Science.gov

Sample records for air oxygen nitrogen

  1. Variable oxygen/nitrogen enriched intake air system for internal combustion engine applications

    DOEpatents

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.; Cole, Roger L.

    1997-01-01

    An air supply control system for selectively supplying ambient air, oxygen enriched air and nitrogen enriched air to an intake of an internal combustion engine includes an air mixing chamber that is in fluid communication with the air intake. At least a portion of the ambient air flowing to the mixing chamber is selectively diverted through a secondary path that includes a selectively permeable air separating membrane device due a differential pressure established across the air separating membrane. The permeable membrane device separates a portion of the nitrogen in the ambient air so that oxygen enriched air (permeate) and nitrogen enriched air (retentate) are produced. The oxygen enriched air and the nitrogen enriched air can be selectively supplied to the mixing chamber or expelled to atmosphere. Alternatively, a portion of the nitrogen enriched air can be supplied through another control valve to a monatomic-nitrogen plasma generator device so that atomic nitrogen produced from the nitrogen enriched air can be then injected into the exhaust of the engine. The oxygen enriched air or the nitrogen enriched air becomes mixed with the ambient air in the mixing chamber and then the mixed air is supplied to the intake of the engine. As a result, the air being supplied to the intake of the engine can be regulated with respect to the concentration of oxygen and/or nitrogen.

  2. Roles of nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide in compressed-air narcosis.

    PubMed

    Hesser, C M; Fagraeus, L; Adolfson, J

    1978-12-01

    In an attempt to determine the roles of nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide in compressed-air narcosis, the effects on performance (mental function and manual dexterity) of adding CO2 in various concentrations to the inspired gas under three different conditions were studied in eight healthy male volunteers. The three conditions were: (1) air breathing at 1.3 ATA; (2) oxygen breathing at 1.7 ATA; and (3) air breathing at 8.0 ATA (same inspired O2 pressure as in (2)). By relating performance to the changes induced in end-tidal (alveolar) gas pressures, and comparing the data from the three conditions, we arrived at the following results and conclusions. A rise in O2 pressure to 1.65 ATA, or in N2 pressure to 6.3 ATA at a constant high PO2 level, caused a significant decrement of 10% in mental function but no consistent effect on psychomotor function. A rise in end-tidal PCO2 of 10 mmHg caused an impairment of approximately 10% in both mental and psychomotor functions. The results suggest that, at raised partial pressures, all three gases have narcotic properties, and that the mechanism of CO2 narcosis differs fundamentally from that of N2 and O2 narcosis.

  3. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  4. [Oxygen metabolism in the body during substitution of nitrogen by helium in the air].

    PubMed

    Troshikhin, G V; Isaakian, L A; Bekirova, G G

    1975-01-01

    The total gas exchange, body temperature, content of free oxygen in the quadriceps muscle and its changes upon oxygen inhalation of a known dosage (oxygen test) were measured in the Wistar rats during their one-hour exposure to a helium-oxygen atmosphere (21%) at 25 degrees C. In this atmosphere the animals displayed a 1.8 degrees decline in the body temperature, a 20.5% increase in the gas exchange and a 26% decrease of oxygen in the muscular tissue as compared with the respective parameters in the air. After the experiment during the first 20 min exposure to the normal atmosphere oxygen tests were 10-15% lower than before the experiment. These findings give evidence for an increase of oxygen exchange in the muscles of animals exposed to the helium-oxygen atmosphere at a temperature below the comfortable level.

  5. Water-vapor line broadening and shifting by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon in the 720-nm wavelength region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic measurements of H2O vapor in the 720-nm wavelength region were conducted to investigate the broadening and shifting of H2O lines by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. For each of the buffer gases under study, a linear relationship was found between the widths and the shifts, with the broader lines having the smaller pressure shifts. The pressure shifts measured compared favorably with theoretical values reported by Bykov et al. (1988). The temperature-dependence exponents for air-broadening were found to be J-dependent, with the lower-J lines having the higher exponents.

  6. Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene as metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Wang, Shaoyun; Yan, Jun; Cong, Lijie; Chen, Ye; Xi, Hongyuan

    2014-02-01

    Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene (PNCN) was used as an alternative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Here we report a novel, low-cost, scalable, synthetic method for preparation of PNCN via the carbonization of graphite oxide-polyaniline hybrid (GO-PANI), subsequently followed by KOH activation treatment. Due to its high concentration of nitrogen and high specific surface area, PNCN exhibited an excellent catalytic activity for ORR. As a result, the maximum power density of 1159.34mWm(-2) obtained with PNCN catalyst was higher than that of Pt/C catalyst (858.49mWm(-2)) in a MFC. Therefore, porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet could be a good alternative to Pt catalyst in MFCs.

  7. 91. VIEW OF OXYGEN AND GASEOUS NITROGEN TANKS AND OXIDIZER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF OXYGEN AND GASEOUS NITROGEN TANKS AND OXIDIZER APRON FROM NORTH - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. Low NOx combustion using cogenerated oxygen and nitrogen streams

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, Lawrence E.; Snyder, William J.

    2009-02-03

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuel is achieved with less formation of NOx by feeding the fuel into a slightly oxygen-enriched atmosphere, and separating air into oxygen-rich and nitrogen-rich streams which are fed separately into the combustion device.

  9. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C.

    1984-01-01

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  10. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C. [Wilmington, DE; Baker, Richard W. [Palo Alto, CA

    1990-09-25

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  11. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, I.C.; Baker, R.W.

    1990-09-25

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible. 1 figure

  12. Upper ocean bubble measurements from the NE Pacific and estimates of their role in air-sea gas transfer of the weakly soluble gases nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagle, Svein; McNeil, Craig; Steiner, Nadja

    2010-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of upper-ocean bubble clouds, and dissolved gaseous nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) from three winter storms are presented and analyzed. The data were collected on the Canadian Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study (C-SOLAS) mooring located near Ocean Station Papa (OSP) at 50°N, 145°W in the NE Pacific during winter of 2003/2004. The bubble field was measured using an upward looking 200 kHz echosounder. Direct estimates of bubble mediated gas fluxes were made using assumed bubble size spectra and the upward looking echosounder data. A one-dimensional biogeochemical model was used to help compare data and various existing models of bubble mediated air-sea gas exchange. The direct bubble flux calculations show an approximate quadratic/cubic dependence on mean bubble penetration depth. After scaling from N2/O2 to carbon dioxide, near surface, nonsupersaturating, air-sea transfer rates, KT, for U10 > 12 m s-1 fall between quadratic and cubic relationships. Estimates of the subsurface bubble induced air injection flux, VT, show an approximate quadratic/cubic dependence on mean bubble penetration depth. Both KT and VT are much higher than those measured during Hurricane Frances over the wind speed range 12 < U10 < 23 m s-1. This result implies that over the open ocean and this wind speed range, older and more developed seas which occur during winter storms are more effective in exchanging gases between the atmosphere and ocean than younger less developed seas which occur during the rapid passage of a hurricane.

  13. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  14. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  15. Nitrogen Uptake During Air Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-10

    depth. The measurement system was attached to a syringe pump and air was added to the closed-circuit system during compression. Gas was circulated...with the syringe pump until pre-dive temperatures and oxygen sensor output stabilized (oxygen sensor output varied with temperature). This equilibration...provided voltage output to the computer. The spirometer was calibrated with a 3 liter syringe (Collins, Model M-20). A temperature probe (YSI, Model

  16. Nitrogen and Oxygen Photochemistry following SL9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Allen, Mark; Gladstone, G. Randall

    1995-01-01

    The collision of Shoemaker Levy 9 (SL9) with Jupiter caused many new molecular species to be deposited in the Jovian stratosphere. We use a photochemical model to follow the evolution of the impact derived species. Our results regarding the nitrogen and oxygen compounds are presented here. NH3 photolysis initiates the nitrogen photochemistry. Much of the nitrogen ends up in N2, nitrogen-sulfur compounds, and HCN, but NH3 and nitriles such as C2H3CN may also exist in observable quantities for a year or so after the impacts. Oxygen species survive for a long time in the Jovian stratosphere. The only major oxygen containing compounds that exhibit dramatic changes in the lower stratosphere in the first year following the impacts are SO, SO2, and OCS - H2O, CO2, and CO are comparatively stable. We discuss the important photochemical processes operating on the nitrogen and oxygen species in the Jovian stratosphere, make prediction concerning the temporal variation of the major species, and identify molecules that might act as good tracers for atmospheric dynamics.

  17. Purging dissolved oxygen by nitrogen bubble aeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We apply aeration with nitrogen microbubbles to water in order to see whether oxygen gas originally dissolved in the water at one atmosphere is purged by the aeration. The concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) is detected by a commercial DO meter. To detect the dissolved nitrogen (DN) level, we observe the growth of millimetre-sized bubbles nucleated at glass surfaces in contact with the aerated water and compare it with the Epstein-Plesset theory that accounts for DO/DN diffusions and the presence of the glass surfaces. Comparisons between the experiment and the theory suggest that the DO in the water are effectively purged by the aeration.

  18. Bifunctional oxygen/air electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörissen, Ludwig

    A selective review on the materials and construction principles used for bifunctional oxygen/air electrodes is given. The discussion emphasizes the catalytically active materials used for the construction of these electrodes, which are a key component in electrically rechargeable air breathing electrochemical systems. Whereas, in acid electrolytes normally noble metal catalysts must be used, there is a possibility to use less expensive transition metal oxides in alkaline electrolytes. Typical transition metal oxides have the perovskite, pyrochlore and spinel structure.

  19. The development of a noncryogenic nitrogen/oxygen supply technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenough, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    A development program was conducted in two phases to define the characteristics and requirements of an electrochemical oxygen/nitrogen supply technique for space station application. In Phase 1, electrode formulations and structures suitable for use as anodes in an oxygen/nitrogen generator were experimentally investigated. A one-man model oxygen/nitrogen generator integrated with a space cabin atmosphere simulator was fabricated and successfully tested in Phase 2. Data from these tests were used to update a computer routine model of the cabin atmosphere control using the oxygen/nitrogen generator technique. A specification and preliminary design for a 12-man oxygen/ nitrogen generation system was prepared.

  20. Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydorgen/Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two-time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (> 1 x 10(exp -20) moles/cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/air fuel and for the H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA s Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T4) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T3). High values of the regression coefficient R2 are obtained.

  1. Summary of Simplified Two Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydrogen/Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John; Molnar, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (greater than l x 10(exp -20)) moles per cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T(sub 4)). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/Air fuel and for H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T(sub 4)) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T(sub 3)). High values of the regression coefficient R squared are obtained.

  2. The Solubility of Nitrogen and Air in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battino, Rubin; Rettich, Timothy R.; Tominaga, Toshihiro

    1984-04-01

    This review covers the solubility of nitrogen and air in liquids as a function of temperature and pressure. Solubility data for individual systems were critically evaluated. Recommended or tentative values are presented as smoothing equations and/or in tabular form. Trends in homologous series or related solvents are discussed. Data for the n-alkanes were smoothed with respect to temperature, pressure, and carbon number. Liquids include: water; heavy water; seawater; aqueous salt solutions; mixed solvents; hydrocarbons; organic compounds containing oxygen, halogen, sulfur, nitrogen, or silicon; olive oil; various biological fluids; H2S; SO2; NH3; CO2; nitrogen oxides; and several halogen and boron containing inorganic solvents.

  3. Foil bearing performance in liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genge, Gary G.; Saville, Marshall; Gu, Alston

    1993-01-01

    Space transfer vehicles and other power and propulsion systems require long-life turbopumps. Rolling-element bearings used in current turbopumps do not have sufficient life for these applications. Process fluid foil bearings have established long life, with exceptional reliability, over a wide range of temperatures and fluids in many high-speed turbomachinery applications. However, actual data on bearing performance in cryogenic fluids has been minimal. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and AlliedSignal Aerospace Systems and Equipment (ASE) have attempted to characterize the leaf-type compliant foil bearing in oxygen and nitrogen. The work performed under a joint internal research and development program between Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and ASE demonstrated that the foil bearing has load capacities of at least 266 psi in liquid oxygen and 352 psi in liquid nitrogen. In addition, the bearing demonstrated a direct damping coefficient of 40 to 50 lb-sec/in. with a damping ratio of .7 to 1.4 in. liquid nitrogen using a bearing sized for upper-stage turbopumps. With the results from this testing and the years of successful use in air cycle machines and other applications, leaf-type compliant foil bearings are ready for testing in liquid oxygen turbopumps.

  4. Hybrid membrane--PSA system for separating oxygen from air

    DOEpatents

    Staiger, Chad L [Albuquerque, NM; Vaughn, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM; Miller, A Keith [Albuquerque, NM; Cornelius, Christopher J [Blackburg, VA

    2011-01-25

    A portable, non-cryogenic, oxygen generation system capable of delivering oxygen gas at purities greater than 98% and flow rates of 15 L/min or more is described. The system consists of two major components. The first component is a high efficiency membrane capable of separating argon and a portion of the nitrogen content from air, yielding an oxygen-enriched permeate flow. This is then fed to the second component, a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit utilizing a commercially available, but specifically formulated zeolite compound to remove the remainder of the nitrogen from the flow. The system is a unique gas separation system that can operate at ambient temperatures, for producing high purity oxygen for various applications (medical, refining, chemical production, enhanced combustion, fuel cells, etc . . . ) and represents a significant advance compared to current technologies.

  5. Nitrogen transfers and air-sea N2O fluxes in the upwelling off Namibia within the oxygen minimum zone: a 3-D model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, E.; Dadou, I.; Le Vu, B.; Cambon, G.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Machu, E.; Rixen, T.; Kock, A.; Flohr, A.; Paulmier, A.; Lavik, G.

    2011-04-01

    As regions of high primary production and being often associated to Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs), Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle. Indeed, by exporting the Organic Matter (OM) and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. Losses of fixed inorganic N, through denitrification and anammox processes and through nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to the atmosphere, take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and alleviate the role of these regions as a source of N. In the present study, we developed a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical (ROMS/BioBUS) model for investigating the full N budget in the Namibian sub-system of the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). The different state variables of a climatological experiment have been compared to different data sets (satellite and in situ observations) and show that the model is able to represent this biogeochemical oceanic region. The N transfer is investigated in the Namibian upwelling system using this coupled model, especially in the Walvis Bay area between 22° S and 24° S where the OMZ is well developed (O2 < 0.5 ml O2 l-1). The upwelling process advects 24.2 × 1010 mol N yr-1 of nitrate enriched waters over the first 100 m over the slope and over the continental shelf. The meridional advection by the alongshore Benguela current brings also nutrient-rich waters with 21.1 × 1010 mol N yr-1. 10.5 × 1010 mol N yr-1 of OM are exported outside of the continental shelf (between 0 and 100-m depth). 32.4% and 18.1% of this OM are exported by advection in the form of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matters (DOM and POM), respectively, however vertical sinking of POM represents the main contributor (49.5%) to OM export outside of the first 100-m depth of the water column on the continental shelf. The continental slope also represents a net N export

  6. Experimental thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat values for mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, R. A.; Cieszkiewicz, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity obtained with a transient hot-wire apparatus are reported for three mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon. Values of the specific heat, Cp, are calculated from these measured values and the density calculated with an equation of state. The measurements were made at temperatures between 65 and 303 K with pressures between 0.1 and 70 MPa. The data cover the vapor, liquid, and supercritical gas phases for the three mixtures. The total reported points are 1066 for the air mixture (78.11 percent nitrogen, 20.97 percent oxygen, and 0.92 percent argon), 1058 for the 50 percent nitrogen, 50 percent oxygen mixture, and 864 for the 25 percent nitrogen, 75 oxygen mixture. Empirical thermal conductivity correlations are provided for the three mixtures.

  7. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilhauer, B.; Bohacova, M.; Fraga, M.; Matthews, J.; Sakaki, N.; Tameda, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Ulrich, A.

    2013-06-01

    Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of Air Fluorescence Workshops commenced in 2002. At the 8th Air Fluorescence Workshop 2011, it was suggested to develop a common way of describing the nitrogen fluorescence for application to air shower observations. Here, first analyses for a common treatment of the major dependences of the emission procedure are presented. Aspects like the contributions at different wavelengths, the dependence on pressure as it is decreasing with increasing altitude in the atmosphere, the temperature dependence, in particular that of the collisional cross sections between molecules involved, and the collisional de-excitation by water vapor are discussed.

  8. A Cabin Air Separator for EVA Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Presently, the Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) conducted from the Quest Joint Airlock on the International Space Station use high pressure, high purity oxygen that is delivered to the Space Station by the Space Shuttle. When the Space Shuttle retires, a new method of delivering high pressure, high purity oxygen to the High Pressure Gas Tanks (HPGTs) is needed. One method is to use a cabin air separator to sweep oxygen from the cabin air, generate a low pressure/high purity oxygen stream, and compress the oxygen with a multistage mechanical compressor. A main advantage to this type of system is that the existing low pressure oxygen supply infrastructure can be used as the source of cabin oxygen. ISS has two water electrolysis systems that deliver low pressure oxygen to the cabin, as well as chlorate candles and compressed gas tanks on cargo vehicles. Each of these systems can feed low pressure oxygen into the cabin, and any low pressure oxygen source can be used as an on-board source of oxygen. Three different oxygen separator systems were evaluated, and a two stage Pressure Swing Adsorption system was selected for reasons of technical maturity. Two different compressor designs were subjected to long term testing, and the compressor with better life performance and more favorable oxygen safety characteristics was selected. These technologies have been used as the basis of a design for a flight system located in Equipment Lock, and taken to Preliminary Design Review level of maturity. This paper describes the Cabin Air Separator for EVA Oxygen (CASEO) concept, describes the separator and compressor technology trades, highlights key technology risks, and describes the flight hardware concept as presented at Preliminary Design Review (PDR)

  9. Method and apparatus for producing oxygen and nitrogen and membrane therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C.; Baker, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    Process and apparatus for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen as well as a novel membrane useful therein are disclosed. The process utilizes novel facilitated transport membranes to selectively transport oxygen from one gaseous stream to another, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the method, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a polar organic membrane which separates a gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form at the interface of the feed stream with the membrane, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form at the interface of the product stream with the membrane. In an alternate mode of operation, the feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form at the interface of the feed stream with the membrane and the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form at the interface of the product stream with the membrane. Under such conditions, the carrier acts as a shuttle, picking up oxygen at the feed side of the membrane, diffusing across the membrane as the oxygenated complex, releasing oxygen to the product stream, and then diffusing back to the feed side to repeat the process. Exceptionally and unexpectedly high O.sub.2 /N.sub.2 selectivity, on the order of 10 to 30, is obtained, as well as exceptionally high oxygen permeability, on the order of 6 to 15.times.10.sup.-8 cm.sup.3 -cm/cm.sup.2 -sec-cmHg, as well as a long membrane life of in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  10. Method and apparatus for producing oxygen and nitrogen and membrane therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, I.C.; Baker, R.W.

    1985-09-17

    Process and apparatus for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen as well as a novel membrane useful therein are disclosed. The process utilizes novel facilitated transport membranes to selectively transport oxygen from one gaseous stream to another, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the method, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a polar organic membrane which separates a gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form at the interface of the feed stream with the membrane, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form at the interface of the product stream with the membrane. In an alternate mode of operation, the feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form at the interface of the feed stream with the membrane and the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form at the interface of the product stream with the membrane. Under such conditions, the carrier acts as a shuttle, picking up oxygen at the feed side of the membrane, diffusing across the membrane as the oxygenated complex, releasing oxygen to the product stream, and then diffusing back to the feed side to repeat the process. Exceptionally and unexpectedly high O[sub 2]/N[sub 2] selectivity, on the order of 10 to 30, is obtained, as well as exceptionally high oxygen permeability, on the order of 6 to 15 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] cm[sup 3]-cm/cm[sup 2]-sec-cmHg, as well as a long membrane life of in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible. 2 figs.

  11. An equation of state for oxygen and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, R. T.; Stewart, R. B.; Myers, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    Recent measurements of the thermodynamic properties of oxygen and nitrogen have been used to develop a single equation of state for both fluids; with appropriate coefficients, the equation describes the pressure-density-temperature surface for each fluid within the estimated experimental uncertainty of the data. The formulation uses least squares curve fitting of the equation of state to the available experimental data (including pressure-density-temperature data, saturation data, and measured isochoric heat capacities). New vapor pressure equations and equations for the ideal gas heat capacities of oxygen and nitrogen are included for use in calculation of derived thermodynamic properties.

  12. Mussel-inspired one-pot synthesis of transition metal and nitrogen co-doped carbon (M/N-C) as efficient oxygen catalysts for Zn-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Chen, Ye; Ge, Xiaoming; Chai, Jianwei; Zhang, Xiao; Hor, T. S. Andy; Du, Guojun; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhang, Hua; Zong, Yun

    2016-02-01

    Transition metal and nitrogen co-doping into carbon is an effective approach to promote the catalytic activities towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and/or oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in the resultant electrocatalysts, M/N-C. The preparation of such catalysts, however, is often complicated and in low yield. Herein we report a robust approach for easy synthesis of M/N-C hybrids in high yield, which includes a mussel-inspired polymerization reaction at room temperature and a subsequent carbonization process. With the introduction of selected transition metal salts into an aqueous solution of dopamine (DA), the obtained mixture self-polymerizes to form metal-containing polydopamine (M-PDA) composites, e.g. Co-PDA, Ni-PDA and Fe-PDA. Upon carbonization at elevated temperatures, these metal-containing composites were converted into M/N-C, i.e. Co-PDA-C, Ni-PDA-C and Fe-PDA-C, respectively, whose morphologies, chemical compositions, and electrochemical performances were fully studied. Enhanced ORR activities were found in all the obtained hybrids, with Co-PDA-C standing out as the most promising catalyst with excellent stability and catalytic activities towards both ORR and OER. This was further proven in Zn-air batteries (ZnABs) in terms of discharge voltage stability and cycling performance. At a discharge-charge current density of 2 mA cm-2 and 1 h per cycle, the Co-PDA-C based ZnABs were able to steadily cycle up to 500 cycles with only a small increase in the discharge-charge voltage gap which notably outperformed Pt/C; at a discharge current density of 5 mA cm-2, the battery continuously discharged for more than 540 h with the discharge voltage above 1 V and a voltage drop rate of merely 0.37 mV h-1. With the simplicity and scalability of the synthetic approach and remarkable battery performances, the Co-PDA-C hybrid catalyst is anticipated to play an important role in practical ZnABs.Transition metal and nitrogen co-doping into carbon is an effective

  13. Startup and oxygen concentration effects in a continuous granular mixed flow autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor.

    PubMed

    Varas, Rodrigo; Guzmán-Fierro, Víctor; Giustinianovich, Elisa; Behar, Jack; Fernández, Katherina; Roeckel, Marlene

    2015-08-01

    The startup and performance of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process was tested in a continuously fed granular bubble column reactor (BCR) with two different aeration strategies: controlling the oxygen volumetric flow and oxygen concentration. During the startup with the control of oxygen volumetric flow, the air volume was adjusted to 60mL/h and the CANON reactor had volumetric N loadings ranging from 7.35 to 100.90mgN/Ld with 36-71% total nitrogen removal and high instability. In the second stage, the reactor was operated at oxygen concentrations of 0.6, 0.4 and 0.2mg/L. The best condition was 0.2 mgO2/L with a total nitrogen removal of 75.36% with a CANON reactor activity of 0.1149gN/gVVSd and high stability. The feasibility and effectiveness of CANON processes with oxygen control was demonstrated, showing an alternative design tool for efficiently removing nitrogen species.

  14. Angular distribution of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. T.; Kennedy, D. J.; Starace, A. F.; Dill, D.

    1974-01-01

    The angular distribution of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen is investigated using Hartree-Fock (HF) wave functions. The correct formulation is used to compare HS and HF results. Agreement between these results is good and the HS calculations have been extended to atomic nitrogen and carbon as well.

  15. Effect of oxygen and nitrogen interactions on friction of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Friction studies were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide contacting silicon carbide and titanium after having been exposed to oxygen and nitrogen in various forms. After they had been sputter cleaned, the surfaces were (1) exposed to gaseous oxygen and nitrogen (adsorption), (2) ion bombarded with oxygen and nitrogen, or (3) reacted with oxygen (SiC only). Auger emission spectroscopy was used to determine the presence of oxygen and nitrogen. The results indicate that the surfaces of silicon carbide with reacted and ion-bombarded oxygen ions give higher coefficients of friction than do argon sputter-cleaned surfaces. The effects of oxygen on friction may be related to the relative chemical, thermodynamic properties of silicon, carbon, and titanium for oxygen. The adsorbed films of oxygen, nitrogen, and mixed gases of oxygen and nitrogen on sputter-cleaned, oxygen-ion bombarded, and oxygen-reacted surfaces generally reduce friction. Adsorption to silicon carbide is relatively weak.

  16. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-17

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  17. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  18. Anaerobic Nitrogen Turnover by Sinking Diatom Aggregates at Varying Ambient Oxygen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    In the world’s oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host anaerobic nitrogen cycling at ambient oxygen levels well above the hypoxic threshold. Aggregates were produced from the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema marinoi and the natural microbial community of seawater. Microsensor profiling through the center of sinking aggregates revealed internal anoxia at ambient 40% air saturation (∼100 μmol O2 L-1) and below. Accordingly, anaerobic nitrate turnover inside the aggregates was evident within this range of ambient oxygen levels. In incubations with 15N-labeled nitrate, individual Skeletonema aggregates produced NO2- (up to 10.7 nmol N h-1 per aggregate), N2 (up to 7.1 nmol N h-1), NH4+ (up to 2.0 nmol N h-1), and N2O (up to 0.2 nmol N h-1). Intriguingly, nitrate stored inside the diatom cells served as an additional, internal nitrate source for dinitrogen production, which may partially uncouple anaerobic nitrate turnover by diatom aggregates from direct ambient nitrate supply. Sinking diatom aggregates can contribute directly to fixed-nitrogen loss in low-oxygen environments in the ocean and vastly expand the ocean volume in which anaerobic nitrogen turnover is possible, despite relatively high ambient oxygen levels. Depending on the extent of intracellular nitrate consumption during the sinking process, diatom aggregates may also be involved in the long-distance export of nitrate to the deep ocean. PMID:26903977

  19. Revising the nitrogen cycle in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Lam, Phyllis; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; van de Vossenberg, Jack; Schmid, Markus; Woebken, Dagmar; Gutiérrez, Dimitri; Amann, Rudolf; Jetten, Mike S M; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2009-03-24

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) is 1 of the 3 major regions in the world where oceanic nitrogen is lost in the pelagic realm. The recent identification of anammox, instead of denitrification, as the likely prevalent pathway for nitrogen loss in this OMZ raises strong questions about our understanding of nitrogen cycling and organic matter remineralization in these waters. Without detectable denitrification, it is unclear how NH(4)(+) is remineralized from organic matter and sustains anammox or how secondary NO(2)(-) maxima arise within the OMZ. Here we show that in the ETSP-OMZ, anammox obtains 67% or more of NO(2)(-) from nitrate reduction, and 33% or less from aerobic ammonia oxidation, based on stable-isotope pairing experiments corroborated by functional gene expression analyses. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was detected in an open-ocean setting. It occurred throughout the OMZ and could satisfy a substantial part of the NH(4)(+) requirement for anammox. The remaining NH(4)(+) came from remineralization via nitrate reduction and probably from microaerobic respiration. Altogether, deep-sea NO(3)(-) accounted for only approximately 50% of the nitrogen loss in the ETSP, rather than 100% as commonly assumed. Because oceanic OMZs seem to be expanding because of global climate change, it is increasingly imperative to incorporate the correct nitrogen-loss pathways in global biogeochemical models to predict more accurately how the nitrogen cycle in our future ocean may respond.

  20. Effective Potential Energies and Transport Properties for Nitrogen and Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The results of recent theoretical studies for N--N2, O--O2, N2--N2 interactions are applied to the transport properties of nitrogen and oxygen gases. The theoretical results are used to select suitable oxygen interaction energies from previous work for determining the diffusion and viscosity coefficients at high temperatures. A universal formulation is applied to determine the collision integrals for O2--O2 interactions at high temperatures and to calculate certain ratios for determining higher-order collision integrals.

  1. 40 CFR 415.490 - Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. 415.490 Section 415.490 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oxygen and Nitrogen Production Subcategory § 415.490 Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  2. 40 CFR 415.490 - Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. 415.490 Section 415.490 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oxygen and Nitrogen Production Subcategory § 415.490 Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  3. 40 CFR 415.490 - Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. 415.490 Section 415.490 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oxygen and Nitrogen Production Subcategory § 415.490 Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  4. 40 CFR 415.490 - Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. 415.490 Section 415.490 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oxygen and Nitrogen Production Subcategory § 415.490 Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  5. 40 CFR 415.490 - Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. 415.490 Section 415.490 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oxygen and Nitrogen Production Subcategory § 415.490 Applicability; description of the oxygen and nitrogen production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  6. Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Dick, Brandon; Cook, Tony; Leonard, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) requires stores of Oxygen (O2) and Nitrogen (N2) to provide for atmosphere replenishment, direct crew member usage, and payload operations. Currently, supplies of N2/O2 are maintained by transfer from the Space Shuttle. Following Space Shuttle is retirement in 2010, an alternate means of resupplying N2/O2 to the ISS is needed. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has determined that the optimal method of supplying the ISS with O2/N2 is using tanks of high pressure N2/O2 carried to the station by a cargo vehicle capable of docking with the ISS. This paper will outline the architecture of the system selected by NASA and will discuss some of the design challenges associated with this use of high pressure oxygen and nitrogen in the human spaceflight environment.

  7. Method and apparatus for reducing cold-phase emissions by utilizing oxygen-enriched intake air

    DOEpatents

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.; Stork, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    An oxygen-enriched air intake control system for an internal combustion engine includes air directing apparatus to control the air flow into the intake of the engine. During normal operation of the engine, ambient air flowing from an air filter of the engine flows through the air directing apparatus into the intake of the engine. In order to decrease the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions that tend to be produced by the engine during a short period of time after the engine is started, the air directing apparatus diverts for a short period of time following the start up of the engine at least a portion of the ambient air from the air filter through a secondary path. The secondary path includes a selectively permeable membrane through which the diverted portion of the ambient air flows. The selectively permeable membrane separates nitrogen and oxygen from the diverted air so that oxygen enriched air containing from about 23% to 25% oxygen by volume is supplied to the intake of the engine.

  8. Current Status of the Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) to date and the current development status of the system. NORS is an element of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) used to resupply the ISS with Nitrogen and Oxygen following the impending retirement of the Space Shuttle. The paper will discuss why NASA is developing NORS, including a summary of other concepts considered, and other related concepts currently being developed by NASA. The current system architecture will be described, along with a summary of the current design of the NORS. The overall programmatic schedule of the NORS in the context of the upcoming shuttle retirement and future launch vehicle development will also be presented. Finally, the paper will examine the significant technical challenges encountered during the requirements and preliminary design phase of NORS development. A key challenge to the development of NORS is the international shipment - and associated regulations - of pressurized Oxygen, which is necessary due to the use of launch vehicles based in Japan and French Guiana to send NORS gasses to the ISS. The storage and use of relatively large quantities of high pressure (41,000 kPa) Oxygen and Nitrogen within the ISS, which is unprecedented both on the ISS and other space vehicles, has had a significant impact on the design and architecture of the system. The high pressure of the system also poses unique thermal considerations, which has led to the development of a heater system for thermal conditioning of high pressure gas to avoid thermal impacts on downstream hardware. The on-orbit envelope allocated to the NORS has changed (gotten smaller) and has impacted both the design and architecture of the system. Finally, the balance of safety considerations associated with these high pressure gasses, particularly high pressure Oxygen, with the functionality of the system has profoundly impacted the form

  9. Electrocatalysts for bifunctional oxygen/air electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, V.; Iliev, P.; Petrov, K.; Vitanov, T.; Zhecheva, E.; Stoyanova, R.; Valov, I.; Stoychev, D.

    Oxygen reduction and evolution have been studied with respect to the development of bifunctional air/oxygen electrode (BFE). Three groups of catalysts have been prepared: (i) Cu xCo 3- xO 4 by thermal decomposition of mixed nitrate and carbonate precursors; (ii) thin films of Co-Ni-Te-O and Co-Te-O were deposited by vacuum co-evaporation of Co, Ni and TeO 2 and (iii) Co xO v/ZrO 2 films were obtained by electrochemical deposition. The electrochemical behavior of the chemically synthesized catalysts was studied on classical bilayered gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs), where the catalyst is in form of powder. The GDE catalyzed with vacuum deposited catalysts was prepared by direct deposition of the catalyst on gas-supplying layer, thus creating a ready-to-use gas diffusion electrode. Catalysts prepared electrochemically were first deposited on Ni foam and than pressed onto the gas-supplying layer. Different catalysts deposited on classical and originally designed GDEs were compared by their electrochemical performances. Cu 0.3Co 2.7O 4 deposited on a classical bilayered GDE with loading of 50 mg cm -2 exhibits stable current-voltage characteristics after 200 charge-discharge cycles in a real metal hydride-air battery. The electrochemically and vacuum deposited Co xO v/ZrO 2, Co-Ni-Te-O and Co-Te-O films exhibit much higher mass activity compared to Cu 0.2Co 2.8O 4 for both oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. The difference is that the loading of electrochemically and vacuum deposited films is 0.06 mg cm -2 only, which is a substantial advantage from a practical viewpoint.

  10. Nitrogen Dioxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The two most prevalent oxides of nitrogen are nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitric oxide (NO). Both are toxic gases with NO2 being a highly reactive oxidant and corrosive. The primary sources indoors are combustion processes.

  11. Measurement and modeling of ozone and nitrogen oxides produced by laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gornushkin, Igor B; Stevenson, Chris L; Galbács, Gábor; Smith, Ben W; Winefordner, James D

    2003-11-01

    The production of ozone nad nitrogen oxides was studied during multiple laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen mixtures at atmospheric pressure. About 2000 laser shots at 10(10) W cm-2 were delivered into a sealed reaction chamber. The chamber with a long capillary was designed to measure absorption of O3, NO, and NO2 as a function of the number of laser shots. The light source for absorption measurements was the continuum radiation emitted by the plasma during the first 0.2 microsecond of its evolution. A kinetic model was developed that encompassed the principal chemical reactions between the major atmospheric components and the products of laser breakdown. In the model, the laser plasma was treated as a source of nitric oxide and atomic oxygen, whose rates of production were calculated using measured absorption by NO, NO2, and O3. The calculated concentration profiles for NO, NO2, and O3 were in good agreement with measured profiles over a time scale of 0-200 s. The steady-state concentration of ozone was measured in a flow cell in air. For a single breakdown in air, the estimated steady-state yield of ozone was 2 x 10(12) molecules, which agreed with the model prediction. This study can be of importance for general understanding of laser plasma chemistry and for elucidating the nature of spectral interferences and matrix effects that may take place in applied spectrochemical analysis.

  12. Aerobic and two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion with pure oxygen and air aeration.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Gregor D; Ros, Milenko

    2008-01-01

    The degradability of excess activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant was studied. The objective was establishing the degree of degradation using either air or pure oxygen at different temperatures. Sludge treated with pure oxygen was degraded at temperatures from 22 degrees C to 50 degrees C while samples treated with air were degraded between 32 degrees C and 65 degrees C. Using air, sludge is efficiently degraded at 37 degrees C and at 50-55 degrees C. With oxygen, sludge was most effectively degraded at 38 degrees C or at 25-30 degrees C. Two-stage anaerobic-aerobic processes were studied. The first anaerobic stage was always operated for 5 days HRT, and the second stage involved aeration with pure oxygen and an HRT between 5 and 10 days. Under these conditions, there is 53.5% VSS removal and 55.4% COD degradation at 15 days HRT - 5 days anaerobic, 10 days aerobic. Sludge digested with pure oxygen at 25 degrees C in a batch reactor converted 48% of sludge total Kjeldahl nitrogen to nitrate. Addition of an aerobic stage with pure oxygen aeration to the anaerobic digestion enhances ammonium nitrogen removal. In a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion process within 8 days HRT of the aerobic stage, the removal of ammonium nitrogen was 85%.

  13. 20-Kw nitrogen diluent chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tientsai T.; Bhowmik, Anup; Burde, David H.; Clark, Roy; Carroll, S.; Dickerson, Robert A.; Eblen, J.; Gylys, Vytas T.; Hsia, Y. C.; Humphreys, Richard H., Jr.; Moon, L. F.; Hurlock, Steve C.; Tomassian, A.

    2002-09-01

    A new Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL) has been developed and demonstrated at chlorine flow rates up to 1 gmol/s. The laser employs a cross flow jet oxygen generator operating with no diluent. The generator product flow enters the laser cavity at Mach 1 and is accelerated by mixing with 5 gmol/s, Mach 5 nitrogen diluent in an ejector nozzle array. The nitrogen also serves as the carrier for iodine. Vortex mixing is achieved through the use of mixing tabs at the nitrogen nozzle exit. Mixing approach design and analysis, including CFD analysis, led to the preferred nozzle configuration. The selected mixing enhancement design was tested in cold flow and the results are in good agreement with the CFD predictions. Good mixing was achieved within the desired cavity flow length of 20 cm and pressure recovery about 90 Torr was measured at the cavity exit. Finally, the design was incorporated into the laser and power extraction as high as 20 kw was measured at the best operating condition of 0.9 gmol/s. Stable resonator mode footprints showed desieable intensity profiles, which none of the sugar scoop profiles characteristic of the conventional COIL designs.

  14. Orbital transfer vehicle oxygen turbopump technology. Volume 2: Nitrogen and ambient oxygen testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brannam, R. J.; Buckmann, P. S.; Chen, B. H.; Church, S. J.; Sabiers, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The testing of a rocket engine oxygen turbopump using high pressure ambient temperature nitrogen and oxygen as the turbine drive gas in separate test series is discussed. The pumped fluid was liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen. The turbopump (TPA) is designed to operate with 400 F oxygen turbine drive gas which will be demonstrated in a subsequent test series. Following bearing tests, the TPA was finish machined (impeller blading and inlet/outlet ports). Testing started on 15 February 1989 and was successfully concluded on 21 March 1989. Testing started using nitrogen to reduce the ignition hazard during initial TPA checkout. The Hydrostatic Bearing System requires a Bearing Pressurization System. Initial testing used a separate bearing supply to prevent a rubbing start. Two test series were successfully completed with the bearing assist supplied only by the pump second stage output which entailed a rubbing start until pump pressure builds up. The final test series used ambient oxygen drive and no external bearing assist. Total operating time was 2268 seconds. There were 14 starts without bearing assist and operating speeds up to 80,000 rpm were logged. Teardown examination showed some smearing of silverplated bearing surfaces but no exposure of the underlying monel material. There was no evidence of melting or oxidation due to the oxygen exposure. The articulating, self-centering hydrostatic bearing exhibited no bearing load or stability problems. The only anomaly was higher than predicted flow losses which were attributed to a faulty ring seal. The TPA will be refurbished prior to the 400 F oxygen test series but its condition is acceptable, as is, for continued operating. This was a highly successful test program.

  15. Effect of oxygen-nitrogen ratio on sinterability of Sialons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of varying the sintering temperature and the oxygen to nitrogen ratio (O/N) on the sinterability of Sialons of the formula Si2.55Al0.6OyN4-0.667y was investigated for y between 0.57 and 1.92 (O/N between 0.157 and 0.706). The Sialons reached maximum density on pressureless sintering for 4 hours at about 1760 C in nitrogen. Optimum sinterability with densities up to about 98 percent of theoretical was attained with negligible X-phase in the O/N range from about 0.2 to 0.3. On sintering at approximately 1830 C the Sialons decomposed with evolution of silicon and aluminum.

  16. 19. INTERIOR VIEW INSIDE BUNKER SHOWING NITROGEN TANKS, 'MOBILE AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR VIEW INSIDE BUNKER SHOWING NITROGEN TANKS, 'MOBILE AIR MONITOR' EQUIPMENT, MAN. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-6183, TAKEN NOVEMBER 10, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Biosynthesis of oxygen and nitrogen-containing heterocycles in polyketides.

    PubMed

    Hemmerling, Franziska; Hahn, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the biosynthesis of heterocycles in polyketide natural products with a focus on oxygen and nitrogen-containing heterocycles with ring sizes between 3 and 6 atoms. Heterocycles are abundant structural elements of natural products from all classes and they often contribute significantly to their biological activity. Progress in recent years has led to a much better understanding of their biosynthesis. In this context, plenty of novel enzymology has been discovered, suggesting that these pathways are an attractive target for future studies.

  18. Biosynthesis of oxygen and nitrogen-containing heterocycles in polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerling, Franziska

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the biosynthesis of heterocycles in polyketide natural products with a focus on oxygen and nitrogen-containing heterocycles with ring sizes between 3 and 6 atoms. Heterocycles are abundant structural elements of natural products from all classes and they often contribute significantly to their biological activity. Progress in recent years has led to a much better understanding of their biosynthesis. In this context, plenty of novel enzymology has been discovered, suggesting that these pathways are an attractive target for future studies. PMID:27559404

  19. Oxygen and nitrogen abundances in Virgo and field spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilyugin, L. S.; Mollá, M.; Ferrini, F.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The oxygen and nitrogen abundances in the H II regions of the nine Virgo spirals of the sample from Skillman et al. (1996) and in nine field spiral galaxies are re-determined with the recently suggested P-method. We confirm that there is an abundance segregation in the sample of Virgo spirals in the sense that the H I deficient Virgo spirals near the core of the cluster have higher oxygen abundances in comparison to the spirals at the periphery of the Virgo cluster. At the same time both the Virgo periphery and core spirals have counterparts among field spirals. Some field spirals have H I to optical radius ratios, similar to that in H I deficient Virgo core spirals. We conclude that if there is a difference in the abundance properties of the Virgo and field spirals, this difference appears to be small and masked by the observational errors.

  20. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  1. [The Status of Hemostasis System in Hypoxic Nitrogen-Oxygen and Argon-Oxygen Diving Gases].

    PubMed

    Kuzichkin, D S; Markin, A A; Juravlyova, O A; Morukov, B V; Zabolotskaya, I V; Vostrikova, L V

    2015-01-01

    In this study the effect of factors of hermetic chamber with modified gas medium on the hemostasis system is analyzed in order to estimate and to compare different diving breathing gases. The parameters characterizing pro-, anticoagulant as well as fibrinolytic components of hemostasis were determined using clotting, chromogenic and immunological methods. The applied exposure did not affect the activity and regulatory potential of hemostasis significantly; however, the nitrogen-oxygen and argon-oxygen diving gases have a different effect on the hemostasis functioning, especially in the recovery period.

  2. Nitrogen metabolism in plants under low oxygen stress.

    PubMed

    Limami, Anis M; Diab, Houssein; Lothier, Jérémy

    2014-03-01

    More frequent flooding and waterlogging events due to more heavy precipitation are expected worldwide in the context of climate change. Accordingly, adaptation of plants to oxygen limitation at both cellular and whole plant levels should be investigated thoroughly, that derived knowledge could be taken into account in breeding programs and agronomical practices for saving plant fitness, growth and development even when oxygen availability is low. In the present review, we highlight current knowledge on essential aspects of low oxygen stress-induced changes in nitrogen metabolism. The involvement of two possible pathways for NO production either via the reaction catalyzed by nitrate reductase or at Complex III or IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, thus contributing to ATP synthesis via the so-called nitrite-NO respiration, is discussed. NO is proposed to be scavenged by non-symbiotic hemoglobin (Hb) in a Hb/NO cycle, in which NAD(P)H is oxidized for the conversion of NO into NO3(-). The investigation of an additional adaptation to the decrease in oxygen availability via transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of amino acid synthesis pathways, using publicly available transcriptome and translatome data for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice is also discussed.

  3. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-08-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently until they disappeared from view at a net disappearance rate (0.02 mm(2) × min(-1)) significantly faster than for similar bubbles at 25 kPa altitude (0.01 mm(2) × min(-1)). At 25 kPa, most bubbles initially grew for 2-40 min, after which they shrank and disappeared. Four bubbles did not disappear while at 25 kPa. The results support bubble kinetic models based on Fick's first law of diffusion, Boyles law, and the oxygen window effect, predicting that oxygen contributes more to bubble volume and growth during hypobaric conditions. As the effect of oxygen increases, the lower the ambient pressure. The results indicate that recompression is instrumental in the treatment of aDCS.

  4. A Method to Exchange Air Nitrogen Emission Reductions for Watershed Nitrogen Load Reductions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation of the method developed for the Chesapeake Bay Program to estimate changes in nitrogen loading to Chesapeake due to changes in Bay State state-level nitrogen oxide emissions to support air-water trading by the Bay States. Type for SticsUnder AMAD Application QAPP, QA...

  5. Oxygen separation from air using zirconia solid electrolyte membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suitor, J. W.; Marner, W. J.; Schroeder, J. E.; Losey, R. W.; Ferrall, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    Air separation using a zirconia solid electrolyte membrane is a possible alternative source of oxygen. The process of zirconia oxygen separation is reviewed, and an oxygen plant concept using such separation is described. Potential cell designs, stack designs, and testing procedures are examined. Fabrication of the materials used in a zirconia module as well as distribution plate design and fabrication are examined.

  6. Energetic Metastable Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili; Dalgarno, A.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes our research performed under NASA Grant NAG5-11857. The three-year grant have been supported by the Geospace Sciences SR&T program. We have investigated the energetic metastable oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the terrestrial stratosphere, mesosphere and thermosphere. Hot atoms in the atmosphere are produced by solar radiation, the solar wind and various ionic reactions. Nascent hot atoms arise in ground and excited electronic states, and their translational energies are larger by two - three orders of magnitude than the thermal energies of the ambient gas. The relaxation kinetics of hot atoms determines the rate of atmospheric heating, the intensities of aeronomic reactions, and the rate of atom escape from the planet. Modeling of the non-Maxwellian energy distributions of metastable oxygen and nitrogen atoms have been focused on the determination of their impact on the energetics and chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere between 25 and 250 km . At this altitudes, we have calculated the energy distribution functions of metastable O and N atoms and computed non-equilibrium rates of important aeronomic reactions, such as destruction of the water molecules by O(1D) atoms and production of highly excited nitric oxide molecules. In the upper atmosphere, the metastable O(lD) and N(2D) play important role in formation of the upward atomic fluxes. We have computed the upward fluxes of the metastable and ground state oxygen atoms in the upper atmosphere above 250 km. The accurate distributions of the metastable atoms have been evaluated for the day and night-time conditions.

  7. Fractionation of Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopes During Microbial Nitrate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Reichert, P.; Barbieri, A.; McKenzie, J. A.

    2001-12-01

    Lakes represent an important continental sink of fixed nitrogen. Besides the burial of particulate nitrogen, fixed nitrogen is eliminated from lakes by emission of N2 and N2O to the atmosphere during dissimilative nitrate reduction within suboxic and anoxic waters or sediments. The understanding and quantification of this efficient nitrogen removal process in eutrophic lakes is crucial for nitrogen budget modelling and the application and evaluation of lake restoration measures. In order to use natural abundance N and O isotope ratios as tracers for microbial nitrate reduction and to obtain quantitative estimates on its intensity, it is crucial to constrain the associated isotope fractionation. This is the first report of nitrogen and oxygen isotope effects associated with microbial nitrate reduction in lacustrine environments. Nitrate reduction in suboxic and anoxic waters of the southern basin of Lake Lugano (Switzerland) is demonstrated by a progressive nitrate depletion coupled to increasing δ 15N and δ 18O values for residual nitrate. 15N and 18O enrichment factors (ɛ ) were estimated using a closed-system (Rayleigh-distillation) model and a dynamic reaction-diffusion model. Calculated enrichment factors ɛ ranged between -11.2 and -22‰ for 15N and between -6.6 and -11.3‰ for 18O with both nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation being greatest during times with the highest nitrate reduction rates. The closed-system model neglects vertical diffusive mixing and does not distinguish between sedimentary and water-column nitrate reduction. Therefore, it tends to underestimate the intrinsic isotope effect of microbial nitrate reduction. Based upon results from earlier studies that indicate that nitrate reduction in sediments displays a highly reduced N-isotope effect (Brandes and Devol, 1997), model-derived enrichment factors could be used to discern the relative importance of nitrate reduction in the water column and in the sediment. Sedimentary nitrate

  8. The interaction of iron pyrite with oxygen, nitrogen and nitrogen oxides: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Marco; Galbraith, Martin C E; Jenkins, Stephen J

    2012-03-14

    Sulphide materials, in particular MoS(2), have recently received great attention from the surface science community due to their extraordinary catalytic properties. Interestingly, the chemical activity of iron pyrite (FeS(2)) (the most common sulphide mineral on Earth), and in particular its potential for catalytic applications, has not been investigated so thoroughly. In this study, we use density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the surface interactions of fundamental atmospheric components such as oxygen and nitrogen, and we have explored the adsorption and dissociation of nitrogen monoxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) on the FeS(2)(100) surface. Our results show that both those environmentally important NO(x) species chemisorb on the surface Fe sites, while the S sites are basically unreactive for all the molecular species considered in this study and even prevent NO(2) adsorption onto one of the non-equivalent Fe-Fe bridge sites of the (1 × 1)-FeS(2)(100) surface. From the calculated high barrier for NO and NO(2) direct dissociation on this surface, we can deduce that both nitrogen oxides species are adsorbed molecularly on pyrite surfaces.

  9. Technical note: Air compared to nitrogen as nebulizing and drying gases for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, P; Silberring, J; Smoluch, M

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we tested the application of compressed air instead of pure nitrogen as the nebulizing and drying gas, and its influence on the quality of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectra. The intensities of the signals corresponding to protonated molecules were significantly (twice) higher when air was used. Inspection of signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios revealed that, in both cases, sensitivity was comparable. A higher ion abundance after the application of compressed air was followed by a higher background. Another potential risk of using air in the ESI source is the possibility for sample oxidation due to the presence of oxygen. To test this, we selected five easily oxidizing compounds to verify their susceptibility to oxidation. In particular, the presence of methionine was of interest. For all the compounds studied, no oxidation was observed. Amodiaquine oxidizes spontaneously in water solutions and its oxidized form can be detected a few hours after preparation. Direct comparison of the spectra where nitrogen was used with the corresponding spectra obtained when air was applied did not show significant differences. The only distinction was slightly different patterns of adducts when air was used. The difference concerns acetonitrile, which forms higher signals when air is the nebulizing gas. It is also important that the replacement of nitrogen with air does not affect quantitative data. The prepared calibration curves also visualize an intensity twice as high (independent of concentration within tested range) of the signal where air was applied. We have used our system continuously for three months with air as the nebulizing and drying gas and have not noticed any unexpected signal deterioration caused by additional source contamination from the air. Moreover, compressed air is much cheaper and easily available using oil-free compressors or pumps.

  10. Nanotechnology for Electroanalytical Biosensors of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species.

    PubMed

    Seenivasan, Rajesh; Kolodziej, Charles; Karunakaran, Chandran; Burda, Clemens

    2017-04-10

    Over the past several decades, nanotechnology has contributed to the progress of biomedicine, biomarker discovery, and the development of highly sensitive electroanalytical / electrochemical biosensors for in vitro and in vivo monitoring, and quantification of oxidative and nitrosative stress markers like reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). A major source of ROS and RNS is oxidative stress in cells, which can cause many human diseases, including cancer. Therefore, the detection of local concentrations of ROS (e. g. superoxide anion radical; O2(•-) ) and RNS (e. g. nitric oxide radical; NO(•) and its metabolites) released from biological systems is increasingly important and needs a sophisticated detection strategy to monitor ROS and RNS in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we discuss the nanomaterials-based ROS and RNS biosensors utilizing electrochemical techniques with emphasis on their biomedical applications.

  11. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulant) Thermodynamic Vent System Test Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2006-04-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low-gravity (space) environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leaks. During low-gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. A series of TVS tests was conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using liquid nitrogen (LN2) as a liquid oxygen (LO2) simulant. The tests were performed at tank fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%, and with a specified tank pressure control band. A transient one-dimensional TVS performance program is used to analyze and correlate the test data for all three fill levels. Predictions and comparisons of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  12. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances in G and K giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, L. M.

    The abundance of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen were determined in 32 bright G and K giants in order to test theoretical predictions of nucleosynthesis and convective mixing in evolved stars. Atmospheric parameters were determined from lines of neutral and ionized iron measured from photographic plates taken with the coude spectrograph on a 2.1 m telescope. These were supplemented by spectra obtained with the coude Reticon on the 2.7 m telescope. Excitation temperatures were determined using a curve of growth technique on the neutral iron lines. Empirical solar oscillator strengths were used. Lineblanketed model atmospheres provides the calibration with effective temperature ionization equilibrium yielded the gravity, while the microturbulence was found by demanding that the iron abundance be independent of line strength.

  13. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Louis S; Pabbidi, Reddy M

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions. There are two forms of diabetes: type 1 diabetes mellitus is due to auto-immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells resulting in absolute insulin deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus is due to reduced insulin secretion and or insulin resistance. Both forms of diabetes are characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, leading to the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and microvascular pathology. DPN is characterized by enhanced or reduced thermal, chemical, and mechanical pain sensitivities. In the long-term, DPN results in peripheral nerve damage and accounts for a substantial number of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations. This review will address the mechanisms, especially the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the development and progression of DPN.

  14. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulant) Thermodynamic Vent System Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low-gravity (space) environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leaks. During low-gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. A series of TVS tests was conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using liquid nitrogen (LN2) as a liquid oxygen (LO2) simulant. The tests were performed at tank til1 levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%, and with a specified tank pressure control band. A transient one-dimensional TVS performance program is used to analyze and correlate the test data for all three fill levels. Predictions and comparisons of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  15. Sound speed measurements in liquid oxygen-liquid nitrogen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Mazel, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    The sound speed in liquid oxygen (LOX), liquid nitrogen (LN2), and five LOX-LN2 mixtures was measured by an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique at temperatures in the vicinity of -195.8C, the boiling point of N2 at a pressure of I atm. Under these conditions, the measurements yield the following relationship between sound speed in meters per second and LN2 content M in mole percent: c = 1009.05-1.8275M+0.0026507 M squared. The second speeds of 1009.05 m/sec plus or minus 0.25 percent for pure LOX and 852.8 m/sec plus or minus 0.32 percent for pure LN2 are compared with those reported by past investigators. Measurement of sound speed should prove an effective means for monitoring the contamination of LOX by Ln2.

  16. Response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, T. R.; Hibler, N. S.; Deretic, V.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant human pathogen capable of replicating in mononuclear phagocytic cells. Exposure to reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates is likely to represent an important aspect of the life cycle of this organism. The response of M. tuberculosis to these agents may be of significance for its survival in the host. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patterns of de novo proteins synthesized in M. tuberculosis H37Rv exposed to compounds that generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates were studied by metabolic labeling and two-dimensional electrophoresis. RESULTS: Menadione, a redox cycling compound which increases intracellular superoxide levels, caused enhanced synthesis of seven polypeptides, six of which appeared to be heat shock proteins. Chemical release of nitric oxide induced eight polypeptides of which only one could be identified as a heat shock protein. Nitric oxide also exhibited a mild inhibitory action on general protein synthesis in the concentration range tested. Hydrogen peroxide did not cause differential gene expression and exerted a generalized inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Cumene hydroperoxide caused mostly inhibition but induction of two heat shock proteins was detectable. CONCLUSIONS: The presented findings indicate major differences between M. tuberculosis and the paradigms of oxidative stress response in enteric bacteria, and are consistent with the multiple lesions found in oxyR of this organism. The effect of hydrogen peroxide, which in Escherichia coli induces eight polypeptides known to be controlled by the central regulator oxyR, appears to be absent in M. tuberculosis. Superoxide and nitric oxide responses, which in E. coli overlap and are controlled by the same regulatory system soxRS, represent discrete and independent phenomena in M. tuberculosis. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:8900541

  17. Air Pollution Impacts on Global Crop Productivity and Nitrogen Depositio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, C. L.; Tai, A. P. K.; Val Martin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The biosphere is undeniably transformed by air pollution. Emissions, climate change, and land use change are all expected to substantially alter future air quality. In this presentation, we discuss near-term projections (2050) of air quality impacts on both crop productivity and nitrogen deposition. First, we contrast the relative impacts of ozone air pollution and a warming climate on global crop yields. To do so, we define statistical crop yield functions to a warming climate based on the historical record. We combine these relationships with ozone-damage estimates and apply these to future air quality and climate projections from a global coupled chemistry-climate model (CESM). We find substantial variability in the response, with certain regions or crops more sensitive to ozone pollution and others more sensitive to warming. This work demonstrates that air quality management is a key element to ensuring global food security. Second, we examine the relative impacts of anthropogenic emissions, climate change, and land use change on global nitrogen deposition. Nitrogen deposition has rapidly increased over the Anthropocene. Excess deposition of nitrogen to ecosystems can lead to eutrophication of waters, and a decrease in biodiversity. We use the CESM to investigate two scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP8.5) and focus our analysis on the impacts on diverse ecoregions in North America, Europe, and Asia.

  18. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  19. Contamination of liquid oxygen by pressurized gaseous nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; King, Tracy K.; Ngo, Kim Chi

    1989-01-01

    The penetration of pressurized gaseous nitrogen (GN2) into liquid oxygen (LOX) was investigated experimentally in the 7-inch High Temperature Tunnel, the pilot tunnel for the 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel (8'HTT) at Langley Research Center. A preliminary test using a nuclear monitor revealed the extent of the liquid nitrogen (LN2) build-up at the LOX interface as a function of GN2 pressure. Then an adaptation of the differential flash vaporization technique was used to determine the binary diffusivity of the LOX-LN2 system at a temperature of 90.2 K. The measured value D equals 0.000086 sq cm/s + or - 25 percent together with two prior measurements at lower temperatures revealed an excellent fit to the Arrhenius equation, yielding a pre-exponential factor D sub 0 equals 0.0452 sq cm/s and an activation enthalpy H equals 1.08 kcal/mol. At a pressure of 1700 psi and holding time of 15 min, the penetration of LN2 into LOX (to a 1 percent contamination level) was found to be 0.9 cm, indicating but minimal impact upon 8'HTT operations.

  20. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulent) Thermodynamic Venting System Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low gravity space environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on excessive tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leakage. During low gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. The TVS consists of a recirculation pump, Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. Using a small amount of liquid extracted by the pump and passing it though the J-T valve, then through the heat exchanger, the bulk liquid and ullage are cooled, resulting in lower tank pressure. A series of TVS tests were conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using liquid nitrogen as a liquid oxygen simulant. The tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25% with gaseous nitrogen and helium pressurants, and with a tank pressure control band of 7 kPa. A transient one-dimensional model of the TVS is used to analyze the data. The code is comprised of four models for the heat exchanger, the spray manifold and injector tubes, the recirculation pump, and the tank. The TVS model predicted ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature are compared with data. Details of predictions and comparisons with test data regarding pressure rise and collapse rates will be presented in the final paper.

  1. Thermal analysis of magnesium reactions with nitrogen/oxygen gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chunmiao, Yuan; Lifu, Yu; Chang, Li; Gang, Li; Shengjun, Zhong

    2013-09-15

    The thermal behavior and kinetic parameters of magnesium powder subjected to a nitrogen-rich atmosphere was investigated in thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experiments with oxygen/nitrogen mixtures heated at rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C/min. At higher temperature increase rates, the observed oxidation or nitridation steps shifted toward higher temperatures. The comparison of mass gain and heat of reaction in different nitrogen concentrations is helpful in interpreting the inerting effect of nitrogen on magnesium powder explosion in closed vessels. Activation energies for oxidation in air calculated by the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) method are generally consistent with previously published reports, but the method was not successful for the entire nitridation process. The change of activation energy with temperature was related to protective properties of the corresponding coating layer at particle surfaces. Two main coating layer growth processes were found in magnesium oxidation and nitridation using a modified Dreizin method which was also employed to determine activation energy for both magnesium oxidation and nitridation. For magnesium powder oxidation, activation energy calculated by the Dreizin method was close to that by KAS. Variation in activation energies was a function of different mechanisms inherent in the two methods.

  2. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Andrienko, Daniil A; Boyd, Iain D

    2016-07-07

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  3. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  4. Synthesis of silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) composite membranes for oxygen enrichment from air

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) [PFA] composite membranes were prepared by solution casting of silicalite-furfuryl alcohol [FA] suspension on a porous polysulfone substrate and subsequent in situ polymerization of FA. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize silicalite nanocrystals and silicalite-PFA composite membranes. The silicalite-PFA composite membrane with 20 wt.% silicalite loading exhibits good oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (4.15) and high oxygen permeability (1,132.6 Barrers) at 50°C. Silicalite-PFA composite membranes are promising for the production of oxygen-enriched air for various applications. PMID:22209012

  5. Synthesis of silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) composite membranes for oxygen enrichment from air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li; Li, Dan; Wang, Kun; Suresh, Akkihebbal K.; Bellare, Jayesh; Sridhar, Tam; Wang, Huanting

    2011-12-01

    Silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) [PFA] composite membranes were prepared by solution casting of silicalite-furfuryl alcohol [FA] suspension on a porous polysulfone substrate and subsequent in situ polymerization of FA. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize silicalite nanocrystals and silicalite-PFA composite membranes. The silicalite-PFA composite membrane with 20 wt.% silicalite loading exhibits good oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (4.15) and high oxygen permeability (1,132.6 Barrers) at 50°C. Silicalite-PFA composite membranes are promising for the production of oxygen-enriched air for various applications.

  6. Synthesis of silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) composite membranes for oxygen enrichment from air.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Li, Dan; Wang, Kun; Suresh, Akkihebbal K; Bellare, Jayesh; Sridhar, Tam; Wang, Huanting

    2011-12-30

    Silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) [PFA] composite membranes were prepared by solution casting of silicalite-furfuryl alcohol [FA] suspension on a porous polysulfone substrate and subsequent in situ polymerization of FA. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize silicalite nanocrystals and silicalite-PFA composite membranes. The silicalite-PFA composite membrane with 20 wt.% silicalite loading exhibits good oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (4.15) and high oxygen permeability (1,132.6 Barrers) at 50°C. Silicalite-PFA composite membranes are promising for the production of oxygen-enriched air for various applications.

  7. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  8. Autotrophic nitrogen removal in sequencing batch biofilm reactors at different oxygen supply modes.

    PubMed

    Wantawin, C; Juateea, J; Noophan, P L; Munakata-Marr, J

    2008-01-01

    Conventional nitrification-denitrification treatment is a common way to treat nitrogen in wastewater, but this process is costly for low COD/N wastewaters due to the addition of air and external carbon-source. However, ammonia may alternatively be converted to dinitrogen gas by autotrophic bacteria utilizing aerobically autotrophically produced nitrite as an electron acceptor under anoxic conditions. Lab-scale sequencing batch biofilm reactors (SBBRs) inoculated with normal nitrifying sludge were employed to study the potential of an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification process initiated with typical nitrifying sludge for treating a synthetic ammonia wastewater devoid of organic carbon in one step. The ring-laced fibrous carrier (length 0.32 m, surface area 3.4 m2/m) was fixed vertically in a 3 L reactor. Two different air supply modes were applied:continuous aeration to control dissolved oxygen at 1.5 mg/L and intermittent aeration. High nitrogen removals of more than 50% were obtained in both SBBRs. At an ammonia loading of 0.882 gm N/m2-day [hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hr], the SBBR continuously aerated to 1.5 mg DO/L had slightly higher nitrogen removal (64%) than the intermittently alternated SBBR (55%). The main form of residual nitrogen in the effluent was ammonia, at concentrations of 25 mg/L and 37 mg N/L in continuous and intermittent aeration SBBRs, respectively. Ammonia was completely consumed when ammonia loading was reduced to 0.441 gm N/m2-day [HRT extended to 48 hr]. The competitive use of nitrite by aerobic nitrite oxidizing bacteria (ANOB) with anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (anammox bacteria) during the expanded aeration period under low remaining ammonia concentration resulted in higher nitrate production and lower nitrogen loss in the continuous aeration SBBR than in the intermittent aeration SBBR. The nitrogen removal efficiencies in SBBRs with continuous and alternating aerated were 80% and 86% respectively

  9. Breathing 100% oxygen compared with 50% oxygen: 50% nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. T.; Pilmanis, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    The risk of venous gas emboli (VGE) and decompression sickness (DCS) must be determined before selection of the lowest pressure for an extravehicular activity (EVA) pressure suit which eliminates the requirement for prebreathing. In earlier studies, use of a 50% oxygen:50% nitrogen breathing mixture (50:50 mix) during 139 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-7.8 psia resulted in 51 instances of severe VGE and one case of DCS. Our current study investigated effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while breathing 100% oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No DCS symptoms were observed. Severe VGE were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10%, 20%, and 40% of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100% oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. Our results show that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100% oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  10. Atomic Oxygen (AO) and Nitrogen (AN) In-situ Flux Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-10

    Grant # FA9550-01-1-0433 M. R. Beasley, PI Stanford University Project Title: Atomic Oxygen (AO) and Nitrogen (AN) In-situ Flux Sensor ...intensity. The major technological challenge is the VUV nature of the relevant spectral lines in the case of oxygen and nitrogen. A LabVIEW™-based data

  11. Measurement of oxygen transfer from air into organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Hobisch, Mathias; Borisov, Sergey; Klimant, Ingo; Krühne, Ulrich; Woodley, John M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND The use of non‐aqueous organic media is becoming increasingly important in many biotechnological applications in order to achieve process intensification. Such media can be used, for example, to directly extract poorly water‐soluble toxic products from fermentations. Likewise many biological reactions require the supply of oxygen, most normally from air. However, reliable online measurements of oxygen concentration in organic solvents (and hence oxygen transfer rates from air to the solvent) has to date proven impossible due to limitations in the current analytical methods. RESULTS For the first time, online oxygen measurements in non‐aqueous media using a novel optical sensor are demonstrated. The sensor was used to measure oxygen concentration in various organic solvents including toluene, THF, isooctane, DMF, heptane and hexane (which have all been shown suitable for several biological applications). Subsequently, the oxygen transfer rates from air into these organic solvents were measured. CONCLUSION The measurement of oxygen transfer rates from air into organic solvents using the dynamic method was established using the solvent resistant optical sensor. The feasibility of online oxygen measurements in organic solvents has also been demonstrated, paving the way for new opportunities in process control. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27773958

  12. Utilizing intake-air oxygen-enrichment technology to reduce cold- phase emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Poola, R.B.; Ng, H.K.; Sekar, R.R.; Baudino, J.H.; Colucci, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    Oxygen-enriched combustion is a proven, serious considered technique to reduce exhaust hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from automotive gasoline engines. This paper presents the cold-phase emissions reduction results of using oxygen-enriched intake air containing about 23% and 25% oxygen (by volume) in a vehicle powered by a spark-ignition (SI) engine. Both engineout and converter-out emissions data were collected by following the standard federal test procedure (FTP). Converter-out emissions data were also obtained employing the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) ``Off-Cycle`` test. Test results indicate that the engine-out CO emissions during the cold phase (bag 1) were reduced by about 46 and 50%, and HC by about 33 and 43%, using nominal 23 and 25% oxygen-enriched air compared to ambient air (21% oxygen by volume), respectively. However, the corresponding oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions were increased by about 56 and 79%, respectively. Time-resolved emissions data indicate that both HC and CO emissions were reduced considerably during the initial 127 s of the cold-phase FTP, without any increase in NO, emissions in the first 25 s. Hydrocarbon speciation results indicate that all major toxic pollutants, including ozone-forming specific reactivity factors, such as maximum incremental reactivity (NUR) and maximum ozone incremental reactivity (MOIR), were reduced considerably with oxygen-enrichment. Based on these results, it seems that using oxygen-enriched intake air during the cold-phase FTP could potentially reduce HC and CO emissions sufficiently to meet future emissions standards. Off-cycle, converter-out, weighted-average emissions results show that both HC and CO emissions were reduced by about 60 to 75% with 23 or 25% oxygen-enrichment, but the accompanying NO{sub x}, emissions were much higher than those with the ambient air.

  13. NO accounts completely for the oxygenated nitrogen species generated by enzymic L-arginine oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Mülsch, A; Vanin, A; Mordvintcev, P; Hauschildt, S; Busse, R

    1992-01-01

    We have assessed the stoichiometry of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase reaction by using a novel e.p.r. technique. NO generated by crude and partially purified NO synthase from endothelial cells and Escherichia coli-lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages was trapped by a ferrous diethyldithiocarbamate complex dispersed in yeast. The paramagnetic ferrous mononitrosyl dithiocarbamate complex formed exhibited a characteristic e.p.r. signal at g perpendicular = 2.035 and g parallel = 2.02 with a triplet hyperfine structure (hfs) at g perpendicular. NO, 3-morpholinosydnonimine and S-nitroso-L-cysteine, but not nitrite or hydroxylamine, generated a similar e.p.r. signal. NO generated by NO synthase and by SIN-1 accumulated at a constant rate for 1 h, as measured by continuous e.p.r. registration at 37 degrees C. The formation of e.p.r.-detectable NO by NO synthases was inhibited by NG-nitro-L-arginine. Incubation with [15N]NG-L-arginine caused an e.p.r. signal with doublet hfs, indicating that the nitrosyl nitrogen derived exclusively from the guanidino nitrogen. The amount of NO generated by NO synthase as measured by e.p.r. technique was compared with formation of L-[3H]citrulline from L-[3H]arginine. NO and L-citrulline were detected at a 1:1 ratio with both NO synthase preparations. GSH and thiol depletion did not significantly affect NO synthase activity, excluding S-nitrosothiols as intermediates in the NO synthase reaction. We conclude that NO fully accounts for the immediate oxygenated nitrogen species derived from the enzymic oxygenation of L-arginine. PMID:1281408

  14. Oxygen-enriched air production for MHD power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    An analysis of several of the cryogenic air separation process cycle variations and compression schemes designed to minimize net system power requirements for supplying pressurized, oxygen-enriched air to the combustor of a 2000 MWt (coal input) baseload MHD power plant is presented.

  15. Oxygen Selective Membranes for Li-Air (O2) Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Owen; Salomon, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Lithium-air (Li-air) batteries have a much higher theoretical energy density than conventional lithium batteries and other metal air batteries, so they are being developed for applications that require long life. Water vapor from air must be prevented from corroding the lithium (Li) metal negative electrode during discharge under ambient conditions, i.e., in humid air. One method of protecting the Li metal from corrosion is to use an oxygen selective membrane (OSM) that allows oxygen into the cell while stopping or slowing the ingress of water vapor. The desired properties and some potential materials for OSMs for Li-air batteries are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:24958173

  16. Signaling by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, Igor B

    2010-06-01

    For many years the formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS) and (RNS) in living organisms has been considered to be dangerous phenomenon due to their damaging action on biomolecules. However, present studies demonstrated another important activity of ROS and RNS: their signaling functions in physiological and pathological processes. In this work we discuss the new data concerning a role of ROS and RNS in many enzymatic/gene cascades causing damaging changes during the development of skin diseases and pathological disorders (skin cancer, the toxic effects of irradiation on the skin, and skin wounding). It has been suggested that the enhancement of ROS formation in tumor cells through the inactivation of mitochondrial MnSOD or the activation of NADPH oxidase leads to apoptosis and might be applied for developing a new cancer therapy. On the other hand ROS overproduction might stimulate malignant transformation of melanoma. Role of ROS signaling is also considered in the damaging action of UVA, UVB, and IRA irradiation on the skin and the processes of wound healing. In the last part of review the possibility of the right choice of antioxidants and free radical scavengers for the treatment of skin disease is discussed.

  17. Interstellar oxygen, nitrogen and neon in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.; Mall, U.; Von Steiger, R.; Galvin, A. B.; Ogilvie, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen and neon pick-up ions of interstellar origin were detected for the first time with the Solar Wind Ion Spectrometer (SWICS) on board Ulysses. The interstellar origin of these ions is established by the following criteria: (a) they are singly charged, (b) they have the broad velocity distributions characteristic of pick-up ions, with an upper limit of twice the solar wind speed, (c) their relative abundance as a function of distance from the sun corresponds to the theoretical expectation, and (d) there is no relation to a planetary or cometary source. The interstellar abundance ratios He(+)/O(+), N(+)/O(+), Ne(+)/O(+) were investigated. At approximately 5.25 AU in the outermost part of Ulysses' trajectory He(+)/O(+) = 175(sup +70 sub -50) N(+)/O(+) = 0.13(sup +0.05 sub -0.05) and Ne(+)/O(+) = 0.18(sup +0.10 sub -0.07) were determined. For the interstellar gas passing through the termination region and entering the heliosphere (He/O)(sub 0) = 290(sup +190 sub -100), (N/O)(sub 0) = 0.13(sup +0.06 sub -0.06) and (Ne/O)(sub 0) = 0.20(sup +0.12 sub -0.09) were obtained from the pick-up ion measurements. Upper limits for the relative abundances of C(+) and C were also determined.

  18. Bordetella bronchiseptica responses to physiological reactive nitrogen and oxygen stresses

    PubMed Central

    Omsland, Anders; Miranda, Katrina M.; Friedman, Richard L.; Boitano, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can establish prolonged airway infection consistent with a highly developed ability to evade mammalian host immune responses. Upon initial interaction with the host upper respiratory tract mucosa, B. bronchiseptica are subjected to antimicrobial reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), effector molecules of the innate immune system. However, the responses of B. bronchiseptica to redox species at physiologically relevant concentrations (nM-µM) have not been investigated. Using predicted physiological concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O2.−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on low numbers of colony forming units (CFU) of B. bronchiseptica, all redox active species displayed dose-dependent antimicrobial activity. Susceptibility to individual redox active species was significantly increased upon introduction of a second species at sub-antimicrobial concentrations. An increased bacteriostatic activity of NO was observed relative to H2O2. The understanding of Bordetella responses to physiologically relevant levels of exogenous RNS and ROS will aid in defining the role of endogenous production of these molecules in host innate immunity against Bordetella and other respiratory pathogens. PMID:18462394

  19. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [evaluation of methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Samples of liquid oxygen, high pressure nitrogen, low pressure nitrogen, and missile grade air were studied to determine the hydrocarbon concentrations. Concentration of the samples was achieved by adsorption on a molecular sieve and activated charcoal. The trapped hydrocarbons were then desorbed and transferred to an analytical column in a gas chromatograph. The sensitivity of the method depends on the volume of gas passed through the adsorbent tubes. The value of the method was verified through recoverability and reproducibility studies. The use of this method enables LOX, GN2, and missile grade air systems to be routinely monitored to determine low level increases in specific hydrocarbon concentration that could lead to potentially hazardous conditions.

  20. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woongchul; Yang, Gang; Kim, Suk Lae; Liu, Peng; Sue, Hung-Jue; Yu, Choongho

    2016-05-01

    Prohibitively expensive precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been one of the major hurdles in a wide use of electrochemical cells. Recent significant efforts to develop precious metal free catalysts have resulted in excellent catalytic activities. However, complicated and time-consuming synthesis processes have negated the cost benefit. Moreover, detailed analysis about catalytically active sites and the role of each element in these high-performance catalysts containing nanomaterials for large surface areas are often lacking. Here we report a facile one-step synthesis method of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts without precious metals. Our catalysts show excellent long-term stability and onset ORR potential comparable to those of other precious metal free catalysts, and the maximum limiting current density from our catalysts is larger than that of the Pt-based catalysts. We carry out a series of synthesis and characterization experiments with/without iron and nitrogen in CNT, and identify that the coordination of nitrogen and iron in CNT plays a key role in achieving the excellent catalytic performances. We anticipate our one-step process could be used for mass production of precious metal free electrocatalysts for a wide range of electrochemical cells including fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  1. Oxygen and nitrogen isotopic composition of nitrate in commercial fertilizers, nitric acid, and reagent salts.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Greg; Kolanowski, Michelle; Riha, Krystin M

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate is a key component of synthetic fertilizers that can be beneficial to crop production in agro-ecosystems, but can also cause damage to natural ecosystems if it is exported in large amounts. Stable isotopes, both oxygen and nitrogen, have been used to trace the sources and fate of nitrate in various ecosystems. However, the oxygen isotope composition of synthetic and organic nitrates is poorly constrained. Here, we present a study on the N and O isotope composition of nitrate-based fertilizers. The δ(15)N values of synthetic and natural nitrates were 0 ± 2 ‰ similar to the air N2 from which they are derived. The δ(18)O values of synthetic nitrates were 23 ± 3 ‰, similar to air O2, and natural nitrate fertilizer δ(18)O values (55 ± 5 ‰) were similar to those observed in atmospheric nitrate. The Δ(17)O values of synthetic fertilizer nitrate were approximately zero following a mass-dependent isotope relationship, while natural nitrate fertilizers had Δ(17)O values of 18 ± 2 ‰ similar to nitrate produced photochemically in the atmosphere. These narrow ranges of values can be used to assess the amount of nitrate arising from fertilizers in mixed systems where more than one nitrate source exists (soil, rivers, and lakes) using simple isotope mixing models.

  2. Nitrogen-doped Graphene-Supported Transition-metals Carbide Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minghua; Liu, Jilei; Zhou, Weijiang; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel and facile two-step strategy has been designed to prepare high performance bi-transition-metals (Fe- and Mo-) carbide supported on nitrogen-doped graphene (FeMo-NG) as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The as-synthesized FeMo carbide -NG catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activities for ORR in alkaline solution, with high onset potential (−0.09 V vs. saturated KCl Ag/AgCl), nearly four electron transfer number (nearly 4) and high kinetic-limiting current density (up to 3.5 mA cm−2 at −0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Furthermore, FeMo carbide -NG composites show good cycle stability and much better toxicity tolerance durability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, paving their application in high-performance fuel cell and lithium-air batteries. PMID:25997590

  3. Benthic nitrogen cycling traversing the capitalize peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, L.; Dale, A. W.; Sommer, S.; Mosch, T.; Hensen, C.; Noffke, A.; Scholz, F.; Wallmann, K.

    2011-10-01

    Benthic nitrogen (N) cycling was investigated at six stations along a transect traversing the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) at 11°S. An extensive dataset including porewater concentration profiles and in situ benthic fluxes of nitrate (NO 3-), nitrite (NO 2-) and ammonium (NH 4+) was used to constrain a 1-D reaction-transport model designed to simulate and interpret the measured data at each station. Simulated rates of nitrification, denitrification, anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by filamentous large sulfur bacteria (e.g. Beggiatoa and Thioploca) were highly variable throughout the OMZ yet clear trends were discernible. On the shelf and upper slope (80-260 m water depth) where extensive areas of bacterial mats were present, DNRA dominated total N turnover (⩽2.9 mmol N m -2 d -1) and accounted for ⩾65% of NO 3- + NO 2- uptake by the sediments from the bottom water. Nonetheless, these sediments did not represent a major sink for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = NO 3- + NO 2- + NH 4+) since DNRA reduces NO 3- and, potentially NO 2-, to NH 4+. Consequently, the shelf and upper slope sediments were recycling sites for DIN due to relatively low rates of denitrification and high rates of ammonium release from DNRA and ammonification of organic matter. This finding contrasts with the current opinion that sediments underlying OMZs are a strong sink for DIN. Only at greater water depths (300-1000 m) did the sediments become a net sink for DIN. Here, denitrification was the major process (⩽2 mmol N m -2 d -1) and removed 55-73% of NO 3- and NO 2- taken up by the sediments, with DNRA and anammox accounting for the remaining fraction. Anammox was of minor importance on the shelf and upper slope yet contributed up to 62% to total N 2 production at the 1000 m station. The results indicate that the partitioning of oxidized N (NO 3-, NO 2-) into DNRA or denitrification is a key factor determining the role of marine sediments as DIN

  4. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  8. Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

    2004-09-14

    Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

  9. 75 FR 6473 - Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 50 and 58 Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Based on its review of the air quality criteria for oxides of nitrogen and...

  10. Determining the nitrogen and oxygen isotope effects of microbial denitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philp, C.; Martin, T. S.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    The nitrogen cycle describes how nitrogen, a critical nutrient for life, moves throughout the ground, oceans, and atmosphere. An essential component of the nitrogen cycle is denitrification, in which bioavailable nitrogen is transformed into nitrous oxide and nitrogen gas and can no longer be harnessed by most organisms. We can further understand the importance of this nitrogen cycle process by examining the N and O isotope effects of microbial denitrification. We have cultured four denitrifying bacteria: P. stutzeri, P. putida, P. aureofaciens, and P. aeruginosa. After providing them with an initial amount of nitrite we tracked the rate at which each type of bacteria consumed the nitrite through a time series experiment. We then measured the N and O isotope ratios of the nitrite at each time point using a gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The subsequent isotope effects calculated using the Rayleigh equation provide an important tool for modeling denitrification in the environment.

  11. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF NITROGEN, OXYGEN AND SULFUR HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS: STUDIES WITH AQUIFER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for anaerobic biodegradation of 12 heterocyclic model compounds was studied. Nine of the model compounds were biotransformed in aquifer slurries under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. The nitrogen and oxygen heterocyclic compounds were more susceptible t...

  12. Thermal degradation of cereal straws in air and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ergundenler, A.

    1991-12-31

    The termogravimetric behavior of four cereal straws (wheat, barley, oats, and rye) was examined at three heating rates (10, 20, and 50{degrees}C/min) in air and nitrogen atmospheres. The thermal degradation rate in active and passive pyrolysis zones, the initial degradation temperature, and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were determined for these straws in both atmospheres. Increasing the heating rate increased the thermal degradation rate, and decreased both the initial degradation temperature and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The higher the cellulosic content of the straw, the higher the thermal degradation rate and the initial degradation temperature. Also, higher ash content in the straw resulted in higher residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The thermal degradation rate in active pyrolysis zone was lower in air atmosphere than in nitrogen atmosphere, whereas the thermal degradation rate in passive pyrolysis zone and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were higher in nitrogen atmosphere than in air atmosphere.

  13. Nitrogen-broadened lineshapes in the oxygen A-band: Experimental results and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Holladay, Christopher; Heung, Henry; Bouanich, Jean-Pierre; Mellau, Georg Ch.; Keller, Reimund; Hurtmans, Daniel R.

    2008-09-01

    We report measurements for N 2-broadening, pressure-shift and line mixing coefficients for 55 oxygen transitions in the A-band retrieved using a multispectrum fitting technique. Nineteen laboratory absorption spectra were recorded at 0.02 cm -1 resolution using a multi-pass absorption cell with path length of 1636.9 cm and the IFS 120 Fourier transform spectrometer located at Justus-Liebig-University in Giessen, Germany. The total sample pressures ranged from 8.8 to 3004.5 Torr with oxygen volume mixing ratios in nitrogen ranging between 0.057 and 0.62. An Exponential Power Gap (EPG) scaling law was used to calculate the N 2-broadening and N 2-line mixing coefficients. The line broadening and shift coefficients for the A-band of oxygen self-perturbed and perturbed by N 2 are modeled using semiclassical calculations based on the Robert-Bonamy formalism and two intermolecular potentials. These potentials involve electrostatic contributions including the hexadecapole moment of the molecules and (a) a simple dispersion contribution with one adjustable parameter to fit the broadening coefficients or (b) the atom-atom Lennard-Jones model without such adjustable parameters. The first potential leads to very weak broadening coefficients for high J transitions whereas the second potential gives much more improved results at medium and large J values, in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. For the line shifts which mainly arise in our calculation from the electronic state dependence of the isotropic potential, their general trends with increasing J values can be well predicted, especially from the first potential. From the theoretical results, we have derived air-broadening and air-induced shift coefficients with an agreement comparable to that obtained for O 2-O 2 and O 2-N 2.

  14. Measurements of air-broadened and nitrogen-broadened half-widths and shifts of ozone lines near 9 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.; Rinsland, C. P.; Devi, Malathy V.; Benner, D. Chris; Thakur, K. B.

    1988-01-01

    Air- and nitrogen-broadened half-widths and line shifts at room temperature for more than 60 individual vibration-rotation transitions in the nu1 fundamental band of (O-16)3 and several transitions in the nu3 band were determined from infrared absorption spectra. These spectra were recorded at 0.005/cm resolution with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. A tunable-diode-laser spectrometer operating in the 1090-1150/cm region was also used to record data on oxygen-, nitrogen-, and air-broadened half-widths for selected individual transitions. The nitrogen- and air-broadened half-widths determined by these two different measurement techniques are consistent to within 4 percent. The results are in good agreement with other published measurements and calculations.

  15. Nonluminous diffusion flame of diluted acetylene in oxygen-enriched air

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, G.

    1994-12-31

    A soot-reducing mechanism of fuel dilution and oxygen enrichment in laminar diffusion flames is suggested. Analysis using the Burke-Schumann theory for the shape of over ventilated diffusion flames has shown that there is a critical ratio of stoichiometric coefficients of the fuel and the oxidizer under which the gas flows from the fuel side to the oxidizer side throughout the flame. When this condition is satisfied, the soot growth region vanishes. A similar result is also found in a numerical simulation for diffusion flames that do not satisfy the Burke-Schumann assumption of uniform flow field. KIVA code is used for that purpose. The theoretically predicted direction of gas-flow across the flame sheet is verified in an experiment in a coaxial-flow diffusion flame. Soot cloud and velocity fields are visualized through a laser sheet method in the experiment. The fuel is a mixture of acetylene and nitrogen. The oxidizer is a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. The compositions of the reactants are controlled so that the adiabatic flame temperature is kept constant to avoid the effect of temperature change. Experimental results show substantial reduction of scattered light intensity by fuel dilution and oxygen enrichment. When a sufficient amount of nitrogen is added to the fuel, nonluminous blue flames are obtained. At higher oxygen concentrations, blue flames are obtained at higher flame temperature region. When oxygen concentration in the oxidizer is 70 vol.%, blue flames are obtained up to 2,250 K. The critical condition of the reactants for nonluminous flames agrees with the theoretical prediction when the oxidizer is ordinary air. In oxygen-enriched conditions, the fuel must be diluted more, than theoretically predicted.

  16. The Extended Oxygen Window Concept for Programming Saturation Decompressions Using Air and Nitrox.

    PubMed

    Kot, Jacek; Sicko, Zdzislaw; Doboszynski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Saturation decompression is a physiological process of transition from one steady state, full saturation with inert gas at pressure, to another one: standard conditions at surface. It is defined by the borderline condition for time spent at a particular depth (pressure) and inert gas in the breathing mixture (nitrogen, helium). It is a delicate and long lasting process during which single milliliters of inert gas are eliminated every minute, and any disturbance can lead to the creation of gas bubbles leading to decompression sickness (DCS). Most operational procedures rely on experimentally found parameters describing a continuous slow decompression rate. In Poland, the system for programming of continuous decompression after saturation with compressed air and nitrox has been developed as based on the concept of the Extended Oxygen Window (EOW). EOW mainly depends on the physiology of the metabolic oxygen window--also called inherent unsaturation or partial pressure vacancy--but also on metabolism of carbon dioxide, the existence of water vapor, as well as tissue tension. Initially, ambient pressure can be reduced at a higher rate allowing the elimination of inert gas from faster compartments using the EOW concept, and maximum outflow of nitrogen. Then, keeping a driving force for long decompression not exceeding the EOW allows optimal elimination of nitrogen from the limiting compartment with half-time of 360 min. The model has been theoretically verified through its application for estimation of risk of decompression sickness in published systems of air and nitrox saturation decompressions, where DCS cases were observed. Clear dose-reaction relation exists, and this confirms that any supersaturation over the EOW creates a risk for DCS. Using the concept of the EOW, 76 man-decompressions were conducted after air and nitrox saturations in depth range between 18 and 45 meters with no single case of DCS. In summary, the EOW concept describes physiology of

  17. Electrochemical Performance of Highly Mesoporous Nitrogen Doped Carbon Cathode in Lithium-Oxygen Batteries (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    rechargeable lithium– oxygen cell that was based pon metallic lithium anode, polymer electrolyte separator, and carbon-impregnated solid-polymer... electrolyte composite cath- de with gravimetric capacity of 1410mAhg−1 in pure oxygen tmosphere. Even higher cathode capacity of 2120mAhg−1 for ithium–air...concentra- ion of dissolved oxygen in air saturated aqueous solution of 0.1M OH solution. Compared to KB carbon, the N-KB carbon exhibits ne order of higher

  18. Visualization of oxygen transfer across the air-water interface using a fluorescence oxygen visualization method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhee

    2002-04-01

    Oxygen concentration fields in a water body were visualized by the fluorescence oxygen visualization (FOV) method. Pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was used as a fluorescent indicator of oxygen, and an intensive charge coupled-device (ICCD) camera as an image detector. Sequential images (over 2000 images) of the oxygen concentration field around the surface water of the tank (1 x 1 x 0.75 m3) were produced during the 3 h experiment. From image processing, the accurate pathway of oxygen-rich, cold water at the water surface was also visualized. The amount of oxygen transferred through the air-water interface during the experiment was measured and the oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)) was determined as 0.22 m/d, which was much higher than that is expected in molecular diffusion. Results suggest that vertical penetration of cold water was the main pathway of oxygen in the water body in the tank. The average velocity of cold water penetrating downward in water body was also measured from consecutive images and the value was 0.3-0.6 mm/s. The FOV method used in this research should have wide application in experimental fluid mechanics and can also provide a phenomenological description of oxygen transfer under physically realizable natural conditions in lakes and reservoirs.

  19. Fuel Cells Utilizing Oxygen From Air at Low Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan; Boyer, Chris; Greenwald, Charles

    2006-01-01

    A fuel cell stack has been developed to supply power for a high-altitude aircraft with a minimum of air handling. The fuel cell is capable of utilizing oxygen from ambient air at low pressure with no need for compression. For such an application, it is advantageous to take oxygen from the air (in contradistinction to carrying a supply of oxygen onboard), but it is a challenging problem to design a fuel-cell stack of reasonable weight that can generate sufficient power while operating at reduced pressures. The present fuel-cell design is a response to this challenge. The design features a novel bipolar plate structure in combination with a gas-diffusion structure based on a conductive metal core and a carbon gas-diffusion matrix. This combination makes it possible for the flow fields in the stack to have a large open fraction (ratio between open volume and total volume) to permit large volumes of air to flow through with exceptionally low backpressure. Operations at reduced pressure require a corresponding increase in the volume of air that must be handled to deliver the same number of moles of oxygen to the anodes. Moreover, the increase in the open fraction, relative to that of a comparable prior fuel-cell design, reduces the mass of the stack. The fuel cell has been demonstrated to operate at a power density as high as 105 W/cm2 at an air pressure as low as 2 psia (absolute pressure 14 kPa), which is the atmospheric pressure at an altitude of about 50,000 ft ( 15.2 km). The improvements in the design of this fuel cell could be incorporated into designs of other fuel cells to make them lighter in weight and effective at altitudes higher than those of prior designs. Potential commercial applications for these improvements include most applications now under consideration for fuel cells.

  20. Effects of Nitrogen and Oxygen Radicals on Low-Temperature Bio-Molecule Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motrescu, Iuliana; Ogino, Akihisa; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Fujiwara, Taketomo; Kodani, Shinya; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Popa, Gheorghe; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2011-08-01

    The mechanism by which microwave plasma is able to modify the structure and function of proteinaceous molecules is investigated. The biomolecule cystine, a dimer aminoacid, was exposed to microwave surface wave plasma produced in reactive gases, such as oxygen and nitrogen, in different conditions. Except for the physical interactions of the charged particles with the samples and the photophysical reactions induced mostly by ultraviolet radiation, these plasmas contain reactive species which promote chemical interactions. In this study we focus on the changes of biomolecules due to neutral particles inside reactive plasmas. The results proved that the effects of neutrals and charged species are not cumulative. Moreover, it seems that the charged species inside the nitrogen plasma promote nitrogen addition while the outcome of neutral exposure is cleavage. Strong oxidation occurs for oxygen treatments, most reactive species which cause oxygen addition being the oxygen molecular ions O2+.

  1. Bronchomotor response to cold air or helium-oxygen at normal and high ambient pressures.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Y; Burnet, H; Cosson, P; Lucciano, M

    1988-05-01

    Effects of inhalation of cold air or helium-oxygen mixture on lung resistance (RL) were studied in anesthetized and tracheotomized rabbits under normal ambient pressure and in human volunteers under normo- and hyperbaric conditions. In artificially ventilated rabbits, an increase in RL occurred when the tracheal temperature fell to 10 degrees C. This effect was more than double with helium breathing compared to air, despite a lower respiratory heat loss by convection (Hc) with helium. In 3 normal humans, inhalation of cold air (mouth temperature = 8 degrees C) at sea level had no effect on RL value. However, with a helium-nitrogen-oxygen mixture, a weak but significant increase in RL due to cold gas breathing was measured in 1 subject at 2 ATA and in 2 individuals at 3.5 ATA. The density of inhaled gas mixture (air or He-N2-O2) was near the same in the three circumstances (1, 2, and 3.5 ATA) but Hc value increased with helium. At 8 ATA a 30-55% increase in RL occurred in the 3 divers during inhalation of cold gas (Hc was multiplied by 6 compared to air at sea level) and at 25 ATA the cold-induced bronchospasm ranged between 38 and 95% (Hc multiplied by 27). Thus, in rabbits and humans helium breathing enhanced the cold-induced increase in RL at normal or elevated ambient pressure, and this effect was interpreted as resulting from different mechanisms in the two circumstances.

  2. 76 FR 46083 - Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No... RIN 2060-AO72 Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur... nitrogen and oxides of sulfur. Based on its review, EPA proposes to retain the current nitrogen dioxide...

  3. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, R.; Ganoe, R.

    2013-12-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle experiment has demonstrated the ability to remotely detect dissolved oxygen and nitrogen in pure water (also Chesapeake Bay water) using a 355nm Nd:YAG laser and a simple monochromater to detect the shifted Raman oxygen and nitrogen backscattered signals at 376.2 and 387.5 nm respectively. The theoretical basis for the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented. A 1.3-m water cell had an attached vertical column to house a Troll 9500 dissolved oxygen in-situ monitor (In-Situ Inc Troll 9500). The Raman oxygen signal could be calibrated with this devise. While Raman backscattered water signals are low a potential aircraft remote system was designed and will be presented.

  4. Afterglow chemistry of atmospheric-pressure helium-oxygen plasmas with humid air impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Niemi, Kari; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Graham, William G.

    2014-04-01

    The formation of reactive species in the afterglow of a radio-frequency-driven atmospheric-pressure plasma in a fixed helium-oxygen feed gas mixture (He+0.5%O2) with humid air impurity (a few hundred ppm) is investigated by means of an extensive global plasma chemical kinetics model. As an original objective, we explore the effects of humid air impurity on the biologically relevant reactive species in an oxygen-dependent system. After a few milliseconds in the afterglow environment, the densities of atomic oxygen (O) decreases from 1015 to 1013 cm-3 and singlet delta molecular oxygen (O2(1D)) of the order of 1015 cm-3 decreases by a factor of two, while the ozone (O3) density increases from 1014 to 1015 cm-3. Electrons and oxygen ionic species, initially of the order of 1011 cm-3, recombine much faster on the time scale of some microseconds. The formation of atomic hydrogen (H), hydroxyl radical (OH), hydroperoxyl (HO2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitric acid (HNO3) resulting from the humid air impurity as well as the influence on the afterglow chemistry is clarified with particular emphasis on the formation of dominant reactive oxygen species (ROS). The model suggests that the reactive species predominantly formed in the afterglow are major ROS O2(1D) and O3 (of the order of 1015 cm-3) and rather minor hydrogen- and nitrogen-based reactive species OH, H2O2, HNO3 and NO2/NO3, of which densities are comparable to the O-atom density (of the order of 1013 cm-3). Furthermore, the model quantitatively reproduces the experimental results of independent O and O3 density measurements.

  5. High-Nitrogen and High-Oxygen Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Sources • High-Oxygen Carriers and Oxidizer Balanced Ionic Liquids 412 July, 2005 3rd Energetic Materials Technology Exchange, Arlington, VA Distribution...spectroscopy • [trans- UO2 (N3)4]2-, the first example of an actinide oxoazide, was also prepared and characterized by its crystal structure 1812 July, 2005...synthesized and characterized, and their usefulness for preparing gem-bis-difluoramino compounds was demonstrated. • High-oxygen carrying anions hold great promise for oxidizer -balanced, ionic liquid propellants.

  6. 76 FR 68698 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Revision to Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...- 9487-7] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Revision to Nitrogen... Commonwealth of Virginia that revises regulatory language that inadvertently ended its nitrogen oxides (NO...

  7. Presence of organophosphorus pesticide oxygen analogs in air samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Jenna L.; Fenske, Richard A.; Yost, Michael G.; Galvin, Kit; Tchong-French, Maria; Yu, Jianbo

    2013-02-01

    A number of recent toxicity studies have highlighted the increased potency of oxygen analogs (oxons) of several organophosphorus (OP) pesticides. These findings were a major concern after environmental oxons were identified in environmental samples from air and surfaces following agricultural spray applications in California and Washington State. This paper reports on the validity of oxygen analog measurements in air samples for the OP pesticide, chlorpyrifos. Controlled environmental and laboratory experiments were used to examine artificial formation of chlorpyrifos-oxon using OSHA Versatile Sampling (OVS) tubes as recommended by NIOSH method 5600. Additionally, we compared expected chlorpyrifos-oxon attributable to artificial transformation to observed chlorpyrifos-oxon in field samples from a 2008 Washington State Department of Health air monitoring study using non-parametric statistical methods. The amount of artificially transformed oxon was then modeled to determine the amount of oxon present in the environment. Toxicity equivalency factors (TEFs) for chlorpyrifos-oxon were used to calculate chlorpyrifos-equivalent air concentrations. The results demonstrate that the NIOSH-recommended sampling matrix (OVS tubes with XAD-2 resin) was found to artificially transform up to 30% of chlorpyrifos to chlorpyrifos-oxon, with higher percentages at lower concentrations (<30 ng m-3) typical of ambient or residential levels. Overall, the 2008 study data had significantly greater oxon than expected by artificial transformation, but the exact amount of environmental oxon in air remains difficult to quantify with the current sampling method. Failure to conduct laboratory analysis for chlorpyrifos-oxon may result in underestimation of total pesticide concentration when using XAD-2 resin matrices for occupational or residential sampling. Alternative methods that can accurately measure both OP pesticides and their oxygen analogs should be used for air sampling, and a toxicity

  8. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  9. Sooting Limits Of Diffusion Flames With Oxygen-Enriched Air And Diluted Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Chao, B. H.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen-enhanced combustion permits certain benefits and flexibility that are not otherwise available in the design of practical combustors, as discussed by Baukal. The cost of pure and enriched oxygen has declined to the point that oxygen-enhanced combustion is preferable to combustion in air for many applications. Carbon sequestration is greatly facilitated by oxygen enrichment because nitrogen can be eliminated from the product stream. For example, when natural gas (or natural gas diluted with CO2) is burned in pure oxygen, the only significant products are water and CO2. Oxygen-enhanced combustion also has important implications for soot formation, as explored in this work. We propose that soot inception in nonpremixed flames requires a region where C/O ratio, temperature, and residence time are above certain critical values. Soot does not form at low temperatures, with the threshold in nonpremixed flames ranging from about 1250-1650 K, a temperature referred to here as the critical temperature for soot inception, Tc. Soot inception also can be suppressed when residence time is short (equivalently, when the strain rate in counterflow flames is high). Soot induction times of 0.8-15 ms were reported by Tesner and Shurupov for acetylene/nitrogen mixtures at 1473 K. Burner stabilized spherical microgravity flames are employed in this work for two main reasons. First, this configuration offers unrestricted control over convection direction. Second, in steady state these flames are strain-free and thus can yield intrinsic sooting limits in diffusion flames, similar to the way past work in premixed flames has provided intrinsic values of C/O ratio associated with soot inception limits.

  10. Defining Nitrogen Kinetics for Air Break in Prebreathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2009-01-01

    Actual tissue nitrogen (N2) kinetics are complex; the uptake and elimination is often approximated with a single half-time compartment in statistical descriptions of denitrogenation [prebreathe (PB)] protocols. Air breaks during PB complicate N2 kinetics. A comparison of symmetrical versus asymmetrical N2 kinetics was performed using the time to onset of hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) as a surrogate for actual venous N2 tension. Published results of 12 tests involving 179 hypobaric exposures in altitude chambers after PB, with and without air breaks, provide the complex protocols from which to model N2 kinetics. DCS survival time for combined control and air breaks were described with an accelerated log logistic model where N2 uptake and elimination before, during, and after the air break was computed with a simple exponential function or a function that changed half-time depending on ambient N2 partial pressure. P1N2-P2 = delta P defined DCS dose for each altitude exposure, where P2 was the test altitude and P1N2 was computed N2 pressure at the beginning of the altitude exposure. The log likelihood (LL) without DCS dose (null model) was -155.6, and improved (best-fit) to -97.2 when dose was defined with a 240 min half-time for both N2 elimination and uptake during the PB. The description of DCS survival time was less precise with asymmetrical N2 kinetics, for example, LL was -98.9 with 240 min half-time elimination and 120 min half-time uptake. The statistical regression described survival time mechanistically linked to symmetrical N2 kinetics during PBs that also included air breaks. The results are data-specific, and additional data may change the conclusion. The regression is useful to compute additional PB time to compensate for an air break in PB within the narrow range of tested conditions.

  11. Energy balance in nanosecond pulse discharges in nitrogen and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2016-02-01

    Kinetic modeling is used to analyze energy partition and energy transfer in nanosecond pulse discharges sustained between two spherical electrodes in nitrogen and air. The modeling predictions are compared with previous time-resolved temperature and {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft(X {}1Σ\\text{g}+,v=0-9\\right) vibrational population measurements by picosecond broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and phase-locked Schlieren imaging. The model shows good agreement with experimental data, reproducing experimental discharge current pulse waveforms, as well as dominant processes of energy transfer in the discharge and the afterglow. Specifically, the results demonstrate that the temperature rise in the plasma occurs in two stages, (i) ‘rapid’ heating on sub-acoustic time scale, dominated by {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft(A {}3Σ\\text{u}+\\right) energy pooling processes, N2(B 3Πg) and N(2P,2D) quenching (in nitrogen), and by quenching of excited electronic states of N2 molecules by O2 (in air), and (ii) ‘slow’ heating due to N2 vibrational relaxation by O atoms (in air), nearly completely missing in nitrogen. Comparison of the model predictions with N2 vibrational level populations confirms that the N2 vibrational temperature rises after the discharge pulse is caused by the ‘downward’ vibrational-vibrational exchange depopulating higher vibrational levels and populating vibrational level v  =  1. The model reproduces temporal dynamics of vibrational level populations and temperature in the discharge and the afterglow, indicating that energy partition among different modes (vibrational, electronic, dissociation, and ionization) is predicted accurately. At the present conditions, energy fraction coupled to the positive column of the discharge filament in air is approximately 50%, with the rest coupled to the cathode layer. Nearly 10% of the total pulse energy is spent on O atom generation, and about 10% is thermalized on a sub-acoustic time scale

  12. Perovskite-nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube composite as bifunctional catalysts for rechargeable lithium-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Hey Woong; Lee, Dong Un; Park, Moon Gyu; Ahmed, Raihan; Seo, Min Ho; Nazar, Linda F; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-03-01

    Developing an effective bifunctional catalyst is a significant issue, as rechargeable metal-air batteries are very attractive for future energy systems. In this study, a facile one-pot process is introduced to prepare an advanced bifunctional catalyst (op-LN) incorporating nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) into perovskite La0.5 Sr0.5 Co0.8 Fe0.2 O3 nanoparticles (LSCF-NPs). Confirmed by half-cell testing, op-LN exhibits synergistic effects of LSCF-NP and NCNT with excellent bifunctionality for both the oxygen reduction reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction. Furthermore, op-LN exhibits comparable performances in these reactions to Pt/C and Ir/C, respectively, which highlights its potential for use as a commercially viable bifunctional catalyst. Moreover, the results obtained by testing op-LN in a practical Li-air battery demonstrate improved and complementary charge/discharge performance compared to those of LSCF-NP and NCNT, and this confirms that simply prepared op-LN is a promising candidate as a highly effective bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air batteries.

  13. Method for measurement of volatile oxygenated hydrocarbons in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibrock, E.; Slemr, J.

    An automated gas chromatographic method for the quantitative determination of oxygenated (C 2C 5 carbonyls and C 1C 2 alcohols) and some non-oxygenated (C 5C 8) hydrocarbons in ambient air has been developed. The analytical system consists of a gas chromatograph with a cryogenic sampling trap, a precolumn for the separation of water and other interfering compounds, a cryogenic focusing trap and two analytical columns connected in series. Substances are detected either by flame ionization or by a mass spectrometer. Ozone is removed by a potassium iodide scrubber placed upstream the sampling trap. External gas standards generated by a permeation device are used for calibration. The detection limits range between 0.03 and 0.08 ng (depending on the compound), equivalent to 5 to 56 ppt in 1 l of sampled air. The method was tested by an intercomparison with a different gas chromatographic technique for the determination of NMHC. The system has been applied since 1994 for measurements in ambient air. Data obtained during an intensive campaign in summer 1995 at the field station Wank (1778 m a.s.l.) near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, are reported and compared with NMHC mixing ratios measured simultaneously in the same air masses.

  14. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  15. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  16. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  17. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  18. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  19. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen and methane cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Lüke, Claudia; Speth, Daan R; Kox, Martine A R; Villanueva, Laura; Jetten, Mike S M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are areas in the global ocean where oxygen concentrations drop to below one percent. Low oxygen concentrations allow alternative respiration with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor to become prevalent in these areas, making them main contributors to oceanic nitrogen loss. The contribution of anammox and denitrification to nitrogen loss seems to vary in different OMZs. In the Arabian Sea, both processes were reported. Here, we performed a metagenomics study of the upper and core zone of the Arabian Sea OMZ, to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic potential for nitrogen and methane cycling. We propose that aerobic ammonium oxidation is carried out by a diverse community of Thaumarchaeota in the upper zone of the OMZ, whereas a low diversity of Scalindua-like anammox bacteria contribute significantly to nitrogen loss in the core zone. Aerobic nitrite oxidation in the OMZ seems to be performed by Nitrospina spp. and a novel lineage of nitrite oxidizing organisms that is present in roughly equal abundance as Nitrospina. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) can be carried out by yet unknown microorganisms harbouring a divergent nrfA gene. The metagenomes do not provide conclusive evidence for active methane cycling; however, a low abundance of novel alkane monooxygenase diversity was detected. Taken together, our approach confirmed the genomic potential for an active nitrogen cycle in the Arabian Sea and allowed detection of hitherto overlooked lineages of carbon and nitrogen cycle bacteria.

  20. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen and methane cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Kox, Martine A.R.; Villanueva, Laura; Jetten, Mike S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are areas in the global ocean where oxygen concentrations drop to below one percent. Low oxygen concentrations allow alternative respiration with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor to become prevalent in these areas, making them main contributors to oceanic nitrogen loss. The contribution of anammox and denitrification to nitrogen loss seems to vary in different OMZs. In the Arabian Sea, both processes were reported. Here, we performed a metagenomics study of the upper and core zone of the Arabian Sea OMZ, to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic potential for nitrogen and methane cycling. We propose that aerobic ammonium oxidation is carried out by a diverse community of Thaumarchaeota in the upper zone of the OMZ, whereas a low diversity of Scalindua-like anammox bacteria contribute significantly to nitrogen loss in the core zone. Aerobic nitrite oxidation in the OMZ seems to be performed by Nitrospina spp. and a novel lineage of nitrite oxidizing organisms that is present in roughly equal abundance as Nitrospina. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) can be carried out by yet unknown microorganisms harbouring a divergent nrfA gene. The metagenomes do not provide conclusive evidence for active methane cycling; however, a low abundance of novel alkane monooxygenase diversity was detected. Taken together, our approach confirmed the genomic potential for an active nitrogen cycle in the Arabian Sea and allowed detection of hitherto overlooked lineages of carbon and nitrogen cycle bacteria. PMID:27077014

  1. An Auger Sputter Profiling Study of Nitrogen and Oxygen Ion Implantations in Two Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, B. D., Pope, L. E., Wittberg, T. N.

    1989-07-31

    Samples of two titanium alloys, Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3A1, were ion implanted with a combination of nitrogen (N+) and oxygen (O+). For each alloy, implantation parameters were chosen to give implanted nitrogen concentrations of approximately 10 or 50 atomic percent, from a depth of 100 nanometers to a depth of 400 nanometers. In all but one case, dual energy (200 keV and 90 keV) implantations of nitrogen were used to give a relatively uniform nitrogen concentration to a depth of 300 nanometers. In each case, oxygen was implanted at 35 keV, following the nitrogen implantation, to give an oxygen-enriched region near the surface. The implanted samples were then examined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) combined with argon ion sputtering. In order to determine the stoichiometry of the nitrogen implanted regions, it was necessary to determine the N (KVV) contribution to the overlapping N (KVV) and Ti (LMM) Auger transitions. It was also necessary to correct for the ion-bombardment-induced compositional changes which have been described in an earlier study of titanium nitride thin films. The corrected AES depth profiles were in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  2. Angular distribution of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. J.; Kennedy, D. J.; Starace, A. F.; Dill, D.

    1974-01-01

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon are calculated. Both Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Slater (Herman-Skillman) wave functions are used for oxygen, and the agreement is excellent; thus only Hartree-Slater functions are used for carbon and nitrogen. The pitch-angle distribution of photoelectrons is discussed, and it is shown that previous approximations of energy-independent isotropic or sin squared theta distributions are at odds with the authors' results, which vary with energy. This variation with energy is discussed, as is the reliability of these calculations.

  3. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  4. Oxygen quenching in a LAB based liquid scintillator and the nitrogen bubbling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hua-Lin; Deng, Jing-Shan; Wang, Nai-Yan

    2010-05-01

    The oxygen quenching effect in a Linear Alkl Benzene (LAB) based liquid scintillator (LAB as the solvent, 3 g/L 2, 5 diphe-nyloxazole (PPO) as the fluor and 15 mg/L p-bis-(o-methylstyryl)-benzene (bis-MSB) as the λ-shifter) is studied by measuring the light yield as a function of the nitrogen bubbling time. It is shown that the light yield of the fully purged liquid scintillator is increased by 11% at room temperature and the room atmospheric pressure. A simple nitrogen bubbling model is proposed to describe the relationship between the relative light yield (oxygen quenching factor) and the bubbling time.

  5. Comparison APMP.QM-S2.1: oxygen in nitrogen at atmospheric level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. M.; Kim, K.; Jung, J.; Oh, S.; Hui, L.; Li, H.; Keat, T. B.; Ann, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    This document describes results of the bilateral comparison of an oxygen in nitrogen gas mixture. The nominal amount-of-substance fraction was 0.2 mol/mol oxygen in nitrogen Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Nitrogen spark denoxer

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Henry K.; Novick, Vincent J.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.

    1997-01-01

    A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

  7. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-22

    environmental fluctuations. As growth can be limited by the scarcity of any one nutrient, the rate at which each nutrient is assimilated must be...multiple nutrient systems. We discovered that the carbonaceous substrate of nitrogen assimilation , α-ketoglutarate, directly inhibits glucose uptake and...at which each nutrient is  assimilated  must be sensitive not only to  its own availability, but also to that of other nutrients. Remarkably, across

  8. Variation of pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for various isooctane-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spakowski, Adolph, A; Belles, Frank E

    1952-01-01

    An investigation was made of the change in the pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for various isooctane-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures. Pressure limits were measured in cylindrical glass tubes of four different inside diameters at six different oxygen-nitrogen ratios. Under the experimental conditions, flame propagation was found to be impossible in isooctane-oxygen mixtures with oxygen concentrations less than 11 to 12 percent. Critical tube diameters for flame propagation were calculated and the effect of pressure was determined and compared with the effect of pressure on quenching distance. Critical diameters were related to flame speeds for various isooctane-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures.

  9. Table of Historical Nitrogen Dioxide National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    See the history of limits to the level of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in ambient air, set through the NAAQS review and rulemaking process under the Clean Air Act. This includes both primary and secondary standards.

  10. Impact of transition metal on nitrogen retention and activity of iron-nitrogen-carbon oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Selvarani; Leonard, Nathaniel; Barton, Scott Calabrese

    2014-03-14

    Iron based nitrogen doped carbon (FeNC) catalysts are synthesized by high-pressure pyrolysis of carbon and melamine with varying amounts of iron acetate in a closed, constant-volume reactor. The optimum nominal amount of Fe (1.2 wt%) in FeNC catalysts is established through oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) polarization. Since the quantity of iron used in FeNCs is very small, the amount of Fe retained in FeNC catalysts after leaching is determined by UV-VIS spectroscopy. As nitrogen is considered to be a component of active sites, the amount of bulk and surface nitrogen retention in FeNC catalysts are measured using elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that increasing nominal Fe content in FeNC catalysts leads to a decreased level of nitrogen retention. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrates that increasing nominal Fe content leads to increased weight loss during pyrolysis, particularly at high temperatures. Catalysts are also prepared in the absence of iron source, and with iron removed by washing with hot aqua regia post-pyrolysis. FeNC catalysts prepared with no Fe show high retained nitrogen content but poor ORR activity, and aqua regia washed catalysts demonstrate similar activity to Fe-free catalysts, indicating that Fe is an active site component.

  11. Effects of nitrogen and helium on CNS oxygen toxicity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Arieli, R; Ertracht, O; Oster, I; Vitenstein, A; Adir, Y

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of inert gases to the risk of central nervous system (CNS) oxygen toxicity is a matter of controversy. Therefore, diving regulations apply strict rules regarding permissible oxygen pressures (Po(2)). We studied the effects of nitrogen and helium (0, 15, 25, 40, 50, and 60%) and different levels of Po(2) (507, 557, 608, and 658 kPa) on the latency to the first electrical discharge (FED) in the EEG in rats, with repeated measurements in each animal. Latency as a function of the nitrogen pressure was not homogeneous for each rat. The prolongation of latency observed in some rats at certain nitrogen pressures, mostly in the range 100 to 500 kPa, was superimposed on the general trend for a reduction in latency as nitrogen pressure increased. This pattern was an individual trait. In contrast with nitrogen, no prolongation of latency to CNS oxygen toxicity was observed with helium, where an increase in helium pressure caused a reduction in latency. This bimodal response and the variation in the response between rats, together with a possible effect of ambient temperature on metabolic rate, may explain the conflicting findings reported in the literature. The difference between the two inert gases may be related to the difference in the narcotic effect of nitrogen. Proof through further research of a correlation between individual sensitivity to nitrogen narcosis and protection by N(2) against CNS oxygen toxicity in rat may lead to a personal O(2) limit in mixed-gas diving based on the diver sensitivity to N(2) narcosis.

  12. Nitrogen fixation in the activated sludge treatment of thermomechanical pulping wastewater: effect of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Slade, A H; Anderson, S M; Evans, B G

    2003-01-01

    N-ViroTech, a novel technology which selects for nitrogen-fixing bacteria as the bacteria primarily responsible for carbon removal, has been developed to treat nutrient limited wastewaters to a high quality without the addition of nitrogen, and only minimal addition of phosphorus. Selection of the operating dissolved oxygen level to maximise nitrogen fixation forms a key component of the technology. Pilot scale activated sludge treatment of a thermomechanical pulping wastewater was carried out in nitrogen-fixing mode over a 15 month period. The effect of dissolved oxygen was studied at three levels: 14% (Phase 1), 5% (Phase 2) and 30% (Phase 3). The plant was operated at an organic loading of 0.7-1.1 kg BOD5/m3/d, a solids retention time of approximately 10 d, a hydraulic retention time of 1.4 d and a F:M ratio of 0.17-0.23 mg BOD5/mg VSS/d. Treatment performance was very stable over the three dissolved oxygen operating levels. The plant achieved 94-96% BOD removal, 82-87% total COD removal, 79-87% soluble COD removal, and >99% total extractives removal. The lowest organic carbon removals were observed during operation at 30% DO but were more likely to be due to phosphorus limitation than operation at high dissolved oxygen, as there was a significant decrease in phosphorus entering the plant during Phase 3. Discharge of dissolved nitrogen, ammonium and oxidised nitrogen were consistently low (1.1-1.6 mg/L DKN, 0.1-0.2 mg/L NH4+-N and 0.0 mg/L oxidised nitrogen). Discharge of dissolved phosphorus was 2.8 mg/L, 0.1 mg/L and 0.6 mg/L DRP in Phases 1, 2 and 3 respectively. It was postulated that a population of polyphosphate accumulating bacteria developed during Phase 1. Operation at low dissolved oxygen during Phase 2 appeared to promote biological phosphorus uptake which may have been affected by raising the dissolved oxygen to 30% in Phase 3. Total nitrogen and phosphorus discharge was dependent on efficient secondary clarification, and improved over the course of

  13. Oxygen electrocatalysts in metal-air batteries: from aqueous to nonaqueous electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Li; Xu, Dan; Xu, Ji-Jing; Zhang, Xin-Bo

    2014-11-21

    With the development of renewable energy and electrified transportation, electrochemical energy storage will be more important in the future than it has ever been in the past. Although lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are traditionally considered to be the most likeliest candidate thanks to their relatively long cycle life and high energy efficiency, their limited energy density as well as cost are still causing a bottleneck for their long-term application. Alternatively, metal-air batteries have been proposed as a very promising large-scale electricity storage technology with the replacement of the intercalation reaction mechanism by the catalytic redox reaction of a light weight metal-oxygen couple. Generally, based on the electrolyte, these metal-air batteries can be divided into aqueous and nonaqueous systems, corresponding to two typical batteries of Zn-air and Li-air, respectively. The prominent feature of both batteries are their extremely high theoretical energy density, especially for nonaqueous Li-air batteries, which far exceeds the best that can be achieved with LIBs. In this review, we focus on the major obstacle of sluggish kinetics of the cathode in both batteries, and summarize the fundamentals and recent advances related to the oxygen catalyst materials. According to the electrolyte, the aqueous and nonaqueous electrocatalytic mechanisms of the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions are discussed. Subsequently, seven groups of oxygen catalysts, which have played catalytic roles in both systems, are selectively reviewed, including transition metal oxides (single-metal oxides and mixed-metal oxides), functional carbon materials (nanostructured carbons and doped carbons), metal oxide-nanocarbon hybrid materials, metal-nitrogen complexes (non-pyrolyzed and pyrolyzed), transition metal nitrides, conductive polymers, and precious metals (alloys). Nonaqueous systems have the advantages of energy density and rechargeability over aqueous systems and have

  14. The balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The study of turnover of carbon and oxygen is an important line of scientific investigation. This line takes on special significance in conditions of soil degradation, which leads to the excess content of carbon dioxide and, as result, decrease of oxygen in the atmosphere. The aim of this article is a statement the balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air (ratio O/C) depending on consumption and assimilation by plants of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the value of the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh). Basis of model was the following: green vascular plants are facultative heterotrophic organisms with symbiotic digestion and nutrition. According to the trophology viewpoint, the plant consumption of organic compounds broadens greatly a notion about the plant nutrition and ways of its regulation. In particular, beside the main known cycle of carbon: plant - litter - humus - carbon dioxide - plant, there is the second carbon cycle (turnover of organic compounds): plant - litter - humus - DOM - plant. The biogeochemical meaning of consumption of organic compounds by plants is that plants build the structural and functional blocks of biological macromolecules in their bodies. It provides receiving of a certain "energy payoff" by plants, which leads to increase of plant biomass by both an inclusion of allochthonous organic molecules in plant tissues, and positive effect of organic compounds on plant metabolic processes. One more of powerful ecological consequence of a heterotrophic nutrition of green plants is oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air. As the organic molecules in the second biological cycle of carbon are built in plants without considerable chemical change, the atmospheric air is enriched on that amount of oxygen, which would be required on oxidation of the organic molecules absorbed by plants, in result. It was accepted that: plant-soil system was climax, the plant community was grassy, initial contents of carbon in phytomass was accepted

  15. An improved bifunctional oxygen (air) electrode for reversible alkaline fuel cell systems and for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, K.; Steininger, K.-H.; Tomantschger, K.

    1988-10-01

    Electrodes with a nickel layer of dual pore structure on the electrolyte side and a PTFE-bonded carbon layer on the oxygen (air) side are discussed, with application to space energy storage. During the electrolyis stage, the oxygen fills the large pores of the porous Ni structure with gas. During the discharge cycle, the iron/air or zinc/air cell of the carbon layer operates as a regular oxygen electrode.

  16. Mesoporous Nitrogen Doped Carbon-Glass Ceramic Cathode for High Performance Lithium-Oxygen Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2012 Conference Proceedings Postprint 01 June 2012 – 01 June 2012 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE MESOPOROUS NITROGEN... 3 , a solid-state lithium-oxygen cell with a 2 cm2 area was fabricated (Figure 4 ). Figure 4 . Photograph of a Solid-State lithium-oxygen...0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Vo lta ge (V ) Cell Capacity (mA.h) 1 2 3 Figure 5. Discharge profiles for a lithium-oxygen cell at 75 C

  17. Mean lives of some astrophysically important excited levels in carbon, nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, M. W.; Bickel, W. S.

    1976-01-01

    A number of astrophysically important mean lives of levels in carbon, nitrogen and oxygen were measured with the beam-foil technique. New values are reported and compared with earlier theoretical and experimental values. Direct references to astrophysical applications are listed.

  18. MODELING NITROGEN-CARBON CYCLING AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN BOTTOM SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model framework is presented for simulating nitrogen and carbon cycling at the sediment–water interface, and predicting oxygen consumption by oxidation reactions inside the sediments. Based on conservation of mass and invoking simplifying assumptions, a coupled system of diffus...

  19. Impact of Clean Air Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in Neuse River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated impacts of Clean Air Act (CAA) nitrogen emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) models were used. Two scenar...

  20. Testing of heat exchangers in membrane oxygenators using air pressure.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Carole; Stein, Jutta; Seidler, Rainer; Kind, Robert; Beck, Karin; Tosok, Jürgen; Upterfofel, Jörg

    2006-03-01

    All heat exchangers (HE) in membrane oxygenators are tested by the manufacturer for water leaks during the production phase. However, for safety reasons, it is highly recommended that HEs be tested again before clinical use. The most common method is to attach the heater-cooler to the HE and allow the water to recirculate for at least 10 min, during which time a water leak should be evident. To improve the detection of water leaks, a test was devised using a pressure manometer with an integrated bulb used to pressurize the HE with air. The cardiopulmonary bypass system is set up as per protocol. A pressure manometer adapted to a 1/2" tubing is connected to the water inlet side of the oxygenator. The water outlet side is blocked with a short piece of 1/2" deadend tubing. The HE is pressurized with 250 mmHg for at least 30 sec and observed for any drop. Over the last 2 years, only one oxygenator has been detected with a water leak in which the air-method leaktest was performed. This unit was sent back to the manufacturer who confirmed the failure. Even though the incidence of water leaks is very low, it does occur and it is, therefore, important that all HEs are tested before they are used clinically. This method of using a pressure manometer offers many advantages, as the HE can be tested outside of the operating room (OR), allowing earlier testing of the oxygenator, no water contact is necessary, and it is simple, easy and quick to perform.

  1. Effect of dissolved oxygen on nitrogen fixation by A. vinelandii. II. Ionically adsorbed cells.

    PubMed

    Diluccio, R C; Kirwan, D J

    1984-01-01

    Continuous culture studies of Azotobacter vinelandii cells immobilized by ionic adsorption to Cellex E anion exchange resin were conducted under oxygen-limited conditions for comparison to free-cell cultures. Immobilization had little effect upon the specific respiration and sucrose consumption rates as compared to free cells. However, maxima in specific nitrogen fixation rate and nitrogenase activity as a function of dissolved oxygen occurred at a C(O(2) ) value of approximately 0.005 mM as opposed to 0.02 mM for free cells. Further, in contrast to free-cell culture, most of the fixed nitrogen appeared in the medium rather than within intact cells. There were strong indications that reproduction of bound cells often resulted in cell lysis accounting for the fixed nitrogen content in solution.

  2. [Oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification and denitrification--a novel technology for biological nitrogen removal].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Xu, Hui; Li, Xiangli; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Guanxiong

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification and denitrification (OLAND) is a biological nitrogen removal process coupled with partial nitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation. In our study, the nitrification was blocked at nitrite stage by controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration at 0.1-0.3 mg.L-1, and then, the denitrification proceeded, with the residual ammonium at the partial nitrification stage as electron donor. As a completely autotrophic nitrification-denitrification process, the OLAND was of many advantages (e.g., low energy consumption, high nitrogen removal rate and small footprint of system), and suitable in particular for treating low COD/NH4(+)-N ratio wastewater. It has become one of the most prosperous and practicable biological nitrogen removal technologies. The recent research of OLAND was reviewed, and its microbial mechanism as well as its applicable prospect was remarked in this paper.

  3. Adsorption of atomic nitrogen and oxygen on [Formula: see text] surface: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Breedon, M; Spencer, M J S; Yarovsky, I

    2009-04-08

    The adsorption of atomic nitrogen and oxygen on the ([Formula: see text]) crystal face of zinc oxide (ZnO) was studied. Binding energies, workfunction changes, vibrational frequencies, charge density differences and electron localization functions were calculated. It was elucidated that atomic oxygen binds more strongly than nitrogen, with the most stable [Formula: see text] structure exhibiting a binding energy of -2.47 eV, indicating chemisorption onto the surface. Surface reconstructions were observed for the most stable minima of both atomic species. Positive workfunction changes were calculated for both adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen if the adsorbate interacted with zinc atoms. Negative workfunction changes were calculated when the adsorbate interacted with both surface oxygen and zinc atoms. Interactions between the adsorbate and the surface zinc atoms resulted in ionic-type bonding, whereas interactions with oxygen atoms were more likely to result in the formation of covalent-type bonding. The positive workfunction changes correlate with an experimentally observed increase in resistance of ZnO conductometric sensor devices.

  4. Raman-based Oxygen and Nitrogen Sensor for Monitoring Empty Airplane Fuel Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a Raman-based method for detecting oxygen and nitrogen in empty fuel tanks. The need for such a method comes from the potential danger of allowing explosive oxygen-fuel mixtures to accumulate in empty airplane fuel tanks. An explosion resulting from such a mixture is believed to have caused the Flight TWA 800 disaster in 1996. Recently, (e.g., February 17,2004 press release) the FAA announced its intentions to make fuel tank inerting mandatory. One potential solution to this problem is to use an inert gas such as nitrogen to flood the empty fue1 tanks in order to reduce the concentration of oxygen.

  5. Modelling of oxygen and nitrogen cycling as a function of macrophyte community in the Thau lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plus, M.; Chapelle, A.; Lazure, P.; Auby, I.; Levavasseur, G.; Verlaque, M.; Belsher, T.; Deslous-Paoli, J.-M.; Zaldívar, J.-M.; Murray, C. N.

    2003-11-01

    A three-dimensional model coupling physical and biological processes for the whole Thau lagoon (Mediterranean coast of France) was developed in order to assess the relationships between macrophytes and the oxygen and nitrogen cycles. Ten species have been inserted as forcing variables in the model. Plankton dynamics, shellfish cultivation impact and mineralization of organic matter are also considered, as well as nutrient and oxygen exchanges between the sediment and the water column. Simulations with and without the macrophytes have shown that the system can be characterized as having a highly structured pattern involving lagoon nitrogen and oxygen cycles. This pattern is created by the combined influence of macrophytes, watershed and oyster farming. The model has been also used to assess the total annual macrophyte production at the whole lagoon scale. Comparisons with phytoplankton production and with results from other temperate lagoons have underlined the high productivity of the Thau lagoon supported by active nutrient regeneration.

  6. Centrifugal spray singlet oxygen generator for a COIL with nitrogen as a buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å palek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít.; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila

    2012-01-01

    A scalable high pressure centrifugal spray generator of singlet oxygen for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was developed. This generator uses nitrogen as chlorine diluting gas. Different spray nozzles were tested which could be assembled together and so enable a high chlorine flow rates for a high-power COIL. The designed generator can produce singlet oxygen, O2(1Δg), with reasonable chlorine utilization and O2(1Δg) yield even at very high generator pressures, which cannot be attained by other O2(1Δg) generators. This high-pressure operation is beneficial for a pressure recovery system of the laser. Another advantage of this generator is a very high BHP utilization. The problem of heating of exit gas was solved by introducing additional nitrogen between the separator rotor and stator.

  7. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganoe, Rene; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle system has been developed and the specifications are being honed to maximize efficiency for the final application. The theoretical criteria of the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented in this report

  8. Nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Nalini P.; Li, Xuguang; Nallathambi, Vijayadurda; Kumaraguru, Swaminatha P.; Colon-Mercado, Hector; Wu, Gang; Lee, Jong-Won; Popov, Branko N.

    Nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalysts for oxygen reduction were synthesized by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursors. The electrocatalytic properties of catalysts were studied as a function of surface pre-treatments, nitrogen and oxygen concentrations, and heat-treatment temperatures. On the optimum catalyst, the onset potential for oxygen reduction is approximately 0.76 V (NHE) and the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced at 0.5 V (NHE) is approximately 3% under our experimental conditions. The characterization studies indicated that pyridinic and graphitic (quaternary) nitrogens may act as active sites of catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction. In particular, pyridinic nitrogen, which possesses one lone pair of electrons in addition to the one electron donated to the conjugated π bond, facilitates the reductive oxygen adsorption.

  9. Increase in whole-body peripheral vascular resistance during three hours of air or oxygen prebreathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Conkin, J.; Dierlam, J. J.; Stanford, J., Jr.; Riddle, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Male and female subjects prebreathed air or 100% oxygen through a mask for 3.0 hours while comfortably reclined. Blood pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output were collected before and after the prebreathe. Peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) was calculated from these parameters and increased by 29% during oxygen prebreathing and 15% during air prebreathing. The oxygen contributed substantially to the increase in PVR. Diastolic blood pressure increased by 18% during the oxygen prebreathe while stystolic blood pressure showed no change under either procedure. The increase in PVR during air prebreathing was attributed to procedural stress common to air and oxygen prebreathing.

  10. Roles of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Pain

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, Daniela; Little, Joshua W.; Doyle, Timothy; Neumann, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxynitrite (PN, ONOO−) and its reactive oxygen precursor superoxide (SO, O2·−), are critically important in the development of pain of several etiologies including in the development of pain associated with chronic use of opiates such as morphine (also known as opiate-induced hyperalgesia and antinociceptive tolerance). This is now an emerging field in which considerable progress has been made in terms of understanding the relative contribution of SO, PN, and nitroxidative stress in pain signaling at the molecular and biochemical levels. Aggressive research in this area is poised to provide the pharmacological basis for development of novel non-narcotic analgesics that are based upon the unique ability to selectively eliminate SO and/or PN. As we have a better understanding of the role of SO and PN in pathophysiological settings, targeting PN may be a better therapeutic strategy than targeting SO. This is due to the fact that unlike PN, which has no currently known beneficial role, SO may play a significant role in learning and memory [1]. Thus, the best approach may be to spare SO while directly targeting its downstream product, PN. Over the last 15 years, our team has spearheaded research concerning the roles of SO/PN in pain and these results are currently leading to the development of solid therapeutic strategies in this important area. PMID:21277369

  11. Roles of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in pain.

    PubMed

    Salvemini, Daniela; Little, Joshua W; Doyle, Timothy; Neumann, William L

    2011-09-01

    Peroxynitrite (PN; ONOO⁻) and its reactive oxygen precursor superoxide (SO; O₂•⁻) are critically important in the development of pain of several etiologies including pain associated with chronic use of opiates such as morphine (also known as opiate-induced hyperalgesia and antinociceptive tolerance). This is now an emerging field in which considerable progress has been made in terms of understanding the relative contributions of SO, PN, and nitroxidative stress in pain signaling at the molecular and biochemical levels. Aggressive research in this area is poised to provide the pharmacological basis for development of novel nonnarcotic analgesics that are based upon the unique ability to selectively eliminate SO and/or PN. As we have a better understanding of the roles of SO and PN in pathophysiological settings, targeting PN may be a better therapeutic strategy than targeting SO. This is because, unlike PN, which has no currently known beneficial role, SO may play a significant role in learning and memory. Thus, the best approach may be to spare SO while directly targeting its downstream product, PN. Over the past 15 years, our team has spearheaded research concerning the roles of SO and PN in pain and these results are currently leading to the development of solid therapeutic strategies in this important area.

  12. An experimental study of air entrainment and oxygen transfer at a water jet from a nozzle with air holes.

    PubMed

    Baylar, Ahmet; Emiroglu, M Emin

    2004-01-01

    An adequate supply of dissolved oxygen is important in natural rivers and in some water treatment processes. The dissolved oxygen concentration can be enhanced by entraining air bubbles in a receiving pool. When a water jet impinges a receiving pool at rest, air bubbles may be entrained and carried away below the pool free surface. This process is called plunging water jet entrainment and aeration. This paper describes an experimental study of the air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency of circular nozzles with and without air holes. In particular, the effect of varying the number, positions, and open/close status of the air holes is investigated. A negative pressure occurred depending on the air holes opened on the circular nozzles. This phenomenon affected the water jet expansion, water jet shape, air entrainment, and bubble penetration depth and, hence, the oxygen transfer efficiency. It was demonstrated that the air entrainment rate and the oxygen transfer efficiency of the circular nozzles with air holes were better than those of the circular nozzles without air holes. Therefore, adding air holes to a simple, circular nozzle could lead to a significantly increased air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency.

  13. Fire-air and dephlogistication. Revisionisms of oxygen's discovery.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2003-01-01

    Americans are taught that Joseph Priestley discovered oxygen in 1774 and promptly brought that news to Lavoisier. Lavoisier proved that air contained a new element, oxygen, which combined with hydrogen to make water. He disproved the phlogiston theory but Priestley called it dephlogisticated air until his death 30 years later. Scandanavians learn that a Swedish apothecary Carl Wilhelm Scheele beat Priestley by 2 years but was deprived of credit because Lavoisier denied receiving a letter Scheele later claimed to have sent in September 1774 describing his 1772 discovery of "fire air". His claim was unconfirmed because Scheele first published his work in 1777. However, Scheele's missing letter was made public in 1992 in Paris, 218 years late, and now resides at the French Academie de Sciences. Lavoisier received it on Oct 15, 1774. His guilt was kept secret in the effects of Madame Lavoisier. He failed on several occasions to credit either Priestley or Scheele for contributing to the most important discovery in the history of science. Priestley was a teacher, political philosopher, essayist, Unitarian minister and pioneer in chemical and electrical science. He discovered 9 gases including nitrous oxide. He invented soda water, refrigeration, and gum erasers for which he coined the term "rubber". He discovered photosynthesis. He was humorless, argumentative, brilliant and passionate, called a "furious free-thinker". While his liberal colleagues Josiah Wedgwood, Erasmus Darwin, James Watts, and others of the Lunar Society were celebrating the 2nd anniversary of the French revolution, a Birmingham mob, supported by the royalists and the established church, destroyed Priestley's home, laboratory and church. Driven from England, he emigrated to Pennsylvania where he built a home and laboratory and collected a 1600 volume library, then among the largest in America. He is regarded as a founder of liberal Unitarian thinking. He was friend and correspondent of Thomas

  14. Nitrogen diffusion in hafnia and the impact of nitridation on oxygen and hydrogen diffusion: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh E-mail: rajesh.sathiyanarayanan@gmail.com; Pandey, R. K.; Murali, K. V. R. M.

    2015-01-21

    Using first-principles simulations, we have computed incorporation energies and diffusion barriers of ammonia, the nitrogen molecule and atomic nitrogen in monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO{sub 2}). Our calculations show that ammonia is likely to dissociate into an NH{sub 2} molecular unit, whereas the nitrogen molecule remains as a molecule either in the interstitial space or at an oxygen lattice site. The lowest energy pathway for the diffusion of atomic nitrogen interstitials consists of the hopping of the nitrogen interstitial between neighboring three-coordinated lattice oxygen atoms that share a single Hf atom, and the barrier for such hops is determined by a switching mechanism. The substitutional nitrogen atom shows a preference for diffusion through the doubly positive oxygen vacancy-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, we have investigated the impact of nitrogen atoms on the diffusion barriers of oxygen and hydrogen interstitials in m-HfO{sub 2}. Our results show that nitrogen incorporation has a significant impact on the barriers for oxygen and hydrogen diffusion: nitrogen atoms attract oxygen and hydrogen interstitials diffusing in the vicinity, thereby slowing down (reducing) their diffusion (diffusion length)

  15. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tsoy, Olga V.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis. PMID:27617010

  16. Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Abundances of Selected Stars in the Hertzsprung Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanture, Andrew D.; Wallerstein, George

    1999-01-01

    The iron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances for several stars whose characteristics place them in the Hertzsprung gap have been derived from high-resolution spectra. These stars were selected based on the fact that previous studies have shown them to have peculiar carbon, nitrogen, or lithium abundances considering their position in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. When combined with the lithium abundances derived by Wallerstein and coworkers, the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances indicate that the sample of stars can generally be broken into two categories-lower luminosity dwarfs or subgiants that are unmixed and higher luminosity mixed giants. Among the sample are two stars, HR 7606 and HR 8626, which previously have been identified by Bidelman as ``low-velocity CH stars.'' These stars show metallicities of [Fe/H]~-0.5 and solar abundances of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The strength of the CH band in these stars is probably an artifact of a mild metal deficiency and the absence of substantial mixing of CN processed materials to the surface of the star rather than an unusual nucleosynthetic history.

  17. Palladium silicide formation under the influence of nitrogen and oxygen impurities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, K. T.; Lien, C.-D.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of impurities on the growth of the Pd2Si layer upon thermal annealing of a Pd film on 100 line-type and amorphous Si substrates is investigated. Nitrogen and oxygen impurities are introduced into either Pd or Si which are subsequently annealed to form Pd2Si. The complementary techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and N-15(p, alpha)C-12 or O-18(p, alpha)N-15 nuclear reaction, are used to investigate the behavior of nitrogen or oxygen and the alterations each creates during silicide formation. Both nitrogen and oxygen retard the silicide growth rate if initially present in Si. When they are initially in Pd, there is no significant retardation; instead, an interesting snow-plowing effect of N or O by the reaction interface of Pd2Si is observed. By using N implanted into Si as a marker, Pd and Si appear to trade roles as the moving species when the silicide front reaches the nitrogen-rich region.

  18. Influence of nitrogen doping on oxygen reduction electrocatalysis at carbon nanofiber electrodes.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Stephen; Stevenson, Keith J

    2005-03-17

    Nondoped and nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon nanofiber (CNF) electrodes were prepared via a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using precursors consisting of ferrocene and either xylene or pyridine to control the nitrogen content. Structural and compositional differences between the nondoped and N-doped varieties were assessed using TEM, BET, Raman, TGA, and XPS. Electrochemical methods were used to study the influence of nitrogen doping on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The N-doped CNF electrodes demonstrate significant catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction in aqueous KNO(3) solutions at neutral to basic pH. Electrochemical data are presented which indicate that the ORR proceeds by the peroxide pathway via two successive two-electron reductions. However, for N-doped CNF electrodes, the reduction process can be treated as a catalytic regenerative process where the intermediate hydroperoxide (HO(2)(-)) is chemically decomposed to regenerate oxygen, 2HO(2)(-) <==> O(2) + 2OH(-). The proposed electrocatalysis mechanisms for ORR at both nondoped and N-doped varieties are supported by electrochemical simulations and by measured difference in hydroperoxide decomposition rate constants. Remarkably, approximately 100 fold enhancement for hydroperoxide decomposition is observed for N-doped CNFs, with rates comparable to the best known peroxide decomposition catalysts. Collectively the data indicate that exposed edge plane defects and nitrogen doping are important factors for influencing adsorption of reactive intermediates (i.e., superoxide, hydroperoxide) and for enhancing electrocatalysis for the ORR at nanostructured carbon electrodes.

  19. NORTH SIDES OF LIQUID OXYGEN TANKS. Looking southwest along railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH SIDES OF LIQUID OXYGEN TANKS. Looking southwest along railroad track to AF Plant 72 - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Liquid Oxygen & Nitrogen Storage Tank Farm, Intersection of Altair & Jupiter Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. Surface-nitrogen-rich ordered mesoporous carbon as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chunhui; Chen, Xu; Fan, Zhaoyang; Liang, Jin; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Shujiang

    2016-11-01

    Exploring efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) will have a great impact on the field of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this paper, we report a simple and efficient routine to coat ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) with nitrogen-doped carbon via pyrolysis of the surface-self-polymerized polydopamine. The optimized CMK-3 catalyst with a coating of nitrogen-doped carbon demonstrates excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ORR in alkaline media. The coating procedure under optimized conditions lowers the ORR half-wave-potential by 80 mV, giving a genuine metal-free catalyst with an onset ORR potential of 0.96 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential of 0.83 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M KOH, which is much better than other carbon material-based catalysts (such as carbon nanotubes and their composites). The performance of this surface-nitrogen-rich CMK-3 catalyst is also superior to that of N-doped ordered mesoporous carbon synthesized by means of the ‘nanocasting’ technique. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst performs comparably in terms of activity, superior durability, and higher tolerance to methanol compared with commercially available Pt/C.

  1. Nitrogen Doping in Oxygen-Deficient Ca2Fe2O5: A Strategy for Efficient Oxygen Reduction Oxide Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Jijil, Chamundi P; Lokanathan, Moorthi; Chithiravel, Sundaresan; Nayak, Chandrani; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, Shambhu Nath; Babu, P D; Kakade, Bhalchandra; Devi, R Nandini

    2016-12-21

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is increasingly being studied in oxide systems due to advantages ranging from cost effectiveness to desirable kinetics. Oxygen-deficient oxides like brownmillerites are known to enhance ORR activity by providing oxygen adsorption sites. In parallel, nitrogen and iron doping in carbon materials, and consequent presence of catalytically active complex species like C-Fe-N, is also suggested to be good strategies for designing ORR-active catalysts. A combination of these features in N-doped Fe containing brownmillerite can be envisaged to present synergistic effects to improve the activity. This is conceptualized in this report through enhanced activity of N-doped Ca2Fe2O5 brownmillerite when compared to its oxide parents. N doping is demonstrated by neutron diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity is also found to be enhanced by N doping, which influences the activity. Electrochemical characterization by cyclic voltammetry, rotating disc electrode, and rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) indicates an improved oxygen reduction activity in N-doped brownmillerite, with a 10 mV positive shift in the onset potential. RRDE measurements show that the compound exhibits 4-electron reduction pathways with lower H2O2 production in the N-doped system; also, the N-doped sample exhibited better stability. The observations will enable better design of ORR catalysts that are stable and cost-effective.

  2. Fundamentals, development and scaleup of the air=oxygen stratified downdraft gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, T.B.; Levie, B.; Graboski, M.S.

    1988-06-01

    In 1979 the US Department of Energy, Office of Alcohol Fuels, asked the Solar Energy Research Institute to develop a process for manufacturing methanol from biomass. This can be achieved by gasification of the biomass to a ''synthesis gas'' (syn-gas) (composed of primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide) followed by catalytic conversion of the gas to methanol. The catalytic conversion of syn-gas is a well developed commercial process. There are a number of gasifiers for wood, but most of them make either a producer gas, high on nitrogen or a pyrolysis gas high in hydrocarbons. None were developed to make syn-gas. Thus the principal technical problem was to develop a gasifier to make synthesis gas from biomass. Work was performed at SERI from 1980--1985 which resulted in the development of a prototype 1 ton/day oxygen-biomass gasifier. In 1985 a program was undertaken for Congress by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to build a commercial scale (50--200 tons/day) medium energy gasifier, based on DOE or other research. A new company, Syn-Gas Inc. (SGI), research. A contract was awarded to SGI to modify the air gasifier for oxygen operation for this project. This modification allowed extended tests of the gasifier with oxygen to determine the possibility of scaling up the SERI-SGI gasifier to 50--200 tons/day.

  3. 77 FR 9532 - Air Quality Designations for the 2010 Primary Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 81 RIN-2060-AR06 Air Quality Designations for the 2010 Primary Nitrogen Dioxide (NO 2 ) National Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule establishes air quality designations for all areas in the United States for the...

  4. Mitigating an increase of specific power consumption in a cryogenic air separation unit at reduced oxygen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Rohit; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2017-02-01

    Specific power consumed in a Linde double column air separation unit (ASU) increases as the quantity of oxygen produced at a given purity is decreased due to the changes of system requirement or market demand. As the plant operates in part load condition, the specific power consumption (SPC) increases as the total power consumption remains the same. In order to mitigate the increase of SPC at lower oxygen production, the operating pressure of high pressure column (HPC) can be lowered by extending the low pressure column (LPC) by a few trays and adding a second reboiler. As the duty of second reboiler in LPC is increased, the recovery of oxygen decreases with a lowering of the HPC pressure. This results in mitigation of the increase of SPC of the plant. A Medium pressure ASU with dual reboiler that produces pressurised gaseous and liquid products of oxygen and nitrogen is simulated in Aspen Hysys 8.6®, a commercial process simulator to determine SPC at varying oxygen production. The effects of reduced pressure of air feed into the cold box on the size of heat exchangers (HX) are analysed. Operation strategy to obtain various oxygen production rates at varying demand is also proposed.

  5. The Pathway for Oxygen: Tutorial Modelling on Oxygen Transport from Air to Mitochondrion: The Pathway for Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Bassingthwaighte, James B; Raymond, Gary M; Dash, Ranjan K; Beard, Daniel A; Nolan, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The 'Pathway for Oxygen' is captured in a set of models describing quantitative relationships between fluxes and driving forces for the flux of oxygen from the external air source to the mitochondrial sink at cytochrome oxidase. The intervening processes involve convection, membrane permeation, diffusion of free and heme-bound O2 and enzymatic reactions. While this system's basic elements are simple: ventilation, alveolar gas exchange with blood, circulation of the blood, perfusion of an organ, uptake by tissue, and consumption by chemical reaction, integration of these pieces quickly becomes complex. This complexity led us to construct a tutorial on the ideas and principles; these first PathwayO2 models are simple but quantitative and cover: (1) a 'one-alveolus lung' with airway resistance, lung volume compliance, (2) bidirectional transport of solute gasses like O2 and CO2, (3) gas exchange between alveolar air and lung capillary blood, (4) gas solubility in blood, and circulation of blood through the capillary syncytium and back to the lung, and (5) blood-tissue gas exchange in capillaries. These open-source models are at Physiome.org and provide background for the many respiratory models there.

  6. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  7. The development of a non-cryogenic nitrogen/oxygen supply system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenough, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development of the hydrazine/water electrolysis process in a manned spacecraft to provide metabolic oxygen and both oxygen and nitrogen for cabin leakage makeup was studied. Electrode development efforts were directed to stability, achieved with catalyst additives and improved processing techniques, and a higher hydrazine conversion efficiency, achieved by reducing catalyst loading on the cathodes. Extensive testing of the one-man breadboard N2/02 system provided complete characterization of cabin atmosphere control aspects. A detailed design of a prototype modular N2/02 unit was conducted. The contact heat exchanger which is an integral component of this design was fabricated and sucessfully design-verification tested.

  8. Detonation limits of clouds of coal dust in mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.H.; Fearnley, P.J.; Nettleton, M.A.

    1987-09-01

    Ignition and the subsequent acceleration of flame in clouds of coal dust dispersed in mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen have been studied. Two coal sizes, 24 and 54 ..mu..m, in concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.22 kg/m/sup 3/ were employed. Flame acceleration and the approach to transition to a stable detonation were monitored by a combination of microwave interferometry and pressure measurements. Flame and shock velocities up to 1.85 km/sec were observed. Ignition distances were found to be independent of the concentrations of dust and oxygen and particle size.

  9. Tumor-dependent kinetics of partial pressure of oxygen fluctuations during air and oxygen breathing.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Navia, L Isabel; Yu, Daohai; Braun, Rod D; Brizel, David M; Secomb, Timothy W; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2004-09-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the kinetics of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) fluctuations in fibrosarcoma (FSA) and 9L tumors under air and O2 breathing conditions. The overall hypothesis was that key factors relating to oxygen tension fluctuations would vary between the two tumor types and as a function of the oxygen content of the breathing gas. To assist in the interpretation of the temporal data, spatial pO2 distributions were measured in 10 FSA and 8 9L tumors transplanted into the subcutis of the hind leg of Nembutal-anesthetized (50 mg/kg) Fischer 344 rats. Recessed-tip oxygen microelectrodes were inserted into the tumor, and linear pO2 measurements were recorded in 50-microm steps along a 3-mm path, and blood pressure was simultaneously measured via femoral arterial access. Additionally, pO2 was measured at a single location for 90 to 120 minutes in FSA (n=11) or 9L tumors (n=12). Rats were switched from air to 100% O2 breathing after 45 minutes. Temporal pO2 records were evaluated for their potential radiobiological significance by assessing the number of times they crossed a 10-mm-Hg threshold. In addition, the data were subjected to Fourier analysis for air and O2 breathing. FSA and 9L tumors had spatial median pO2 measurements of 4 and 1 mm Hg, respectively. 9L had more low pO2 measurements < or =2.5 mm Hg than did FSA, whereas between 2.5 and 10 mm Hg this pattern was reversed. Pimonidazole staining patterns in FSA and 9L tumors supported these results. Temporal pO2 instability was observed in all experiments during air and O2 breathing. Threshold analyses indicated that the 10 mm Hg threshold was crossed 2 to 5 times per hour, independent of tumor type. However, the magnitude of 9L pO2 fluctuations was approximately eight times greater than FSA fluctuations, as assessed with Fourier transform analysis (Wilcoxon, P < 0.005). O2 breathing significantly increased median pO2 in FSA from 3 to 8 mm Hg (P < 0.005) and caused a

  10. Catalytic recombination of nitrogen and oxygen on iron-cobalt-chromia spinel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    The energy-transfer catalytic recombination coefficient for nitrogen and oxygen recombination on iron-cobalt-chromia spinel is inferred from stagnation-point heat flux measurements in dissociated arc-jet flow. This material was coated on several Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection tiles. The resulting coefficients are correlated with an Arrhenius model for convenience, and these expressions may be used to account for catalytic recombination in predictions of the heat flux on the spinel-coated tiles flown on several Space Shuttle Orbiter flights. The results are compared with those inferred by Rakich, Stewart, and Lanfranco from an Orbiter flight and arc-jet experiments. Good agreement is obtained for oxygen recombination, but agreement for nitrogen is poor.

  11. Charge state stabilization of shallow nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond by oxygen surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Hayate; Kawai, Sora; Kato, Kanami; Kageura, Taisuke; Inaba, Masafumi; Okada, Takuma; Higashimata, Itaru; Haruyama, Moriyoshi; Tanii, Takashi; Yamada, Keisuke; Onoda, Shinobu; Kada, Wataru; Hanaizumi, Osamu; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Isoya, Junichi; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the charge state stability and coherence properties of near-surface single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in 12C-enriched diamond for potential use in nanoscale magnetic field sensing applications. The stability of charge states in negatively charged NV centers (NV‑) was evaluated using one of the pulsed optically detected magnetic resonance measurements, Rabi oscillation measurements. During the accumulation of Rabi oscillations, an unstable shallow NV‑ was converted to a neutral state. As a result, the contrast of Rabi oscillations degraded, depending on charge state stability. We stabilized the NV‑ state of very shallow NV centers (∼2.6 ± 1.1 nm from the surface) created by 1.2 keV nitrogen ion implantation by diamond surface modification, UV/ozone exposure, and oxygen annealing. This improvement indicates that we can suppress the upward surface band bending and surface potential fluctuations through Fermi level pinning originating from oxygen-terminated diamond surfaces.

  12. Oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere and its impact on the evolution of nitrogen-based metabolisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papineau, D.; Mojzsis, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    The evolution of metabolic pathways is closely linked to the evolution of the redox state of the terrestrial atmosphere. Nitrogen has been an essential biological element since the emergence of life when reduced nitrogen compounds (e.g. ammonia) were utilized in the prebiotic synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids. The nitrogen isotopic composition of sediments has been used to trace the origin of sedimentary organic matter in the rock record. Nitrogen is therefore suitable as a biosignature to trace the emergence of life on Earth or other planetary bodies as well as to follow the subsequent evolution of the biosphere in response to global redox changes. Evidence is strong that biological nitrogen fixation evolved very early in the history of life. The Last Common Ancestor (LCA) on Earth was most likely capable of nitrogen fixation as seen from the phylogenetic distribution of nitrogen-fixing organisms in both the domains of Bacteria and Archaea. Phylogenetic trees plotted with nitrogen-fixing gene (Nif) sequences from lineages of Bacteria and Archaea suggest that the Nif genes originated in a common ancestor of the two domains. Other phylogenetic analyses have also demonstrated that the paralogous duplication of the nifDK and nifEN operons, central to nitrogen fixation, predated the divergence of Archaea from Bacteria and therefore occurred prior to the emergence of the LCA. Although the same may be true for denitrification, this metabolic pathway probably did not become dominant until atmospheric pO2 increased between ~2.4 to 1.9 Ga during the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE). Recent work has shown a general depletion in 15N content of Archean (pre-2.5 Ga) relative to Phanerozoic (<540 Ma) kerogens. Studies have shown that the distribution of the δ15N values in kerogens shift from negative values in the Early Archean (from -6 to +6‰ with an average near 0‰ ) to approximately contemporary positive values (from +2 to +10‰ with an average at +6‰ ) by the

  13. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  14. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  15. Forensic applications of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in tracing nitrate sources in urban environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, S.R.; Ging, P.B.; Lee, R.W.; Ebbert, J.C.; Tesoriero, A.J.; Inkpen, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground and surface waters in urban areas are susceptible to nitrate contamination from septic systems, leaking sewer lines, and fertilizer applications. Source identification is a primary step toward a successful remediation plan in affected areas. In this respect, nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate, in conjunction with hydrologic data and water chemistry, have proven valuable in urban studies from Austin, Texas, and Tacoma, Washington. In Austin, stream water was sampled during stremflow and baseflow conditions to assess surface and subsurface sources of nitrate, respectively. In Tacoma, well waters were sampled in adjacent sewered and un-sewered areas to determine if locally high nitrate concentrations were caused by septic systems in the un-sewered areas. In both studies, sewage was identified as a nitrate source and mixing between sewage and other sources of nitrate was apparent. In addition to source identification, combined nitrogen and oxygen isotopes were important in determining the significance of denitrification, which can complicate source assessment by reducing nitrate concentrations and increasing ??15N values. The two studies illustrate the value of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate for forensic applications in urban areas. ?? Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. on behalf of AEHS.

  16. Simulating unsteady transport of nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Chattahoochee River downstream from Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1985-01-01

    As part of an intensive water-quality assessment of the Chattahoochee River, repetitive water-quality measurements were made at 12 sites along a 69-kilometer reach of the river downstream of Atlanta, Georgia. Concentrations of seven constituents (temperature, dissolved oxygen, ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), organic nitrogen, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate) were obtained during two periods of 36 hours, one starting on August 30, 1976, and the other starting on May 31, 1977. The study reach contains one large and several small sewage outfalls and receives the cooling water from two large powerplants. An unsteady water-quality model of the Lagrangian type was calibrated using the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The model provided a good means of interpreting these data even though both the flow and the pollution loading rates were highly unsteady. A kinetic model of the cascade type accurately described the physical and biochemical processes occurring in the river. All rate coefficients, except reaeration coefficients and those describing the resuspension of BOD, were fitted to the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The study showed that, at steady low flow, about 38 percent of the BOD settled without exerting an oxygen demand. At high flow, this settled BOD was resuspended and exerted an immediate oxygen demand. About 70 percent of the ammonia extracted from the water column was converted to nitrite, but the fate of the remaining 30 percent is unknown. Photosynthetic production was not an important factor in the oxygen balance during either run.

  17. Helium:oxygen versus air:oxygen noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Ghanei, Mostafa; Rajaeinejad, Mohsen; Motiei-Langroudi, Rouzbeh; Alaeddini, Farshid; Aslani, Jafar

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) causes a variety of respiratory symptoms, such as chronic bronchitis and constrictive bronchiolitis. This study assessed the effectiveness of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation, adjunct with 79:21 helium:oxygen instead of 79:21 air:oxygen, in 24 patients with a previous exposure to SM presenting with acute respiratory failure. Both air:oxygen and helium:oxygen significantly decreased systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, dyspnea, and increased oxygen saturation (P values: .007, .029, .002, <.001, <.001, <.001, and .002 for air:oxygen, respectively, and <.001, .020, .001, <.001, <.001, <.001, and .002, for helium:oxygen, respectively). Moreover, helium:oxygen more potently improved systolic pressure, mean arterial pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, and dyspnea (P values: .012, .048, <.001, <.001, and .012, respectively). The results of our study support the benefit of using helium:oxygen adjunct with noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients exposed to SM with acute respiratory decompensation.

  18. Defining Nitrogen Kinetics for Air Break in Prebreath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2010-01-01

    Actual tissue nitrogen (N2) kinetics are complex; the uptake and elimination is often approximated with a single half-time compartment in statistical descriptions of denitrogenation [prebreathe(PB)] protocols. Air breaks during PB complicate N2 kinetics. A comparison of symmetrical versus asymmetrical N2 kinetics was performed using the time to onset of hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) as a surrogate for actual venous N2 tension. METHODS: Published results of 12 tests involving 179 hypobaric exposures in altitude chambers after PB, with and without airbreaks, provide the complex protocols from which to model N2 kinetics. DCS survival time for combined control and airbreaks were described with an accelerated log logistic model where N2 uptake and elimination before, during, and after the airbreak was computed with a simple exponential function or a function that changed half-time depending on ambient N2 partial pressure. P1N2-P2 = (Delta)P defined decompression dose for each altitude exposure, where P2 was the test altitude and P1N2 was computed N2 pressure at the beginning of the altitude exposure. RESULTS: The log likelihood (LL) without decompression dose (null model) was -155.6, and improved (best-fit) to -97.2 when dose was defined with a 240 min half-time for both N2 elimination and uptake during the PB. The description of DCS survival time was less precise with asymmetrical N2 kinetics, for example, LL was -98.9 with 240 min half-time elimination and 120 min half-time uptake. CONCLUSION: The statistical regression described survival time mechanistically linked to symmetrical N2 kinetics during PBs that also included airbreaks. The results are data-specific, and additional data may change the conclusion. The regression is useful to compute additional PB time to compensate for an airbreak in PB within the narrow range of tested conditions.

  19. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects of Ammonia Oxidation by Thermophilic Thaumarchaeota from a Geothermal Water Stream

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Sanae; Konno, Uta; Nakahara, Nozomi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tasumi, Eiji; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ammonia oxidation regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature. Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been recently recognized to often outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in various environments, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea is still uncertain due to difficulties in the in situ quantification of ammonia oxidation activity. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrite (δ15NNO2− and δ18ONO2−, respectively) are geochemical tracers for evaluating the sources and the in situ rate of nitrite turnover determined from the activities of nitrification and denitrification; however, the isotope ratios of nitrite from archaeal ammonia oxidation have been characterized only for a few marine species. We first report the isotope effects of ammonia oxidation at 70°C by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota populations composed almost entirely of “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus.” The nitrogen isotope effect of ammonia oxidation varied with ambient pH (25‰ to 32‰) and strongly suggests the oxidation of ammonia, not ammonium. The δ18O value of nitrite produced from ammonia oxidation varied with the δ18O value of water in the medium but was lower than the isotopic equilibrium value in water. Because experiments have shown that the half-life of abiotic oxygen isotope exchange between nitrite and water is longer than 33 h at 70°C and pH ≥6.6, the rate of ammonia oxidation by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota could be estimated using δ18ONO2− in geothermal environments, where the biological nitrite turnover is likely faster than 33 h. This study extended the range of application of nitrite isotopes as a geochemical clock of the ammonia oxidation activity to high-temperature environments. IMPORTANCE Because ammonia oxidation is generally the rate-limiting step in nitrification that regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, it is important to understand the biological and environmental factors underlying

  20. Pulmonary Effects of Eight Hours Underwater Breathing 1.35 ATM Oxygen: 100% Oxygen or 16% Nitrogen, 84% Oxygen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    conditions. The incidences of changes in pulmonary function at any time measured , symptoms during dives, and symptoms on surfacing did not differ between...experienced symptoms, and four had measurable changes in pulmonary function.2 The incidence of pulmonary toxic effects with a single four-hour underwater...exposure to 100% oxygen at this P02 is lower: although 16 of 51 divers reported symptoms, only three of them had measurable changes in pulmonary function

  1. Control of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in liquid by nonthermal plasma jet with controlled surrounding gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Taiki; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    We present the development of a low-frequency nonthermal plasma-jet system, where the surrounding-gas condition of the plasma jet is precisely controlled in open air. By restricting the mixing of the ambient air into the plasma jet, the plasma jet can be selectively changed from a N2 main discharge to an O2 main discharge even in open air. In the plasma-jet system with the controlled surrounding gas, the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is successfully controlled in deionized water: the concentration ratio of NO2 - to H2O2 is tuned from 0 to 0.18, and a high NO2 - concentration ratio is obtained at a N2 gas ratio of 0.80 relative to the total N2/O2 gas mixture in the main discharge gas. We also find that the NO2 - concentration is much higher in the plasma-activated medium than in the plasma-activated deionized water, which is mainly explained by the contribution of amino acids to NO2 - generation in the medium.

  2. 78 FR 47253 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maine; Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Nitrogen Exemption and Ozone Transport Region Restructuring AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... exemption from the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) emissions control requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act... from Stephen D. Page, Director, OAQPS, dated January 14, 2005, entitled ``Guidance on Limiting...

  3. Nitrogen-doped graphene as efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Liangti; Liu, Yong; Baek, Jong-Beom; Dai, Liming

    2010-03-23

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition of methane in the presence of ammonia. The resultant N-graphene was demonstrated to act as a metal-free electrode with a much better electrocatalytic activity, long-term operation stability, and tolerance to crossover effect than platinum for oxygen reduction via a four-electron pathway in alkaline fuel cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of graphene and its derivatives as metal-free catalysts for oxygen reduction. The important role of N-doping to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be applied to various carbon materials for the development of other metal-free efficient ORR catalysts for fuel cell applications, even new catalytic materials for applications beyond fuel cells.

  4. Nitrogen transformation of reclaimed wastewater in a pipeline by oxygen injection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, L E; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez-Sevilla, J; Marrero, M C; Hernández, A

    2009-06-01

    A study of oxygen injection was performed in a completely filled gravity pipe, which is part of the South Tenerife reclaimed wastewater reuse scheme (Spain), in order to inhibit the appearance of anaerobic conditions by a nitrification-denitrification process. The pipe was 0.6 m in diameter and 62 km long and made of cast iron with a concrete inner coating, A high-pressure oxygen injection system was installed at 16 km from the pipe inlet, where severe anaerobic conditions appear. Experiments on oxygen injection were carried out with three different concentrations (7, 15 and 30 mg l(-1) O2). In all experiments, oxygen dissolved properly after injection, and no gas escapes were detected during water transportation. Most oxygen was consumed in the nitrification process, due to the low COD/NH4-N ratio, leading to a maximum production of oxidized nitrogen compounds of 7.5 mg l(-1) NO(x)-N with the 30 mg l(-1) O2 dose. Nitrification occured with nitrite accumulation, attributed to the presence of free ammonia within the range 1.2-1.4 mg l(-). Once the oxygen had been consumed, an apparent half-order denitrification took place, with limitation of biodegradable organic matter. The anoxic conditions led to a complete inhibition of sulphide generation.

  5. A Comparison of the Nitrogen Gas Excess Versus the Fixed Nitrogen Deficit in Two Major Oxygen Deficient Zones of the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devol, A. H.; Chang, B. X.

    2006-12-01

    This study compares the nitrogen gas excesses in the oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) and the Arabian Sea. These are two of the three largest ODZs in the world. In the near absence of oxygen, heterotrophic denitrification is the dominant form of respiration in these regions which, coupled to the sheer vastness of the ODZs, makes them a globally significant sink of marine fixed nitrogen. Thus, understanding how nitrogen is cycled in the ODZs is important to understanding the global nitrogen cycle. We measured profiles of nitrogen gas and argon concentrations through the ODZs of the ETSP and the Arabian Sea in the fall of 2005 and 2004, respectively. Nitrogen gas concentrations were normalized to argon concentrations to eliminate variations due to physical changes in the water mass. Any nitrogen gas in excess of the background nitrogen gas concentration was interpreted to be from denitrification. In the Arabian Sea ODZ, we found the nitrogen gas excess up to 18 uM N. Using stoichiometric relationships of nitrate and phosphate specific to the Arabian Sea, previous workers have estimated the nitrate deficit in the Arabian Sea ODZ to be no more than 12 uM N, which is only two-thirds of the nitrogen gas excess. In the ODZ of the ETSP, we found the nitrogen gas excess to be 15 uM N and the estimated nitrate deficit to be comparable, which suggests that in the ETSP, the nitrogen gas excess may be accounted for by the nitrate deficit. In the Arabian Sea ODZ, however, there is 50% more nitrogen in the excess than can be accounted for by the nitrate deficit. Several explanations are possible for this discrepancy, but probably the most significant is the likely greater contribution of nitrogen fixation to the overall productivity of the Arabian Sea compared to the ETSP. Nitrogen fixing bacteria are known to have an elevated N:P relative to the assumed near-Redfieldian organic matter falling into the ODZ. Nitrogen fixation has been

  6. Metal free nitrogen doped hollow mesoporous graphene-analogous spheres as effective electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Meng, Hui; Xie, Fangyan; Yuan, Xiaoli; Yu, Wendan; Lin, Worong; Ouyang, Wenpeng; Yuan, Dingsheng

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon spheres has been synthesized from mesoporous silica spheres using glycine as carbon and nitrogen precursor. The wall of the spheres is composed by broken graphene. The metal free nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon spheres are proven to be active electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution. A unique advantage of the nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon sphere is its methanol-tolerant property because of the absence of active metal. The catalytic activity is ascribed to the pyridinic-nitrogen formed during pyrolysis and the graphene-like structure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon sphere as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction which is an important reaction in fuel cell. The prepared mesoporous carbon material can also be used as catalyst support and find application both in the anode and cathode of fuel cell.

  7. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  8. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  9. A Simple Experiment To Measure the Content of Oxygen in the Air Using Heated Steel Wool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The typical experiment to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere uses the rusting of steel wool inside a closed volume of air. Two key aspects of this experiment that make possible a successful measurement of the content of oxygen in the air are the use of a closed atmosphere and the use of a chemical reaction that involves the oxidation of…

  10. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  11. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  12. 42 CFR 84.80 - Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. 84...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.80 Interchangeability of oxygen and air prohibited. Approvals shall not... or respirator component which is designed or constructed to permit the interchangeable use of...

  13. Modeling of recovery mechanism of ozone zero phenomenaby adding small amount of nitrogen in atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu

    2013-09-01

    Ozone zero phenomena in an atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges have been one of the major problems during a long time operation of ozone generators. But it is also known that the adding a small amount of nitrogen makes the recover from the ozone zero phenomena. To make clear the mechanism of recovery, authors have been simulated the discharges with using the results of Ref. 3. As a result, the recovery process can be seen and ozone density increased. It is found that the most important species would be nitrogen atoms. The reaction of nitrogen atoms and oxygen molecules makes oxygen atoms which is main precursor species of ozone. This generation of oxygen atoms is effective to increase ozone. The dependence of oxygen atom density (nO) and nitrogen atom density (nN) ratio was examined in this paper. In the condition of low nN/nO ratio case, generation of nitrogen oxide is low, and the quenching of ozone by the nitrogen oxide would be low. But in the high ratio condition, the quenching of ozone by nitrogen oxide would significant. This work was supported by KAKENHI(23560352).

  14. [Research advances in identifying nitrate pollution sources of water environment by using nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes].

    PubMed

    Mao, Wei; Liang, Zhi-wei; Li, Wei; Zhu, Yao; Yanng, Mu-yi; Jia, Chao-jie

    2013-04-01

    Water body' s nitrate pollution has become a common and severe environmental problem. In order to ensure human health and water environment benign evolution, it is of great importance to effectively identify the nitrate pollution sources of water body. Because of the discrepant composition of nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes in different sources of nitrate in water body, nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes can be used to identify the nitrate pollution sources of water environment. This paper introduced the fractionation factors of nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes in the main processes of nitrogen cycling and the composition of these stable isotopes in main nitrate sources, compared the advantages and disadvantages of five pre-treatment methods for analyzing the nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrate, and summarized the research advances in this aspect into three stages, i. e. , using nitrogen stable isotope alone, using nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes simultaneously, and combining with mathematical models. The future research directions regarding the nitrate pollution sources identification of water environment were also discussed.

  15. The laser microprobe: a technique for extracting carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen from solid samples for isotopic measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchi, I. A.; Wright, I. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1986-03-01

    The laser microprobe extraction technique has been adapted for the determination of concentrations and stable isotopic compositions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Initial studies on the distribution of nitrogen in an iron meteorite (Uwet) and a carbonaceous chondrite (Murchison) have been undertaken.

  16. Influence of oxygen on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber growth directly on nichrome foil.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Shinde, Sachin M; Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Takahashi, Chisato; Papon, Remi; Mahyavanshi, Rakesh D; Ishii, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Shinji; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-09-09

    The synthesis of various nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon nanostructures has been significantly explored as an alternative material for energy storage and metal-free catalytic applications. Here, we reveal a direct growth technique of N-doped carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on flexible nichrome (NiCr) foil using melamine as a solid precursor. Highly reactive Cr plays a critical role in the nanofiber growth process on the metal alloy foil in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process. Oxidation of Cr occurs in the presence of oxygen impurities, where Ni nanoparticles are formed on the surface and assist the growth of nanofibers. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) clearly show the transformation process of the NiCr foil surface with annealing in the presence of oxygen impurities. The structural change of NiCr foil assists one-dimensional (1D) CNF growth, rather than the lateral two-dimensional (2D) growth. The incorporation of distinctive graphitic and pyridinic nitrogen in the graphene lattice are observed in the synthesized nanofiber, owing to better nitrogen solubility. Our finding shows an effective approach for the synthesis of highly N-doped carbon nanostructures directly on Cr-based metal alloys for various applications.

  17. Influence of oxygen on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber growth directly on nichrome foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Shinde, Sachin M.; Saufi Rosmi, Mohamad; Takahashi, Chisato; Papon, Remi; Mahyavanshi, Rakesh D.; Ishii, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Shinji; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of various nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon nanostructures has been significantly explored as an alternative material for energy storage and metal-free catalytic applications. Here, we reveal a direct growth technique of N-doped carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on flexible nichrome (NiCr) foil using melamine as a solid precursor. Highly reactive Cr plays a critical role in the nanofiber growth process on the metal alloy foil in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process. Oxidation of Cr occurs in the presence of oxygen impurities, where Ni nanoparticles are formed on the surface and assist the growth of nanofibers. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) clearly show the transformation process of the NiCr foil surface with annealing in the presence of oxygen impurities. The structural change of NiCr foil assists one-dimensional (1D) CNF growth, rather than the lateral two-dimensional (2D) growth. The incorporation of distinctive graphitic and pyridinic nitrogen in the graphene lattice are observed in the synthesized nanofiber, owing to better nitrogen solubility. Our finding shows an effective approach for the synthesis of highly N-doped carbon nanostructures directly on Cr-based metal alloys for various applications.

  18. Depletion of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone cause an imbalance of benthic nitrogen fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, S.; Gier, J.; Treude, T.; Lomnitz, U.; Dengler, M.; Cardich, J.; Dale, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are key regions for fixed nitrogen loss in both the sediments and the water column. During this study, the benthic contribution to N cycling was investigated at ten sites along a depth transect (74-989 m) across the Peruvian OMZ at 12°S. O2 levels were below detection limit down to ~500 m. Benthic fluxes of N2, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, H2S and O2 were measured using benthic landers. Flux measurements on the shelf were made under extreme geochemical conditions consisting of a lack of O2, NO3- and NO2- in the bottom water and elevated seafloor sulphide release. These particular conditions were associated with a large imbalance in the benthic nitrogen cycle. The sediments on the shelf were densely covered by filamentous sulphur bacteria Thioploca, and were identified as major recycling sites for DIN releasing high amounts of NH4+up to 21.2 mmol m-2 d-1 that were far in excess of NH4+ release by ammonification. This difference was attributed to dissimilatory nitrate (or nitrite) reduction to ammonium (DNRA) that was partly being sustained by NO3- stored within the sulphur oxidizing bacteria. Sediments within the core of the OMZ (ca. 200-400 m) also displayed an excess flux of N of 3.5 mmol m-2 d-1 mainly as N2. Benthic nitrogen and sulphur cycling in the Peruvian OMZ appears to be particularly susceptible to bottom water fluctuations in O2, NO3- and NO2-, and may accelerate the onset of pelagic euxinia when NO3- and NO2- become depleted.

  19. 76 FR 48073 - Public Hearing for Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Announcement... titled ``Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur'' which was... ``Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur'' proposed rule should...

  20. Enrichment of nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 in stratospheric nitrous oxide: Observations, experimental results, and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Thomas A.

    The biogeochemical cycling of nitrous oxide plays an important role in atmospheric greenhouse forcing and in the catalytic cycling of stratospheric ozone. The abundances of the light stable isotopes of nitrogen (14N and 15N) and oxygen (16O, 17O, and 18O) are useful tools in monitoring the bacterial and chemical processes which produce N2O as well as the processes in the stratosphere which are responsible for its destruction. This work describes a technique developed for mass spectrometric analysis of directly injected N2O and applies it to a suite of samples collected from the lower stratosphere and to samples collected during photolysis experiments conducted under controlled laboratory conditions. It is shown that the isotopic signature of N2O in the lower stratosphere covaries with N2O concentration in a manner which can best be modeled as a single stage loss process also known as a Rayleigh distillation. The enrichment factors determined from these samples are ɛ = -14.5 per mil for 15N2O and ɛ = -12.9 per mil for N218O. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if the ultraviolet photolytic destruction of N2O could be the source of the large enrichments observed in the stratosphere. Studies of N2O:N2 mixtures irradiated at 193 and 207 nm indeed reveal a significant enrichment of the heavy nitrous oxide isotopomers in the unreacted residual gas. The isotopic signatures resulting from photolysis are also well modeled by an irreversible Rayleigh distillation process, with large enrichment factors of ɛ15,18(207 nm) -48.7, - 46.0 per mil and ɛ15,18(193 nm) = - 18.4, -14.5 per mil. The apparent incompatibility of laboratory results and stratospheric observations is accounted for by the derivation of an 'effective' fractionation factor resulting from diffusive mixing processes. Finally, a simple two box model is developed to re- examine our current understanding of the budget of nitrous oxide. It is seen that fractionation associated with ultraviolet

  1. Charge state of anomalous cosmic-ray nitrogen, oxygen, and neon: SAMPEX observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klecker, B.; Mcnab, M. C.; Blake, J. B.; Hamilton, D. C.; Hovestadt, D.; Kaestle, H.; Looper, M. D.; Mason, G. M.; Mazur, J. E.; Scholer, M.

    1995-01-01

    We report observations of the ionization state of anomalous cosmic-ray (ACR) nitrogen, oxygen, and neon during the period 1992 October to 1993 May, carried out with instrumentation on the Solar, Anomalous & Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft. The low-altitude (510 x 675 km) and high-inclination (82 deg) orbit enables SAMPEX to sample the interplanetary ACR fluxes on each polar pass and then to observe the cutoff of these fluxes by the geomagnetic field at lower latitudes. The arrival time and direction of each ion is recorded by the instruments, allowing detailed calculations of the particle's trajectory through the Earth's magnetic field and thereby placing upper limits on the ionization state of the particles. We find (a) that ACR nitrogen, oxygen, and neon each contain singly ionized particles and (b) that ACR oxygen is predominantly singly ionized with an upper limit of 10% for higher ionization states. These ionization states confirm theories of ACR origin as neutral interstellar material that is singly ionized near the Sun by UV or charge exchange with the solar wind, and is subsequently accelerated in the outer heliosphere.

  2. Enhancing pyridinic nitrogen level in graphene to promote electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiaguang; Wang, Lan; Song, Ranran; Yanga, Shubin

    2016-02-01

    We develop an efficient approach to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene with tunable pyridinic nitrogen levels (from 1.1 to 1.8 at.%), abundant in-plane holes and high surface areas (623 m2 g-1) via a hydrothermal treatment of graphene oxide with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent annealing under ammonia gas. It is found that the chemical etching is beneficial to the formation of pyridinic nitrogen in graphene during the nitrogen-doping process, which is crucial to enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of graphene for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Hence, the optimized NG exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, more positive onset potential than Pt-C (-0.08 V versus -0.09 V), good durability, and high selectivity when it is employed as a metal-free catalyst for ORR. This approach may uncover a mechanism in escalation of pyridinic N atoms doped on the graphene basal edge and provide an efficient platform for the synthesis of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene with tunable heteroatom content for broad applications.

  3. Enhanced nitrogen removal in constructed wetlands: effects of dissolved oxygen and step-feeding.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengmin; Lu, Lun; Zheng, Xiang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Liang, Shuang; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Xiuwen

    2014-10-01

    Four horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSFCWs), named HSFCW1 (three-stage, without step-feeding), HSFCW2 (three-stage, with step-feeding), HSFCW3 (five-stage, without step-feeding) and HSFCW4 (five-stage, with step-feeding) were designed to investigate the effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and step-feeding on nitrogen removal. High removal of 90.9% COD, 99.1% ammonium nitrogen and 88.1% total nitrogen (TN) were obtained simultaneously in HSFCW4 compared with HSFCW1-3. The excellent TN removal of HSFCW4 was due to artificial aeration provided sufficient DO for nitrification and the favorable anoxic environment created for denitrification. Step-feeding was a crucial factor because it provided sufficient carbon source (high COD: nitrate ratio of 14.3) for the denitrification process. Microbial activities and microbial abundance in HSFCW4 was found to be influenced by DO distribution and step-feeding, and thus improve TN removal. These results suggest that artificial aeration combined with step-feeding could achieve high nitrogen removal in HSFCWs.

  4. Coupling of oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrocarbon species in the photochemistry of Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrijevic, M.; Hébrard, E.; Loison, J. C.; Hickson, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of recent detections of water by Herschel/HIFI-PACS and Cassini/CIRS suggest for a steep gradient of the water profile in the lower stratosphere of Titan's atmosphere (Cottini, V., Nixon, C.A., Jennings, D.E., Anderson, C.M., Gorius, N., Bjoraker, G.L., Coustenis, A., Teanby, N.A., Achterberg, R.K., Béezard, B., de Kok, R., Lellouch, E., Irwin, P.G.J., Flasar, F.M., Bampasidis, G. [2012]. Icarus 220, 855-862; Moreno, R., Lellouch, E., Lara, L.M., Feuchtgruber, H., Rengel, M., Hartogh, P., Courtin, R. [2012]. Icarus 221, 753-767). This result provides a good opportunity to better understand the origin of oxygen compounds. However, the current photochemical models use an incomplete oxygen chemical scheme. In the present work, we improve the photochemistry of oxygen and introduce in particular a coupling between hydrocarbon, oxygen and nitrogen chemistries. Through the use of several different scenarios, we show that some oxygen compound abundances are sensitive to the nature of oxygen atoms (O+, OH and H2O) and the source of the flux (micrometeorites ablation or Enceladus' plume activity). Our model also predicts the presence of new and as yet undetected compounds such as NO (nitric oxide), HNO (nitrosyl hydride), HNCO (isocyanic acid) and N2O (nitrous oxide). Their future putative detection will give valuable constraints to discriminate between the different hypotheses for the nature and the source of oxygen compounds in the atmosphere of Titan. Through the use of a Monte Carlo-based uncertainty propagation study and global sensitivity analysis, we identify the key reactions that should be studied in priority to improve coupled photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere.

  5. Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the Neuse River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, M. C.; Knightes, C. D.; Dennis, R. L.; Cooter, E. J.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated impacts of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) NOx emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA from 1990 to 2020. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system were used. CMAQ simulated atmospheric chemical transport and nitrogen deposition. This data was entered into SWAT which simulated watershed hydrology and water quality. Two cases were investigated: one that incorporates CAAA regulatory emissions controls in CMAQ simulation (with) and a second case that does not (without). SWAT model results forecasted a 70% decrease in inorganic nitrogen discharge from the Little River watershed and a 50% decrease for the Nahunta watershed by 2020 under the emission control (with) scenario. Denitrification and plant nitrogen uptake played important roles in nitrogen discharge from each watershed. The nitrogen discharge response time following a change in atmospheric nitrogen deposition was 4 years for the Nahunta watershed and 2 years for the Little River watershed. The longer response time for Nahunta is primarily due to a higher percentage of soybean land cover (22.5% [Nahunta]; 1.6% [Little River]). Agricultural land covers had varied nitrogen response times to changes in atmospheric deposition, particularly for soybean, hay and corn. The studied watersheds retained >80% of all nitrogen delivered by agriculture fertilization, biological fixation and atmospheric deposition.

  6. Boron- and Nitrogen-Substituted Graphene Nanoribbons as Efficient Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yongji; Fei, Huilong; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Shubin; Ye, Gonglan; Liu, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Lou, Jun; Vajtai, Robert; Yakobson, Boris I.; Tour, James M.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2015-02-02

    Here, we show that nanoribbons of boron- and nitrogen-substituted graphene can be used as efficient electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Optimally doped graphene nanoribbons made into three-dimensional porous constructs exhibit the highest onset and half-wave potentials among the reported metal-free catalysts for this reaction and show superior performance compared to commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover, this catalyst possesses high kinetic current density and four-electron transfer pathway with low hydrogen peroxide yield during the reaction. Finally, first-principles calculations suggest that such excellent electrocatalytic properties originate from the abundant edges of boron- and nitrogen-codoped graphene nanoribbons, which significantly reduce the energy barriers of the rate-determining steps of the ORR reaction.

  7. Boron- and Nitrogen-Substituted Graphene Nanoribbons as Efficient Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Gong, Yongji; Fei, Huilong; Zou, Xiaolong; ...

    2015-02-02

    Here, we show that nanoribbons of boron- and nitrogen-substituted graphene can be used as efficient electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Optimally doped graphene nanoribbons made into three-dimensional porous constructs exhibit the highest onset and half-wave potentials among the reported metal-free catalysts for this reaction and show superior performance compared to commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover, this catalyst possesses high kinetic current density and four-electron transfer pathway with low hydrogen peroxide yield during the reaction. Finally, first-principles calculations suggest that such excellent electrocatalytic properties originate from the abundant edges of boron- and nitrogen-codoped graphene nanoribbons, which significantly reduce the energymore » barriers of the rate-determining steps of the ORR reaction.« less

  8. Assessment of nitrogen and oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrification and its expression in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L; Buchwald, Carolyn; Santoro, Alyson E; Frame, Caitlin

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification is a microbially-catalyzed process whereby ammonia (NH(3)) is oxidized to nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and subsequently to nitrate (NO(3)(-)). It is also responsible for production of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), a climatically important greenhouse gas. Because the microbes responsible for nitrification are primarily autotrophic, nitrification provides a unique link between the carbon and nitrogen cycles. Nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios have provided insights into where nitrification contributes to the availability of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-), and where it constitutes a significant source of N(2)O. This chapter describes methods for determining kinetic isotope effects involved with ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation, the two independent steps in the nitrification process, and their expression in the marine environment. It also outlines some remaining questions and issues related to isotopic fractionation during nitrification.

  9. Elementary reactions of nitrogen and oxygen with boron and carbon at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Cynn, H.; Nicol, M.F.

    1997-08-01

    The direct elementary reactions among the first and second row elements often yield novel super hard, high energy density, and wide band-gap optical materials. The reactions of oxygen and nitrogen with boron and carbon have been investigated at high pressures and temperatures by using an integrated technique of diamond-anvil cell, laser-heating, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy. A wide range of products has been synthesized and characterized in-situ at high pressures, including {alpha}-CO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}0{sub 3}-I,B{sub 2}0{sub 3}-II, c-BN, h-BN, h{sup `}-B, amorphous carbon nitrides. The elementary reactions occur exothermically and result in highly polycrystallized products with an exception in carbon-nitrogen reactions. The implication of the elementary reactions to energetic materials applications is discussed.

  10. Effects of Air/Nitrogen Cure on An Acetylene Terminated Quinoxaline Thermoset System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    AFWAL-TR-81-401 2 FILE Copy EFFECTS OF AIR/NITROGEN CURE ON AN ACETYLENE TERMINATED QUINOXALINE THERMOSET SYSTEM Polymer Branch Nonmetallic Materials...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER AFWAL-TR- 81-4012 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Effects of Air/Nitrogen Cure on an Acetylene ...81-4012 SECTION I INTRODUCTION The Air Force has an interest in the development of acetylene - terminated (AT) resins as a new technology to form high

  11. Chemistry induced by energetic ions in water ice mixed with molecular nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boduch, Ph.; Domaracka, A.; Fulvio, D.; Langlinay, T.; Lv, X. Y.; Palumbo, M. E.; Rothard, H.; Strazzulla, G.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Several molecular species have been observed as frozen gases in cold environments such as grains in the interstellar/circumstellar medium or icy objects in the outer solar system. Because N2 and O2 are homonuclear, symmetric molecules are not easily observed. It is therefore relevant to find indirect methods to prove their presence from astronomical observations. Aims: Here we investigate one of the possible indirect methods, namely the formation of specific molecules by cosmic ion bombardment of ices in astrophysical environments that contain O2 and N2. The observation of these molecules in astronomical environments could act as a trojan horse to detect the presence of frozen molecular oxygen and/or nitrogen. Methods: We have conducted ion bombardment experiments of frozen O2, H2O and their mixtures with N2 at the laboratories of CIMAP-GANIL at Caen (France) and LASp at Catania (Italy). Different ions (13C2+, Ar2+ and H+) and energies (30-200 keV) have been used. Results: We have found that 13CO2 is formed when carbon ions are implanted in ices containing H2O and/or O2. Ozone and nitrogen oxides (NO, N2O, NO2) are formed in the studied ices containing O2 and N2 with different relative abundances. Conclusions: We suggest that ozone and nitrogen oxides are present and have to be searched for in some specific environments such as dense clouds in the interstellar medium and the surfaces of Pluto, Charon and Triton. Their observation could demonstrate the presence of molecular oxygen and/or nitrogen. A possible interest for the observations of atmospheres in exo-planetary objects is also discussed.

  12. Adsorption of aqueous metal ions on oxygen and nitrogen functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, B; Thomas, K M

    2005-04-26

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of two series of oxygen and nitrogen functionalized activated carbons were investigated. These series were a low nitrogen content (approximately 1 wt % daf) carbon series derived from coconut shell and a high nitrogen content (approximately 8 wt % daf) carbon series derived from polyacrylonitrile. In both series, the oxygen contents were varied over the range approximately 2-22 wt % daf. The porous structures of the functionalized activated carbons were characterized using N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) adsorption. Only minor changes in the porous structure were observed in both series. This allowed the effect of changes in functional group concentrations on metal ion adsorption to be studied without major influences due to differences in porous structure characteristics. The surface group characteristics were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, acid/base titrations, and measurement of the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)). The adsorption of aqueous metal ion species, M(2+)(aq), on acidic oxygen functional group sites mainly involves an ion exchange mechanism. The ratios of protons displaced to the amount of M(2+)(aq) metal species adsorbed have a linear relationship for the carbons with pH(PZC) < or = 4.15. Hydrolysis of metal species in solution may affect the adsorption of metal ion species and displacement of protons. In the case of basic carbons, both protons and metal ions are adsorbed on the carbons. The complex nature of competitive adsorption between the proton and metal ion species and the amphoteric character of carbon surfaces are discussed in relation to the mechanism of adsorption.

  13. Effect of fuel-air-ratio nonuniformity on emissions of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1981-01-01

    The inlet fuel-air ratio nonuniformity is studied to deterine how nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions are affected. An increase in NOx emissions with increased fuel-air ratio nonuniformity for average equivalence ratios less than 0.7 and a decrease in NOx emissions for average equivalence ratios near stoichiometric is predicted. The degree of uniformityy of fuel-air ratio profiles that is necessary to achieve NOx emissions goals for actual engines that use lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion systems is determined.

  14. Fiber Optic Raman Sensor to Monitor Concentration Ratio of Nitrogen and Oxygen in a Cryogenic Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Kalluru, Rajamohan R.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.; SaintCyr, William

    2007-01-01

    A spontaneous Raman scattering optical fiber sensor is developed for a specific need of NASA/SSC for long-term detection and monitoring of the quality of liquid oxygen (LOX) in the delivery line during ground testing of rocket engines. The sensor performance was tested in the laboratory and with different excitation light sources. To evaluate the sensor performance with different excitation light sources for the LOX quality application, we have used the various mixtures of liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen as samples. The study of the sensor performance shows that this sensor offers a great deal of flexibility and provides a cost effective solution for the application. However, an improved system response time is needed for the real-time, quantitative monitoring of the quality of cryogenic fluids in harsh environment.

  15. Analysis of On-Board Oxygen and Nitrogen Generation Systems for Surface Vessels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    22 3.2 Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Zeolite Molecular Sieves . . . . . . . . .. 25 3.3 Overview of System Components...Basic Element of a 4A Type Synthetic Zeolite . . . 27 10 a Simplified Version of Rotary Valve . ....... 35 11 a-f Comparison Among Oxygen and...carbo-gel, carbonex) . Framework silicates: Zeolites (e.g. Na-Al silicates) In both cases, pressurized air (20-100 psi depending on the appli- cation

  16. Photoluminescence Characteristics of Pulsed Laser Deposited ZnO Thin Films Grown in Nitrogen/Oxygen Ambients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Cui, J. B.; Soo, Y. C.; Kandel, H.; Chen, T. P.; Daghlian, C. P.

    2009-03-01

    ZnO thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition using a Zn target in different atmospheres. The samples were characterized by SEM, XRD, EDX, and temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The growth conditions were varied sequentially from a pure oxygen to a pure nitrogen atmosphere, and the resulting changes of the material properties were investigated. The presence of nitrogen during growth was found to have a strong impact on the materials. Samples grown with higher nitrogen concentrations showed weak PL characteristics at room temperature as well as a small temperature dependence of the near band edge emission. At temperatures below 40 K, a sharp and pronounced emission peak was present at 3.362 eV. In an attempt to understand the PL characteristics, the samples were annealed in both pure oxygen and pure nitrogen environments at 600 C. The samples grown with large nitrogen ratios exhibited a strong dependence on the annealing atmosphere; those annealed in nitrogen showed a strong increase in emissions in the 3.362 eV range compared to the same samples annealed in oxygen. In addition, the defect emissions of the samples were strongly affected by the presence of nitrogen during annealing. The possible role of nitrogen in ZnO growth and annealing is discussed.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS Pt. 50, App. S Appendix S to Part 50—Interpretation of the Primary... be submitted to EPA's Air Quality System (AQS), or otherwise available to EPA, meeting...

  18. Oxygen Limited Bioreactors System For Nitrogen Removal Using Immobilized Mix Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, B. K.; Sumino, T.; Saiki, Y.; Kazama, F.

    2005-12-01

    Recently nutrients concentrations especially nitrogen in natural water is alarming in the world wide. Most of the effort is being done on the removal of high concentration of nitrogen especially from the wastewater treatment plants. The removal efficiency is targeted in all considering the effluent discharge standard set by the national environment agency. In many cases, it does not meet the required standard and receiving water is being polluted. Eutrophication in natural water bodies has been reported even if the nitrogen concentration is low and self purification of natural systems itself is not sufficient to remove the nitrogen due to complex phenomenon. In order to recover the pristine water environment, it is very essential to explore bioreactor systems for natural water systems using immobilized mix culture. Microorganism were entrapped in Polyethylene glycol (PEG) prepolymer gel and cut into 3mm cubic immobilized pellets. Four laboratory scale micro bio-reactors having 0.1 L volumes were packed with immobilized pellets with 50% compact ratio. RUN1, RUN2, RUN3 and RUN4 were packed with immobilized pellets from reservoirs sediments, activated sludge (AS), mixed of AS, AG and biodegradable plastic and anaerobic granules (AG) respectively. Water from Shiokawa Reservoirs was feed to all reactors with supplemental ammonia and nitrite nitrogen as specified in the results and discussions. The reactors were operated dark incubated room in continuous flow mode with hydraulic retention time of 12 hours under oxygen limiting condition. Ammonium, nitrate nitrite nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were measured as described in APWA and AWWA (1998). Laboratory scale four bioreactors containing different combination of immobilized cell were monitored for 218 days. Influent NH4+-N and NO2--N concentration were 2.27±0.43 and 2.05±0.41 mg/l respectively. Average dissolved oxygen concentration and pH in the reactors were 0.40-2.5 mg/l and pH 6

  19. Synergistic Effect of Nitrogen in Cobalt Nitride and Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Carbon Spheres for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xing; Liu, Lin; Jiang, Yu; Wang, Xinde; Wang, Lei; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jian-guo; Su, Dang S.

    2015-06-15

    The need for inexpensive and high-activity oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts has attracted considerable research interest over the past years. Here we report a novel hybrid that contains cobalt nitride/nitrogen-rich hollow carbon spheres (CoxN/NHCS) as a high-performance catalyst for ORR. The CoxN nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed and confined in the hollow NHCS shell. The performance of the resulting CoxN/NHCS hybrid was comparable with that of a commercial Pt/C at the same catalyst loading toward ORR, but the mass activity of the former was 5.7 times better than that of the latter. The nitrogen in both CoxN and NHCS, especially CoxN, could weaken the adsorption of reaction intermediates (O and OOH), which follows the favourable reaction pathway on CoxN/NHCS according to the DFT-calculated Gibbs free energy diagrams. Our results demonstrated a new strategy for designing and developing inexpensive, non-precious metal electrocatalysts for next-generation fuels. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the National Basic Research Program (973 program, No. 2013CB733501) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21306169, 21101137, 21136001, 21176221 and 91334013). Dr. D. Mei is supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  20. Thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of gaseous products resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Results of calculations to determine thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of combustion product gases are presented. The product gases are those resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures. The oxygen content of products resulting from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures was similiar to that of air; however, the oxygen contained in products of methane-oxygen combustion ranged from 20 percent by volume to zero for stoichiometric combustion. Calculations were made for products of reactant mixtures with fuel percentages, by mass, of 7.5 to 20. Results are presented for specific mixtures for a range of pressures varying from 0.0001 to 1,000 atm and for temperatures ranging from 200 to 3,800 K.

  1. MnO2 Nanofilms on Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Graphene Spheres as a High-Performance Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiangmin; Xu, Jiaoxing; Wu, Chuxin; Zhang, Jianshuo; Guan, Lunhui

    2016-12-28

    Platinum is commonly chosen as an electrocatalyst used for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we report an active catalyst composed of MnO2 nanofilms grown directly on nitrogen-doped hollow graphene spheres, which exhibits high activity toward ORR with positive onset potential (0.94 V vs RHE), large current density (5.2 mA cm(-2)), and perfect stability. Significantly, when it was used as catalyst for air electrode, a zinc-air battery exhibited a high power density (82 mW cm(-2)) and specific capacities (744 mA h g(-1)) comparable to that with Pt/C (20 wt %) as air cathode. The enhanced activity is ascribed to the synergistic interaction between MnO2 and the doped hollow carbon nanomaterials. This easy and cheap method paves a way of synthesizing high-performance electrocatalysts for ORR.

  2. Bottom-up synthesis of high-performance nitrogen-enriched transition metal/graphene oxygen reduction electrocatalysts both in alkaline and acidic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Qingxue; Gao, Qingwen; Su, Qi; Liang, Yanyu; Wang, Yuxi; Yang, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Oxygen reduction electrocatalysts with low cost and excellent performance are urgently required for large-scale application in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Though nitrogen-enriched transition metal/graphene hybrids (N-TM/G, TM = Fe, Co, and Ni and related compounds) have been developed as novel substitutes for precious metal catalysts (PMCs) towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), a significant challenge still remains for simple and efficient synthesis of N-TM/G catalysts with satisfactory electrocatalytic behavior. Herein, we demonstrate a universal bottom-up strategy for efficient fabrication of strongly-coupled N-TM/G catalysts. This strategy is implemented via direct polymerization of transition metal phthalocyanine (TMPc) in the two-dimensional confined space of in situ generated g-C3N4 and a subsequent pyrolysis. Such a space-confined bottom-up synthesis route successfully constructs a strongly-coupled triple junction of transition metal-graphitic carbon-nitrogen-doped graphene (TM-GC-NG) with extensive controllability over the specific surface area, nitrogen content/types as well as the states of metal. As a result, the optimized N-Fe/G materials have promising potential as high-performance NPMCs towards ORR both in alkaline and acidic solution.Oxygen reduction electrocatalysts with low cost and excellent performance are urgently required for large-scale application in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Though nitrogen-enriched transition metal/graphene hybrids (N-TM/G, TM = Fe, Co, and Ni and related compounds) have been developed as novel substitutes for precious metal catalysts (PMCs) towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), a significant challenge still remains for simple and efficient synthesis of N-TM/G catalysts with satisfactory electrocatalytic behavior. Herein, we demonstrate a universal bottom-up strategy for efficient fabrication of strongly-coupled N-TM/G catalysts. This strategy is implemented via direct polymerization of transition

  3. Influence of chemical oxygen demand/total Kjeldahl nitrogen ratio and sludge age on nitrification of nitrogenous wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Gupta, S K

    2004-01-01

    Four laboratory-scale biological nitrification units (influent total Kjeldahl nitrogen [TKN] = 1002 to 1062 mg/L) were operated at chemical oxygen demand (COD)/TKN ratios of approximately 0.5, 1.0,15, and 2.0 and at three different sludge ages of 30, 20, and 10 days to study the influence of COD/TKN, sludge age, COD loading, and TKN loading on nitrification and nitrifiers. Percent nitrification was found to increase with decreases in COD/TKN and increases in sludge age. The average nitrifier concentration increased from 460 mg/L at a COD/TKN of 2.22 and a sludge age of 10 days to 706 mg/L at a COD/TKN of 0.676 and a sludge age of 30 days. The nitrifier fraction was found to be higher at a lower COD/TKN and lower at a higher COD/TKN. The nitrifier fraction increased with the decrease in sludge age and COD loadings and the increase in TKN loadings. The effect of sludge age on the nitrifier fraction was amplified at a COD/ TKN of approximately 0.5 rather than at approximately 2.0. The nitrification rate (kilograms TKN oxidized per kilograms nitrifiers per day) was shown to be dependent on COD/TKN and sludge age. The activity performed by Nitrobacter was affected at all COD/TKN ratios studied as well as at a sludge age of 10 days. This was manifested by the accumulation of high levels of nitrite-nitrogen in the nitrified effluent. The presence of heterotrophs did not affect nitrification rates and the growth of nitrifiers, which were found to be beneficial. High sludge age and COD loadings resulted in a higher sludge volume index of more than 200 mL/g mixed liquor suspended solids. Microscopic examination showed filamentous structure of sludge under these conditions. It is concluded from the investigations that a sludge age of 30 days and a COD/TKN of approximately 1.0 are optimal to yield maximum nitrification and nitrifier growth rates for treating high-strength nitrogenous wastewater.

  4. Raman spectra of single walled carbon nanotubes at high temperatures: pretreating samples in a nitrogen atmosphere improves their thermal stability in air.

    PubMed

    Molina-Duarte, J; Espinosa-Vega, L I; Rodríguez, A G; Guirado-López, R A

    2017-03-08

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study dedicated to analyzing the structural stability and chemical reactivity of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the presence of air and nitrogen atmospheres in the temperature interval of 300-1000 K. The temperature dependence of the radial breathing mode (RBM) region of the Raman spectra is irreversible in the presence of air, but it is reversible up to 1000 K in a nitrogen atmosphere. Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that irreversibility is due to partial degradation of SWCNTs produced by dissociative chemical adsorption of molecular oxygen on intrinsic defects of the nanotube surface. Oxygen partially opens the nanotubes forming semi-tubes with a non-uniform diameter distribution observed by Raman scattering. In contrast, heating CNTs in a nitrogen atmosphere seems to lead to the formation of nitrogen-doped SWCNTs. Our DFT calculations indicate that in general the most common types of nitrogen doping (e.g., pyridinic, pyrrolic, and substitutional) modify the location of the RBM frequency, leading also to frequency shifts and intensity changes of the surrounding modes. However, by performing a systematic comparison between calculated and measured spectra we have been able to infer the possible adsorbed configurations adopted by N species on the nanotube surface. Interestingly, by allowing previously nitrogen-exposed SWCNTs to interact with air at different temperatures (up to 1000 K) we note that the RBM region remains nearly unperturbed, defining thus our nitrogen-pretreated SWCNTs as more appropriate carbon nanostructures for high temperature applications in realistic environments. We believe that we have implemented a post-growth heat-treatment process that improves the stability of carbon nanotubes preserving their diameter and inducing a defect-healing process of the carbon wall.

  5. Oxygen Response of the Wine Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 Grown under Carbon-Sufficient, Nitrogen-Limited Enological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Aceituno, Felipe F.; Orellana, Marcelo; Torres, Jorge; Mendoza, Sebastián; Slater, Alex W.; Melo, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Discrete additions of oxygen play a critical role in alcoholic fermentation. However, few studies have quantitated the fate of dissolved oxygen and its impact on wine yeast cell physiology under enological conditions. We simulated the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations that occur after a pump-over during the winemaking process by sparging nitrogen-limited continuous cultures with oxygen-nitrogen gaseous mixtures. When the dissolved oxygen concentration increased from 1.2 to 2.7 μM, yeast cells changed from a fully fermentative to a mixed respirofermentative metabolism. This transition is characterized by a switch in the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and an activation of NADH shuttling from the cytosol to mitochondria. Nevertheless, fermentative ethanol production remained the major cytosolic NADH sink under all oxygen conditions, suggesting that the limitation of mitochondrial NADH reoxidation is the major cause of the Crabtree effect. This is reinforced by the induction of several key respiratory genes by oxygen, despite the high sugar concentration, indicating that oxygen overrides glucose repression. Genes associated with other processes, such as proline uptake, cell wall remodeling, and oxidative stress, were also significantly affected by oxygen. The results of this study indicate that respiration is responsible for a substantial part of the oxygen response in yeast cells during alcoholic fermentation. This information will facilitate the development of temporal oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations. PMID:23001663

  6. Method and apparatus for monitoring oxygen partial pressure in air masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Mark E. (Inventor); Pettit, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring an oxygen partial pressure in an air mask and providing a tactile warning to the user. The oxygen partial pressure in the air mask is detected using an electrochemical sensor, the output signal from which is provided to a comparator. The comparator compares the output signal with a preset reference value or range of values representing acceptable oxygen partial pressures. If the output signal is different than the reference value or outside the range of values, the air mask is vibrated by a vibrating motor to alert the user to a potentially hypoxic condition.

  7. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances in main-sequence stars. II 20 F and G stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, R. E. S.; Tomkin, J.; Lambert, D. L.

    1981-11-01

    High-resolution Reticon spectra of red and near-infrared C I, N I, and O I lines have been analyzed to determine C, N, and O abundances in a sample of 20 F and G main-sequence stars. Their iron abundances, which have been determined from analysis of additional Reticon spectra of red Fe I lines, cover the Fe/H range from -0.9 to 0.4. Sulfur abundances have also been obtained. It is found that the variations of the carbon and sulfur abundances closely follow those of iron. The oxygen abundance varies much more slowly than iron (O/Fe = 0.48 (+ or - 0.07) Fe/H). This result confirms an earlier conclusion that oxygen is overabundant in more metal-deficient stars. The behavior of the nitrogen abundance appears to be similar to that of iron (N/Fe = 0.0 + or - 0.2). However, the unavailability of nitrogen abundances for the most metal-deficient stars in the sample makes this result less certain than the results for the other elements. These results are discussed in the light of current theories of stellar nucleosynthesis of the elements.

  8. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli--Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Wingreen, Ned s; Rabitz, Herschel A; Xu, Yifan

    2012-10-22

    A key challenge for living systems is balancing utilization of multiple elemental nutrients, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, whose availability is subject to environmental fluctuations. As growth can be limited by the scarcity of any one nutrient, the rate at which each nutrient is assimilated must be sensitive not only to its own availability, but also to that of other nutrients. Remarkably, across diverse nutrient conditions, E. coli grows nearly optimally, balancing effectively the conversion of carbon into energy versus biomass. To investigate the link between the metabolism of different nutrients, we quantified metabolic responses to nutrient perturbations using LC-MS based metabolomics and built differential equation models that bridge multiple nutrient systems. We discovered that the carbonaceous substrate of nitrogen assimilation, -ketoglutarate, directly inhibits glucose uptake and that the upstream glycolytic metabolite, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, ultrasensitively regulates anaplerosis to allow rapid adaptation to changing carbon availability. We also showed that NADH controls the metabolic response to changing oxygen levels. Our findings support a general mechanism for nutrient integration: limitation for a nutrient other than carbon leads to build-up of the most closely related product of carbon metabolism, which in turn feedback inhibits further carbon uptake.

  9. Modelling of operation of a lithium-air battery with ambient air and oxygen-selective membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahapatsombut, Ukrit; Cheng, Hua; Scott, Keith

    2014-03-01

    A macro-homogeneous model has been developed to evaluate the impact of replacing pure oxygen with ambient air on the performance of a rechargeable non-aqueous Li-air battery. The model exhibits a significant reduction in discharge capacity, e.g. from 1240 to 226 mAh gcarbon-1 at 0.05 mA cm-2 when using ambient air rather than pure oxygen. The model correlates the relationship between the performance and electrolyte decomposition and formation of discharge products (such as Li2O2 and Li2CO3) under ambient air conditions. The model predicts a great benefit of using an oxygen-selective membrane on increasing capacity. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model.

  10. Method of Separating Oxygen From Spacecraft Cabin Air to Enable Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Extravehicular activities (EVAs) require high-pressure, high-purity oxygen. Shuttle EVAs use oxygen that is stored and transported as a cryogenic fluid. EVAs on the International Space Station (ISS) presently use the Shuttle cryo O2, which is transported to the ISS using a transfer hose. The fluid is compressed to elevated pressures and stored as a high-pressure gas. With the retirement of the shuttle, NASA has been searching for ways to deliver oxygen to fill the highpressure oxygen tanks on the ISS. A method was developed using low-pressure oxygen generated onboard the ISS and released into ISS cabin air, filtering the oxygen from ISS cabin air using a pressure swing absorber to generate a low-pressure (high-purity) oxygen stream, compressing the oxygen with a mechanical compressor, and transferring the high-pressure, high-purity oxygen to ISS storage tanks. The pressure swing absorber (PSA) can be either a two-stage device, or a single-stage device, depending on the type of sorbent used. The key is to produce a stream with oxygen purity greater than 99.5 percent. The separator can be a PSA device, or a VPSA device (that uses both vacuum and pressure for the gas separation). The compressor is a multi-stage mechanical compressor. If the gas flow rates are on the order of 5 to 10 lb (.2.3 to 4.6 kg) per day, the compressor can be relatively small [3 16 16 in. (.8 41 41 cm)]. Any spacecraft system, or other remote location that has a supply of lowpressure oxygen, a method of separating oxygen from cabin air, and a method of compressing the enriched oxygen stream, has the possibility of having a regenerable supply of highpressure, high-purity oxygen that is compact, simple, and safe. If cabin air is modified so there is very little argon, the separator can be smaller, simpler, and use less power.

  11. A strategy for oxygen conditioning at high altitude: comparison with air conditioning.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2015-09-15

    Large numbers of people live or work at high altitude, and many visit to trek or ski. The inevitable hypoxia impairs physical working capacity, and at higher altitudes there is also cognitive impairment. Twenty years ago oxygen enrichment of room air was introduced to reduce the hypoxia, and this is now used in dormitories, hotels, mines, and telescopes. However, recent advances in technology now allow large amounts of oxygen to be obtained from air or cryogenic oxygen sources. As a result it is now feasible to oxygenate large buildings and even institutions such as hospitals. An analogy can be drawn between air conditioning that has improved the living and working conditions of millions of people who live in hot climates and oxygen conditioning that can do the same at high altitude. Oxygen conditioning is similar to air conditioning except that instead of cooling the air, the oxygen concentration is raised, thus reducing the equivalent altitude. Oxygen conditioning on a large scale could transform living and working conditions at high altitude, where it could be valuable in homes, hospitals, schools, dormitories, company headquarters, banks, and legislative settings.

  12. Meta-omic signatures of microbial metal and nitrogen cycling in marine oxygen minimum zones

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Jennifer B.; Kretz, Cecilia B.; Ganesh, Sangita; Ranjan, Piyush; Seston, Sherry L.; Buck, Kristen N.; Landing, William M.; Morton, Peter L.; Moffett, James W.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.; Vergin, Kevin L.; Stewart, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) are essential cofactors for microbial metalloenzymes, but little is known about the metalloenyzme inventory of anaerobic marine microbial communities despite their importance to the nitrogen cycle. We compared dissolved O2, NO3−, NO2−, Fe and Cu concentrations with nucleic acid sequences encoding Fe and Cu-binding proteins in 21 metagenomes and 9 metatranscriptomes from Eastern Tropical North and South Pacific oxygen minimum zones and 7 metagenomes from the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station. Dissolved Fe concentrations increased sharply at upper oxic-anoxic transition zones, with the highest Fe:Cu molar ratio (1.8) occurring at the anoxic core of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific oxygen minimum zone and matching the predicted maximum ratio based on data from diverse ocean sites. The relative abundance of genes encoding Fe-binding proteins was negatively correlated with O2, driven by significant increases in genes encoding Fe-proteins involved in dissimilatory nitrogen metabolisms under anoxia. Transcripts encoding cytochrome c oxidase, the Fe- and Cu-containing terminal reductase in aerobic respiration, were positively correlated with O2 content. A comparison of the taxonomy of genes encoding Fe- and Cu-binding vs. bulk proteins in OMZs revealed that Planctomycetes represented a higher percentage of Fe genes while Thaumarchaeota represented a higher percentage of Cu genes, particularly at oxyclines. These results are broadly consistent with higher relative abundance of genes encoding Fe-proteins in the genome of a marine planctomycete vs. higher relative abundance of genes encoding Cu-proteins in the genome of a marine thaumarchaeote. These findings highlight the importance of metalloenzymes for microbial processes in oxygen minimum zones and suggest preferential Cu use in oxic habitats with Cu > Fe vs. preferential Fe use in anoxic niches with Fe > Cu. PMID:26441925

  13. LIFE Chamber Chemical Equilibrium Simulations with Additive Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, J A; Simon, A J

    2009-09-03

    In order to enable continuous operation of a Laser Inertial confinement Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine, the material (fill-gas and debris) in the fusion chamber must be carefully managed. The chamber chemical equilibrium compositions for post-shot mixtures are evaluated to determine what compounds will be formed at temperatures 300-5000K. It is desired to know if carbon and or lead will deposit on the walls of the chamber, and if so: at what temperature, and what elements can be added to prevent this from happening. The simulation was conducted using the chemical equilibrium solver Cantera with a Matlab front-end. Solutions were obtained by running equilibrations at constant temperature and constant specific volume over the specified range of temperatures. It was found that if nothing is done, carbon will deposit on the walls once it cools to below 2138K, and lead below 838K. Three solutions to capture the carbon were found: adding pure oxygen, hydrogen/nitrogen combo, and adding pure nitrogen. The best of these was the addition of oxygen which would readily form CO at around 4000K. To determine the temperature at which carbon would deposit on the walls, temperature solutions to evaporation rate equations needed to be found. To determine how much carbon or any species was in the chamber at a given time, chamber flushing equations needed to be developed. Major concerns are deposition of carbon and/or oxygen on the tungsten walls forming tungsten oxides or tungsten carbide which could cause embrittlement and cause failure of the first wall. Further research is needed.

  14. A Study of Oxidation of Hydrogen Based on Flashback of Hydrogen-Oxygen-Nitrogen Burner Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, Burton D.

    1959-01-01

    The flashback of hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen flames was studied as a function of pressure, burner diameter, equivalence ratio, and oxidant strength. The results were treated on the assumption that the product of the critical boundary velocity gradient for flashback and the initial concentration of that reactant which is not in excess is proportional to a mean reaction rate associated with the flame zone. It was further assumed that this reaction rate can be expressed in terms of initial concentrations and flame temperature. Measurements at constant flame temperature yield orders of reaction with respect to hydrogen and oxygen. These do not vary with flame temperature. Measurements in which pressure is varied for several values of oxidant strength at constant equivalence ratio yield a total order of reaction and a function describing the dependence of the mean reaction rate on flame temperature. The total reaction order is independent of flame temperature and equal to the sum of the orders for hydrogen and oxygen. The dependence of the reaction rate on flame temperature cannot be described by a constant activation energy. The activation energy obtained apparently increases with flame temperature. Flashback results can be described by a single rate constant which is independent of equivalence ratio. Values were estimated for this rate constant as a function of flame temperature.

  15. “Exchanges of Aggregate Air Nitrogen Emissions and Watershed Nitrogen Loads”

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approach has been developed to define transfer coefficients that can be used to convert changes in air emissions to changes in air deposition and subsequently to changes in loads delivered to the Bay. This approach uses a special CMAQ version that quantitatively attributes wa...

  16. Effects of oxygen and/or nitrogen on phase transformations above the monotectoid temperature in NbZr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, K.; Kinoshita, C.; Kitajima, S.

    1981-05-01

    Effects of small amounts of oxygen and/or nitrogen on the NbZr phase diagram and the kinetics of phase transformations have been examined by use of optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electron-probe micro-analysis. Hcp α phase and two bcc phases, βNb, and βZr' are observed near specimen surfaces annealed in vacua at temperatures above the monotectoid temperature and outside the monotectoid loop in Rogers and Atkins' phase diagram. The kinetics of the phase transformation from homogeneous β phase to (βNb + βZr) follows the kinetics of an Ostwald ripening reaction and the reaction rate is reduced by oxygen and/or nitrogen. The conclusion is that oxygen and/or nitrogen have direct effects on the kinetics of phase transformation as well as phase stability in NbZr alloys.

  17. Armillaria luteobubalina mycelium develops air pores that conduct oxygen to rhizomorph clusters.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Mamta; Allaway, William G; Ashford, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    Armillaria luteobubalina produces air pores in culture. They consist of two parts: a basal region of tissue elevated to form a mound covered with a rind continuous with that of the colony, but perforated; and an apical region of long parallel hyphae, cemented together by scattered patches of extracellular material. This forms a hydrophobic structure that is elevated above the general level of the mycelial crust and does not easily become waterlogged. Air pores develop near the inoculum plug shortly after inoculation, arising directly from the mycelium, and rhizomorphs are initiated from them. The air pore contains a complex system of gas space connecting the atmosphere with the central canal of each rhizomorph. The tissue beneath the melanised colony crust also contains gas space, especially near air pores. This is also connected with the gas space of each rhizomorph and of each air pore. Measurements with oxygen electrodes show that air pores and their associated rhizomorphs conduct oxygen. The average oxygen conductance of a group of air pores with associated rhizomorphs, within agar blocks, but with rhizomorph apices cut off, was about 700 x 10(-12) m3s(-1), equivalent to about 200 x 10(-12) m3s(-1) for each air-pore. We conclude that the air pores conduct oxygen into the gas space below the pigmented mycelium of the colony, where the rhizomorphs - which also conduct oxygen - originate. A. luteobubalina thus has a complex aerating system which allows efficient diffusion of oxygen into rhizomorphs, and this is likely to facilitate extension of inoculum into low-oxygen environments.

  18. Measurement and Modeling of Site-specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, M. J.; Saikawa, E.; Prinn, R. G.; Ono, S.

    2015-12-01

    Global mixing ratios of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, have increased nearly linearly from the beginning of the modern industrial period to today, with the current global average in excess of 325 ppb. This increase can be largely attributed to anthropogenic activity above the level of N2O emissions from natural biotic sources. The effect of N2O on Earth's climate is twofold: in the troposphere, N2O is radiatively active and chemically inert, while it serves as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. The marked altitudinal divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on Earth's climate. However, the understanding of the total impact of N2O is incomplete, as there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. Due to unique isotopic substitutions (15N and 18O) made by different N2O sources and stratospheric chemical reactions, the measurement of N2O isotopic ratios in ambient air can help identify the distribution and magnitude of distinct source types. We present the first year of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the MIT Stheno-tunable infrared direct absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) instrument at Mace Head, Ireland. Aided by the Stheno preconcentration system, Stheno-TILDAS can achieve measurement precisions of 0.10‰ or greater for all isotopic ratios (δ15N and δ18O) in ambient N2O. We further compare these data to the results from Model for Ozone and Related Tracers version 4 (MOZART-4) simulations, including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and MERRA/GEOS-5 reanalysis meteorological fields. These results will form the basis of future Bayesian inverse modeling simulations that will constrain global N2O source, circulation, and sink dynamics better.

  19. Nitrogen-doped and simultaneously reduced graphene oxide with superior dispersion as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Cheol-Ho; Yun, Jin-Mun; Lee, Sungho; Jo, Seong Mu; Yoo, Sung Jong; Cho, Eun Ae; Khil, Myung-Seob; Joh, Han-Ik

    2014-11-15

    Nitrogen doped graphene oxide (Nr-GO) with properties suitable for electrocatalysts is easily synthesized using phenylhydrazine as a reductant at relatively low temperature. The reducing agent removes various oxygen functional groups bonded to graphene oxide and simultaneously dope the nitrogen atoms bonded with phenyl group all over the basal planes and edge sites of the graphene. The Nr-GO exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction reaction compared to the commercial carbon black and graphene oxide due to the electronic modification of the graphene structure. In addition, Nr-GO shows excellent dispersibility in various solvent due to the dopant molecules.

  20. Performance evaluation of oxygen, air and nitrate for the microaerobic removal of hydrogen sulphide in biogas from sludge digestion.

    PubMed

    Díaz, I; Lopes, A C; Pérez, S I; Fdz-Polanco, M

    2010-10-01

    The removal performance of hydrogen sulphide in severely polluted biogas produced during the anaerobic digestion of sludge was studied by employing pure oxygen, air and nitrate as oxidant reactives supplied to the biodigester. Research was performed in a 200-L digester with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of ∼20 days under mesophilic conditions. The oxygen supply (0.25 N m³/m³ feed) to the bioreactor successfully reduced the hydrogen sulphide content from 15,811 mg/N m³ to less than 400 mg/N m³. The introduction of air (1.27 N m³/m³ feed) removed more than 99% of the hydrogen sulphide content, with a final concentration of ∼55 mg/N m³. COD removal, VS reduction and methane yield were not affected under microaerobic conditions; however, methane concentration in the biogas decreased when air was employed as a result of nitrogen dilution. The nitrate addition was not effective for hydrogen sulphide removal in the biogas.

  1. Ozone production in parallel multichannel dielectric barrier discharge from oxygen and air: the influence of gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Dingkun; Wang, Zhihua; Ding, Can; He, Yong; Whiddon, Ronald; Cen, Kefa

    2016-11-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of gas pressure (0.1 Mpa-0.2 Mpa) on ozone generation in a parallel multichannel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with a narrow gap (0.2 mm). In addition to determining ozone concentration and ozone yield characteristics with gas pressure variation, this paper examines the possible reasons leading to the inconsistency with previous reported results. All the experimental results are plotted on the basis of specific input energy (SIE) in order to conduct the comparison within identical power density. By reviewing the experimental results, the possible cause leading to the inconsistency concerning gas pressure dependences of ozone generation was found using different comparison bases. Results show that ozone generation is slightly suppressed with an increase of gas pressure with an initial increase in SIE. The results of the ozone yield show that an increase of gas pressure would have a favorable effect on ozone production efficiency with an SIE larger than 400 J l-1 in oxygen while ozone yield reaches the maximum at 0.14 Mpa with an SIE larger than 150 J l-1 in air. Increasing gas pressure would lead to a higher critical SIE value at which ozone yield firstly decreases with an increase of SIE both in oxygen and air. The results of nitrogen oxide byproducts show that both NO x byproducts emission and the discharge poisoning effect are suppressed by increasing gas pressure in air plasmas.

  2. Fast Degradation for High Activity: Oxygen- and Nitrogen-Functionalised Carbon Nanotubes in Solid-Acid Fuel-Cell Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Olga; Naumov, Sergej; Flyunt, Roman; Abel, Bernd; Varga, Aron

    2016-12-08

    Similar to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, the widespread application of solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) has been hindered partly by the necessity of the use of the precious-metal catalyst Pt in the electrodes. Here we investigate multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for their potential catalytic activity by using symmetric cell measurements of solid-acid-based electrochemical cells in a cathodic environment. For all measurements, the carbon nanotubes were Pt free and subject to either nitrogen or oxygen plasma treatment. AC impedance spectroscopy of the electrochemical cells, with and without a DC bias, was performed and showed significantly lower initial impedances for oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs compared to those treated with a nitrogen plasma. In symmetric cell measurements with a DC bias, the current declines quickly for oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs and more slowly, over 12 days, for nitrogen-plasma-treated MWCNTs. To elucidate the degradation mechanisms of the oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs under SAFC operating conditions, theoretical calculations were performed using DFT. The results indicate that several degradation mechanisms are likely to occur in parallel through the reduction of the surface oxygen groups that were introduced by the plasma treatment. This finally leads to an inert MWCNT surface and a very low electrode performance. Nitrogen-plasma-treated MWCNTs appear to have a higher stability and may be worthwhile for future investigations.

  3. Groundbased studies of spacecraft glow and erosion caused by impact of oxygen and nitrogen beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Cohen, S. A.; Manos, D. M.; Motley, R. W.; Paul, S. F.

    1987-01-01

    To simulate surface reactions in the space environment a ground-based facility was developed that produces a very high flux 10(14) to 10(16)/sq cm/s of low energy (2 to 20 eV) neutral atoms and molecules. The neutral beams are created using a method involving neutralization and reflection of ions from a biased limiter, where the ions are extracted from a toroidal plasma source. The spectra of emission due to beam-solid interactions on targets of Chemglaze Z-306 optical paint and Kapton are presented. Erosion yields for carbon and Kapton targets with low energy (approx. 10 eV) nitrogen and oxygen beams were measured. The reaction rates and surface morphology for the erosion of Kapton are similar to those measured in experiments on STS-5.

  4. High-performance oxygen reduction catalyst derived from porous, nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Kai; Cao, Yingjie; Zhu, Juntong; Jiang, Yining; Feng, Lai; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu

    2016-10-01

    A facile, self-foaming strategy is reported to synthesize porous, nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets (N-CNSs) as a metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Benefiting from the synergistic functions of N-induced active sites, a highly specific surface area and continuous structure, the optimal N-CNS catalyst exhibits Pt-like ORR activity (positive onset potential of ˜0 V versus Ag/AgCl and limiting current density of 5 mA cm-2) through a four-electron transfer process in alkaline media with excellent cycle stability and methanol tolerance. This work not only provides a promising metal-free ORR catalyst but also opens up a new path for designing carbon-based materials towards broad applications.

  5. Effect of dissolved oxygen on nitrogen and phosphorus removal and electricity production in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qinqin; Luo, Jingjing; Zhou, Juan; Zhou, Shaoqi; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo

    2014-07-01

    Performance of a two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was evaluated with the influence of cathodic dissolved oxygen (DO). The maximum voltage, coulombic efficiency and maximum power density outputs of MFC decreased from 521 to 303 mV, 52.48% to 23.09% and 530 to 178 mW/m(2) with cathodic DO declining. Furthermore, a great deal of total phosphorus (TP) was removed owing to chemical precipitation (about 80%) and microbial absorption (around 4-17%). COD was first removed in anode chamber (>70%) then in cathode chamber (<5%). Most of nitrogen was removed when the cathodic DO was at low levels. Chemical precipitates formed in cathode chamber were verified as phosphate, carbonate and hydroxyl compound with the aid of scanning electron microscope capable of energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  6. On the Role of Metals in Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Masa, Justus; Xia, Wei; Muhler, Martin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-08-24

    The notion of metal-free catalysts is used to refer to carbon materials modified with nonmetallic elements. However, some claimed metal-free catalysts are prepared using metal-containing precursors. It is highly contested that metal residues in nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) catalysts play a crucial role in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In an attempt to reconcile divergent views, a definition for truly metal-free catalysts is proposed and the differences between NC and M-Nx /C catalysts are discussed. Metal impurities at levels usually undetectable by techniques such as XPS, XRD, and EDX significantly promote the ORR. Poisoning tests to mask the metal ions reveal the involvement of metal residues as active sites or as modifiers of the electronic structure of the active sites in NC. The unique merits of both M-Nx /C and NC catalysts are discussed to inspire the development of more advanced nonprecious-metal catalysts for the ORR.

  7. Air trapping ability of the Spiral Gold membrane oxygenator: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, X M; Tevaearai, H T; van Ness, K; Horisberger, J; Augstburger, M; Burki, M; von Segesser, L K

    1998-01-01

    Despite an overall improvement in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) technology and materials, air emboli still occur. The latest generation membrane oxygenator from Bentley Laboratories, the SpiralGold, was tested ex vivo for its air handling ability. The study was conducted on four calves. Bolus amounts of air of 10, 15 and 20 cm3 were each injected three times, upstream of the oxygenator and a bubble detector located directly downstream. The amount of bubbles was measured semiquantitatively on a 10 unit scale (U one semiquantitative unit). The animals were killed 10 days after the CPB. When 10 cm3 of air was injected, no bubbles were detected. With 15 and 20 cm3, respectively, 1 +/- 1.5 and 5 +/- 3.3 U of bubbles were detected. Despite a total of 135 cm3 of air injected as large bolus amounts, all the animals survived without any obvious neurological deficit secondary to air bubble manipulation. In conclusion, the SpiralGold oxygenator per se can reliably trap an air bolus of up to 10 cm3. This feature should be taken into account when choosing an oxygenator, as it offers an additional barrier to air bubbles in the CPB circuit.

  8. Implications of Nitrogen-Climate Interactions for Ambient Air Pollution and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeuber, R.; Peel, J. L.; Garcia, V.; Neas, L.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOX) are important components of ambient and indoor air pollution and are emitted from a range of combustion sources, including on-road mobile sources, electric power generators, and non-road mobile sources. While anthropogenic sources dominate, NOX is also formed by lightning and wildland fires and is emitted by soil. Reduced nitrogen (e.g., ammonia, NH3) is also emitted by various sources, including fertilizer application and animal waste decomposition. NOX, ozone and PM2.5 pollution related to atmospheric emissions of nitrogen and other pollutants can cause premature death and a variety of serious health effects. Climate change is expected to impact how nitrogen-related pollutants affect human health. For example, changes in temperature and precipitation patterns are projected to both lengthen the ozone season and intensify high ozone episodes in some areas. Other climate-related changes may increase the atmospheric release of nitrogen compounds through impacts on wildfire regimes, soil emissions, and biogenic emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. This session will examine the potential human health implications of climate change and nitrogen cycle interactions related to ambient air pollution.

  9. Effect of microstructure of nitrogen-doped graphene on oxygen reduction activity in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lipeng; Niu, Jianbing; Dai, Liming; Xia, Zhenhai

    2012-05-15

    The development of fuel cells as clean-energy technologies is largely limited by the prohibitive cost of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of catalyst design principle that links material structures to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant nonmetal catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we present a first-principles study of ORR on nitrogen-doped graphene in acidic environment. We demonstrate that the ORR activity primarily correlates to charge and spin densities of the graphene. The nitrogen doping and defects introduce high positive spin and/or charge densities that facilitate the ORR on graphene surface. The identified active sites are closely related to doping cluster size and dopant-defect interactions. Generally speaking, a large doping cluster size (number of N atoms >2) reduces the number of catalytic active sites per N atom. In combination with N clustering, Stone-Wales defects can strongly promote ORR. For four-electron transfer, the effective reversible potential ranges from 1.04 to 1.15 V/SHE, depending on the defects and cluster size. The catalytic properties of graphene could be optimized by introducing small N clusters in combination with material defects.

  10. A Passive Sampler for Determination of Nitrogen Dioxide in Ambient Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Dan; Lin, Lianzhi; Yuan, Hongyan; Choi, Martin M. F.; Chan, Winghong

    2005-01-01

    A passive sampler that provides a convenient, simple, and fast method for nitrogen dioxide determination is proposed. The experiment can be modified for determinations of other air pollutants like formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide for hands-on experience for students studying environmental pollution problems.

  11. 76 FR 52283 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions From Glass Melting Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... (NO X ) emissions from glass melting furnaces. EPA is approving these revisions to reduce NO X emissions from glass melting furnaces in accordance with the requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA)....

  12. 76 FR 34021 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions From Glass Melting Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... oxide (NO X ) emissions from glass melting furnaces. This action is being taken under the Clean Air Act... revision to its State Implementation Plan for the control of NO X from glass melting furnaces....

  13. 76 FR 29180 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions From Portland Cement Kilns AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... oxide (NO X ) emissions from Portland cement kilns. This action is being taken under the Clean Air Act... revision to its State Implementation Plan for the control of NO X from Portland cement kilns. I....

  14. 76 FR 42558 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Portland Cement Kilns AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... (NO X ) emissions from Portland cement kilns. EPA is approving these revisions to reduce emissions from Portland cement kilns in accordance with the requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA)....

  15. Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in Neuse River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated impacts of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) NOx emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA from 1990 to 2020. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-...

  16. 75 FR 32858 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Control of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From Industrial Boilers and Process Heaters at Petroleum Refineries Correction...

  17. Chapter 7: Impact of Nitrogen and Climate Change Interactions on Ambient Air Pollution and Human Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen oxides (NOX) are important components of ambient and indoor air pollution and are emitted from a range of combustion sources, including on-road mobile sources, electric power generators, and non-road mobile sources. While anthropogenic sources dominate, NOX is also forme...

  18. Analysis of nitrogenous and algal oxygen demand in effluent from a system of aerated lagoons followed by polishing pond.

    PubMed

    Khorsandi, Hassan; Alizadeh, Rahimeh; Tosinejad, Horiyeh; Porghaffar, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    In this descriptive-analytical study, nitrogenous and algal oxygen demand were assessed for effluent from a system of facultative partially mixed lagoons followed by the polishing pond using 120 grab samples over 1 year. Filtered and non-filtered samples of polishing pond effluent were tested in the presence and absence of a nitrification inhibitor. Effective factors, including 5-day biochemical and chemical oxygen demand (BOD and COD), total suspended solids (TSS), dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll A, and temperature, were measured using standard methods for water and wastewater tests. The results were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance with SPSS version 16. Findings show that the annual mean of the total 5-day BOD in the effluent from the polishing pond consisted of 44.92% as the algal carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD), 43.61% as the nitrogenous biochemical oxygen demand (NBOD), and 11.47% as the soluble CBOD. According to this study, the annual mean ratios of algal COD and 5-day algal CBOD to TSS were 0.8 and 0.37, respectively. As the results demonstrate, undertaking quality evaluation of the final effluent from the lagoons without considering nitrogenous and algal oxygen demand would undermine effluent quality assessment and interpretation of the performance of the wastewater treatment plant.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Motion of Paramagnetic Oxygen Molecules in Air by Magnetic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezawa, Nobuhisa; Fukushima, Kimichika

    2000-03-01

    Oxygen molecules with integer spin in air move upward to higher magnetic fields along magnetic field gradient. This motion is disturbed by the collisions between oxygen molecules and other diamagnetic molecules. To magnetically separate oxygen molecules in air, it is necessary to suppress the collisions with diamagnetic molecules and enhance the transport by magnetic force. In our study, molecular dynamics calculations were carried out to investigate temperature and pressure dependence of the ratio of oxygen molecules to air transported along magnetic field gradient. At temperature T=300K, pressure P=0.1MPa and magnetic field H=20T, the ratio of oxygen molecules to air transported along magnetic field gradient increased from 20% without magnetic fields to about 22% in magnetic fields; at T=200K and P=0.1MPa, to 25%; at T=300K and P=0.005MPa, to 24%. This indicates that the transport of oxygen molecules in air by magnetic force was promoted at lower temperature and pressure.

  20. Studies on the oxygen reduction catalyst for zinc-air battery electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianyou; Sebastian, P. J.; Smit, Mascha A.; Yang, Hongping; Gamboa, S. A.

    In this paper, perovskite type La 0.6Ca 0.4CoO 3 as a catalyst of oxygen reduction was prepared, and the structure and performance of the catalysts was examined by means of IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric (TG). Mixed catalysts doped, some metal oxides were put also used. The cathodic polarization curves for oxygen reduction on various catalytic electrodes were measured by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). A Zn-air battery was made with various catalysts for oxygen reduction, and the performance of the battery was measured with a BS-9300SM rechargeable battery charge/discharge device. The results showed that the perovskite type catalyst (La 0.6Ca 0.4CoO 3) doped with metal oxide is an excellent catalyst for the zinc-air battery, and can effectively stimulate the reduction of oxygen and improve the properties of zinc-air batteries, such as discharge capacity, etc.

  1. ON THE OXYGEN AND NITROGEN CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE 'GREEN PEA' GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Amorin, Ricardo O.; Perez-Montero, Enrique; Vilchez, J. M. E-mail: epm@iaa.e

    2010-06-01

    We have investigated the oxygen and nitrogen chemical abundances in extremely compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with redshifts between {approx}0.11 and 0.35, popularly referred to as 'green peas'. Direct and strong-line methods sensitive to the N/O ratio applied to their Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra reveal that these systems are genuine metal-poor galaxies, with mean oxygen abundances {approx}20% solar. At a given metallicity these galaxies display systematically large N/O ratios compared to normal galaxies, which can explain the strong difference between our metallicities measurements and previous ones. While their N/O ratios follow the relation with stellar mass of local SFGs in the SDSS, we find that the mass-metallicity relation of the 'green peas' is offset {approx_gt}0.3 dex to lower metallicities. We argue that recent interaction-induced inflow of gas, possibly coupled with a selective metal-rich gas loss, driven by supernova winds, may explain our findings and the known galaxy properties, namely high specific star formation rates, extreme compactness, and disturbed optical morphologies. The 'green pea' galaxy properties seem to be uncommon in the nearby universe, suggesting a short and extreme stage of their evolution. Therefore, these galaxies may allow us to study in great detail many processes, such as starburst activity and chemical enrichment, under physical conditions approaching those in galaxies at higher redshifts.

  2. K-shell Photoioinization of the atomic nitrogen and oxygen isonuclear sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Brendan M.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of third and fourth generation light sources, such as the ALS at Berkeley, USA, SOLEIL in Orsay, France and PETRA III in Hamburg, Germany, this past decade or more and the unprecedented high brightness and spectral resolution have made it possible to perform detailed cross section measurements in the X-ray region of extremely important astrophysical elements such as Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen and their isonuclear sequences. In tandem with this world wide experimental endeavour theoretical work has provided interpretation in unravelling and identifying prominent resonance features in the spectra in the vicinity of the K-shell region. For the atomic oxygen sequence (Kα and Kβ resonance positions in the vicinity of the K-edge) we note that ground based measurements (ALS and SOLEIL) and R-matrix with pseudo-states (RMPS) theoretical results are in agreement but are ~ 0.5 eV in discrepancy with satellite observations from CHANDRA and XMM-NEWTON. A review of the current status of experiment, theory and observation will be presented for the various sequences. Supported by NSF, DOE, CNRS, DFG, NERSC and HLRS at Stuttgart University.

  3. Compartmentalized microbial composition, oxygen gradients and nitrogen fixation in the gut of Odontotaenius disjunctus.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Nguyen, Nhu H; Karaoz, Ulas; Gross, Stephanie R; Herman, Donald J; Andersen, Gary L; Bruns, Thomas D; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Blackwell, Meredith; Brodie, Eoin L

    2014-01-01

    Coarse woody debris is an important biomass pool in forest ecosystems that numerous groups of insects have evolved to take advantage of. These insects are ecologically important and represent useful natural analogs for biomass to biofuel conversion. Using a range of molecular approaches combined with microelectrode measurements of oxygen, we have characterized the gut microbiome and physiology of Odontotaenius disjunctus, a wood-feeding beetle native to the eastern United States. We hypothesized that morphological and physiological differences among gut regions would correspond to distinct microbial populations and activities. In fact, significantly different communities were found in the foregut (FG), midgut (MG)/posterior hindgut (PHG) and anterior hindgut (AHG), with Actinobacteria and Rhizobiales being more abundant toward the FG and PHG. Conversely, fermentative bacteria such as Bacteroidetes and Clostridia were more abundant in the AHG, and also the sole region where methanogenic Archaea were detected. Although each gut region possessed an anaerobic core, micron-scale profiling identified radial gradients in oxygen concentration in all regions. Nitrogen fixation was confirmed by (15)N2 incorporation, and nitrogenase gene (nifH) expression was greatest in the AHG. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH identified the most abundant transcript as related to Ni-Fe nitrogenase of a Bacteroidetes species, Paludibacter propionicigenes. Overall, we demonstrate not only a compartmentalized microbiome in this beetle digestive tract but also sharp oxygen gradients that may permit aerobic and anaerobic metabolism to occur within the same regions in close proximity. We provide evidence for the microbial fixation of N2 that is important for this beetle to subsist on woody biomass.

  4. Ocean redox structure across the Late Neoproterozoic Oxygenation Event: A nitrogen isotope perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ader, Magali; Sansjofre, Pierre; Halverson, Galen P.; Busigny, Vincent; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.

    2014-06-01

    The end of the Neoproterozoic Era (1000 to 541 Ma) is widely believed to have seen the transition from a dominantly anoxic to an oxygenated deep ocean. This purported redox transition appears to be closely linked temporally with metazoan radiation and extraordinary perturbations to the global carbon cycle. However, the geochemical record of this transition is not straightforward, and individual data sets have been variably interpreted to indicate full oxygenation by the early Ediacaran Period (635 to 541 Ma) and deep ocean anoxia persevering as late as the early Cambrian. Because any change in marine redox structure would have profoundly impacted nitrogen nutrient cycling in the global ocean, the N isotope signature of sedimentary rocks (δ15Nsed) should reflect the Neoproterozoic deep-ocean redox transition. We present new N isotope data from Amazonia, northwest Canada, northeast Svalbard, and South China that span the Cryogenian glaciations (˜750 to 580 Ma). These and previously published data reveal a N-isotope distribution that closely resembles modern marine sediments, with a mode in δ15N close to +4‰ and range from -4 to +11‰. No apparent change is seen between the Cryogenian and Ediacarian. Data from earlier Proterozoic samples show a similar distribution, but shifted slightly towards more negative δ15N values and with a wider range. The most parsimonious explanation for the similarity of these N-isotope distribution is that as in the modern ocean, nitrate (and hence O2) was stable in most of the middle-late Neoproterozoic ocean, and possibly much of Proterozoic Eon. However, nitrate would likely have been depleted in partially restricted basins and oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which may have been more widespread than in the modern ocean.

  5. Compartmentalized microbial composition, oxygen gradients and nitrogen fixation in the gut of Odontotaenius disjunctus

    PubMed Central

    Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Nguyen, Nhu H; Karaoz, Ulas; Gross, Stephanie R; Herman, Donald J; Andersen, Gary L; Bruns, Thomas D; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Blackwell, Meredith; Brodie, Eoin L

    2014-01-01

    Coarse woody debris is an important biomass pool in forest ecosystems that numerous groups of insects have evolved to take advantage of. These insects are ecologically important and represent useful natural analogs for biomass to biofuel conversion. Using a range of molecular approaches combined with microelectrode measurements of oxygen, we have characterized the gut microbiome and physiology of Odontotaenius disjunctus, a wood-feeding beetle native to the eastern United States. We hypothesized that morphological and physiological differences among gut regions would correspond to distinct microbial populations and activities. In fact, significantly different communities were found in the foregut (FG), midgut (MG)/posterior hindgut (PHG) and anterior hindgut (AHG), with Actinobacteria and Rhizobiales being more abundant toward the FG and PHG. Conversely, fermentative bacteria such as Bacteroidetes and Clostridia were more abundant in the AHG, and also the sole region where methanogenic Archaea were detected. Although each gut region possessed an anaerobic core, micron-scale profiling identified radial gradients in oxygen concentration in all regions. Nitrogen fixation was confirmed by 15N2 incorporation, and nitrogenase gene (nifH) expression was greatest in the AHG. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH identified the most abundant transcript as related to Ni–Fe nitrogenase of a Bacteroidetes species, Paludibacter propionicigenes. Overall, we demonstrate not only a compartmentalized microbiome in this beetle digestive tract but also sharp oxygen gradients that may permit aerobic and anaerobic metabolism to occur within the same regions in close proximity. We provide evidence for the microbial fixation of N2 that is important for this beetle to subsist on woody biomass. PMID:23985746

  6. Materials and methods for the separation of oxygen from air

    DOEpatents

    MacKay, Richard; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2003-07-15

    Metal oxides particularly useful for the manufacture of catalytic membranes for gas-phase oxygen separation processes having the formula: O.sub.5+z where: x and x' are greater than 0; y and y' are greater than 0; x+x' is equal to 2; y+y' is less than or equal to 2; z is a number that makes the metal oxide charge neutral; A is an element selected from the lanthanide elements; A' is an element selected from Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; A" is an element selected from the f block lanthanides, Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; B is an element selected from the group consisting of Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof and B" is Co or Mg, with the exception that when B" is Mg, A' and A" are not Mg. The metal oxides are useful for preparation of dense membranes which may be formed from dense thin films of the mixed metal oxide on a porous metal oxide element. The invention also provides methods and catalytic reactors for oxygen separation and oxygen enrichment of oxygen deficient gases which employ mixed conducting metal oxides of the above formula.

  7. Amorphous carbon enriched with pyridinic nitrogen as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyan; Wang, Xin; Cui, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Guangmin; Zheng, Weitao

    2014-01-18

    An amorphous metal-free N-doped carbon film prepared by sputtering and annealing exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity and superior stability and methanol tolerance to the commercial Pt/C catalyst via a four-electron pathway for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Pyridinic nitrogen in films plays a key role in electrocatalytic activity for ORR.

  8. Differential accumulation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in maize lines with contrasting drought tolerance and aflatoxin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abiotic stresses such as drought stress can exacerbate aflatoxin contamination of maize kernels. Previous studies showed that maize lines resistance to aflatoxin contamination tend to exhibit enhanced drought tolerance and accumulate lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species...

  9. Natural and Anthropogenic Impacts on the Stable Isotopes of Nitrogen and Oxygen of Ice-Core Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, W.; Michalski, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    The stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen of the Ross Ice Drainage System (RIDS) ice-core nitrate were measured in approximately 2-3 year time resolution using a Delta V Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS). The nitrogen isotope variation (δ15N) and the mass-independent fractionation of oxygen (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52*δ18O) yield a detailed picture of the changes in the global nitrogen cycling and the shift in the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere in response to natural and anthropogenic induced climate change. This is one of the few studies on stable isotopes of ice-core nitrate for time periods prior to the 1800's and will increase our understanding of the oxidation feedbacks of the atmosphere in response to volcanic events, the Little Ice Age, the Maunder Minimum, and anthropogenic emissions in the Southern Hemisphere.

  10. Inorganic nitrogenous air pollutants, atmospheric nitrogen deposition and their potential ecological impacts in remote areas of western North America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytnerowicz, A.; Fenn, M. E.; Fraczek, W.; Johnson, R.; Allen, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    Dry deposition of gaseous inorganic nitrogenous (N) air pollutants plays an important role in total atmospheric N deposition and its ecological effects in the arid and semi-arid ecosystems. Passive samplers and denuder/ filter pack systems have been used for determining ambient concentrations of ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and nitric acid vapor (HNO3) in the topographically complex remote areas of the western United States and Canada. Concentrations of the measured pollutants varied significantly between the monitoring areas. Highest NH3, NO2 and HNO3 levels occurred in southern California areas downwind of the Los Angeles Basin and in the western Sierra Nevada impacted by emissions from the California Central Valley and the San Francisco Bay area. Strong spatial gradients of N pollutants were also present in southeastern Alaska due to cruise ship emissions and in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region in Canada affected by oil exploitation. Distribution of these pollutants has been depicted by maps generated by several geostatistical methodologies within the ArcGIS Geostatistical Analyst (ESRI, USA). Such maps help to understand spatial and temporal changes of air pollutants caused by various anthropogenic activities and locally-generated vs. long range-transported air pollutants. Pollution distribution maps for individual N species and gaseous inorganic reactive nitrogen (Nr) have been developed for the southern portion of the Sierra Nevada, Lake Tahoe Basin, San Bernardino Mountains, Joshua Tree National Park and the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. The N air pollution data have been utilized for estimates of dry and total N deposition by a GIS-based inferential method specifically developed for understanding potential ecological impacts in arid and semi-arid areas. The method is based on spatial and temporal distribution of concentrations of major drivers of N dry deposition, their surface deposition velocities and stomatal conductance values

  11. Ecological effects of nitrogen and sulfur air pollution in the US: what do we know?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greaver, Tara L.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Herrick, Jeffrey D.; Barber, Mary C.; Baron, Jill S.; Cosby, Bernard J.; Deerhake, Marion E.; Dennis, Robin L.; Dubois, Jean-Jacque B.; Goodale, Christine L.; Herlihy, Alan T.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Liu, Lingli; Lynch, Jason A.; Novak, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Four decades after the passage of the US Clean Air Act, air-quality standards are set to protect ecosystems from damage caused by gas-phase nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) compounds, but not from the deposition of these air pollutants to land and water. Here, we synthesize recent scientific literature on the ecological effects of N and S air pollution in the US. Deposition of N and S is the main driver of ecosystem acidification and contributes to nutrient enrichment in many natural systems. Although surface-water acidification has decreased in the US since 1990, it remains a problem in many regions. Perturbations to ecosystems caused by the nutrient effects of N deposition continue to emerge, although gas-phase concentrations are generally not high enough to cause phytotoxicity. In all, there is overwhelming evidence of a broad range of damaging effects to ecosystems in the US under current air quality conditions.

  12. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  13. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  14. The influence of riverine nitrogen on the dynamics of the North Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große, Fabian; Kreus, Markus; Lenhart, Hermann; Pätsch, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The mitigation of eutrophication and its concomitants, like oxygen deficiency in bottom waters, is one of the major aspects of the ecological management of coastal marine ecosystems. In the past, biogeochemical models helped to significantly improve the understanding of the interaction of the physical and biological processes driving eutrophication. Anthropogenic river input of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) is the main driver for eutrophication. Nevertheless, the quantification of their influence in a specific region remains an important issue, since it is as crucial for an efficient management as it is difficult to obtain. During the past decade, a quantitative method applicable to biogeochemical models - often referred to as `trans-boundary nutrient transports' (TBNT) - became more and more popular in the context of marine ecosystem management. This method allows for the tracing of elements from various sources, e.g., nitrogen (N) from different rivers, throughout the whole process chain of the applied model. By this, it provides valuable information about the contributions from different sources to the overall amount and turnover of an element in different areas of the model domain. This information constitutes the basis for the quantification, evaluation and optimisation of river input reduction targets for the tributaries, which are defined in relation to their ecological consequences in the marine environment. In existing studies, the TBNT method has been applied to a variety of biogeochemical models, e.g. to quantify the atmospheric contribution to total N in the North Sea (Troost et al., 2013). This study presents a novel approach to link the TBNT method applied to N to the biological processes driving the oxygen dynamics in the bottom layer of the North Sea. For this purpose, simulations from the biogeochemical model ECOHAM (ECOlogical model HAMburg) are analysed for the years 2002 and 2010, with the focus on the southern central North Sea, the region of

  15. Effects of repeated hyperbaric nitrogen-oxygen exposures on the striatal dopamine release and on motor disturbances in rats.

    PubMed

    Lavoute, Cécile; Weiss, Michel; Rostain, Jean-Claude

    2005-09-14

    Previous studies have demonstrated disruptions of motor activities and a decrease of extracellular dopamine level in the striatum of rats exposed to high pressure of nitrogen. Men exposed to nitrogen pressure develop also motor and cognitive disturbances related to inert gas narcosis. After repetitive exposures, adaptation to narcosis was subjectively reported. To study the effects of repetitive exposures to hyperbaric nitrogen-oxygen, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted in the striatum with multifiber carbon dopamine-sensitive electrodes. After recovery from surgery, free-moving rats were exposed for 2 h up to 3 MPa of nitrogen-oxygen mixture before and after one daily exposure to 1 MPa of nitrogen-oxygen, for 5 consecutive days. Dopamine release was measured by differential pulse voltammetry and motor activities were quantified using piezo-electric captor. At the first exposure to 3 MPa, the striatal dopamine level decreased during the compression (-15%) to reach -20% during the stay at 3 MPa. Motor activities were increased during compression (+15%) and the first 60 min at constant pressure (+10%). In contrast, at the second exposure to 3 MPa, an increase of dopamine of +15% was obtained during the whole exposure. However, total motor activities remained unchanged as compared to the first exposure. Our results confirm that nitrogen exposure at 3 MPa led to a decreased striatal dopamine release and increased motor disturbances in naïve rats. Repetitive exposures to 1 MPa of nitrogen induced a reversal effect on the dopamine release which suggests a neurochemical change at the level of the neurotransmitter regulation processes of the basal ganglia. In contrast, motor activity remained quantitatively unchanged, thus suggesting that dopamine is not involved alone in modulating these motor disturbances.

  16. Interference of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor on the analysis for oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The interference of small concentrations (less than 4 percent by volume) of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor on the analysis for oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence was measured. The sample gas consisted primarily of nitrogen, with less than 100 parts per million concentration of nitric oxide, and with small concentrations of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor added. Results obtained under these conditions indicate that although oxygen does not measurably affect the analysis for nitric oxide, the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor causes the indicated nitric oxide concentration to be too low. An interference factor - defined as the percentage change in indicated nitric oxide concentration (relative to the true nitric oxide concentration) divided by the percent interfering gas present - was determined for carbon dioxide to be -0.60 + or - 0.04 and for water vapor to be -2.1 + or - 0.3.

  17. Liquid products from oxidative thermal treatment of oil sludge with different oxygen concentrations of air.

    PubMed

    Shie, J L; Chang, C Y; Lin, J P; Le, D J; Wu, C H

    2001-01-01

    Oxidative thermal treatment of oil sludge with different oxygen concentrations of air by using a dynamic thermogravimetric (TG) reaction system is investigated. The experimental conditions employed are: gas flow rate of 50 cm3/min (value at 298 K) for 300 mg dry waste, a constant heating rate of 5.2 K/min, the oxygen concentrations in air of 1.09, 8.62 and 20.95 vol. % O2, and the temperature (T) range of 378-873 K. From the experimental results, the residual mass fractions (M) are about 78.95, 28.49, 8.77 and 4.13 wt. % at the oxidative T of 563, 713, 763 and 873 K for the case with 20.95 vol. % O2, respectively. The values of M with 8.62 and 1.09 vol. % O2 at T of 873 K are 4.87 and 9.44 wt. %, respectively. The distillation characteristics of the oil portion of liquid products (condensates of gas at 298 K) from the oxidative thermal treatment of oil sludge with 20.95 vol. % O2 at T of 378-873 K is close to those of commercial gasoline. Nevertheless, the liquid product contains a large amount of water. The distillation characteristics of the oil portions of liquid products with 8.62 and 1.09 vol. % O2 at T of 378-873 K are close to those of diesel and fuel oils, respectively. The oil quality with 8.62 vol. % O2 is better than that with 1.09 vol. % O2. However, the liquid product with 8.62 vol. % O2 still contains a large amount of water; nonetheless, that with 1.09 vol. % O2 is with negligible water. Compared with the oil product of nitrogen pyrolysis, the oil quality with 1.09 vol. % O2 is better. Certainly, low oxygen conditions (i.e. 1.09 vol. % O2) not only accelerate the thermal reaction of oil sludge, but also at the same time avoid or reduce the production of water. Further, from the analysis of benzene (B), ethylbenzene (E), toluene (T) and iso-xylene (X) concentrations of the oil portion of liquid products, the BETX concentrations of oil with 20.95 vol. % O2 are higher than those with 8.62 and 1.09 vol. % O2. The yields of liquid products with 20.95, 8

  18. Determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air employing diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Santosh Kumar; Deb, Manas Kanti; Verma, Devsharan

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a simple and precise analytical method for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air. In this method nitrogen dioxide is determined in the form of nitrite. The determination of nitrogen dioxide needs no reagents except for a solution of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium arsenite (NaOH-Na 2As 2O 3) which is used as an absorbing reagent for trapping the nitrogen dioxide from the atmosphere in the form of nitrite, i.e., a prior analysis step. The determination of submicrogram levels of nitrogen dioxide is based on the selection of a strong and sharp quantitative analytical peak at 1380 cm - 1 using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRS-FTIR). The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification of the method are found to be 0.008 μg g - 1 NO 2- and 0.05 μg g - 1 NO 2-, respectively. The precision in terms of standard deviation and relative standard deviation value at a level of 2 μg NO 2- / 0.1 g KBr for n = 10 is found to be 0.036 μg NO 2- and 1.8%, respectively. The relative standard deviation ( n = 10) for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air was observed to be in the range 2.6-3.8%. The method proposed is time-saving and eliminates the slow and cumbersome steps of pH maintenance of the reaction mixture and color formation of the EPA recommended spectrophotometric and other methods for quantitative determination of nitrogen dioxide.

  19. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  20. Nitrogen and oxygen bridged calixaromatics: synthesis, structure, functionalization, and molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Xiang

    2012-02-21

    Pedersen, Lehn, and Cram established supramolecular chemistry through their pioneering work with crown ethers, cryptands, and spherands. Since then, the hallmark of supramolecular science has been an increasing sophistication in the design and construction of macrocyclic molecules, as manifested in cyclodextrin derivatives, calixarenes, resorcinarenes, cyclotriveratrylenes, cucurbiturils, calixpyrroles, cyclophanes, and many other examples. Indeed, macrocyclic compounds provide unique models for the study of noncovalent molecular interactions. They also constitute building blocks for constructing high-level molecular and supramolecular architectures and fabricating molecular devices and advanced materials. As a postgraduate in the Huang laboratory in the late 1980s, I became interested in the calix[n]arenes because of their unique conformational structures and versatile complexation properties. The notion of introducing heteroatoms, and particularly nitrogen, into the bridging position of conventional calixarenes was particularly intriguing. Nitrogen, unlike methylene, can adopt either an sp(2) or sp(3) electronic configuration, providing different conjugation systems with adjacent aromatic rings. Consequently, depending on the configuration and conjugation, a range of C-N bond lengths and C-N-C bond angles is possible. The conformation and cavity size in heteroatom-bridged calixarenes might thus be tuned through the bridging heteroatoms and the number of aromatic rings. Furthermore, because heteroatom linkages significantly affect the electron density and distribution on aromatic rings, the electronic features of macrocyclic cavities might be regulated by heteroatoms. Given the essentially limitless combinations possible, only synthetic hurdles would prevent access to numerous diverse heteracalixaromatics. We began a systematic study on nitrogen- and oxygen-bridged calixarenes in 2000, years later than originally envisioned. Before this study, very few

  1. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  2. Electron ionization of metastable nitrogen and oxygen atoms in relation to the auroral emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Joshipura, K. N.

    Atomic and molecular excited metastable states (EMS) are exotic systems due to their special properties like long radiative life-time, large size (average radius) and large polarizability along with relatively smaller first ionization energy compared to their respective ground states (GS). The present work includes our theoretical calculations on electron impact ionization of metastable atomic states N( (2) P), N( (2) D) of nitrogen and O( (1) S), O( (1) D) of oxygen. The targets of our present interest, are found to be present in our Earth's ionosphere and they play an important role in auroral emissions observed in Earth’s auroral regions [1] as also in the emissions observed from cometary coma [2, 3] and airglow emissions. In particular, atomic oxygen in EMS can radiate, the visible O( (1) D -> (3) P) doublet 6300 - 6364 Å red doublet, the O( (1) S -> (1) D) 5577 Å green line, and the ultraviolet O( (1) S -> (3) P) 2972 Å line. For metastable atomic nitrogen one observes the similar emissions, in different wavelengths, from (2) D and (2) P states. At the Earth's auroral altitudes, from where these emissions take place in the ionosphere, energetic electrons are also present. In particular, if the metastable N as well as O atoms are ionized by the impact of electrons then these species are no longer available for emissions. This is a possible loss mechanism, and hence it is necessary to analyze the importance of electron ionization of the EMS of atomic O and N, by calculating the relevant cross sections. In the present paper we investigate electron ionization of the said metastable species by calculating relevant total cross sections. Our quantum mechanical calculations are based on projected approximate ionization contribution in the total inelastic cross sections [4]. Detailed results and discussion along with the significance of these calculations will be presented during the COSPAR-2014. References [1] A.Bhardwaj, and G. R. Gladstone, Rev. Geophys., 38

  3. The Geologic Nitrogen Cycle and its Relationship to Oxygenation of the Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catling, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    There is no evidence that the partial pressure of atmospheric nitrogen (pN2) changed greatly in the Phanerozoic but the Precambrian is different. Some suggest that Archean pN2 was higher because it would pressure broaden absorption lines of greenhouse gases and counteract a fainter young Sun [1]. However, analysis of raindrop imprints and fluid inclusions indicate that pN2 was no more than ~0.5-1.2 bar [2, 3] while basalt vesicles show pN2 < 0.5 bar at 2.7 Ga [4]. Low pN2 suggests that the Archean N cycle operated differently than today, which is unsurprising given the absence of O2. The coupling of the N cycle to oxygenation can be understood by comparing modern and ancient fluxes. Today, the long-term N source is from volcanism and metamorphism as well as oxidative weathering of organics. The geologic sink is the burial of organic matter, with minor subduction. But in the Archean, ammonium would have been the dominant N species in seawater. NH4+ substitutes for K+ in seafloor phyllosilicates. NH4+ in silicates can be stable under igneous and metamorphic conditions. Thus, the subduction sink should have been larger. Moreover, the N source from oxidative weathering was absent. With a more efficient geologic sink than today and smaller relative degassing, the steady-state pN2 would be lower. Nitrogen levels can be modeled and with plausible fluxes, Archean pN2 is lower. Once O2 becomes available, nitrifying chemoautotrophs make nitrate and the sink via ammonium declines. A speculative possibility is that oxidized sediments after the Great Oxidation raised the redox state in subduction zones. Higher oxygen fugacity would lead to more N2 degassing [5]. In any case, pN2 changes need not have been monotonic. [1] Goldblatt C. et al. (2009) Nat Geosci 2, 891-896. [2] Som S. M. et al. (2012) Nature 484, 359-362. [3] Marty B. et al. (2013) Science 342, 101-104. [4] Som S. M. et al. (2015), submitted. [5] Mikhail S., Sverjensky D. A. (2014) Nat Geosci 7, 816-819.

  4. Measurements and modeling of nitric oxide formation in counterflow, premixed, methane/oxygen/nitrogen flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Duane Douglas

    1999-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of NO concentration in a variety of CH4/O2/N2 flames are used to evaluate the chemical kinetics of NO formation. The analysis begins with previous measurements in flat, laminar, premixed CH4/O2/N 2 flames stabilized on a water-cooled McKenna burner at pressures ranging from 1 to 14.6 atm, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.6, and volumetric nitrogen/oxygen dilution ratios of 2.2, 3.1 and 3.76. These measured results are compared to predictions to determine the capabilities and limitations of the comprehensive kinetic mechanism developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), version 2.11. The model is shown to predict well the qualitative trends of NO formation in lean-premixed flames, while quantitatively underpredicting NO concentration by 30-50%. For rich flames, the model is unable to even qualitatively match the experimental results. These flames were found to be limited by low temperatures and an inability to separate the flame from the burner surface. In response to these limitations, a counterflow burner was designed for use in opposed premixed flame studies. A new LIF calibration technique was developed and applied to obtain quantitative measurements of NO concentration in laminar, counterflow premixed, CH 4/O2/N2 flames at pressures ranging from 1 to 5.1 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.6 to 1.5, and an N2/O2 dilution ratio of 3.76. The counterflow premixed flame measurements are combined with measurements in burner-stabilized premixed flames and counterflow diffusion flames to build a comprehensive database for analysis of the GRI kinetic mechanism. Pathways, quantitative reaction path and sensitivity analyses are applied to the GRI mechanism for these flame conditions. The prompt NO mechanism is found to severely underpredict the amount of NO formed in rich premixed and nitrogen-diluted diffusion flames. This underprediction is traced to uncertainties in the CH kinetics as well as in the nitrogen oxidation chemistry

  5. Mesoporous Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-LiSICON Glass Ceramics as High Performance Cathodes in Solid-State Lithium Oxygen Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-18

    SUBTITLE MESOPOROUS NITROGEN-DOPED CARBON-LiSICON GLASS CERAMICS AS HIGH PERFORMANCE CATHODES IN SOLID-STATE LITHIUM -OXYGEN BATTERIES (POSTPRINT) 5a...AFRL-RQ-WP-TP-2015-0054 MESOPOROUS NITROGEN-DOPED CARBON-LiSICON GLASS CERAMICS AS HIGH PERFORMANCE CATHODES IN SOLID-STATE LITHIUM -OXYGEN...superior electrochemical activity of composite 3 for the reduction of oxygen and the higher ionic conductivity of LAGP to transport lithium ions in the

  6. Nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand removal from septic tank wastewater in subsurface flow constructed wetlands: substrate (cation exchange capacity) effects.

    PubMed

    Collison, Robert S; Grismer, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    The current article focuses on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen (ammonium and nitrate) removal performance from synthetic human wastewater as affected by different substrate rocks having a range of porosities and cation exchange capacities (CECs). The aggregates included lava rock, lightweight expanded shale, meta-basalt (control), and zeolite. The first three had CECs of 1 to 4 mequiv/100 gm, whereas the zeolite CEC was much greater (-80 mequiv/100 gm). Synthetic wastewater was gravity fed to each constructed wetland system, resulting in a 4-day retention time. Effluent samples were collected, and COD and nitrogen species concentrations measured regularly during four time periods from November 2008 through June 2009. Chemical oxygen demand and nitrogen removal fractions were not significantly different between the field and laboratory constructed wetland systems when corrected for temperature. Similarly, overall COD and nitrogen removal fractions were practically the same for the aggregate substrates. The important difference between aggregate effects was the zeolite's ammonia removal process, which was primarily by adsorption. The resulting single-stage nitrogen removal process may be an alternative to nitrification and denitrification that may realize significant cost savings in practice.

  7. Combined Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen XANES Spectroscopy on Hydrated and Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feser, M.; Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth s stratosphere generally contain percent-level concentrations of organic matter. This organic matter in IDPs is important for several reasons: 1) some IDPs contain interstellar organic matter, identified by high D/H or N-15, providing the opportunity to characterize this interstellar material, 2) comparison of the organic matter in anhydrous IDPs to that in hydrated IDPs can help establish the effects of parent body aqueous alteration, and, 3) IDPs are believed to have delivered to the surface of the early Earth pre-biotic organic matter important for the origin of life. X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy provides information on the functional groups present in a sample, and XANES can be performed on the nano-scale, comparable to the size of some of the sub-units of the IDPs. The energies of the XANES transitions are diagnostic of the type of bonding of the C, N, and O, allowing identification of the functional groups present in the sample. As part of our ongoing effort to characterize the organic matter in the IDPs, we have performed carbon- and oxygen- and the first nitrogen-XANES spectroscopy on two IDPs and acid-insoluble residue from the CM2 meteorite Murchison.

  8. The chemistry of cell signaling by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and 4-hydroxynonenal

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Henry Jay; Fukuto, Jon M.; Miller, Tom; Zhang, Hongqiao; Rinna, Alessandra; Levy, Smadar

    2008-01-01

    During the past several years, major advances have been made in understanding how reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) participate in signal transduction. Identification of the specific targets and the chemical reactions involved still remains to be resolved with many of the signaling pathways in which the involvement of reactive species has been determined. Our understanding is that ROS and RNS have second messenger roles. While cysteine residues in the thiolate (ionized) form found in several classes of signaling proteins can be specific targets for reaction with H2O2 and RNS, better understanding of the chemistry, particularly kinetics, suggests that for many signaling events in which ROS and RNS participate, enzymatic catalysis is more likely to be involved than non-enzymatic reaction. Due to increased interest in how oxidation products, particularly lipid peroxidation products, also are involved with signaling, a review of signaling by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is included. This article focuses on the chemistry of signaling by ROS, RNS, and HNE and will describe reactions with selected target proteins as representatives of the mechanisms rather attempt to comprehensively review the many signaling pathways in which the reactive species are involved. PMID:18602883

  9. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  10. Global rate coefficients for ionization and recombination of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annaloro, Julien; Morel, Vincent; Bultel, Arnaud; Omaly, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The flow field modeling of planetary entry plasmas, laser-induced plasmas, inductively coupled plasmas, arcjets, etc., requires to use Navier-Stokes codes. The kinetic mechanisms implemented in these codes involve global (effective) rate coefficients. These rate coefficients result from the excited states coupling during a quasi-steady state. In order to obtain these global rate coefficients over a wide electron temperature (Te) range for ionization and recombination of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon, the behavior of their excited states is investigated using a zero-dimensional (time-dependent) code. The population number densities of these electronic states are considered as independent species. Their relaxation is studied within the range 3000 K ≤Te≤20 000 K and leads to the determination of the ionization (ki) and recombination (kr) global rate coefficients. Comparisons with existing data are performed. Finally, the ratio ki/kr is compared with the Saha equilibrium constant. This ratio increases more rapidly than the equilibrium constant for Te>15 000 K.

  11. Four Components of the Conjugated Redox System in Organisms: Carbon, Nitrogen, Sulfur, Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Tereshina, E V; Laskavy, V N; Ivanenko, S I

    2015-09-01

    C1 compounds participate in various metabolic processes and regulations including DNA methylation. Formaldehyde (FA), a product of methyl group oxidation, is highly cytotoxic. In the cell, there are two pathways of its utilization: assimilation and oxidation. Formaldehyde displays cytotoxicity, and therefore its oxidation is considered as detoxification. The sensitivity to the threshold concentration of FA we regard as an indication of its major role in biosystem functioning. A model of a three-component conjugated redox system is proposed in which the methyl group oxidation pathway is an archaic and conservative donor of protons and electrons, the reduction of O2 serves as an acceptor, and the arginine amino group is used for production of both urea and nitric oxide (the donor and acceptor, respectively). The fourth component of the redox system is glutathione, which maintains redox balance. The three-level system of proton donors includes the oxidation of a methyl group (first level), the oxidation of acetate in mitochondria (second level), and glucose catabolism in the pentose phosphate pathway (third level). The whole redox system is united by the sulfhydryl groups of cysteines, glutathione, thioredoxin, and α-lipoic acid. The central regulatory role in this redox system belongs to glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase, which controls FA binding with tetrahydrofolic acid, arginine methylation, and denitrosation of sulfhydryl groups. The conjugated redox system was formed during evolution as a union of separate redox cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen.

  12. The potential of extracts of Caryocar villosum pulp to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Chisté, Renan Campos; Freitas, Marisa; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2012-12-01

    Caryocar villosum (piquiá) is a native fruit from the Amazonian region, considered to be an interesting source of bioactive compounds. In this paper, five extracts of C. villosum pulp were obtained, using solvents with different polarities and their in vitro scavenging capacity against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was determined. Additionally, the phenolic compounds and carotenoids in each extract were identified and quantified by a high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array and mass spectrometer detectors (HPLC-DAD-MS/MS). The ethanol/water and water extracts, which presented the highest phenolic contents (5163 and 1745μg/g extract, respectively), with ellagic acid as the major phenolic compound, proved to have the highest ROS and RNS scavenging potential. Nevertheless, in general, ellagic acid was less effective in scavenging ROS (IC(50) from 1.7 to 108μg/ml) and RNS (IC(50) from 0.05 to 0.59μg/ml), when compared to gallic acid (IC(50) from 0.4 to 226μg/ml for ROS and IC(50) from 0.04 to 0.12μg/ml for RNS). The results obtained in the present study clearly demonstrated that the in vitro antioxidant efficiency of C. villosum extracts was closely related to their contents of phenolic compounds.

  13. Oxygen- and Nitrogen-Enriched 3D Porous Carbon for Supercapacitors of High Volumetric Capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Liu, Kang; Gao, Xiang; Yao, Bin; Huo, Kaifu; Cheng, Yongliang; Cheng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Dongchang; Wang, Bo; Sun, Wanmei; Ding, Dong; Liu, Meilin; Huang, Liang

    2015-11-11

    Efficient utilization and broader commercialization of alternative energies (e.g., solar, wind, and geothermal) hinges on the performance and cost of energy storage and conversion systems. For now and in the foreseeable future, the combination of rechargeable batteries and electrochemical capacitors remains the most promising option for many energy storage applications. Porous carbonaceous materials have been widely used as an electrode for batteries and supercapacitors. To date, however, the highest specific capacitance of an electrochemical double layer capacitor is only ∼200 F/g, although a wide variety of synthetic approaches have been explored in creating optimized porous structures. Here, we report our findings in the synthesis of porous carbon through a simple, one-step process: direct carbonization of kelp in an NH3 atmosphere at 700 °C. The resulting oxygen- and nitrogen-enriched carbon has a three-dimensional structure with specific surface area greater than 1000 m(2)/g. When evaluated as an electrode for electrochemical double layer capacitors, the porous carbon structure demonstrated excellent volumetric capacitance (>360 F/cm(3)) with excellent cycling stability. This simple approach to low-cost carbonaceous materials with unique architecture and functionality could be a promising alternative to fabrication of porous carbon structures for many practical applications, including batteries and fuel cells.

  14. Magnetism of single-walled silicon carbide nanotubes doped by boron, nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghnaoui, Ahmed; Boufelfel, Ahmed

    2012-09-01

    We calculated, using spin polarized density functional theory, the electronic properties of zigzag (10,0) and armchair (6,6) semiconductor silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) doped once at the time with boron, nitrogen, and oxygen. We have looked at the two possible scenarios where the guest atom X (B, N, O), replaces the silicon XSi, or the carbon atom XC, in the unit cell. We found that in the case of one atom B @ SiCNT replacing a carbon atom position annotated by BC exhibits a magnetic moment of 1 μB/cell in both zigzag and armchair nanotubes. Also, B replacing Si, (BSi), induce a magnetic moment of 0.46 μB/cell in the zigzag (10,0) but no magnetic moment in armchair (6,6). For N substitution; (NC) and (NSi) each case induce a magnetic moment of 1 μB/cell in armchair (6,6), while NSi give rise to 0.75 μB/cell in zigzag (10,0) and no magnetic moment for NC. In contrast the case of OC and OSi did not produce any net magnetic moment in both zigzag and armchair geometries.

  15. Localized reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates inhibit escape of Listeria monocytogenes from vacuoles in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jesse T; Tsang, Albert W; Swanson, Joel A

    2003-11-15

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) evades being killed after phagocytosis by macrophages by escaping from vacuoles into cytoplasm. Activated macrophages are listericidal, in part because they can retain Lm in vacuoles. This study examined the contribution of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) to the inhibition of Lm escape from vacuoles. Lm escaped from vacuoles of nonactivated macrophages within 30 min of infection. Macrophages activated with IFN-gamma, LPS, IL-6, and a neutralizing Ab against IL-10 retained Lm within the vacuoles, and inhibitors of ROI and RNI blocked inhibition of vacuolar escape to varying degrees. Measurements of Lm escape in macrophages from gp91(phox-/-) and NO synthase 2(-/-) mice showed that vacuolar retention required ROI and was augmented by RNI. Live cell imaging with the fluorogenic probe dihydro-2',4,5,6,7,7'-hexafluorofluorescein coupled to BSA (DHFF-BSA) indicated that oxidative chemistries were generated rapidly and were localized to Lm vacuoles. Chemistries that oxidized DHFF-BSA were similar to those that retained Lm in phagosomes. Fluorescent conversion of DHFF-BSA occurred more efficiently in smaller vacuoles, indicating that higher concentrations of ROI or RNI were generated in more confining volumes. Thus, activated macrophages retained Lm within phagosomes by the localization of ROI and RNI to vacuoles, and by their combined actions in a small space

  16. Graphene functionalization with nitrogen and oxygen: controlled modification of the electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, Peter; Marsden, Alexander; Wilson, Neil; Bell, Gavin; Quigley, David

    2014-03-01

    For many applications it is essential to modify the electronic properties of graphene in a controlled fashion. This can be achieved via oxygen and nitrogen functionalization in ultra-high vacuum, leading to a system in which electronic and structural properties can be systematically studied. Here we present insights from DFT calculations on functionalized graphene systems, such as the low-energy configurations and simulated transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, binding energies and effective band structures (EBS) of the N and O decorated graphene sheets. We directly compare our results with experiments on CVD grown graphene. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES - performed at the Antares beamline of Synchrotron SOLEIL, France) resolves the band structure changes on functionalization, whilst the simulated TEM images provide feedback for the interpretation of low-voltage aberration-corrected TEM measurements. Combined, the computational and experimental results have important implications for the manipulation of electronic properties in graphene by controlled functionalization. We acknowledge funding by the EPSRC through grant number EP/H00341X/1.

  17. Production characteristics of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in water using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Timoshkin, Igor; Given, Martin; MacGregor, Scott

    2016-07-01

    A pulsed discharge, a DC corona discharge, and a plasma jet are separately generated above a water surface, and reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the water are investigated. ROS/RNS in water after the sparging of the off-gas of a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge (PB-DBD) are also investigated. H2O2, NO2 -, and NO3 - are detected after plasma exposure and only NO3 - after off-gas sparging. Short-lifetime species in plasma are found to play an important role in H2O2 and NO2 - production and long-lifetime species in NO3 - production. NO x may inhibit H2O2 production through OH consumption to produce HNO2 and HNO3. O3 does not contribute to ROS/RNS production. The pulsed plasma exposure is found to be effective for the production of H2O2 and NO2 -, and the off-gas sparging of the PB-DBD for the production of NO3 -.

  18. Nitrogen fixation in sediments along a depth transect through the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gier, Jessica; Sommer, Stefan; Löscher, Carolin R.; Dale, Andrew W.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Treude, Tina

    2016-07-01

    The potential coupling of nitrogen (N2) fixation and sulfate reduction (SR) was explored in sediments of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Sediment samples were retrieved by a multiple corer at six stations along a depth transect (70-1025 m water depth) at 12° S, covering anoxic and hypoxic bottom water conditions. Benthic N2 fixation, determined by the acetylene reduction assay, was detected at all sites, with highest rates between 70 and 253 m and lower rates at greater depth. SR rates decreased with increasing water depth. N2 fixation and SR overlapped in sediments, suggesting a potential coupling of both processes. However, a weak positive correlation of their activity distribution was detected by principle component analysis. A potential link between N2 fixation and sulfate-reducing bacteria was indicated by the molecular analysis of nifH genes. Detected nifH sequences clustered with the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfonema limicola at the 253 m station. However, nifH sequences of other stations clustered with uncultured organisms, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes (Clostridia) rather than with known sulfate reducers. The principle component analysis revealed that benthic N2 fixation in the Peruvian OMZ is controlled by organic matter (positive) and free sulfide (negative). No correlation was found between N2 fixation and ammonium concentrations (even at levels > 2022 µM). N2 fixation rates in the Peruvian OMZ sediments were in the same range as those measured in other organic-rich sediments.

  19. Regulation of Murine Intestinal Inflammation by Reactive Metabolites of Oxygen and Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Krieglstein, Christian F.; Cerwinka, Wolfgang H.; Laroux, F. Stephen; Salter, James W.; Russell, Janice M.; Schuermann, Guido; Grisham, Matthew B.; Ross, Christopher R.; Granger, D. Neil

    2001-01-01

    Several reports have implicated reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites (RONS) in the initiation and/or progression of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). We have investigated the role of three key RONS-metabolizing enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS], superoxide dismutase [SOD], nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NADPH] oxidase) in a murine model of IBD. Mice genetically deficient (−/−) in either iNOS or the p47phox subunit of NADPH oxidase, transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress SOD, and their respective wild-type (WT) littermates were fed dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days to induce colitis. In addition, the specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W was used in DSS-treated WT and p47phox−/− mice. WT mice responded to DSS feeding with progressive weight loss, bloody stools, elevated serum NOX and colonic mucosal injury with neutrophil infiltration. Both the onset and severity of colitis were significantly attenuated in iNOS−/− and 1400W-treated WT mice. While the responses to DSS did not differ between WT and p47phox−/− mice, enhanced protection was noted in 1400W-treated p47phox−/− mice. Interestingly, SODTg mice exhibited more severe colitis than their WT littermates. These findings reveal divergent roles for superoxide and iNOS-derived NO in intestinal inflammation. PMID:11696587

  20. Porous Carbon Nanosheets Codoped with Nitrogen and Sulfur for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Heyang; Hou, Yang; Wen, Zhenhai; Guo, Xiaoru; Chen, Junhong; He, Zhen

    2015-08-26

    In this work, a simple synthesis strategy has been developed for the preparation of nitrogen- and sulfur-codoped porous carbon nanosheets (N/S-CNS) as a cathode catalyst for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The as-prepared N/S-CNS showed favorable features for electrochemical energy conversion such as high surface area (1004 m(2) g(-1)), defect structure, and abundant exposure of active sites that arose primarily from porous nanosheet morphology. Benefiting from the unique nanostructure, the resulting nanosheets exhibited effective electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The onset potential of the N/S-CNS in linear-sweep voltammetry was approximately -0.05 V vs Ag/AgCl in neutral phosphate buffer saline. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that the ohmic and charge-transfer resistance of the codoped catalyst were 1.5 and 14.8 Ω, respectively, both of which were lower than that of platinum/carbon (Pt/C). Furthermore, the electron-transfer number of the N/S-CNS was calculated to be ∼3.5, suggesting that ORR on the catalyst proceeds predominantly through the favorable four-electron pathway. The MFC with N/S-CNS as a cathode catalyst generated current density (6.6 A m(-2)) comparable to that with Pt/C (7.3 A m(-2)). The high durability and low price indicate that N/S-CNS can be a competitive catalyst for applications of MFCs.

  1. Formation, Reactivity, and Properties of Nondative Late Transition Metal–Oxygen and–Nitrogen Bonds

    PubMed Central

    FULTON, J. ROBIN; HOLLAND, ANDREW W.; FOX, DANIEL J.; BERGMAN*, ROBERT G.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes containing bonds between heteroatoms such as nitrogen and oxygen and “late” transition metals (i.e., those located on the right side of the transition series) have been implicated as reactive intermediates in numerous important catalytic systems. Despite this, our understanding of such M–X linkages still lags behind that of their M–H and M–C analogues. New synthetic strategies have now made possible the isolation and study of a variety of monomeric late-metal alkoxide, aryloxide, and amide complexes, including parent hydroxide and amide species. The heteroatoms in these materials form surprisingly strong bonds to their metal centers, and their bond energies do not necessarily correlate with the energies of the corresponding H–X bonds. The M–X complexes typically exhibit nucleophilic reactivity, in some cases form strong hydrogen bonds to proton donors, and even deprotonate relatively weak acids. These observations, as well as thermodynamic investigations, suggest that late metal–heteroatom bonds are strongly polarized and possess significant ionic character, properties that play an important role in their interactions with organic compounds. PMID:11790088

  2. Global rate coefficients for ionization and recombination of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Annaloro, Julien; Morel, Vincent; Bultel, Arnaud; Omaly, Pierre

    2012-07-15

    The flow field modeling of planetary entry plasmas, laser-induced plasmas, inductively coupled plasmas, arcjets, etc., requires to use Navier-Stokes codes. The kinetic mechanisms implemented in these codes involve global (effective) rate coefficients. These rate coefficients result from the excited states coupling during a quasi-steady state. In order to obtain these global rate coefficients over a wide electron temperature (T{sub e}) range for ionization and recombination of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon, the behavior of their excited states is investigated using a zero-dimensional (time-dependent) code. The population number densities of these electronic states are considered as independent species. Their relaxation is studied within the range 3000 K{<=}T{sub e}{<=}20 000 K and leads to the determination of the ionization (k{sub i}) and recombination (k{sub r}) global rate coefficients. Comparisons with existing data are performed. Finally, the ratio k{sub i}/k{sub r} is compared with the Saha equilibrium constant. This ratio increases more rapidly than the equilibrium constant for T{sub e}>15 000 K.

  3. The role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in airway epithelial gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, L D; Krunkosky, T M; Voynow, J A; Adler, K B

    1998-01-01

    The body first encounters deleterious inhaled substances, such as allergens, industrial particles, pollutants, and infectious agents, at the airway epithelium. When this occurs, the epithelium and its resident inflammatory cells respond defensively by increasing production of cytokines, mucus, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). As inflammation in the airway increases, additional infiltrating cells increase the level of these products. Recent interest has focused on ROS/RNS as potential modulators of the expression of inflammation-associated genes important to the pathogenesis of various respiratory diseases. ROS/RNS appear to play a variety of roles that lead to changes in expression of genes such as interleukin-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. By controlling this regulation, the reactive species can serve as exogenous stimuli, as intercellular signaling molecules, and as modulators of the redox state in epithelial cells. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms affected by ROS/RNS acting in these capacities should aid in the understanding of how stimulated defense mechanisms within the airway can lead to disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:9788898

  4. Metal-organic framework-derived bamboo-like nitrogen-doped graphene tubes as an active matrix for hybrid oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Pan, Hengyu; Higgins, Drew; Cao, Ruiguo; Zhang, Guoqi; Lv, Haifeng; Wu, Kangbing; Cho, Jaephil; Wu, Gang

    2015-03-25

    In this work, large size (i.e., diameter > 100 nm) graphene tubes with nitrogen-doping are prepared through a high-temperature graphitization process of dicyandiamide (DCDA) and Iron(II) acetate templated by a novel metal-organic framework (MIL-100(Fe)). The nitrogen-doped graphene tube (N-GT)-rich iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) catalysts exhibit inherently high activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in more challenging acidic media. Furthermore, aiming to improve the activity and stability of conventional Pt catalysts, the ORR active N-GT is used as a matrix to disperse Pt nanoparticles in order to build a unique hybrid Pt cathode catalyst. This is the first demonstration of the integration of a highly active Fe-N-C catalyst with Pt nanoparticles. The synthesized 20% Pt/N-GT composite catalysts demonstrate significantly enhanced ORR activity and H(2) -air fuel cell performance relative to those of 20% Pt/C, which is mainly attributed to the intrinsically active N-GT matrix along with possible synergistic effects between the non-precious metal active sites and the Pt nanoparticles. Unlike traditional Pt/C, the hybrid catalysts exhibit excellent stability during the accelerated durability testing, likely due to the unique highly graphitized graphene tube morphologies, capable of providing strong interaction with Pt nanoparticles and then preventing their agglomeration.

  5. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanoparticle-Carbon Nanofiber Composite as an Efficient Metal-Free Cathode Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Saito, Nagahiro; Ishizaki, Takahiro

    2016-03-23

    Metal-free nitrogen-doped carbon materials are currently considered at the forefront of potential alternative cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cell technology. Despite numerous efforts in this area over the past decade, rational design and development of a new catalyst system based on nitrogen-doped carbon materials via an innovative approach still present intriguing challenges in ORR catalysis research. Herein, a new kind of nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle-carbon nanofiber (NCNP-CNF) composite with highly efficient and stable ORR catalytic activity has been developed via a new approach assisted by a solution plasma process. The integration of NCNPs and CNFs by the solution plasma process can lead to a unique morphological feature and modify physicochemical properties. The NCNP-CNF composite exhibits a significantly enhanced ORR activity through a dominant four-electron pathway in an alkaline solution. The enhancement in ORR activity of NCNP-CNF composite can be attributed to the synergistic effects of good electron transport from highly graphitized CNFs as well as abundance of exposed catalytic sites and meso/macroporosity from NCNPs. More importantly, NCNP-CNF composite reveals excellent long-term durability and high tolerance to methanol crossover compared with those of a commercial 20 wt % supported on Vulcan XC-72. We expect that NCNP-CNF composite prepared by this synthetic approach can be a promising metal-free cathode catalyst candidate for ORR in fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  6. BON-BONs: cyclic molecules with a boron-oxygen-nitrogen backbone. Computational studies of their thermodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Lawong, Aloysus K; Ball, David W

    2012-04-01

    Although they were first reported in 1963, molecules with a boron-oxygen-nitrogen dimeric backbone do not seem to have been investigated seriously in terms of thermodynamic properties. Here we report on the calculated structures and properties, including thermodynamics, of several so-called "BON-BON" molecules. With the popularity of nitrogen-containing substituents on new high-energy materials, nitro-substituted BON-BONs were a focus of our investigation. A total of 42 BON-BON molecules were evaluated, and thermochemical analysis shows a decrease in the specific enthalpy of combustion or decomposition with increasing NO(2) content, consistent with other systems.

  7. Linking agricultural crop management and air quality models for regional to national-scale nitrogen assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooter, E. J.; Bash, J. O.; Benson, V.; Ran, L.

    2012-05-01

    While nitrogen (N) is an essential element for life, human population growth and demands for energy, transportation and food can lead to excess nitrogen in the environment. A modeling framework is described and implemented, to promote a more integrated, process-based and system-level approach to the estimation of ammonia (NH3) emissions resulting from the application of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers to agricultural soils in the United States. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate plant demand-driven fertilizer applications to commercial cropland throughout the continental US. This information is coupled with a process-based air quality model to produce continental-scale NH3 emission estimates. Regional cropland NH3 emissions are driven by the timing and amount of fertilizer applied, local meteorology, and ambient air concentrations. An evaluation of EPIC-simulated crop management activities associated with fertilizer application at planting compared with similar USDA state-level event estimates shows temporally progressive spatial patterns that agree well with one another. EPIC annual inorganic fertilizer application amounts also agree well with reported spatial patterns produced by others, but domain-wide the EPIC values are biased about 6 % low. Preliminary application of the integrated fertilizer application and air quality modeling system produces a modified geospatial pattern of seasonal NH3 emissions that improves current simulations of observed atmospheric nitrate concentrations. This modeling framework provides a more dynamic, flexible, and spatially and temporally resolved estimate of NH3 emissions than previous factor-based NH3 inventories, and will facilitate evaluation of alternative nitrogen and air quality policy and adaptation strategies associated with future climate and land use changes.

  8. Linking agricultural crop management and air quality models for regional to national-scale nitrogen assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooter, E. J.; Bash, J. O.; Benson, V.; Ran, L.

    2012-10-01

    While nitrogen (N) is an essential element for life, human population growth and demands for energy, transportation and food can lead to excess nitrogen in the environment. A modeling framework is described and implemented to promote a more integrated, process-based and system-level approach to the estimation of ammonia (NH3) emissions which result from the application of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers to agricultural soils in the United States. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate plant demand-driven fertilizer applications to commercial cropland throughout the continental US. This information is coupled with a process-based air quality model to produce continental-scale NH3 emission estimates. Regional cropland NH3 emissions are driven by the timing and amount of inorganic NH3 fertilizer applied, soil processes, local meteorology, and ambient air concentrations. Initial fertilizer application often occurs when crops are planted. A state-level evaluation of EPIC-simulated, cumulative planted area compares well with similar USDA reported estimates. EPIC-annual, inorganic fertilizer application amounts also agree well with reported spatial patterns produced by others, but domain-wide the EPIC values are biased about 6% low. Preliminary application of the integrated fertilizer application and air quality modeling system produces a modified geospatial pattern of seasonal NH3 emissions that improves current simulations of observed atmospheric particle nitrate concentrations. This modeling framework provides a more dynamic, flexible, and spatially and temporally resolved estimate of NH3 emissions than previous factor-based NH3 inventories, and will facilitate evaluation of alternative nitrogen and air quality policy and adaptation strategies associated with future climate and land use changes.

  9. Cobalt Ferrite Bearing Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Layers Spatially Separated with Microporous Carbon as Efficient Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Varchaswal; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2016-08-17

    The present work discloses how high-quality dispersion of fine particles of cobalt ferrite (CF) could be attained on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (CF/N-rGO) and how this material in association with a microporous carbon phase could deliver significantly enhanced activity toward electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our study indicates that the microporous carbon phase plays a critical role in spatially separating the layers of CF/N-rGO and in creating a favorable atmosphere to ensure the seamless distribution of the reactants to the active sites located on CF/N-rGO. In terms of the ORR current density, the heat-treated hybrid catalyst at 150 °C (CF/N-rGO-150) is found to be clearly outperforming (7.4 ± 0.5 mA/cm(2)) the state-of-the-art 20 wt % Pt-supported carbon catalyst (PtC) (5.4 ± 0.5 mA/cm(2)). The mass activity and stability of CF-N-rGO-150 are distinctly superior to PtC even after 5000 electrochemical cycles. As a realistic system level exploration of the catalyst, testing of a primary zinc-air battery could be demonstrated using CF/N-rGO-150 as the cathode catalyst. The battery is giving a galvanostatic discharge time of 15 h at a discharge current density of 20 mA/cm(2) and a specific capacity of ∼630 mAh g(-1) in 6 M KOH by using a Zn foil as the anode. Distinctly, the battery performance of this system is found to be superior to that of PtC in less concentrated KOH solution as the electrolyte.

  10. Ultrahigh Capacity Lithium-Oxygen Batteries Enabled by Dry-Pressed Holey Graphene Air Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Moitoso, Brandon; Martinez-Martinez, Chalynette; Walsh, Evan D; Lacey, Steven D; Kim, Jae-Woo; Dai, Liming; Hu, Liangbing; Connell, John W

    2017-03-31

    Lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries have the highest theoretical energy density of all the Li-based energy storage systems, but many challenges prevent them from practical use. A major obstacle is the sluggish performance of the air cathode, where both oxygen reduction (discharge) and oxygen evolution (charge) reactions occur. Recently, there have been significant advances in the development of graphene-based air cathode materials with a large surface area and catalytically active for both oxygen reduction and evolution reactions especially with additional catalysts or dopants. However, most studies reported so far have examined air cathodes with a limited areal mass loading rarely exceeding 1 mg/cm(2). Despite the high gravimetric capacity values achieved, therefore, the actual (areal) capacities of those batteries were far from sufficient for practical applications. Here, we present the fabrication, performance, and mechanistic investigations of high mass loading (up to 10 mg/cm(2)) graphene-based air electrodes for high-performance Li-O2 batteries. Such air electrodes could be easily prepared within minutes under solvent-free and binder-free conditions by compression molding holey graphene materials because of their unique dry compressibility associated with in-plane holes. Li-O2 batteries with a high mass loading thus prepared exhibited excellent gravimetric capacity as well as ultrahigh areal capacity (as high as ~40 mAh/cm(2)). The batteries were also cycled at a high curtailing areal capacity (2 mAh/cm(2)), showing a better cycling stability for ultrathick cathodes than their thinner counterparts. Detailed postmortem analyses of the electrodes clearly revealed the battery failure mechanisms under both primary and secondary modes, arising from the oxygen diffusion blockage and the catalytic site deactivation, respectively. These results strongly suggest that the dry-pressed holey graphene electrodes are a highly viable architectural platform for high capacity

  11. Methanol Droplet Extinction in Oxygen/Carbon-dioxide/Nitrogen Mixtures in Microgravity: Results from the International Space Station Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the need to understand the flammability limits of condensed-phase fuels in microgravity, isolated single droplet combustion experiments were carried out in the Combustion Integrated Rack Facility onboard the International Space Station. Experimental observations of methanol droplet combustion and extinction in oxygen/carbon-dioxide/nitrogen mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressure in quiescent microgravity environment are reported for initial droplet diameters varying between 2 mm to 4 mm in this study.The ambient oxygen concentration was systematically lowered from test to test so as to approach the limiting oxygen index (LOI) at fixed ambient pressure. At one atmosphere pressure, ignition and some burning were observed for an oxygen concentration of 13% with the rest being nitrogen. In addition, measured droplet burning rates, flame stand-off ratios, and extinction diameters are presented for varying concentrations of oxygen and diluents. Simplified theoretical models are presented to explain the observed variations in extinction diameter and flame stand-off ratios.

  12. Facile synthesis of nitrogen and sulfur codoped carbon from ionic liquid as metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    She, Yiyi; Lu, Zhouguang; Ni, Meng; Li, Li; Leung, Michael K H

    2015-04-08

    Developing metal-free catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a great challenge in the development of fuel cells. Nitrogen and sulfur codoped carbon with remarkably high nitrogen content up to 13.00 at % was successfully fabricated by pyrolysis of homogeneous mixture of exfoliated graphitic flakes and ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Bimi][Tf2N]). The exfoliated graphite flakes served as a structure-directing substance as well as additional carbon source in the fabrication. It was demonstrated that the use of graphite flakes increased the nitrogen doping level, optimized the composition of active nitrogen configurations, and enlarged the specific surface area of the catalysts. Electrochemical characterizations revealed that the N and S codoped carbon fabricated by this method exhibited superior catalytic activities toward ORR under both acidic and alkaline conditions. Particularly in alkaline solution, the current catalyst compared favorably to the conventional 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst via four-electron transfer pathway with better ORR selectivity. The excellent catalytic activity was mainly ascribed to high nitrogen doping content, appropriate constitution of active nitrogen configurations, large specific surface area, and synergistic effect of N and S codoping.

  13. Accumulation of non-superoxide anion reactive oxygen species mediates nitrogen-limited alcoholic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Ferreira, Ana; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Barbosa, Catarina; Rodrigues, Fernando; Costa, Vítor; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Ludovico, Paula; Leão, Cecília

    2010-12-01

    Throughout alcoholic fermentation, nitrogen depletion is one of the most important environmental stresses that can negatively affect the yeast metabolic activity and ultimately leads to fermentation arrest. Thus, the identification of the underlying effects and biomarkers of nitrogen limitation is valuable for controlling, and therefore optimizing, alcoholic fermentation. In this study, reactive oxygen species (ROS), plasma membrane integrity, and cell cycle were evaluated in a wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation in nitrogen-limiting medium under anaerobic conditions. The results indicated that nitrogen limitation leads to an increase in ROS and that the superoxide anion is a minor component of the ROS, but there is increased activity of both Sod2p and Cta1p. Associated with these effects was a decrease in plasma membrane integrity and a persistent cell cycle arrest at G(0)/G(1) phases. Moreover, under these conditions it appears that autophagy, evaluated by ATG8 expression, is induced, suggesting that this mechanism is essential for cell survival but does not prevent the cell cycle arrest observed in slow fermentation. Conversely, nitrogen refeeding allowed cells to reenter cell cycle by decreasing ROS generation and autophagy. Altogether, the results provide new insights on the understanding of wine fermentations under nitrogen-limiting conditions and further indicate that ROS accumulation, evaluated by the MitoTracker Red dye CM-H(2)XRos, and plasma membrane integrity could be useful as predictive markers of fermentation problems.

  14. The development of a non-cryogenic nitrogen/oxygen supply system. [using hydrazine/water electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenough, B. M.; Mahan, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A hydrazine/water electrolysis process system module design was fabricated and tested to demonstrate component and module performance. This module is capable of providing both the metabolic oxygen for crew needs and the oxygen and nitrogen for spacecraft leak makeup. The component designs evolved through previous R and D efforts, and were fabricated and tested individually and then were assembled into a complete module which was successfully tested for 1000 hours to demonstrate integration of the individual components. A survey was made of hydrazine sensor technology and a cell math model was derived.

  15. Latitudinal variations of nitrogen and triple oxygen isotopic composition of nitrate in the marine boundary layer over the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, S.; Frey, M. M.; Grudzieu, A.; Martins, J.; Savarino, J.

    2007-12-01

    The analysis of the isotopic composition of nitrate (NO3-) in various environments is a fast-growing field of investigation. Atmospheric nitrate oxygen isotopes feature the appealing potential to record a footprint of the cycling between ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx), through the transmission of an isotope anomaly (Δ17O=δ17O - 0.52 ×~δ18O) borne by the ozone molecule. This discovery has lead to the idea that the isotopic composition of nitrate preserved in firn and ice of the polar ice caps could be used as a proxy of past ozone chemistry and thus provide the long-awaited link between the climate record from ice cores and the oxidative capacity of ancient atmospheres. To better constrain the relationships between nitrate oxygen isotopes and the oxidative state of the atmosphere, we have carried out a series of ship-borne measurements in the marine boundary layer (MBL) between Cape Town, Rep. South Africa (30°S) and Bremerhaven, Germany (50°N) covering a wide range of meteorological and atmospheric chemistry conditions. Onboard the R/V Polarstern, we measured surface ozone and collected size-segregated aerosols with a latitudinal resolution of 4°. Besides major ions concentrations, nitrate contained in these samples was analyzed for all stable isotopes of its constituents (namely δ15N, δ17O and δ18O), using the denitrifier technique (based on Kaiser et al., Anal. Chem., 2007), thus providing an unprecedented latitudinal profile of nitrate isotopes in the MBL. Variations of nitrate isotopic compositions are studied as a function of particle size and changing MBL background chemistry, ranging from the remote and unpolluted Southern Atlantic Ocean (O3 20 nmol~mol-1) to the polluted English Channel area (O3 45 nmol~mol-1), through air masses influenced by North-African desert dust in the subtropical North Atlantic. Known main chemical mechanisms responsible for the formation of atmospheric nitrate are used to test our understanding of the causes for the

  16. Performance analysis of small capacity liquid nitrogen generator based on Joule-Thomson refrigerator coupled with air separation membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska-Hajnus, Agnieszka; Chorowski, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Joule - Thomson small capacity refrigerators supplied with gas mixture are studied theoretically and experimentally for a variety of applications. They can be especially promising when coupled with membrane air separators. We present liquid nitrogen generation system based on Joule - Thomson cooler joined with air separation membrane. Hollow fiber membrane is used for nitrogen separation from compressed and purified atmospheric air. Joule-Thomson refrigerator operates with a dedicated nitrogen - hydrocarbons mixture and provides a cooling power used for the separated nitrogen liquefaction. Special attention has been paid to a heat exchanger coupling the Joule- Thomson refrigerator with the membrane air separator. This paper describes the system design, the procedure of its working parameters optimization and tests results.

  17. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  18. Analysis of Mexico City urban air pollution using nitrogen dioxide column density measurements from UV/Visible spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Payne, D. G.; Grutter, M.; Melamed, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The differential optical absorption spectroscopy method (DOAS) was used to get column densities of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the analysis of zenith sky UV/visible spectra. Since the optical path length provides critical information in interpreting NO2 column densities, in conjunction with NO2 column densities, the oxygen dimer (O4) column density was retrieved to give insight into the optical path length. We report observations of year round NO2 and O4 column densities (from august 2009 to september 2010) from which the mean seasonal levels and the daily evolution, as well as the occurrence of elevated pollution episodes are examined. Surface nitric oxide (NO) and NO2 from the local monitoring network, as well as wind data and the vertical aerosol density from continuous Lidar measurements are used in the analysis to investigate specific events in the context of local emissions from vehicular traffic, photochemical production and transport from industrial emissions. The NO2 column density measurements will enhance the understanding Mexico City urban air pollution. Recent research has begun to unravel the complexity of the air pollution problem in Mexico City and its effects not only locally but on a regional and global scale as well.

  19. A model to predict the removal of oxygen from air using a zirconia solid electrolyte membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J.; Suitor, J. W.; Glazer, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A finite difference mathematical model has been developed to predict the removal of oxygen from air using a zirconia separation cell. The model predicts the electrical and mass transfer processes in circular disk cells with either axial or radial current flow in the electrodes and in tubular cells with axial current flow in the electrodes. Representative results are presented and discussed.

  20. The Determination of the Percent of Oxygen in Air Using a Gas Pressure Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    The experiment of determination of the percent of oxygen in air is performed in a general chemistry laboratory in which students compare the results calculated from the pressure measurements obtained with the calculator-based systems to those obtained in a water-measurement method. This experiment allows students to explore a fundamental reaction…

  1. Growth of oxygen bubbles during recharge process in zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Chen, Huicui; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang; Xing, Haoqiang

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable zinc-air battery used for energy storage has a serious problem of charging capacity limited by oxygen bubble coalescence. Fast removal of oxygen bubbles adhered to the charging electrode surface is of great importance for improving the charging performance of the battery. Here we show that the law of oxygen bubble growth can be achieved by means of phase-field simulation, revealing two phenomena of bubble detachment and bubble coalescence located in the charging electrode on both sides. Hydrodynamic electrolyte and partial insulation structure of the charging electrode are investigated to solve the problem of oxygen bubble coalescence during charging. Two types of rechargeable zinc-air battery are developed on the basis of different tri-electrode configurations, demonstrating that the charging performance of the battery with electrolyte flow (Ⅰ) is better than that of the battery with the partially insulated electrode (Ⅱ), while the battery Ⅱ is superior to the battery Ⅰ in the discharging performance, cost and portability. The proposed solutions and results would be available for promoting commercial application of rechargeable zinc-air batteries or other metal-air batteries.

  2. 75 FR 11877 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability of draft... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: First External Review Draft... (welfare-based) NAAQS for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) and oxides of sulfur (SO X ). Because NO X , SO...

  3. 75 FR 57463 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability of draft... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft... for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) and oxides of sulfur (SO X ). Because NO X , SO X , and...

  4. Passive dosimeters for nitrogen dioxide in personal/indoor air sampling: A review

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang Ho; Morandi, Maria T.; Weisel, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of nitrogen dioxide concentrations in both outdoor and indoor environments, including personal exposures, is a fundamental step for linking atmospheric nitrogen dioxide levels to potential health and ecological effects. The measurement has been conducted generally in two ways: active (pumped) sampling and passive (diffusive) sampling. Diffusion samplers, initially developed and used for workplace air monitoring, have been found to be useful and cost-effective alternatives to conventional pumped samplers for monitoring ambient, indoor and personal exposures at the lower concentrations found in environmental settings. Since the 1970s, passive samplers have been deployed for ambient air monitoring in urban and rural sites, and to determine personal and indoor exposure to NO2. This article reviews the development of NO2 passive samplers, the sampling characteristics of passive samplers currently available, and their application in ambient and indoor air monitoring and personal exposure studies. The limitations and advantages of the various passive sampler geometries (i.e., tube, badge, and radial type) are also discussed. This review provides researchers and risk assessors with practical information about NO2 passive samplers, especially useful when designing field sampling strategies for exposure and indoor/outdoor air sampling. PMID:18446185

  5. Metal-Organic Framework Derived Hierarchically Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanostructures as Novel Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Zhou, Yazhou; Yang, Guohai; Jeon, Ju Won; Lemmon, John P.; Du, Dan; Nune, Satish K.; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-10-01

    The hierarchically porous nitrogen-doped carbon materials, derived from nitrogen-containing isoreticular metal-organic framework-3 (IRMOF-3) through direct carbonization, exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity in alkaline solution for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This high activity is attributed to the 10 presence of high percentage of quaternary and pyridinic nitrogen, the high surface area as well as good conductivity. When IRMOF-3 was carbonized at 950 °C (CIRMOF-3-950), it showed four-electron reduction pathway for ORR and exhibited better stability (about 78.5% current density was maintained) than platinum/carbon (Pt/C) in the current durability test. In addition, CIRMOF-3-950 presented high selectivity to cathode reactions compared to commercial Pt/C.

  6. Characterization of a novel micro-pressure swirl reactor for removal of chemical oxygen demand and total nitrogen from domestic wastewater at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qingkai; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Suiyi; Bian, Dejun; Huo, Mingxin; Zhou, Dandan; Huo, Hongliang

    2017-02-06

     A novel micro-pressure swirl reactor (MPSR) was designed and applied to treat domestic wastewater at low temperature by acclimating microbial biomass with steadily decreasing temperature from 15 to 3 °C. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) was constantly removed by 85% and maintained below 50 mg L(-1) in the effluent during the process. When the air flow was controlled at 0.2 m(3) h(-1), a swirl circulation was formed in the reactor, which created a dissolved oxygen (DO) gradient with a low DO zone in the center and a high DO zone in the periphery for denitrification and nitrification. 81% of total nitrogen was removed by this reactor, in which ammonium was reduced by over 90%. However, denitrification was less effective because of the presence of low levels of oxygen. The progressively decreasing temperature favored acclimation of psychrophilic bacteria in the reactor, which replaced mesophilic bacteria in the process of treatment.

  7. The effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on FFV exhaust emissions using M85

    SciTech Connect

    Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.; Ng, H.K.; Baudino, J.H.; Colucci, C.P.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents results of emission tests of a flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) powered by an SI engine, fueled by M85 (methanol), and supplied with oxygen-enriched intake air containing 21, 23, and 25 vol% O2. Engine-out total hydrocarbons (THCs) and unburned methanol were considerably reduced in the entire FTP cycle when the O2 content of the intake air was either 23 or 25%. However, CO emissions did not vary much, and NOx emissions were higher. HCHO emissions were reduced by 53% in bag 1, 84% in bag 2, and 59% in bag 3 of the FTP cycle with 25% oxygen-enriched intake air. During cold-phase FTP,reductions of 42% in THCs, 40% in unburned methanol, 60% in nonmethane hydrocarbons, and 45% in nonmethane organic gases (NMOGs) were observed with 25% enriched air; NO{sub x} emissions increased by 78%. Converter-out emissions were also reduced with enriched air but to a lesser degree. FFVs operating on M85 that use 25% enriched air during only the initial 127 s of cold-phase FTP or that use 23 or 25% enriched air during only cold-phase FTP can meet the reactivity-adjusted NMOG, CO, NO{sub x}, and HCHO emission standards of the transitional low-emission vehicle.

  8. Layered perovskite oxide: a reversible air electrode for oxygen evolution/reduction in rechargeable metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Takahashi, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Haruyuki; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Takano, Hiroshi; Ohguri, Nobuaki; Matsuda, Motofumi; Murota, Tadatoshi; Uosaki, Kohei; Ueda, Wataru

    2013-07-31

    For the development of a rechargeable metal-air battery, which is expected to become one of the most widely used batteries in the future, slow kinetics of discharging and charging reactions at the air electrode, i.e., oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), respectively, are the most critical problems. Here we report that Ruddlesden-Popper-type layered perovskite, RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 (n = 3), functions as a reversible air electrode catalyst for both ORR and OER at an equilibrium potential of 1.23 V with almost no overpotentials. The function of RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 as an ORR catalyst was confirmed by using an alkaline fuel cell composed of Pd/LaSr3Fe3O10-2x(OH)2x·H2O/RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 as an open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.23 V was obtained. RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 also catalyzed OER at an equilibrium potential of 1.23 V with almost no overpotentials. Reversible ORR and OER are achieved because of the easily removable oxygen present in RP-LaSr3Fe3O10. Thus, RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 minimizes efficiency losses caused by reactions during charging and discharging at the air electrode and can be considered to be the ORR/OER electrocatalyst for rechargeable metal-air batteries.

  9. Nitrogen removal from wastewater and bacterial diversity in activated sludge at different COD/N ratios and dissolved oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Bernat, Katarzyna; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Sobolewska, Joanna; Wojnowska-Baryła, Irena

    2012-01-01

    The impact of the organic carbon to nitrogen ratio (chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N) in wastewater and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on carbon and nitrogen removal efficiency, and total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) communities in activated sludge in constantly aerated sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) was determined. At DO of 0.5 and 1.5 mg O2/L during the aeration phase, the efficiency of ammonia oxidation exceeded 90%, with nitrates as the main product. Nitrification and denitrification achieved under the same operating conditions suggested the simultaneous course of these processes. The most effective nitrogen elimination (above 50%) was obtained at the COD/N ratio of 6.8 and DO of 0.5 mg O2/L. Total bacterial diversity was similar in all experimental series, however, for both COD/N ratios of 6.8 and 0.7, higher values were observed at DO of 0.5 mg O2/L. The diversity and abundance of AOB were higher in the reactors with the COD/N ratio of 0.7 in comparison with the reactors with the COD/N of 6.8. For both COD/N ratios applied, the AOB population was not affected by oxygen concentration. Amplicons with sequences indicating membership of the genus Nitrosospira were the determinants of variable technological conditions.

  10. Air-water oxygen exchange in a large whitewater river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Robert O.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water gas exchange governs fluxes of gas into and out of aquatic ecosystems. Knowing this flux is necessary to calculate gas budgets (i.e., O2) to estimate whole-ecosystem metabolism and basin-scale carbon budgets. Empirical data on rates of gas exchange for streams, estuaries, and oceans are readily available. However, there are few data from large rivers and no data from whitewater rapids. We measured gas transfer velocity in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as decline in O2 saturation deficit, 7 times in a 28-km segment spanning 7 rapids. The O2 saturation deficit exists because of hypolimnetic discharge from Glen Canyon Dam, located 25 km upriver from Lees Ferry. Gas transfer velocity (k600) increased with slope of the immediate reach. k600 was -1 in flat reaches, while k600 for the steepest rapid ranged 3600-7700 cm h-1, an extremely high value of k600. Using the rate of gas exchange per unit length of water surface elevation (Kdrop, m-1), segment-integrated k600 varied between 74 and 101 cm h-1. Using Kdrop we scaled k600 to the remainder of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. At the scale corresponding to the segment length where 80% of the O2 exchanged with the atmosphere (mean length = 26.1 km), k600 varied 4.5-fold between 56 and 272 cm h-1 with a mean of 113 cm h-1. Gas transfer velocity for the Colorado River was higher than those from other aquatic ecosystems because of large rapids. Our approach of scaling k600 based on Kdrop allows comparing gas transfer velocity across rivers with spatially heterogeneous morphology.

  11. Nitrogen-doped graphene-wrapped iron nanofragments for high-performance oxygen reduction electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Na Young; Shin, Dong Yun; Park, Hee-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Joon Kwon, S.; Lim, Dong-Hee; Bong, Ki Wan; Son, Jeong Gon; Kim, Jin Young

    2017-03-01

    Transition metals, such as iron (Fe)- or cobalt (Co)-based nanomaterials, are promising electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells due to their high theoretical activity and low cost. However, a major challenge to using these metals in place of precious metal catalysts for ORR is their low efficiency and poor stability, thus new concepts and strategies should be needed to address this issue. Here, we report a hybrid aciniform nanostructures of Fe nanofragments embedded in thin nitrogen (N)-doped graphene (Fe@N-G) layers via a heat treatment of graphene oxide-wrapped iron oxide (Fe2O3) microparticles with melamine. The heat treatment leads to transformation of Fe2O3 microparticles to nanosized zero-valent Fe fragments and formation of core-shell structures of Fe nanofragments and N-doped graphene layers. Thin N-doped graphene layers massively promote electron transfer from the encapsulated metals to the graphene surface, which efficiently optimizes the electronic structure of the graphene surface and thereby triggers ORR activity at the graphene surface. With the synergistic effect arising from the N-doped graphene and Fe nanoparticles with porous aciniform nanostructures, the Fe@N-G hybrid catalyst exhibits high catalytic activity, which was evidenced by high E1/2 of 0.82 V, onset potential of 0.93 V, and limiting current density of 4.8 mA cm-2 indicating 4-electron ORR, and even exceeds the catalytic stability of the commercial Pt catalyst.

  12. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopes of Low-Level Nitrate in Groundwater For Environmental Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Sources of nitrate in water from human activities include fertilizers, animal feedlots, septic systems, wastewater treatment lagoons, animal wastes, industrial wastes and food processing wastes. Nitrogen and Oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrate in groundwater is essential to source identification and environmental forensics as nitrate from different sources carry distinctly different N and O isotopic compositions. Nitrate is extracted from groundwater samples and converted into AgNO3 using ion exchange techniques. The purified AgNO3 is then broken down into N2 and CO for N and O isotopic measurement. Since nitrate concentrations in natural ground waters are usually less than 2 mg/L, however, such method has been limited by minimum sample size it requires, in liters, which is highly nitrate concentration dependent. Here we report a TurboVap- Denitrifier method for N and O isotopic measurement of low-level dissolved nitrate, based on sample evaporation and isotopic analysis of nitrous oxide generated from nitrate by denitrifying bacteria that lack N2O- reductase activity. For most groundwater samples with mg/L-level of nitrate direct injection of water samples in mLs is applied. The volume of sample is adjusted according to its nitrate concentration to achieve a final sample size optimal for the system. For water samples with ug/L-level of nitrate, nitrate is highly concentrated using a TurboVap evaporator, followed by isotopic measurement with Denitrifier method. Benefits of TurboVap- Denitrifier method include high sensitivity and better precision in both isotopic data. This method applies to both freshwater and seawater. The analyses of isotopic reference materials in nitrate-free de-ionized water and seawater are included as method controls to correct for any blank effects. The isotopic data from groundwater and ocean profiles demonstrate the consistency of the data produced by the TurboVap-Denitrifier method.

  13. Elevated Generation of Reactive Oxygen/Nitrogen Species in Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ian C.; Zajac, Allan J.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Botten, Jason; Hjelle, Brian; Matalon, Sadis

    2002-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a life-threatening respiratory disease characterized by profound pulmonary edema and myocardial depression. Most cases of HCPS in North America are caused by Sin Nombre virus (SNV), which is carried asymptomatically by deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). The underlying pathophysiology of HCPS is poorly understood. We hypothesized that pathogenic SNV infection results in increased generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS), which contribute to the morbidity and mortality of HCPS. Human disease following infection with SNV or Andes virus was associated with increased nitrotyrosine (NT) adduct formation in the lungs, heart, and plasma and increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the lungs compared to the results obtained for normal human volunteers. In contrast, NT formation was not increased in the lungs or cardiac tissue from SNV-infected deer mice, even at the time of peak viral antigen expression. In a murine (Mus musculus) model of HCPS (infection of NZB/BLNJ mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13), HCPS-like disease was associated with elevated expression of iNOS in the lungs and NT formation in plasma, cardiac tissue, and the lungs. In this model, intraperitoneal injection of 1400W, a specific iNOS inhibitor, every 12 h during infection significantly improved survival without affecting intrapulmonary fluid accumulation or viral replication, suggesting that cardiac damage may instead be the cause of mortality. These data indicate that elevated production of RONS is a feature of pathogenic New World hantavirus infection and that pharmacologic blockade of iNOS activity may be of therapeutic benefit in HCPS cases, possibly by ameliorating the myocardial suppressant effects of RONS. PMID:12134039

  14. Gas bubble disease: mortalities of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, in water with constant total gas pressure and different oxygen-nitrogen ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding gas-bubble disease can be found in a recent publication by Rucker (1972); one by the National Academy of Science (Anonymous in press); and an unpublished report by Weitkamp and Katz (1973)." Most discussions on gas-bubble disease have dealt with the inert gas, nitrogen-oxygen was given a secondary role. It is important to know the relationship of nitrogen and oxygen when we are concerned with the total gas pressure in water. Where water becomes aerated at dams or falls, oxygen and nitrogen are usually about equally saturated, however, many of the samples analyzed from the Columbia River indicate that nitrogen is often about 7% higher than oxygen when expressed as a percentage. When oxygen is removed from water by metabolic and chemical action, or when oxygen is added to the water by photosynthesis, there is a definite change in the ratio of oxygen and the inert gases (mainly nitrogen with some argon, etc.). This present study shows the effect of varying the oxygen and nitrogen ratio in water on fingerling coho salmon, Oncorh.llnchllS kislltch, while maintaining a constant total gas pressure. The primary purpose of these experiments was to determine differences in lethality of various gas ratios of oxygen and nitrogen at a constant total gas pressure of 119%. I also wished to determine whether there was a difference in susceptibility between sizes and stocks of juvenile coho. Also to be examined was the effect of reducing the oJl:ygen while holding the nitrogen constant.

  15. Breathing 100 percent oxygen compared with 50 percent oxygen:50 percent nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while they were breathing 100 percent oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms were observed. Severe venous gas emboli (VGE) were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10, 20, and 40 percent of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100 percent oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. It is shown that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100 percent oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  16. A Facile Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Highly Porous Carbon Nanoplatelets: Efficient Catalysts for Oxygen Electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaqing; Zhang, Xianlei; Ma, Xiuxiu; Guo, Wenhui; Wang, Chunchi; Asefa, Tewodros; He, Xingquan

    2017-02-27

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great importance for various renewable energy conversion technologies such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Heteroatom-doped carbon nanomaterials have proven to be robust metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR in the above-mentioned energy devices. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of novel highly porous N-doped carbon nanoplatelets (N-HPCNPs) derived from oatmeal (or a biological material) and we show the materials' high-efficiency as electrocatalyst for ORR. The obtained N-HPCNPs hybrid materials exhibit superior electrocatalytic activities towards ORR, besides excellent stability and good methanol tolerance in both basic and acidic electrolytes. The unique nanoarchitectures with rich micropores and mesopores, as well as the high surface area-to-volume ratios, present in the materials significantly increase the density of accessible catalytically active sites in them and facilitate the transport of electrons and electrolyte within the materials. Consequently, the N-HPCNPs catalysts hold a great potential to serve as low-cost and highly efficient cathode materials in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  17. A Facile Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Highly Porous Carbon Nanoplatelets: Efficient Catalysts for Oxygen Electroreduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaqing; Zhang, Xianlei; Ma, Xiuxiu; Guo, Wenhui; Wang, Chunchi; Asefa, Tewodros; He, Xingquan

    2017-02-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great importance for various renewable energy conversion technologies such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Heteroatom-doped carbon nanomaterials have proven to be robust metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR in the above-mentioned energy devices. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of novel highly porous N-doped carbon nanoplatelets (N-HPCNPs) derived from oatmeal (or a biological material) and we show the materials’ high-efficiency as electrocatalyst for ORR. The obtained N-HPCNPs hybrid materials exhibit superior electrocatalytic activities towards ORR, besides excellent stability and good methanol tolerance in both basic and acidic electrolytes. The unique nanoarchitectures with rich micropores and mesopores, as well as the high surface area-to-volume ratios, present in the materials significantly increase the density of accessible catalytically active sites in them and facilitate the transport of electrons and electrolyte within the materials. Consequently, the N-HPCNPs catalysts hold a great potential to serve as low-cost and highly efficient cathode materials in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  18. A Facile Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Highly Porous Carbon Nanoplatelets: Efficient Catalysts for Oxygen Electroreduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaqing; Zhang, Xianlei; Ma, Xiuxiu; Guo, Wenhui; Wang, Chunchi; Asefa, Tewodros; He, Xingquan

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great importance for various renewable energy conversion technologies such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Heteroatom-doped carbon nanomaterials have proven to be robust metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR in the above-mentioned energy devices. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of novel highly porous N-doped carbon nanoplatelets (N-HPCNPs) derived from oatmeal (or a biological material) and we show the materials’ high-efficiency as electrocatalyst for ORR. The obtained N-HPCNPs hybrid materials exhibit superior electrocatalytic activities towards ORR, besides excellent stability and good methanol tolerance in both basic and acidic electrolytes. The unique nanoarchitectures with rich micropores and mesopores, as well as the high surface area-to-volume ratios, present in the materials significantly increase the density of accessible catalytically active sites in them and facilitate the transport of electrons and electrolyte within the materials. Consequently, the N-HPCNPs catalysts hold a great potential to serve as low-cost and highly efficient cathode materials in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). PMID:28240234

  19. Air separation and oxygen storage properties of hexagonal rare-earth manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abughayada, Castro

    This dissertation presents evaluation results of hexagonal Y1-x RxMnO3+delta (R = Er, Y, Dy, Pr, La, Tb and Ho) rare-earth manganites for prospective air separation applications. In these materials, oxygen content is sensitively dependent on the surrounding conditions of temperature and/or oxygen partial pressure, and therefore they exhibit the ability to selectively absorb, store, and release significant amounts of separated oxygen from air. This study presents a full characterization of their thermogravimetric characteristics and air separation capabilities. With the expected potential impact of oxygen content on the physical properties of these materials, the scope of this work is expanded to explore other relevant properties such as magnetic, transport, and dilatometric characteristics. Single-phase polycrystalline samples of these materials were achieved in the hexagonal P63cm phase through solid state reaction at elevated temperatures. Further annealings under reducing conditions were required for samples with large rare-earth cations in order to suppress the competing perovskite structure and form in the anticipated hexagonal phase. Thermogravimetric measurements in oxygen atmospheres demonstrated that samples with the larger R ionic radii show rapid and reversible incorporation of significant amounts of excess oxygen (0.41 > delta > 0) at an unusual low temperature range ~190-325 °C. The reversible oxygen storage characteristics of HoMnO3+delta and related materials shown by the fast incorporation and release of interstitial oxygen at easily accessible elevated temperatures of ~300 °C demonstrate the feasibility and potential for low-cost thermal swing adsorption TSA process for oxygen separation and enrichment from air. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction measurements confirmed the presence of three line compounds RMnO3+delta, the oxygen stoichiometric P6 3cm (delta = 0 for all R), the intermediate oxygen content superstructure phase R3c (delta ~ 0

  20. Oxygen-selective immobilized liquid membranes for operation of lithium-air batteries in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Liu, Wei

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, nonaqueous-electrolyte-based Li-air batteries with O2-selective immobilized liquid membranes have been developed and operated in ambient air with 20~30% relative humidity(RH). Continuous anhydrous O2 can be supplied from the ambient through a membrane barrier layer at interface of the cathode and ambient air. The membranes allow O2 permeate through while blocking moisture. These membranes were prepared by loading O2-selective liquid fluids such as silicone oils into porous supports such as porous metal sheets and Teflon (PTFE) films. It was found that silicone oil of high viscosity shows better performance. The membrane performance was not affected by the oil loading temperature. The immobilized silicone oil (viscosity 100,000cst) membrane in porous PTFE film enabled the Li-air batteries with Ketjen black carbon air electrodes to operate in ambient air (with 20% RH) for 16.3 days with a specific capacity of 789 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 2182 Wh/kg carbon. Its performance is much better than reference battery assembled with the same battery material but by use of a commercial, porous PTFE diffusion membranes as the moisture barrier layer on the cathode, which only had a discharge time of 5.5 days corresponding to a specific capacity of 267 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 704 Wh/kg carbon. The Li-air battery with the present selective membrane barrier layer even showed better performance in ambient air operation (20% RH) than the reference battery tested in the dry air box (< 1% RH).

  1. Oxygen and air nanobubble water solution promote the growth of plants, fishes, and mice.

    PubMed

    Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun; Kawato, Yoshitaka; Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Morimoto, Tokimitsu; Koizumi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles (<200 nm in diameter) have several unique properties such as long lifetime in liquid owing to its negatively charged surface, and its high gas solubility into the liquid owing to its high internal pressure. They are used in variety of fields including diagnostic aids and drug delivery, while there are no reports assessing their effects on the growth of lives. Nanobubbles of air or oxygen gas were generated using a nanobubble aerator (BUVITAS; Ligaric Company Limited, Osaka, Japan). Brassica campestris were cultured hydroponically for 4 weeks within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Sweetfish (for 3 weeks) and rainbow trout (for 6 weeks) were kept either within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Finally, 5 week-old male DBA1/J mice were bred with normal free-chaw and free-drinking either of oxygen-nanobubble water or of normal water for 12 weeks. Oxygen-nanobubble significantly increased the dissolved oxygen concentration of water as well as concentration/size of nanobubbles which were relatively stable for 70 days. Air-nanobubble water significantly promoted the height (19.1 vs. 16.7 cm; P<0.05), length of leaves (24.4 vs. 22.4 cm; P<0.01), and aerial fresh weight (27.3 vs. 20.3 g; P<0.01) of Brassica campestris compared to normal water. Total weight of sweetfish increased from 3.0 to 6.4 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 3.0 to 10.2 kg in air-nanobubble water. In addition, total weight of rainbow trout increased from 50.0 to 129.5 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 50.0 to 148.0 kg in air-nanobubble water. Free oral intake of oxygen-nanobubble water significantly promoted the weight (23.5 vs. 21.8 g; P<0.01) and the length (17.0 vs. 16.1 cm; P<0.001) of mice compared to that of normal water. We have demonstrated for the first time that oxygen and air-nanobubble water may be potentially effective tools for the growth of lives.

  2. EFFECTS OF OXYGEN AND AIR MIXING ON VOID FRACTIONS IN A LARGE SCALE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R; Hector Guerrero, H; Michael Restivo, M

    2008-09-11

    Oxygen and air mixing with spargers was performed in a 30 foot tall by 30 inch diameter column, to investigate mass transfer as air sparged up through the column and removed saturated oxygen from solution. The mixing techniques required to support this research are the focus of this paper. The fluids tested included water, water with an antifoam agent (AFA), and a high, solids content, Bingham plastic, nuclear waste simulant with AFA, referred to as AZ01 simulant, which is non-radioactive. Mixing of fluids in the column was performed using a recirculation system and an air sparger. The re-circulation system consisted of the column, a re-circulating pump, and associated piping. The air sparger was fabricated from a two inch diameter pipe concentrically installed in the column and open near the bottom of the column. The column contents were slowly re-circulated while fluids were mixed with the air sparger. Samples were rheologically tested to ensure effective mixing, as required. Once the fluids were adequately mixed, oxygen was homogeneously added through the re-circulation loop using a sintered metal oxygen sparger followed by a static mixer. Then the air sparger was re-actuated to remove oxygen from solution as air bubbled up through solution. To monitor mixing effectiveness several variables were monitored, which included flow rates, oxygen concentration, differential pressures along the column height, fluid levels, and void fractions, which are defined as the percent of dissolved gas divided by the total volume of gas and liquid. Research showed that mixing was uniform for water and water with AFA, but mixing for the AZ101 fluid was far more complex. Although mixing of AZ101 was uniform throughout most of the column, gas entrapment and settling of solids significantly affected test results. The detailed test results presented here provide some insight into the complexities of mixing and void fractions for different fluids and how the mixing process itself

  3. Oxygen and Air Nanobubble Water Solution Promote the Growth of Plants, Fishes, and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun; Kawato, Yoshitaka; Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Morimoto, Tokimitsu; Koizumi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles (<200 nm in diameter) have several unique properties such as long lifetime in liquid owing to its negatively charged surface, and its high gas solubility into the liquid owing to its high internal pressure. They are used in variety of fields including diagnostic aids and drug delivery, while there are no reports assessing their effects on the growth of lives. Nanobubbles of air or oxygen gas were generated using a nanobubble aerator (BUVITAS; Ligaric Company Limited, Osaka, Japan). Brassica campestris were cultured hydroponically for 4 weeks within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Sweetfish (for 3 weeks) and rainbow trout (for 6 weeks) were kept either within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Finally, 5 week-old male DBA1/J mice were bred with normal free-chaw and free-drinking either of oxygen-nanobubble water or of normal water for 12 weeks. Oxygen-nanobubble significantly increased the dissolved oxygen concentration of water as well as concentration/size of nanobubbles which were relatively stable for 70 days. Air-nanobubble water significantly promoted the height (19.1 vs. 16.7 cm; P<0.05), length of leaves (24.4 vs. 22.4 cm; P<0.01), and aerial fresh weight (27.3 vs. 20.3 g; P<0.01) of Brassica campestris compared to normal water. Total weight of sweetfish increased from 3.0 to 6.4 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 3.0 to 10.2 kg in air-nanobubble water. In addition, total weight of rainbow trout increased from 50.0 to 129.5 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 50.0 to 148.0 kg in air-nanobubble water. Free oral intake of oxygen-nanobubble water significantly promoted the weight (23.5 vs. 21.8 g; P<0.01) and the length (17.0 vs. 16.1 cm; P<0.001) of mice compared to that of normal water. We have demonstrated for the first time that oxygen and air-nanobubble water may be potentially effective tools for the growth of lives. PMID:23755221

  4. Decomposition of nitric oxide in a hot nitrogen stream to synthesize air for hypersonic wind tunnel combustion testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumdieck, J. F.; Zlatarich, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    A clean source of high enthalpy air was obtained from the exothermic decomposition of nitric oxide in the presence of strongly heated nitrogen. A nitric oxide jet was introduced into a confined coaxial nitrogen stream. Measurements were made of the extent of mixing and reaction. Experimental results are compared with one- and two-dimensional chemical kinetics computations. Both analyses predict much lower reactivity than was observed experimentally. Inlet nitrogen temperatures above 2400 K were sufficient to produce experimentally a completely reacted gas stream of synthetic air.

  5. [Delivery room resuscitation with room air and oxygen in newborns. State of art, recommendations].

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Ryszard; Musialik-Swietlińska, Ewa; Swietliński, Janusz; Pawlik, Dorota; Bober, Klaudiusz

    2008-01-01

    The authors present and discuss the current data, concerning delivery room resuscitation with oxygen and room air in neonates. On the ground of the results obtained from literature and the Polish National Survey on Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care, 2007/2008 issue, the authors give the following proposals regarding optimal oxygen treatment: 1. there is a need for optimizing tissue oxygenation in order to prevent injury caused by radical oxygen species; 2. newborn resuscitation should be monitored by measuring the haemoglobin saturation - the values above 90%, found in resuscitated newborn within the first minutes of life may be dangerous and cause tissue injury; 3. starting the resuscitation with oxygen concentration lower than 40% and adjusting it according to the effects of the procedure - the less mature infant the lower oxygen concentration at the beginning of resuscitation; 4. heart rate >100/min and SatO2Hb between 70-80% within the first minutes of life should not be an indication for increasing oxygen concentration.

  6. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  7. Vitamin E alters alveolar type II cell phospholipid synthesis in oxygen and air

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, K.A.; Snyder, J.M.; Stenzel, W.; Saito, K.; Warshaw, J.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Newborn rats were injected with vitamin E or placebo daily until 6 days after birth. The effect of vitamin E pretreatment on in vitro surfactant phospholipid synthesis was examined in isolated type II cells exposed to oxygen or air form 24 h in vitro. Type II cells were also isolated from untreated 6-day-old rats and cultured for 24 h in oxygen or air with control medium or vitamin E supplemented medium. These cells were used to examine the effect of vitamin E exposure in vitro on type II cell phospholipid synthesis and ultrastructure. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis was reduced in cells cultured in oxygen as compared with air. This decrease was not prevented by in vivo pretreatment or in vitro supplementation with vitamin E. Vitamin E pretreatment increased the ratio of disaturated PC to total PC and increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis. The volume density of lamellar bodies in type II cells was increased in cells maintained in oxygen. Vitamin E did not affect the volume density of lamellar bodies. We conclude that in vitro hyperoxia inhibits alveolar type II cell phosphatidylcholine synthesis without decreasing lamellar body volume density and that supplemental vitamin E does not prevent hyperoxia-induced decrease in phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

  8. Surface-Tuned Co3O4 Nanoparticles Dispersed on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene as an Efficient Cathode Electrocatalyst for Mechanical Rechargeable Zinc-Air Battery Application.

    PubMed

    Singh, Santosh K; Dhavale, Vishal M; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-09-30

    The most vital component of the fuel cells and metal-air batteries is the electrocatalyst, which can facilitate the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a significantly reduced overpotential. The present work deals with the development of surface-tuned cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanoparticles dispersed on nitrogen-doped graphene as a potential ORR electrocatalyst possessing some unique advantages. The thermally reduced nitrogen-doped graphene (NGr) was decorated with three different morphologies of Co3O4 nanoparticles, viz., cubic, blunt edged cubic, and spherical, by using a simple hydrothermal method. We found that the spherical Co3O4 nanoparticle supported NGr catalyst (Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h) has acquired a significant activity makeover to display the ORR activity closely matching with the state-of-the-art Pt supported carbon (PtC) catalyst in alkaline medium. Subsequently, the Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h catalyst has been utilized as the air electrode in a Zn-air battery, which was found to show comparable performance to the system derived from PtC. Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h catalyst has shown several hours of flat discharge profile at the discharge rates of 10, 20, and 50 mA/cm(2) with a specific capacity and energy density of ~590 mAh/g-Zn and ~840 Wh/kg-Zn, respectively, in the primary Zn-air battery system. In conjunction, Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h has outperformed as an air electrode in mechanical rechargeable Zn-air battery as well, which has shown consistent flat discharge profile with minimal voltage loss at a discharge rate of 50 mA/cm(2). The present results, thus demonstrate that the proper combination of the tuned morphology of Co3O4 with NGr will be a promising and inexpensive material for efficient and ecofriendly cathodes for Zn-air batteries.

  9. Cavity Ring Down Absorption of Oxygen in Air as a Temperature Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanares, Carlos; Nyaupane, Parashu R.

    2016-06-01

    The A-band of oxygen has been measured at low resolution at temperatures between 90 K and 373 K using the phase shift cavity ring down (PS-CRD) technique. For temperatures between 90 K and 295 K, the PS-CRD technique presented here involves an optical cavity attached to a cryostat. The static cell and mirrors of the optical cavity are all inside a vacuum chamber at the same temperature of the cryostat. The temperature of the cell can be changed between 77 K and 295 K. For temperatures above 295 K, a hollow glass cylindrical tube without windows has been inserted inside an optical cavity to measure the temperature of air flowing through the tube. The cavity consists of two highly reflective mirrors which are mounted parallel to each other and separated by a distance of 93 cm. In this experiment, air is passed through a heated tube. The temperature of the air flowing through the tube is determined by measuring the intensity of the oxygen absorption as a function of the wavenumber. The A-band of oxygen is measured between 298 K and 373 K, with several air flow rates. Accuracy of the temperature measurement is determined by comparing the calculated temperature from the spectra with the temperature obtained from a calibrated thermocouple inserted at the center of the tube.

  10. Change in strategy of solving psychological tests: evidence of nitrogen narcosis in shallow air-diving.

    PubMed

    Petri, N M

    2003-01-01

    The depths from 10 to 30 m are usually not considered narcotic in scuba air-diving, and evidence of psychomotor disturbances attributable to nitrogen narcosis at these depths is weak and contradictory. 15 experienced male divers were tested in a chamber at 1, 2, 3, and 4 bars over five consecutive days using a battery of computer generated psychological tests-Computerized Reactionmeter Drenovac (CRD-series). Total test solving time, minimal single task solving time, total "ballast" time, and total number of errors were recorded. Nitrogen narcosis effects were evident at all hyperbaric pressures with marked performance differences among subjects. MANOVA revealed significant effects of nitrogen partial pressure for groups of the same variables as follows: total test solving time (p < 0.001), total "ballast" time (p < 0.001), and total number of errors (p = 0.038), but not for minimal single task solving time. ANOVA showed significant effects of pressure only on tests of visual discrimination of signal location (total test solving time: p = 0.012, total "ballast" time: p < 0.001), simple convergent visual orientation (total test solving time: p = 0.012), and convergent thinking (total test solving time: p = 0.002, total number of errors: p = 0.049). The order of the pressure exposures had no influence on subject performance. Impaired psychomotor processing found during air exposures from 2 to 4 bars suggests that nitrogen narcosis at depths usually considered safe from its effects might be a problem in underwater operations that require accuracy, speed, limited time of performance, and complex psychomotor skills.

  11. Review of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide: Risk and Exposure Assessment Planning Document

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting a review of the air quality criteria and the primary (health-based) national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The major phases of the process for reviewing NAAQS include the following: (...

  12. Cobalt nanoparticles/nitrogen-doped graphene with high nitrogen doping efficiency as noble metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jingwen; Hassan, Mehboob; Zhu, Dongsheng; Guo, Liping; Bo, Xiangjie

    2017-03-15

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (N/GR) has been considered as active metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the nitrogen (N) doping efficiency is very low and only few N atoms are doped into the framework of GR. To boost the N doping efficiency, in this work, a confined pyrolysis method with high N doping efficiency is used for the preparation of cobalt nanoparticles/nitrogen-doped GR (Co/N/GR). Under the protection of SiO2, the inorganic ligand NH3 in cobalt amine complex ([Co(NH3)6](3+)) is trapped in the confined space and then can be effectively doped into the framework of GR without the introduction of any carbon residues. Meanwhile, due to the redox reaction between the cobalt ions and carbon atoms of GR, Co nanoparticles are supported into the framework of N/GR. Due to prevention of GR layer aggregation with SiO2, the Co/N/GR with high dispersion provides sufficient surface area and maximum opportunity for the exposure of Co nanoparticles and active sites of N dopant. By combination of enhanced N doping efficiency, Co nanoparticles and high dispersion of GR sheets, the Co/N/GR is remarkably active, cheap and selective noble-metal free catalysts for ORR.

  13. Current legal framework and practical aspects of oxygen therapy during air travel.

    PubMed

    Cascante-Rodrigo, Jose Antonio; Iridoy-Zulet, Amaia Atenea; Alfonso-Imízcoz, María

    2015-01-01

    It is unusual for pulmonologists to be familiar with the European and US regulations governing the administration of oxygen during air travel and each airline's policy in this respect. This lack of knowledge is in large part due to the scarcity of articles addressing this matter in specialized journals and the noticeably limited information provided by airlines on their websites. In this article we examine the regulations, the policies of some airlines and practical aspects that must be taken into account, so that the questions of a patient who may need to use oxygen during a flight may be answered satisfactorily.

  14. Characteristics of nitrogen balance in open-air and greenhouse vegetable cropping systems of China.

    PubMed

    Ti, Chaopu; Luo, Yongxia; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) loss from vegetable cropping systems has become a significant environmental issue in China. In this study, estimation of N balances in both open-air and greenhouse vegetable cropping systems in China was established. Results showed that the total N input in open-air and greenhouse vegetable cropping systems in 2010 was 5.44 and 2.60 Tg, respectively. Chemical fertilizer N input in the two cropping systems was 201 kg N ha(-1) per season (open-air) and 478 kg N ha(-1) per season (greenhouse). The N use efficiency (NUE) was 25.9 ± 13.3 and 19.7 ± 9.4% for open-air and greenhouse vegetable cropping systems, respectively, significantly lower than that of maize, wheat, and rice. Approximately 30.6% of total N input was accumulated in soils and 0.8% was lost by ammonia volatilization in greenhouse vegetable system, while N accumulation and ammonia volatilization accounted for 19.1 and 11.1%, respectively, of total N input in open-air vegetable systems.

  15. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 5: Density and liquid level measurement instrumentation for the cryogenic fluids oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    Information is presented on instrumentation for density measurement, liquid level measurement, quantity gauging, and phase measurement. Coverage of existing information directly concerned with oxygen was given primary emphasis. A description of the physical principle of measurement for each instrumentation type is included. The basic materials of construction are listed if available from the source document for each instrument discussed. Cleaning requirements, procedures, and verification techniques are included.

  16. Revisiting the mechanism of nitrogen fluorescence emission induced by femtosecond filament in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suyu; Jiang, Yuanfei; Chen, Anmin; He, Lanhai; Liu, Dunli; Jin, Mingxing

    2017-03-01

    The backward propagating and side emitted fluorescence during the femtosecond filamentation in air is experimentally investigated in this paper. By comparing the fluorescence emission in the circular and linear polarization states, we find that in the shorter focal length case, the direct ionization of N 2 greatly affects the fluorescence emission behaviors: the fluorescence from N2 + and N 2 is always stronger in the linear and circular polarization cases, respectively. Based on the observation, the emission mechanism of nitrogen fluorescence emission induced by a femtosecond filament is discussed.

  17. Determination of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban stream sediments.

    PubMed

    Witter, Amy E; Nguyen, Minh H

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that PAH transformation products such as ketone or quinone-substituted PAHs (OPAHs) are potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activators that elicit toxicological effects independent of those observed for PAHs. Here, we measured eight OPAHs, two sulfur-containing (SPAH), one oxygen-containing (DBF), and one nitrogen-containing (CARB) heterocyclic PAHs (i.e. ΣONS-PAHs = OPAH8 + SPAH + DBF + CARB) in 35 stream sediments collected from a small (∼1303 km(2)) urban watershed located in south-central Pennsylvania, USA. Combined ΣONS-PAH concentrations ranged from 59 to 1897 μg kg(-1) (mean = 568 μg kg(-1); median = 425 μg kg(-1)) and were 2.4 times higher in urban versus rural areas, suggesting that activities taking place on urban land serve as a source of ΣONS-PAHs to sediments. To evaluate urban land use metrics that might explain these data, Spearman rank correlation analyses was used to evaluate the degree of association between ΣONS-PAH concentrations and urban land-use/land-cover metrics along an urban-rural transect at two spatial scales (500-m and 1000-m upstream). Combined ΣONS-PAH concentrations showed highly significant (p < 0.0001) correlations with ΣPAH19, residential and commercial/industrial land use (RESCI), and combined state and local road miles (MILES), suggesting that ΣONS-PAHs originate from similar sources as PAHs. To evaluate OPAH sources, a subset of ΣONS-PAHs for which reference assemblages exist, an average OPAH fractional assemblage for urban sediments was derived using agglomerative hierarchal cluster (AHC) analysis, and compared to published OPAH source profiles. Urban sediments from the Condoguinet Creek (n = 21) showed highly significant correlations with urban particulate matter (X(2) = 0.05, r = 0.91, p = 0.0047), suggesting that urban particulate matter is an important OPAH source to sediments in this watershed. Results suggest the inclusion of ΣONS-PAH measurements

  18. Central enhancement of the nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Zurita, A.; Pérez, I.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Coelho, P. R. T.; Gadotti, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Bar-induced gas inflows towards galaxy centres are recognised as a key agent for the secular evolution of galaxies. One immediate consequence of this inflow is the accumulation of gas in the centre of galaxies where it can form stars and alter the chemical and physical properties. Aims: Our aim is to study whether the properties of the ionised gas in the central parts of barred galaxies are altered by the presence of a bar and whether the change in central properties is related to bar and/or parent galaxy properties. Methods: We use a sample of nearby face-on disc galaxies with available SDSS spectra, morphological decomposition, and information on the stellar population of their bulges, to measure the internal Balmer extinction from the Hα to Hβ line ratio, star formation rate, and relevant line ratios to diagnose chemical abundances and gas density. Results: The distributions of all the parameters analysed (internal Balmer extinction at Hβ (c(Hβ)), star formation rate per unit area, electron density, [N ii]λ6583/Hα emission-line ratio, ionisation parameter, and nitrogen-to-oxygen (N/O) abundance ratio) are different for barred and unbarred galaxies, except for the R23 metallicity tracer and the oxygen abundance obtained from photoionisation models. The median values of the distributions of these parameters point towards (marginally) larger dust content, star formation rate per unit area, electron density, and ionisation parameter in the centres of barred galaxies than in their unbarred counterparts. The most remarkable difference between barred and unbarred galaxies appears in the [N ii]λ6583/Hα line ratio that is, on average, ~25% higher in barred galaxies, due to an increased N/O abundance ratio in the centres of these galaxies compared to the unbarred ones. We analyse these differences as a function of galaxy morphological type (as traced by bulge-to-disc light ratios and bulge mass), total stellar mass, and bulge Sérsic index. We observe an

  19. A neutron diffraction study of oxygen and nitrogen ordering in a kinetically stable orthorhombic iron doped titanium oxynitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, On Ying; Parkin, Ivan P; Hyett, Geoffrey

    2012-06-15

    The synthesis of a polycrystalline powder sample of iron doped orthorhombic titanium oxynitride, Ti{sub 2.92}Fe{sub 0.01}O{sub 4.02}N{sub 0.98}, on the scale of 0.7 g has been achieved. This was conducted by the unusual route of delamination from a steel substrate of a thin film deposited using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition. The structure of the titanium oxynitride is presented, determined from a combined analysis of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data. The use of neutron diffraction allows the position of the oxygen and nitrogen ions in the material to be reported unambiguously for the first time. In this study Ti{sub 2.92}Fe{sub 0.01}O{sub 4.02}N{sub 0.98} is found to crystallise in the Cmcm space group, iso-structural pseudobrookite, with lattice parameters a=3.81080(6) A, b=9.6253(2) A, and c=9.8859(2) A, and contains partial oxygen-nitrogen ordering. Of the three anion sites in this structure one is exclusively occupied by oxygen, while the remaining two sites are occupied by oxygen and nitrogen in a disordered manner. Testing indicates that this iron doped titanium oxynitride is a metastable phase that decomposes above 700 Degree-Sign C into TiN and TiO{sub 2}, the thermodynamic products. - Graphical abstract: We report the synthesis of Ti{sub 2.92}Fe{sub 0.01}O{sub 4.02}N{sub 0.98} deposited as a thin film using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition onto stainless steel, which is then delaminated to produce a polycrystalline powder sample. This powder sample was used in a neutron diffraction experiment, and analysis of this data has allowed the position of the oxygen and nitrogen ions in the material to be reported unambiguously for the first time. Ti{sub 2.92}Fe{sub 0.01}O{sub 4.02}N{sub 0.98} is found to crystallise in the Cmcm space group iso-structural pseudobrookite and contains partial oxygen-nitrogen ordering. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partial oxygen and nitrogen ordering has been observed using neutron

  20. Effects of oxygen and carbon content on nitrogen removal capacities in landfill bioreactors and response of microbial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiqing; Wu, Dong; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xinghua; Xie, Bing

    2016-07-01

    In this study, landfill bioreactors were tested to treat the recalcitrant leachate-nitrogen and the impacts of relevant operational parameters on its conversion were comprehensively investigated. We found that the highly diverse microbial community in landfill bioreactors could be substantially affected by increasing biodegradable carbon and oxygen content, which led to the whole system's intrinsic nitrogen removal capacity increasing from 50 to 70 %, and meanwhile, the contribution of anammox was detected less than 20 %. The sequencing and q-PCR results showed that microbial community in bioreactor was dominated by Proteobacteria (∼35 %) and Acidobacteria (~20 %) during the whole experiment. The abundance of anammox functioning bacteria (Amx) kept at a stable level (-2.5 to -2.2 log (copies/16S rRNA)) and was not statistically correlated to the abundance of anammox bacteria. However, significant linear correlation (p < 0.05) was determined between the abundance of nirS and Proteobacteria; amoA and AOB. Redundancy analysis (RDA) suggested that although oxygen and biodegradable carbon can both impose effects on microbial community structure, only biodegradable carbon content is the determinant in the total nitrogen removal.

  1. Potential Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the Neuse River Basin: a Modeling Investigation Using CMAQ and SWAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been extensive analysis of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) regulation impacts to changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition; however, few studies have focused on watershed nitrogen transfer particularly regarding long-term predictions. In this study, we investigated impa...

  2. Development of Nanofiller-Modulated Polymeric Oxygen Enrichment Membranes for Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides in Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Jianzhong Lou; Shamsuddin Ilias

    2010-12-31

    North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, North Carolina, has undertaken this project to develop the knowledge and the material to improve the oxygen-enrichment polymer membrane, in order to provide high-grade oxygen-enriched streams for coal combustion and gasification applications. Both experimental and theoretical approaches were used in this project. The membranes evaluated thus far include single-walled carbon nano-tube, nano-fumed silica polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and zeolite-modulated polyimide membranes. To document the nanofiller-modulated polymer, molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to calculate the theoretical oxygen molecular diffusion coefficient and nitrogen molecular coefficient inside single-walled carbon nano-tube PDMS membranes, in order to predict the effect of the nano-tubes on the gas-separation permeability. The team has performed permeation and diffusion experiments using polymers with nano-silica particles, nano-tubes, and zeolites as fillers; studied the influence of nano-fillers on the self diffusion, free volume, glass transition, oxygen diffusion and solubility, and perm-selectivity of oxygen in polymer membranes; developed molecular models of single-walled carbon nano-tube and nano-fumed silica PDMS membranes, and zeolites-modulated polyimide membranes. This project partially supported three graduate students (two finished degrees and one transferred to other institution). This project has resulted in two journal publications and additional publications will be prepared in the near future.

  3. 3D PIC-MCC simulations of discharge inception around a sharp anode in nitrogen/oxygen mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2016-08-01

    We investigate how photoionization, electron avalanches and space charge affect the inception of nanosecond pulsed discharges. Simulations are performed with a 3D PIC-MCC (particle-in-cell, Monte Carlo collision) model with adaptive mesh refinement for the field solver. This model, whose source code is available online, is described in the first part of the paper. Then we present simulation results in a needle-to-plane geometry, using different nitrogen/oxygen mixtures at atmospheric pressure. In these mixtures non-local photoionization is important for the discharge growth. The typical length scale for this process depends on the oxygen concentration. With 0.2% oxygen the discharges grow quite irregularly, due to the limited supply of free electrons around them. With 2% or more oxygen the development is much smoother. An almost spherical ionized region can form around the electrode tip, which increases in size with the electrode voltage. Eventually this inception cloud destabilizes into streamer channels. In our simulations, discharge velocities are almost independent of the oxygen concentration. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind these phenomena and compare our simulations with experimental observations.

  4. [Methodology of the description of atmospheric air pollution by nitrogen dioxide by land use regression method in Ekaterinburg].

    PubMed

    Antropov, K M; Varaksin, A N

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides the description of Land Use Regression (LUR) modeling and the result of its application in the study of nitrogen dioxide air pollution in Ekaterinburg. The paper describes the difficulties of the modeling for air pollution caused by motor vehicles exhaust, and the ways to address these challenges. To create LUR model of the NO2 air pollution in Ekaterinburg, concentrations of NO2 were measured, data on factors affecting air pollution were collected, a statistical analysis of the data were held. A statistical model of NO2 air pollution (coefficient of determination R2 = 0.70) and a map of pollution were created.

  5. Effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas-turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen from a gas-turbine combustor. Combustor inlet-air temperature ranged from 450 F to 1050 F. The tests were run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NO sub x emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet-air humidity at a constant exponential rate of 19 percent per mass percent water vapor in the air. This decrease of NO sub x emission index with increasing humidity was found to be independent of inlet-air temperature.

  6. Symmetry breaking in nanostructure development of carbogenic molecular sieves: Effects of morphological pattern formation on oxygen and nitrogen transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.S.; Goellner, J.F.; Foley, H.C.

    1996-08-01

    A comprehensive study has been undertaken to establish the primary factors that control transport of oxygen and nitrogen in polymer-derived carbogenic molecular sieves (CMS). Characterization of the nanostructure of CMS derived from poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) indicates that significant physical and chemical reorganization occurs as a function of synthesis temperature. Spectroscopic measurements show a drastic decrease in oxygen and hydrogen functionality with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Structural reorganization and elimination of these heteroatoms lead to a measurable increase in the unpaired electron density in these materials. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and powder neutron diffraction are used to probe the corresponding changes in the physical structural features in the CMS. These indicate that as the pyrolysis temperature is increased, the structure of the CMS transforms from one that is disordered and therefore highly symmetric to one that is more ordered on a length scale of 15 {Angstrom} and hence less symmetric. This structural transformation process, one of symmetry breaking and pattern formation, if often observed in other nonlinear dissipative systems, but not in solids. Symmetry breaking provides the driving force for these high-temperature reorganizations, but unlike most dissipative systems, these less-symmetric structures remain frozen in place when energy is no longer applied. The impact of these nanostructural reorganizations on the molecular sieving character of the CMS is studied in terms of the physical separation of oxygen and nitrogen. 40 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Interaction of root nodule size and oxygen pressure on the rate of nitrogen fixation by cowpea and peanut

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, D.; Weaver, R.W.

    1987-04-01

    Size and anatomical features of nodules influence the rate of O/sub 2/ diffusion into nodules. Availability of oxygen can be a limiting factor in nitrogen fixation. Larger nodules have thicker cortices and low surface to volume ratio leading to lower rates of gaseous diffusion. Increased oxygen pressure in the environment alters the rate of nitrogen fixation but the rate of change may depend on the nodule size. This was investigated by measuring /sup 15/N/sub 2/ incorporation into nodules. Root nodules from 38 day old cowpea and peanut plants were collected and sorted into size groups having diameters of >3 mm, 2-3 mm, and just below 2 mm. Samples of each size group were enclosed in tubes and exposed to various combination of oxygen (8-28%) and /sup 15/N/sub 2/. With higher O/sub 2/ pressure all nodules showed increased N/sub 2/ fixation but the largest nodules showed the maximum increase. Specific activity of larger nodules was higher for N/sub 2/ fixation. For the sizes of nodules examined the largest nodules did not reflect any of the disadvantages of the large size but the benefits of higher rates of O/sub 2/ entry was evident.

  8. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 12 companies at 27 plants in 15 states in the United States during 2011. Sixty-one percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2011, U.S. producers operated at about 84 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Four companies — CF Industries Holdings Inc.; Koch Nitrogen Co.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 77 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity.

  9. Nitrogen-doped MoS2/carbon as highly oxygen-permeable and stable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Yu, Jia; Xu, Xin; Yang, Liu; Xing, Zipeng; Dai, Ying; Sun, Ye; Zou, Jinlong

    2017-01-01

    Developing non-noble metal catalysts with high oxygen-permeability and activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is crucial for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, nitrogen-doped molybdenum disulfide/carbon (N-MoS2/C) is prepared using melamine as nitrogen and carbon sources. Ammonium molybdate, thiourea and Pluronic F127 are used as Mo source, S source and surfactant, respectively. Mo-S-melamine complex precursor is obtained through the evaporation-induced self-assembly route, which is then carbonized at 800, 900 and 1000 °C to fabricate N-MoS2/C. Defect-rich N-MoS2/C has a large number of exposed active sites and a high oxygen permeability. N-MoS2/C (900 °C) with regular honeycomb structure shows the maximum power density of 0.815 W m-2, which is far higher than that of Pt/C (0.520 W m-2) and only has a decline of 1.23% after 1800 h operation in MFCs. Four-electron (4e-) reduction of O2 is the main ORR pathway for N-MoS2/C (900 °C), attributing to the efficient permeation, adsorption, activation and reduction of O2 on the active sites. The synergy among abundant defects, N-species (pyridinic N, graphitic N and Mo-Nx) and high conductivity contributes to the promising ORR activity. This simple synthetic route of N-doped metal sulfides/carbon composites displays a new prospect for preparation of ORR catalyst.

  10. An on-line optimisation of a SBR cycle for carbon and nitrogen removal based on on-line pH and Our: the role of dissolved oxygen control.

    PubMed

    Puig, S; Corominas, Ll; Traore, A; Colomer, J; Balaguer, M D; Colprim, J

    2006-01-01

    A pilot plant sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was applied in a wastewater treatment plant treating urban wastewater focused on carbon and nitrogen removal. From an initial predefined step-feed cycle definition, the evolution of the on-line monitored pH and calculated oxygen uptake rate (OUR) were analysed in terms of knowledge extraction. First, the aerobic phases of the SBR cycle were operated using an On/Off dissolved oxygen (DO) control strategy that concluded with a sinusoidal pH profile that made detecting the "ammonia valley" difficult. After changing to fuzzy logic control of the dissolved oxygen and by adding an air flow meter to the pilot plant, the pH evolution and on-line calculated OUR showed a clearer trend during the aerobic phases. Finally, a proposed algorithm for adjusting the aerobic phases of the SBR for carbon and ammonia removal is presented and discussed.

  11. Feed-derived volatile basic nitrogen increases reactive oxygen species production of blood leukocytes in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Ei; Gross, Josef J; Kawashima, Chiho; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Kida, Katsuya; Miyamoto, Akio

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated over 9 months the changes of fermentative quality of total mixed rations (TMR) containing grass silage (GS) as a major component, associated with changes in the volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) levels in an experimental dairy farm. Effects of VBN levels in TMR on metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and conception rates for dairy cows were analyzed. According to VBN levels in TMR during survey periods, three distinct phases were identified; phase A with low VBN; phase B with high VBN; and phase C with mid-VBN. Metabolic parameters in blood were all within normal range. However, during phases B and C, nitrogen metabolic indices such as blood urea nitrogen and milk urea nitrogen showed higher levels compared to those in phase A, and a simultaneous increase in ROS production by blood PMNs and the load on hepatic function in metabolic parameters was observed in the cows with a lower conception rate. This suggests that feeding TMR with elevated VBN levels due to poor fermented GS results in stimulation of ROS production by PMNs by ammonia, and negatively affects metabolism and reproductive performance in lactating dairy cow.

  12. Effects of organic carbon source, chemical oxygen demand/N ratio and temperature on autotrophic nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Guillén, J A; Yimman, Y; Lopez Vazquez, C M; Brdjanovic, D; van Lier, J B

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of the Anammox process as a cost-effective post-treatment step for anaerobic sewage treatment, the simultaneous effects of organic carbon source, chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N ratio, and temperature on autotrophic nitrogen removal was studied. In batch experiments, three operating conditions were evaluated at 14, 22 and 30 °C, and at COD/N ratios of 2 and 6. For each operating condition, containing 32 ± 2 mg NH4(+)-N/L and 25 ± 2 mg NO2(-)-N/L, three different substrate combinations were tested to simulate the presence of readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable organic matter (RBCOD and SBCOD, respectively): (i) acetate (RBCOD); (ii) starch (SBCOD); and (iii) acetate + starch. The observed stoichiometric NO2(-)-N/NH4(+)-N conversion ratios were in the range of 1.19-1.43, and the single or simultaneous presence of acetate and starch did not affect the Anammox metabolism. High Anammox nitrogen removal was observed at 22 °C (77-84%) and 30 °C (73-79%), whereas there was no nitrogen removal at 14 °C; the Anammox activity was strongly influenced by temperature, in spite of the COD source and COD/N ratios applied. These results suggest that the Anammox process could be applied as a nitrogen removal post-treatment for anaerobic sewage systems in warm climates.

  13. M(Salen)-derived Nitrogen-doped M/C (M = Fe, Co, Ni) Porous Nanocomposites for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Cheng, Fangyi; Wang, Shiwen; Zhang, Tianran; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials containing non-precious metal and/or doped nitrogen have attracted tremendous attention in the field of electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Herein, we report the synthesis and electrochemical properties of a new family of nitrogen-doped metal/carbon (M/N/C, M = Fe, Co, Ni) nanocomposites. The M/N/C nanocomposites, in which metal nanoparticles are embedded in the highly porous nitrogen-doped carbon matrix, have been synthesized by simply pyrolyzing M(salen) (salen = N,N′-bis(salicylidene)-ethylenediamine) complex precursors. The prepared Co/N/C and Fe/N/C exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic activity (with onset potential of 0.96 V for Fe/N/C and half-wave potential of 0.80 V for Co/N/C) and high stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The superior performance of the nanocomposites is attributed to their bimodal-pore structure, high surface area, as well as uniform distribution of high-density nitrogen and metal active sites. PMID:24865606

  14. Nitrogen-doped hierarchically porous carbon spheres as efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for an oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, You-Lin; Shi, Cheng-Xiang; Xu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Using hierarchically mesoporous silica spheres as a hard template and methyl violet as carbon and nitrogen source, nitrogen-doped hierarchically porous carbon spheres (N-HCS) are successfully prepared via a nanocasting method. The nitrogen-doped carbon spheres obtained after carbonization at 1000 °C (N-HCS-1000) exhibit a hierarchically micro-meso-macroporous structure with a relatively high surface area (BET) of 1413 m2 g-1 and a notably large pore volume of 2.96 cm3 g-1. In an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media, the N-HCS-1000 material exhibits excellent activity with high current density, and its onset potential is notably close to that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The efficient catalytic activity of this catalyst could be attributed to the high electrical conductivity of the nitrogen-doped carbon matrix as well as the hierarchically porous framework. This catalyst also exhibits better methanol crossover resistance and higher stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  15. Exfoliated, Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Nanosheet Cathode for Lithium-Oxygen Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    and lithium ion conducting electrolyte . During discharge, lithium is oxidized at the anode and oxygen is reduced at the cathode to produce...In continuation of our work on a fully solid -state, rechargeable lithium -oxygen cells [22-25], we report here the use of GNSs, N-GNSs...LAGP) in a solid -state lithium -oxygen cell and compared the cell performance with cells using cathodes prepared from mesoporous carbon

  16. Analysis of oxygen reduction and microbial community of air-diffusion biocathode in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zejie; Zheng, Yue; Xiao, Yong; Wu, Song; Wu, Yicheng; Yang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Feng

    2013-09-01

    Microbes play irreplaceable role in oxygen reduction reaction of biocathode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, air-diffusion biocathode MFCs were set up for accelerating oxygen reduction and microbial community analysis. Linear sweep voltammetry and Tafel curve confirmed the function of cathode biofilm to catalyze oxygen reduction. Microbial community analysis revealed higher diversity and richness of community in plankton than in biofilm. Proteobacteria was the shared predominant phylum in both biofilm and plankton (39.9% and 49.8%) followed by Planctomycetes (29.9%) and Bacteroidetes (13.3%) in biofilm, while Bacteroidetes (28.2%) in plankton. Minor fraction (534, 16.4%) of the total operational taxonomic units (3252) was overlapped demonstrating the disproportionation of bacterial distribution in biofilm and plankton. Pseudomonadales, Rhizobiales and Sphingobacteriales were exoelectrogenic orders in the present study. The research obtained deep insight of microbial community and provided more comprehensive information on uncultured rare bacteria.

  17. Study of the dissociation of nitrous oxide following resonant excitation of the nitrogen and oxygen K-shells

    SciTech Connect

    Ceolin, D.; Travnikova, O.; Bao, Z.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Tanaka, T.; Hoshino, M.; Kato, H.; Tanaka, H.; Harries, J. R.; Tamenori, Y.; Pruemper, C.; Lischke, T.; Liu, X.-J.; Ueda, K.

    2008-01-14

    A photochemistry study on nitrous oxide making use of site-selective excitation of terminal nitrogen, central nitrogen, and oxygen 1s{yields}3{pi} excitations is presented. The resonant Auger decay which takes place following excitation can lead to dissociation of the N{sub 2}O{sup +} ion. To elucidate the nuclear dynamics, energy-resolved Auger electrons were detected in coincidence with the ionic dissociation products, and a strong dependence of the fragmentation pathways on the core-hole site was observed in the binding energy region of the first satellite states. A description based on the molecular orbitals as well as the correlation between the thermodynamical thresholds of ion formation and the first electronic states of N{sub 2}O{sup +} has been used to qualitatively explain the observed fragmentation patterns.

  18. Effect of N-acetyl-cysteine on liposomal and muscle model oxidation induced by reactive oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Robert G

    2011-08-01

    N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a naturally occurring thiol, is found in some fruits and vegetables, sometimes in concentrations higher than glutathione. The objective of this research was to determine the antioxidative effect of NAC in liposomal and muscle models challenged by different oxidizing systems, three that produce reactive oxygen species, two that produce reactive nitrogen species, and two that produce reactive sulfur. The antioxidative effect of cysteine and NAC was compared in the liposomes and NAC and BHT were compared in the muscle homogenates. Lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH), TBARS, and sulfydryls (protein and non-protein) were analyzed. Results indicated that NAC is a more effective inhibitor of lipid oxidation in systems induced by free radicals and reactive nitrogen than those that are induced by peroxides. NAC appears to be at least mildly antioxidative in both liposomal and muscle models, although it did not completely inhibit oxidation in liposomes and generally was not as effective as BHT in the muscle models.

  19. Mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon microfibers derived from Mg-biquinoline-dicarboxy compound for efficient oxygen electroreduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Aiguo; Fan, Xiaohong; Chen, Aoling; Zhang, Hengiang; Shan, Yongkui

    2017-02-01

    An in-situ MgO-templating synthesis route was introduced to obtain the mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon microfibers by thermal conversion of new Mg-2,2‧-biquinoline 4,4-dicarboxy acid coordination compound (Mg-DCA) microfibers. The investigated crystal structure of Mg-DCA testified that the assembling of Mg2+ and DCA through Mg-O coordination bond and hydrogen bond contributed to the formation of one-dimensional (1D) crystalline Mg-DCA microfibers. The nitrogen-doped carbons derived from the pyrolysis of Mg-DCA showed the well-defined microfiber morphology with high mesopore-surface area. Such mesoporous microfibers exhibited the efficient catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solutions with better stability and methanol-tolerance performance.

  20. A comparison of air and hydrogen peroxide oxygenated microbial fuel cell reactors.

    PubMed

    Tartakovsky, B; Guiot, S R

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a two-compartment continuous flow microbial fuel cell (MFC) reactor was used to compare the efficiencies of cathode oxygenation by air and by hydrogen peroxide. The MFC reactor had neither a proton-selective membrane nor an electron transfer mediator. At startup, the cathodic compartment was continuously aerated and the anodic compartment was fed with a glucose solution. An increase of electrical power generation from 0.008 to 7.2 mW m(-2) of anode surface with a steady-state potential of 215-225 mV was observed within a period of 12 days. The performance of the air-oxygenated MFC reactor progressively declined over time because of biofilm proliferation in the cathodic compartment. Oxygenation of the cathodic compartment using 300 mL d(-1) of 0.3% hydrogen peroxide solution resulted in a power density of up to 22 mW m(-2) (68.2 mA m(-2)) of anode surface at a potential of 340-350 mV. The use of H2O2 for oxygenation was found to improve the long-term stability of the MFC reactor.

  1. Portable Cathode-Air Vapor-Feed Electrochemical Medical Oxygen Concentrator (OC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Missions on the International Space Station and future space exploration will present significant challenges to crew health care capabilities, particularly in the efficient utilization of onboard oxygen resources. Exploration vehicles will require lightweight, compact, and portable oxygen concentrators that can provide medical-grade oxygen from the ambient cabin air. Current pressure-swing adsorption OCs are heavy and bulky, require significant start-up periods, operate in narrow temperature ranges, and require a liquid water feed. Lynntech, Inc., has developed an electrochemical OC that operates with a cathode-air vapor feed, eliminating the need for a bulky onboard water supply. Lynntech's OC is smaller and lighter than conventional pressure-swing OCs, is capable of instant start-up, and operates over a temperature range of 5-80 C. Accomplished through a unique nanocomposite proton exchange membrane and catalyst technology, the unit delivers 4 standard liters per minute of humidified oxygen at 60 percent concentration. The technology enables both ambient-pressure operating devices for portable applications and pressurized (up to 3,600 psi) OC devices for stationary applications.

  2. Highly Crumpled Hybrids of Nitrogen/Sulfur Dual-Doped Graphene and Co9S8 Nanoplates as Efficient Bifunctional Oxygen Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanping; Jing, Fan; Xu, Zhixiao; Zhang, Fan; Mai, Yiyong; Wu, Dongqing

    2017-04-03

    A bifunctional electrocatalyst for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is highly attractive for the manufacture of clean energy conversion devices. In this work, highly crumpled hybrid of nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped graphene and quasi-hexagonal Co9S8 nanoplates (Co9S8/NSGg-C3N4) is fabricated via a facile ionic assembly approach. The unique structure of Co9S8/NSGg-C3N4 renders it high specific surface area (288.3 m(2) g(-1)) and large pore volume (1.32 cm(3) g(-1)). As the electrocatalyst for ORR, Co9S8/NSGg-C3N4 demonstrates excellent performance with the onset potential of -0.02 V vs Ag/AgCl and the limited current density of 6.05 mA cm(-2) at -0.9 V vs Ag/AgCl. Co9S8/NSGg-C3N4 also presents outstanding catalytic activity toward OER by delivering a limited current density of 48 mA cm(-2) at 1 V vs Ag/AgCl. The bifunctional catalytic behaviors of Co9S8/NSGg-C3N4 enable the assembly of a rechargeable Zn-air battery with it as the cathode catalyst, which exhibits stable discharge/charge voltage plateaus upon long time cycling over 50 h.

  3. Evolution of air breathing: oxygen homeostasis and the transitions from water to land and sky.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Connie C W; Schmitz, Anke; Lambertz, Markus; Perry, Steven F; Maina, John N

    2013-04-01

    Life originated in anoxia, but many organisms came to depend upon oxygen for survival, independently evolving diverse respiratory systems for acquiring oxygen from the environment. Ambient oxygen tension (PO2) fluctuated through the ages in correlation with biodiversity and body size, enabling organisms to migrate from water to land and air and sometimes in the opposite direction. Habitat expansion compels the use of different gas exchangers, for example, skin, gills, tracheae, lungs, and their intermediate stages, that may coexist within the same species; coexistence may be temporally disjunct (e.g., larval gills vs. adult lungs) or simultaneous (e.g., skin, gills, and lungs in some salamanders). Disparate systems exhibit similar directions of adaptation: toward larger diffusion interfaces, thinner barriers, finer dynamic regulation, and reduced cost of breathing. Efficient respiratory gas exchange, coupled to downstream convective and diffusive resistances, comprise the "oxygen cascade"-step-down of PO2 that balances supply against toxicity. Here, we review the origin of oxygen homeostasis, a primal selection factor for all respiratory systems, which in turn function as gatekeepers of the cascade. Within an organism's lifespan, the respiratory apparatus adapts in various ways to upregulate oxygen uptake in hypoxia and restrict uptake in hyperoxia. In an evolutionary context, certain species also become adapted to environmental conditions or habitual organismic demands. We, therefore, survey the comparative anatomy and physiology of respiratory systems from invertebrates to vertebrates, water to air breathers, and terrestrial to aerial inhabitants. Through the evolutionary directions and variety of gas exchangers, their shared features and individual compromises may be appreciated.

  4. Evolution of Air Breathing: Oxygen Homeostasis and the Transitions from Water to Land and Sky

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Connie C. W.; Schmitz, Anke; Lambertz, Markus; Perry, Steven F.; Maina, John N.

    2014-01-01

    Life originated in anoxia, but many organisms came to depend upon oxygen for survival, independently evolving diverse respiratory systems for acquiring oxygen from the environment. Ambient oxygen tension (PO2) fluctuated through the ages in correlation with biodiversity and body size, enabling organisms to migrate from water to land and air and sometimes in the opposite direction. Habitat expansion compels the use of different gas exchangers, for example, skin, gills, tracheae, lungs, and their intermediate stages, that may coexist within the same species; coexistence may be temporally disjunct (e.g., larval gills vs. adult lungs) or simultaneous (e.g., skin, gills, and lungs in some salamanders). Disparate systems exhibit similar directions of adaptation: toward larger diffusion interfaces, thinner barriers, finer dynamic regulation, and reduced cost of breathing. Efficient respiratory gas exchange, coupled to downstream convective and diffusive resistances, comprise the “oxygen cascade”—step-down of PO2 that balances supply against toxicity. Here, we review the origin of oxygen homeostasis, a primal selection factor for all respiratory systems, which in turn function as gatekeepers of the cascade. Within an organism's lifespan, the respiratory apparatus adapts in various ways to upregulate oxygen uptake in hypoxia and restrict uptake in hyperoxia. In an evolutionary context, certain species also become adapted to environmental conditions or habitual organismic demands. We, therefore, survey the comparative anatomy and physiology of respiratory systems from invertebrates to vertebrates, water to air breathers, and terrestrial to aerial inhabitants. Through the evolutionary directions and variety of gas exchangers, their shared features and individual compromises may be appreciated. PMID:23720333

  5. Generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and its effects on DNA damage in lung cancer cells exposed to atmospheric pressure helium/oxygen plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Hun; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Choi, Ji Ye; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of the operating parameters on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the gas and liquid phases exposed to atmospheric pressure a pulsed-dc helium plasma jets. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. And the nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of RONS in the plasmas and liquids. Exposure of plasma to cancer cells increases the cellular levels of RONS, which has been linked to apoptosis and the damage of cellular proteins, and may also indirectly cause structural damage to DNA. To identify the correlation between the production of RONS in cells and plasmas, various assay analyses were performed on plasma treated human lung cancer cells (A549) cells. In addition, the effect of additive oxygen gas on the plasma-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells was investigated. It was observed that DNA damage was significantly increased with helium/oxygen plasma compared to with pure helium plasma.

  6. Enhanced Nitrogen Loss by Eddy-Induced Vertical Transport in the Offshore Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone.

    PubMed

    Callbeck, Cameron M; Lavik, Gaute; Stramma, Lothar; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Bristow, Laura A

    2017-01-01

    The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) upwelling region is one of the ocean's largest sinks of fixed nitrogen, which is lost as N2 via the anaerobic processes of anammox and denitrification. One-third of nitrogen loss occurs in productive shelf waters stimulated by organic matter export as a result of eastern boundary upwelling. Offshore, nitrogen loss rates are lower, but due to its sheer size this area accounts for ~70% of ETSP nitrogen loss. How nitrogen loss and primary production are regulated in the offshore ETSP region where coastal upwelling is less influential remains unclear. Mesoscale eddies, ubiquitous in the ETSP region, have been suggested to enhance vertical nutrient transport and thereby regulate primary productivity and hence organic matter export. Here, we investigated the impact of mesoscale eddies on anammox and denitrification activity using 15N-labelled in situ incubation experiments. Anammox was shown to be the dominant nitrogen loss process, but varied across the eddy, whereas denitrification was below detection at all stations. Anammox rates at the eddy periphery were greater than at the center. Similarly, depth-integrated chlorophyll paralleled anammox activity, increasing at the periphery relative to the eddy center; suggestive of enhanced organic matter export along the periphery supporting nitrogen loss. This can be attributed to enhanced vertical nutrient transport caused by an eddy-driven submesoscale mechanism operating at the eddy periphery. In the ETSP region, the widespread distribution of eddies and the large heterogeneity observed in anammox rates from a compilation of stations suggests that eddy-driven vertical nutrient transport may regulate offshore primary production and thereby nitrogen loss.

  7. Enhanced Nitrogen Loss by Eddy-Induced Vertical Transport in the Offshore Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone

    PubMed Central

    Callbeck, Cameron M.; Lavik, Gaute; Stramma, Lothar; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Bristow, Laura A.

    2017-01-01

    The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) upwelling region is one of the ocean’s largest sinks of fixed nitrogen, which is lost as N2 via the anaerobic processes of anammox and denitrification. One-third of nitrogen loss occurs in productive shelf waters stimulated by organic matter export as a result of eastern boundary upwelling. Offshore, nitrogen loss rates are lower, but due to its sheer size this area accounts for ~70% of ETSP nitrogen loss. How nitrogen loss and primary production are regulated in the offshore ETSP region where coastal upwelling is less influential remains unclear. Mesoscale eddies, ubiquitous in the ETSP region, have been suggested to enhance vertical nutrient transport and thereby regulate primary productivity and hence organic matter export. Here, we investigated the impact of mesoscale eddies on anammox and denitrification activity using 15N-labelled in situ incubation experiments. Anammox was shown to be the dominant nitrogen loss process, but varied across the eddy, whereas denitrification was below detection at all stations. Anammox rates at the eddy periphery were greater than at the center. Similarly, depth-integrated chlorophyll paralleled anammox activity, increasing at the periphery relative to the eddy center; suggestive of enhanced organic matter export along the periphery supporting nitrogen loss. This can be attributed to enhanced vertical nutrient transport caused by an eddy-driven submesoscale mechanism operating at the eddy periphery. In the ETSP region, the widespread distribution of eddies and the large heterogeneity observed in anammox rates from a compilation of stations suggests that eddy-driven vertical nutrient transport may regulate offshore primary production and thereby nitrogen loss. PMID:28122044

  8. Joule-Thomson cryocooler with neon and nitrogen mixture using commercial air-conditioning compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jisung; Oh, Haejin; Baek, Seungwhan; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-01-01

    A 2-stage mixed refrigerant (MR) Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler was designed for cooling high temperature superconducting cable below 70 K. The low temperature cycle was to operate with neon-nitrogen mixture, and the required compression ratio was approximately 24 when the suction pressure was 100 kPa. The high compression ratio of 24, the low pressure of 100 kPa at compressor suction, and the working fluid with high heat of compression were challenging issues to existing typical compression systems. We developed an innovative compression system with commercial oil-lubricated air-conditioning compressors. They were 2-stage rotary compressors originally designed for R410Aand connected in series. The compressors were modified to accommodate effective intercooling at every stage to alleviate compressor overheating problem. Additionally, fine-grade three-stage oil filters, an adsorber, and driers were installed at the discharge line to avoid a potential clogging problem from oil mist and moisture at low temperature sections. The present compression system was specifically demonstrated with a neon-nitrogen MR JT cryocooler. The operating pressure ratio was able to meet the designed specifications, and the recorded no-load mini mum temperature was 63.5 K . Commercial air-conditioning compressors were successfully applied to the high-c ompression ratio MR JT cryocooler with adequate modification using off-the-shelf components.

  9. Air-Water Exchange of N2 and O2 from In Situ Measurements in the Subarctic and Subtropical Pacific Oceans: Oxygen Flux and Net Biological Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, S.

    2008-12-01

    In-situ measurements of wind speed, atmospheric pressure, surface-ocean total dissolved gas pressure and oxygen concentration are used to determine the flux of nitrogen and oxygen between the ocean and atmosphere in the subarctic and subtropical Pacific Oceans. Measurements were made hourly over a period of about one year on surface moorings at the Hawaii Ocean Time series (HOT) in 2005 and at Station P in 2007. Gas pressures in the mixed layer were determined using a gas tension device (GTD) and an oxygen sensor calibrated by Winkler O2 titrations. The pressures of nitrogen and oxygen vary smoothly within a few percent of atmospheric saturation in the subtropical Pacific Ocean, but in the subarctic surface waters these values are punctuated by very rapid excursions caused by storms. The primary flux of oxygen in the upper ocean is between the ocean and atmosphere. We use a simple ocean mixed-layer model to determine this flux and estimate the net biological oxygen production at these sites. Assuming that the net biological oxygen and carbon production are stoichiometrically related over an annual cycle, this method provides a measure of the annual carbon export from the mixed layer, an important component of the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle. There is net biological O2 production most of the year in the subtropical ocean; however, little evidence of net O2 production in the wintertime in the subarctic Pacific. This contrasts with earlier 14C primary production measurements which indicate that wintertime production is about half that in summer at both locations. Annual estimates of biologically produced carbon export at these two sites will be contrasted at the presentation in the fall meeting. This research indicates that it should be possible to derive estimates of the net annual air-water oxygen fluxes caused by biological production at any location of the open ocean where there is a surface mooring. Large, abrupt atmospheric pressure changes (up to 50

  10. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrogen dioxide in air and nitrite in water and soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    Pandurangappa, M.; Balasubramanian, N.

    1995-02-01

    A sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in air and nitrite in water and soil samples is described. Nitrogen dioxide in air is fixed as nitrite ion in alkaline sodium arsenite or in triethanolamine absorber solutions. The method is based on the diazo coupling reaction between p-nitro aniline and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid. The azo dye formed under aqueous condition has an absorption maximum at 585nm and obeys Beer`s law over the range 0-25{mu}g of nitrite. The colour system is stable for 72h. The relative standard deviation is 2.7% for ten determinations at 15{mu}g of nitrite. The dye is extracted with 1:1 isoamyl alcohol-IBMK mixture and stabilisation with methanolic potassium hydroxide showed {lambda}{sub max} at 610nm. It obeys Beer`s law over the range 0-4{mu}g of nitrite. The colour system is stable for 40h in organic phase and the relative standard deviation is 2.5% for ten determinations at 3{mu}g of nitrite. The molar absorptivity of the colour system is 3.68 x 10{sup 4} Lmol{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}. The effect of interfering gases and other ions on the determination of nitrite is described. The developed method has been applied for the determination of residual nitrogen dioxide gas present in the laboratory fume cupboard and automobile exhaust gases. In addition, the method has been applied for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in samples like water, soil and radiator coolants.

  11. C-H functionalization directed by transformable nitrogen heterocycles: synthesis of ortho-oxygenated arylnaphthalenes from arylphthalazines.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shiva K; Medellin, Derek C; Kornienko, Alexander

    2014-01-21

    Two protocols for oxygenation of aromatic C-H bonds ortho-positioned to the phthalazine ring were developed. The transannulation of the phthalazine ring to a naphthalene moiety by an Inverse Electron Demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reaction led to the synthesis of naphtho[2,1-c]chromenes, 1-(ortho-hydroxyaryl)naphthalenes and 6,7-dihydrobenzo[b]naphtho[1,2-d]oxepine. This new strategy based on the utilization of transformable nitrogen heterocycles in C-H functionalization chemistry can be potentially applicable to the synthesis of a broad range of biaryl compounds.

  12. Franck-Condon Factors, R-Centroids Electronic Transition Moments, and Einstein Coefficients for Many Nitrogen and Oxygen Band Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    Box 92500 P.O. Box 109 Los Angeles, CA 90009 Logan, UT 84321 February 1992 D TIC Technical Report FEB8199U CONTRACT No. DNA 001-88-C- 0046 Approved for...Factors, R-Centroids, Electronic Transition Moments, and Einstein Coefficients for Many Nitrogen and C - DNA 001-88-C- 0046 Oxygen Band Systems PE 62715H 6...5.02E+02 6.56402 7.561+01’ 7.261402 2.30E+02 1.151+02 7.971+02 8.87E+02 4.59E+02 11 .1620 .1675 .1733 .1793 . 1857 .1925 .1997 .2073 .2153 .2239 .2330

  13. Retrieval of thermospheric atomic oxygen, nitrogen and temperature from the 732 NM emission measured by the ISO on ATLAS 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, Judy A.; Torr, Douglas G.; Torr, Marsha R.; Richards, Phillip G.; Yung, Sopo

    1993-01-01

    The Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) was a part of the ATLAS 1 Mission flown on the shuttle Atlantis from March 24 to April 2, 1992. During limb scanning operations, the ISO measured the O+(2P) ion emission at 732 nm. We have used a numerical inversion technique to retrieve thermospheric atomic oxygen, molecular nitrogen and temperature profiles. These preliminary results indicate a lower thermospheric temperature cooler than that predicted by MSIS for the solar conditions during the mission. Although the densities agree at low altitudes, the reduced scale height produces O and N2 densities 25 percent lower than the MSIS at 300 km.

  14. A new method for collection of nitrate from fresh water and the analysis of nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, S.R.; Kendall, C.; Wilkison, D.H.; Ziegler, A.C.; Chang, Cecily C.Y.; Avanzino, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new method for concentrating nitrate from fresh waters for ??15N and ??18O analysis has been developed and field-tested for four years. The benefits of the method are: (1) elimination of the need to transport large volumes of water to the laboratory for processing; (2) elimination of the need for hazardous preservatives; and (3) the ability to concentrate nitrate from fresh waters. Nitrate is collected by, passing the water-sample through pre-filled, disposable, anion exchanging resin columns in the field. The columns are subsequently transported to the laboratory where the nitrate is extracted, converted to AgNO3 and analyzed for its isotope composition. Nitrate is eluted from the anion exchange columns with 15 ml of 3 M HCl. The nitrate-bearing acid eluant is neutralized with Ag2O, filtered to remove the AgCl precipitate, then freeze-dried to obtain solid AgNO3, which is then combusted to N2 in sealed quartz tubes for ?? 15N analysis. For ?? 18O analysis, aliquots of the neutralized eluant are processed further to remove non-nitrate oxygen-bearing anions and dissolved organic matter. Barium chloride is added to precipitate sulfate and phosphate; the solution is then filtered, passed through a cation exchange column to remove excess Ba2+, re-neutralized with Ag2O, filtered, agitated with activated carbon to remove dissolved organic matter and freeze-dried. The resulting AgNO3 is combusted with graphite in a closed tube to produce CO2, which is cryogenically purified and analyzed for its oxygen isotope composition. The 1?? analytical precisions for ??15N and ??18O are ?? 0.05%o and ??0.5???, respectively, for solutions of KNO3 standard processed through the entire column procedure. High concentrations of anions in solution can interfere with nitrate adsorption on the anion exchange resins, which may result in isotope fractionation of nitrogen and oxygen (fractionation experiments were conducted for nitrogen only; however, fractionation for oxygen is expected

  15. A new method for collection of nitrate from fresh water and the analysis of nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Wilkison, D. H.; Ziegler, A. C.; Chang, C. C. Y.; Avanzino, R. J.

    2000-02-01

    A new method for concentrating nitrate from fresh waters for δ15N and δ18O analysis has been developed and field-tested for four years. The benefits of the method are: (1) elimination of the need to transport large volumes of water to the laboratory for processing; (2) elimination of the need for hazardous preservatives; and (3) the ability to concentrate nitrate from fresh waters. Nitrate is collected by, passing the water-sample through pre-filled, disposable, anion exchanging resin columns in the field. The columns are subsequently transported to the laboratory where the nitrate is extracted, converted to AgNO 3 and analyzed for its isotope composition. Nitrate is eluted from the anion exchange columns with 15 ml of 3 M HCl. The nitrate-bearing acid eluant is neutralized with Ag 2O, filtered to remove the AgCl precipitate, then freeze-dried to obtain solid AgNO 3, which is then combusted to N 2 in sealed quartz tubes for δ15N analysis. For δ18O analysis, aliquots of the neutralized eluant are processed further to remove non-nitrate oxygen-bearing anions and dissolved organic matter. Barium chloride is added to precipitate sulfate and phosphate; the solution is then filtered, passed through a cation exchange column to remove excess Ba 2+, re-neutralized with Ag 2O, filtered, agitated with activated carbon to remove dissolved organic matter and freeze-dried. The resulting AgNO 3 is combusted with graphite in a closed tube to produce CO 2, which is cryogenically purified and analyzed for its oxygen isotope composition. The 1 σ analytical precisions for δ15N and δ18O are ±0.05‰ and ±0.5‰, respectively, for solutions of KNO 3 standard processed through the entire column procedure. High concentrations of anions in solution can interfere with nitrate adsorption on the anion exchange resins, which may result in isotope fractionation of nitrogen and oxygen (fractionation experiments were conducted for nitrogen only; however, fractionation for oxygen is

  16. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  17. Highly graphitized nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanopolyhedra derived from ZIF-8 nanocrystals as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjie; Su, Zixue; Jiang, Feilong; Yang, Lingling; Qian, Jinjie; Zhou, Youfu; Li, Wenmu; Hong, Maochun

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphitic porous carbons (NGPCs) have been synthesized by using a zeolite-type nanoscale metal-organic framework (NMOF) as a self-sacrificing template, which simultaneously acts as both the carbon and nitrogen sources in a facile carbonization process. The NGPCs not only retain the nanopolyhedral morphology of the parent NMOF, but also possess rich nitrogen, high surface area and hierarchical porosity with well-conducting networks. The promising potential of NGPCs as metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells is demonstrated. Compared with commercial Pt/C, the optimized NGPC-1000-10 (carbonized at 1000 °C for 10 h) catalyst exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity via an efficient four-electron-dominant ORR process coupled with superior methanol tolerance as well as cycling stability in alkaline media. Furthermore, the controlled experiments reveal that the optimum activity of NGPC-1000-10 can be attributed to the synergetic contributions of the abundant active sites with high graphitic-N portion, high surface area and porosity, and the high degree of graphitization. Our findings suggest that solely MOF-derived heteroatom-doped carbon materials can be a promising alternative for Pt-based catalysts in fuel cells.Nitrogen-doped graphitic porous carbons (NGPCs) have been synthesized by using a zeolite-type nanoscale metal-organic framework (NMOF) as a self-sacrificing template, which simultaneously acts as both the carbon and nitrogen sources in a facile carbonization process. The NGPCs not only retain the nanopolyhedral morphology of the parent NMOF, but also possess rich nitrogen, high surface area and hierarchical porosity with well-conducting networks. The promising potential of NGPCs as metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells is demonstrated. Compared with commercial Pt/C, the optimized NGPC-1000-10 (carbonized at 1000 °C for 10 h) catalyst exhibits comparable

  18. Radiographic evaluation of positional atelectasis in sedated dogs breathing room air versus 100% oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Michele; Almondia, Donna; Williams, Jamie; Crochik, Sonia; Hofmeister, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This study documents the degree of positional atelectasis in sedated dogs receiving 100% oxygen (O2) versus room air. Initial lateral recumbency was determined by an orthopedic study and initial treatment (O2 or room air) was randomized. Each dog was maintained in lateral recumbency for 15 min, at which time ventrodorsal (VD) and opposite lateral thoracic radiographs were obtained. Each dog was then maintained in the opposite lateral recumbency and received the other treatment for 15 min, followed by a VD and opposite lateral radiograph. Radiographs were scored for severity of pulmonary pattern and mediastinal shift by 3 radiologists. Dogs breathing O2 had significantly higher scores than dogs breathing room air. If radiographically detectable dependent atelectasis is present, repeat thoracic images following manual positive ventilation and/or position change to the opposite lateral recumbency should be made to rule out the effect of O2 positional atelectasis and avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:25320389

  19. Novel Hydrogel-Derived Bifunctional Oxygen Electrocatalyst for Rechargeable Air Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Gengtao; Chen, Yifan; Cui, Zhiming; Li, Yutao; Zhou, Weidong; Xin, Sen; Tang, Yawen; Goodenough, John B

    2016-10-12

    The commercialization of Zn-air batteries has been impeded by the lack of low-cost, highly active, and durable catalysts that act independently for oxygen electrochemical reduction and evolution. Here, we demonstrate excellent performance of NiCo nanoparticles anchored on porous fibrous carbon aerogels (NiCo/PFC aerogels) as bifunctional catalysts toward the Zn-air battery. This material is designed and synthesized by a novel K2Ni(CN)4/K3Co(CN)6-chitosan hydrogel-derived method. The outstanding performance of NiCo/PFC aerogels is confirmed as a superior air-cathode catalyst for a rechargeable Zn-air battery. At a discharge-charge current density of 10 mA cm(-2), the NiCo/PFC aerogels enable a Zn-air battery to cycle steadily up to 300 cycles for 600 h with only a small increase in the round-trip overpotential, notably outperforming the more costly Pt/C+IrO2 mixture catalysts (60 cycles for 120 h). With the simplicity of the synthetic method and the outstanding electrocatalytic performance, the NiCo/PFC aerogels are promising electrocatalysts for Zn-air batteries.

  20. Air purifiers that diffuse reactive oxygen species potentially cause DNA damage in the lung.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kosuke; Sato, Itaru; Yoshida, Midori; Tsuda, Shuji

    2010-12-01

    Several appliance manufacturers have recently released new type air purifiers that can disinfect bacteria, fungi and viruses by diffusing reactive oxygen species (ROS) into the air. In this study, mice were exposed to the outlet air from each of 3 air purifiers from different manufacturers (A, B, C), and the lung was examined for DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and histopathology to confirm the safety of these air purifiers. Neither abnormal behavior during exposure nor gross abnormality at necropsy was observed. No histopathological changes were also observed in the lung. However, significant increase of DNA damage was detected by the comet assay in the lung immediately after the direct exposure for 48 hr to models A and B, and for 16 hr to model B. As for model B, DNA migration was also increased by 2 hr exposure in a 1 m(3) plastic chamber but not by 48 hr exposure in a room (12.6 m(3)). Model C did not cause DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation and 8-hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) was not increased under the conditions DNA damage was detected by the comet assay. The present results revealed that some models of air purifiers that diffuse ROS potentially cause DNA damage in the lung although the mechanism was left unsolved.

  1. Atomic oxygen dynamics in an air dielectric barrier discharge: a combined diagnostic and modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldus, Sabrina; Schröder, Daniel; Bibinov, Nikita; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas are a promising alternative therapy for treatment of chronic wounds, as they have already shown in clinical trials. In this study an air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) developed for therapeutic use in dermatology is characterized with respect to the plasma produced reactive oxygen species, namely atomic oxygen and ozone, which are known to be of great importance to wound healing. To understand the plasma chemistry of the applied DBD, xenon-calibrated two-photon laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy are applied. The measured spatial distributions are shown and compared to each other. A model of the afterglow chemistry based on optical emission spectroscopy is developed to cross-check the measurement results and obtain insight into the dynamics of the considered reactive oxygen species. The atomic oxygen density is found to be located mostly between the electrodes with a maximum density of {{n}\\text{O}}=6× {{10}16} cm-3 . Time resolved measurements reveal a constant atomic oxygen density between two high voltage pulses. The ozone is measured up to 3 mm outside the active plasma volume, reaching a maximum value of {{n}{{\\text{O}3}}}=3× {{10}16} cm-3 between the electrodes.

  2. Metabolic Regulation of “Ca. Methylacidiphilum Fumariolicum” SolV Cells Grown Under Different Nitrogen and Oxygen Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Khadem, Ahmad F.; Pol, Arjan; Wieczorek, Adam S.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria can use methane as their sole energy source. The discovery of “Ca. Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum” strain SolV and other verrucomicrobial methanotrophs has revealed that the ability of bacteria to oxidize CH4 is much more diverse than has previously been assumed in terms of ecology, phylogeny, and physiology. A remarkable characteristic of the methane-oxidizing Verrucomicrobia is their extremely acidophilic phenotype, growing even below pH 1. In this study we used RNA-Seq to analyze the metabolic regulation of “Ca. M. fumariolicum” SolV cells growing at μmax in batch culture or under nitrogen fixing or oxygen limited conditions in chemostats, all at pH 2. The analysis showed that two of the three pmoCAB operons each encoding particulate methane monoxygenases were differentially expressed, probably regulated by the available oxygen. The hydrogen produced during N2 fixation is apparently recycled as demonstrated by the upregulation of the genes encoding a Ni/Fe-dependent hydrogenase. These hydrogenase genes were also upregulated under low oxygen conditions. Handling of nitrosative stress was shown by the expression of the nitric oxide reductase encoding genes norB and norC under all conditions tested, the upregulation of nitrite reductase nirK under oxygen limitation and of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase hao in the presence of ammonium. Unraveling the gene regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism helps to understand the underlying physiological adaptations of strain SolV in view of the harsh conditions of its natural ecosystem. PMID:22848206

  3. Using Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Nitrate to Distinguish Contaminant Sources in Hanford Soil and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Mark; Bill, Markus

    2008-08-01

    The nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) and oxygen ({delta}{sup 18}O) isotopic compositions of nitrate in the environment are primarily a function of the source of the nitrate. The ranges of isotopic compositions for nitrate resulting from common sources are outlined in Figure 1 from Kendall (1998). As noted on Figure 1, processes such as microbial metabolism can modify the isotopic compositions of the nitrate, but the effects of these processes are generally predictable. At Hanford, nitrate and other nitrogenous compounds were significant components of most of the chemical processes used at the site. Most of the oxygen in nitrate chemicals (e.g., nitric acid) is derived from atmospheric oxygen, giving it a significantly higher {delta}{sup 18}O value (+23.5{per_thousand}) than naturally occurring nitrate that obtains most of its oxygen from water (the {delta}{sup 18}O of Hanford groundwater ranges from -14{per_thousand} to -18{per_thousand}). This makes it possible to differentiate nitrate from Hanford site activities from background nitrate at the site (including most fertilizers that might have been used prior to the Department of Energy plutonium production activities at the site). In addition, the extreme thermal and chemical conditions that occurred during some of the waste processing procedures and subsequent waste storage in select single-shell tanks resulted in unique nitrate isotopic compositions that can be used to identify those waste streams in soil and groundwater at the site (Singleton et al., 2005; Christensen et al., 2007). This report presents nitrate isotope data for soil and groundwater samples from the Hanford 200 Areas and discusses the implications of that data for potential sources of groundwater contamination.

  4. Iron- and indium-catalyzed reactions toward nitrogen- and oxygen-containing saturated heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Cornil, Johan; Gonnard, Laurine; Bensoussan, Charlélie; Serra-Muns, Anna; Gnamm, Christian; Commandeur, Claude; Commandeur, Malgorzata; Reymond, Sébastien; Guérinot, Amandine; Cossy, Janine

    2015-03-17

    A myriad of natural and/or biologically active products include nitrogen- and oxygen-containing saturated heterocycles, which are thus considered as attractive scaffolds in the drug discovery process. As a consequence, a wide range of reactions has been developed for the construction of these frameworks, much effort being specially devoted to the formation of substituted tetrahydropyrans and piperidines. Among the existing methods to form these heterocycles, the metal-catalyzed heterocyclization of amino- or hydroxy-allylic alcohol derivatives has emerged as a powerful and stereoselective strategy that is particularly interesting in terms of both atom-economy and ecocompatibility. For a long time, palladium catalysts have widely dominated this area either in Tsuji-Trost reactions [Pd(0)] or in an electrophilic activation process [Pd(II)]. More recently, gold-catalyzed formation of saturated N- and O-heterocycles has received growing attention because it generally exhibits high efficiency and diastereoselectivity. Despite their demonstrated utility, Pd- and Au-complexes suffer from high costs, toxicity, and limited natural abundance, which can be barriers to their widespread use in industrial processes. Thus, the replacement of precious metals with less expensive and more environmentally benign catalysts has become a challenging issue for organic chemists. In 2010, our group took advantage of the ability of the low-toxicity and inexpensive FeCl3 in activating allylic or benzylic alcohols to develop iron-catalyzed N- and O-heterocylizations. We first focused on N-heterocycles, and a variety of 2,6-disubstituted piperidines as well as pyrrolidines were synthesized in a highly diastereoselective fashion in favor of the cis-compounds. The reaction was further extended to the construction of substituted tetrahydropyrans. Besides triggering the formation of heterocycles, the iron salts were shown to induce a thermodynamic epimerization, which is the key to reach the high

  5. The dependence of oxygen and nitrogen abundances on stellar mass from the CALIFA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Montero, E.; García-Benito, R.; Vílchez, J. M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Kehrig, C.; Husemann, B.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Galbany, L.; Mollá, M.; Walcher, C. J.; Ascasíbar, Y.; González Delgado, R. M.; Marino, R. A.; Masegosa, J.; Pérez, E.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bomans, D.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Ziegler, B.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Context. The study of the integrated properties of star-forming galaxies is central to understand their formation and evolution. Some of these properties are extensive and therefore their analysis require totally covering and spatially resolved observations. Among these properties, metallicity can be defined in spiral discs by means of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of individual H ii regions. The simultaneous analysis of the abundances of primary elements, as oxygen, and secondary, as nitrogen, also provides clues about the star formation history and the processes that shape the build-up of spiral discs. Aims: Our main aim is to analyse simultaneously O/H and N/O abundance ratios in H ii regions in different radial positions of the discs in a large sample of spiral galaxies to obtain the slopes and the characteristic abundance ratios that can be related to their integrated properties. Methods: We analysed the optical spectra of individual selected H ii regions extracted from a sample of 350 spiral galaxies of the CALIFA survey. We calculated total O/H abundances and, for the first time, N/O ratios using the semi-empirical routine Hii-Chi-mistry, which, according to Pérez-Montero (2014, MNRAS, 441, 2663), is consistent with the direct method and reduces the uncertainty in the O/H derivation using [N ii] lines owing to the dispersion in the O/H-N/O relation. Then we performed linear fittings to the abundances as a function of the de-projected galactocentric distances. Results: The analysis of the radial distribution both for O/H and N/O in the non-interacting galaxies reveals that both average slopes are negative, but a non-negligible fraction of objects have a flat or even a positive gradient (at least 10% for O/H and 4% for N/O). The slopes normalised to the effective radius appear to have a slight dependence on the total stellar mass and the morphological type, as late low-mass objects tend to have flatter slopes. No clear relation is found, however, to

  6. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  7. The laser microprobe: A technique for extracting carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen from solid samples for isotopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchi, I. A.; Wright, I. P.; Gibson, E. K.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1986-09-01

    The laser microprobe extraction technique has been adapted for the determination of concentrations and stable isotopic compositions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The power from a focused laser beam is used to selectively pyrolyse, or combust, specific areas of a solid sample of interest, which is located within a vacuum extraction line. Gases released from the sample are collected, purified, and then admitted to an appropriate mass spectrometer as either molecular nitrogen (for δ15N measurements) or carbon dioxide (for δ13C and δ18O measurements). The minimum amounts of gas that can be measured isotopically are less than a nanomole. A number of samples have been analysed in order to evaluate the efficacy of the laser microprobe including two carbonate minerals (calcite and siderite), graphite, and titanium nitride. Initial studies on the distribution of nitrogen in an iron meteorite (Uwet) and a carbonaceous chondrite (Murchison) have been undertaken. Nitrogen in Uwet was found to be concentrated in the phosphide mineral schreibersite rather than in the kamacite. Laser extractions of the dark matrix of Murchison reveal 620 to 790 ppm of nitrogen with a δ15N=+38.5 to +44.7% (in agreement with stepped heating extractions of bulk Murchison) while much lower concentrations, down to 80 ppm (and δ15N=+12 to +60%), were found in the light-coloured high-temperature inclusions. For carbon-containing phases, there appears to be an isotope fractionation associated with the formation of CO2 and CO. However, preliminary results suggest that the extent of isotope fractionation may be reproducible, allowing suitable corrections to be applied to the raw data.

  8. Diffuse discharge produced by repetitive nanosecond pulses in open air, nitrogen, and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Zhang, Cheng; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.; Zhang, Dongdong; Erofeev, Mikhail V.; Ren, Chengyan; Shutko, Yuliya V.; Yan, Ping

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric-pressure gas discharge driven by high voltage pulses with fast rise-time and short duration has attracted significant attention for various plasma applications. In this paper, discharges were generated in a highly non-uniform electric field by point-plane gaps in open air by four repetitive nanosecond-pulse generators with repetition rate up to 1 kHz. The rise time of generators was 25 (generator #1), 15 (generator #2), 3 (generator #3), and 0.2 ns (generator #4) and a full width at half maximum was 40, 30-40, 5, and 1 ns, respectively. The experimental results show that there were typical discharge fashions, i.e., corona, diffuse, spark, or arc modes. The variables affecting the discharge characteristics, including the gap spacing and applied pulse parameters, were investigated. Especially, the diffuse discharges were investigated and discussed. With generator #1 at voltage 70-120 kV, characteristics of measured x-rays on the discharge modes were studied, and it indicates that counts of x-rays in a diffuse discharge are up to a peak value under the experimental conditions. With amplitude of voltage pulses in incident wave up to 18 (generator #3) and 12.5 kV (generator #4), runaway electron beam in low pressure helium, nitrogen, and air in a pulse-periodic mode of discharge with repetition rate up to 1 kHz was obtained. Electron beam was registered behind a thin foil in a pressure range from several to tens of Torr. X-ray radiation was obtained in a wide range of pressures, as well as at atmospheric pressure of helium, nitrogen, and air. Voltage pulses of positive and negative polarities were used. Generation of runaway electrons with pulses of positive polarity appeared because of reflected voltage pulses of reverse polarity.

  9. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air.

    PubMed

    Men, Yongjun; Ambrogi, Martina; Han, Baohang; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-04-08

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m²/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection.

  10. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yongjun; Ambrogi, Martina; Han, Baohang; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m2/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection. PMID:27070588

  11. Neurological oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Farmery, Scott; Sykes, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    SCUBA diving has several risks associated with it from breathing air under pressure--nitrogen narcosis, barotrauma and decompression sickness (the bends). Trimix SCUBA diving involves regulating mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen and helium in an attempt to overcome the risks of narcosis and decompression sickness during deep dives, but introduces other potential hazards such as hypoxia and oxygen toxicity convulsions. This study reports on a seizure during the ascent phase, its potential causes and management and discusses the hazards posed to the diver and his rescuer by an emergency ascent to the surface.

  12. 71. DETAIL OF NITROGEN GAS STORAGE TANKS AND TRANSFER TUBING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. DETAIL OF NITROGEN GAS STORAGE TANKS AND TRANSFER TUBING ON SLC-3W LIQUID OXYGEN APRON - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  14. Mouse model of liver ischemia and reperfusion injury: method for studying reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuta; Hines, Ian N; Zibari, Gazi; Pavlick, Kevin; Gray, Laura; Kitagawa, Yuko; Grisham, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    The mouse model of liver ischemia and reperfusion injury has proven to be valuable for our understanding of the role that reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites play in postischemic tissue injury. This methods paper provides a detailed protocol for inducing partial liver ischemia followed by reperfusion. Liver ischemia is induced in anesthetized mice by cross-clamping the hepatic artery and portal vein for varying lengths of time, resulting in deprivation of blood flow to approximately 70% of the liver. Restoration of blood flow to the ischemic lobes enhances superoxide production concomitant with a rapid and marked decrease in the bioavailability of nitric oxide, resulting in alterations in the redox state of the liver in favor of a more oxidative environment. This hepatocellular oxidative stress induces the activation of oxidant-sensitive transcription factors followed by the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and mediators that ultimately lead to liver injury. This model can be induced in any strain or sex of mouse and requires 1-2 months of practice to become proficient in the surgery and animal manipulation. The roles of various reactive metabolites of oxygen and nitrogen may be evaluated using genetically engineered mice as well as selective molecular, cellular, and/or pharmacological agents.

  15. Nitrogen-doped carbon-embedded TiO2 nanofibers as promising oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassen, D.; Shenashen, M. A.; El-Safty, S. A.; Selim, M. M.; Isago, H.; Elmarakbi, A.; El-Safty, A.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2016-10-01

    The development of inexpensive and effective electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as a substitute for commercial Pt/C catalyst is an important issue in fuel cells. In this paper, we report on novel fabrication of self-supported nitrogen-doped carbon-supported titanium nanofibers (Nsbnd TiO2@C) and carbon-supported titanium (TiO2@C) electrocatalysts via a facile electrospinning route. The nitrogen atom integrates physically and homogenously into the entire carbon-titanium structure. We demonstrate the catalytic performance of Nsbnd TiO2@C and TiO2@C for ORR under alkaline conditions in comparison with Pt/C catalyst. The Nsbnd TiO2@C catalyst shows excellent ORR reactivity and durability. Interestingly, among all the catalysts used in this ORR, Nsbnd TiO2@C-0.75 exhibits remarkable competitive oxygen reduction activity in terms of current density and onset potential, as well as superior methanol tolerance. Such tolerance attributes to maximizing the diffusion of trigger pulse electrons during catalytic reactions because of enhanced electronic features. Results indicate that our fabrication strategy can provide an opportunity to produce a simple, efficient, cost-effective, and promising ORR electrocatalyst for practical applications in energy conversion and storage technologies.

  16. Buffering agents-assisted synthesis of nitrogen-doped graphene with oxygen-rich functional groups for enhanced electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Yan, Qiuyun; Zhang, Shanshan; Lu, Luhua; Xie, Bingqiao; Xie, Ting; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Yucheng; Zhang, Yuxing; Liu, Dong

    2016-11-01

    In this work, designed growth of two type of N-doped graphene nanosheets has been investigated using NH4H2PO4 and (NH4)2HPO4 as buffering agents, respectively, in a mild hydrothermal process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicates that the graphene nanosheets grown using NH4H2PO4 (NGC) have lower nitrogen but higher oxygen content than those using (NH4)2HPO4 (NGL). Electrochemical measurements in three-electrode systems show that both type of the graphene products exhibit superior electrochemical performance (383 and 356 F g-1 at 1 A g-1). While the specific capacitance of NGC is steadily higher than that of NGL under all investigated current densities, the capacitance attenuation of NGL is 4.80% from 500 to 10000 cycles showing more durable in cyclicity than that of NGC (8.81%). The two-electrode supercapacitor devices for NGC and NGL exhibit high energy density of 12.21 Wh kg-1 and 9.28 Wh kg-1 at 0.25 A g-1. The difference in electrochemical behaviors between NGC and NGL electrodes can be attributed to the different contribution of nitrogen and oxygenic groups. The buffer agents assisted synthesis procedure coupled with the reasonable capacitance performance suggests an alternative way in the designed functionalization of graphene for developing high performance supercapacitors.

  17. Dispersibility of vapor phase oxygen and nitrogen functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in various organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Khazaee, Maryam; Xia, Wei; Lackner, Gerhard; Mendes, Rafael G.; Rümmeli, Mark; Muhler, Martin; Lupascu, Doru C.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of gas phase oxygen- and nitrogen-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (OMWCNTs and NMWCNTs) and the dispersibility of these tubes in organic solvents were investigated. Recently, carbon nanotubes have shown supreme capacity to effectively enhance the efficiency of organic solar cells (OSCs). A critical challenge is to individualize tubes from their bundles in order to provide homogenous nano-domains in the active layer of OSCs. OMWCNTs and NMWCNTs were synthesized via HNO3 vapor and NH3 treatments, respectively. Surface functional groups and the structure of the tubes were analyzed by temperature-programmed desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy which confirmed the formation of functional groups on the tube surface and the enhancement of surface defects. Elemental analysis demonstrated that the oxygen and nitrogen content increased with increasing treatment time of the multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in HNO3 vapor. According to ultra-violet visible spectroscopy, modification of the MWCNT increased the extinction coefficients of the tubes owing to enhanced compatibility of the functionalized tubes with organic matrices. PMID:27188622

  18. An integrated laser Raman optical sensor for fast detection of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vidhu S; Luanje, Appolinaire T; Kalluru, Rajamohan R; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2011-04-01

    An integrated fiber optic Raman sensor was designed for real-time, nonintrusive detection of liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) in liquid oxygen (LO(2)) at high pressures and high flow rates. This was intended to monitor the quality of LO(2) in oxidizer feed lines during the ground testing of rocket engines. Various issues related to optical diagnosis of cryogenic fluids (LN(2)/LO(2)) in supercritical environment of rocket engine test facility, such as fluorescence from impurity in optical window of feed line, signal-noise ratio, and fast data acquisition time, etc., are well addressed. The integrated sensor employed a frequency doubled 532-nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser as an excitation light source. The other optical components included were InPhotonics Raman probes, spectrometers, and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The spectrometer was used to collect the Raman spectrum of LN(2) and LO(2). The PMT detection unit was integrated with home-built LABVIEW software for fast monitoring of concentration ratios LN(2) and LO(2). Prior to designing an integrated sensor system, its optical components were also tested with gaseous nitrogen (GN(2)) and oxygen (GO(2)).

  19. Co-production of Nitrogen-15 and Oxygen-18 in Explosive Helium Burning and Implications for Supernova Graphite Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojazi, Michael

    My Masters research involves simulations of a supernova whereby a shock wave of constant Mach number is sent through a 15-solar-mass star evolved to the point of core-collapse. The resulting nucleosynthesis is examined with the intent of explaining the overproduction, relative to solar values, of nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 abundances in supernova presolar graphite grains, as experimentally determined by Groopman et al. via a NanoSIMS analysis. We find such overabundances to be present in the helium-rich zone. Oxygen-18 is leftover from presupernova helium burning while nitrogen-15 is produced by explosive helium burning. Interestingly, anomalous excesses in molybdenum-95 and molybdenum-97 abundances in SiC X grains, discovered by Pellin et al. using the CHARISMA instrument, probably arise from explosive helium burning as well. These results signal the importance of the helium-rich zone for supernova presolar grain growth. We suggest that matter deep from the supernova, which is rich in iron-peak elements, gets injected into the helium-rich zone. Small TiC grains form in this material. These subgrains then traverse the helium-rich zone and serve as seeds for the growth of the graphite or SiC X grains.

  20. Does shift in oxygen level in soil air affect the trace gases emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    malghani, S.; Gleixner, G.; Trumbore, S.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic processes in soil such as, trace gasses emissions are influenced by presence or absence of oxygen as it is a dominant final acceptor of electrons for number of biochemical processes. However, it is unknown that trace gases emissions from soil are influenced by the level of oxygen or not. To understand the impact of oxygen level on CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions, five contrasting soils which differ in land use and other properties, were incubated at constant temperature and moisture in an automated chamber measurement system. Automated system continuously (30 mL/min) flushed the chambers holding soil samples with inlet air of known composition and the outlet air, sampling the headspace of the column, was connected to an automated multiport stream selection valve (Valco) that directed the air stream from different columns sequentially to instrumental part (LiCOR6262,PICARRO2101i and PICCARO2301). Other greenhouse gases and isotopes (δ13C & D) of CH4 were sampled weekly using 2L flasks. Oxygen levels in inlet air were switched weekly, started from 20% followed by 10, 5, 2.5, 1, 0%, and all levels were repeated in reverse fashion (from 1 to 20%).The results showed that soil respiration was higher in soils that were rich in soil organic matter with higher microbial biomass. Three out of five soils exhibited a gradual decrease in soil respiration while shifting higher to lower O2 levels but no such impact was recorded during gradual increase in O2 level. The lowest respiration rates in all soil types were recorded under anaerobic conditions. Forest soils were rich in soil organic carbon and respired more CO2 than grassland or cropland soils. All soils oxidized CH4, except one grassland soil which was acidic in nature (pH=4.1), in the presence of O2 at all levels. Amount of CH4 oxidized varied among soil types and was highest in forest soils. Under anaerobic condition CH4 oxidation was not observed in any soil, while two soils (cropland and one grassland) emitted

  1. Gas diffusion-type oxygen electrode using perovskite-type oxides for metal-air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hyodo, Takeo; Miura, Norio; Yamazoe, Noboru

    1995-12-31

    In order to develop an air cathode of metal-air batteries, oxygen reduction behavior of gas diffusion-type carbon electrodes loaded with perovskite-type oxides, La{sub 1{minus}x}A{prime}{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (A{prime} = Ca, Sr, Ba, 0 {le} x {le} 1.0), was examined in 8 M KOH at 60 C. Among the oxide catalysts tested, La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} (specific surface area: 21.5 m{sup 2}{center_dot}g{sup {minus}1}) gave the highest electrode performance. On the basis of electrode reaction kinetics, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition rates, and temperature programmed desorption of oxygen, it was concluded that such a performance was attributable to the active sites of the oxide for the direct 4-electron reduction of oxygen. Moreover, the electrode using La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} was found to be rather stable in a short-term operation for 90 h at 300 mA{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}.

  2. Air-adapted Methanosarcina acetivorans shows high methane production and develops resistance against oxygen stress.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Belmont-Díaz, Javier; Encalada, Rusely; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans, considered a strict anaerobic archaeon, was cultured in the presence of 0.4-1% O2 (atmospheric) for at least 6 months to generate air-adapted cells; further, the biochemical mechanisms developed to deal with O2 were characterized. Methane production and protein content, as indicators of cell growth, did not change in air-adapted cells respect to cells cultured under anoxia (control cells). In contrast, growth and methane production significantly decreased in control cells exposed for the first time to O2. Production of reactive oxygen species was 50 times lower in air-adapted cells versus control cells, suggesting enhanced anti-oxidant mechanisms that attenuated the O2 toxicity. In this regard, (i) the transcripts and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase significantly increased; and (ii) the thiol-molecules (cysteine + coenzyme M-SH + sulfide) and polyphosphate contents were respectively 2 and 5 times higher in air-adapted cells versus anaerobic-control cells. Long-term cultures (18 days) of air-adapted cells exposed to 2% O2 exhibited the ability to form biofilms. These data indicate that M. acetivorans develops multiple mechanisms to contend with O2 and the associated oxidative stress, as also suggested by genome analyses for some methanogens.

  3. Analysis of High Frequency Site-Specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, M. J.; Harris, E. J.; Olszewski, W.; Ono, S.; Prinn, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) significantly impacts Earth's climate due to its dual role as an inert potent greenhouse gas in the troposphere and as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. However, there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. The marked spatial divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on climate. Source and sink processes of N2O lead to varying concentrations of N2O isotopologues (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, and 14N14N18O being measured) due to preferential isotopic production and elimination in different environments. Estimation of source and sink fluxes can be improved by combining isotopically resolved N2O observations with simulations using a chemical transport model with reanalysis meteorology and treatments of isotopic signatures of specific surface sources and stratospheric intrusions. We present the first few months of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the Stheno-TILDAS instrument (Harris et al, 2013) at Mace Head, Ireland and compare these to results from MOZART-4 (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4) chemical transport model runs including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and reanalysis meterological fields (NCEP/NCAR, MERRA, and GEOS-5). This study forms the basis for future inverse modeling experiments that will improve the accuracy of isotopically differentiated N2O emission and loss estimates. Ref: Harris, E., D. Nelson, W. Olszewski, M. Zahniser, K. Potter, B. McManus, A. Whitehill, R. Prinn, and S. Ono, Development of a spectroscopic technique for continuous online monitoring of oxygen and site-specific nitrogen isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrous oxide, Analytical Chemistry, 2013; DOI: 10.1021/ac403606u.

  4. A Metal-Amino Acid Complex-Derived Bifunctional Oxygen Electrocatalyst for Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanjun; Niu, Yuchen; Yang, Jia; Ma, Liang; Liu, Jianguo; Xiong, Yujie; Xu, Hangxun

    2016-10-01

    Bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst: A metal-amino acid complex is developed to prepare high-performance mesoporous carbon electrocatalyst for both oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions. Such prepared catalyst can be used to assemble rechargeable zinc-air batteries with excellent durability. This work represents a new route toward low-cost, highly active, and durable bifunctional electrocatalysts for cutting-edge energy conversion devices.

  5. Dissolved oxygen as a factor influencing nitrogen removal rates in a one-stage system with partial nitritation and Anammox process.

    PubMed

    Cema, G; Płaza, E; Trela, J; Surmacz-Górska, J

    2011-01-01

    A biofilm system with Kaldnes biofilm carrier was used in these studies to cultivate bacteria responsible for both partial nitritation and Anammox processes. Due to co-existence of oxygen and oxygen-free zones within the biofilm depth, both processes can occur in a single reactor. Oxygen that inhibits the Anammox process is consumed in the outer layer of the biofilm and in this way Anammox bacteria are protected from oxygen. The impact of oxygen concentration on nitrogen removal rates was investigated in the pilot plant (2.1 m3), supplied with reject water from the Himmerfjärden Waste Water Treatment Plant. The results of batch tests showed that the highest nitrogen removal rates were obtained for a dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration around 3 g O2 m(-3) At a DO concentration of 4 g O2 m(-3), an increase of nitrite and nitrate nitrogen concentrations in the batch reactor were observed. The average nitrogen removal rate in the pilot plant during a whole operating period oscillated around 1.3 g N m(-2)d(-1) (0.3 +/- 0.1 kg N m(-3)d(-1)) at the average dissolved oxygen concentration of 2.3 g O2 m(-3). The maximum value of a nitrogen removal rate amounted to 1.9 g N m(-2)d(-1) (0.47 kg N m(-3)d(-1)) and was observed for a DO concentration equal to 2.5 g O2 m(-3). It was observed that increase of biofilm thickness during the operational period, had no influence on nitrogen removal rates in the pilot plant.

  6. 93. VIEW OF LIQUID OXYGEN TOPPING TANK BEHIND SKID 9 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    93. VIEW OF LIQUID OXYGEN TOPPING TANK BEHIND SKID 9 AND GASEOUS NITROGEN TANKS BEHIND SKID 7 - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Application to Air Quality Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Khan, Maudood; Biazar, Arastoo; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are discussed. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark)(NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NO(x) (= NO + NO2). The latest LNOM estimates of lightning channel length distributions, lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and the vertical profile of lightning NO(x) are presented. The primary improvement to the LNOM is the inclusion of non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: (1) hot core stepped and dart leaders, (2) stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NO(x) for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  8. Atmospheric air pollutants: CO in Nitrogen, 5 μmol/mol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelko, L. A.; Pankratov, V. V.; Pankov, A. A.; Ivahnenko, B. V.; Efremova, O. V.; Bakovec, N. V.; Mironchik, A. M.; Aleksandrov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the report on the COOMET supplementary comparison "Atmospheric air pollutants: CO in Nitrogen, 5 μmol/mol". Carbon monoxide (CO) is present in atmosphere due to different natural and anthropogenic sources. CO is a toxic gas and in concentrations higher than (3-5) μmol/mol it is hazardous to human health. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Macrofauna regulate heterotrophic bacterial carbon and nitrogen incorporation in low-oxygen sediments

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, William R; Veuger, Bart; Witte, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) currently impinge upon >1 million km2 of sea floor and are predicted to expand with climate change. We investigated how changes in oxygen availability, macrofaunal biomass and retention of labile organic matter (OM) regulate heterotrophic bacterial C and N incorporation in the sediments of the OMZ-impacted Indian continental margin (540–1100 m; [O2]=0.35–15 μmol l−1). In situ pulse-chase experiments traced 13C:15N-labelled phytodetritus into bulk sediment OM and hydrolysable amino acids, including the bacterial biomarker 𝒟-alanine. Where oxygen availability was lowest ([O2]=0.35 μmol l−1), metazoan macrofauna were absent and bacteria assimilated 30–90% of the labelled phytodetritus within the sediment. At higher oxygen levels ([O2]=2–15 μmol l−1) the macrofaunal presence and lower phytodetritus retention with the sediment occur concomitantly, and bacterial phytodetrital incorporation was reduced and retarded. Bacterial C and N incorporation exhibited a significant negative relationship with macrofaunal biomass across the OMZ. We hypothesise that fauna–bacterial interactions significantly influence OM recycling in low-oxygen sediments and need to be considered when assessing the consequences of global change on biogeochemical cycles. PMID:22592818

  10. Pyrolysis and combustion of tobacco in a cigarette smoking simulator under air and nitrogen atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Busch, Christian; Streibel, Thorsten; Liu, Chuan; McAdam, Kevin G; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2012-04-01

    A coupling between a cigarette smoking simulator and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer was constructed to allow investigation of tobacco smoke formation under simulated burning conditions. The cigarette smoking simulator is designed to burn a sample in close approximation to the conditions experienced by a lit cigarette. The apparatus also permits conditions outside those of normal cigarette burning to be investigated for mechanistic understanding purposes. It allows control of parameters such as smouldering and puff temperatures, as well as combustion rate and puffing volume. In this study, the system enabled examination of the effects of "smoking" a cigarette under a nitrogen atmosphere. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with a soft ionisation technique is expedient to analyse complex mixtures such as tobacco smoke with a high time resolution. The objective of the study was to separate pyrolysis from combustion processes to reveal the formation mechanism of several selected toxicants. A purposely designed adapter, with no measurable dead volume or memory effects, enables the analysis of pyrolysis and combustion gases from tobacco and tobacco products (e.g. 3R4F reference cigarette) with minimum aging. The combined system demonstrates clear distinctions between smoke composition found under air and nitrogen smoking atmospheres based on the corresponding mass spectra and visualisations using principal component analysis.

  11. Iron-nitrogen-activated carbon as cathode catalyst to improve the power generation of single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yajun; Mo, Xiaoping; Li, Kexun; Pu, Liangtao; Liu, Di; Yang, Tingting

    2016-04-01

    In order to improve the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC), iron-nitrogen-activated carbon (Fe-N-C) as an excellent oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst was prepared here using commercial activated carbon (AC) as matrix and employed in single chamber MFC. In MFC, the maximum power density increased to 2437±55 mW m(-2), which was 2 times of that with AC. The open circuit potential (OCP) of Fe-N-C cathode (0.47) was much higher than that of AC cathode (0.21 V). The R0 of Fe-N-C decreased by 47% from 14.36 Ω (AC) to 7.6 Ω (Fe-N-C). From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species were present, which played an important role in the ORR performance of Fe-N-C. These results demonstrated that the as-prepared Fe-N-C material provided a potential alternative to Pt in AC air cathode MFC for relatively desirable energy generation and wastewater treatment.

  12. Potential benefits of oxygen-enriched intake air in a vehicle powered by a spark-ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, H. K.; Sekar, R. R.

    1994-04-01

    A production vehicle powered by a spark-ignition engine (3.1-L Chevrolet Lumina, model year 1990) was tested. The test used oxygen-enriched intake air containing 25 and 28% oxygen by volume to determine (1) if the vehicle would run without difficulties and (2) if emissions benefits would result. Standard Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions test cycles were run satisfactorily. Test results of catalytic converter-out emissions (emissions out of the converter) showed that both carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons were reduced significantly in all three phases of the emissions test cycle. Test results of engine-out emissions (emissions straight out of the engine, with the converter removed) showed that carbon monoxide was significantly reduced in the cold phase. All emission test results were compared with those for normal air (21% oxygen). The catalytic converter also had an improved carbon monoxide conversion efficiency under the oxygen-enriched-air conditions. Detailed results of hydrocarbon speciation indicated large reductions in 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and benzene from the engine with the oxygen-enriched air. Catalytic converter-out ozone was reduced by 60% with 25%-oxygen-content air. Although NO(x) emissions increased significantly, both for engine-out and catalytic converter-out emissions, we anticipate that they can be ameliorated in the near future with new control technologies. The automotive industry currently is developing exhaust-gas control technologies for an oxidizing environment; these technologies should reduce NO(x) emissions more efficiently in vehicles that use oxygen-enriched intake air. On the basis of estimates made from current data, several production vehicles that had low NO(x) emissions could meet the 2004 Tier 2 emissions standards with 25%-oxygen-content air.

  13. 78 FR 54813 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maine; Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Nitrogen Exemption and Ozone Transport Region Restructuring AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...; Oxides of Nitrogen Exemption and Ozone Transport Region Restructuring (August 5, 2013). The EPA...

  14. Increased Efficiency in SI Engine with Air Replaced by Oxygen in Argon Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N J; Rapp, V H; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-01-13

    Basic engine thermodynamics predicts that spark ignited engine efficiency is a function of both the compression ratio of the engine and the specific heat ratio of the working fluid. In practice the compression ratio of the engine is often limited due to knock. Both higher specific heat ratio and higher compression ratio lead to higher end gas temperatures and increase the likelihood of knock. In actual engine cycles, heat transfer losses increase at higher compression ratios and limit efficiency even when the knock limit is not reached. In this paper we investigate the role of both the compression ratio and the specific heat ratio on engine efficiency by conducting experiments comparing operation of a single-cylinder variable-compression-ratio engine with both hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures. For low load operation it is found that the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures result in higher indicated thermal efficiencies. Peak efficiency for the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures is found at compression ratio 5.5 whereas for the hydrogen-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.24 the peak efficiency is found at compression ratio 13. We apply a three-zone model to help explain the effects of specific heat ratio and compression ratio on efficiency. Operation with hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures at low loads is more efficient because the lower compression ratio results in a substantially larger portion of the gas to reside in the adiabatic core rather than in the boundary layer and in the crevices, leading to less heat transfer and more complete combustion.

  15. Tracer study of oxygen and hydrogen uptake by Mg alloys in air with water vapor

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, M. P.; Fayek, M.; Meyer, H. M.; ...

    2015-05-15

    We studied the pure oxidation of Mg, Mg–3Al–1Zn (AZ31B), and Mg–1Zn–0.25Zr–<0.5Nd (ZE10A) at 85 °C in humid air using sequential exposures with H218O and D216O for water vapor. Incorporation of 18O in the hydroxide/oxide films indicated that oxygen from water vapor participated in the reaction. Moreover, penetration of hydrogen into the underlying metal was observed, particularly for the Zr- and Nd-containing ZE10A. Isotopic tracer profiles suggested a complex mixed inward/outward film growth mechanism.

  16. 114. WEST SIDE OF LIQUID OXYGEN CONTROL ROOM (205). LIQUID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. WEST SIDE OF LIQUID OXYGEN CONTROL ROOM (205). LIQUID NITROGEN (LN2) SUBCOOLER ON LEFT; SKID 8, LIQUID OXYGEN CONTROLLER FOR SWITCHING BETWEEN RAPID-LOAD AND TOPPING ON RIGHT. LIQUID OXYGEN LINE FROM SKID 9A AT RIGHT EDGE OF PHOTO. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  17. Microdialysis study of striatal dopaminergic dysfunctions induced by 3 MPa of nitrogen- and helium-oxygen breathing mixtures in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Dedieu, David; Balon, Norbert; Weiss, Michel; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Kinkead, Richard; Rostain, Jean-Claude

    2004-02-20

    Previous studies have demonstrated opposite effects of high-pressure helium and nitrogen on extracellular dopamine (DA) levels, which may reflect disturbances on the synthesis, release or metabolic mechanisms. Intrastriatal microdialysis was used to measure the precursor (tyrosine), DA and its metabolites (DOPAC, HVA) levels under nitrogen- or helium- at pressure up to 3 MPa. Under 3 MPa of helium-oxygen breathing mixtures, the extracellular concentration of tyrosine is decreased while the extracellular concentration of DA is increased. On the contrary, nitrogen-oxygen breathing mixture at the same pressure increased extracellular tyrosine concentration and decreased DA release. Under both conditions, an increment of the DOPAC and HVA levels could be noted. Our results suggest that changes in DA release and metabolism during high-pressure helium exposure reflect the effect of the pressure per se, whereas the intrinsic effects of narcotic gases, although sensitive to pressure, would be revealed by hyperbaric nitrogen exposure.

  18. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species.

  19. Air separation process using packed columns for oxygen and argon recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Thorogood, R.M.; Bennett, D.L.; Allam, R.J.; Prentice, A.L.; Dawson, B.K.

    1989-10-03

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for the separation of mixtures, which comprise oxygen, nitrogen, and argon, by cryogenic distillation in an integrated multi-column distillation system of at least three distillation columns, having a higher pressure column, low pressure column and an argon sidearm column. Wherein the argon sidearm column integrally communicates with the low pressure column. Wherein each column of the integrated distillation system, a liquid phase stream and a vapor phase stream are intimately contacted thereby allowing mass transfer. The improvement involves increasing argon recovery. It comprises effectuating the intimate contact of the liquid and vapor phase streams in the low pressure column and the argon sidearm column by utilizing a structured packing.

  20. Oxygen amendment on growth and nitrogen-use efficiency of flooded Italian Basil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flooding is a frequent and often unavoidable cause of stress, in vegetable production in Florida. Flooding results in hypoxia i.e., oxygen deficiency. This study was conducted with traditional Italian basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), cv. Genovese OG, treated with either a fast- or slow-release solid oxy...

  1. Workshop in Support of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen (NOx) and Sulfur Oxides (SOx)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing a workshop to discuss policy-relevant science to Inform EPA’s "Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur" report. The workshop is being organized by EPA’s Office of Research and Development’s, Nation...

  2. Energy and materials flows in the production of liquid and gaseous oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1980-08-01

    Liquid and gaseous oxygen is produced in an energy-intensive air separation processo that also generates nitrogen. More than 65% of the cost of oxygen is attributable to energy costs. Energy use and materials flows are analyzed for various air separation methods. Effective approaches to energy and material conservation in air separation plants include efficient removal of contaminants (carbon dioxide and water), centralization of air products user-industries so that large air separation plants are cost-effective and the energy use in transportation is minimized, and increased production of nitrogen. Air separation plants can produce more than three times more nitrogen than oxygen, but present markets demand, at most, only 1.5 times more. Full utlization of liquid and gaseous nitrogen should be encouraged, so that the wasted separation energy is minimized. There are potential markets for nitrogen in, for example, cryogenic separation of metallic and plastic wastes, cryogenic particle size reduction, and production of ammonia for fertilizer.

  3. Composition surveys of test gas produced by a hydrogen-oxygen-air burner. [for supersonic ramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    As a result of the need for a uniform hot gas test stream for fuel injector development for hydrogen fueled supersonic combustion ramjet engines, an experimental study of injector configuration effect on exit flow uniformity of a hydrogen fueled oxygen replenished, combustion burner was made. Measurements used to investigate the burner nozzle exit profiles were pitot and gas sample measurements. Gas composition and associated temperature profiles were reduced to an acceptable level by burner injector modifications. The effect of the injector modifications was to redistribute the hydrogen fuel, increase the air pressure drop, promote premixing of the oxygen and air, and establish a uniform flow pattern where the oxygen-air mixture comes into contact with the hydrogen fuel. The most sensitive phenomenon which affected the composition profiles was the uniformity of the air distribution supplied to the combustion chamber.

  4. Well-Combined Magnetically Separable Hybrid Cobalt Ferrite/Nitrogen-Doped Graphene as Efficient Catalyst with Superior Performance for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Hao, Qingli; Lei, Wu; Xia, Xifeng; Liu, Peng; Sun, Dongping; Wang, Xin; Yang, Xujie

    2015-11-18

    Catalysts with low-cost, high activity and stability toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are extremely desirable, but its development still remains a great challenge. Here, a novel magnetically separable hybrid of multimetal oxide, cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4), anchored on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (CoFe2O4/NG) is prepared via a facile solvothermal method followed by calcination at 500 °C. The structure of CoFe2O4/NG and the interaction of both components are analyzed by several techniques. The possible formation of Co/Fe-N interaction in the CoFe2O4/NG catalyst is found. As a result, the well-combination of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with NG and its improved crystallinity lead to a synergistic and efficient catalyst with high performance to ORR through a four-electron-transfer process in alkaline medium. The CoFe2O4/NG exhibits particularly comparable catalytic activity as commercial Pt/C catalyst, and superior stability against methanol oxidation and CO poisoning. Meanwhile, it has been proved that both nitrogen doping and the spinel structure of CoFe2O4 can have a significant contribution to the catalytic activity by contrast experiments. Multimetal oxide hybrid demonstrates better catalysis to ORR than a single metal oxide hybrid. All results make the low-cost and magnetically separable CoFe2O4/NG a promising alternative for costly platinum-based ORR catalyst in fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  5. Plasma effects on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in cancer cells in-vitro exposed by atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure pulsed helium plasma jets are utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, and duty ratio on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in gas and liquid phases and within cells is investigated. The apoptotic changes detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay in cells caused by plasma exposure are observed to correlate well with the levels of extracellular and intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  6. Determination of collisional quenching rate coefficients of metastable nitrogen molecules by air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Susumu; Itoh, Haruo

    2009-10-01

    It has already been investigated on the determination of the collisional quenching rate coefficients of the metastable nitrogen molecules N2(A^3σu^+ ) by some air pollutants [1] in our laboratory. In this report, we present the result on the collisional quenching rate coefficient of N2(A^3σu^+ ) by formaldehyde (CH2O) using a theoretical procedure that takes into account the reflection of metastables at the boundary. As far as we know, this report is the first result of the collisional quenching rate coefficients of N2(A^3σu^+ ) by CH2O. Formaldehyde is a colorless gas with the foul odor, and elements of the adhesive, paints, and preservative, etc. It is widely used for construction materials such as houses, because it is low cost. It is released from paint of construction materials in air, and, in that case, it is known as one of the causative agents of so-called ``Sick building syndrome'' to influence the human body harmfully even if it is a low concentration. The obtained collisional quenching rate coefficient of N2(A^3σu^+ ) by CH2O is (4.7±0.4) x 10-12 cm^3/s. Because the collisional quenching rate coefficient by CH2O is large, it is understood that CH2O receives energy easily from N2(A^3σu^+ ). In addition, we reports on the obtained collisional quenching rate coefficient of N2(A^3σu^+ ) by some air pollutants. [1] S. Suzuki, T.Suzuki and H.Itoh: Proc. of XXVIII ICPIG (Prague, Czech Republic), (2007) 1P01-40.

  7. Degradation mechanisms of 4-chlorophenol in a novel gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor by pulsed high voltage system with oxygen or nitrogen bubbling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Minghua; Hao, Xiaolong; Lei, Lecheng

    2007-03-01

    The effect of gas bubbling on the removal efficiency of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in aqueous solution has been investigated using a novel pulsed high voltage gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor, which generates gas-phase discharge above the water surface simultaneously with the spark discharge directly in the liquid. The time for 100% of 4-CP degradation in the case of oxygen bubbling (7 min) was much shorter than that in the case of nitrogen bubbling (25 min) as plenty of hydrogen peroxide and ozone formed in oxygen atmosphere enhanced the removal efficiency of 4-CP. Except for the main similar intermediates (4-chlorocatechol, hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone) produced in the both cases of oxygen and nitrogen bubbling, special intermediates (5-chloro-3-nitropyrocatechol, 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol, nitrate and nitrite ions) were produced in nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction pathway of 4-CP in the case of oxygen bubbling was oxygen/ozone attack on the radical hydroxylated derivatives of 4-CP. However, in the case of nitrogen bubbling, hydroxylation was the main reaction pathway with effect of N atom on degradation of 4-CP.

  8. Controls on the Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition (δ 15N, δ 18O, δ 17O) of Atmospheric Nitrate in Princeton, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, M. G.; Malcolm, E.; Kaiser, J.; Sigman, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate reflects the oxidative mechanisms that convert NOx to HNO3, while the nitrogen isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate may reflect different NOx source signatures and/or fractionations related to NOx chemistry [Michalski et al., 2003; Hastings et al., 2003; Freyer et al., 1993]. New analysis techniques are capable of determining the 15N/14N, 18O/16O and 17O/16O isotope ratios in samples at the nanomolar level [Sigman et al., 2001; Casciotti et al., 2002; see Kaiser et al., session H38]. This allows for the analysis of short-term variations in the isotopes of HNO3 with the potential to diagnose causal relationships by comparing the isotopic data with other features of atmospheric deposition. The 15N/14N, 18O/16O and 17O/16O of nitrate were analyzed from precipitation samples collected on an event-basis in Princeton, NJ between December 2002 and 2003. The nitrate concentration in Princeton rain ranges from 2.5 to 99.7 μ M (mean=21.1 μ M, n=61), similar to that found in other urban areas of New Jersey by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. The isotopes of nitrate fall in the wide range reported for various environments with the δ 15N ranging from -4.0 to 9.5‰ (vs. air), and the δ 18O and δ 17O ranging from 57.2 to 90.5‰ and 50.7 to 77.8‰ (vs. VSMOW), respectively. The correlation between nitrate and sulfate concentration (R2=0.66) and the lack of a relationship between these major ions and the isotopes of nitrate supports the conclusion that below cloud scavenging is not the dominant control on the isotopic variations observed. Seasonal variations are observed in both the nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate. Overall the δ 15N is not correlated with either δ 18O or δ 17O, although both the δ 15N and δ 18O average lowest in the summer and highest in the winter. δ 18O is highly correlated with δ 17O of nitrate with anomalous enrichment in 17O relative to 18O (Δ 17O ranges from 19

  9. Enhanced photoluminescence in air-suspended carbon nanotubes by oxygen doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jihan; Dhall, Rohan; Hou, Bingya; Yang, Sisi; Wang, Bo; Kang, Daejing; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2016-10-01

    We report photoluminescence (PL) imaging and spectroscopy of air-suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) before and after exposure to a brief (20 s) UV/ozone treatment. These spectra show enhanced PL intensities in 10 out of 11 nanotubes that were measured, by as much as 5-fold. This enhancement in the luminescence efficiency is caused by oxygen defects which trap excitons. We also observe an average 3-fold increase in the D-band Raman intensity further indicating the creation of defects. Previous demonstrations of oxygen doping have been carried out on surfactant-coated carbon nanotubes dissolved in solution, thus requiring substantial longer ozone/UV exposure times (˜15 h). Here, the ozone treatment is more efficient because of the surface exposure of the air-suspended CNTs. In addition to enhanced PL intensities, we observe narrowing of the emission linewidth by 3-10 nm. This ability to control and engineer defects in CNTs is important for realizing several optoelectronic applications such as light-emitting diodes and single photon sources.

  10. Bioinspired synthesis of nitrogen/sulfur co-doped graphene as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huanhuan; Liu, Xiangqian; He, Guangli; Zhang, Xiaoxing; Bao, Shujuan; Hu, Weihua

    2015-04-01

    Efficient electrocatalyst of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is crucial for a variety of renewable energy applications and heteroatom-doped carbon materials have demonstrated promising catalytic performance towards ORR. In this paper we report a bioinspired method to synthesize nitrogen/sulfur (N/S) co-doped graphene as an efficient ORR electrocatalyst via self-polymerization of polydopamine (PDA) thin layer on graphene oxide sheets, followed by reacting with cysteine and finally thermal annealing in Argon (Ar) atmosphere. As-prepared N/S co-doped graphene exhibits significantly enhanced ORR catalytic activity in alkaline solution compared with pristine graphene or N-doped graphene. It also displays long-term operation stability and strong tolerance to methanol poison effect, indicating it a promising ORR electrocatalyst.

  11. Effects of Pectic Polysaccharides Isolated from Leek on the Production of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species by Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Mariana; Ambrozova, Gabriela; Kratchanova, Maria; Denev, Petko; Kussovski, Veselin; Ciz, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The current survey investigates the effect of four polysaccharides isolated from fresh leek or alcohol insoluble substances (AIS) of leek on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) from phagocytes. The ability of the polysaccharides to activate serum complement was also investigated. Despite the lack of antioxidant activity, the pectic polysaccharides significantly decreased the production of ROS by human neutrophils. Polysaccharides isolated from AIS markedly activated RAW 264.7 macrophages for RNS production in a concentration-dependent manner. The Western blot analysis revealed that this effect was due to the stimulation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression of macrophages. The polysaccharides extracted from AIS with water showed the ability to fix serum complement, especially through the alternative pathway. It was found that the polysaccharide that has the highest complement-fixing effect is characterized by the highest content of uronic acids and the highest molecular weight. PMID:23905651

  12. Monitoring of anoxic/oxic process for nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand removal using fuzzy neural networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Ma, Yongwen

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a software sensor based on a fuzzy neural network (FNN) approach was proposed for the real-time estimation of nutrient concentrations and overcoming the problem of delayed measurements. To improve the FNN performance, fuzzy subtractive clustering was used to identify the model's architecture and optimize the fuzzy rule; meanwhile, a split network structure, applied separately for anaerobic and aerobic conditions, was used with dynamic modeling methods, such as an auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs. The proposed methodology was applied to a bench-scale anoxic/oxic process for biological nitrogen removal. It was possible to partially overcome the extrapolation problem of FNNs with the aid of multi-way principal component analysis, because it has the ability to detect abnormal situations, which could generate extrapolation. Real-time estimation of chemical oxygen demand, nitrate, and ammonium concentrations based on the model was successfully carried out with the simple online information of the anoxic/oxic system.

  13. Sliding mode control of dissolved oxygen in an integrated nitrogen removal process in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C; Young, H; Antileo, C; Bornhardt, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a sliding mode controller (SMC) for dissolved oxygen (DO) in an integrated nitrogen removal process carried out in a suspended biomass sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The SMC performance was compared against an auto-tuning PI controller with parameters adjusted at the beginning of the batch cycle. A method for cancelling the slow DO sensor dynamics was implemented by using a first order model of the sensor. Tests in a lab-scale reactor showed that the SMC offers a better disturbance rejection capability than the auto-tuning PI controller, furthermore providing reasonable performance in a wide range of operation. Thus, SMC becomes an effective robust nonlinear tool to the DO control in this process, being also simple from a computational point of view, allowing its implementation in devices such as industrial programmable logic controllers (PLCs).

  14. Fiber optic Raman sensor to monitor the concentration ratio of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vidhu S; Kalluru, Rajamohan R; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P; Cyr, William St; Khijwania, Sunil K

    2007-06-01

    A spontaneous Raman scattering optical fiber sensor was developed for a specific need of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for long-term detection and monitoring of the purity of liquid oxygen (LO(2)) in the oxidizer feed line during ground testing of rocket engines. The Raman peak intensity ratios for liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) and LO(2) with varied weight ratios (LN(2)/LO(2)) were analyzed for their applicability to impurity sensing. The study of the sensor performance with different excitation light sources has helped to design a miniaturized, cost-effective system for this application. The optimal system response time of this miniaturized sensor for LN(2)/LO(2) measurement was found to be in the range of a few seconds. It will need to be further reduced to the millisecond range for real-time, quantitative monitoring of the quality of cryogenic fluids in a harsh environment.

  15. Effect of electronic excitation on high-temperature flows of ionized nitrogen and oxygen mixtures behind strong shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    Strongly non-equilibrium flows of reacting five-component ionized mixtures of nitrogen (N2/N2+/N /N+/e-) and oxygen (O2/O2+/O /O+/e-) behind the plane shock wave are studied taking into account electronic degrees of freedom of both neutral and ionized species. The kinetic scheme includes non-equilibrium reactions of ionization, dissociation, recombination and charge-transfer. Two test cases corresponding to the spacecraft re-entry (Hermes and Fire II experiments) are considered; fluid-dynamic variables, transport coefficients and heat flux are calculated, and different contribution to the heat flux are analyzed. The effect of electronic excitation on the heat transfer is governed by the competition of diffusion and heat conduction; it becomes weak if diffusive processes prevail. An important role of thermal diffusion in ionized flows is emphasized. The influence of dissociation rates on the heat flux is assessed.

  16. Synergy among manganese, nitrogen and carbon to improve the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Wang, Hui; Ji, Shan; Key, Julian; Wang, Rongfang

    2014-04-01

    A highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction, manganese modified glycine derivative-carbon (Mn-CNx), is synthesized by a two-step carbonizing process. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to characterize structure and morphology of the catalysts. Electrochemical tests show that Mn-CNx has higher catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction than CNx derived glycine and Mn modified Vulcan carbon. Moreover, the half-wave potential of Mn-CNx is only 12 mV lower than that of commercial Pt/C. Mn-CNx also has excellent durability to methanol crossover in alkaline solution, and thus provides a promising low cost, non-precious metal cathode catalyst for fuel cells.

  17. The Reaction of Oxygen-Nitrogen Mixtures with Granular Activated Carbons Below the Spontaneous Ignition Temperature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-14

    number) Activated carbon Oxidation of charcoals with 02 Spontaneous ignition temperature Anonialous desorption of CO and CO2 20. VTRACT (Conlnue on...that desorbed as CO or CO2. An example of the temperature control is shown (Figure 7) for the coconut shell charcoal (G-210) in 100% oxygen in which...and Flammability 2, 141-156 (1971). (5) "Standard Test for Ignition Temperature of Granular Activated Carbon ’’, American Society of Testing Materials

  18. Dose-dependent intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) production from particulate matter exposure: comparison to oxidative potential and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuet, Wing Y.; Fok, Shierly; Verma, Vishal; Tagle Rodriguez, Marlen S.; Grosberg, Anna; Champion, Julie A.; Ng, Nga L.

    2016-11-01

    Elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations have been associated with cardiopulmonary risks. In this study, alveolar macrophages and ventricular myocytes were exposed to PM extracts from 104 ambient filters collected in multiple rural and urban sites in the greater Atlanta area. PM-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) were measured to investigate the effect of chemical composition and determine whether chemical assays are representative of cellular responses. For summer samples, the area under the ROS/RNS dose-response curve per volume of air (AUCvolume) was significantly correlated with dithiothreitol (DTT) activity, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), brown carbon, titanium, and iron, while a relatively flat response was observed for winter samples. EC50 was also correlated with max response for all filters investigated, which suggests that certain PM constituents may be involved in cellular protective pathways. Although few metal correlations were observed, exposure to laboratory-prepared metal solutions induced ROS/RNS production, indicating that a lack of correlation does not necessarily translate to a lack of response. Collectively, these results suggest that complex interactions may occur between PM species. Furthermore, the strong correlation between organic species and ROS/RNS response highlights a need to understand the contribution of organic aerosols, especially photochemically driven secondary organic aerosols (SOA), to PM-induced health effects.

  19. The Oxygen and Nitrogen Abundance of Leo A and GR 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zee, L.; Skillman, E. D.; Haynes, M. P.

    1999-05-01

    Gas phase abundances are one of the best measures of the intrinsic metallicity of low mass galaxies. We recently obtained low resolution long slit optical spectra of several HII regions in Leo A and GR 8 with the Palomar 5m telescope. Previous studies of the resolved stellar population of Leo A indicated that the stars have metallicities approximately 2% of solar (Tolstoy et al. 1998). Preliminary analysis of the HII region spectra, and that of a planetary nebula, indicates that the gas phase oxygen abundance of Leo A is approximately 3% of solar. This confirms the result of Skillman et al. (1989), who also derived an oxygen abundance for Leo A from a planetary nebula. Similarly, for GR 8 we find a mean oxygen abundance of 5% of solar. For all the HII regions, the derived log(N/O) is -1.5 +/- 0.1, as has been found for other low metallicity systems. These new observations of multiple HII regions in Leo A and GR 8 confirm that metals in low mass galaxies are well mixed.

  20. Decay of femtosecond laser-induced plasma filaments in air, nitrogen, and argon for atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Bodrov, S. B.; Tsarev, M. V.; Murzanev, A. A.; Sergeev, Yu. A.; Malkov, Yu. A.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    The temporal evolution of a plasma channel at the trail of a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse was studied experimentally and theoretically in air, nitrogen (with an admixture of ˜3% O2), and argon in a wide range of gas pressures (from 2 to 760 Torr). Measurements by means of transverse optical interferometry and pulsed terahertz scattering techniques showed that plasma density in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure reduces by an order of magnitude within 3-4 ns and that the decay rate decreases with decreasing pressure. The argon plasma did not decay within several nanoseconds for pressures of 50-760 Torr. We extended our theoretical model previously applied for atmospheric pressure air plasma to explain the plasma decay in the gases under study and to show that allowance for plasma channel expansion affects plasma decay at low pressures.

  1. BOND: Bayesian Oxygen and Nitrogen abundance Determinations in giant H II regions using strong and semistrong lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale Asari, N.; Stasińska, G.; Morisset, C.; Cid Fernandes, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present the Bayesian oxygen and nitrogen abundance determinations (BOND) method. BOND is a Bayesian code (available at: http://bond.ufsc.br) to simultaneously derive oxygen and nitrogen abundances in giant H II regions. It compares observed emission lines to a grid of photoionization models without assuming any relation between O/H and N/O. Our grid spans a wide range in O/H, N/O and ionization parameter U, and covers different starburst ages and nebular geometries. Varying starburst ages accounts for variations in the ionizing radiation field hardness, which arise due to the ageing of H II regions or the stochastic sampling of the initial mass function. All previous approaches assume a strict relation between the ionizing field and metallicity. The other novelty is extracting information on the nebular physics from semistrong emission lines. While strong lines ratios alone ([O III]/Hβ, [O II]/Hβ and [N II]/Hβ) lead to multiple O/H solutions, the simultaneous use of [Ar III]/[Ne III] allows one to decide whether an H II region is of high or low metallicity. Adding He I/Hβ pins down the hardness of the radiation field. We apply our method to H II regions and blue compact dwarf galaxies, and find that the resulting N/O versus O/H relation is as scattered as the one obtained from the temperature-based method. As in previous strong-line methods calibrated on photoionization models, the BOND O/H values are generally higher than temperature-based ones, which might indicate the presence of temperature fluctuations or kappa distributions in real nebulae, or a too soft ionizing radiation field in the models.

  2. [Effect of the active nitrogen and oxygen metabolities on the level of cGMP in uterus myocytes].

    PubMed

    Danylovych, Iu V; Tuhaĭ, V A

    2006-01-01

    The level of cGMP in myocytes of uterus of rats at an action active metabolities of nitrogen and oxygen (NO, NO2- and H2O2) in the conditions of influence of progesteron on myocytes was studied. Cell suspension was selected with the use of collagenase and soy-bean inhibitor of tripsin. Determining the amount of cGMP was conducted with the use of standard kit produced by "Amersham" (Great Britain). The basal level of cGMP in unactivated myocytes made 1.5 +/- 0.17 pmol cGMP/mg of protein (n = 5). It is shown that incubation of myocytes with 0.1 mM acetylcholin during 1 hour resulted in 2 times growth of cGMP content in suspension approximately, this increase is fully supressed in the presenced 0.1 mM methilene blue, that specifies activity of soluble cGMP in myocytes. Treatment of cells with 10 nM progesteron during 1 hour did not cause substantial changes in the level of cGMP. At the same time addition of 0.1 mM sodium nitroprussid or 10 nM H2O2 to suspension resulted in such conditions in the increase of level of cGMP to 3.1 +/- 0.6 and 6.8 +/- 0.4 pmol cGMP/mg of protein. Poor penetration of NO2- (10 nM) to the cells did not cause changes in the level of cGMP. The results got by us testify that the long-term influence of active metabolities of nitrogen and oxygen, instead of progesteron, provides the increase of the level of cGMP in the myometrium.

  3. Monitoring organic nitrogen species in the UT/LS - a new system for analysis of CARIBIC whole air samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, Carina; Thorenz, Ute; Baker, Angela; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    The CARIBIC project is a unique program for long term and global scale monitoring of the atmosphere (http://www.caribic-atmospheric.com). An instrument container is installed monthly into a civil aircraft operated by Lufthansa (Airbus A 340-600) and makes atmospheric observations en route from Frankfurt, Germany to various destinations around the globe. In four to six long distance flights at a cruising altitude of 10 to 12 km online measurements of various atmospheric tracers are performed during the flight as well as whole air samples are taken with two different sampling units (116 samples in both glass and stainless steel canisters). These samples are routinely analyzed for greenhouse gases, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and halogenated compounds. Nitrogen containing compounds play various important roles in the atmosphere. Alkyl nitrates (RONO2) are products of the reaction of NMHC with OH and other oxidants in the presence of NO. They can provide information on the oxidative history of an air mass. Moreover they influence photolchemical ozone formation and act as a transport mechanism for reactive nitrogen. Less reactive nitrogen containing species such as HCN and acetonitrile are important markers for biomass burning, while organic amines are involved in gas to particle partitioning. Finally N2O is a long lived nitrogen containing gas important for the Earth's radiative budget. Regular measurements of such nitrogen compounds would therefore be a significant contribution to the CARIBIC data set. Especially for high altitude samples, in which the mixing ratios of many species are expected to be in the low ppt range, a highly sensitive method for analysis is required. Therefore a new system for measurement of nitrogen compounds has been built up, comprising a gas chromatograph (GC) using a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). An important advantage of the NCD is that it is selective for nitrogen and equimolar. The nitrogen compounds are sequentially pre

  4. Simultaneous efficient removal of high-strength ammonia nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand from landfill leachate by using an extremely high ammonia nitrogen-resistant strain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dahai; Yang, Jiyu; Fang, Xuexun; Ren, Hejun

    2015-01-01

    Bioaugmentation is a promising technology for pollutant elimination from stressed environments, and it would provide an efficient way to solve challenges in traditional biotreatment of wastewater with high strength of ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N). A high NH4(+)-N-resistant bacteria strain, identified as Bacillus cereus (Jlu BC), was domesticated and isolated from the bacteria consortium in landfill leachate. Jlu BC could survive in 100 g/L NH4(+)-N environment, which indicated its extremely high NH4(+)-N tolerance than the stains found before. Jlu BC was employed in the bioaugmented system to remove high strength of NH4(+)-N from landfill leachate, and to increase the removal efficiency, response surface methodology (RSM) was used for optimizing bioaugmentation degradation conditions. At the optimum condition (initial pH 7.33, 4.14 days, initial chemical oxygen demand [COD] concentration [18,000 mg/L], 3.5 mL inoculated domesticated bacteria strain, 0.3 mg/mL phosphorus supplement, 30 °C, and 170 rpm), 94.74 ± 3.8% removal rate of NH4(+)-N was obtained, and the experiment data corresponded well with the predicted removal rate of the RSM models (95.50%). Furthermore, COD removal rate of 81.94 ± 1.4% was obtained simultaneously. The results presented are promising, and the screened strain would be of great practical importance in mature landfill leachate and other NH4(+)-N enrichment wastewater pollution control.

  5. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  6. Synergistic effect of Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbon/graphene with enhanced catalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dewang; Yuan, Wenjing; Li, Cun; Song, Jiming; Xie, Anjian; Shen, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Developing efficient and economical catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is important to promote the commercialization of fuel cells. Here, we report a simple and environmentally friendly method to prepare nitrogen (N) -doped hierarchical porous carbon (HPC)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composites by reusing waste biomass (pomelo peel) coupled with graphene oxide (GO). This method is green, low-cost and without using any acid or alkali activator. The typical sample (N-HPC/RGO-1) contains 5.96 at.% nitrogen and larger BET surface area (1194 m2/g). Electrochemical measurements show that N-HPC/RGO-1 exhibits not only a relatively positive onset potential and high current density, but also considerable methanol tolerance and long-term durability in alkaline media as well as in acidic media. The electron transfer number is close to 4, which means that it is mostly via a four-electron pathway toward ORR. The excellent catalytic performance of N-HPC/RGO-1 is due to the synergistic effect of the inherent interwoven network structure of HPC, the good electrical conductivity of RGO, and the heteroatom doping for the composite. More importantly, this work demonstrates a good example for turning discarded rubbish into valuable functional products and addresses the disposal issue of waste biomass simultaneously for environment clean.

  7. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe3C and Co3C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe3C, and Co3C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  8. Free Energy-Based Coarse-Grained Force Field for Binary Mixtures of Hydrocarbons, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fenglei; Deetz, Joshua D; Sun, Huai

    2017-01-23

    The free energy based Lennard-Jones 12-6 (FE-12-6) coarse-grained (CG) force field developed for alkanes1 has been extended to model small molecules of light hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, propane, butane, and isobutane), nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. The adjustable parameters of the FE-12-6 potential are determined by fitting against experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) curves and heat of vaporization (HOV) data for pure substance liquids. Simulations using the optimized FE-12-6 parameters correctly reproduced experimental measures of the VLE, HOV, density, vapor pressure, compressibility, critical point, and surface tension for pure substances over a wide range of thermodynamic states. The force field parameters optimized for pure substances were tested on methane/butane, nitrogen/decane, and carbon dioxide/decane binary mixtures to predict their vapor-liquid equilibrium phase diagrams. It is found that for nonpolar molecules represented by different sized beads, a common scaling factor (0.08) that reduces the strength of the interaction potential between unlike beads, generated using Lorentz-Berthelot (LB) combination rules, is required to predict vapor-liquid phase equilibria accurately.

  9. Nitrogen, phosphorus and iron doped carbon nanospheres with high surface area and hierarchical porous structure for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xiaochang; Peng, Hongliang; You, Chenghang; Liu, Fangfang; Zheng, Ruiping; Xu, Dongwei; Li, Xiuhua; Liao, Shijun

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen, phosphorus and Fe doped carbon nanospheres have been synthesized by a facile method in which polyacrylonitrile nanospheres are pyrolyzed in the presence of diammonium phosphate and iron trichloride hexahydrate. The specific surface area of the catalyst is high up to 771.3 m2 g-1, and it has a hierarchical micro-meso-macroporous structure. In an alkaline medium, the catalyst exhibits high electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as well as excellent stability and methanol tolerance-superior in each case to commercial Pt/C catalyst. The effects that adding Fe salt and phosphorus on the structure and performance of the catalyst are also investigated. We suggest that the catalyst's excellent electrocatalytic performance may be attributed to: (1) the synergistic effect, which provides more catalytic sites for the ORR, due to the nitrogen and phosphorus co-doping; (2) the strong promotion by trace Fe residues; and (3) the high surface area and excellent mass transport rate arising from the hierarchical porous structure.

  10. Highly uniform and monodisperse carbon nanospheres enriched with cobalt-nitrogen active sites as a potential oxygen reduction electrocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xing; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Peng, Feng

    2017-04-01

    Uniform cobalt and nitrogen co-doped carbon nanospheres (CoN-CNS) with high specific surface area (865 m2 g-1) have been prepared by a simple but efficient method. The prepared CoN-CNS catalyst exhibits outstanding catalytic performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in both alkaline and acidic electrolytes. In alkaline electrolyte, the prepared CoN-CNS has more positive half-wave potential and larger kinetic current density than commercial Pt/C. In acidic electrolyte, CoN-CNS also shows good ORR activity with high electron transfer number, its onset and half-wave potentials are all close to those of commercial carbon supported platinum catalyst (Pt/C). CoN-CNS catalyst shows more superior stability and higher methanol-tolerance than commercial Pt/C both in alkaline and in acidic electrolytes. The potassium thiocyanate-poisoning test further confirms that the cobalt-nitrogen active sites exist in CoN-CNS, which are dominating to endow high ORR catalytic activity in acidic electrolyte. This study develops a new method to prepare non-precious metal catalyst with excellent ORR performances for direct methanol fuel cells.

  11. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanosheets made from biomass as highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Fuping; Cao, Zhongyue; Zhao, Qiuping; Liang, Hongyu; Zhang, Junyan

    2014-12-01

    The successful commercialization of fuel cells requires the efficient electrocatalyst to make the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) fast because of the sluggish nature of ORR and the high cost of the platinum catalysts. In this work, we report the excellent performance of metal-free nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanosheets (NPCN) with hierarchical porous structure and a high surface area of 1436.02 m2 g-1 for catalyzing ORR. The active NPCN is synthesized via facile high-temperature carbonization of natural ginkgo leaves followed by purification and ammonia post-treatment without using additional supporting templates and activation processes. In O2-saturated 0.1 M KOH solution, the resultant NPCN exhibits a high kinetic-limiting current density of 13.57 mA cm-2 at -0.25 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) approaching that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst (14 mA cm-2) and long-term electrochemical stability. Notably, the NPCN shows a slightly negative ORR half-wave potential in comparison with Pt/C (ΔE1/2 = 19 mV). The excellent electrocatalytic properties of NPCN originate from the combined effect of optimal nitrogen doping, high surface area, and porous architecture, which induce the high-density distribution of highly active and stable catalytic sites.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and biological relevance of some metal (II) complexes with oxygen, nitrogen and oxygen (ONO) donor Schiff base ligand derived from thiazole and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesh, G. Y.; Mruthyunjayaswamy, B. H. M.

    2015-04-01

    The novel Schiff base ligand 2-((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)methylene)-N-(4-phenylthiazol-2-yl)hydrazinecarboxamide (L) obtained by the condensation of N-(4-phenylthiazol-2-yl)hydrazinecarboxamide with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and its newly synthesized Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes have been characterized by microanalysis, molar conductance, IR, 1H NMR, ESI-mass, UV-Visible, TGA/DTA, ESR and powder X-ray diffraction data to explicate their structures. The IR results confirmed the tridentate binding of the ligand involving oxygen atom of amide carbonyl, azomethine nitrogen and naphthol oxygen. 1H NMR spectral data of the ligand (L) and its Zn(II) complex agreed well with the proposed structures. Thermogravimetric studies for Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes indicated the presence of coordinated water molecules and the final product is the metal oxide. In order to appraise the effect of antimicrobial activity of metal ions upon chelation, the newly synthesized ligand and its metal complexes were screened for their antimicrobial activity by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. The DNA cleavage activities were studied using plasmid DNA pBR322 (Bangal re Genei, Bengaluru, Cat. No 105850) as a target molecule by agarose gel electrophoresis method. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to study the in vitro cytotoxicity properties against Artemia salina. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity were determined in vitro by reduction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH). The ligand exhibited better in vitro-antioxidant activity than its metal complexes.

  13. Trophic ecology and vertical patterns of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in zooplankton from oxygen minimum zone regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rebecca L.; Wakeham, Stuart; McKinney, Rick; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-08-01

    The unique physical and biogeochemical characteristics of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) influence plankton ecology, including zooplankton trophic webs. Using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, this study examined zooplankton trophic webs in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ. δ13C values were used to indicate zooplankton food sources, and δ15N values were used to indicate zooplankton trophic position and nitrogen cycle pathways. Vertically stratified MOCNESS net tows collected zooplankton from 0 to 1000 m at two stations along a north-south transect in the ETNP during 2007 and 2008, the Tehuantepec Bowl and the Costa Rica Dome. Zooplankton samples were separated into four size fractions for stable isotope analyses. Particulate organic matter (POM), assumed to represent a primary food source for zooplankton, was collected with McLane large volume in situ pumps. The isotopic composition and trophic ecology of the ETNP zooplankton community had distinct spatial and vertical patterns influenced by OMZ structure. The most pronounced vertical isotope gradients occurred near the upper and lower OMZ oxyclines. Material with lower δ13C values was apparently produced in the upper oxycline, possibly by chemoautotrophic microbes, and was subsequently consumed by zooplankton. Between-station differences in δ15N values suggested that different nitrogen cycle processes were dominant at the two locations, which influenced the isotopic characteristics of the zooplankton community. A strong depth gradient in zooplankton δ15N values in the lower oxycline suggested an increase in trophic cycling just below the core of the OMZ. Shallow POM (0-110 m) was likely the most important food source for mixed layer, upper oxycline, and OMZ core zooplankton, while deep POM was an important food source for most lower oxycline zooplankton (except for samples dominated by the seasonally migrating copepod Eucalanus inermis). There was no consistent isotopic progression among the four

  14. Nitrogen-doped carbon dots originating from unripe peach for fluorescent bioimaging and electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Atchudan, Raji; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Lee, Yong Rok

    2016-11-15

    This paper reports the robust hydrothermal synthesis of nitrogen doped carbon dots (N-CDs) using the unripe fruit of Prunus persica (peach) as the carbon precursor and aqueous ammonia as the nitrogen source. The optical properties of synthesized N-CDs were characterized by ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The synthesized N-CDs were emitted blue light when excitated with a portable UV lamp. The materials with the optical properties were characterized further by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The mean size of the N-CDs was approximately 8nm, as calculated from the HRTEM image. The d-spacing of N-CDs, calculated using Bragg law, was approximately 0.21nm, which was consistent with the interlayer distance calculated from the HRTEM image. FT-IR spectroscopy and XPS revealed the presence of the phytoconstituents functionalities of peach fruit over the N-CDs surface and a high level of nitrogen doping on carbon dots (CDs) was confirmed by XPS studies. These results suggest that the unripe fruit extract of peach is an ideal candidate for the preparation of N-CDs. The resulting N-CDs showed excellent optical properties in water. The synthesized N-CDs exhibited a high fluorescence quantum yield and low cytotoxicity, and can be used as fluorescence imaging probes. In addition, the N-CDs were catalytically activite towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The N-CDs exhibited good catalytic activity in an alkaline medium (0.1M KOH) with a remarkable ORR of approximately 0.72V vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), and O2 reduction follows mainly a 2 electron pathway by being reduced to hydrogen peroxide. The 2-electron reduction pathway is used in industry for H2O2 production.

  15. Active Site Structures in Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Cobalt Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yingdan; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2016-12-07

    The catalytic mechanism and the nature of active sites are revealed for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with new non-noble-metal nitrogen-doped carbon-supported transition-metal catalysts (metal-N-C catalyst). Specifically, new nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt catalysts (Co-N-C catalysts) are made by pyrolyzing various ratios of the nitrogen-atom rich heterocycle compound, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium dicyanamide (EMIM-dca) and cobalt salt (Co(NO3)2). The ORR activity (JK at 0.8 V vs RHE, in 0.1 M KOH solution) of a typical catalyst in this family, Co15-N-C800, is 8.25 mA/mg, which is much higher than the ORR activity values of N-C catalysts (0.41 mA/mg). The active site in the catalyst is found to be the Co-N species, which is most likely in the form of Co2N. Metallic cobalt (Co) particles, Co3C species, and N-C species are not catalytically active sites, nor do these moieties interact with the Co-N active sites during the catalysis of the ORR. Increasing the Co salt content during the synthesis favors the formation of Co-N active sites in the final catalyst. Higher pyrolysis temperatures (e.g., a temperature higher than 800 °C) do not favor the formation of the Co-N active sites, but cause the formed Co-N active sites to decompose, which, therefore, leads to a lower catalytic activity. This reveals that the control of the parameters that affect the final structure is critical to catalyst performance and, therefore, the effective development of high-performance heteroatom-doped non-noble-metal ORR catalysts.

  16. Nitrogen potential recovery and concentration of ammonia from swine manure using electrodialysis coupled with air stripping.

    PubMed

    Ippersiel, D; Mondor, M; Lamarche, F; Tremblay, F; Dubreuil, J; Masse, L

    2012-03-01

    The practice of intensive animal production in certain areas has resulted in excessive manure production for the available regional land base. Consequently, there is a need to develop treatment technologies to recover the valuable nutrients that manure contains so that the resulting product can be transported and used as fertilizer on agricultural land. The project presented here used electrodialysis in a dilution/concentration configuration to transfer the manure ammonia in the diluate solution by electromigration to an adjacent solution separated by an ion-exchange membrane under the driving force of an electrical potential. Then, air stripping from the electrodialysis-obtained concentrate solution without pH modification was used to isolate the ammonia in an acidic solution. An optimal process operating voltage of 17.5 V was first determined on the basis of current efficiency and total energy consumption. During the process, the swine manure pH varied from 8.5 to 8.2, values favourable for NH(4)(+) electromigration. Total ammonia nitrogen reached 21,352 mg/L in the concentrate solution, representing approximately seven times the concentration in the swine manure. Further increases in concentration were limited by water transfer from the diluate solution due to electroosmosis and osmosis. Applying vacuum to the concentrate reservoir was found to be more efficient than direct concentrate solution aeration for NH(3) recuperation in the acid trap, given that the ammonia recuperated under vacuum represented 14.5% of the theoretical value of the NH(3) present in the concentrate solution as compared to 6.2% for aeration. However, an excessively low concentrate solution pH (8.6-8.3) limited NH(3)volatilization toward the acid trap. These results suggest that the concentrate solution pH needs to be raised to promote the volatile NH(3) form of total ammonia nitrogen.

  17. A synthesis of the ecological effects of air pollution from nitrogen and sulfur in the U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greaver, T.L.; Sullivan, T.; Herrick, J.D.; Barber, M.; Baron, J.; Cosby, B.; Deerharke, M.; Dennis, R.; Dubois, J.J.D.; Goodale, C.; Herlihy, A.; Lawrence, G.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.; Novak, K.

    2012-01-01

    Four decades after the passage of the US Clean Air Act, air-quality standards are set to protect ecosystems from damage caused by gas-phase nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) compounds, but not from the deposition of these air pollutants to land and water. Here, we synthesize recent scientific literature on the ecological effects of N and S air pollution in the US. Deposition of N and S is the main driver of ecosystem acidification and contributes to nutrient enrichment in many natural systems. Although surface-water acidification has decreased in the US since 1990, it remains a problem in many regions. Perturbations to ecosystems caused by the nutrient effects of N deposition continue to emerge, although gas-phase concentrations are generally not high enough to cause phytotoxicity. In all, there is overwhelming evidence of a broad range of damaging effects to ecosystems in the US under current air quality conditions.

  18. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively).

  19. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Defense/Stress Responses Activated by Chitosan in Sycamore Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation. PMID:25642757

  20. Biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in sequencing batch reactors: effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen concentration and influent particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Kayaalp, Ahmet S; Cheng, Ka Yu; Wylie, Jason; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2013-01-01

    Removal of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) from municipal wastewaters is required to mitigate eutrophication of receiving water bodies. While most treatment plants achieve good N removal using influent carbon (C), the use of influent C to facilitate enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is poorly explored. A number of operational parameters can facilitate optimum use of influent C and this study investigated the effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during aerobic period and influent solids on biological P and N removal in sequencing batch reactors (SRBs) using municipal wastewaters. Increasing cycle length from 3 to 6 h increased P removal efficiency, which was attributed to larger portion of N being removed via nitrite pathway and more biodegradable organic C becoming available for EBPR. Further increasing cycle length from 6 to 8 h decreased P removal efficiencies as the demand for biodegradable organic C for denitrification increased as a result of complete nitrification. Decreasing DO concentration in the aerobic period from 2 to 0.8 mg L(-1) increased P removal efficiency but decreased nitrification rates possibly due to oxygen limitation. Further, sedimented wastewater was proved to be a better influent stream than non-sedimented wastewater possibility due to the detrimental effect of particulate matter on biological nutrient removal.