this species from the relatively unpolluted Cuyamaca Rancho State Park into the San Bernardino Mountains exhibited similar deterioration after a year's exposure. 4 figures, 9 tables.

  11. Air Oxidation Behavior of Two Ti-Base Alloys Synthesized by HIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Guo, Q. Q.; Liu, L. L.; Xu, L.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn and Ti-6Al-4V produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been studied at 650-850°C in air for 24 h. The oxidation kinetics of both alloys followed the parabolic law with good approximation, except for Ti-5Al-2.5Sn oxidized at 850°C. Multi-layered scales formed on both alloys at 750°C and 850°C. Ternary additions of Sn and V accounted for the different morphology of the scales formed on these two alloys. In addition, the oxidation behavior of HIP alloys is compared with that of the corresponding cast alloys and the scaling mechanism is discussed.

  12. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  13. Thermal contact resistance in solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillig, Marius; Biedermann, Thomas; Karl, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    For detailed thermal modelling of SOFC stacks, in particular research of improved thermal management, start-up and shut-down processes, thermal contact resistances (TCR) are required input parameters. These parameters are difficult to access analytically and strongly depend on temperature, geometry and material properties of the contact. Therefore, this work presents an experimental study of thermal contact resistance between different components of one SOFC stack repeating unit at varying temperatures up to typical operating temperatures (800 °C). Heat transfer rates are obtained for full repeating units, cell only, contact mesh only and sealing set-ups. Thermal interface resistances between interconnector and Ni-mesh, Ni-mesh and anode, cathode and interconnector as well as between interconnector and sealing are computed based on the measured data and provide information for numerical SOFC stack modelling.

  14. Strengthening of oxidation resistant materials for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, D. R.; Kirchner, H. P.; Gruver, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Compressive surface layers were formed on hot-pressed silicon carbide and nitride. The objective of these treatments was to improve the impact resistance of these materials at 1590 K (2400 F). Quenching was used to form compressive surface layers on silicon carbide. The presence of the compressive stresses was demonstrated by slotted rod tests. Compressive stresses were retained at elevated temperatures. Improvements in impact resistance at 1590 K (2400 F) and flexural strength at room temperature were achieved using cylindrical rods 3.3 mm (0.13 in.) in diameter. Carburizing treatments were used to form the surface layers on silicon nitride. In a few cases using rectangular bars improvements in impact resistance at 1590 K (2400 F) were observed.

  15. The Measurement of Fuel-Air Ratio by Analysis for the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C.; Meem, J. Lawrence, Jr.

    1943-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy fuel Specification No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs for the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124.

  16. The Measurement of Fuel-air Ratio by Analysis of the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memm, J. Lawrence, Jr.

    1943-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy Fuel Specification, No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs or the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124

  17. Impact of Air Filter Material on Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) Device Characteristics in HF Vapor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chih-Wen; Lou, Jen-Chung; Yeh, Ching-Fa; Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Lin, Shiuan-Jeng; Kusumi, Toshio

    2004-05-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) is becoming increasingly important as devices are scaled down to the nanometer generation. Optimum ultra low penetration air (ULPA) filter technology can eliminate AMC. In a cleanroom, however, the acid vapor generated from the cleaning process may degrade the ULPA filter, releasing AMC to the air and the surface of wafers, degrading the electrical characteristics of devices. This work proposes the new PTFE ULPA filter, which is resistant to acid vapor corrosion, to solve this problem. Experimental results demonstrate that the PTFE ULPA filter can effectively eliminate the AMC and provide a very clean cleanroom environment.

  18. Catalytic wet air oxidation of carboxylic acids on TiO{sub 2}-supported ruthenium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Beziat, J.C.; Besson, M.; Gallezot, P.; Durecu, S.

    1999-02-15

    The total oxidation of aqueous solutions of carboxylic acids by air was studied in a slurry reactor over the temperature range 180--100 C and oxygen partial pressure of 0.3--1.8 MPa in the presence of a 2.8%Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalyst. The influence of various parameters is presented: the catalytic wet air oxidation of succinic acid is 0 order with respect to succinic acid; the order with respect to oxygen pressure is 0.4, and the activation energy is ca. 125 kJ/mol. It was found that acetic acid, which is one of the intermediates, and CO{sub 2} have no retarding effect on the total organic carbon abatement rate of succinic acid. Substitution of one hydrogen atom of the methyl group in acetic acid by Cl, OH, or NH{sub 2} gives an increase of the oxidation rate. However, it was proposed that the low activity of acetic acid oxidation is due not only to the difficulty to oxidize the methyl group, but also to the low adsorption coefficient of acetic acid on ruthenium surface. Inorganic salts, such as sodium chloride, only slightly decrease the oxidation rate of acetic acid. The absence of metal ions (Ru, Ti) in the effluents after reaction and the absence of particle sintering indicate also a high stability of the catalyst under the conditions employed. The catalyst can be recycled without loss of activity after the second run. The activity becomes stable after the attainment of a steady-state coverage of the Ru particles by oxygen. The study of the effect of reduction-oxidation treatments of the catalyst showed that the activity depends on the oxidation state of the surface.

  19. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC...

  20. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC...

  1. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC...

  2. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC...

  3. OXIDATION-RESISTANT COATING ON ARTICLES OF YTTRIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Wilder, D.R.; Wirkus, C.D.

    1963-11-01

    A process for protecting yttrium metal from oxidation by applying thereto and firing thereon a liquid suspension of a fritted ground silicate or phosphate glass plus from 5 to 35% by weight of CeO/sub 2/ is presented. (AEC)

  4. Thermochemical Compatibility and Oxidation Resistance of Advanced LWR Fuel Cladding

    DOE PAGES

    Besmann, T. M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Unocic, K. A.

    2016-06-21

    We assessed the thermochemical compatibility of potential replacement cladding materials for zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Considered were FeCrAl steel (similar to Kanthal APMT), Nb-1%Zr (similar to PWC-11), and a hybrid SiC-composite with a metallic barrier layer. The niobium alloy was also seen as requiring an oxidation protective layer, and a diffusion silicide was investigated. Metallic barrier layers for the SiC-composite reviewed included a FeCrAl alloy, Nb-1%Zr, and chromium. Thermochemical calculations were performed to determine oxidation behavior of the materials in steam, and for hybrid SiC-composites possible interactions between the metallic layer and SiC. Additionally, experimental exposures of SiC-alloymore » reaction couples at 673K, 1073K, and 1273K for 168 h in an inert atmosphere were made and microanalysis performed. Whereas all materials were determined to oxidize under higher oxygen partial pressures in the steam environment, these varied by material with expected protective oxides forming. Finally, the computed and experimental results indicate the formation of liquid phase eutectic in the FeCrAl-SiC system at the higher temperatures.« less

  5. Oxidation resistant filler metals for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1986-01-01

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using essentially pure trinickel aluminide and trinickel aluminide containing small amounts of carbon. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  6. Better End-Cap Processing for Oxidation-Resistant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2004-01-01

    A class of end-cap compounds that increase the thermo-oxidative stab ility of polyimides of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PM R) type has been extended. In addition, an improved processing proto col for this class of end-cap compounds has been invented.

  7. Modified ferritic iron alloys with improved high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    An alloy modification program was conducted in which the compositions of two existing Fe-Cr-Al alloys (Armco 18SR and GE-1541) were changed to achieve either improved high-temperature strength or improved fabricability. Only modifications of Armco 18SR were successful in achieving increased strength without loss of fabricability or oxidation resistance. The best modified alloy, designated NASA-18T, had twice the rupture strength of Armco 18SR at 800 and 1000 C. The NASA-18T alloy also had better oxidation resistance than Armco 18SR and comparable fabricability. The nominal composition of NASA-18T is Fe-18Cr-2Al-1Si-1.25Ta. All attempted modifications of the GE-1541 alloy were unsuccessful in terms of achieving better fabricability without sacrificing high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance.

  8. Oxidation resistant nanocrystalline MCrAl(Y) coatings and methods of forming such coatings

    DOEpatents

    Cheruvu, Narayana S.; Wei, Ronghua

    2014-07-29

    The present disclosure relates to an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating and a method of forming an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating. An oxidation resistant coating comprising an MCrAl(Y) alloy may be deposited on a substrate, wherein M, includes iron, nickel, cobalt, or combinations thereof present greater than 50 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, chromium is present in the range of 15 wt % to 30 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, aluminum is present in the range of 6 wt % to 12 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy and yttrium, is optionally present in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy. In addition, the coating may exhibit a grain size of 200 nm or less as deposited.

  9. On the Resistance of the Air at High Speeds and on the Automatic Rotation of Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riabouchinski, D

    1921-01-01

    Here, the laws governing the flow of a compressible fluid through an opening in a thin wall are applied to the resistance of the air at high speeds, especially as applied to the automatic rotation of projectiles. The instability which we observe in projectiles shot into the air without being given a moment of rotation about their axis of symmetry, or without stabilizing planes, is a phenomenon of automatic rotation. It is noted that we can prevent this phenomenon of automatic rotation by bringing the center of gravity sufficiently near one end, or by fitting the projectile with stabilizing planes or a tail. The automatic rotation of projectiles is due to the suction produced by the systematic formation of vortices behind the extremity of the projectile moving with the wind.

  10. Oxidation of spent fuel in air at 175{degree} to 195{degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R.E.; Buchanan, H.C.; Thomas, L.E.; Stout, R.B.

    1992-04-01

    Oxidation tests in dry air were conducted on four LWR spent fuels at 175{degrees} and 195{degrees}C to determine the effect of the fuel characteristics on the oxidation state likely to exist at the time leaching occurs in a potential repository. Weight changes were measured and samples were examined by XRD, ceramography, TEM, and TGA. Despite local variations in the grain boundary susceptibility to oxidation, all four fuels progressed toward an apparent endpoint at an oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio of 2.4. The sole oxidation product was U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x,} a cubic phase structurally related to UO{sub 2} but with a slightly smaller lattice constant. The growth of the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} from the grain boundaries into the UO{sub 2} grains followed parabolic kinetics and had an activation energy of 26.6 kcal/mol. Based on the kinetics, the time required at 95{degrees}C to completely oxidize LWR spent fuel to U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} would be at least 2000 yr. The next oxidation product to form after the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} phase may be U{sub 3}O{sub 8,} but no U{sub 3}O{sub 8} or other dilatational oxidation product has been detected in these accelerated tests conducted up to 25,000 h.

  11. Oxidation of spent fuel in air at 175 degree to 195 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R.E.; Buchanan, H.C.; Thomas, L.E. ); Stout, R.B. )

    1992-04-01

    Oxidation tests in dry air were conducted on four LWR spent fuels at 175{degrees} and 195{degrees}C to determine the effect of the fuel characteristics on the oxidation state likely to exist at the time leaching occurs in a potential repository. Weight changes were measured and samples were examined by XRD, ceramography, TEM, and TGA. Despite local variations in the grain boundary susceptibility to oxidation, all four fuels progressed toward an apparent endpoint at an oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio of 2.4. The sole oxidation product was U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x,} a cubic phase structurally related to UO{sub 2} but with a slightly smaller lattice constant. The growth of the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} from the grain boundaries into the UO{sub 2} grains followed parabolic kinetics and had an activation energy of 26.6 kcal/mol. Based on the kinetics, the time required at 95{degrees}C to completely oxidize LWR spent fuel to U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} would be at least 2000 yr. The next oxidation product to form after the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} phase may be U{sub 3}O{sub 8,} but no U{sub 3}O{sub 8} or other dilatational oxidation product has been detected in these accelerated tests conducted up to 25,000 h.

  12. Oxidation Behavior and Mechanism of Pentlandite at 973 K (700 °C) in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huihui; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Yu, Ranbo; Xing, Xianran

    2012-06-01

    The oxidation behavior of synthetic pentlandite at 973 K (700 °C) under isothermal conditions was investigated. The pentlandite sample (Ni,Fe)9S8 was synthesized from pure components and oxidized at 973 K (700 °C) in air in a muffle furnace. The phase identification and components analysis of the oxidation products were performed by using the Rietveld quantitative analysis method based on the powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The magnetic hysteresis loops were determined by a vibrating sample magnetometer. Fe2O3, Ni x Fe3- x O4, and NiO were dominant oxidation products, and their weight fractions changed in different ways along with the oxidation time. The nickel-rich phase and sulfur-rich phase were observed as intermediate phases in unreacted cores during oxidation, which led to the formation of gaps and holes. The oxidation reaction rate was rapid in the first 2 hours, and then it slowed down sharply.

  13. Oxidation of delta-phase plutonium alloy: Corrosion kinetics in dry and humid air at 35 {degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    Kinetic data for oxidation of delta-phase plutonium alloy are evaluated to provide a technical basis for assessing the merit of an existing time limitation on air exposure of components during process operations. Data describing the effects of humidity and oxygen pressure on the oxidation rate of the Pu-1.0 wt% Ga alloy at elevated temperatures are obtained from literature sources and used to predict the oxidation behavior of the alloy in air at 35 C and 0 to 100% relative humidity. A mandated six-hour limit on air exposure is inconsistent with a predicted thirty-day period required for formation of a 1-{micro}m-thick oxide layer in moisture-saturated air at 35 C. Relationships are defined for predicting kinetic behavior of the alloy at other conditions, and recommendations for addressing oxidation-related concerns in production are presented.

  14. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  15. Environmental degradation of oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings for fuel-flexible gas turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Prabhakar

    The development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been undoubtedly the most critical advancement in materials technology for modern gas turbine engines. TBCs are widely used in gas turbine engines for both power-generation and propulsion applications. Metallic oxidation-resistant coatings (ORCs) are also widely employed as a stand-alone protective coating or bond coat for TBCs in many high-temperature applications. Among the widely studied durability issues in these high-temperature protective coatings, one critical challenge that received greater attention in recent years is their resistance to high-temperature degradation due to corrosive deposits arising from fuel impurities and CMAS (calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate) sand deposits from air ingestion. The presence of vanadium, sulfur, phosphorus, sodium and calcium impurities in alternative fuels warrants a clear understanding of high-temperature materials degradation for the development of fuel-flexible gas turbine engines. Degradation due to CMAS is a critical problem for gas turbine components operating in a dust-laden environment. In this study, high-temperature degradation due to aggressive deposits such as V2O5, P2O 5, Na2SO4, NaVO3, CaSO4 and a laboratory-synthesized CMAS sand for free-standing air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the topcoat of the TBC system, and APS CoNiCrAlY, the bond coat of the TBC system or a stand-alone ORC, is examined. Phase transformations and microstructural development were examined by using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. This study demonstrated that the V2O5 melt degrades the APS YSZ through the formation of ZrV2O7 and YVO 4 at temperatures below 747°C and above 747°C, respectively. Formation of YVO4 leads to the depletion of the Y2O 3 stabilizer and the deleterious transformation of the YSZ to the monoclinic ZrO2 phase. The investigation on the YSZ degradation by Na 2SO4 and a Na2SO4 + V2

  16. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today. PMID:26573709

  17. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today.

  18. NASA technical advances in aircraft occupant safety. [clear air turbulence detectors, fire resistant materials, and crashworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enders, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's aviation safety technology program examines specific safety problems associated with atmospheric hazards, crash-fire survival, control of aircraft on runways, human factors, terminal area operations hazards, and accident factors simulation. While aircraft occupants are ultimately affected by any of these hazards, their well-being is immediately impacted by three specific events: unexpected turbulence encounters, fire and its effects, and crash impact. NASA research in the application of laser technology to the problem of clear air turbulence detection, the development of fire resistant materials for aircraft construction, and to the improvement of seats and restraint systems to reduce crash injuries are reviewed.

  19. Nose-only water-pipe smoking effects on airway resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Raza, Haider; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; John, Annie; Yasin, Javed; Hameed, Rasheed S; Adeghate, Ernest; Ali, Badreldin H

    2013-11-01

    Water-pipe smoking (WPS) is a common practice in the Middle East and is now gaining popularity in Europe and the United States. However, there is a limited number of studies on the respiratory effects of WPS. More specifically, the underlying pulmonary pathophysiological mechanisms related to WPS exposure are not understood. Presently, we assessed the respiratory effects of nose-only exposure to mainstream WPS generated by commercially available honey flavored "moasel" tobacco. The duration of the session was 30 min/day and 5 days/wk for 1 mo. Control mice were exposed to air only. Here, we measured in BALB/c mice the airway resistance using forced-oscillation technique. Lung inflammation was assessed histopathologically and by biochemical analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and oxidative stress was evaluated biochemically by measuring lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and several antioxidant enzymes. Pulmonary inflammation assessment showed an increase in neutrophil and lymphocyte numbers. Likewise, airway resistance was significantly increased in the WPS group compared with controls. Tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 concentrations were significantly increased in BAL fluid. Lipid peroxidation in lung tissue was significantly increased whereas the level and activity of antioxidants including reduced glutathione, glutathione S transferase, and superoxide dismutase were all significantly decreased following WPS exposure, indicating the occurrence of oxidative stress. Moreover, carboxyhemoglobin levels were significantly increased in the WPS group. We conclude that 1-mo nose-only exposure to WPS significantly increased airway resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Our results provide a mechanistic explanation for the limited clinical studies that reported the detrimental respiratory effects of WPS.

  20. Air-pressure tunable depletion width, rectification behavior, and charge conduction in oxide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alivov, Yahya; Funke, Hans H; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-02-01

    Metal-oxide nanotubes provide large surface areas and functionalizable surfaces for a variety of optical and electronic applications. Here we report air-tunable rectifying behavior, depletion width modulation, and two-dimensional (2D) charge conduction in hollow titanium-dioxide nanotubes. The metal contact forms a Schottky-diode in the nanotubes, and the rectification factor (on/off ratio) can be varied by more than 3 orders of magnitude (1-2 × 10(3)) as the air pressure is increased from 2 mTorr to atmospheric pressure. This behavior is explained using a change in depletion width of these thin nanotubes by adsorption of water vapor on both surfaces of a hollow nanotube, and the resulting formation of a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) junction, which controls the 2D charge conduction properties in thin oxide nanotubes.

  1. Cyclic oxidation resistance of a reaction milled NiAl-AlN composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Based upon recent mechanical property tests a NiAl-AlN composite produced by cryomilling has very attractive high temperature strength. This paper focuses on the oxidation resistance of the NiAl-AlN composite at 1473 and 1573 K as compared to that of Ni-47Al-0.15Zr, one of the most oxidation resistant intermetallics. The results of cyclic oxidation tests show that the NiAl-AlN composite has excellent properties although not quite as good as those of Ni-47Al-0.15Zr. The onset of failure of the NiAl-AlN was unique in that it was not accompanied by a change in scale composition from alumina to less protective oxides. Failure in the composite appears to be related to the entrapment of AlN particles within the alumina scale.

  2. Oxidation resistance and microstructure of Ru-capped extreme ultraviolet lithography multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Dai, Z; Nelson, E J; Wall, M A; Alameda, J B; Nguyen, N; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Taylor, J S; Aquila, A; Edwards, N V

    2005-06-15

    The oxidation resistance of protective capping layers for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) multilayers depends on their microstructure. Differently prepared Ru-capping layers, deposited on Mo/Si EUVL multilayers, were investigated to establish their baseline structural, optical, and surface properties in as-deposited state. The same capping layer structures were then tested for their thermal stability and oxidation resistance. The best performing Ru-capping layer structure was analyzed in detail with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As compared to other Ru capping layers preparations studied here it is the only one that shows grains with preferential orientation. This information is essential for modeling and performance optimization of EUVL multilayers.

  3. The Effect of Hydrogen Annealing on the Oxidation Resistance of Four EPM Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.

    2001-01-01

    Four single crystal EPM (enabling propulsion materials) developmental airfoil superalloys were hydrogen annealed at 1300 C for up to 100 hours to remove sulfur and improve oxidation resistance. Although the 1100 and 1150 C cyclic oxidation resistance was remarkably improved by annealing for 24 or 100 hours, the behavior was still considerably inferior to that of commercially available single crystal superalloys, especially those that are either Y-doped or hydrogen annealed. Excessive degradation in the developmental alloys appeared to be correlated with low Cr contents and, to a lesser extent, high Co and Re contents.

  4. A study of mercuric oxide and zinc-air battery life in hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, C; Lacey, N K

    1997-09-01

    The requirement to phase out mercuric oxide (mercury) batteries on environmental grounds has led to the widespread introduction of zinc-air technology. The possibility arises that high drain hearing aids may not be adequately catered for by zinc-air cells, leading to poor performance. This study investigated the hearing aid user's ability to perceive differences between zinc-air and mercury cells in normal everyday usage. The data was collected for 100 experienced hearing aid users in field trials. Users report 50 per cent greater life for zinc-air cells in high power aids and 28 per cent in low power aids. The average life of the zinc-air cells range from 15 days in high power to 34 days in low power aids. Users are able to perceive a difference in sound quality in favour of zinc-air cells for low and medium power aids. The hearing aid population is not disadvantaged by phasing out mercury cells. PMID:9373545

  5. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  6. Amine-Oxide Hybrid Materials for CO2 Capture from Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Didas, Stephanie A; Choi, Sunho; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-10-20

    Oxide supports functionalized with amine moieties have been used for decades as catalysts and chromatographic media. Owing to the recognized impact of atmospheric CO2 on global climate change, the study of the use of amine-oxide hybrid materials as CO2 sorbents has exploded in the past decade. While the majority of the work has concerned separation of CO2 from dilute mixtures such as flue gas from coal-fired power plants, it has been recognized by us and others that such supported amine materials are also perhaps uniquely suited to extract CO2 from ultradilute gas mixtures, such as ambient air. As unique, low temperature chemisorbents, they can operate under ambient conditions, spontaneously extracting CO2 from ambient air, while being regenerated under mild conditions using heat or the combination of heat and vacuum. This Account describes the evolution of our activities on the design of amine-functionalized silica materials for catalysis to the design, characterization, and utilization of these materials in CO2 separations. New materials developed in our laboratory, such as hyperbranched aminosilica materials, and previously known amine-oxide hybrid compositions, have been extensively studied for CO2 extraction from simulated ambient air (400 ppm of CO2). The role of amine type and structure (molecular, polymeric), support type and structure, the stability of the various compositions under simulated operating conditions, and the nature of the adsorbed CO2 have been investigated in detail. The requirements for an effective, practical air capture process have been outlined and the ability of amine-oxide hybrid materials to meet these needs has been discussed. Ultimately, the practicality of such a "direct air capture" process is predicated not only on the physicochemical properties of the sorbent, but also how the sorbent operates in a practical process that offers a scalable gas-solid contacting strategy. In this regard, the utility of low pressure drop monolith

  7. Amine-Oxide Hybrid Materials for CO2 Capture from Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Didas, Stephanie A; Choi, Sunho; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-10-20

    Oxide supports functionalized with amine moieties have been used for decades as catalysts and chromatographic media. Owing to the recognized impact of atmospheric CO2 on global climate change, the study of the use of amine-oxide hybrid materials as CO2 sorbents has exploded in the past decade. While the majority of the work has concerned separation of CO2 from dilute mixtures such as flue gas from coal-fired power plants, it has been recognized by us and others that such supported amine materials are also perhaps uniquely suited to extract CO2 from ultradilute gas mixtures, such as ambient air. As unique, low temperature chemisorbents, they can operate under ambient conditions, spontaneously extracting CO2 from ambient air, while being regenerated under mild conditions using heat or the combination of heat and vacuum. This Account describes the evolution of our activities on the design of amine-functionalized silica materials for catalysis to the design, characterization, and utilization of these materials in CO2 separations. New materials developed in our laboratory, such as hyperbranched aminosilica materials, and previously known amine-oxide hybrid compositions, have been extensively studied for CO2 extraction from simulated ambient air (400 ppm of CO2). The role of amine type and structure (molecular, polymeric), support type and structure, the stability of the various compositions under simulated operating conditions, and the nature of the adsorbed CO2 have been investigated in detail. The requirements for an effective, practical air capture process have been outlined and the ability of amine-oxide hybrid materials to meet these needs has been discussed. Ultimately, the practicality of such a "direct air capture" process is predicated not only on the physicochemical properties of the sorbent, but also how the sorbent operates in a practical process that offers a scalable gas-solid contacting strategy. In this regard, the utility of low pressure drop monolith

  8. Air, aqueous and thermal stabilities of Ce3+ ions in cerium oxide nanoparticle layers with substrates.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Tamaki; Traversa, Enrico

    2014-06-21

    Abundant oxygen vacancies coexisting with Ce(3+) ions in fluorite cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have the potential to enhance catalytic ability, but the ratio of unstable Ce(3+) ions in CNPs is typically low. Our recent work, however, demonstrated that the abundant Ce(3+) ions created in cerium oxide nanoparticle layers (CNPLs) by Ar ion irradiation were stable in air at room temperature. Ce valence states in CNPs correlate with the catalytic ability that involves redox reactions between Ce(3+) and Ce(4+) ions in given application environments (e.g. high temperature in carbon monoxide gas conversion and immersion conditions in biomedical applications). To better understand the mechanism by which Ce(3+) ions achieve stability in CNPLs, we examined (i) extra-long air-stability, (ii) thermal stability up to 500 °C, and (iii) aqueous stability of Ce(3+) ions in water, buffer solution and cell culture medium. It is noteworthy that air-stability of Ce(3+) ions in CNPLs persisted for more than 1 year. Thermal stability results showed that oxidation of Ce(3+) to Ce(4+) occurred at 350 °C in air. Highly concentrated Ce(3+) ions in ultra-thin CNPLs slowly oxidized in water within 1 day, but stability was improved in the cell culture medium. Ce(3+) stability of CNPLs immersed in the medium was associated with phosphorus adsorption on the Ce(3+) sites. This study also illuminates the potential interaction mechanisms of stable Ce(3+) ions in CNPLs. These findings could be utilized to understand catalytic mechanisms of CNPs with abundant oxygen vacancies in their application environments.

  9. Pyrrhotite Oxidation as an Indicator of Air Entrainment into Eruption Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2015-12-01

    Fragmented magmas in eruption columns obtain buoyancy by entrainment and heating of cold air. Theoretically, the proportion of the entrained air and temperature change of the magma fragments can be calculated through rigorous fluid dynamics, but these factors have not been evaluated from natural pyroclasts. In this study, we developed a new method for quantifying the degree of air entrainment based on pyrrhotite (Po) oxidation reactions, whose time scale corresponds to the typical duration of (sub-) Plinian eruptions (i.e., tens of seconds to a few hours). We examined pumice clasts and lava flows from the 1914-15 eruption of Sakurajima. During this event, various types of eruption were observed: Plinian eruptions with intermittent generation of clastogenic lava flow, followed by voluminous effusive lava flow. The products of Po oxidation consisted of magnetite (Mt), hematite (Hm), and their composites. The occurrence of Po and the oxides were systematically correlated with the types of eruption. In Plinian pumices, unreacted Po ± porous Mt-Hm composite reaction rims were dominant, whereas in the clastogenic lava, porous Hm occurred predominantly with scarce unreacted Po and porous Mt. In the effusive lava, a variety of Po, Mt, and Hm assemblage was observed, but Po did not coexist with Hm-rims. The porous Mt crystals in the pumice clasts were found to be Ti-free, whereas those in the effusive lava had Ti-enriched rims. These correlations were explained by considering two factors: the achieved fO2, which was controlled by the extent of fragmentation (i.e., surface area exposed to air), and duration of the maintenance of a high-T and high-fO2 condition. This study has demonstrated that the cooling timescale of pumice clasts in eruption columns can be estimated through the rate of Po oxidation reactions Po→Mt and Mt→Hm. Lavas of clastogenic origin may also be recognized from the reaction.

  10. Scaling effect on unipolar and bipolar resistive switching of metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Takeshi; Nagashima, Kazuki; Oka, Keisuke; Kanai, Masaki; Klamchuen, Annop; Park, Bae Ho; Kawai, Tomoji

    2013-01-01

    Electrically driven resistance change in metal oxides opens up an interdisciplinary research field for next-generation non-volatile memory. Resistive switching exhibits an electrical polarity dependent "bipolar-switching" and a polarity independent "unipolar-switching", however tailoring the electrical polarity has been a challenging issue. Here we demonstrate a scaling effect on the emergence of the electrical polarity by examining the resistive switching behaviors of Pt/oxide/Pt junctions over 8 orders of magnitudes in the areas. We show that the emergence of two electrical polarities can be categorised as a diagram of an electric field and a cell area. This trend is qualitatively common for various oxides including NiOx, CoOx, and TiO(2-x). We reveal the intrinsic difference between unipolar switching and bipolar switching on the area dependence, which causes a diversity of an electrical polarity for various resistive switching devices with different geometries. This will provide a foundation for tailoring resistive switching behaviors of metal oxides. PMID:23584551

  11. Thermally oxidized titania nanotubes enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, John; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Butt, Arman; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T

    2016-02-01

    The negative impact of in vivo corrosion of metallic biomedical implants remains a complex problem in the medical field. We aimed to determine the effects of electrochemical anodization (60V, 2h) and thermal oxidation (600°C) on the corrosive behavior of Ti-6Al-4V, with serum proteins, at physiological temperature. Anodization produced a mixture of anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes, while the annealing process yielded an anatase/rutile mixture of TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes. The surface area was analyzed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and was estimated to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polished control samples. Corrosion resistance was evaluated on the parameters of open circuit potential, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, passivation current density, polarization resistance and equivalent circuit modeling. Samples both anodized and thermally oxidized exhibited shifts of open circuit potential and corrosion potential in the noble direction, indicating a more stable nanoporous/nanotube layer, as well as lower corrosion current densities and passivation current densities than the smooth control. They also showed increased polarization resistance and diffusion limited charge transfer within the bulk oxide layer. The treatment groups studied can be ordered from greatest corrosion resistance to least as Anodized+Thermally Oxidized > Anodized > Smooth > Thermally Oxidized for the conditions investigated. This study concludes that anodized surface has a potential to prevent long term implant failure due to corrosion in a complex in-vivo environment. PMID:26652422

  12. Thermally oxidized titania nanotubes enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, John; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Butt, Arman; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T

    2016-02-01

    The negative impact of in vivo corrosion of metallic biomedical implants remains a complex problem in the medical field. We aimed to determine the effects of electrochemical anodization (60V, 2h) and thermal oxidation (600°C) on the corrosive behavior of Ti-6Al-4V, with serum proteins, at physiological temperature. Anodization produced a mixture of anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes, while the annealing process yielded an anatase/rutile mixture of TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes. The surface area was analyzed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and was estimated to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polished control samples. Corrosion resistance was evaluated on the parameters of open circuit potential, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, passivation current density, polarization resistance and equivalent circuit modeling. Samples both anodized and thermally oxidized exhibited shifts of open circuit potential and corrosion potential in the noble direction, indicating a more stable nanoporous/nanotube layer, as well as lower corrosion current densities and passivation current densities than the smooth control. They also showed increased polarization resistance and diffusion limited charge transfer within the bulk oxide layer. The treatment groups studied can be ordered from greatest corrosion resistance to least as Anodized+Thermally Oxidized > Anodized > Smooth > Thermally Oxidized for the conditions investigated. This study concludes that anodized surface has a potential to prevent long term implant failure due to corrosion in a complex in-vivo environment.

  13. Method of making bearing materials. [self-lubricating, oxidation resistant composites for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for making a composite material which provides low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact. The composite material which is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure and a fluorine salt component which provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  14. The Nature of Surface Oxides on Corrosion-Resistant Nickel Alloy Covered by Alkaline Water

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A nickel alloy with high chrome and molybdenum content was found to form a highly resistive and passive oxide layer. The donor density and mobility of ions in the oxide layer has been determined as a function of the electrical potential when alkaline water layers are on the alloy surface in order to account for the relative inertness of the nickel alloy in corrosive environments. PMID:20672134

  15. Very Long Term Oxidation of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb at 704 C In Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, I. E.; Brady, M. P.; MacKay, R. A.; Smith, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction Titanium aluminides are of great interest for intermediate-temperature (600 C - 850 C) aerospace and power generation applications because of their high specific properties. Replacement of conventional superalloys by titanium aluminides offers the potential of significant weight savings. Extensive development efforts over the past IO years have led to the identification of y (TiAl) + alpha(sub 2) (Ti3Al) alloys, such as the G.E. alloy Ti48Al-2Cr-2Nb (all composition in at. %), which offer a balance of room temperature mechanical properties and high-temperature strength retention. The two phase gamma + alpha(sub 2) class of titanium aluminides also offers superior oxidation and embrittlement resistance compared to the alpha(sub 2) and orthorhombic classes of titanium aluminides. However, environmental durability is still a major concern. Significant progress has recently been made in understanding the fundamental aspects of the oxidation behavior of binary gamma + alpha(sub 2) Ti-Al alloys. However, most of this work has concentrated on short term (less than 1000 hours), high temperature (900 C - 1000 C) exposures. Also little data are available in the literature regarding the oxidation behavior of the quaternary and higher order gamma + alpha(sub 2) engineering alloys. This is especially true for the very long-term, low temperature conditions likely to be experienced during engineering applications. The present work addresses this regime to fill this gap by characterizing the oxidation behavior of Ti48Al-2Cr-2Nb for periods up to 9000 h at 704 C in air.

  16. Anisotropy and oxidative resistance of highly crosslinked UHMWPE after deformation processing by solid-state ram extrusion.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Steven M; Mazzucco, Dan; Rimnac, Clare M; Schroeder, Dave

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state deformation processing is a promising technique for modifying the physical and mechanical properties of highly crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) beyond simple thermal treatment cycles that have been employed previously. This study evaluates anisotropy and oxidative resistance in a novel, radiation crosslinked (50 kGy) UHMWPE material (ArComXL: Biomet, Inc., Warsaw, IN), incorporating solid-state, deformation processing by extrusion below the melt transition for application in total hip arthroplasty. Tensile, compression, and small punch tests were conducted to evaluate the material properties in the three principal axes of the resulting material. Furthermore, short-term oxidative resistance was evaluated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the small punch test in conjunction with accelerated shelf aging protocols. The results of this testing indicate that the material is anisotropic, with significantly enhanced strength oriented along the long axis of the rod. For certain other properties, the magnitude of the anisotropy was relatively slight, especially in the elastic regime, in which only a 20% difference was noted between the long axis of the rod and the orthogonal, radial direction. The highly crosslinked material contains detectable free radicals, at a concentration that is 90% less than control, gamma inert sterilized UHMWPE. An unexpected finding of this study was evidence of oxidative stability of the deformation-processed material, even after 4 weeks of accelerated aging in a pressure vessel containing five atmospheres of oxygen (ASTM F2003), which resulted in macroscopic embrittlement of the control material. The oxidative stability observed in ArComXL suggests that the deformation-processed material may be suitable for air-permeable packaging and gas sterilization, which has thus far been reserved for remelted highly crosslinked UHMWPE.

  17. Formation and growth of indoor air aerosol particles as a result of D-limonene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartiainen, E.; Kulmala, M.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Taipale, R.; Rinne, J.; Vehkamäki, H.

    Oxidation of D-limonene, which is a common monoterpene, can lead to new aerosol particle formation in indoor environments. Thus, products containing D-limonene, such as citrus fruits, air refresheners, household cleaning agents, and waxes, can act as indoor air aerosol particle sources. We released D-limonene into the room air by peeling oranges and measured the concentration of aerosol particles of three different size ranges. In addition, we measured the concentration of D-limonene, the oxidant, and the concentration of ozone, the oxidizing gas. Based on the measurements we calculated the growth rate of the small aerosol particles, which were 3-10 nm in diameter, to be about 6300nmh-1, and the losses of the aerosol particles that were due to the coagulation and condensation processes. From these, we further approximated the concentration of the condensable vapour and its source rate and then calculated the formation rate of the small aerosol particles. For the final result, we calculated the nucleation rate and the maximum number of molecules in a critical cluster. The nucleation rate was in the order of 105cm-3s-1 and the number of molecules in a critical-sized cluster became 1.2. The results were in agreement with the activation theory.

  18. A conformal oxidation-resistant, plasma-polymerized coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Lerner, Narcinda R.

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the surface recession (etching) of thin films of plasma polymerized tetrafluoro ethylene (PPTFE), polytetrafluoro ethylene (PTFE), and ion-beam sputter deposited polytetrafluoro ethylene (SPTFE) exposed to ground-state atomic oxygen downstream from a nonequilibrium radio-frequency O2 plasma. At 22 C, the etch rates for PTFE, SPTFE, and PPTFE were in the ratio of 8.7:1.8:1.0. A thin, conformal coating of PPTFE (etch rate of 0.3 nm/h at 22 C) was found to protect an underlying cast film of a reactive polymer, cis-1,4 polybutadiene, against ground-state atomic oxygen attack for the time required to fully etch away the PPTFE coating. From ESCA analysis, PTFE exhibited only minor surface oxidation (uptake of 0.5 atom percent O) upon etching, its F/C ratio decreasing slightly from 2.00 to 1.97; PPTFE exhibited considerable surface oxidation (uptake of 5.9 atom percent O) intermediate between those of PTFE and PPTFE, with a decrease in F/C ratio from 1.73 to 1.67. A plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon coating such as PPTFE might be useful for space applications to protect polymers that are vulnerable to oxidation or degradation by oxygen atoms.

  19. The oxidation behavior of SiC sintered with Al-B-C and improved oxidation resistance via heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sixta, M

    1997-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of high strength and high toughness SiC, sintered with Al, B, and C (ABC-SiC), was examined. Kinetic data were acquired and the parabolic rate constant for oxidation was determined and compared with literature data on various SiC materials. The role of secondary phases on the oxide morphology was explored. ABC-SiC was compared to commercially available SiC, Hexoloy, and SiC sintered with 10% yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). Two-step sintering (pre-coarsening) was employed with holds for 48 hours at 600--1,600 C, prior to the typical hot-pressing conditions of 1,900 C for 1 hour, to change the chemistry and reduce the number of bubbles in the silica scale. The effects on the oxide thickness and integrity was examined as a function of the precoarsening heat treatment temperature. Additionally, the hot-pressed ABC-SiC was subjected to heat treatments (anneals) at 1,800 C for 1 hour in nitrogen, Ar, and vacuum environments, and the effects on subsequent oxidation were evaluated. The Ar and vacuum heat treatments dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of ABC-SiC. Finally, reoxidation experiments were performed to try to alter the surface chemistry of the SiC to improve the oxidation resistance. The four-point bend strengths and two-parameter Weibull plots of the most successful heat treatments were compared with the standard ABC-SiC to ensure that significant degradation did not result from altering the processing of the material.

  20. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J.L.

    1992-09-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, a' is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, b' is from 0.3 to 0.5 and c' is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1[minus]d)ZrO[sub 2]-(d)Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] where d' is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO[sub 2], where X' is an elemental metal. 5 figs.

  1. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J. Lambert

    1992-01-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, "a" is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, "b" is from 0.3 to 0.5 and "c" is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1-d)ZrO.sub.2 -(d)Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 where "d" is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO.sub.2, where "X" is an elemental metal.

  2. Mortality from asthma and chronic bronchitis associated with changes in sulfur oxides air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, M.; Yoshida, K.; Kitabatake, M.

    1986-01-01

    Death certificates issued in Yokkaichi, Japan, during the 21 yr from 1963 until 1983 were surveyed to determine the relationship between changes in air pollution and mortality due to bronchial asthma and chronic bronchitis. The following results were obtained. In response to worsening air pollution, mortality for bronchial asthma and chronic bronchitis began to increase. Mortality due to bronchial asthma decreased immediately in response to improvement of pollution, whereas mortality due to chronic bronchitis decreased to the level in the control area 4 to 5 yr after the concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) began to satisfy the ambient air quality standard. In the polluted area, mortality due to bronchial asthma in subjects who were 20 yr of age was higher during the period in which higher concentrations of sulfur oxides were prevalent.

  3. Evaluation of Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation for Indoor AirApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Sullivan, D.P.; Fisk, W.J.

    2006-02-01

    Acceptable indoor air quality in office buildings may be achieved with less energy by combining effective air cleaning systems for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with particle filtration then by relying solely on ventilation. For such applications, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) systems are being developed for VOC destruction. An experimental evaluation of a UVPCO system is reported. The evaluation was unique in that it employed complex mixtures of VOCs commonly found in office buildings at realistically low concentrations. VOC conversion efficiencies varied over a broad range, usually exceeded 20%, and were as high as {approx}80%. Conversion efficiency generally diminished with increased air flow rate. Significant amounts of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were produced due to incomplete mineralization. The results indicate that formaldehyde and acetaldehyde production rates may need to be reduced before such UVPCO systems can be deployed safely in occupied buildings.

  4. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  5. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  6. Band gap shift in the indium-tin-oxide films on polyethylene napthalate after thermal annealing in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, H.; Mayer, J. W.; Alford, T. L.

    2006-10-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films on polyethylene napthalate (PEN) with high carrier concentration (˜1021/cm3) have been grown by electron-beam deposition without the introduction of oxygen into the chamber. The electrical properties of the ITO films (such as, carrier concentration, electrical mobility, and resistivity) abruptly changed after annealing in the air atmospheres. In addition, optical transmittance and optical band gap values significantly changed after heat treatment. The optical band gap narrowing behavior is observed in the as-deposited sample because of impurity band and heavy carrier concentration. The influence of annealing in air on the electrical and optical properties of ITO/PEN samples can be explained by the change in the free electron concentration, which is evaluated in terms of the oxygen content. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses are used to determine the oxygen content in the film. Hall effect measurements are used to determine the dependence of electrical properties on oxygen content.

  7. Proline Metabolism Increases katG Expression and Oxidative Stress Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Alfano, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of l-proline to glutamate in Gram-negative bacteria is catalyzed by the proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme, which contains proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase domains in a single polypeptide. Previous studies have suggested that aside from providing energy, proline metabolism influences oxidative stress resistance in different organisms. To explore this potential role and the mechanism, we characterized the oxidative stress resistance of wild-type and putA mutant strains of Escherichia coli. Initial stress assays revealed that the putA mutant strain was significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress than the parental wild-type strain. Expression of PutA in the putA mutant strain restored oxidative stress resistance, confirming that depletion of PutA was responsible for the oxidative stress phenotype. Treatment of wild-type cells with proline significantly increased hydroperoxidase I (encoded by katG) expression and activity. Furthermore, the ΔkatG strain failed to respond to proline, indicating a critical role for hydroperoxidase I in the mechanism of proline protection. The global regulator OxyR activates the expression of katG along with several other genes involved in oxidative stress defense. In addition to katG, proline increased the expression of grxA (glutaredoxin 1) and trxC (thioredoxin 2) of the OxyR regulon, implicating OxyR in proline protection. Proline oxidative metabolism was shown to generate hydrogen peroxide, indicating that proline increases oxidative stress tolerance in E. coli via a preadaptive effect involving endogenous hydrogen peroxide production and enhanced catalase-peroxidase activity. PMID:25384482

  8. Removal of ammonia from air on molybdenum and tungsten oxide modified activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Petit, Camille; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2008-04-15

    Microporous coconut-based activated carbon was impregnated with solutions of ammonium metatungstate or ammonium molybdate and then calcined in air in order to convert the salts into their corresponding oxides. The surface of those materials was characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermal analysis. The results indicated a significant increase in surface acidity related to the presence of tungsten or molybdenum oxides. On the materials obtained, adsorption of ammonia from either dry or moist air was carried out. The oxides distributed on the surface provided Lewis and/or Brønsted centers for interactions with ammonia molecules or ammonium ions. Water on the surface of carbon or in the gas phase increased the amount of ammonia adsorbed via involvement of Brønsted-type interactions and/or by leading to the formation of molybdate or tungstate salts on the surface. Although the amount of ammonia adsorbed is closely related to the number of moles of oxides and their acidic centers, the carbon surface also contributes to the adsorption via providing small pores where ammonia can be dissolved in the water film.

  9. Impact of clay mineral on air oxidation of PAH-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Biache, Coralie; Kouadio, Olivier; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Faure, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    This work investigated the impact of a clay mineral (bentonite) on the air oxidation of the solvent extractable organic matters (EOMs) and the PAHs from contaminated soils. EOMs were isolated from two coking plant soils and mixed with silica sand or bentonite. These samples, as well as raw soils and bentonite/soil mixtures, were oxidized in air at 60 and 100 °C for 160 days. Mineralization was followed by measuring the CO2 produced over the experiments. EOM, polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC), including PAH, contents were also determined. Oxidation led to a decrease in EOM contents and PAH concentrations, these diminutions were enhanced by the presence of bentonite. Transfer of carbon from EOM to insoluble organic matter pointed out a condensation phenomenon leading to a stabilization of the contamination. Higher mineralization rates, observed during the oxidation of the soil/bentonite mixtures, seem to indicate that this clay mineral had a positive influence on the transformation of PAC into CO2.

  10. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, B. B.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Ortega, A. M.; Day, D. A.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Karl, T.; Hansel, A.; Hunter, J. F.; Cross, E. S.; Kroll, J. H.; Peng, Z.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    Ambient air was oxidized by OH radicals in an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) located in a montane pine forest during the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign to study biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and aging. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semi-continuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative time scales of condensation of low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles, condensational loss to the walls, and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 4 μg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 1 μg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4-1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene + p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 LT. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic compounds, and net production at lower ages followed by net consumption of terpenoid oxidation products as photochemical age increased. New particle formation was observed in the reactor after oxidation, especially during times when precursor gas concentrations and SOA formation were largest. Approximately 6 times more SOA was formed in the reactor from OH oxidation than

  11. Ellipsometric characterization of ethylene oxide-butylene oxide diblock copolymer adsorption at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, B Rippner; Benjamins, J-W; Nylander, T; Arnebrant, T

    2005-05-24

    Ellipsometry was used to determine the adsorbed layer thickness (d) and the surface excess (adsorbed amount, Gamma) of a nonionic diblock copolymer, E(106)B(16), of poly(ethylene oxide) (E) and poly(butylene oxide) (B) at the air-water interface. The results were obtained (i) by the conventional ellipsometric evaluation procedure using the change of both ellipsometric angles Psi and Delta and (ii) by using the change of Delta only and assuming values of the layer thickness. It was demonstrated that the calculated surface excesses from the different methods were in close agreement, independent of the evaluation procedure, with a plateau adsorption of about 2.5 mg/m(2) (400 A(2)/molecule). Furthermore, the amount of E(106)B(16) adsorbed at the air-water interface was found to be almost identical to that adsorbed from aqueous solution onto a hydrophobic solid surface. In addition, the possibility to use combined measurements with H(2)O or D(2)O as substrates to calculate values of d and Gamma was investigated and discussed. We also briefly discuss within which limits the Gibbs equation can be used to determine the surface excess of polydisperse block copolymers. PMID:15896051

  12. Progressive resistance neck exercises using a compressible ball coupled with an air pressure gauge.

    PubMed

    Axen, K; Haas, F; Schicchi, J; Merrick, J

    1992-01-01

    Strength training of neck muscles, a potentially important approach to injury prevention and rehabilitation, has been limited by the lack of a convenient means of instituting progressive resistance exercise (PRE) programs. By positioning a compressible ball coupled with an air pressure gauge between the head and a wall, eight men, ranging in age from 21 to 46 years, initially measured the maximum voluntary pressure (MVP) generated within the ball (a measure of neck muscle force), while maximally flexing, extending, and laterally flexing their head into the ball. In accordance with PRE principles, they then performed three sets of 10 repetitions of each motion while maintaining ball pressure at 60-80% of the measured MVP. This training program, consisting of three to five sessions per week for 4-7 weeks: 1) increased the MVPs for flexion [to 156 +/- 9% (SE) pretraining, p < 0.05], extension [to 162 +/- 11% (SE) pretraining, p < 0.05], and lateral flexion [to 173 +/- 12% (SE) pretraining, p < 0.05]; and 2) decreased the disparity between the MVPs for left and right lateral flexion, indicating that the weaker side showed greater improvement than the stronger side (p < 0.05). These findings demonstrate that progressive resistance neck exercises, facilitated by a compressible ball coupled with an air pressure gauge, can markedly increase neck muscle strength and decrease lateral force imbalance. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1992;16(6):275-280.

  13. Apelin Treatment Increases Complete Fatty Acid Oxidation, Mitochondrial Oxidative Capacity, and Biogenesis in Muscle of Insulin-Resistant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Attané, Camille; Foussal, Camille; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Benani, Alexandre; Daviaud, Danièle; Wanecq, Estelle; Guzmán-Ruiz, Rocío; Dray, Cédric; Bezaire, Veronic; Rancoule, Chloé; Kuba, Keiji; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano; Levade, Thierry; Penninger, Josef; Burcelin, Rémy; Pénicaud, Luc; Valet, Philippe; Castan-Laurell, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Both acute and chronic apelin treatment have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in mice. However, the effects of apelin on fatty acid oxidation (FAO) during obesity-related insulin resistance have not yet been addressed. Thus, the aim of the current study was to determine the impact of chronic treatment on lipid use, especially in skeletal muscles. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice treated by an apelin injection (0.1 μmol/kg/day i.p.) during 4 weeks had decreased fat mass, glycemia, and plasma levels of triglycerides and were protected from hyperinsulinemia compared with HFD PBS-treated mice. Indirect calorimetry experiments showed that apelin-treated mice had a better use of lipids. The complete FAO, the oxidative capacity, and mitochondrial biogenesis were increased in soleus of apelin-treated mice. The action of apelin was AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) dependent since all the effects studied were abrogated in HFD apelin-treated mice with muscle-specific inactive AMPK. Finally, the apelin-stimulated improvement of oxidative capacity led to decreased levels of acylcarnitines and enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in soleus. Thus, by promoting complete lipid use in muscle of insulin-resistant mice through mitochondrial biogenesis and tighter matching between FAO and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, apelin treatment could contribute to insulin sensitivity improvement. PMID:22210322

  14. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-09-01

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am2 kg-1 is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications.

  15. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am2 kg–1 is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications. PMID:27628898

  16. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am(2) kg(-1) is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications. PMID:27628898

  17. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-09-15

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am(2) kg(-1) is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications.

  18. Carbon catalysis in the aqueous oxidation of SO2 by NO2 and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.; Schryer, J.; Cofer, W. R., III; Vay, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide and an oxidant gas (air or NO2) were bubbled through aqueous suspensions of both washed and unwashed carbon black as well as through samples of wash water, which contained whatever soluble species were originally present on the carbon, and high-purity water. The sulfate yields obtained showed the washed and unwashed carbon to be equally catalytic for the oxidation of SO2 to sulfate by both oxidants, whereas little sulfate was generated in either the wash water or high-purity water in the absence of carbon. These results indicate that the sulfate yields produced in aqueous suspensions of the carbon studied are due to catalysis by the carbon particles rather than by soluble species dissolved from them.

  19. Integrated catalytic wet air oxidation and biological treatment of wastewater from Vitamin B 6 production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jianxiong; Zhan, Wei; Li, Daosheng; Wang, Xiaocong; Song, Jing; Liu, Dongqi

    This study investigated the feasibility of coupling a catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO), with CuO/Al 2O 3 as catalyst, and an anaerobic/aerobic biological process to treat wastewater from Vitamin B 6 production. Results showed that the CWAO enhanced the biodegradability (BOD 5/COD) from 0.10 to 0.80. The oxidized effluents with COD of 10,000 mg l -1 was subjected to subsequent continuous anaerobic/aerobic oxidation, and 99.3% of total COD removal was achieved. The quality of the effluent obtained met the discharge standards of water pollutants for pharmaceutical industry Chemical Synthesis Products Category (GB21904-2008), and thereby it implies that the integrated CWAO and anaerobic/aerobic biological treatment may offer a promising process to treat wastewater from Vitamin B 6 production.

  20. Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

    2013-11-26

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup -}, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate (Cr(VI) was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate, Tc(VII), in Cast Stone samples prepared with 5 M Simulant. Cast Stone spiked with pertechnetate was also prepared and tested. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Cr were cut from Cast Stone exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) outdoor ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Tc-99 were cut from Cast Stone exposed to laboratory ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Similar conditions are expected to be encountered in the Cast Stone curing container. The leachability of Cr and Tc-99 and the reduction capacities, measured by the Angus-Glasser method, were determined for each subsample as a function of depth from the exposed surface. The results obtained to date were focused on continued method development and are preliminary and apply to the sample composition and curing / exposure conditions described in this report. The

  1. Highly defective oxides as sinter resistant thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2005-08-16

    A thermal barrier coating material formed of a highly defective cubic matrix structure having a concentration of a stabilizer sufficiently high that the oxygen vacancies created by the stabilizer interact within the matrix to form multi-vacancies, thereby improving the sintering resistance of the material. The concentration of stabilizer within the cubic matrix structure is greater than that concentration of stabilizer necessary to give the matrix a peak ionic conductivity value. The concentration of stabilizer may be at least 30 wt. %. Embodiments include a cubic matrix of zirconia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % yttria, and a cubic matrix of hafnia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % gadolinia.

  2. Methane oxidation and methanotrophs: resistance and resilience against model perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, A.; Frenzel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Biodiversity is claimed to be essential for ecosystem functioning. However, most experiments on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) have been made on higher plants, while only few studies have dealt with microbial communities. Overall microbial diversity may be very high, and general functions like aerobic carbon mineralization are assumed to be supported by highly redundant communities. Therefore, we focused on methane oxidation, a microbial process of global importance mitigating methane emissions from wetland, rice fields, and landfills. We used a rice paddy as our model system, where >90% of potentially emitted methane may be oxidized in the oxic surface layer. This community is presumed to consist of 10-20 taxa more or less equivalent to species. We focused on the ability of methanotrophs to recover from a disturbance causing a significant die-off of all microbial populations. This was simulated by mixing native with sterile soil in two ratios (1:4 and 1:40). Microcosms were incubated and the temporal shift of the methanotrophic communities was followed by pmoA-based Terminal Restriction Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP), qPCR, and a pmoA-based diagnostic microarray. We consistently observed distinctive temporal shifts between Methylocystaceaea and Methylococcacea, a rapid population growth leading to the same or even higher cell numbers as in microcosms made from native soil alone, but no effect on the amount of methane oxidized. The ratio of different methanotrophs changed with treatment, while the number of taxa stayed nearly the same. Overall, methanotrophs showed a remarkable resilience compensating for die-offs. It has to be noted, however, that our experiment focused on methanotrophs adapted to and living at high methane fluxes. Quite different, methanotrophs living in upland soils do not mitigate methane emissions, but are the only biological sink to atmospheric methane. These microbes are severely substrate limited, and will be much more

  3. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  4. A Peroxiredoxin Promotes H2O2 Signaling and Oxidative Stress Resistance by Oxidizing a Thioredoxin Family Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jonathon D.; Day, Alison M.; Taylor, Sarah R.; Tomalin, Lewis E.; Morgan, Brian A.; Veal, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary H2O2 can cause oxidative damage associated with age-related diseases such as diabetes and cancer but is also used to initiate diverse responses, including increased antioxidant gene expression. Despite significant interest, H2O2-signaling mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we present a mechanism for the propagation of an H2O2 signal that is vital for the adaptation of the model yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, to oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxins are abundant peroxidases with conserved antiaging and anticancer activities. Remarkably, we find that the only essential function for the thioredoxin peroxidase activity of the Prx Tpx1(hPrx1/2) in resistance to H2O2 is to inhibit a conserved thioredoxin family protein Txl1(hTxnl1/TRP32). Thioredoxins regulate many enzymes and signaling proteins. Thus, our discovery that a Prx amplifies an H2O2 signal by driving the oxidation of a thioredoxin-like protein has important implications, both for Prx function in oxidative stress resistance and for responses to H2O2. PMID:24268782

  5. Combined hydrolysis acidification and bio-contact oxidation system with air-lift tubes and activated carbon bioreactor for oilfield wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunmei; Chen, Yi; Chen, Jinfu; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Guangqing; Wang, Jingxiu; Cui, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigated the enhancement of the COD reduction of an oilfield wastewater treatment process by installing air-lift tubes and adding an activated carbon bioreactor (ACB) to form a combined hydrolysis acidification and bio-contact oxidation system with air-lift tubes (HA/air-lift BCO) and an ACB. Three heat-resistant bacterial strains were cultivated and subsequently applied in above pilot plant test. Installing air-lift tubes in aerobic tanks reduced the necessary air to water ratio from 20 to 5. Continuous operation of the HA/air-lift BCO system for 2 months with a hydraulic retention time of 36 h, a volumetric load of 0.14 kg COD/(m(3)d) (hydrolysis-acidification or anaerobic tank), and 0.06 kg COD/(m(3)d) (aerobic tanks) achieved an average reduction of COD by 60%, oil and grease by 62%, total suspended solids by 75%, and sulfides by 77%. With a COD load of 0.56 kg/(m(3)d), the average COD in the ACB effluent was 58 mg/L.

  6. The effect of various oxide dispersions on the oxidation resistance of Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, B.A.; Alexander, K.B.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-10-01

    Oxide-dispersed Fe-28at.%Al-2%Cr alloys were produced by a powder metallurgy technique followed by hot extrusion. Yttria and ceria were added to the base alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior. The amount of dopant was varied from 0.05-0.5 at.% Y in a series of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-dispersed alloys. isothermal and cyclic oxidation testing was conducted at temperatures from 800{degrees} to 1300{degrees}C. A CeO{sub 2} addition was detrimental to the oxidation behavior. The Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} improved the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale adhesion relative to an undoped alloy, but was not as effective as similar additions to an oxide-dispersed FeCrAl alloy.

  7. Integrating affordability, energy and environmental efficiency, air quality and disaster resistance into residential design and construction

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Much has been researched and written about the individual qualities of good home design and construction in terms of: energy efficiency; affordability; indoor air quality; sustainability; and wind, fire, and flood resistance. The real challenge is to integrate all these characteristics into the ideal house. The purpose of this paper is to review the characteristics of each of the above features and explore the integration of them into the ideal residential structure. The house would take the shape of a compact two story structure. A geometrically compact structure uses less construction materials per floor area, presents less area for improved thermal efficiency, and less profile for wind and flood resistance. The first floor would be constructed using insulated strong high thermal mass masonry system resistant to flood, wind, fire, and termite damage. The second story would be constructed using a lighter reinforced wood frame system with between stud insulation coupled with exterior insulated sheathing to minimize thermal bridging across studs. Optimizing floor plan such as separating living and sleeping areas present opportunities for efficient split HVAC zoning, natural ventilation, and solar passive adaptation. The design would emphasize the 4, 8, and 12 foot dimensioning for waste reduction; selection of environmentally friendly building materials, such as cellulose insulation; and efficient lighting and appliances. Features providing improved indoor air quality such as prudent duct selection, design and location, use of radon barriers, omission of carpeting, and control of moisture would be addressed. The design philosophy, concepts and rationale for the integration of these and many other features of the ideal residence will be addressed and illustrated.

  8. DETECTION AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION INDUCED CARDIOPULMONARY OXIDATIVE STRESS USING A TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODEL AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Identification of particle characteristics and biological mechanism(s) responsible for the adverse pulmonary and cardiovascular responses associated with particulate air pollution exposure remains a critical research activity. We have employed an oxidative stress sensitive an...

  9. Flow mechanism for the long-range transport of air pollutants by the sea breeze causing inland nighttime high oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, H.; Mitsumoto, S.; Kurita, H.

    1988-02-01

    Flow mechanism causing nightttime smog was investigated by analyzing 1) continuous records of meteorological data and concentration of oxidants (Ox) for 15 days and 2) aircraft data along the transportation route of a polluted air mass.

  10. Planar solid oxide fuel cell with staged indirect-internal air and fuel preheating and reformation

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A; Williams, Mark C

    2003-10-21

    A solid oxide fuel cell arrangement and method of use that provides internal preheating of both fuel and air in order to maintain the optimum operating temperature for the production of energy. The internal preheat passes are created by the addition of two plates, one on either side of the bipolar plate, such that these plates create additional passes through the fuel cell. This internal preheat fuel cell configuration and method reduce the requirements for external heat exchanger units and air compressors. Air or fuel may be added to the fuel cell as required to maintain the optimum operating temperature through a cathode control valve or an anode control valve, respectively. A control loop comprises a temperature sensing means within the preheat air and fuel passes, a means to compare the measured temperature to a set point temperature and a determination based on the comparison as to whether the control valves should allow additional air or fuel into the preheat or bypass manifolds of the fuel cell.

  11. Resistance of various shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to electrolyzed oxidizing water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resistance of thirty two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and six major serotypes of non-O157 Shiga toxin- producing E. coli (STEC) plus E. coli O104 was tested against Electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water using two different methods; modified AOAC 955.16 sequential inoculation method and minim...

  12. Oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Rouge, Carl J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites comprises an MCrAlX material. M is a metal selected from nickel, cobalt, and iron. X is an active element selected from Y, Yb, Zr, and Hf.

  13. High-temperature oxidation/sulfidation resistance of iron-aluminide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.; Goodwin, G.M.; Howell, M.

    1996-04-01

    Iron aluminides containing > 20-25 at. % Al have oxidation and sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. Accordingly, these alloys may find application as coatings or claddings on more conventional higher-strength materials which are generally less corrosion-resistant at high temperatures. To this end, iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. Specimens were cut from weld deposits and exposed to a highly aggressive oxidizing-sulfidizing (H2S-H2-H2O-Ar) environment at 800 C. All the weld overlayers showed good corrosion behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc-produced deposit with only 21 at. % Al. Rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initally grown scales spalled and the rate of reaction was then not controlled by formation of slowly growing Al oxide. Higher starting Al concentrations (> {approximately} 25 at. %) are needed to assure overall oxidation-sulfidation resistance of the weld overlays, but hydrogen cracking susceptibility must be minimized in order to physically separate the corrosive species from the reactive substrate material.

  14. Differential response of DDT susceptible and resistant Drosophila melanogaster strains to DDT and oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic DDT resistance in Drosophila melanogaster is associated with increased cytochrome P450 expression. Increased P450 activity is also associated with increased oxidative stress. In contrast, increased glutathione S transferase (GST) expression has been associated with a greater ability of o...

  15. Multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from indoor air of an urban wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Juliana V; Cecílio, Pedro; Gonçalves, Daniela; Vilar, Vítor J P; Pinto, Eugénia; Ferreira, Helena N

    2016-07-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have been recognized as sources of bioaerosols that may act as vehicles for dissemination of pathogens and multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. The occurrence of MDR Enterobacteriaceae in indoor air of an urban WWTP was investigated. A possible airborne contamination with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae was also explored. Fourteen of 39 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were MDR. These isolates were found at all sampling sites, mainly at the secondary sedimentation settings. The highest levels of resistance were detected in three different species: Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, and Citrobacter freundii. Furthermore, one of the airborne E. coli isolates was phenotypically characterized as an ESBL producer. Additionally, five isolates showed non-susceptibility to at least one carbapenem tested. The presence of genes encoding relevant beta-lactamase types in these ESBL-producing and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates was investigated by PCR. Results showed amplification for bla CTX-M and bla OXA. These findings are relevant both in terms of occupational/public health and of environmental dissemination of MDR bacteria.

  16. Root-soil air gap and resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Zhang, W J; Wang, X Y; Cai, Y J; Chang, J G

    2015-12-01

    During periods of water deficit, growing roots may shrink, retaining only partial contact with the soil. In this study, known mathematical models were used to calculate the root-soil air gap and water flow resistance at the soil-root interface, respectively, of Robinia pseudoacacia L. under different water conditions. Using a digital camera, the root-soil air gap of R. pseudoacacia was investigated in a root growth chamber; this root-soil air gap and the model-inferred water flow resistance at the soil-root interface were compared with predictions based on a separate outdoor experiment. The results indicated progressively greater root shrinkage and loss of root-soil contact with decreasing soil water potential. The average widths of the root-soil air gap for R. pseudoacacia in open fields and in the root growth chamber were 0.24 and 0.39 mm, respectively. The resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface in both environments increased with decreasing soil water potential. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that soil water potential and soil temperature were the best predictors of variation in the root-soil air gap. A combination of soil water potential, soil temperature, root-air water potential difference and soil-root water potential difference best predicted the resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface.

  17. OXIDATION OF INCONEL 718 IN AIR AT TEMPERATURES FROM 973K TO 1620K.

    SciTech Connect

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2000-10-01

    As part of the APT project, it was necessary to quantify the release of tungsten from the APT spallation target during postulated accident conditions in order to develop accident source terms for accident consequence characterization. Experiments with tungsten rods at high temperatures in a flowing steam environment characteristic of postulated accidents revealed that considerable vaporization of the tungsten occurred as a result of reactions with the steam and that the aerosols which formed were readily transported away from the tungsten surfaces, thus exposing fresh tungsten to react with more steam. The resulting tungsten release fractions and source terms were undesirable and it was decided to clad the tungsten target with Inconel 718 in order to protect it from contact with steam during an accident and mitigate the accident source term and the consequences. As part of the material selection criteria, experiments were conducted with Inconel 718 at high temperatures to evaluate the rate of oxidation of the proposed clad material over as wide a temperature range as possible, as well as to determine the high-temperature failure limit of the material. Samples of Inconel 718 were inserted into a preheated furnace at temperatures ranging from 973 K to 1620 K and oxidized in air for varying periods of time. After oxidizing in air at a constant temperature for the prescribed time and then being allowed to cool, the samples would be reweighed to determine their weight gain due to the uptake of oxygen. From these weight gain measurements, it was possible to identify three regimes of oxidation for Inconel 718: a low-temperature regime in which the samples became passivated after the initial oxidation, an intermediate-temperature regime in which the rate of oxidation was limited by diffusion and exhibited a constant parabolic rate dependence, and a high-temperature regime in which material deformation and damage accompanied an accelerated oxidation rate above the parabolic

  18. Metal oxide-resistive memory using graphene-edge electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Sohn, Joon; Jiang, Zizhen; Chen, Hong-Yu; Philip Wong, H.-S.

    2015-09-01

    The emerging paradigm of `abundant-data' computing requires real-time analytics on enormous quantities of data collected by a mushrooming network of sensors. Todays computing technology, however, cannot scale to satisfy such big data applications with the required throughput and energy efficiency. The next technology frontier will be monolithically integrated chips with three-dimensionally interleaved memory and logic for unprecedented data bandwidth with reduced energy consumption. In this work, we exploit the atomically thin nature of the graphene edge to assemble a resistive memory (~3 Å thick) stacked in a vertical three-dimensional structure. We report some of the lowest power and energy consumption among the emerging non-volatile memories due to an extremely thin electrode with unique properties, low programming voltages, and low current. Circuit analysis of the three-dimensional architecture using experimentally measured device properties show higher storage potential for graphene devices compared that of metal based devices.

  19. Metal oxide-resistive memory using graphene-edge electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Sohn, Joon; Jiang, Zizhen; Chen, Hong-Yu; Philip Wong, H-S

    2015-01-01

    The emerging paradigm of 'abundant-data' computing requires real-time analytics on enormous quantities of data collected by a mushrooming network of sensors. Todays computing technology, however, cannot scale to satisfy such big data applications with the required throughput and energy efficiency. The next technology frontier will be monolithically integrated chips with three-dimensionally interleaved memory and logic for unprecedented data bandwidth with reduced energy consumption. In this work, we exploit the atomically thin nature of the graphene edge to assemble a resistive memory (∼ 3 Å thick) stacked in a vertical three-dimensional structure. We report some of the lowest power and energy consumption among the emerging non-volatile memories due to an extremely thin electrode with unique properties, low programming voltages, and low current. Circuit analysis of the three-dimensional architecture using experimentally measured device properties show higher storage potential for graphene devices compared that of metal based devices.

  20. Effect of myricetin, pyrogallol, and phloroglucinol on yeast resistance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Vanda; Vilaça, Rita; de Freitas, Victor; Ferreira, Pedro Moradas; Mateus, Nuno; Costa, Vítor

    2015-01-01

    The health beneficial effects of dietary polyphenols have been attributed to their intrinsic antioxidant activity, which depends on the structure of the compound and number of hydroxyl groups. In this study, the protective effects of pyrogallol, phloroglucinol, and myricetin on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Pyrogallol and myricetin, which have a pyrogallol structure in the B ring, increased H2O2 resistance associated with a reduction in intracellular oxidation and protein carbonylation, whereas phloroglucinol did not exert protective effects. The acquisition of oxidative stress resistance in cells pretreated with pyrogallol and myricetin was not associated with an induction of endogenous antioxidant defences as assessed by the analysis of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. However, myricetin, which provided greater stress resistance, prevented H2O2-induced glutathione oxidation. Moreover, myricetin increased the chronological lifespan of yeast lacking the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2p), which exhibited a premature aging phenotype and oxidative stress sensitivity. These findings show that the presence of hydroxyl groups in the ortho position of the B ring in pyrogallol and myricetin contributes to the antioxidant protection afforded by these compounds. In addition, myricetin may alleviate aging-induced oxidative stress, particularly when redox homeostasis is compromised due to downregulation of endogenous defences present in mitochondria. PMID:26000072

  1. Toughened uni-piece, fibrous, reinforced, oxidization-resistant composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A composite thermal protection structure, for applications such as atmospheric re-entry vehicles, that can withstand temperatures as high as 3600.degree. F. The structure includes an exposed surface cap having a specially formulated coating, an insulator base adjacent to the cap with another specially formulated coating, and one or more pins that extend from the cap through the insulator base to tie the cap and base together, through ceramic bonding and mechanical attachment. The cap and insulator base have corresponding depressions and projections that mate and allow for differences in thermal expansion of the cap and base. A thin coating of a reaction cured glass formulation is optionally provided on the structure to allow reduce oxidization and/or to reduce catalytic efficiency.

  2. Direct laser printing of graphene oxide for resistive chemosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazoglou, S.; Tsouti, V.; Chatzandroulis, S.; Zergioti, I.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the pulsed laser printing of graphene oxide, and a subsequent thermal reduction step, aiming towards the fabrication of a chemical sensor device that operates at room temperature. Laser printing was performed using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer technique, which enables for the rapid and highly resolved deposition of liquid and solid phase materials, while printing conditions were also studied, in terms of optimum laser fluence regime and donor-receiver substrates distance, so as to avoid undesirable satellite debris, which has detrimental effects on the sensor performance such as adjacent sensor cross-talk, etc. The evaluation of the reduction efficiency was made by Fourier Transform Reflectance spectroscopy and electrical characterization of the thermally reduced devices. Finally, the response of the sensor upon exposure to water vapors is evaluated, and sensitivities down to 0.22%/%RH were recorded.

  3. Effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas-turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen from a gas-turbine combustor. Combustor inlet-air temperature ranged from 450 F to 1050 F. The tests were run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NO sub x emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet-air humidity at a constant exponential rate of 19 percent per mass percent water vapor in the air. This decrease of NO sub x emission index with increasing humidity was found to be independent of inlet-air temperature.

  4. Ambient particulate air pollution induces oxidative stress and alterations of mitochondria and gene expression in brown and white adipose tissues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prior studies have demonstrated a link between air pollution and metabolic diseases such as type II diabetes. Changes in adipose tissue and its mitochondrial content/function are closely associated with the development of insulin resistance and attendant metabolic complications. We investigated changes in adipose tissue structure and function in brown and white adipose depots in response to chronic ambient air pollutant exposure in a rodent model. Methods Male ApoE knockout (ApoE-/-) mice inhaled concentrated fine ambient PM (PM < 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5) or filtered air (FA) for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, for 2 months. We examined superoxide production by dihydroethidium staining; inflammatory responses by immunohistochemistry; and changes in white and brown adipocyte-specific gene profiles by real-time PCR and mitochondria by transmission electron microscopy in response to PM2.5 exposure in different adipose depots of ApoE-/- mice to understand responses to chronic inhalational stimuli. Results Exposure to PM2.5 induced an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in brown adipose depots. Additionally, exposure to PM2.5 decreased expression of uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue as measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Mitochondrial number was significantly reduced in white (WAT) and brown adipose tissues (BAT), while mitochondrial size was also reduced in BAT. In BAT, PM2.5 exposure down-regulated brown adipocyte-specific genes, while white adipocyte-specific genes were differentially up-regulated. Conclusions PM2.5 exposure triggers oxidative stress in BAT, and results in key alterations in mitochondrial gene expression and mitochondrial alterations that are pronounced in BAT. We postulate that exposure to PM2.5 may induce imbalance between white and brown adipose tissue functionality and thereby predispose to metabolic dysfunction. PMID:21745393

  5. Tailoring resistive switching properties of TiO2 with controlled incorporation of oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristians Rios, Alejandro; Aarão-Rodrigues, Lorena; Ronieri Cadore, Alisson; de Andrade, Rodrigo R.; Montoro, Luciano A.; Malachias, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Reversible resistance states were extensively observed in thin film systems, and their physical properties were in most cases determined by the electric behavior of the dielectric layer placed between contacts. Here we include SnO2 nanoparticles on TiO2 dielectric films, inducing modifications of the resistive switching behavior. We show that the choice of oxide nanoparticles with dielectric constant smaller than the dielectric constant of the main oxide film guides conductive channels, increasing the extension of the Fowler-Nordheim (tunneling) conduction regime during their electroforming as the density of nanoparticles rises. It is found that the SnO2 nanoparticles show reduced impact on the resistive switching response of devices produced following this methodology. The formation of Ti4O7 conductive channels is discussed based on electric measurements as well as on scanning probe and electron microscopy techniques.

  6. Investigation into the resistance of lactoperoxidase tolerant Escherichia coli mutants to different forms of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    De Spiegeleer, Philipp; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Lietaert, Annelies; Sermon, Jan; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2005-11-15

    Six lactoperoxidase tolerant Escherichia coli transposon mutants isolated and characterized in an earlier study, and some newly constructed double mutants, were subjected to peroxide, superoxide and hypochlorite stress, and their inactivation was compared to that of the wild type strain MG1655. Knock out mutants of waaQ and waaO, which owed their lactoperoxidase tolerance to an impaired outer membrane permeability due to a reduced porin content, also exhibited higher resistance to hypochlorite, as did a knock-out strain of lrp, encoding a regulatory protein affecting a wide range of cellular functions. Unlike the outer membrane mutants however, the lrp strain was also more resistant to t-butyl hydroperoxide, but more susceptible to the superoxide generating compound plumbagin. Finally, a lactoperoxidase tolerant knock-out strain of ulaA, involved in ascorbic acid uptake, did not show resistance to any of the other oxidants. The possible modes of action of these different oxidants are discussed.

  7. Tailoring resistive switching properties of TiO2 with controlled incorporation of oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristians Rios, Alejandro; Aarão-Rodrigues, Lorena; Ronieri Cadore, Alisson; de Andrade, Rodrigo R.; Montoro, Luciano A.; Malachias, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Reversible resistance states were extensively observed in thin film systems, and their physical properties were in most cases determined by the electric behavior of the dielectric layer placed between contacts. Here we include SnO2 nanoparticles on TiO2 dielectric films, inducing modifications of the resistive switching behavior. We show that the choice of oxide nanoparticles with dielectric constant smaller than the dielectric constant of the main oxide film guides conductive channels, increasing the extension of the Fowler–Nordheim (tunneling) conduction regime during their electroforming as the density of nanoparticles rises. It is found that the SnO2 nanoparticles show reduced impact on the resistive switching response of devices produced following this methodology. The formation of Ti4O7 conductive channels is discussed based on electric measurements as well as on scanning probe and electron microscopy techniques.

  8. Mechanical properties and oxidation and corrosion resistance of reduced-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify effective substitutes for part of the Cr in 304 stainless steel as a method of conserving the strategic element Cr. Although special emphasis was placed on tensile properties, oxidation and corrosion resistance were also examined. Results indicate that over the temperature range of -196 C to 540 C the yield stress of experimental austenitic alloys with only 12 percent Cr compare favorably with the 18 percent Cr in 304 stainless steel. Oxidation resistance and in most cases corrosion resistance for the experimental alloys were comparable to the commercial alloy. Effective substitutes for Cr included Al, Mo, Si, Ti, and V, while Ni and Mn contents were increased to maintain an austenitic structure.

  9. Oxide Defect Engineering Methods for Valence Change (VCM) Resistive Random Access Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capulong, Jihan O.

    Electrical switching requirements for resistive random access memory (ReRAM) devices are multifaceted, based on device application. Thus, it is important to obtain an understanding of these switching properties and how they relate to the oxygen vacancy concentration and oxygen vacancy defects. Oxygen vacancy defects in the switching oxide of valence-change-based ReRAM (VCM ReRAM) play a significant role in device switching properties. Oxygen vacancies facilitate resistive switching as they form the conductive filament that changes the resistance state of the device. This dissertation will present two methods of modulating the defect concentration in VCM ReRAM composed of Pt/HfOx/Ti stack: 1) rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in Ar using different temperatures, and 2) doping using ion implantation under different dose levels. Metrology techniques such as x-ray diffractometry (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the HfOx switching oxide, which provided insight on the material properties and oxygen vacancy concentration in the oxide that was used to explain the changes in the electrical properties of the ReRAM devices. The resulting impact on the resistive switching characteristics of the devices, such as the forming voltage, set and reset threshold voltages, ON and OFF resistances, resistance ratio, and switching dispersion or uniformity were explored and summarized. Annealing in Ar showed significant impact on the forming voltage, with as much as 45% (from 22V to 12 V) of improvement, as the annealing temperature was increased. However, drawbacks of a higher oxide leakage and worse switching uniformity were seen with increasing annealing temperature. Meanwhile, doping the oxide by ion implantation showed significant effects on the resistive switching characteristics. Ta doping modulated the following switching properties with increasing dose: a) the reduction of the forming voltage, and Vset

  10. Improving singlet oxygen resistance during photochemical water oxidation by cobalt porphyrin catalysts.

    PubMed

    Nakazono, Takashi; Parent, Alexander R; Sakai, Ken

    2015-04-27

    Enabling the production of solar fuels on a global scale through artificial photosynthesis requires the development of water oxidation catalysts with significantly improved stability. The stability of photosystems is often reduced owing to attack by singlet oxygen, which is produced during light harvesting. Here, we report photochemical water oxidation by CoFPS, a fluorinated Co-porphyrin designed to resist attack by singlet oxygen. CoFPS exhibits significantly improved stability relative to its non-fluorinated analogue, as shown by a large increase in turnover numbers. This increased stability results from resistance of CoFPS to attack by singlet oxygen, the formation of which was monitored in situ by using 9,10-diphenylanthracene as a chemical probe. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) confirms that CoFPS remains homogeneous, proving its stability during water oxidation catalysis.

  11. Combustion synthesis of MoSi{sub 2} - SiC oxidation resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, K.A.; Govindarajan, S.; Moore, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Several high-temperature, oxidation resistant materials were investigated as possible coatings for molybdenum furnace elements. Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) composites are potential candidates for these high temperature coating applications. Composite materials were selected based on several factors, including oxidation resistance, coefficients of thermal expansion, compatibility at the coating/substrate interface, thermodynamic stability over a large temperature range and adhesion. The synthesis of dense MoSi{sub 2}-SiC composites through simultaneous combustion and hot-pressing is currently being investigated. Functionally graded materials (FGM`s) are being studied to overcome some of the property differences between a coating and a substrate. Oxidation testing was used to determine the protective qualities of the FGM`s.

  12. Impact of air pollution on oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in mothers and their newborns.

    PubMed

    Ambroz, Antonin; Vlkova, Veronika; Rossner, Pavel; Rossnerova, Andrea; Svecova, Vlasta; Milcova, Alena; Pulkrabova, Jana; Hajslova, Jana; Veleminsky, Milos; Solansky, Ivo; Sram, Radim J

    2016-08-01

    Ambient air particulate matter (PM) represents a class of heterogeneous substances that form one component of air pollution. Oxidative stress has been implicated as an important action mechanism for PM on the human organism. Oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) may affect any cellular macromolecule. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of air pollution on oxidative DNA damage [8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG)] and lipid peroxidation [15-F2t-isoprostane (15-F2t-IsoP)] in the urine and blood from mothers and newborns from two localities with different levels of air pollution: Ceske Budejovice (CB), a locality with a clean air, and Karvina, a locality with high air pollution. The samples from normal deliveries (38-41 week+) of nonsmoking mothers and their newborns were collected in the summer and winter seasons. Higher PM2.5 concentrations were found in Karvina than in CB in the summer 2013 (mean±SD: 20.41±6.28 vs. 9.45±3.62μg/m(3), P<0.001), and in the winter 2014 (mean±SD: 53.67±19.76 vs. 27.96±12.34μg/m(3), P<0.001). We observed significant differences in 15-F2t-IsoP levels between the summer and winter seasons in Karvina for newborns (mean±SD: 64.24±26.75 vs. 104.26±38.18pg/ml plasma, respectively) (P<0.001). Levels of 8-oxodG differed only in the winter season between localities, they were significantly higher (P<0.001) in newborns from Karvina in comparison with CB (mean±SD: 5.70±2.94 vs. 4.23±1.51 nmol/mmol creatinine, respectively). The results of multivariate regression analysis in newborns from Karvina showed PM2.5 concentrations to be a significant predictor for 8-oxodG excretion, PM2.5 and B[a]P (benzo[a]pyrene) concentrations to be a significant predictor for 15-F2t-IsoP levels. The results of multivariate regression analysis in mothers showed PM2.5 concentrations to be a significant predictor of 8-oxodG levels.

  13. Resistive switching and conductance quantization in Ag/SiO{sub 2}/indium tin oxide resistive memories

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, S.; Chen, C.; Liu, H. Y.; Lin, Y. S.; Li, S. Z.; Lu, S. H.; Wang, G. Y.; Song, C.; Zeng, F. Pan, F.; Zhai, Z.

    2014-08-11

    The Ag/SiO{sub 2}/indium tin oxide (ITO) devices exhibit bipolar resistive switching with a large memory window of ∼10{sup 2}, satisfactory endurance of >500 cycles, good retention property of >2000 s, and fast operation speed of <100 ns, thus being a type of promising resistive memory. Under slow voltage sweep measurements, conductance plateaus with a conductance value of integer or half-integer multiples of single atomic point contact have been observed, which agree well with the physical phenomenon of conductance quantization. More importantly, the Ag/SiO{sub 2}/ITO devices exhibit more distinct quantized conductance plateaus under pulse measurements, thereby showing the potential for realizing ultra-high storage density.

  14. Airway inflammation and oxidative potential of air pollutant particles in a pediatric asthma panel

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, Ralph J.; Staimer, Norbert; Tjoa, Thomas; Gillen, Daniel L.; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) components from fossil fuel combustion can induce oxidative stress initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Reported associations between worsening asthma and PM2.5 mass could be related to PM oxidative potential to induce airway oxidative stress and inflammation (hallmarks of asthma pathology). We followed 45 schoolchildren with persistent asthma in their southern California homes daily over 10 days with offline fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), a biomarker of airway inflammation. Ambient exposures included daily average PM2.5, PM2.5 elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC), NO2, O3, and endotoxin. We assessed PM2.5 oxidative potential using both an abiotic and an in vitro bioassay on aqueous extracts of daily particle filters: (1) dithiothreitol (DTT) assay (abiotic), representing chemically produced ROS; and (2) ROS generated intracellularly in a rat alveolar macrophage model using the fluorescent probe 2′7′-dicholorohidroflourescin diacetate. We analyzed relations of FENO to air pollutants in mixed linear regression models. FENO was significantly positively associated with lag 1-day and 2-day averages of traffic-related markers (EC, OC, and NO2), DTT and macrophage ROS, but not PM2.5 mass. DTT associations were nearly twice as strong as other exposures per interquartile range: median FENO increased 8.7–9.9% per 0.43 nmole/min/m3 DTT. Findings suggest that future research in oxidative stress-related illnesses such as asthma and PM exposure would benefit from assessments of PM oxidative potential and composition. PMID:23673461

  15. Resistance switching behavior of ZnO resistive random access memory with a reduced graphene oxide capping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Wei-Yi; Huang, Yen-Lun; Juan, Pi-Chun; Wang, Tse-Wen; Hung, Ke-Yu; Hsieh, Cheng-Yu; Kang, Tsung-Kuei; Shi, Jen-Bin

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the characteristics of ZnO resistive random access memory (RRAM) with a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) capping layer and the polarity effect of the SET/RESET bias on the RRAM. The rGO film insertion enhances the stability of the current-voltage (I-V) switching curve and the superior resistance ratio (˜105) of high-resistance state (HRS) to low-resistance state (LRS). Using the appropriate polarity of the SET/RESET bias applied to the rGO-capped ZnO RRAM enables the oxygen ions to move mainly at the interface of the rGO and ZnO films, resulting in the best performance. Presumably, the rGO film acts as an oxygen reservoir and enhances the easy in and out motion of the oxygen ions from the rGO film. The rGO film also prevents the interaction of oxygen ions and the Al electrode, resulting in excellent performance. In a pulse endurance test, the rGO-capped ZnO RRAM reveals superior endurance of up to 108 cycles over that of the ZnO RRAM without rGO insertion (106 cycles).

  16. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protectivemore » thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.« less

  17. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; et al

    2016-03-08

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen–Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed formore » semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of

  18. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Peng, Zhe; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-03-01

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen-Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4-1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic

  19. Dual operation characteristics of resistance random access memory in indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jyun-Bao; Chang, Ting-Chang; Huang, Jheng-Jie; Chen, Yu-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ting; Tseng, Hsueh-Chih; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Sze, Simon M.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors can be operated either as transistors or resistance random access memory devices. Before the forming process, current-voltage curve transfer characteristics are observed, and resistance switching characteristics are measured after a forming process. These resistance switching characteristics exhibit two behaviors, and are dominated by different mechanisms. The mode 1 resistance switching behavior is due to oxygen vacancies, while mode 2 is dominated by the formation of an oxygen-rich layer. Furthermore, an easy approach is proposed to reduce power consumption when using these resistance random access memory devices with the amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor.

  20. Dual operation characteristics of resistance random access memory in indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jyun-Bao; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Chang, Ting-Chang; Huang, Jheng-Jie; Chen, Yu-Chun; Tseng, Hsueh-Chih; Sze, Simon M.

    2014-04-14

    In this study, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors can be operated either as transistors or resistance random access memory devices. Before the forming process, current-voltage curve transfer characteristics are observed, and resistance switching characteristics are measured after a forming process. These resistance switching characteristics exhibit two behaviors, and are dominated by different mechanisms. The mode 1 resistance switching behavior is due to oxygen vacancies, while mode 2 is dominated by the formation of an oxygen-rich layer. Furthermore, an easy approach is proposed to reduce power consumption when using these resistance random access memory devices with the amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor.

  1. Aqueously dispersed silver nanoparticle-decorated boron nitride nanosheets for reusable, thermal oxidation-resistant surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Bunker, Christopher E; Fernando, K A Shiral; Connell, John W

    2012-02-01

    The impurity-free aqueous dispersions of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) allowed the facile preparation of silver (Ag) nanoparticle-decorated BNNS by chemical reduction of an Ag salt with hydrazine in the presence of BNNS. The resultant Ag-BNNS nanohybrids remained dispersed in water, allowing convenient subsequent solution processing. By using substrate transfer techniques, Ag-BNNS nanohybrid thin film coatings on quartz substrates were prepared and evaluated as reusable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensors that were robust against repeated solvent washing. In addition, because ofthe unique thermal oxidation-resistant properties of the BNNS, the sensor devices may be readily recycled by short-duration high temperature air oxidation to remove residual analyte molecules in repeated runs. The limiting factor associated with the thermal oxidation recycling process was the Ostwald ripening effect of Ag nanostructures. PMID:22280102

  2. Aqueously Dispersed Silver Nanoparticle-Decorated Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Reusable, Thermal Oxidation-Resistant Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yi; Bunker, Christopher E.; Fernandos, K. A. Shiral; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The impurity-free aqueous dispersions of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) allowed the facile preparation of silver (Ag) nanoparticle-decorated BNNS by chemical reduction of an Ag salt with hydrazine in the presence of BNNS. The resultant Ag-BNNS nanohybrids remained dispersed in water, allowing convenient subsequent solution processing. By using substrate transfer techniques, Ag-BNNS nanohybrid thin film coatings on quartz substrates were prepared and evaluated as reusable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensors that were robust against repeated solvent washing. In addition, because of the unique thermal oxidation-resistant properties of the BNNS, the sensor devices may be readily recycled by short-duration high temperature air oxidation to remove residual analyte molecules in repeated runs. The limiting factor associated with the thermal oxidation recycling process was the Ostwald ripening effect of Ag nanostructures.

  3. Melting of corrosion-resisting steels using air in bath agitation at the end of oxygen blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizatulin, R. A.; Valuev, D. V.; Valueva, A. V.; Yedesheva, Ch V.

    2014-10-01

    A number of metallurgical plants employ ladle stirring with argon at the end of oxygen blowing during the melting process of corrosion-resisting steels [1, 2]. At the same time, the scarcity and relatively high cost of argon, its low pressure in a shop air pipeline restrain most plants from using argon for corrosion-resisting steel production. Compressed air was used instead of argon to intensify the process of decarbonizing when chromium-nickel stainless steels were made with a 40-ton electric arc furnace at the Kuznetsk Metallurgical Plant.

  4. Retrieval of the Nitrous Oxide Profiles using the AIRS Data in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Ma, P.; Tao, J.; Li, X.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Li, S.; Xiong, X.

    2014-12-01

    As an important greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance, the 100-year global warming potential of Nitrous Oxide (N2O) is almost 300 times higher than that of carbon dioxide. However, there are still large uncertainties about the quantitative N2O emission and its feedback to climate change due to the coarse ground-based network. This approach attempts to retrieve the N2O profiles from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) data. First, the sensitivity of atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles and surface parameters between two spectral absorption bands were simulated by using the radiative transfer model. Second, the eigenvector regression algorithm is used to construct a priori state. Third, an optimal estimate method was developed based on the band selection of N2O. Finally, we compared our retrieved AIRS profiles with HIPPO data, and analyzed the seasonal and annual N2O distribution in China from 2004 to 2013.

  5. Crossflow air stripping and catalytic oxidation of chlorinated hydrocarbons from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Gavaskar, A.R.; Kim, B.C.; Rosansky, S.H.; Ong, S.K.; Marchand, E.G.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes air stripping of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants from groundwater in a crossflow air stripping tower and destruction of the organic compounds by catalytic oxidation. Crossflow stripping has an advantage over conventional countercurrent stripping. In typical stripping operations, the mass transfer coefficient is insensitive to the velocity of the gas stream. The crossflow stripping tower is a geometry that increases the cross section of gas flow while making minimal disturbances to the liquid flow, allowing high gas-liquid ratios without flooding. By increasing the flow cross section for the gas stream, pressure drop (and thus fan power) can be reduced significantly. A field demonstration of the crossflow column was performed at a contaminated groundwater site. The groundwater was pumped out and sent to two 17-ft-high (5.2-m) towers in a parallel arrangement. One tower was a crossflow air stripper and the other a conventional countercurrent design. The performance of the two was compared. The key organic species targeted was dichloroethane, which has a low Henry`s law constant. Three different baffle configurations were tested in the crossflow tower. The results of this demonstration were used to develop design criteria for crossflow air strippers to be used for destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons. 4 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Kuo, Lewis; Li, Baozhen

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La.sub.w Ca.sub.x Ln.sub.y Ce.sub.z MnO.sub.3, wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics.

  7. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Kuo, L.; Li, B.

    1999-06-29

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO[sub 3]. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La[sub w]Ca[sub x]Ln[sub y]Ce[sub z]MnO[sub 3], wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics. 10 figs.

  8. Synthesis of Oxidation-Resistant Cupronickel Nanowires for Transparent Conducting Nanowire Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rathmall, Aaron; Nguyen, Minh; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2012-01-01

    Nanowires of copper can be coated from liquids to create flexible, transparent conducting films that can potentially replace the dominant transparent conductor, indium tin oxide, in displays, solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, and electrochromic windows. One issue with these nanowire films is that copper is prone to oxidation. It was hypothesized that the resistance to oxidation could be improved by coating copper nanowires with nickel. This work demonstrates a method for synthesizing copper nanowires with nickel shells as well as the properties of cupronickel nanowires in transparent conducting films. Time- and temperature-dependent sheet resistance measurements indicate that the sheet resistance of copper and silver nanowire films will double after 3 and 36 months at room temperature, respectively. In contrast, the sheet resistance of cupronickel nanowires containing 20 mol % nickel will double in about 400 years. Coating copper nanowires to a ratio of 2:1 Cu:Ni gave them a neutral gray color, making them more suitable for use in displays and electrochromic windows. These properties, and the fact that copper and nickel are 1000 times more abundant than indium or silver, make cupronickel nanowires a promising alternative for the sustainable, efficient production of transparent conductors.

  9. Regulation of oxidative stress resistance in Campylobacter jejuni, a microaerophilic foodborne pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Chul; Oh, Euna; Kim, Jinyong; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the leading bacterial causes of human gastroenteritis. Due to the increasing rates of human campylobacteriosis, C. jejuni is considered as a serious public health concern worldwide. C. jejuni is a microaerophilic, fastidious bacterium. C. jejuni must overcome a wide range of stress conditions during foodborne transmission to humans, such as food preservation and processing conditions, and even in infection of the gastrointestinal tracts of humans. Particularly, this microaerophilic foodborne pathogen must survive in the atmospheric conditions prior to the initiation of infection. C. jejuni possesses unique regulatory mechanisms for oxidative stress resistance. Lacking OxyR and SoxRS that are highly conserved in other Gram-negative foodborne pathogens, C. jejuni modulates the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance mainly via the peroxide resistance regulator and Campylobacter oxidative stress regulator. Based on recent findings of ours and others, in this review, we described how C. jejuni regulates the expression of oxidative stress defense. PMID:26284041

  10. Mitochondria thioredoxin's backup role in oxidative stress resistance in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guokun; Wang, Haijun; Xiong, Xiaochao; Chen, Shulin; Zhang, Dongyuan

    2015-02-01

    Microorganisms often suffer from oxidative stress created from nutrient starvation and environmental changes. Thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) pathways are believed critical in related protective functions. The roles of Trx in improving abiotic stress resistance in Trichoderma reesei are still unclear. In this study, we identified a Trx-encoding gene, Trtrx1. The protein expressed located specifically in the mitochondria as verified by the fluorescence signals of TrTRX1-EGFP. TrTRX1 can catalyze the reduction of insulin disulfides by dithiothreitol (DTT). Loss of Trtrx1 however, did not lead to either significant morphology abnormality under normal and oxidative stress condition, or detectable difference in reactive oxygen species (ROS) resistance. The unchanged GSH amount in Trtrx1 deletion strain under normal condition and slight increase under oxidative stress condition, as well as the interplay between Trx and GSH systems suggested that GSH system was dominant and sufficient to maintain the mitochondrial redox state in T. reesei, where TrTRX1 played a role as the backup oxidative stress resistance.

  11. The influence of Cr and Al pack cementation on low carbon steel to improve oxidation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetya, Didik; Sugiarti, Eni; Destyorini, Fredina; Thosin, Kemas Ahmad Zaini

    2012-06-01

    Pack chromizing and aluminizing has been widely used for many years to improve hot temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance of metals. The coating process involves packing the steel in a powder mixture which contain aluminum and chromium source, and inert filler (usually alumina), and halide activator NH4Cl. Al and Cr were deposited onto carbon steel by pack cementation process using elemental Al and Cr powder as Al and Cr source, whereas NiCo alloys codeposited by electrodeposition. The position of Al and Cr could be under or over Ni-Co alloys deposited. Pack cementation was heated on dry inert gas at temperature 800 °C about 5 hours and 20 minute for Cr and Al respectively. Al and Cr was successfully deposited. Laying down effect of Al and Cr onto carbon steel whether up and down toward NiCo alloys coating have affected to oxidation resistance. The pack aluminizing as top layer given best resitance to restrain excessive oxide scale, in contrast pack chromizing reveal bad oxidation resistance, moreover occured spallation on layer.

  12. Resistive switching in a few nanometers thick tantalum oxide film formed by a metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Takeo; Samukawa, Seiji

    2015-04-27

    Resistive switching in a Cu/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Pt structure that consisted of a few nanometer-thick Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film was demonstrated. The Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film with thicknesses of 2–5 nm was formed with a combination of Ta metal film deposition and neutral oxygen particle irradiation at room temperature. The device exhibited a bipolar resistive switching with a threshold voltage of 0.2 V and multilevel switching operation.

  13. Formation of calcium in the products of iron oxide-aluminum thermite combustion in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, A. A.; Gromov, A. M.; Popenko, E. M.; Sergienko, A. V.; Sabinskaya, O. G.; Raab, B.; Teipel, U.

    2016-10-01

    The composition of condensed products resulting from the combustion of thermite mixtures (Al + Fe2O3) in air is studied by precise methods. It is shown that during combustion, calcium is formed and stabilized in amounts of maximal 0.55 wt %, while is missing from reactants of 99.7 wt % purity. To explain this, it is hypothesized that a low-energy nuclear reaction takes place alongside the reactions of aluminum oxidation and nitridation, resulting in the formation of calcium (Kervran-Bolotov reaction).

  14. Inhaled nitric oxide does not alter the longitudinal distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeborg, D.M.; Kavanagh, B.P.; Van Meurs, K.

    1995-01-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide does not alter the longitudinal distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance. Because the effects of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) may be localized to its site of delivery, we studied the effects of inhaled NO on the longitudinal distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance during pulmonary hypertension in perfused rabbit lungs. Before NO administration, pulmonary hypertension was produced by infusion of the thromboxane A{sub 2} mimetic U-46619 in all lungs. Pulmonary vascular resistance was divided into arterial, microvascular, and venous components by arterial and venous occlusion techniques. In the buffer-perfused lung, all doses of inhaled NO (5, 20, and 80 ppm) produced small decreases ({approximately}3 mmHg) in pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa), with equivalent proportional reductions in all segmental vascular resistances. Similar results were obtained after an extended inhaled NO dose range of 20, 80, and 240 ppm. In the buffer-perfused lung, inhibition of endogenous NO synthesis with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) potentiated the effects of U-46619. Subsequent inhaled NO administration produced larger decreases ({approximately} 7 mmHg) in Ppa with equivalent proportional reductions in all segmental vascular resistances. In the blood-perfused lung, L-NAME did not alter baseline pulmonary pressures. Administration of inhaled NO during U-46619-induced pulmonary hypertension produced dose-related decreases in Ppa. The highest dose (80 ppm) of inhaled NO decreased Ppa by 3.5 mmHg, with equivalent proportional reductions in all segmental vascular resistances. We conclude that inhaled NO does not selectively alter the longitudinal distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance and that the magnitude of reduction in total pulmonary vascular resistance in the isolated perfused rabbit lung depends on the endogenous NO synthesis and on the use of buffer or blood as the perfusate. 47 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

    2009-10-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

  16. Carbon-catalyzed oxidation of SO2 by NO2 and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Schryer, D. R.; Cofer, W. R., III; Edahl, R. A., Jr.; Munavalli, S.

    1982-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed using carbon particles (commercial furnace black) as a surrogate for soot particles. Carbon particles were suspended in water, and gas mixtures were bubbled into the suspensions to observe the effect of carbon particles on the oxidation of SO2 by air and NO2. Identical gas mixtures were bubbled into a blank containing only pure water. After exposure each solution was analyzed for pH and sulfate. It was found that NO2 greatly enhances the oxidation of SO2 to sulfate in the presence of carbon particles. The amount of sulfate found in the blanks was significantly less. Under the conditions of these experiments no saturation of the reaction was observed and SO2 was converted to sulfate even in a highly acid medium (pH or = 1.5).

  17. Oxidation of SO2 by NO2 and air in an aqueous suspension of carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Schryer, D. R.; Cofer, W. R., III; Edahl, R. A., Jr.; Munavalli, S.

    1982-01-01

    A series of experiments has been performed using carbon black as a surrogate for soot particles. Carbon black was suspended in water and gas mixtures were bubbled into the suspensions to observe the effect of carbon particles on the oxidation of SO2 by air and NO2. Identical gas mixtures were bubbled into a black containing only pure water. After exposure each solution was analyzed for pH and sulfate. It was found that NO2 greatly enhances the oxidation of SO2 to sulfate in the presence of carbon black. The amount of sulfate in the blanks was significantly less. Under the conditions of the experiments no saturation of the reaction was observed and SO2 was converted to sulfate even in a highly acid medium (pH not less than 1.5).

  18. Exhaustive submaximal endurance and resistance exercises induce temporary immunosuppression via physical and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chan-Ho; Paik, Il-Young; Kwak, Yi-Sub; Jee, Yong-Seok; Kim, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    Regular running and strength training are the best ways to improve aerobic capacity and develop the size of skeletal muscles. However, uncontrolled physical activities can often lead to an undertraining or over-training syndrome. In particular, overtraining causes persistent fatigue and reduces physical performance due to changes in the various physiological and immunological factors. In this study, we gave an exhaustive submaximal endurance or resistance exercise to participants and investigated the relationship between physical stress (cortisol level in blood), oxidative stress (intracellular ROS accumulation), and adaptive immune response (CD4:CD8 ratio). Materials and Methods Ten male volunteers were recruited, and performed a submaximal endurance or resistance exercise with 85% of VO2max or 1-repetition maximum until exhaustion. Blood samples were collected at rest, and at 0 and 30 min after the exercise. Cortisol levels, oxidative stress, and immune cell phenotypes in peripheral blood were evaluated. Cortisol levels in the sera increased after the exhaustive endurance and resistance exercises and such increments were maintained through the recovery. Intra-cellular ROS levels also increased after the exhaustive endurance and resistance exercises. The ratio of CD4+ T cells to CD8+ T cells after each type of submaximal exercise decreased compared with that at the resting stage, and returned to the resting level at 30 min after the exercise. In this study, an exhaustive endurance or a resistance exercise with submaximal intensity caused excessive physical stress, intra-cellular oxidative stress, and post-exercise immunosuppression. This result suggests that excessive physical stress induced temporary immune dysfunction via physical and oxidative stress. PMID:26331134

  19. Oxidative metabolism drives inflammation-induced platinum resistance in human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matassa, D S; Amoroso, M R; Lu, H; Avolio, R; Arzeni, D; Procaccini, C; Faicchia, D; Maddalena, F; Simeon, V; Agliarulo, I; Zanini, E; Mazzoccoli, C; Recchi, C; Stronach, E; Marone, G; Gabra, H; Matarese, G; Landriscina, M; Esposito, F

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells have long been considered defective in mitochondrial respiration and mostly dependent on glycolytic metabolism. However, this assumption is currently challenged by several lines of evidence in a growing number of tumours. Ovarian cancer (OC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, but it continues to be a poorly understood disease and its metabolic features are far to be elucidated. In this context, we investigated the role of tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), which is found upregulated in several cancer types and is a key modulator of tumour cell metabolism. Surprisingly, we found that TRAP1 expression inversely correlated with grade, stage and lower survival in a large cohort of OC patients. Accordingly, TRAP1 silencing induced resistance to cisplatin, resistant cells showed increased oxidative metabolism compared with their sensitive counterpart, and the bioenergetics cellular index of higher grade tumours indicated increased mitochondrial respiration. Strikingly, cisplatin resistance was reversible upon pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by metformin/oligomycin. At molecular level, increased oxidative metabolism in low TRAP1-expressing OC cells and tissues enhanced production of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Mechanistically, we identified members of the multidrug resistance complex (MDR) as key mediators of such metabolism-driven, inflammation-induced process. Indeed, treatment of OC cell lines with TNFα and IL6 induced a selective increase in the expression of TAP1 and multidrug resistance protein 1, whereas TAP1 silencing sensitized cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Our results unveil a novel role for TRAP1 and oxidative metabolism in cancer progression and suggest the targeting of mitochondrial bioenergetics to increase cisplatin efficacy in human OC. PMID:27206315

  20. Oxidative metabolism drives inflammation-induced platinum resistance in human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Matassa, D S; Amoroso, M R; Lu, H; Avolio, R; Arzeni, D; Procaccini, C; Faicchia, D; Maddalena, F; Simeon, V; Agliarulo, I; Zanini, E; Mazzoccoli, C; Recchi, C; Stronach, E; Marone, G; Gabra, H; Matarese, G; Landriscina, M; Esposito, F

    2016-09-01

    Tumour cells have long been considered defective in mitochondrial respiration and mostly dependent on glycolytic metabolism. However, this assumption is currently challenged by several lines of evidence in a growing number of tumours. Ovarian cancer (OC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, but it continues to be a poorly understood disease and its metabolic features are far to be elucidated. In this context, we investigated the role of tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), which is found upregulated in several cancer types and is a key modulator of tumour cell metabolism. Surprisingly, we found that TRAP1 expression inversely correlated with grade, stage and lower survival in a large cohort of OC patients. Accordingly, TRAP1 silencing induced resistance to cisplatin, resistant cells showed increased oxidative metabolism compared with their sensitive counterpart, and the bioenergetics cellular index of higher grade tumours indicated increased mitochondrial respiration. Strikingly, cisplatin resistance was reversible upon pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by metformin/oligomycin. At molecular level, increased oxidative metabolism in low TRAP1-expressing OC cells and tissues enhanced production of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Mechanistically, we identified members of the multidrug resistance complex (MDR) as key mediators of such metabolism-driven, inflammation-induced process. Indeed, treatment of OC cell lines with TNFα and IL6 induced a selective increase in the expression of TAP1 and multidrug resistance protein 1, whereas TAP1 silencing sensitized cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Our results unveil a novel role for TRAP1 and oxidative metabolism in cancer progression and suggest the targeting of mitochondrial bioenergetics to increase cisplatin efficacy in human OC. PMID:27206315