Science.gov

Sample records for air plasma formation

  1. Design and characterization of a novel coaxial VHF plasma source for air plasma formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrns, Brandon; Wooten, Daniel; Shannon, Steven

    2011-10-01

    A key challenge in the expansion of atmospheric plasma applicators into new markets is the effective surface area that these systems can efficiently treat. To this end, a large area atmospheric air glow discharge, with approximately 9.5 cm2 cross sectional area, is obtained using a simple coaxial structure. The room air plasma is driven by a 162MHz generator at powers ranging from 300W-1000W. The VHF drive appears to produce a steady state glow void of streamers or arcs typically found in atmospheric air systems. Electrical measurements coupled with a global plasma model and transmission line theory allow for the calculation of electron density. Densities calculated for 400W are approximately 1011 cm-3. Spectroscopy data shows dominant emissions consist of OH, N2, and N2+,along with a continuum indicating neutral bremsstrahlung radiation; this is used for electron density calculations and model validation. In this presentation, source design, plasma characterization, and preliminary surface treatments of HDPE will be presented. A key challenge in the expansion of atmospheric plasma applicators into new markets is the effective surface area that these systems can efficiently treat. To this end, a large area atmospheric air glow discharge, with approximately 9.5 cm2 cross sectional area, is obtained using a simple coaxial structure. The room air plasma is driven by a 162MHz generator at powers ranging from 300W-1000W. The VHF drive appears to produce a steady state glow void of streamers or arcs typically found in atmospheric air systems. Electrical measurements coupled with a global plasma model and transmission line theory allow for the calculation of electron density. Densities calculated for 400W are approximately 1011 cm-3. Spectroscopy data shows dominant emissions consist of OH, N2, and N2+,along with a continuum indicating neutral bremsstrahlung radiation; this is used for electron density calculations and model validation. In this presentation, source design

  2. Laser prepulse induced plasma channel formation in air and relativistic self focusing of an intense short pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashok; Dahiya, Deepak; Sharma, A. K.

    2011-02-15

    An analytical formalism is developed and particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to study plasma channel formation in air by a two pulse technique and subsequent relativistic self focusing of the third intense laser through it. The first prepulse causes tunnel ionization of air. The second pulse heats the plasma electrons and establishes a prolonged channel. The third pulse focuses under the combined effect of density nonuniformity of the channel and relativistic mass nonlinearity. A channel with 20% density variation over the spot size of the third pulse is seen to strongly influence relativistic self focusing at normalized laser amplitude {approx}0.4-1. In deeper plasma channels, self focusing is less sensitive to laser amplitude variation. These results are reproduced in particle-in-cell simulations. The present treatment is valid for millimeter range plasma channels.

  3. Formation of thermal flow fields and chemical transport in air and water by atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Tetsuji; Iwafuchi, Yutaka; Morfill, Gregor E.; Sato, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is a potential tool for medical purposes, e.g. disinfection/sterilization. In order for it to be effective and functional, it is crucial to understand the transport mechanism of chemically reactive species in air as well as in liquid. An atmospheric plasma discharge was produced between a platinum pin electrode and the surface of water. The thermal flow field of a cold atmospheric plasma as well as its chemical components was measured. A gas flow with a velocity of around 15 m s-1 to the water's surface was shown to be induced by the discharge. This air flow induced a circulating flow in the water from the discharge point at the water's surface because of friction. It was also demonstrated that the chemical components generated in air dissolved in water and the properties of the water changed. The reactive species were believed to be distributed mainly by convective transport in water, because the variation in the pH profile indicated by a methyl red solution resembled the induced flow pattern.

  4. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  5. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  6. Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskii, Iu. M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskii, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The ambient-pressure dependences of the dynamic and optical characteristics of a laser plasma generated by CO2-laser irradiation of an obstacle are investigated experimentally. The change of the sample's surface roughness after irradiation is investigated as a function of air pressure. It is concluded that the transition from the air plasma to the erosion plasma takes place at an air pressure of about 1 mm Hg. The results confirm the existing theory of plasma formation near the surface of an obstacle under the CO2-laser pulse effect in air.

  7. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti3+, Ti4+, O2−, oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift. PMID:27572095

  8. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti(3+) state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-08-30

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti(3+), Ti(4+), O(2-), oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift.

  9. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-08-01

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti3+, Ti4+, O2‑, oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift.

  10. A novel approach to regulate cell membrane permeability for ATP and NADH formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae induced by air cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyu, DONG; Tingting, LIU; Yuqin, XIONG

    2017-02-01

    Air cold plasma has been used as a novel method for enhancing microbial fermentation. The aim of this work was to explore the effect of plasma on membrane permeability and the formation of ATP and NADH in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, so as to provide valuable information for large-scale application of plasma in the fermentation industry. Suspensions of S. cerevisiae cells were exposed to air cold plasma for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 min, and then subjected to various analyses prior to fermentation (0 h) and at the 9 and 21 h stages of fermentation. Compared with non-exposed cells, cells exposed to plasma for 1 min exhibited a marked increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration as a result of the significant increase in membrane potential prior to fermentation. At the same time, the ATP level in the cell suspension decreased by about 40%, resulting in a reduction of about 60% in NADH prior to culturing. However, the levels of ATP and NADH in the culture at the 9 and 21 h fermentation stages were different from the level at 0 h. Taken together, the results indicated that exposure of S. cerevisiae to air cold plasma could increase its cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration by improving the cell membrane potential, consequently leading to changes in ATP and NADH levels. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 21246012, 21306015 and 21476032).

  11. Screening in humid air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Anatoly; Derbenev, Ivan; Dyatko, Nikolay; Kurkin, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    Low temperature air plasmas containing H2O molecules are of high importance for atmospheric phenomena, climate control, biomedical applications, surface processing, and purification of air and water. Humid air plasma created by an external ionization source is a good model of the troposphere where ions are produced by the galactic cosmic rays and decay products of air and soil radioactive elements such as Rn222. The present paper is devoted to study the ionic composition and the screening in an ionized humid air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The ionization rate is varied in the range of 101 -1018 cm-3s-1. The humid air with 0 - 1 . 5 % water admixture that corresponds to the relative humidity of 0 - 67 % at the air temperature equal to 20°C is considered. The ionic composition is determined on the analysis of more than a hundred processes. The system of 41 non-steady state particle number balance equations is solved using the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The screening of dust particle charge in the ionized humid air are studied within the diffusion-drift approach. The screening constants are well approximated by the inverse Debye length and characteristic lengths of recombination and attachment processes. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, Project No. 16-12-10424.

  12. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, S.; Murata, R. M.; Saxena, D.; Kuo, S. P.; Chen, C. Y.; Huang, K. J.; Popovic, S.

    2011-07-15

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  13. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, S.; Kuo, S. P.; Murata, R. M.; Chen, C. Y.; Saxena, D.; Huang, K. J.; Popovic, S.

    2011-07-01

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  14. Plasma Chemical Aspects Of Dust Formation In Hydrocarbon Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stepanovic, O.; Stefanovic, I.; Winter, J.

    2008-09-07

    This contribution deals with some plasma chemical aspects of dust formation in hydrocarbon plasmas. The interplay between dust formation and plasma chemistry will be discussed by means of different experimental results. One specific example concerns the formation of benzene and the role of atomic hydrogen for plasma chemical processes and dust formation in hydrocarbon discharges.

  15. Portable nanosecond pulsed air plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2011-08-22

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas are of great importance in many emerging biomedical and materials processing applications. The redundancy of a vacuum system opens the gateway for highly portable plasma systems, for which air ideally becomes the plasma-forming gas and remote plasma processing is preferred to ensure electrical safety. Typically, the gas temperature observed in air plasma greatly exceeds that suitable for the processing of thermally liable materials; a large plasma-sample distance offers a potential solution but suffers from a diluted downstream plasma chemistry. This Letter reports a highly portable air plasma jet system which delivers enhanced downstream chemistry without compromising the low temperature nature of the discharge, thus forming the basis of a powerful tool for emerging mobile plasma applications.

  16. Plasma Formation Around Single Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duselis, Peter U.; Kusse, Bruce R.

    2002-12-01

    At Cornell's Laboratory of Plasma Studies, single wires of various metals were exploded using a ˜250 ns pulser with a rise time of ˜20 A/ns. It was found that the wires first experience a resistive heating phase that lasts 50-80 ns before a rapid collapse of voltage. From that point on, the voltage across the wire was negligible while the current through the wire continued to increase. We attribute this voltage collapse to the formation of plasma about the wire. Further confirmation of this explanation will be presented along with new experimental data describing preliminary spectroscopy results, the expansion rate of the plasma, and current flow along the wire as a function of radius. The resistance of the wire-electrode connection will be shown to significantly affect the energy deposition. Various diagnostics were used to obtain these experiments. Ultraviolet sensitive vacuum photodiodes and a framing camera with an 8 ns shutter were used to detect and measure the width of the visible light emitted by the plasma. A special wire holder was constructed that allowed the transfer of current from the wire to the surrounding plasma to be observed.

  17. Microwave Probing of Air-Plasma and Plasma Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Katherine; Rock, Ben; Helle, Mike

    2016-10-01

    Plasma metamaterials are of recent interest due to their unique ability to be engineered with specific electromagnetic responses. One potential metamaterial architecture is based on a `forest' of plasma rods that can be produced using intense laser plasma filaments. In our work, we use a continuous microwave source at 26.5 GHz to measure a single air plasma filament characteristics generated from a 5 mJ laser pulse within a cylindrical hole in a Ka-band waveguide. Preliminary results show the air plasma produces a strong shock and acts to reflect microwave radiation. A computational comparison using 3D EM modeling is performed to examine the reflection and transmission properties of a single plasma rod, and further, to investigate an array of plasma rods as a potential plasma based metamaterial.

  18. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  19. Antimicrobial Applications of Ambient--Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew John

    The emerging field of plasma biotechology studies the applications of the plasma phase of matter to biological systems. "Ambient-condition" plasmas created at or near room temperature and atmospheric pressure are especially promising for biomedical applications because of their convenience, safety to patients, and compatibility with existing medical technology. Plasmas can be created from many different gases; plasma made from air contains a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or RONS, involved in various biological processes, including immune activity, signaling, and gene expression. Therefore, ambient-condition air plasma is of particular interest for biological applications. To understand and predict the effects of treating biological systems with ambient-air plasma, it is necessary to characterize and measure the chemical species that these plasmas produce. Understanding both gaseous chemistry and the chemistry in plasma-treated aqueous solution is important because many biological systems exist in aqueous media. Existing literature about ambient-air plasma hypothesizes the critical role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; a major aim of this dissertation is to better quantify RONS by produced ambient-air plasma and understand how RONS chemistry changes in response to different plasma processing conditions. Measurements imply that both gaseous and aqueous chemistry are highly sensitive to operating conditions. In particular, chemical species in air treated by plasma exist in either a low-power ozone-dominated mode or a high-power nitrogen oxide-dominated mode, with an unstable transition region at intermediate discharge power and treatment time. Ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) are mutually exclusive in this system and that the transition region corresponds to the transition from ozone- to nitrogen oxides-mode. Aqueous chemistry agrees well with to air plasma chemistry, and a similar transition in liquid-phase composition

  20. Terahertz wave absorption via preformed air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji; Zhang, LiangLiang; Wu, Tong; Zhang, CunLin; Zhao, YueJin

    2016-12-01

    Terahertz wave generation from laser-induced air plasma has continued to be an exciting field of research over the course of the past decade. In this paper, we report on an investigation concerning terahertz wave absorption with preformed plasma created by another laser pulse. We examine terahertz absorption behavior by varying the pump power and then analyze the polarization effect of the preplasma beam on terahertz wave absorption. The results of experiments conducted in which a type-I beta barium borate (BBO) crystal is placed before the preformed air plasma indicate that the fundamental (ω) and second harmonic (2ω) pulses can also influence terahertz absorption.

  1. Aqueous-phase chemistry and bactericidal effects from an air discharge plasma in contact with water: evidence for the formation of peroxynitrite through a pseudo-second-order post-discharge reaction of H2O2 and HNO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, P.; Dolezalova, E.; Sisrova, I.; Clupek, M.

    2014-02-01

    The formation of transient species (OH·, NO2·, NO radicals) and long-lived chemical products (O3, H2O2, NO_{3}^{-} , NO_{2}^{-} ) produced by a gas discharge plasma at the gas-liquid interface and directly in the liquid was measured in dependence on the gas atmosphere (20% oxygen mixtures with nitrogen or with argon) and pH of plasma-treated water (controlled by buffers at pH 3.3, 6.9 or 10.1). The aqueous-phase chemistry and specific contributions of these species to the chemical and biocidal effects of air discharge plasma in water were evaluated using phenol as a chemical probe and bacteria Escherichia coli. The nitrated and nitrosylated products of phenol (4-nitrophenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrocatechol, 4-nitrosophenol) in addition to the hydroxylated products (catechol, hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone) evidenced formation of NO2·, NO· and OH· radicals and NO+ ions directly by the air plasma at the gas-liquid interface and through post-discharge processes in plasma-activated water (PAW) mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOOH). Kinetic study of post-discharge evolution of H2O2 and NO_{2}^{-} in PAW has demonstrated excellent fit with the pseudo-second-order reaction between H2O2 and NO_{2}^{-} . The third-order rate constant k = 1.1 × 103 M-2 s-1 for the reaction NO_{2}^{-} +H_{2}O_{2}+H^{+}\\to ONOOH+H_{2}O was determined in PAW at pH 3.3 with the rate of ONOOH formation in the range 10-8-10-9 M s-1. Peroxynitrite chemistry was shown to significantly participate in the antibacterial properties of PAW. Ozone presence in PAW was proved indirectly by pH-dependent degradation of phenol and detection of cis,cis-muconic acid, but contribution of ozone to the inactivation of bacteria by the air plasma was negligible.

  2. Optical Measurements of Air Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-05

    generated in air by means of an electron beam is highly efficient. Fast electrons propagating through air result in production of electron- ion pairs...through the mechanism of impact ionization, which requires 33.7 eV per electron- ion pair. The air pressure, concentration of variable species, such as...and polyatomic species. Because our time scales are in the 1 ms to 10 ms range, there is a strong possibility of obtaining real-time absorption

  3. Evolution of a plasma vortex in air.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a vortex-shaped plasma in air by using a capacitively coupled dielectric barrier discharge system. We show that a vortex-shaped plasma can be produced inside a helium gas vortex and is capable of propagating for 3 cm. The fluctuation of the plasma ring shows a scaling relation with the Reynolds number of the vortex. The transient discharge reveals the property of corona discharge, where the conducting channel within the gas vortex and the blur plasma emission are observed at each half voltage cycle.

  4. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  5. Basic Studies on High Pressure Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-30

    33, 2268 (2000). [3] Non- Equilibrium Air Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure, K.H. Becker, U. Kogelschatz, K.H. Schoenbach, and R.J. Barker, eds., IOP...10). Note that LIFBASE assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium . 120 100 oExperimentalm Siuation 80 60 20- 0 -J ~ LkXi 3060 3070 3080 3090 3100...Dual laser interferometer for plasma density measurements on large tokamaks >>, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 49 p.919 (1978) [5] C.W. Gowers, C. Lamb, « A

  6. Formation Of Voids In Dusty Lorentzian Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bahamida, S.; Annou, K.; Annou, R.

    2008-09-07

    We study the possibility of formation of voids in Lorentzian plasmas containing of dust particles obeying to vortex-like velocity distribution. The size of the void is found to be ion spectral index dependent.

  7. Inactivation of the biofilm by the air plasma containing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Ryota; Yasuoka, Koichi; Yasuoka Takeuchi lab Team

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factory and medical facilities. Inactivation of biofilm has the method of making it react to chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone. Although inactivation by chemicals has the problem that hazardous property of a residual substance and hydrogen peroxide have slow reaction velocity. We achieved advanced oxidation process (AOP) with air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were able to be generated selectively by adjusting the amount of water supplied to the plasma. We inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in five minutes with OH radicals generated by using hydrogen peroxide and ozone.

  8. Structure Formation in Complex Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-24

    electrically levitated above the wafer and fell on the wafer when the applied voltage on the wafer was turned off. The Coulomb lattice discovered...such an extreme condition as cryogenic temperature. We also developed an experimental device to study the flow effects of microparticles levitated at...dynamics of dust particles in the diffused plasma produced above the liquid helium. To study the effect of magnetic field on the behavior of

  9. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  10. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  11. Semianalytical models of sprite formation from plasma inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkov, V. V.; Hayakawa, M.

    2016-11-01

    A spherical plasma inhomogeneity located at mesospheric altitudes in a thundercloud quasi-electrostatic field is considered as a possible cause of sprite formation. A simple semianalytical model of ionization instability in a quasi-electrostatic field, the value of which is larger than the air breakdown value, is developed on the assumption that plasma ball conductivity is controlled by impact ionization and electron attachment to neutrals. After several simplifications, the problem is reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations for the average conductivity and plasma ball radius. The analytical estimates and numerical simulation indicate that the predicted expansion rate and acceleration of the plasma inhomogeneity boundary are close in magnitude to the values observed during high-speed imaging of sprite development.

  12. Plasma formation and expansion in an electrothermal plasma injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.D.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental device SIRENS has been used to conduct studies on plasma formation and expansion in electrothermal launchers. The 1-D, time-dependent fluid dynamics code, ODIN, models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and the equation-of-state of the source and barrel of the SIRENS experiment. Because electrothermal plasmas are highly collisional (high-density, low-temperature), the plasma is modeled as a viscous fluid, assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium for each cell. The viscous drag forces were varied according to the Reynolds number of each cell. As the Reynolds number increases the modeled drag forces change accordingly, going from laminar to smooth turbulent to rough turbulent. The measured mass loss of the ablating liner (Lexan) in the source section is in good agreement with that predicted by the code. Comparisons between the measured and predicted pressures inside the barrel are in good agreement. The pressure reaches its maximum inside the source at approximately 45 {mu}s, then decreases steadily due to the drop in temperature and density. The plasma flows into the barrel and the pressure profile begins to flatten out and drop as the plasma exits the barrel. The variation of the plasma parameters as a function of the energy input to the source have also been calculated and will be discussed.

  13. Formation of Long-Lived Fireballs by Plasma Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, I.

    2001-10-01

    Results of the long-lived plasma structure and fireball formation (so called ``plasmoids") investigations in the atmosphere have been presented and discussed. Lifetimes of these objects considerably (by several orders of magnitude) exceed typical times of their generation by power sources and of plasma decay time. Experiments on the formation of these objects have been carried out by means of different types of pulse erosive plasma injectors in a wide range of energy (100 J - 100 kJ) putted into the plasmoid. Acrylic glass, fabric-based laminate, caprolon, and different organic materials (waxes, paraffines, resins with natural fillers, wood, lignin, etc.) have been used as plasma forming materials. Injection was made both into undisturbed air and into air saturated by organic vapors. It is shown that the formation of plasmoids of different forms (spherical, torus -type, cylindrical and others) with typical sizes 10-20 cm and their lifetime up to ~1 s takes place during pulse plasma injection into the air. In so doing the time of energy input ranged from 10 mcs to 10 ms. Typical temperature's value at the initial stage of the plasmoid existence is 7 - 10 kK. Initial value of the electron concentration reaches ten in (16-17) power per cubic cm. Obtained plasma radiation spectra and their temporary evolution is under the analysis. It is shown that at late stages of the existence of fireballs their radiation spectra correspond to the radiation of solid carbon and metallic oxide particles, and to spectra of burning of organic materials. It is shown that different structures have been formed at the application of the organic plasma forming materials and /or at the injection of plasma jet into the air saturated by organic vapors. One of them with typical sizes 10-20 cm and temperature ~2000 K has a lifetime up to 0.5 s. Undertaken experimental and theoretical investigations have shown a possibility of different ball lightning type realization in nature in the result of

  14. Plasma treatment of air pollution control residues.

    PubMed

    Amutha Rani, D; Gomez, E; Boccaccini, A R; Hao, L; Deegan, D; Cheeseman, C R

    2008-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues from waste incineration have been blended with silica and alumina and the mix melted using DC plasma arc technology. The chemical composition of the fully amorphous homogeneous glass formed has been determined. Waste acceptance criteria compliance leach testing demonstrates that the APC residue derived glass releases only trace levels of heavy metals (Pb (<0.007mg/kg) and Zn (0.02mg/kg)) and Cl(-) (0.2mg/kg). These are significantly below the limit values for disposal to inert landfill. It is concluded that plasma treatment of APC residues can produce an inert glass that may have potential to be used either in bulk civil engineering applications or in the production of higher value glass-ceramic products.

  15. Properties of air-aluminum thermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Gleizes, A.; Riquel, G.

    2012-07-01

    We present the calculation and the main results of the properties of air-aluminum thermal plasmas, useful for complete modelling of arc systems involving aluminum contacts. The properties are calculated assuming thermal equilibrium and correspond to the equilibrium composition, thermodynamic functions, transport coefficients including diffusion coefficients and net emission coefficient representing the divergence of the radiative flux in the hottest plasma regions. The calculation is developed in the temperature range between 2000 and 30 000 K, for a pressure range from 0.1 to 1 bar and for several metal mass proportions. As in the case of other metals, the presence of aluminum vapours has a strong influence on three properties at intermediate temperatures: the electron number density, the electrical conductivity and the net emission coefficient. Some comparisons with other metal vapour (Cu, Fe and Ag) properties are made and show the original behaviour for Al-containing mixtures: mass density at high temperatures is low due to the low Al atomic mass; high electrical conductivity at T < 10 000 K due to low ionization potential (around 2 V less for Al than for the other metals); very strong self-absorption of ionized aluminum lines, leading to a net emission coefficient lower than that of pure air when T > 10 000 K, in contrast to copper or iron radiation.

  16. Quasistatic formation of the spheromak plasma configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Furth, H.P.; Hsu, W.; Jardin, S.; Janos, A.; Okabayashi, M.; Sinnis, J.; Stix, T.H.; Yamazaki, K.

    1980-10-01

    A novel method for creating the spheromak configuration has been proposed and verified experimentally. The scheme is based on a transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes into a plasma from a flux core. In this paper we present the first experimental verification of this quasistatic (tau/sub Alf/ much less than tau/sub form/ < tau/sub diff/) formation scheme, which is suitable for future scale-up to fusion-reactor parameters.

  17. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  18. A technique to reduce plasma armature formation voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, K.A. ); Littrell, D.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The initiation of a plasma armature by foil vaporization in a railgun is often accompanied by a large, fast, voltage transient appearing on both the breech and muzzle of the gun. For a railgun driven by an inductor/opening switch power supply, this voltage transient becomes a concern during current commutation from the switch to the railgun. To lessen the requirements on the opening switch, techniques must be found to reduce the armature formation voltage. This paper presents the experimental results from railgun firings at AFATL's Electromagnetic Launcher Basic Research Facility (Site A-15, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida) using different shapes of initiation foils. These foils have been designed to vaporize into a plasma armature with reduced transient voltages. A design criteria was developed to ensure that all portions of the foil vaporize at slightly different times.

  19. Shock wave mediated plume chemistry for molecular formation in laser ablation plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-16

    Laser ablation is used in a variety of applications albeit formation mechanisms of molecules and nanoclusters are not well understood. We investigated the formation mechanisms of AlO molecules during complex interactions between an Al laser plume expanding into ambient air at atmospheric pressure levels. To produce the plasma a high-purity Al target was ablated using 1064 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Our results show that the plasma chemistry leading to the formation of AlO is mediated by shock waves. During the early times of plasma expansion, the generated shock waves at the plume edges act as a barrier for the combustion process and the molecular formation is prevalent after the shockwave collapse. The temporally and spatially resolved contour mapping of Al and AlO highlight the formation routes and persistence of species in the plasma and its relation to plume hydrodynamics.

  20. Nonlinear current sheet formation in ideal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voge, A.; Schindler, K.; Otto, A.

    1994-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the formation of current sheets in ideal plasmas. First we confirm the development of singular current sheets in a one-dimensional model. In a second step we extend the analysis to two-dimensional equilibria. Here it is found that the resulting structures are quiet insensitive to the boundary conditions. For the special case of a magnetotail like equilibrium it will be shown that the resulting current distribution provides a possibility to understand the onset of a localized anomalous resistivity from a macroscopic point of view. Furthermore, the resulting structures provide an explanation for the dramatic decrease of the thickness of the current sheet in the magnetotail prior to the onset of geomagnetic substorms.

  1. Radiofrequency plasma antenna generated by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Brelet, Y.; Houard, A.; Point, G.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; Andre, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Arantchouk, L.; Pellet, M.

    2012-12-24

    We demonstrate tunable radiofrequency emission from a meter-long linear plasma column produced in air at atmospheric pressure. A short-lived plasma column is initially produced by femtosecond filamentation and subsequently converted into a long-lived discharge column by application of an external high voltage field. Radiofrequency excitation is fed to the plasma by induction and detected remotely as electromagnetic radiation by a classical antenna.

  2. Effect of glow discharge air plasma on grain crops seed

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, A.E.; Lazarenko, E.M.; Selemir, V.D.

    2000-02-01

    Oat and barley seeds have been exposed to both continuous and pulsed glow discharge plasmas in air to investigate the effects on germination and sprout growth. Statistical analysis was used to evaluate the effect of plasma exposure on the percentage germination and length of sprout growth. A stimulating effect of plasma exposure was found together with a strong dependence on whether continuous or pulsed discharges were used.

  3. Quantification of air plasma chemistry for surface disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew J.; Clark, Douglas S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air plasmas, created by a variety of discharges, are promising sources of reactive species for the emerging field of plasma biotechnology because of their convenience and ability to operate at ambient conditions. One biological application of ambient-air plasma is microbial disinfection, and the ability of air plasmas to decontaminate both solid surfaces and liquid volumes has been thoroughly established in the literature. However, the mechanism of disinfection and which reactive species most strongly correlate with antimicrobial effects are still not well understood. We describe quantitative gas-phase measurements of plasma chemistry via infrared spectroscopy in confined volumes, focusing on air plasma generated via surface micro-discharge (SMD). Previously, it has been shown that gaseous chemistry is highly sensitive to operating conditions, and the measurements we describe here extend those findings. We quantify the gaseous concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) throughout the established ‘regimes’ for SMD air plasma chemistry: the low-power, ozone-dominated mode; the high-power, nitrogen oxides-dominated mode; and the intermediate, unstable transition region. The results presented here are in good agreement with previously published experimental studies of aqueous chemistry and parameterized models of gaseous chemistry. The principal finding of the present study is the correlation of bacterial inactivation on dry surfaces with gaseous chemistry across these time and power regimes. Bacterial decontamination is most effective in ‘NOx mode’ and less effective in ‘ozone mode’, with the weakest antibacterial effects in the transition region. Our results underscore the dynamic nature of air plasma chemistry and the importance of careful chemical characterization of plasma devices intended for biological applications.

  4. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

  5. Genetic effects of an air discharge plasma on Staphylococcus aureus at the gene transcription level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zimu; Wei, Jun; Shen, Jie; Liu, Yuan; Ma, Ronghua; Zhang, Zelong; Qian, Shulou; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Weidong; Sun, Qiang; Cheng, Cheng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of gene expression regulation (at transcription level) in Staphylococcus aureus after different doses of atmospheric-pressure room-temperature air plasma treatments are investigated by monitoring the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The plasma treatment influences the transcription of genes which are associated with several important bio-molecular processes related to the environmental stress resistance of the bacteria, including oxidative stress response, biofilm formation, antibiotics resistance, and DNA damage protection/repair. The reactive species generated by the plasma discharge in the gas phase and/or induced in the liquid phase may account for these gene expression changes.

  6. Scaled-Up Nonequilibrium Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    electrode pairs will be tested to increase the plasma volume. In addition, thermionic cathodes (LaCrO3, LaB6) will be examined to enhance the electron...measure the cathode fall in the glow discharge regime. Current density, electric field strength and other important plasma parameters will be...thermal nonequilibrium, and together with electrical discharge characteristics, estimating the electron density and reduced electric field strength (E/N

  7. Plasma test on industrial diamond powder in hydrogen and air for fracture strength study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Rohit Asuri Sudharshana

    Diamonds are the most precious material all over the world. Ever since their discovery, the desire for natural diamonds has been great; recently, the demand has steeply increased, leading to scarcity. For example, in 2010, diamonds worth $50 billion were marketed. This increased demand has led to discovering alternative sources to replace diamonds. The diamond, being the hardest material on earth, could be replaced with no other material except another diamond. Thus, the industrial or synthetic diamond was invented. Because of extreme hardness is one of diamond's properties, diamonds are used in cutting operations. The fracture strength of diamond is one of the crucial factors that determine its life time as a cutting tool. Glow discharge is one of the techniques used for plasma formation. The glow discharge process is conducted in a vacuum chamber by ionizing gas atoms. Ions penetrate into the atomic structure, ejecting a secondary electron. The objective of this study is to determine the change in fracture strength of industrial diamond powder before and after plasma treatment. This study focuses mainly on the change in crystal defects and crushing strength (CS) of industrial diamond powder after the penetration of hydrogen gas, air and hydrogen-air mixture ions into the sample powder. For this study, an industrial diamond powder sample of 100 carats weight, along with its average fracture strength value was received from Engis Corporation, Illinois. The sample was divided into parts, each weighing 10-12 carats. At the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), a plasma test was conducted on six sample parts for a total of 16 hours on each part. The three gas types mentioned above were used during plasma tests, with the pressure in vacuum chamber between 200 mTorr and 2 Torr. The plasma test on four sample parts was in the presence of hydrogen-air mixture. The first sample had chamber pressures between 200 mTorr and 400 mTorr. The remaining three samples had chamber

  8. Analysis of processes in DC arc plasma torches for spraying that use air as plasma forming gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V.; Ivanov, D.; Toropchin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Developed in Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University technological processes of air-plasma spraying of wear-resistant, regenerating, hardening and decorative coatings used in number of industrial areas are described. The article contains examples of applications of air plasma spraying of coatings as well as results of mathematical modelling of processes in air plasma torches for spraying.

  9. Air-Plasma Bullets Propagating Inside Microcapillaries and in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, Deanna A.; Bourdon, Anne; Kuribara, Koichi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    We report on the characterization of air-plasma bullets formed inside microcapillary tubes and in ambient air, obtained without the use of inert or noble gases. The bullets are produced by nanosecond discharges, applied at 1 kHz in a dielectric barrier discharge configuration. The anode consists of a tungsten wire with a 50- μm diameter, centered in the microcapillary, while the cathode is a silver ring, fixed on the outer surface of the fused silica tube. The gap distance is kept constant at 1.35 mm. The microcapillary is fed with a 4-sccm flow of air at atmospheric pressure. In the tubes and in ambient air, the propagation of air plasma bullets is observed. The temporal evolution of the bullet propagation has been studied with the aid of an ICCD camera. The effect of the applied voltage (from 5.2 to 8.2 kV) and the inner diameter of the microcapillaries (from 100 to 500 μm) on the discharge dynamics are investigated. Inside the tubes, while the topology of the bullets seems to be strongly dependent on the diameter, their velocity (on the order of 1 to 5 ×105 ms-1) is only a function of the applied voltage. In ambient air, the air-plasma bullets propagate at a velocity of 1 . 25 ×105 ms-1. Possible mechanisms for the propagation of air-plasma bullets in ambient air are discussed.

  10. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  11. Structural Analysis of Dusty Plasma Formations Based on Spatial Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Khakhaev, A. D.; Luizova, L. A.; Piskunov, A. A.; Podryadchikov, S. F.; Soloviev, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    Some advantages of studying the structure of dusty plasma formations using spatial spectra are illustrated by simulated experiments and by processing actual images of dusty structures in dc glow discharge in inert and molecular gases.

  12. Portable microwave air plasma device for wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S. K.; Kim, H. Y.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. K.

    2015-06-01

    A portable microwave air plasma has been developed for safe and effective wound healing. The device is operated by a fixed microwave power and two different air gas flows (main and cooling air flow). It was found that the speeds of the two air flows determine the stability of the plasma jet and gas temperature and thereby regulate the concentrations of the individual reactive species. Two different regimes, i.e. the NO abundant (0.1 slm main air flow) and ozone abundant regimes (4 slm main air flow), were identified as suitable for wound healing without thermal damage and toxicity. These regimes show similar plasma characteristics (e.g. less than 40 °C at the treatment point, less than 4 ppm of NO2) except for different NO and ozone amounts. Both regimes show more than twice as fast wound healing speed compared with the untreated case without any histological damages. Faster healing speed with intrinsic ozone safety make the NO abundant regime the best operation regime for wound healing. Finally, the stability of the developed device was demonstrated by a one-hour continuous operation test with a 24 V battery.

  13. Air plasma treatment of liquid covered tissue: long timescale chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietz, Amanda M.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for the treatment of wounds and cancerous tumors. In these applications, the sample is usually covered by a thin layer of a biological liquid. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by the plasma activate and are processed by the liquid before the plasma produced activation reaches the tissue. The synergy between the plasma and the liquid, including evaporation and the solvation of ions and neutrals, is critical to understanding the outcome of plasma treatment. The atmospheric pressure plasma sources used in these procedures are typically repetitively pulsed. The processes activated by the plasma sources have multiple timescales—from a few ns during the discharge pulse to many minutes for reactions in the liquid. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of plasma-liquid interactions and liquid phase chemistry using a global model with the goal of addressing this large dynamic range in timescales. In modeling air plasmas produced by a dielectric barrier discharge over liquid covered tissue, 5000 voltage pulses were simulated, followed by 5 min of afterglow. Due to the accumulation of long-lived species such as ozone and N x O y , the gas phase dynamics of the 5000th discharge pulse are different from those of the first pulse, particularly with regards to the negative ions. The consequences of applied voltage, gas flow, pulse repetition frequency, and the presence of organic molecules in the liquid on the gas and liquid reactive species are discussed.

  14. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  15. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  16. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schaller, Emily L

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  17. Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

    2013-01-28

    New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

  18. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  19. Target Plasma Formation for Magnetic Compression/Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, I. R.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Chrien, R. E.; Christian, J. M.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Goforth, J. H.; Haight, R. C.; Idzorek, G.; King, N. S.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Larson, R. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Olinger, B. W.; Oona, H.; Sheehey, P. T.; Shlachter, J. S.; Smith, R. C.; Veeser, L. R.; Warthen, B. J.; Younger, S. M.; Chernyshev, V. K.; Mokhov, V. N.; Demin, A. N.; Dolin, Y. N.; Garanin, S. F.; Ivanov, V. A.; Korchagin, V. P.; Mikhailov, O. D.; Morozov, I. V.; Pak, S. V.; Pavlovskii, E. S.; Seleznev, N. Y.; Skobelev, A. N.; Volkov, G. I.; Yakubov, V. A.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental observations of plasma behavior in a novel plasma formation chamber are reported. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations suggesting that the plasma could subsequently be adiabatically compressed by a magnetically driven pusher to yield 1 GJ of fusion energy. An explosively driven helical flux compression generator mated with a unique closing switch/opening switch combination delivered a 2.7 MA, 347 μs magnetization current and an additional 5 MA, 2.5 μs electrical pulse to the chamber. A hot plasma was produced and 1013 D-T fusion reactions were observed.

  20. Shock Formation in Electron-Ion Plasmas: Mechanism and Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bret, Antoine; Stockem Novo, Anne; Ricardo, Fonseca; Luis, Silva

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the formation of a collisionless shock in electron-ion plasmas in theory and simulations. In initially un-magnetized relativistic plasmas, such shocks are triggered by the Weibel instability. While in pair plasmas the shock starts forming right after the instability saturates, it is not so in electron-ion plasmas because the Weibel filaments at saturation are too small. An additional merging phase is therefore necessary for them to efficiently stop the flow. We derive a theoretical model for the shock formation time, taking into account filament merging in the nonlinear phase of the Weibel instability. This process is much slower than in electron-positron pair shocks, and so the shock formation is longer by a factor proportional to √{mi /me } ln(mi /me).

  1. Advancements in predictive plasma formation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purvis, Michael A.; Schafgans, Alexander; Brown, Daniel J. W.; Fomenkov, Igor; Rafac, Rob; Brown, Josh; Tao, Yezheng; Rokitski, Slava; Abraham, Mathew; Vargas, Mike; Rich, Spencer; Taylor, Ted; Brandt, David; Pirati, Alberto; Fisher, Aaron; Scott, Howard; Koniges, Alice; Eder, David; Wilks, Scott; Link, Anthony; Langer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    We present highlights from plasma simulations performed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Labs. This modeling is performed to advance the rate of learning about optimal EUV generation for laser produced plasmas and to provide insights where experimental results are not currently available. The goal is to identify key physical processes necessary for an accurate and predictive model capable of simulating a wide range of conditions. This modeling will help to drive source performance scaling in support of the EUV Lithography roadmap. The model simulates pre-pulse laser interaction with the tin droplet and follows the droplet expansion into the main pulse target zone. Next, the interaction of the expanded droplet with the main laser pulse is simulated. We demonstrate the predictive nature of the code and provide comparison with experimental results.

  2. Experimental study of the behavior of two laser produced plasmas in air

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zefeng; Wei, Wenfu; Han, Jiaxun; Wu, Jian Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli

    2015-07-15

    The interactions among two laser ablated Al plasmas and their shock wave fronts (SWFs) induced by double laser pulses in air were studied experimentally. The evolution processes, including the expansion and interaction of the two plasmas and their shocks, were investigated by laser shadowgraphs, schlieren images, and interferograms. Remarkably, the distribution of the compressed air and the laser plasmas during the colliding process was clearly obtained using the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. From the refractive index profiles, typical plasmas density and gas density behind the shock front were estimated as ∼5.2 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} and ∼2.4 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}. A stagnation layer formed by the collision of gas behind the shock front is observed. The SWFs propagated, collided, and reflected with a higher velocity than plasmas. The results indicated that the slower plasma collided at middle, leading to the formation of the soft stagnation.

  3. Plasma formation in diode pumped alkali lasers sustained in Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markosyan, Aram H.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-11-01

    In diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), lasing action occurs on the resonant lines of alkali atoms following pumping by broadband semiconductor lasers. The goal is to convert the efficient but usually poor optical quality of inexpensive diode lasers into the high optical quality of atomic vapor lasers. Resonant excitation of alkali vapor leads to plasma formation through the excitation transfer from the 2P states to upper lying states, which then are photoionized by the pump and intracavity radiation. A first principles global model was developed to investigate the operation of the He/Cs DPAL system and the consequences of plasma formation on the efficiency of the laser. Over a range of pump powers, cell temperatures, excitation frequency, and mole fraction of the collision mixing agent (N2 or C2H6), we found that sufficient plasma formation can occur that the Cs vapor is depleted. Although N2 is not a favored collisional mixing agent due to large rates of quenching of the 2P states, we found a range of pump parameters where laser oscillation may occur. The poor performance of N2 buffered systems may be explained in part by plasma formation. We found that during the operation of the DPAL system with N2 as the collisional mixing agent, plasma formation is in excess of 1014-1015 cm-3, which can degrade laser output intensity by both depletion of the neutral vapor and electron collisional mixing of the laser levels.

  4. Pure air-plasma bullets propagating inside microcapillaries and in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, Deanna A.; Bourdon, Anne; Kuribara, Koichi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of air-plasma bullets in microcapillary tubes and in ambient air, obtained without the use of inert or noble gases. The bullets were produced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, applied in a dielectric barrier discharge configuration. The anode was a tungsten wire with a diameter of 50 µm, centered in the microcapillary, while the cathode was a silver ring, fixed on the outer surface of the fused silica tube. The effects of the applied voltage and the inner diameter of the microcapillary tube on the plasma behavior were investigated. Inside the tubes, while the topology of the bullets seems to be strongly dependent on the diameter, their velocity is only a function of the amplitude of the applied voltage. In ambient air, the propagation of air bullets with a velocity of about 1.25 × 105 m s-1 is observed.

  5. The role of in situ reforming in plasma enhanced ultra lean premixed methane/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wookyung; Godfrey Mungal, M.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes a mechanism for the stabilization of ultra lean premixed methane/air flames by pulsed nonequilibrium plasma enhancement. It is shown that the pulsed discharge plasma produces a cool ({proportional_to}500-600 K) stream of relatively stable intermediate species including hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), which play a central role in enhancing flame stability. This stream is readily visualized by ultraviolet emission from electronically excited hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The rotational and vibrational temperature of this ''preflame'' are determined from its emission spectrum. Qualitative imaging of the overall flame structure is obtained by planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of OH. Preflame nitric oxide (NO) concentrations are determined by gas sampling chromatography. A simple numerical model of this plasma enhanced premixed flame is proposed that includes the generation of the preflame through plasma activation, and predicts the formation of a dual flame structure that arises when the preflame serves to pilot the combustion of the surrounding non-activated premixed flow. The calculation represents the plasma through its ability to produce an initial radical yield, which serves as a boundary condition for conventional flame simulations. The simulations also capture the presence of the preflame and the dual flame structure, and predict preflame levels of NO comparable to those measured. A subsequent pseudo-sensitivity analysis of the preflame shows that flame stability is most sensitive to the concentrations of H{sub 2} and CO in the preflame. As a consequence of the role of H{sub 2} and CO in enhancing the flame stability, the blowout limit extensions of methane/air and hydrogen/air mixtures in the absence/presence of a discharge are investigated experimentally. For methane/air mixtures, the blowout limit of the current burner is extended by {proportional_to}10% in the presence of a discharge while comparable studies carried

  6. Halo Formation And Emittance Growth of Positron Beams in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2011-10-25

    An ultrarelativistic 28.5 GeV, 700-{micro}m-long positron bunch is focused near the entrance of a 1.4-m-long plasma with a density n{sub e} between {approx}10{sup 13} and {approx}5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. Partial neutralization of the bunch space charge by the mobile plasma electrons results in a reduction in transverse size by a factor of {approx}3 in the high emittance plane of the beam {approx}1 m downstream from the plasma exit. As n{sub e} increases, the formation of a beam halo containing {approx}40% of the total charge is observed, indicating that the plasma focusing force is nonlinear. Numerical simulations confirm these observations. The bunch with an incoming transverse size ratio of {approx}3 and emittance ratio of {approx}5 suffers emittance growth and exits the plasma with approximately equal sizes and emittances.

  7. Nanoparticle formation and thin film deposition in aniline containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattyn, Cedric; Dias, Ana; Hussain, Shahzad; Strunskus, Thomas; Stefanovic, Ilija; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Lecas, Thomas; Kovacevic, Eva; Berndt, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    This contribution deals with plasma based polymerization processes in mixtures of argon and aniline. The investigations are performed in a capacitively coupled RF discharge (in pulsed and continuous mode) and concern both the observed formation of nanoparticles in the plasma volume and the deposition of films. The latter process was used for the deposition of ultra-thin layers on different kind of nanocarbon materials (nanotubes and free standing graphene). The analysis of the plasma and the plasma chemistry (by means of mass spectroscopy and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy) is accompanied by several ex-situ diagnostics of the obtained materials which include NEXAFS and XPS measurements as well as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The decisive point of the investigations concern the preservation of the original monomer structure during the plasma polymerization processes and the stability of the thin films on the different substrates.

  8. Formation of pre-sheath boundary layers in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    In electronegative plasmas Coulomb scattering between positive and negative ions can lead to the formation of a pre-sheath boundary layer containing the bulk of the negative ions. The negative ion boundary layer forms when momentum transfer from positive to negative ions dominates the negative ion acceleration from the electric field. This condition is met in Inductively Coupled Plasma reactors that operate at low pressure and high plasma density. Simulations of the GEC reactor for Chlorine and Oxygen chemistries using the INDUCT95 2D model are presented showing the pre-sheath boundary layer structure as a function of applied power and neutral pressure.

  9. Air trichloroethylene oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The oxidative decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE; 300 ppm) by non-thermal corona plasma was investigated in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, both in the absence and presence of catalysts including MnOx, CoOx. The catalysts were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the catalysts were characterized by BET surface area measurement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) methods. Decomposition of TCE and distribution of products were evaluated by a gas chromatograph (GC) and an FTIR. In the absence of the catalyst, TCE removal is increased with increases in the applied voltage and current intensity. Higher TCE removal and CO2 selectivity is observed in presence of the corona and catalysts, as compared to those with the plasma alone. The results show that MnOx and CoOx catalysts can dissociate the in-plasma produced ozone to oxygen radicals, which enhances the TCE decomposition.

  10. Microwave plasma-assisted ignition and flameholding in premixed ethylene/air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Che A.; Wu, Wei; Wang, Chuji

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a 2.45 GHz microwave source and a surfatron were used, coupled with a T-shaped quartz combustor, to investigate the role of a nonthermal microwave argon plasma jet on the plasma-assisted ignition and flameholding of a premixed ethylene/air mixture. A modified U-shaped plot of the minimum plasma power required for ignition versus fuel equivalence ratio was obtained, whereby the plasma power required for plasma-assisted ignition decreased with increase in fuel equivalence ratios in the range 0.2-0.6, but for fuel equivalence ratios of 0.7 and above, the plasma power required for ignition remained fairly constant throughout. It was observed that leaner fuel/air mixtures were more sensitive to heat losses to the surrounding and this sensitivity decreased with increase in the fuel equivalence ratio. Comparison with results obtained from previous studies suggested that the mixing scheme between the plasma and the premixed fuel/air mixture and the energy density of the fuel used played an important role in influencing the minimum plasma power required for ignition with the effect being more pronounced for near stoichiometric to rich fuel equivalence ratios (0.7-1.4). Flame images obtained showed a dual layered flame with an inner white core and a bluish outer layer. The images also showed an increased degree of flameholding (tethering of the flame to the combustor orifice) with increase in plasma power. The concurrency of the dual peaks in the emission intensity profiles for OH(A), CH(A), C2(d), and the rotational temperature profiles obtained via optical emission spectroscopy along with the ground state OH(X) number density profiles in the flame using cavity ringdown spectroscopy led to the proposal that the mechanism of plasma-assisted flameholding in ethylene/air flames is predominantly radical dependent with the formation of an inner radical rich flame core which enhances the ignition and stabilization of the surrounding coflow.

  11. Air spark-like plasma source for antimicrobial NOx generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, M. J.; Ono, T.; Galleher, C.; Curtis, B.; Clark, D. S.; Machala, Z.; Graves, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate and analyse the generation of nitrogen oxides and their antimicrobial efficacy using atmospheric air spark-like plasmas. Spark-like discharges in air in a 1 L confined volume are shown to generate NOx at an initial rate of about 1.5  ×  1016 NOx molecules/J dissipated in the plasma. Such a discharge operating in this confined volume generates on the order of 6000 ppm NOx in 10 min. Around 90% of the NOx is in the form of NO2 after several minutes of operation in the confined volume, suggesting that NO2 is the dominant antimicrobial component. The strong antimicrobial action of the NOx mixture after several minutes of plasma operation is demonstrated by measuring rates of E. coli disinfection on surfaces and in water exposed to the NOx mixture. Some possible applications of plasma generation of NOx (perhaps followed by dissolution in water) include disinfection of surfaces, skin or wound antisepsis, and sterilization of medical instruments at or near room temperature.

  12. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue Fang, Jing

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  13. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  14. Development of Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Gun Formation Techniques for Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Wynkoop, Tyler; Intrator, Thomas; Weber, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an innovative approach for a relatively fast and cheap path to the production of fusion energy that utilizes magnetic confinement to assist in the compression of a hot plasma to thermonuclear conditions by an external driver. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently pursing demonstration of the MTF concept via compression of an FRC (field-reversed configuration) plasma by a metal liner z-pinch in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM. A key physics issue for the FRC as an MTF target lies in the initial pre-ionization (PI) stage. The PI formation process determines the amount of magnetic flux that can be trapped to form the FRC. This trapped flux plays an important role in the FRC's final equilibrium, transport, and stability properties. It also provides the route to greatest potential gains in FRC lifetime, which is essential to provide enough time to translate and compress the FRC effectively. In conjunction with LANL we plan to test and characterize a new system to improve the initial PI plasma formation. This system will use an array of plasma guns to form the initial plasma. Initial characterization of the plasma gun behavior will be presented.

  15. Plasma formation in a double-gap vircator

    SciTech Connect

    Queller, T.; Shlapakovski, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2010-11-15

    Time-resolved light emission imaging was used to observe the plasma formation within the cavity of the double-gap vircator powered by a sub-microsecond generator ({approx}500 kV, {approx}10 kA, {approx}500 ns). The vircator generated well reproducible S-band microwave pulses of {approx}200 MW peak power and up to 200 ns full duration. The plasma light emission was observed {approx}30 ns prior to the ending of the generated microwave pulses at the surface of the aluminum foil separating the vircator cavity gaps, in the gap where the virtual cathode is formed. Estimations showed that the energy deposition into the foil by the high-current electron beam is sufficient for the surface plasma formation. The plasma ions accelerated toward the virtual cathode neutralize its electron space charge. The latter was confirmed by the increase in the electron current transmitted through the vircator cavity. In addition, the time of the plasma appearance was determined by comparing the measured transmitted current with that following from the one-dimensional model of a stationary un-neutralized two-stream electron flow. This time agrees with the maximum of the microwave power observed in the experiments, thus showing that the plasma ions cause the termination of the microwave generation.

  16. The different effects of oxygen and air DBD plasma byproducts on the degradation of methyl violet 5BN.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangliang; Zhou, Mingyan; Chen, Shihua; Chen, Wenxing

    2009-12-30

    Through a novel design of the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma plume used in fabric-fiber surface modification, its discharge byproducts mainly including downstream gases and ultraviolet light were used to treat the dye solution. The different influence of oxygen and air DBD plasmas on the degradation of methyl violet 5BN (MV-5BN), which is widely used in textile industry, was investigated in this paper. The results showed that the cooperation between ultraviolet light and active species generated by the DBD plasma can decolorize MV-5BN effectively, and the chromophore peaks attributed to the -NN- bonds in MV-5BN molecule disappeared entirely when the azo dye solutions were treated for 25 min by the air and oxygen DBD plasmas. The degradation reaction followed an exponential kinetics over time, and the peak of aromatic derivatives at 209 nm in UV-vis spectra increased nearly 2.7 times when the dye solution was treated for 30 min by air DBD plasma. However, the oxygen DBD plasma could deplete the aromatic derivatives entirely. It is found that the formation of O(3) and NO(x) in the downstream gases of air and oxygen plasmas may be responsible for the different effects on the azo dye degradation.

  17. A First-Principle Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2015-11-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to observe visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo. Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for more accurate quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements. Work supported by NSF Grant 1244842.

  18. Plasma formation in water vapour layers in high conductivity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, C. P.; Schaper, L.; Stalder, K. R.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-10-01

    The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current-voltage characteristics) they can be correlated with the spectra features. Initial measurements reveal two apparently different plasma formations. Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line indicate electron densities of 3 to 5 ×1020 m-3 for plasmas produced early in the voltage pulse and an order of magnitude less for the later plasmas. The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current

  19. Effects of real viscosity on plasma liner formation and implosion from supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillo, Kevin; Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Team

    2015-11-01

    The PLX- α project endeavors to study plasma liner formation and implosion by merging of a spherical array of plasma jets as a candidate standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is being used to model the liner formation and implosion processes. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method to simulate fluid flows by dividing a fluid into a set of particles and using a summation interpolant function to calculate the properties and gradients for each of these particles. The SPH code was used to simulate test cases in which the number of plasma guns and initial conditions for the plasma were varied. Linear stabilizations were observed, but the possibility exists that this stabilization was due to the implementation of artificial viscosity in the code. A real viscosity model was added to our SPHC model using the Braginskii ion viscosity. Preliminary results for test cases that incorporate real viscosity are presented.

  20. Soot Formation in Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames are important because they affect the durability and performance of propulsion systems, the hazards of unwanted fires, the pollutant and particulate emissions from combustion processes, and the potential for developing computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, this investigation involved an experimental study of the structure and soot properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames, seeking an improved understanding of soot formation (growth and nucleation) within diffusion flames. The present study extends earlier work in this laboratory concerning laminar smoke points (l) and soot formation in acetylene/air laminar jet diffusion flames (2), emphasizing soot formation in hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames for fuels other than acetylene. In the flame system, acetylene is the dominant gas species in the soot formation region and both nucleation and growth were successfully attributed to first-order reactions of acetylene, with nucleation exhibiting an activation energy of 32 kcal/gmol while growth involved negligible activation energy and a collision efficiency of O.53%. In addition, soot growth in the acetylene diffusion flames was comparable to new soot in premixed flame (which also has been attributed to first-order acetylene reactions). In view of this status, a major issue is the nature of soot formation processes in diffusion flame involving hydrocarbon fuels other than acetylene. In particular, information is needed about th dominant gas species in the soot formation region and the impact of gas species other than acetylene on soot nucleation and growth.

  1. Rotating Magnetic Field FRC Formation Studies using the Multi-Fluid Plasma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Eder

    2016-10-01

    The multi-fluid plasma model equations are derived by taking velocity moments of the Boltzmann equation for each of the components in a plasma, and each species mass density, momentum density and total energy are evolved in time. This model is used to study field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation dynamics using a Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) as an electron current drive. Particular interest is placed on the coupling of the RMF to the plasma and collisional effects between the electron, ion and neutral fluids, and some consideration to ionization effects. The simulations are designed such that they can be compared to experimental results using collisional-radiative (CR) models developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited AFTC/PA clearance No. 15399.

  2. Investigation of sewage sludge treatment using air plasma assisted gasification.

    PubMed

    Striūgas, Nerijus; Valinčius, Vitas; Pedišius, Nerijus; Poškas, Robertas; Zakarauskas, Kęstutis

    2017-03-18

    This study presents an experimental investigation of downdraft gasification process coupled with a secondary thermal plasma reactor in order to perform experimental investigations of sewage sludge gasification, and compare process parameters running the system with and without the secondary thermal plasma reactor. The experimental investigation were performed with non-pelletized mixture of dried sewage sludge and wood pellets. To estimate the process performance, the composition of the producer gas, tars, particle matter, producer gas and char yield were measured at the exit of the gasification and plasma reactor. The research revealed the distribution of selected metals and chlorine in the process products and examined a possible formation of hexachlorobenzene. It determined that the plasma assisted processing of gaseous products changes the composition of the tars and the producer gas, mostly by destruction of hydrocarbon species, such as methane, acetylene, ethane or propane. Plasma processing of the producer gas reduces their calorific value but increases the gas yield and the total produced energy amount. The presented technology demonstrated capability both for applying to reduce the accumulation of the sewage sludge and production of substitute gas for drying of sewage sludge and electrical power.

  3. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Application

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Brockington, Samuel; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Mike; Wu, Linchun; Elton, Ray

    2014-11-11

    /s for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initial work used existing computational and analytical tools to develop and refine a specific plasma gun concept having a novel tapered coaxial electromagnetic accelerator contour with an array of symmetric ablative plasma injectors. The profile is designed to suppress the main barrier to success in coaxial guns, namely the blow-by instability in which the arc slips past and outruns the bulk of the plasma mass. Efforts to begin developing a set of annular non-ablative plasma injectors for the coaxial gun, in order to accelerate pure gases, resulted in development of linear parallel-plate MiniRailguns that turned out to work well as plasma guns in their own right and we subsequently chose them for an initial plasma liner experiment on the PLX facility at LANL. This choice was mainly driven by cost and schedule for that particular experiment, while longer term goals still projected use of coaxial guns for reactor-relevant applications for reasons of better symmetry, lower impurities, more compact plasma jet formation, and higher gun efficiency. Our efforts have focused mainly on 1) developing various plasma injection systems for both coax and linear railguns and ensuring they work reliably with the accelerator section, 2) developing a suite of plasma and gun diagnostics, 3) performing computational modeling to design and refine the plasma guns, 4) establishing a research facility dedicated to plasma gun development, and finally, 5) developing plasma guns and associated pulse power systems capable of achieving these goals and installing and testing the first two gun sets on the PLX facility at LANL. During the second funding cycle for this program, HyperV joined in a collaborative effort with LANL, the University of Alabama at Huntsville, and the University of New Mexico to perform a plasma liner experiment (PLX) to investigate the physics and technology of forming spherically imploding

  4. Numerical study of plasma formation from current carrying conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Milena A.

    The problem of plasma formation from thick conductors driven by intense currents have practical applications in a number of high energy density (HED) fields of interest where complex interaction between conductor surfaces and megagauss magnetic fields is involved. These include: wire-array Z-pinches, magnetically accelerated flier plates, liner acceleration by magnetic field, ultrahigh magnetic field generators, high current fuses, magneto-inertial fusion (MIF), magnetically insulated transmission lines, as well as some astrophysical applications. Recent aluminum rod experiments driven by 1-MA Zebra generator at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) have provided a benchmark for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling. The innovative 'hourglass' and 'barbell' load geometries used in the experiments made it possible to distinguish between plasma formation due to Ohmic heating, which can be studied numerically utilizing MHD codes, and plasma formation due to high electric fields, by introducing a large-diameter contact with the electrodes. This prevents nonthermal formation of plasma from being caused early in the current pulse by plasma at contacts, as occurs in simple straight-rod explosion experiments. The UNR megagauss rod experiments were modeled by employing the state-of-the-art radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic code MHRDR. Numerical simulations were performed for a wide range of rods, varying from 100 to 580 microns in radius. A "cold start" initiation was employed in order to create initial parameters close to the experimental conditions. Material properties of aluminum, crucial for such simulations, were modeled employing a set of well tested SESAME format equations-of-state (EOS), ionization, and thermal and electrical conductivity tables. The cold start initiation also allowed observation of the numerical phase transitions of the aluminum rod, from solid to liquid to vapor and finally to low density plasma as it is ohmically heated by the megaampere driving current

  5. Development of a diffuse air-argon plasma source using a dielectric-barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Jie; Jiang Weiman; Zhao Wei; Wang Yishan; Li Shibo; Wang Haojing; Duan Yixiang

    2013-01-21

    A stable diffuse large-volume air plasma source was developed by using argon-induced dielectric-barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be operated in a filamentary discharge with the average areal power density of 0.27 W/cm{sup 2} and the gas temperature of 315{+-}3 K. Spatial measurement of emission spectrum and temperature indicates that this plasma is uniform in the central region along the transverse direction. It is also found that the formation of diffuse air plasma mainly lies in the creation of sufficient seed electrons by the Penning effect through collisions between two argon or nitrogen metastables at low electric fields.

  6. Gas heating effects on the formation and propagation of a microwave streamer in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Rogier, François; Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The development of microwave plasma streamers at 110 GHz in atmospheric pressure air is numerically investigated taking into account the intense gas heating and its effects on the plasma formation and dynamics. The simulations are based on an implicit finite difference time domain formulation of Maxwell's equations coupled with a simple plasma fluid model and a real gas Euler equation solver. The numerical results show how the formation of a shock wave due to the large microwave power absorbed by the plasma and converted into gas heating strongly modifies the streamer elongation and dynamics. A microwave streamer filament stretches along its axis because of ionization-diffusion mechanisms in the enhanced electric field at the streamer tips. The change in the gas density distribution associated with the formation of shock wave due to gas heating strongly modifies the ionization and diffusion mechanisms and tends to limit the on-axis microwave streamer elongation by enhancing resonance effects. The simulations suggest that gas heating effects also play an important role in the observed bending or branching of microwave streamers after they have reached a critical length.

  7. Modeling of plasma jet production from rail and coaxial guns for imploding plasma liner formation*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Faehl, R. J.; Kirikpatrick, R. C.; Witherspoon, D.; Cassibry, J.

    2010-11-01

    We study the generation of plasma jets for forming imploding plasma liners using an enhanced version of the ePLAS implicit/hybrid model.^1 Typically, the jets are partially ionized D or Ar gases, in initial 3-10 cm long slugs at 10^16-10^18 electron/cm^3, accelerated for microseconds along 15-30 cm rail or coaxial guns with a 1 cm inter-electrode gap and driven by magnetic fields of a few Tesla. We re-examine the B-field penetration mechanisms that can be active in such wall-connected plasmas,^2 including erosion and EMHD influences, which can subsequently impact plasma liner formation and implosion. For the background and emitted plasma components we discuss optimized PIC and fluid modeling techniques, and the use of implicit fields and hybridized electrons to speed simulation. The plasmas are relatively cold (˜3 eV), so results with fixed atomic Z are compared to those from a simple analytic EOS, and allowing radiative heat loss from the plasma. The use of PIC ions is explored to extract large mean-free-path kinetic effects. 1. R. J. Mason and C. Cranfill, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 45 (1986) 2. R. Mason, et al., Phys. Fluids B, 5, 1115 (1993). [4pt] *Research supported in part by USDOE Grant DE-SC0004207.

  8. Diagnostic studies of ion beam formation in inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jenee L.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies focused on the plasma and the ion beam in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ability to use ICP-MS for measurements of trace elements in samples requires the analytes to be efficiently ionized. Updated ionization efficiency tables are discussed for ionization temperatures of 6500 K and 7000 K with an electron density of 1 x 1015 cm-3. These values are reflective of the current operating parameters of ICP-MS instruments. Calculations are also discussed for doubly charged (M2+) ion formation, neutral metal oxide (MO) ionization, and metal oxide (MO+) ion dissociation for similar plasma temperature values. Ionization efficiency results for neutral MO molecules in the ICP have not been reported previously.

  9. Formation and Stability of Partially-Neutralized Plasma Clumps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    propagation in the vacuum region, to the extent studied in the experiments. The goal of that related work is the generation of nearly charge-neutral...A179 444 FORMATION AND STABILITY OF PARTIALLY-NEUTRALIZED PLOSMA Y CLUNPS(U) MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK LAS FOR PLASMA AND FUSION ENERGY STUDIES J...Energy Studies / Bldg 410 Energy Research 3ldg, College Park Md 20742 Bolling AFB, D.C. 20332-6448 Ga. NAME OF FUNOING;SPONSORINGB. OFFICE SYMBOL 9

  10. Influence of air diffusion on the OH radicals and atomic O distribution in an atmospheric Ar (bio)plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A.; Li, L.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Vanraes, P.; Leys, C.

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of samples with plasmas in biomedical applications often occurs in ambient air. Admixing air into the discharge region may severely affect the formation and destruction of the generated oxidative species. Little is known about the effects of air diffusion on the spatial distribution of OH radicals and O atoms in the afterglow of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets. In our work, these effects are investigated by performing and comparing measurements in ambient air with measurements in a controlled argon atmosphere without the admixture of air, for an argon plasma jet. The spatial distribution of OH is detected by means of laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics (LIF), whereas two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) is used for the detection of atomic O. The spatially resolved OH LIF and O TALIF show that, due to the air admixture effects, the reactive species are only concentrated in the vicinity of the central streamline of the afterglow of the jet, with a characteristic discharge diameter of ˜1.5 mm. It is shown that air diffusion has a key role in the recombination loss mechanisms of OH radicals and atomic O especially in the far afterglow region, starting up to ˜4 mm from the nozzle outlet at a low water/oxygen concentration. Furthermore, air diffusion enhances OH and O production in the core of the plasma. The higher density of active species in the discharge in ambient air is likely due to a higher electron density and a more effective electron impact dissociation of H2O and O2 caused by the increasing electrical field, when the discharge is operated in ambient air.

  11. Fastest Formation Routes of Nanocarbons in Solution Plasma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Tetsunori; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Hieda, Junko; Yoshida, Akihito; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-11-01

    Although solution-plasma processing enables room-temperature synthesis of nanocarbons, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated the routes of solution-plasma-induced nanocarbon formation from hexane, hexadecane, cyclohexane, and benzene. The synthesis rate from benzene was the highest. However, the nanocarbons from linear molecules were more crystalline than those from ring molecules. Linear molecules decomposed into shorter olefins, whereas ring molecules were reconstructed in the plasma. In the saturated ring molecules, C–H dissociation proceeded, followed by conversion into unsaturated ring molecules. However, unsaturated ring molecules were directly polymerized through cation radicals, such as benzene radical cation, and were converted into two- and three-ring molecules at the plasma–solution interface. The nanocarbons from linear molecules were synthesized in plasma from small molecules such as C2 under heat; the obtained products were the same as those obtained via pyrolysis synthesis. Conversely, the nanocarbons obtained from ring molecules were directly synthesized through an intermediate, such as benzene radical cation, at the interface between plasma and solution, resulting in the same products as those obtained via polymerization. These two different reaction fields provide a reasonable explanation for the fastest synthesis rate observed in the case of benzene.

  12. Analysis of mechanisms for anode plasma formation in ion diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.A.; Brandenburg, J.E.; Gerber, R.A.; Johnson, D.J.; Hoffman, J.M.; Miller, P.A.; Quintenz, J.P.; Slutz, S.A.; Bieg, K.W.

    1983-01-01

    Understanding how anode plasma is formed in intense pulsed-power ion diodes by insulator breakdown is important in assessing the effect on ion beam quality. Formation of a passive flashover anode plasma source may involve one or more of the following: polarization of the anode dielectric, direct leakage electron bombardment, UV-stimulated desorption of excited gas in the gap or on the anode surface, ionization of desorbed neutrals in a surface plasma by electron return currents associated with ion extraction, or bombardment by low energy electrons or negative ions. At Sandia National Laboratories experiments have been done on Nereus, PI 110A, Proto I, Proto II, HydraMITE, and PBFA I using anodes with dielectric-filled surfaces. The experiments represent a variety of anode turn-on delays (2 to 15 ns), magnetic field strengths (7 to 30 kG), voltages (300 keV to 2 MeV), and anode configurations. Data include ion beam current from Faraday cups, holographic observation of plasma motion, the spatial and temporal character of visible light emitted from the plasma, and optical metallographic examination of the dielectric.

  13. A Quantitative Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2014-10-01

    Every second millions of small meteoroids hit the Earth from space, the vast majority too small to observe visually. Radars easily detect the plasma they generate and use the data they gather to characterize the meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. These diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of the formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Meteors become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently that they begin to sublimate. The sublimated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around and behind the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from the plasma around the descending meteoroid produces a localized signal called a head echo. This research applies kinetic theory to show that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. This analytical model will serve as a basis for quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements, the ionization efficiency (called the Beta parameter), and should help us calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. Work supported by NSF Grant AGS-1244842.

  14. Fastest Formation Routes of Nanocarbons in Solution Plasma Processes

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Tetsunori; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Hieda, Junko; Yoshida, Akihito; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-01-01

    Although solution-plasma processing enables room-temperature synthesis of nanocarbons, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated the routes of solution-plasma-induced nanocarbon formation from hexane, hexadecane, cyclohexane, and benzene. The synthesis rate from benzene was the highest. However, the nanocarbons from linear molecules were more crystalline than those from ring molecules. Linear molecules decomposed into shorter olefins, whereas ring molecules were reconstructed in the plasma. In the saturated ring molecules, C–H dissociation proceeded, followed by conversion into unsaturated ring molecules. However, unsaturated ring molecules were directly polymerized through cation radicals, such as benzene radical cation, and were converted into two- and three-ring molecules at the plasma–solution interface. The nanocarbons from linear molecules were synthesized in plasma from small molecules such as C2 under heat; the obtained products were the same as those obtained via pyrolysis synthesis. Conversely, the nanocarbons obtained from ring molecules were directly synthesized through an intermediate, such as benzene radical cation, at the interface between plasma and solution, resulting in the same products as those obtained via polymerization. These two different reaction fields provide a reasonable explanation for the fastest synthesis rate observed in the case of benzene. PMID:27841288

  15. Formation of High-Beta Plasma and Stable Confinement of Toroidal Electron Plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko

    2010-11-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a laboratory magnetosphere generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. The goals of RT-1 are to realize stable formation of ultra high-beta plasma suitable for burning advanced fusion fuels, and confinement of toroidal non-neutral plasmas including antimatter particles. RT- 1 has produced high-beta plasma in the magnetospheric configuration. The effects of coil levitation and geomagnetic field compensation [Y. Yano et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 4, 039] resulted drastic improvements of the plasma properties, and a maximum local beta value exceeded 70%. Because plasma is generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in the present experiment, the plasma pressure is mainly due to hot electrons, whose bremsstrahlung was observed with an x-ray CCD camera. The pressure profiles have rather steep gradient near the superconducting coil in the strong field region. The decay rates of magnetic probe and interferometer signals have different time constants, suggesting multiple temperature components. The energy confinement time estimated from the input RF power and stored magnetic energy is on the order of 1s, which is comparable to the decay time constant of the density of hot electron component. Pure electron plasma experiments are also conducted in RT-1. Radial profiles of electrostatic potential and electron density showed that the plasma rigidly rotates in the toroidal direction in the stable confinement phase. Long time confinement of toroidal non- neutral plasma for more than 300s and inward particle diffusion to strong field regions, caused by the activation of the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability, have been realized [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235004].

  16. Plasma quenching by air during single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2006-08-03

    We report the observation of sudden and dramatic changes in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) intensity (i.e., radiant power, phi(SL)) and spectral profiles at a critical acoustic pressure (P(c)) for solutions of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) containing mixtures of air and noble gas. Nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen (N2), and atomic oxygen emission lines are visible just below P(c). At P(c), very bright (factor of 7000 increase in phi(SL)) and featureless SBSL is observed when Ar is present. In addition, Ar lines are observed from a dimmed bubble that has been driven above P(c). These observations suggest that bright SBSL from H2SO4 is due to a plasma, and that molecular components of air suppress the onset of bright light emission through quenching mechanisms and endothermic processes. Determination of temperatures from simulations of the emission lines shows that air limits the heating during single-bubble cavitation. When He is present, phi(SL) increases by only a factor of 4 at P(c), and the SBSL spectrum is not featureless as for Ar, but instead arises from sulfur oxide (SO) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) bands. These differences are attributed to the high thermal conductivity and ionization potential of He compared to Ar.

  17. Transfer of microwave energy along a filament plasma column in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prade, B.; Houard, A.; Larour, J.; Pellet, M.; Mysyrowicz, A.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of microwave radiation into a plasma channel formed by laser filamentation in air, leading to the amplification by two orders of magnitude of longitudinal oscillations of the plasma. Transfer of this longitudinal excitation toward unexcited region of the plasma column occurs over >10 cm, in good agreement with a theoretical model describing the propagation of a TM wave guided along the surface between air and plasma. We foresee that high-power low-frequency electromagnetic waves injected into a multi-filament plasma could initiate and sustain a long-lived plasma over several meters distance.

  18. Demixing-stimulated lane formation in binary complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.-R.; Jiang, K.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2011-11-29

    Recently lane formation and phase separation have been reported for experiments with binary complex plasmas in the PK3-Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Positive non-additivity of particle interactions is known to stimulate phase separation (demixing), but its effect on lane formation is unknown. In this work, we used Langevin dynamics (LD) simulation to probe the role of non-additivity interactions on lane formation. The competition between laning and demixing leads to thicker lanes. Analysis based on anisotropic scaling indices reveals a crossover from normal laning mode to a demixing-stimulated laning mode. Extensive numerical simulations enabled us to identify a critical value of the non-additivity parameter {Delta} for the crossover.

  19. Photoionization capable, extreme and vacuum ultraviolet emission in developing low temperature plasmas in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J.; Fierro, A.; Beeson, S.; Laity, G.; Trienekens, D.; Joshi, R. P.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental observation of photoionization capable extreme ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet emission from nanosecond timescale, developing low temperature plasmas (i.e. streamer discharges) in atmospheric air is presented. Applying short high voltage pulses enabled the observation of the onset of plasma formation exclusively by removing the external excitation before spark development was achieved. Contrary to the common assumption that radiative transitions from the b{{}1}{{\\Pi}u} (Birge-Hopfield I) and b{{}\\prime 1}Σu+ (Birge-Hopfield II) singlet states of N2 are the primary contributors to photoionization events, these results indicate that radiative transitions from the c{{4\\prime}1}Σu+ (Carroll-Yoshino) singlet state of N2 are dominant in developing low temperature plasmas in air. In addition to c{}4\\prime transitions, photoionization capable transitions from atomic and singly ionized atomic oxygen were also observed. The inclusion of c{{4\\prime}1}Σu+ transitions into a statistical photoionization model coupled with a fluid model enabled streamer growth in the simulation of positive streamers.

  20. Afterglow chemistry of atmospheric-pressure helium-oxygen plasmas with humid air impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Niemi, Kari; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Graham, William G.

    2014-04-01

    The formation of reactive species in the afterglow of a radio-frequency-driven atmospheric-pressure plasma in a fixed helium-oxygen feed gas mixture (He+0.5%O2) with humid air impurity (a few hundred ppm) is investigated by means of an extensive global plasma chemical kinetics model. As an original objective, we explore the effects of humid air impurity on the biologically relevant reactive species in an oxygen-dependent system. After a few milliseconds in the afterglow environment, the densities of atomic oxygen (O) decreases from 1015 to 1013 cm-3 and singlet delta molecular oxygen (O2(1D)) of the order of 1015 cm-3 decreases by a factor of two, while the ozone (O3) density increases from 1014 to 1015 cm-3. Electrons and oxygen ionic species, initially of the order of 1011 cm-3, recombine much faster on the time scale of some microseconds. The formation of atomic hydrogen (H), hydroxyl radical (OH), hydroperoxyl (HO2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitric acid (HNO3) resulting from the humid air impurity as well as the influence on the afterglow chemistry is clarified with particular emphasis on the formation of dominant reactive oxygen species (ROS). The model suggests that the reactive species predominantly formed in the afterglow are major ROS O2(1D) and O3 (of the order of 1015 cm-3) and rather minor hydrogen- and nitrogen-based reactive species OH, H2O2, HNO3 and NO2/NO3, of which densities are comparable to the O-atom density (of the order of 1013 cm-3). Furthermore, the model quantitatively reproduces the experimental results of independent O and O3 density measurements.

  1. Numerical model of the plasma formation at electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M.

    2015-01-07

    The model of plasma formation in the keyhole in liquid metal as well as above the electron beam welding zone is described. The model is based on solution of two equations for the density of electrons and the mean electron energy. The mass transfer of heavy plasma particles (neutral atoms, excited atoms, and ions) is taken into account in the analysis by the diffusion equation for a multicomponent mixture. The electrostatic field is calculated using the Poisson equation. Thermionic electron emission is calculated for the keyhole wall. The ionization intensity of the vapors due to beam electrons and high-energy secondary and backscattered electrons is calibrated using the plasma parameters when there is no polarized collector electrode above the welding zone. The calculated data are in good agreement with experimental data. Results for the plasma parameters for excitation of a non-independent discharge are given. It is shown that there is a need to take into account the effect of a strong electric field near the keyhole walls on electron emission (the Schottky effect) in the calculation of the current for a non-independent discharge (hot cathode gas discharge). The calculated electron drift velocities are much bigger than the velocity at which current instabilities arise. This confirms the hypothesis for ion-acoustic instabilities, observed experimentally in previous research.

  2. Cathode Plasma Formation in High Intensity Electron Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Oliver, Bryan; Bennett, Nichelle; Droemer, Darryl; Bernshtam, V.; Doron, R.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    This talk will detail the experimental results and conclusions obtained for cathode plasma formation on the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (4-7.5 MeV) at Sandia National Laboratories. The SMP diode utilizes a hollowed metal cathode to produce high power (TW), focused electron beams (<3 mm diameter) which are used for flash x-ray radiography applications. Optical diagnostics include high speed (<10 ns) framing cameras, optical streak cameras, and spectroscopy. The cathode plasma in this high electric (MV/cm) and magnetic (>10 Tesla) field environment forms well-defined striations. These striations have been examined for a number of different cathode sizes, vacuum gap spacings, and diode voltages. Optical streak images have been taken to determine the time evolution of the plasma, and optical spectroscopy has been employed to determine its constituents as well as their densities and temperatures inferred from detailed time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) and radiation transport modelings. Comments will be made as to the overall effect of the cathode plasma in regards to the diode impedance and electron beam focusing. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Air Plasma Kinetics Under the Influence of Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    A full time-dependent kinetic study is presented for the main microscopic collisional and radiative processes underlying the optical flashes associated to an impulsive (t = 5 ms) discharge in the form of a single sprite streamer going through an air region of the mesosphere at three different altitudes (63 km, 68 km and 78 km). The kinetic formalism developed includes the coupling of the rate equations of each of the different species considered (electrons, ions, atoms and molecules) with the Boltzmann transport equation so that, in this way, all the kinetics is self-consistent, although, in the present approach, the electrodynamics (no Poisson equation is considered) is not coupled. The chemical model set up for air plasmas includes more than 75 species and almost 500 reactions. In addition, a complete set of reactions (more than 110) has been considered to take into account the possible impact of including H2O (humid chemistry) in the generated air plasmas. This study also considers the vibrational kinetics of N2 and CO2, and explicitly evaluates the optical emissions associated to a number of excited states of N2, O2, O in the visible, CO2 in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions of sprite streamers due to the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) and the NO-γ band systems. All the calculations are conducted for midnight conditions in mid- latitude regions (+ 38°), and 0° longitude, using as initial values for the neutral species those provided by the latest version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). According to our calculations, the impact of 4 ppm of H2O is only slightly visible in O3- at 68 km and 78 km while it strongly affects the behaviour of the anion CO4- at all the altitudes investigated. The local enhancement of NOX predicted by the present model varies with the altitude. At 68 km, the concentrations of NO and NO2 increase in about one order of magnitude while that of NO3 exhibits a remarkable growth of up to almost three

  4. Air plasma kinetics under the influence of sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    A full time-dependent kinetic study is presented for the main microscopic collisional and radiative processes underlying the optical flashes associated with an impulsive (τ = 5 µs) discharge in the form of a single sprite streamer passing through an air region of the mesosphere at three different altitudes (63, 68 and 78 km). The kinetic formalism developed includes the coupling of the rate equations of each of the different species considered (electrons, ions, atoms and molecules) with the Boltzmann transport equation so that, in this way, all the kinetics is self-consistent, although, in the present approach, the electrodynamics (no Poisson equation is considered) is not coupled. The chemical model set up for air plasmas includes more than 75 species and almost 500 reactions. In addition, a complete set of reactions (more than 110) has been considered to take into account the possible impact of including H2O (humid chemistry) in the generated air plasmas. This study also considers the vibrational kinetics of N2 and CO2 and explicitly evaluates the optical emissions associated with a number of excited states of N2, O2, O in the visible, CO2 in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions of sprite streamers due to the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) and the NO-γ band systems. All the calculations are conducted for midnight conditions in mid-latitude regions (+38°N) and 0° longitude, using as initial values for the neutral species those provided by the latest version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). According to our calculations, the impact of 4 ppm of H2O is only slightly visible in O_{3}^{-} at 68 and 78 km while it strongly affects the behaviour of the anion CO_{4}^{-} at all the altitudes investigated. The local enhancement of NOx predicted by the present model varies with the altitude. At 68 km, the concentrations of NO and NO2 increase by about one order of magnitude while that of NO3 exhibits a remarkable growth of up to almost

  5. Formation and control of plasma potentials in TMX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Porkolab, M.; Stallard, B.W.

    1981-05-06

    The methods to be employed to form and control plasma potentials in the TMX Upgrade tandem mirror with thermal barriers are described. ECRH-generated mirror -confined electron plasmas are used to establish a negative potential region to isolate the end-plug and central-cell celectrons. This thermal isolation will allow a higher end-plug electron temperature and an increased central-cell confining potential. Improved axial central-cell ion confinement results since higher temperature central-cell ions can be confined. This paper describes: (1) calculations of the sensitivity of barrier formation to vacuum conditions and to the presence of impurities in the neutral beams, (2) calculations of microwave penetration and absorption used to design the ECRH system, and (3) techniques to limit electron runaway to high energies by localized microwave beams and by relativistic detuning.

  6. Cell immobilization on polymer by air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Om, Ji-yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-08-01

    The study of cell immobilization on delicate polymer by an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) is required for its medical application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AAPPJ treatment induce cell immobilization effect on delicate polymers without significant change of surface roughness by AAPPJ treatment. After surface roughness, dynamic contact angle, and chemical characteristics were investigated, the immobilization effect was evaluated with the mouse fibroblast L929 cell line. Surface roughness change was not observed (P > 0.05) in either delicate dental wax or polystyrene plate (PSP) as advancing and receding contact angles significantly decreased (P < 0.05), thanks to decreased hydrocarbon and formation of oxygen-related functional groups in treated PSP. Adherent L929 cells with elongated morphology were found in treated PSP along with the formation of immobilization markers vinculin and actin cytoskeleton. Increased PTK2 gene expression upregulated these markers on treated PSP.

  7. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  8. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements.

  9. ADI-FDTD modeling of microwave plasma discharges in air towards fully three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Rogier, François; Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Plasma formation and propagation during microwave breakdown has been extensively studied during the last decades. Numerical modeling of the strong coupling between the high frequency electromagnetic waves and the plasma is still a challenging topic due to the different time and space scales involved. In this article, an Alternative Direction Implicit (ADI) formulation of the Finite Difference Time Domain method for solving Maxwell's equations coupled with a simplified plasma model via the electric current is being proposed, leading to a significant reduction of the computational cost as the CFL criterion for stability of the FDTD method is being removed. An energy estimate has been used to prove the unconditional stability of the ADI-FDTD leapfrog scheme as well as its coupled formulation. The computational efficiency and accuracy of this approach has been studied in a simplified case. The proposed method is applied and validated in two dimensional microwave breakdown in air while its computational efficiency allows for fully three dimensional simulations, an important step for understanding the complex nature and evolution of a microwave plasma discharge and its possible applicability as an aerodynamic flow control method.

  10. OH production by transient plasma and mechanism of flame ignition and propagation in quiescent methane-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Cathey, Charles; Cain, Jeremy; Wang, Hai; Gundersen, Martin A.; Carter, Campbell; Ryan, Michael

    2008-09-15

    Transient plasma induced production of OH is followed in a quiescent, stoichiometric CH{sub 4}-air mixture using the planar laser induced fluorescence technique. Ignition and subsequent flame propagation, for both the transient plasma and traditional spark ignition, are observed with a high speed camera (2000 fps). The transient plasma is generated using a 70 ns FWHM, 60 kV, 800 mJ pulse. OH production was confirmed throughout the chamber volume; however, the mean number density was found to decay below 1.3 x 10{sup 14}cm{sup -3} near 100 {mu}s. Nonetheless, ignition induced by transient plasma was decidedly faster than by spark ignition. Using the high speed camera, ignition initiated by transient plasma was found to occur along the length of the anode at approximately 1 ms, leading to the formation of a wrinkled, cylindrically-shaped flame. Analysis of the flame front propagation rates shows that flames ignited by transient plasma propagate essentially at the speed consistent with well accepted literature values for the stoichiometric methane-air mixture. This supports the notion that residue plasma, if any, has little effect on flame propagation. (author)

  11. Collisionless expansion of pulsed radio frequency plasmas. I. Front formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, T.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.; Boswell, R. W.; Charles, C.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics during plasma expansion are studied with the use of a versatile particle-in-cell simulation with a variable neutral gas density profile. The simulation is tailored to a radio frequency plasma expansion experiment [Schröder et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47(5), 055207 (2014)]. The experiment has shown the existence of a propagating ion front. The ion front features a strong electric field and features a sharp plasma potential drop similar to a double layer. However, the presented results of a first principle simulation show that, in general, the ion front does not have to be entangled with an electric field. The propagating electric field reflects the downstream ions, which stream with velocities up to twice as high as that of the ion front propagation. The observed ion density peak forms due to the accumulation of the reflected ions. The simulation shows that the ion front formation strongly depends on the initial ion density profile and is subject to a wave-breaking phenomenon. Virtual diagnostics in the code allow for a direct comparison with experimental results. Using this technique, the plateau forming in the wake of the plasma front could be indirectly verified in the expansion experiment. Although the simulation considers profiles only in one spatial dimensional, its results are qualitatively in a very good agreement with the laboratory experiment. It can successfully reproduce findings obtained by independent numerical models and simulations. This indicates that the effects of magnetic field structures and tangential inhomogeneities are not essential for the general expansion dynamic. The presented simulation will be used for a detailed parameter study dealt with in Paper II [Schröder et al., Phys. Plasma 23, 013512 (2016)] of this series.

  12. Asymmetry-driven structure formation in pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S. M.; Shatashvili, N. L.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2009-12-15

    The nonlinear propagation of electromagnetic waves in pair plasmas, in which the electrostatic potential plays a very important but subdominant role of a 'binding glue' is investigated. Several mechanisms for structure formation are investigated, in particular, the 'asymmetry' in the initial temperatures of the constituent species. It is shown that the temperature asymmetry leads to a (localizing) nonlinearity that is qualitatively different from the ones originating in ambient mass or density difference. The temperature-asymmetry-driven focusing-defocusing nonlinearity supports stable localized wave structures in 1-3 dimensions, which, for certain parameters, may have flat-top shapes.

  13. The Effect of Air Plasma on Sterilization of Escherichia coli in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Miao; Guo, Yun

    2012-08-01

    In this work, a Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) air plasma was used to sterilize Escherichia coli (E. coli) on the surface of medical Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) film. The leakage of cellular DNA and protein by optical absorbance measurement at 260 nm and 280 nm, together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) about cell morphology were performed after sterilization to analyse inactivation mechanisms. The results indicated that the DBD air plasma was very effective in E. coli sterilization. The plasma germicidal efficiency depended on the plasma treatment time, the air-gap distance, and the applied voltage. Within 5 min of plasma treatment, the germicidal efficiency against E. coli could reach 99.99%. An etching action on cell membranes by electrons, ions and radicals is the primary mechanism for DBD air plasma sterilization, which leads to the effusion of cellular contents (DNA and protein) and bacterial death.

  14. Nanosecond-pulsed plasma actuation in quiescent air and laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, G.; Michelis, T.; Ragni, D.; Kotsonis, M.; Scarano, F.

    2014-03-01

    An experimental investigation of the working principles of a nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuator has been conducted. Special emphasis is given on the thermal effects accompanying the rapid deposition of energy associated with this kind of actuation. A ns-DBD plasma actuator has been operated in quiescent air conditions as well as in a flat plate laminar boundary layer, with external flow velocity of 5 and 10 m s-1. Schlieren imaging and particle image velocimetry have been used to characterize the actuation. Additionally, the back-current shunt technique has been used for current measurements, from which energy input (per pulse) is calculated. Cases of 10-, 20- and 50-pulse bursts are tested. Schlieren imaging in still air conditions shows the formation of a high-temperature region in the vicinity of the discharge volume. The spatial extent of the visible ‘hot spot’ depends upon the number of pulses within the burst, following a power law. Schlieren imaging of the span-wise effect of the plasma actuator reveals weak compression waves originating from the loci of discharge filaments. The thermal ‘hot spots’ exhibit significant three-dimensionality. Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field resulting from the ns-DBDs acting on a laminar boundary layer. The disturbance leads to formation of a Tollmien-Schlichting wave train, with spectral content in good agreement with linear stability theory. It is observed that the group length of the wave train is proportional to the number of pulses within the burst.

  15. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  16. X-ray line formation in radiation dominated astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, G.; Bailey, J. E.; Hansen, S. B.; Nagayama, T.; Rochau, G. A.; Liedahl, D.; Mancini, R.; Koepke, M.

    2014-10-01

    A remarkable opportunity to observe matter in a regime where the effects of General Relativity are significant has arisen through measurements of strongly red-shifted iron x-ray lines emitted from black hole accretion disks. A major uncertainty in the spectral formation models is the efficiency of Resonant Auger Destruction (RAD), in which fluorescent Ka photons are resonantly absorbed by neighbor ions. The absorbing ion preferentially decays by Auger ionization, thus reducing the emerging Ka intensity. If Ka lines from L-shell ions are not observed in iron spectral emission, why are such lines observed from silicon plasma surrounding other accretion powered objects? To help answer this question, we are investigating photoionized silicon plasmas produced using intense x-rays from the Z facility. For the first time in a terrestrial lab, we measured simultaneous absorption and emission spectra from these plasmas at high resolution. The charge state distribution, electron temperature, and electron density are determined through space-resolved absorption spectra. The emission spectra have been recorded at different column densities thus testing different radiative transport regime. These should allow us to answer quantitatively the original RAD hypothesis. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Scaled-Up Nonequilibrium Air Plasmas Generated by DC and Pulsed Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-08

    scalability of nonequilibrium plasmas produced by electrical discharges in atmospheric pressure air. Both DC and repetitively pulsed discharges ...Key results demonstrate that both DC glow discharge and pulsed transient spark generate air plasmas of required parameters. Glow discharge is easier...Corona discharge as a temperature probe was developed to diagnose the microwave torch preheated air. A new concept of the DC-driven pulsed

  18. Chemical kinetics and relaxation of non-equilibrium air plasma generated by energetic photon and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulois, Melissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The comprehension of electromagnetic perturbations of electronic devices, due to air plasma-induced electromagnetic field, requires a thorough study on air plasma. In the aim to understand the phenomena at the origin of the formation of non-equilibrium air plasma, we simulate, using a volume average chemical kinetics model (0D model), the time evolution of a non-equilibrium air plasma generated by an energetic X-ray flash. The simulation is undertaken in synthetic air (80% N2 and 20% O2) at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. When the X-ray flash crosses the gas, non-relativistic Compton electrons (low energy) and a relativistic Compton electron beam (high energy) are simultaneously generated and interact with the gas. The considered chemical kinetics scheme involves 26 influent species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutral atoms and molecules in their ground or metastable excited states) reacting following 164 selected reactions. The kinetics model describing the plasma chemistry was coupled to the conservation equation of the electron mean energy, in order to calculate at each time step of the non-equilibrium plasma evolution, the coefficients of reactions involving electrons while the energy of the heavy species (positive and negative ions and neutral atoms and molecules) is assumed remaining close to ambient temperature. It has been shown that it is the relativistic Compton electron beam directly created by the X-ray flash which is mainly responsible for the non-equilibrium plasma formation. Indeed, the low energy electrons (i.e., the non-relativistic ones) directly ejected from molecules by Compton collisions contribute to less than 1% on the creation of electrons in the plasma. In our simulation conditions, a non-equilibrium plasma with a low electron mean energy close to 1 eV and a concentration of charged species close to 1013 cm-3 is formed a few nanoseconds after the peak of X-ray flash intensity. 200 ns after the flash

  19. Formation and Acceleration Physics on Plasma Injector 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with conical accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, with power input of the same topology as the RACE device. The goal of PI-1 research is to produce a self-confined compact toroid with high-flux (200 mWb), high-density (3x10^16 cm-3) and moderate initial temperature (100 eV) to be used as the target plasma in a MTF reactor. PI-1 is 5 meters long and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration stage is 4 m long and tapers to an outer diameter of 40 cm. The capacitor banks store 0.5 MJ for formation and 1.13 MJ for acceleration. Power is delivered via 62 independently controlled switch modules. Several geometries for formation bias field, inner electrodes and target chamber have been tested, and trends in accelerator efficiency and target lifetime have been observed. Thomson scattering and ion Doppler spectroscopy show significant heating (>100 eV) as the CT is compressed in the conical accelerator. B-dot probes show magnetic field structure consistent with Grad-Shafranov models and MHD simulations, and CT axial length depends strongly on the lambda profile.

  20. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E.; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections. PMID:26369955

  1. Effects of higher-order Kerr nonlinearity and plasma diffraction on multiple filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in air

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T. W.; Zhou, C. T.; Zhang, H.; He, X. T.

    2013-07-15

    The effect of higher-order Kerr nonlinearity on channel formation by, and filamentation of, ultrashort laser pulses propagating in air is considered. Filament patterns originating from multiphoton ionization of the air molecules with and without the higher-order Kerr and molecular-rotation effects are investigated. It is found that diverging multiple filaments are formed if only the plasma-induced defocusing effect is included. In the presence of the higher-order Kerr effects, the light channel can exist for a long distance. The effect of noise on the filament patterns is also discussed.

  2. Modification of polysulfone porous hollow fiber membranes by air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. V.; Ibragimov, R. G.; Abdullin, I. Sh; Gallyamov, R. T.; Ovcharova, A. A.; Bildyukevich, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Air plasma treatment was used to enhance the surface hydrophilic properties of the polysulfone porous hollow fiber membranes prepared via a dry-wet phase invertion technique in the free spinning mode in air. Membranes prepared had porous asymmetric structure with macroporous support on the shell side and fine-porous selective layer on the lumen side. The wettability of the inner membrane surfaces were checked by contact angle measurements and FTIR was used to compare the surfaces before and after plasma treatment. Membrane morphology was examined with confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). Contact angle measurements confirm that air plasma treatment affords improvement in the wettability of polysulfone membranes and FTIR results show that air plasmas chemically modify the lumen side membrane surface, however, there is no significant change in membranes chemical structure after modification. CSLM data obtained, as well as gas permeability (He and CO2) measurements show that after plasma treatment pore etching occurs.

  3. Air plasma processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) micro-beads: Surface characterisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaozong; Cui, Nai-Yi; Osbeck, Susan; Liang, He

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports the surface processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) micro-beads by using a rotary air plasma reactor, and its effects on surface properties. The surface properties, including surface wettability, surface chemistry and textures of the PMMA beads, were characterised. It was observed that the air plasma processing can improve the surface wettability of the PMMA microbeads significantly. A 15 min plasma processing can reduce the surface water contact angle of PMMA beads to about 50° from its original value of 80.3°. This was accompanied by about 8% increase in surface oxygen concentration as confirmed by XPS analysis. The optical profilometry examination revealed the air plasma processing resulted in a rougher surface that has a “delicate” surface texture. It is concluded that the surface chemistry and texture, induced by air plasma processing, co-contributed to the surface wettability improvement of PMMA micro-beads.

  4. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  5. On-site formation of emulsions by controlled air plugs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowen; Hui, Wenli; Hao, Chonglei; Yue, Wanqing; Yang, Mengsu; Cui, Yali; Wang, Zuankai

    2014-02-26

    Air plugs are usually undesirable in microfluidic systems because of their detrimental effect on the system's stability and integrity. By controlling the wetting properties as well as the topographical geometry of the microchannel, it is reported herein that air plugs can be generated in pre-defined locations to function as a unique valve, allowing for the on-site formation of various emulsions including single-component droplets, composite droplets with droplet-to-droplet concentration gradient, blood droplets, paired droplets, as well as bubble arrays without the need for precious flow control, a difficult task with conventional droplet microfluidics. Moreover, the self-generated air valve can be readily deactivated (turned off) by the introduction of an oil phase, allowing for the on-demand release of as-formed droplets for downstream applications. It is proposed that the simple, yet versatile nature of this technique can act as an important method for droplet microfluidics and, in particular, is ideal for the development of affordable lab-on-a-chip systems without suffering from scalability and manufacturing challenges that typically confound the conventional droplet microfluidics.

  6. Structure Formation in Planetary Disk and Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Koichi; Tajima, Toshiki; Horton, Wendell

    2000-10-01

    The shear flow instabilities under the presence of magnetic fields in the protoplanetary disk can greatly facilitate the formation of density structures that serve prior to the onset of the gravitational Jeans instability as a seed for the faster formation of planetesimals. Such a process may explain several puzzles in the planetary genesis. We evaluate the effects of the Parker, magnetorotational, and kinematic dynamo instabilities, and calculate the mass spectra of coagulated density structures by the above mechanism in the radial direction for two typical models. The mass spectrum of the magnetorotational instability may describe the origin of giant planets away from central star. Our local three-dimentional MHD simulation indicates that the coupling of those instabilities creates spiral arms and gas blobs in the accretion disk, reinforcing our theory. Such a mechanism for the early structure formation may be tested in a laboratory. The recent progress in experiments invloving shear flows in tokamak and laser plasmas may become a key in this regard. * The work is supported by NSF and DoE.

  7. Effects of Atmospheric Air Plasma Irradiation on pH of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarinont, Thapanut; Koga, Kazunori; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Uchida, Giichirou; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu

    We have studied the effects of atmospheric air plasma irradiation to water using a scalable dielectric barrier discharge device. Measurements of the pH of water treated by the plasmas have shown the pH decreases due to peroxide molecules generated by plasma irradiation and depends on material of water container. We also found this plasma treated water has little effect on the growth enhancement on Radish sprouts compare with plasma irradiation on dry seeds and the plasma irradiation can affect them through the water buffer of 0.2 mm in thickness.

  8. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater.

  9. Ion-viscosity effects on plasma-liner formation and implosion via merging supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillo, Kevin; Cassibry, Jason; Samulyak, Roman; Shih, Wen; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Team

    2016-10-01

    The PLX- α project endeavors to study plasma-liner formation and implosion by merging a spherical array of plasma jets as a candidate standoff driver for MIF. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics is used to model the liner formation and implosion processes. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method to simulate fluid flows by dividing a fluid into a set of particles and using a summation interpolant function to calculate the properties and gradients for each of these particles. Ion viscosity is anticipated to be an important mechanism for momentum transport during liner formation, implosion, and stagnation. To study this, ion viscosity was incorporated into the code. To provide confidence in the numerical output and to help identify the difference between numerical and physical diffusion, a series of test cases were performed, consisting of Couette flow, Gresho vortex, and a Taylor-Green vortex. An L2-norm analysis was performed to measure the error and convergence. Simulations of conical (6 jets) and 4 π (60 jets) liners with and without ion viscosity reveal potential effects of viscosity on ram pressure, Mach-number degradation, and evolution of liner perturbations during jet merging and liner implosion.

  10. On the thermodynamic properties of thermal plasma in the flame kernel of hydrocarbon/air premixed gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, Omid; Beretta, Gian Paolo; Eisazadeh-Far, Kian; Metghalchi, Hameed

    2016-07-01

    Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air plasma mixtures at ultra-high temperatures must be precisely calculated due to important influence on the flame kernel formation and propagation in combusting flows and spark discharge applications. A new algorithm based on the complete chemical equilibrium assumption is developed to calculate the ultra-high temperature plasma composition and thermodynamic properties, including enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs free energy, specific heat at constant pressure, specific heat ratio, speed of sound, mean molar mass, and degree of ionization. The method is applied to compute the thermodynamic properties of H2/air and CH4/air plasma mixtures for different temperatures (1000-100 000 K), different pressures (10-6-100 atm), and different fuel/air equivalence ratios within flammability limit. In calculating the individual thermodynamic properties of the atomic species needed to compute the complete equilibrium composition, the Debye-Huckel cutoff criterion has been used for terminating the series expression of the electronic partition function so as to capture the reduction of the ionization potential due to pressure and the intense connection between the electronic partition function and the thermodynamic properties of the atomic species and the number of energy levels taken into account. Partition functions have been calculated using tabulated data for available atomic energy levels. The Rydberg and Ritz extrapolation and interpolation laws have been used for energy levels which are not observed. The calculated plasma properties are then presented as functions of temperature, pressure and equivalence ratio, in terms of a new set of thermodynamically self-consistent correlations that are shown to provide very accurate fits suitable for efficient use in CFD simulations. Comparisons with existing data for air plasma show excellent agreement.

  11. Formation of current singularity in a topologically constrained plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yao; Huang, Yi-Min; Qin, Hong; Bhattacharjee, A

    2016-02-01

    Recently a variational integrator for ideal magnetohydrodynamics in Lagrangian labeling has been developed. Its built-in frozen-in equation makes it optimal for studying current sheet formation. We use this scheme to study the Hahm-Kulsrud-Taylor problem, which considers the response of a 2D plasma magnetized by a sheared field under sinusoidal boundary forcing. We obtain an equilibrium solution that preserves the magnetic topology of the initial field exactly, with a fluid mapping that is non-differentiable. Unlike previous studies that examine the current density output, we identify a singular current sheet from the fluid mapping. These results are benchmarked with a constrained Grad-Shafranov solver. The same signature of current singularity can be found in other cases with more complex magnetic topologies.

  12. Formation and dissociation of dust molecules in dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jia; Feng, Fan; Liu, Fucheng; Dong, Lifang; He, Yafeng

    2016-09-01

    Dust molecules are observed in a dusty plasma experiment. By using measurements with high spatial resolution, the formation and dissociation of the dust molecules are studied. The ion cloud in the wake of an upper dust grain attracts the lower dust grain nearby. When the interparticle distance between the upper dust grain and the lower one is less than a critical value, the two dust grains would form a dust molecule. The upper dust grain always leads the lower one as they travel. When the interparticle distance between them is larger than the critical value, the dust molecule would dissociate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. A2011201006 and A2012201015), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. Y2012009), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, China, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project, China.

  13. Formation of current singularity in a topologically constrained plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yao; Huang, Yi-Min; Qin, Hong; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recently a variational integrator for ideal magnetohydrodynamics in Lagrangian labeling has been developed. Its built-in frozen-in equation makes it optimal for studying current sheet formation. We use this scheme to study the Hahm-Kulsrud-Taylor problem, which considers the response of a 2D plasma magnetized by a sheared field under sinusoidal boundary forcing. We obtain an equilibrium solution that preserves the magnetic topology of the initial field exactly, with a fluid mapping that is non-differentiable. Unlike previous studies that examine the current density output, we identify a singular current sheet from the fluid mapping. These results are benchmarked with a constrained Grad-Shafranov solver. The same signature of current singularity can be found in other cases with more complex magnetic topologies.

  14. Understanding the dynamics of the inductive plasma formation and its application to create doublet shaped plasma in the TCV tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Joyeeta; Coda, Stefano; Duval, Basil Paul; Galperti, Cristian; Moret, Jean-Marc; Reimerdes, Holger

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of the plasma formation in TCV are revisited with the goal of improving reliability and developing new scenarios such as the creation of doublet configurations. A database for the plasma formation scenarios in TCV reveals that 15% of the attempts to form a plasma fail during the burn-through phase. Plasma formation dynamics are greatly affected by the difference between programmed and obtained plasma current ramp rates that can lead to oscillations in IP when the IP feedback control is activated. This mismatch in IP also propagates into the radial position control. Failed burn-throughs occur when the Ohmic heating power is insufficient either since IP rises too slow or due to a combined effect of the IP feedback oscillations and a regularly occurring MHD instability. Several strategies to improve the present plasma formation scenario have been implemented. Based on the improved understanding of the plasma formation dynamics, a strategy has been developed to create and control a doublet configuration by merging of two droplet-shaped plasma requiring simultaneous breakdown at two locations.

  15. An investigation of an underwater steam plasma discharge as alternative to air plasmas for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah N.; Foster, John E.; Garcia, Maria C.

    2015-10-01

    An underwater steam plasma discharge, in which water itself is the ionizing media, is investigated as a means to introduce advanced oxidation species into contaminated water for the purpose of water purification. The steam discharge avoids the acidification observed with air discharges and also avoids the need for a feed gas, simplifying the system. Steam discharge operation did not result in a pH changes in the processing of water or simulated wastewater, with the actual pH remaining roughly constant during processing. Simulated wastewater has been shown to continue to decompose significantly after steam treatment, suggesting the presence of long-lived plasma produced radicals. During steam discharge operation, nitrate production is limited, and nitrite production was found to be below the detection threshold of (roughly 0.2 mg L-1). The discharge was operated over a broad range of deposited power levels, ranging from approximately 30 W to 300 W. Hydrogen peroxide production was found to scale with increasing power. Additionally, the hydrogen peroxide production efficiency of the discharge was found to be higher than many of the rates reported in the literature to date.

  16. Experimental study of the heat transfer process of air around atmospheric arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi Meidanshahi, F.; Madanipour, Kh.; Shokri, Babak

    2011-05-01

    The experimental investigation of thermodynamic properties such heat and mass transfer of plasmas has many applications in different industries. Laboratory atmospheric arc plasma is studied in this work. The refractive index of the air around the plasma is changed because of convection phenomena. When the convection creates the air flowing around the plasma, the density and consequently, the refractive index of air are distributed symmetrically. Moiré deflectometry is a technique of wave front analysis which in both Talbot effect and moiré technique is applied for measuring phase objects. Deflection of light beam passing through the inhomogeneous medium is utilized to obtain the refractive index distribution. In experimental set-up, an expanded collimated He-Ne laser propagate through the arc plasma and the around air. The temperature distribution is obtained by use of thermo-optic coefficient of air. To calculate the thermo- optic coefficient and the refractive index of air for a given wavelength of light and given atmospheric conditions (air temperature, pressure, and humidity), the Edlén equation is used. The convective heat transfer coefficient is obtained by calculating the temperature gradient on the plasma border. This method is not expensive, complicated and sensitive to environmental vibrations.

  17. Sheath formation criterion in magnetized electronegative plasmas with thermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hatami, M. M.; Shokri, B.

    2013-03-15

    Taking into account the effect of collisions and positive ion temperatures, the sheath formation criterion is investigated in a weakly magnetized electronegative plasma consisting of electrons, negative and positive ions by using the hydrodynamics equations. It is assumed that the electron and negative ion density distributions are the Boltzmann distribution with two different temperatures. Also, it is assumed that the velocity of positive ions at the sheath edge is not normal to the wall (oblique entrance). Our results show that a sheath region will be formed when the initial velocity of positive ions or the ion Mach number M lies in a specific interval with particular upper and lower limits. Also, it is shown that the presence of the magnetic field affects both of these limits. Moreover, as an practical application, the density distribution of charged particles in the sheath region is studied for an allowable value of M, and it is seen that monotonically reduction of the positive ion density distribution leading to the sheath formation occurs only when M lies between two above mentioned limits.

  18. Nanodiamond formation via thermal radiation from an air shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carli, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Nanodiamonds have recently been found in sediments of Younger Dryas age, about 12,900 years ago. Carbon isotope ratios imply that the source of carbon was terrestrial organic matter and rule out the possibility that the diamond was of cosmic origin, e.g., from an influx of meteorites. The nanodiamonds are associated with mineral spherules (and other shapes) that have compositions and textures consistent with the rapid melting and solidification of local soil. The inferred temperatures are much too high for natural events such as forest fires. Similar deposits of nanodiamond have been found in the 65 million year old K-Pg layer associated with the ca. 200 km diameter Chicxulub impact crater. Nanodiamond have also been reported in the vicinity of the Tunguska event, presumed to be the result of an air shock produced by the interaction of a rapidly moving cosmic body with the Earth's atmosphere. We infer that the nanodiamonds were formed when the thermal radiation from the air shock pyrolyzed surface organic matter. Rapid reaction locally depleted the atmosphere of oxygen and the remaining carbon could condense as nanodiamond. A similar mechanism can be invoked to account for the formation of nanodiamond as a froduct of the detonation of ozygen-deficient high explosives.

  19. Fluorocarbon nano-coating of polyester fabrics by atmospheric air plasma with aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, F.; Campagne, C.; Perwuelz, A.; Gengembre, L.

    2008-04-01

    A fluorocarbon coating was deposited on polyester (PET) woven fabric using pulse discharge plasma treatment by injecting a fluoropolymer directly into the plasma dielectric barrier discharge. The objective of the treatment was to improve the hydrophobic properties as well as the repellent behaviour of the polyester fabric. Plasma treatment conditions were optimised to obtain optimal hydrophobic properties which were evaluated using water contact angle measurement as well as spray-test method at the polyester fabric surface. The study showed that adhesion of the fluoropolymer to the woven PET was greatly enhanced by the air plasma treatment. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed chemical surface modifications occurring after the plasma treatments.

  20. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  1. Responses by pacific halibut to air exposure: Lack of correspondence among plasma constituents and mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, M.W.; Schreck, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    Age-1 and age-2 Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis were exposed to a range of times in air (0-60 min) and air temperatures (10??C or 16??C) that simulated conditions on deck after capture to test for correspondence among responses in plasma constituents and mortality. Pacific halibut mortality generally did not correspond with cortisol, glucose, sodium, and potassium since the maximum observed plasma concentrations were reached after exposure to 30 min in air, while significant mortality occurred only after exposure to 40 min in air for age-1 fish and 60 min in air for age-2 fish. Predicting mortality in discarded Pacific halibut using these plasma constituents does not appear to be feasible. Lactate concentrations corresponded with mortality in age-1 fish exposed to 16??C and may be useful predictors of discard mortality under a limited set of fishing conditions.

  2. Plasma flame for mass purification of contaminated air with chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Shin, Dong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2006-09-18

    An elimination of airborne simulated chemical and biological warfare agents was carried out by making use of a plasma flame made of atmospheric plasma and a fuel-burning flame, which can purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces such as buildings, public transportation systems, and military vehicles. The plasma flame generator consists of a microwave plasma torch connected in series to a fuel injector and a reaction chamber. For example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22 cm diameter and 30 cm length, purifies an airflow rate of 5000 lpm contaminated with toluene (the simulated chemical agent) and soot from a diesel engine (the simulated aerosol for biological agents). Large volumes of purification by the plasma flame will free mankind from the threat of airborne warfare agents. The plasma flame may also effectively purify air that is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, in addition to eliminating soot from diesel engines as an environmental application.

  3. Plasma flame for mass purification of contaminated air with chemical and biological warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Shin, Dong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2006-09-01

    An elimination of airborne simulated chemical and biological warfare agents was carried out by making use of a plasma flame made of atmospheric plasma and a fuel-burning flame, which can purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces such as buildings, public transportation systems, and military vehicles. The plasma flame generator consists of a microwave plasma torch connected in series to a fuel injector and a reaction chamber. For example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22cm diameter and 30cm length, purifies an airflow rate of 5000lpm contaminated with toluene (the simulated chemical agent) and soot from a diesel engine (the simulated aerosol for biological agents). Large volumes of purification by the plasma flame will free mankind from the threat of airborne warfare agents. The plasma flame may also effectively purify air that is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, in addition to eliminating soot from diesel engines as an environmental application.

  4. Molecular formation in the stagnation region of colliding laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Hassan, S. M.; Harilal, S. S.

    2016-10-27

    The laser-produced colliding plasmas have numerous attractive applications and stagnation layer formed during collisions between plasmas is a useful system for understanding particle collisions and molecular formation in a controlled way. In this article, we explore carbon dimer formation and its evolutionary paths in a stagnation layer formed during the interaction of two laser-produced plasmas. Colliding laser produced plasmas are generated by splitting a laser beam into two sub-beams and then focus them into either a single flat (laterally colliding plasmas) or a V-shaped graphite targets (orthogonally colliding plasmas). The C2 formation in the stagnation region of both colliding plasma schemes is investigated using optical spectroscopic means and compared with emission features from single seed plasma. Our results show that the collisions among the plasmas followed by the stagnation layer formation lead to rapid cooling causing enhanced carbon dimer formation. In addition, plasma electron temperature, density and C2 molecular temperature were measured for the stagnation zone and compared with seed plasma.

  5. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  6. Optical Diagnostics of Air Flows Induced in Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobatake, Takuya; Deguchi, Masanori; Suzuki, Junya; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-10-01

    A surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator has recently been intensively studied for the flow control over airfoils and turbine blades in the fields of aerospace and aeromechanics. It consists of two electrodes placed on both sides of the dielectric, where one is a top powered electrode exposed to the air, and the other is a bottom grounded electrode encapsulated with an insulator. The unidirectional gas flow along the dielectric surfaces is induced by the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) body force. It is known that the thinner the exposed electrode, the greater the momentum transfer to the air is, indicating that the thickness of the plasma is important. To analyze plasma profiles and air flows induced in the SDBD plasma actuator, we performed time-resolved and -integrated optical emission and schlieren imaging of the side view of the SDBD plasma actuator in atmospheric air. We applied a high voltage bipolar pulse (4-8 kV, 1-10 kHz) between electrodes. Experimental results indicated that the spatial extent of the plasma is much smaller than that of the induced flows. Experimental results further indicated that in the positive-going phase, a thin and long plasma is generated, where the optical emission is weak and uniform; on the other hand, in the negative-going phase, a thick and short plasma is generated, where a strong optical emission is observed near the top electrode.

  7. ''Runaway'' electron current and formation of spatial structures in excimer laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dresvyannikov, V.G.; Fisun, O.I.

    1983-10-01

    Results are presented of a nonlinear analysis of runaway plasma current observed in KrF( electrodischarge laser plasmas maintained by an electron beam. It is shown that under these conditions, a uniform plasma is unstable with respect to pinching, which results in arc formation.

  8. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  9. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  10. Numerical Investigation of Radiative Heat Transfer in Laser Induced Air Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Y. S.; Wang, T. S.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is one of the most important phenomena in the laser induced plasmas. This study is intended to develop accurate and efficient methods for predicting laser radiation absorption and plasma radiative heat transfer, and investigate the plasma radiation effects in laser propelled vehicles. To model laser radiation absorption, a ray tracing method along with the Beer's law is adopted. To solve the radiative transfer equation in the air plasmas, the discrete transfer method (DTM) is selected and explained. The air plasma radiative properties are predicted by the LORAN code. To validate the present nonequilibrium radiation model, several benchmark problems are examined and the present results are found to match the available solutions. To investigate the effects of plasma radiation in laser propelled vehicles, the present radiation code is coupled into a plasma aerodynamics code and a selected problem is considered. Comparisons of results at different cases show that plasma radiation plays a role of cooling plasma and it lowers the plasma temperature by about 10%. This change in temperature also results in a reduction of the coupling coefficient by about 10-20%. The present study indicates that plasma radiation modeling is very important for accurate modeling of aerodynamics in a laser propelled vehicle.

  11. OH(A,X) radicals in microwave plasma-assisted combustion of methane/air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Fuh, Che; Wang, Chuji; Laser Spectroscopy and Plasma Team

    2014-10-01

    A novel microwave plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) system, which consists of a microwave plasma-assisted combustor, a gas flow control manifold, and a set of optical diagnostic systems, was developed as a new test platform to study plasma enhancement of combustion. Using this system, we studied the state-resolved OH(A,X) radicals in the plasma-assisted combustion and ignition of a methane/air mixture. Experimental results identified three reaction zones in the plasma-assisted combustor: the plasma zone, the hybrid plasma-flame zone, and the flame zone. The OH(A) radicals in the three distinct zones were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Results showed a surge of OH(A) radicals in the hybrid zone compared to the plasma zone and the flame zone. The OH(X) radicals in the flame zone were measured using cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), and the absolute number density distribution of OH(X) was quantified in two-dimension. The effect of microwave argon plasma on combustion was studied with two different fuel/oxidizer injection patterns, namely the premixed methane/air injection and the nonpremixed (separate) methane/air injection. Parameters investigated included the flame geometry, the lean flammability limit, the emission spectra, and rotational temperature. State-resolved OH(A,X) radicals in the PAC of both injection patterns were also compared. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation through the Grant No. CBET-1066486.

  12. Double layer formation at the interface of complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Thoma, M. H.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-08-15

    Necessary conditions are formulated for the generation of a double layer at the interface of a complex plasma and a particle-free electron-ion plasma in a weakly collisional discharge. Examples are calculated for realistic observed complex plasmas, and it is shown that situations of both ''smooth'' transitions and 'sharp' transitions can exist. The model can explain the abrupt boundaries observed.

  13. Production of geopolymers using glass produced from DC plasma treatment of air pollution control (APC) residues.

    PubMed

    Kourti, Ioanna; Rani, D Amutha; Deegan, D; Boccaccini, A R; Cheeseman, C R

    2010-04-15

    Air pollution control (APC) residues are the hazardous waste produced from cleaning gaseous emissions at energy-from-waste (EfW) facilities processing municipal solid waste (MSW). APC residues have been blended with glass-forming additives and treated using DC plasma technology to produce a high calcium alumino-silicate glass. This research has investigated the optimisation and properties of geopolymers prepared from this glass. Work has shown that high strength geopolymers can be formed and that the NaOH concentration of the activating solution significantly affects the properties. The broad particle size distribution of the APC residue glass used in these experiments results in a microstructure that contains unreacted glass particles included within a geopolymer binder phase. The high calcium content of APC residues may cause the formation of some amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. A mix prepared with S/L=3.4, Si/Al=2.6 and [NaOH]=6M in the activating solution, produced high strength geopolymers with compressive strengths of approximately 130 MPa. This material had high density (2070 kg/m(3)) and low porosity. The research demonstrates for the first time that glass derived from DC plasma treatment of APC residues can be used to form high strength geopolymer-glass composites that have potential for use in a range of applications.

  14. On the different regimes of gas heating in air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of the gas temperature in air (N2-20%O2) plasma discharges are presented for different values of the reduced electric field, E/N g, electron density n e, pressure and tube radius. This study is based on the solutions to the time-dependent gas thermal balance in a cylindrical geometry coupled to the electron, vibrational and chemical kinetics, for E/{{N}\\text{g}}=50 and 100 Td (1 Td = 10-17 V cm2), 109  ⩽  n e  ⩽  1011 cm-3, pressure in the range 1-20 Torr, and also considering different tube radius, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 cm. The competing role of different gas heating mechanisms is discussed in detail within the time range 0.01-100 ms. For times below 1 ms, gas heating occurs from O2 dissociation by electron impact through pre-dissociative excited states, e + O2  →  e + \\text{O}2*   →  e + 2O(3P) and …  →  e + O(3P) + O(1D), as well as through the quenching of N2 electronically excited states by O2. For longer times, simulation results show that gas heating comes from processes N(4S) + NO(X)  →  N2(X, v ~ 3) + O, N2(A) + O  →  NO(X) + N(2D), V-T N2-O collisions and the recombination of oxygen atoms at the wall. Depending on the given E/N g and n e values, each one of these processes can be an important gas-heating channel. The contribution of V-T N2-O exchanges to gas heating is important in the analysis of the gas temperature for different pressures and values of the tube radius. A global picture of these effects is given by the study of the fraction of the discharge power spent on gas heating, which is always ~15%. The values for the fractional power transferred to gas heating from vibrational and electronic excitation are also presented and discussed.

  15. Disoriented chiral condensate formation from tubes of hot quark plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.; Birse, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a system of quarks interacting with {sigma} and pion fields starting from an initial configuration consisting of a tube of hot quark plasma undergoing a boost-invariant longitudinal expansion. We work within the framework of the linear sigma model using classical transport equations for the quarks coupled to the mean-field equations for the meson fields. In certain cases we find strong amplifications of any initial pion fields. For large-radius tubes, starting from quark densities that are very close to critical, we find that a disoriented chiral condensate can form in the center of the tube. Eventually the collapse of the tube drives this state back to the true vacuum. This process converts the disoriented condensate, dominated by long-wavelength pion modes, into a coherent excitation of the pion field that includes significant components with transverse momenta of around 400 MeV. In contrast, for narrow tubes or larger initial temperatures, amplification occurs only via the pion-laser-like mechanism found previously for spherical systems. In addition, we find that explicit chiral symmetry breaking significantly suppresses the formation of disoriented condensates. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Modeling Plasma Formation in a Micro-gap at Microwave Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Arthur; Remillard, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    In the presence of a strong electric field, gas molecules become ionized, forming a plasma. The study of this dielectric breakdown at microwave frequency has important applications in improving the operation of radio frequency (RF) devices, where the high electric fields present in small gaps can easily ionize gases like air. A cone and tuner resonant structure was used to induce breakdown of diatomic Nitrogen in adjustable micro-gaps ranging from 13 to 1,156 μm. The electric field for plasma formation exhibited strong pressure dependence in the larger gap sizes, as predicted by previous theoretical and experimental work. Pressure is proportional to the frequency of collision between electrons and molecules, which increases with pressure when the gap is large, but levels off in the micro-gap region. A separate model of the breakdown electric field based on the characteristic diffusion length of the plasma also fit the data poorly for these smaller gap sizes. This may be explained by a hypothesis that dielectric breakdown at and below the 100 μm gap size occurs outside the gap, an argument that is supported by the observation of very high breakdown threshold electric fields in this region. Optical emissions revealed that vibrational and rotational molecular transitions of the first positive electronic system are suppressed in micro-gaps, indicating that transitions into the molecular ground state do not occur in micro-gap plasmas. Acknowledgements: National Science Foundation under NSF-REU Grant No. PHY/DMR-1004811, the Provost's Office of Hope College, and the Hope College Division of Natural and Applied Sciences.

  17. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  18. Shock formation in magnetised electron-positron plasmas: mechanism and timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Bret, A.; Sinha, U.

    2016-10-01

    The shock formation process in electron-positron pair plasmas is investigated in the presence of an ambient perpendicular magnetic field. In initially unmagnetised plasmas, which are dominated by the Weibel or filamentation instability, the shock formation time is a multiple of the saturation time of the linear instability. While in weakly magnetised plasmas the mechanism is still the same, higher magnetisations induce synchrotron maser modes such that the shock formation is dominated by magnetic reflection. As a consequence the formation times are reduced. The focus is on the detailed picture of the particle kinetics, in which the transition between Weibel and magneto-hydrodynamic shocks can be clearly identified.

  19. A new air-cooled argon/helium-compatible inductively coupled plasma torch.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Hidekazu; Iwai, Takahiro; Kaburaki, Yuki; Kozuma, Tomokazu; Shigeta, Kaori; Okino, Akitoshi

    2014-01-01

    A new inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch with an air-cooling system has been designed and developed for both argon and helium plasma. The same torch and impedance-matching network could be used to generate stable Ar- and He-ICP. The torch consists of three concentric quartz tubes. The carrier gas, plasma gas, and cooling gas flow through the intervals between each tube. In an experiment, it was found that Ar-ICP could form a stable plasma under the following conditions: RF power of 1 kW, plasma gas flow rate of 11 L min(-1), and cooling gas flow rate of 20 L min(-1). For He-ICP, an input RF power of 2 kW, which is two-times higher than that of a conventional He-ICP, could be constantly applied to the plasma with plasma gas and cooling gas flow rates of 15 and 20 L min(-1), respectively. Using this torch, it is possible to realize lower plasma gas consumption for Ar- and He-ICP and a high-power drive for He-ICP. It has been found that the air-cooling gas stabilizes the shape of the plasma due to the pressure difference between the cooling gas and the plasma gas.

  20. Characteristics of micro air plasma produced by double femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Wu, Zehua; Xu, Kuanhong; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2012-01-30

    Dynamic characteristics of air plasma generated by focused double collinear femtosecond laser pulses with a time interval of 10 ns are experimentally investigated. The air plasma emission changes significantly when altering the energy ratio between the two laser pulses. Time-resolved shadowgraphic measurements reveal that a small volume of transient vacuum is formed inside the air shock wave produced by the first laser pulse, which causes the second laser pulse induced ionization zone to present as two separate sections in space. Also recorded is strong scattering of the second laser pulse by the ionized air just behind the ionization front of the first laser pulse produced shock wave. Due to the high intensity of the scattered light, coherent Thomson scattering enhanced by plasma instabilities is believed to be the main scattering mechanism in this case.

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Transport and Structural Formation in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    1999-06-01

    The book under review is one of a series of monographs on plasma physics published by the Institute of Physics under the editorship of Peter Stott and Hans Wilhelmsson. It is nicely produced and is aimed at research workers and advanced students of both laboratory (i.e. tokamak plasmas) and astrophysical plasma physics. The authors are prolific contributors to the subject of plasma turbulence and transport with a well-defined message: ``The authors' view is that the plasma structure, fluctuations and turbulent transport are continually regulating each other and, in addition, that the structural formation and structural transition of plasmas are typical of the physics of far from equilibrium systems. The book presents and explains why the plasma inhomogeneity is the ordering parameter governing transport and how self-sustained fluctuations can be driven through subcritical excitation even beyond linear instability''. This point of view is expounded in 24 chapters, including topics such as transport phenomena in toroidal plasmas (Chapters 2-4), low frequency modes and instabilities of confined systems (Chapters 5-7), renormalization (Chapter 8), self-sustained turbulence due to the current diffusive mode and resistive effects (Chapters 9-11), subcritical turbulence and numerical simulations (Chapters 12-14), scale invariance arguments (Chapter 15), electric field effects (Chapters 17-21) and self-organized dynamics (Chapter 22). The material is essentially drawn from the authors' many and varied original contributions to the plasma turbulence and transport literature. Whatever view one might have about the merits of this work, there is little doubt in this reviewer's mind that it is indeed thought-provoking and presents a worthy intellectual challenge to plasma theorists and experimentalists alike. The authors take a consistent stance and discuss the issues from their own standpoint. They observe that the plasmas one encounters in practice (for definiteness, the

  2. A Novel Technique to Treat Air Leak Following Lobectomy: Intrapleural Infusion of Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinou, Froso; Potaris, Konstantinos; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.; Tsipas, Panteleimon; Karagkiouzis, Grigorios; Konstantinou, Marios

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent air leak following pulmonary lobectomy can be very difficult to treat and results in prolonged hospitalization. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a new method of postoperative air leak management using intrapleurally infused fresh frozen plasma via the chest tube. Material/Methods Between June 2008 and June 2014, we retrospectively reviewed 98 consecutive patients who underwent lobectomy for lung cancer and postoperatively developed persistent air leak treated with intrapleural instillation of fresh frozen plasma. Results The study identified 89 men and 9 women, with a median age of 65.5 years (range 48–77 years), with persistent postoperative air leak. Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma was successful in stopping air leaks in 90 patients (92%) within 24 hours, and in 96 patients (98%) within 48 hours, following resumption of the procedure. In the remaining 2, air leak ceased at 14 and 19 days. Conclusions Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma is a safe, inexpensive, and remarkably effective method for treatment of persistent air leak following lobectomy for lung cancer. PMID:27079644

  3. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying

    2013-09-30

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  4. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying; Bao, Wenting

    2013-09-01

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  5. Spectra modulation of terahertz radiation from air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Wenfeng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz spectra modulation can be potentially used in the remote sensing. The spectra modulation of terahertz radiation from two plasmas is demonstrated experimentally. With the comparison of the spectra of terahertz radiated from single and two plasmas, the output spectrum of terahertz wave has been proved to be of interference superposition of the two separate terahertz waves. With measurement and analysis of the polarization states of the output terahertz wave, it is fund that the two orthogonal components of THz electric fields have effects on the components involved in the interference of two terahertz waves. The output terahertz radiation from two plasmas is simulated, and the result shows that the distance between two plasmas contributes greatly to the spectrum modulation of terahertz radiation.

  6. Method and apparatus for the formation of a spheromak plasma

    DOEpatents

    Yamada, Masaaki; Furth, Harold P.; Stix, Thomas H.; Todd, Alan M. M.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for forming a detached, compact toroidally shaped spheromak plasma by an inductive mechanism. A generally spheroidal vacuum vessel (1) houses a toroidally shaped flux ring or core (2) which contains poloidal and toroidal field generating coils. A plasma discharge occurs with the pulsing of the toroidal field coil, and the plasma is caused to expand away from the core (2) and toward the center of the vacuum vessel (1). When the plasma is in an expanded state, a portion of it is pinched off in order to form a separate, detached spheromak plasma configuration. The detached plasma is supported by a magnetic field generated by externally arranged equilibrium field coils (5).

  7. Laser Initiation and Radiofrequency Sustainment of Seeded Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    pressure plasma that projects well away from the antenna by this means that could not be obtained by RF alone. The initial plasma ionization also...a much lower RF power levels and with more enhanced axial projection away from the antenna with laser initiation than without. Power densities of 1...SCIENTECH ( Astral AD30). In order to account for the laser attenuation by the UV window, the UV window is placed in front of the energy meter. A laser

  8. Column formation in suspension plasma-sprayed coatings and resultant thermal properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, K.; Krane, M. J. M.; Trice, R. W.; Wang, H.; Porter, W.; Besser, M.; Sordelet, D.; Ilavsky, J.; Almer, J.

    2011-06-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  9. Column Formation in Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Coatings and Resultant Thermal Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, Kent; Krane, Matthew; Trice, Rodney; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Besser, Matthew; Sordelet, Daniel; Ilavsky, Dr. Jan; Almer, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  10. Characterization of Wet Air Plasma Jet Powered by Sinusoidal High Voltage and Nanosecond Pulses for Plasma Agricultural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Shimada, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Not only for the plasma sterilization but also for many of plasma life-science applications, atmospheric pressure plasma devices that allowed us to control its state and reactive species production are deserved to resolve the roles of the chemical species. Influence of the hydroxyl radical and ozone on germination of conidia of a strawberry pathogen is presented. Water addition to air plasma jet significantly improves germination suppression performance, while measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) are reduced. Although the results show a negative correlation between ROS and the germination suppression, this infers the importance of chemical composition generated by plasma. For further control of the plasma product, a plasma jet powered by sinusoidal high voltage and nanosecond pulses is developed and characterized with the voltage-charge Lissajous. Control of breakdown phase and discharge power by pulse-imposed phase is presented. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) Grant Number 15K17480 and Exploratory Research Grant Number 23644199.

  11. Interaction of field-aligned cold plasma flows with an equatorially-trapped hot plasma - Electrostatic shock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1993-01-01

    Effects of equatorially trapped hot plasma on the highly supersonic cold-plasma flow occurring during early stage plasmaspheric refilling are studied by means of numerical simulations. It is shown that the equatorially trapped hot ions set up a potential barrier for the cold ion beams and facilitate formation of electrostatic shocks by reflecting them from the equatorial region. Simulations with and without the hot plasma show different flow properties; the formation of electrostatic shocks occur only in the former case. The simulation with the hot plasma also reveals that the magnetic trapping in conjunction with the evolution of the electrostatic potential barrier produces ion velocity distribution functions consisting of a cold core and a hot ring in the perpendicular velocity. Such a distribution function provides a source of free energy for equatorial waves. The corresponding electron population is warm and field-aligned.

  12. Formation of Jet Propulsion Near Dust Particle in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Vysykailo, F. I.; Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.

    2011-11-29

    Processes of asymmetric ionization and cumulation of electric field and electron and ion flows can develop near the surface of charged dust particles in plasma. In the region of cumulation asymmetry on heating, the particle surface and ion momentum transfer arises; as a result, the dust particle moves in the plasma with high velocity.

  13. The AMY experiment: Microwave emission from air shower plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Blanco, M.; Boháčová, M.; Buonomo, B.; Cataldi, G.; Coluccia, M. R.; Creti, P.; De Mitri, I.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Foggetta, L.; Gaïor, R.; Garcia-Fernandez, D.; Iarlori, M.; Le Coz, S.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Louedec, K.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Monasor, M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Salamida, F.; Salina, G.; Settimo, M.; Valente, P.; Vazquez, J. R.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2016-07-01

    You The Air Microwave Yield (AMY) experiment investigate the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted in the GHz frequency range from an electron beam induced air-shower. The measurements have been performed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati INFN National Laboratories with a 510 MeV electron beam in a wide frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. We present the apparatus and the results of the tests performed.

  14. Air surface microdischarge-photon synergy in antibacterial plasma-activated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David; Pavlovich, Mathew; Chang, Hung-Wen; Sakiyama, Yuki; Clark, Douglas

    2013-09-01

    We show that the antibacterial effects of air plasma on water can be amplified by synergy with ultraviolet (UV) photons. We use the surface microdischarge configuration (SMD) in atmospheric air adjacent to bacteria-laden water coupled with UVA (360 nm) photons from a light emitting diode (LED) to demonstrate this synergy. Air SMD, especially if operated in a confined space, can operate in different modes: low power mode (<0.1 W/cm2) generates primarily O3 whereas higher powers generate mainly nitrogen oxides; we focus here on the latter. The nitrogen oxide mode creates a powerful antibacterial mixture in water, including NO2-, NO3- and H2O2. Although these species alone can be strongly antibacterial, especially at low pH, we show that addition of UVA photons greatly amplifies the antibacterial effect. We first measured log reductions with only photons and then only plasma. Only when UVA exposes water after plasma does the synergy appear. Synergy appears to be due to UVA photolysis of plasma-generated NO2- to form NO and OH. We conclude that combining plasma-generated chemical species with activating photons can amplify and strengthen plasma effectiveness in many biological and other applications. Supported by Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Science Plasma Science Center.

  15. Electron ranaway and ion-ion plasma formation in afterglow low-pressure plasma of oxygen-containing gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Kosykh, Nikolay; Gutsev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigation of temporal evolution of charged plasma species in afterglow plasma of oxygen-containing mixtures have been investigated. The probe VAC and the time dependence of the saturation positive and negative particles currents to a probe in a fixed bias voltage were performed. The decay of afterglow low-pressure electronegative gas plasmas take place in two distinct stages (the electron-ion stage, and the ion-ion stage) as it was shown in [1] for pure oxygen. In the first stage, the negative ions are locked within a discharge volume and plasma is depleted of electrons and positive ions. The electron density decay is faster, than exponential, and practically all electrons leave plasma volume during finite time followed by the ion--ion (electron-free) plasma formation. The decay of the ion-ion plasma depends on the presence of detachment. With a large content of electronegative gas (oxygen) in a mixture, when there is a ``detachment particles,'' a small fraction of the electrons appearing as a result of the detachment continue to hold all negative ions in the discharge volume. In this case, the densities of all charged plasma components decay according to the same exponential law with a characteristic detachment time. At a low oxygen content in the gas mixture there is no detachment and plasma decays by an ion--ion ambipolar diffusion mechanism.[4pt][1]. S.A.Gutsev, A.A.Kudryavtsev, V.A.Romanenko. Tech.Phys. 40, 1131, (1995).

  16. Numerical study of Si nanoparticle formation by SiCl4 hydrogenation in RF plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehmet, Christophe; Cao, Tengfei; Cheng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) is a promising material for many applications related to electronics and optoelectronics. This work performs numerical simulations in order to understand a new process with high deposition rate production of nc-Si in a radio-frequency plasma reactor. Inductive plasma formation, reaction kinetics and nanoparticle formation have been considered in a sophisticated model. Results show that the plasma parameters could be adjusted in order to improve selectivity between nanoparticle and molecule formation and, thus, the deposition rate. Also, a parametric study helps to optimize the system with appropriate operating conditions.

  17. Laser scattered images observed from carbon plasma stagnation and following molecular formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K.; Shibata, R.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Sunahara, A.

    2014-06-16

    Two carbon targets were irradiated to create plasma plumes to collide at right angle with two UV laser pulses each other at 10 J/cm{sup 2}/pulse. The collision results in carbon plasma stagnation. Laser scattered imaging indicates that the carbon large molecular formation takes place much later in time after the laser irradiation and stagnation. Compared with the temporal history of electron density (n{sub e}), ion density (n{sub i}), and plasma self-emission dominated by carbon Swan band, it is estimated that the carbon large molecular formation has been initiated with the ion collision followed by the C{sub 2} formation.

  18. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  19. A simple atmospheric pressure room-temperature air plasma needle device for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Z.; Zhao, F.; Xian, Y.; Xiong, Q.; Gong, W.; Zou, C.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-11-01

    Rather than using noble gas, room air is used as the working gas for an atmospheric pressure room-temperature plasma. The plasma is driven by submicrosecond pulsed directed current voltages. Several current spikes appear periodically for each voltage pulse. The first current spike has a peak value of more than 1.5 A with a pulse width of about 10 ns. Emission spectra show that besides excited OH, O, N2(C-B), and N2+(B-X) emission, excited NO, N2(B-A), H, and even N emission are also observed in the plasma, which indicates that the plasma may be more reactive than that generated by other plasma jet devices. Utilizing the room-temperature plasma, preliminary inactivation experiments show that Enterococcus faecalis can be killed with a treatment time of only several seconds.

  20. The cold and atmospheric-pressure air surface barrier discharge plasma for large-area sterilization applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dacheng; Zhao Di; Feng Kecheng; Zhang Xianhui; Liu Dongping; Yang Size

    2011-04-18

    This letter reports a stable air surface barrier discharge device for large-area sterilization applications at room temperature. This design may result in visually uniform plasmas with the electrode area scaled up (or down) to the required size. A comparison for the survival rates of Escherichia coli from air, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} surface barrier discharge plasmas is presented, and the air surface plasma consisting of strong filamentary discharges can efficiently kill Escherichia coli. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH generated in the room temperature air plasmas play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  1. Elimination of diazinon insecticide from cucumber surface by atmospheric pressure air-dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Dorraki, Naghme; Mahdavi, Vahideh; Ghomi, Hamid; Ghasempour, Alireza

    2016-12-06

    The food industry is in a constant search for new technologies to improve the commercial sterilization process of agricultural commodities. Plasma treatment may offer a novel and efficient method for pesticide removal from agricultural product surfaces. To study the proposed technique of plasma food treatment, the degradation behavior of diazinon insecticide by air-dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was investigated. The authors studied the effect of different plasma powers and treatment times on pesticide concentration in liquid form and coated on the surface of cucumbers, where the diazinon residue was analyzed with mass spectroscopy gas chromatography. Our results suggest that atmospheric pressure air-DBD plasma is potentially effective for the degradation of diazinon insecticide, and mainly depends on related operating parameters, including plasma treatment time, discharge power, and pesticide concentrations. Based on the interaction between reactive oxygen species and electrons in the plasma with the diazinon molecule, two degradation pathway of diazinon during plasma treatment are proposed. It was also found that produced organophosphate pesticides are harmless and less hazardous compounds than diazinon.

  2. [THE FORMATION OF BIOFILM IN OPPORTUNISTIC MICROORGANISMS IN BLOOD PLASMA DEPENDING ON CONTENT OF IRON].

    PubMed

    Leonov, V V; Mironov, A Yu

    2016-01-01

    The article considers results of analysis offormation of biofilm of priority opportunistic pathogens in blood plasma and LB-broth. As compared with LB-broth, bloodplasma stimulates formation of biofilm of microorganisms in the following sequence: Staphylococcus aureus > Pseudomonas aeruginosa > Escherichia coli. The application oftechnique of infra-redspectroscopy of bio-films established that blood plasma promotes formation of external exopolysaccharides of S.aureus. The cultivation of bio-films in plasma depending on content of iron demonstrated that the analyzed strains of S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli form bio-films in a better way in plasma with normal content of iron and iron-deficient and iron-loaded plasma decreases their activity of formation of biofilm.

  3. Final Report on Development of Optimized Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Formation Techniques for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan

    2013-11-01

    The University of New Mexico (UNM) proposed a collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop and test methods for improved formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas relevant to magnetized target fusion (MTF) energy research. MTF is an innovative approach for a relatively fast and cheap path to the production of fusion energy that utilizes magnetic confinement to assist in the compression of a hot plasma to thermonuclear conditions by an external driver. LANL is currently pursing demonstration of the MTF concept via compression of an FRC plasma by a metal liner z-pinch in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM. A key physics issue for the FRC's ultimate success as an MTF target lies in the initial pre-ionization (PI) stage. The PI plasma sets the initial conditions from which the FRC is created. In particular, the PI formation process determines the amount of magnetic flux that can be trapped to form the FRC. A ringing theta pinch ionization (RTPI) technique, such as currently used by the FRX-L device at LANL, has the advantages of high ionization fraction, simplicity (since no additional coils are required), and does not require internal electrodes which can introduce impurities into the plasma. However RTPI has been shown to only trap 50% of the initial bias flux at best and imposes additional engineering constraints on the capacitor banks. The amount of trapped flux plays an important role in the FRC's final equilibrium, transport, and stability properties, and provides increased ohmic heating of the FRC through induced currents as the magnetic field decays. Increasing the trapped flux also provides the route to greatest potential gains in FRC lifetime, which is essential to provide enough time to translate and compress the FRC effectively. In conjunction with LANL we initially planned to develop and test a microwave break- down system to improve the initial PI plasma formation. The UNM team would

  4. Production and Characterization of High Repetition Rate Terahertz Radiation in Femtosecond-Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    and plasma signal. The air plasma intensity was measured using a 40 kHz ultrasonic transducer, while the terahertz radiation was measured by a... calibrate the time axis of the streak camera ................................................... 28 8. Processed data used to calibrate the time axis of...field can be measured 5 directly, but is difficult to manipulate and requires bulky waveguides. However, in optics, radiation is viewed as light

  5. High-speed sterilization technique using dielectric barrier discharge plasmas in atmospheric humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamae, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma produced by an ac voltage application of 1 kHz in atmospheric humid air was investigated in order to develop low-temperature, low-cost and high-speed plasma sterilization technique. The biological indicators covered with a Tyvek sheet were set just outside the DBD plasma region, where the air temperature and humidity as a discharge gas were precisely controlled by an environmental test chamber. The results show that the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores was found to be dependent strongly on the humidity, and was completed within 15 min at a relative humidity of 90 % and a temperature of 30 C. The treatment time for sterilization is shorter than those of conventional sterilization methods using ethylene oxide gas and dry heat treatment. It is considered that reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals that are effective for the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores could be produced by the DBD plasma in the humid air. Repetitive micro-pulsed discharge plasmas in the humid air will be applied for the sterilization experiment to enhance the sterilization efficiency.

  6. Temporal evolution of femtosecond laser induced plasma filament in air and N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Papeer, J.; Botton, M.; Zigler, A.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.

    2013-12-09

    We present single shot, high resolution, time-resolved measurements of the relaxation of laser induced plasma filaments in air and in N{sub 2} gas. Based on the measurements of the time dependent electromagnetic signal in a waveguide, an accurate and simple derivation of the electron density in the filament is demonstrated. This experimental method does not require prior knowledge of filament dimensions or control over its exact spatial location. The experimental results are compared to numerical simulations of air plasma chemistry. Results reveal the role of various decay mechanisms including the importance of O{sub 4}{sup +} molecular levels.

  7. Resonant- and avalanche-ionization amplification of laser-induced plasma in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili; Jiang, Naibo; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2014-10-14

    Amplification of laser-induced plasma in air is demonstrated utilizing resonant laser ionization and avalanche ionization. Molecular oxygen in air is ionized by a low-energy laser pulse employing (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) to generate seed electrons. Subsequent avalanche ionization of molecular oxygen and nitrogen significantly amplifies the laser-induced plasma. In this plasma-amplification effect, three-body attachments to molecular oxygen dominate the electron-generation and -loss processes, while either nitrogen or argon acts as the third body with low electron affinity. Contour maps of the electron density within the plasma obtained in O₂/N₂ and O₂/Ar gas mixtures are provided to show relative degrees of plasma amplification with respect to gas pressure and to verify that the seed electrons generated by O₂ 2 + 1 REMPI are selectively amplified by avalanche ionization of molecular nitrogen in a relatively low-pressure condition (≤100 Torr). Such plasma amplification occurring in air could be useful in aerospace applications at high altitude.

  8. Sterilization of soybean powder with plasma treatment in atmospheric humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwami, R.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Nakayama, A.; Nakagawa, K.

    2013-10-01

    Sterilization of foods has been performed by conventional methods such as heat, steam and chemical solutions. However, these sterilization techniques could cause damages to the food material. It is considered that plasma sterilization at atmospheric pressure is one of the promising alternative methods because of the low temperature process. In our previous study, the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeusspores by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma produced in atmospheric humid air was investigated in order to develop low-temperature, low-cost and high-speed plasma sterilization technique. The results showed that the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeusspores was found to be dependent strongly on the humidity. In the present study, the plasma treatment technique in humid air is applied to sterilization of soybean powder. Effects of plasma sterilization were successfully confirmed by a colony counting method. It was found that the sterilization efficiency was increased by using the humid air as the discharge gas. In the conference, an improvement of the plasma treatment system to enhance the sterilization efficiency will be shown.

  9. Roughness formation on photoresist during etching examined by HBr plasma-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Makoto; Zhang, Yan; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Plasma Nanotechnology Team

    2014-10-01

    For highly precise patterning in device fabrication, it is required to suppress roughness formations on photoresist (PR) polymers during plasma etching. HBr plasma treatment called ``plasma cure'' was proposed to reduce the roughness. By using a beam irradiation, we reported the PR roughness formation in fluorocarbon plasma, and the effect of HBr cure. We report the roughness formation mechanism by surface analyses and power spectral density (PSD) of the roughness. Average slope and roll-off frequency of PSD are characterized by frequency components, the high-frequency roughness. We treated the data for six samples: a) pristine, b) after Ar plasma irradiation, c) after Ar plasma followed by HBr cure, d) after HBr cure, e) after HBr followed by Ar plasma beam, and f) after HBr followed by H2 and Ar plasma beam irradiations. The PSD slopes were changed by each process. Based on the results, we speculated that the Ar-plasma beam formed a crust layer on the PR surface with unrelieved stress and HBr cure may soften the bulk PR to relieve the stress and cause agglomeration of polymers at the size over 10 nm.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Metallic Surface Plasma Formation by Megagauss Magnetic Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    formation agree well with the observations across the full range of wire diameters. This leads to the conclusion that plasma formation is an MHD effect...and does not involve the non- MHD processes often evoked in other contexts. The computations show that plasma is formed in low- density material that...flux compression generators , and the fuel- pusher interface in Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). Simple diffusion theory such as given by Knoepfel

  11. Double Layers: Potential Formation and Related Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas: Proceedings of the 5th Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, S.

    1998-02-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * PREFACE * INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE * LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE AT TOHOKU UNIVERSITY * CHAPTER 1: DOUBLE LAYERS, SHEATHS, AND POTENTIAL STRUCTURES * 1.1 Double Layers * On Fluid Models of Stationary, Acoustic Double Layers (Invited) * Particle Simulation of Double Layer (Invited) * Space-Time Dependence of Non-Steady Double Layers * The Role of Low Energy Electrons for the Generation of Anode Double Layers in Glow Discharges * Arbitrary Amplitude Ion-Acoustic Double Layers in a Dusty Plasma * 1.2 Sheaths * Bounded Plasma Edge Physics as Observed from Simulations in 1D and 2D (Invited) * Control of RF Sheath Structure in RF Diode Discharge * Observation of Density Gradients with Fine Structures and Low Frequency Wave Excitation at the Plasma-Sheath Boundary * Double Sheath Associated with an Electron Emission to a Plasma Containing Negative Ions * Sheath Edge and Floating Potential for Multi-Species Plasmas Including Dust Particles * 1.3 Potential Structures and Oscillations * Potential Structure Formed at a Constriction of a DC He Positive Column and its Coupling with Ionization Wave * Potential Structure in a New RF Magnetron Device with a Hollow Electrode * Potential Disruption in a RF Afterglow Electronegative Plasma * Potential Oscillation in a Strongly Asymmetry RF Discharge Containing Negative Ions * Effects of External Potential Control on Coulomb Dust Behavior * Potential Structure of Carbon Arc Discharge for High-Yield Fullerenes Formation * Control of Axial and Radial Potential Profiles in Tandem Mirrors (Invited) * CHAPTER 2: FIELD-ALIGNED ELECTRIC FIELDS AND RELATED PARTICLE ACCELERATIONS * 2.1 Field-Aligned Potential Formation * Formation of Large Potential Difference in a Plasma Flow along Converging Magnetic Field Lines (Invited) * Presheath Formation in front of an Oblique End-Plate in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma * Plasma Potential Formation Due to ECRH in a Magnetic Well * Electrostatic

  12. Air-liquid biofilm formation is dependent on ammonium depletion in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor strain.

    PubMed

    Zara, Giacomo; Budroni, Marilena; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Zara, Severino

    2011-12-01

    Air-liquid biofilm formation appears to be an adaptive mechanism that promotes foraging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor strains in response to nutrient starvation. The FLO11 gene plays a central role in this phenotype as its expression allows yeast cells to rise to the liquid surface. Here, we investigated the role of ammonium depletion in air-liquid biofilm formation and FLO11 expression in a S. cerevisiae flor strain. The data obtained show that increasing ammonium concentrations from 0 to 450 m m reduce air-liquid biofilm in terms of biomass and velum formation and correlate with a reduction of FLO11 expression. Rapamycin inhibition of the TOR pathway and deletion of RAS2 gene significantly reduced biofilm formation and FLO11 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that ammonium depletion is a key factor in the induction of air-liquid biofilm formation and FLO11 expression in S. cerevisiae flor strains.

  13. Optical emission spectroscopy characterizations of micro-air plasma used for simulation of cell membrane poration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerrouki, A.; Motomura, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Jinno, M.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-07-01

    K. Then, \\text{N}2+ (FNS) for (0,0) and (1,1) head bands spectra at 391.4 nm and 388.4 nm allowed estimation of the vibrational temperature T vib from around 3000 K near the tip electrode up to about 6500 K near the plate. Last, the spatial variation along the z axis of the nitrogen ion density has been determined, with an error bar of about 50%, from the relative intensities of the same close wavelength spectra (N2(SPS) at 394.3 nm and \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm) when assuming a prior calibration of 1015 cm-3 at z  =  0 mm taken from literature streamer dynamics simulations. The present experimental plasma characteristics are used to better understand the mechanisms and the processes involved during plasma gene transfections in a Monte Carlo poration model previously developed to simulate the membrane permeabilization and pore formation when the cells are impacted by the present micro-air plasma fluxes.

  14. Enhanced filament ablation of metals based on plasma grating in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Di; Liu, Fengjiang; Ding, Liangen; Yuan, Shuai; Zeng, Heping

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate efficient ablation of metals with filamentary plasma grating generated by two intense blue femtosecond filaments and a third focused infrared pulse. This scheme leads to significant promotion of ablation efficiency on metal targets in air in comparison with single infrared or blue filament with equal pulse energy. The reason is that the blue plasma grating firstly provides stronger intensity and a higher density of background electrons, then the delayed infrared pulse accelerates local electrons inside the plasma grating. These two processes finally results in robustly increased electron density and highly ionized metallic atoms.

  15. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  16. Effect of radial plasma transport at the magnetic throat on axial ion beam formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-08-01

    Correlation between radial plasma transport and formation of an axial ion beam has been investigated in a helicon plasma reactor implemented with a convergent-divergent magnetic nozzle. The plasma discharge is sustained under a high magnetic field mode and a low magnetic field mode for which the electron energy probability function, the plasma density, the plasma potential, and the electron temperature are measured at the magnetic throat, and the two field modes show different radial parametric behaviors. Although an axial potential drop occurs in the plasma source for both field modes, an ion beam is only observed in the high field mode while not in the low field mode. The transport of energetic ions is characterized downstream of the plasma source using the delimited ion current and nonlocal ion current. A decay of ion beam strength is also observed in the diffusion chamber.

  17. Energetic particle production, cavition formation, and nonlinear development at a plasma density maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.Y.; Bauer, B.S. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-09-04

    We have investigated several phenomena of importance to laser-plasma interactions. In our studies, these are modeled by microwave and rf-plasma interactions. Our focus has been on resonant absorption of intense electromagnetic radiation at the plasma critical layer. Electron plasma wave (EPW) growth and caviton formation have been shown to be most efficient for shallow density gradients at the critical layer, where EPW convection losses are minimized. EPW electric field energies of 5000 times the plasma thermal energy, and energetic electron tails out to 5000T{sub e}, have been observed at the top of an inverse parabolic density profile. Ions receive delta-function-like impulses from localized electron plasma waves and wave-breaking electron ejection; the disruption of the ion fluid can only partially be described by the ponderomotive force. Our attempt is to test and illuminate some of the fundamental concepts of strong turbulence and EM wave-plasma interaction. 7 refs.

  18. Nanopattern formation using localized plasma for growth of single-standing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Mohammad; Abdi, Yaser

    2017-01-01

    We report a novel method for formation of self-organized single-standing carbon nanotubes by customizing a plasma-based process. The growth of carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition provides suitable grounds to utilize plasma-solid interactions for nanopatterning. The bulk plasma is utilized to fabricate carbon nanotubes on the prepatterned Ni catalyst which in turn can confine the plasma to the growth region. The plasma localization leads to a dielectrophoretic force exerted on Ni atoms and can be engineered in order to grow a specific pattern of self-organized single-standing carbon nanotubes. Numerical simulations based on the plasma localization and dielectrophoretic force confirmed the experimental results. This method provides a simple and cost-effective approach to obtain nanopatterned arrays of carbon nanotubes which can be used for fabrication of photonic and phononic crystals, self-gated field emission-based transistors and displays.

  19. Active plasma source formation in the MAP diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, K.P.; Stinnett, R.W.; Renk, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    The Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST) program is exploring using ion beams to treat the surface of a wide variety of materials. These experiments have shown that improved corrosion resistance, surface hardening, grain size modification, polishing and surface cleaning can all be achieved using a pulsed 0.4-0.8 MeV ion beam delivering 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The Magnetically-confined Anode Plasma (MAP) diode, developed at Cornell University, produces an active plasma which can be used to treat the surfaces of materials. The diode consists of a fast puff valve as the source of gas to produce the desired ions and two capacitively driven B-fields. A slow magnetic field is used for electron insulation and a fast field is used to both ionize the puffed gas and to position the plasma in the proper spatial location in the anode prior to the accelerator pulse. The relative timing between subsystems is an important factor in the effective production of the active plasma source for the MAP diode system. The MAP diode has been characterized using a Langmuir probe to measure plasma arrival times at the anode annulus for hydrogen gas. This data was then used to determine the optimum operating point for the MAP diode on RHEPP-1 accelerator shots. Operation of the MAP diode system to produce an ion beam of 500 kV, 12 kA with 40% efficiency (measured at the diode) has been demonstrated.

  20. Method and apparatus for the formation of a spheromak plasma

    DOEpatents

    Jardin, Stephen C.; Yamada, Masaaki; Furth, Harold P.; Okabayashi, Mitcheo

    1984-01-01

    An inductive method and apparatus for forming detached spheromak plasma using a thin-walled metal toroidal ring, with external current leads and internal poloidal and toroidal field coils located inside a vacuum chamber filled with low density hydrogen gas and an external axial field generating coil. The presence of a current in the poloidal field coils, and an externally generated axial field sets up the initial poloidal field configuration in which the field is strongest toward the major axis of the toroid. The internal toroidal-field-generating coil is then pulsed on, ionizing the gas and inducing poloidal current and toroidal magnetic field into the plasma region in the sleeve exterior to and adjacent to the ring and causing the plasma to expand away from the ring and toward the major axis. Next the current in the poloidal field coils in the ring is reversed. This induces toroidal current into the plasma and causes the poloidal magnetic field lines to reconnect. The reconnection continues until substantially all of the plasma is formed in a separated spheromak configuration held in equilibrium by the initial external field.

  1. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation is elicited in response to cold physical plasma.

    PubMed

    Bekeschus, Sander; Winterbourn, Christine C; Kolata, Julia; Masur, Kai; Hasse, Sybille; Bröker, Barbara M; Parker, Heather A

    2016-10-01

    Cold physical plasma is an ionized gas with a multitude of components, including hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent studies suggest that exposure of wounds to cold plasma may accelerate healing. Upon wounding, neutrophils are the first line of defense against invading microorganisms but have also been identified to play a role in delayed healing. In this study, we examined how plasma treatment affects the functions of peripheral blood neutrophils. Plasma treatment induced oxidative stress, as assessed by the oxidation of intracellular fluorescent redox probes; reduced metabolic activity; but did not induce early apoptosis. Neutrophil oxidative burst was only modestly affected after plasma treatment, and the killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus was not significantly affected. Intriguingly, we found that plasma induced profound extracellular trap formation. This was inhibited by the presence of catalase during plasma treatment but was not replicated by adding an equivalent concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Plasma-induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation was not dependent on the activity of myeloperoxidase or NADPH oxidase 2 but seemed to involve short-lived molecules. The amount of DNA release and the time course after plasma treatment were similar to that with the common neutrophil extracellular trap inducer PMA. After neutrophil extracellular traps had formed, concentrations of IL-8 were also significantly increased in supernatants of plasma-treated neutrophils. Both neutrophil extracellular traps and IL-8 release may aid antimicrobial activity and spur inflammation at the wound site. Whether this aids or exacerbates wound healing needs to be tested.

  2. Observations and Simulations of Formation of Broad Plasma Depletions Through Merging Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chao-Song; Retterer, J. M.; Beaujardiere, O. De La; Roddy, P. A.; Hunton, D.E.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Broad plasma depletions in the equatorial ionosphere near dawn are region in which the plasma density is reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude over thousands of kilometers in longitude. This phenomenon is observed repeatedly by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during deep solar minimum. The plasma flow inside the depletion region can be strongly upward. The possible causal mechanism for the formation of broad plasma depletions is that the broad depletions result from merging of multiple equatorial plasma bubbles. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of the merging mechanism with new observations and simulations. We present C/NOFS observations for two cases. A series of plasma bubbles is first detected by C/NOFS over a longitudinal range of 3300-3800 km around midnight. Each of the individual bubbles has a typical width of approx 100 km in longitude, and the upward ion drift velocity inside the bubbles is 200-400 m/s. The plasma bubbles rotate with the Earth to the dawn sector and become broad plasma depletions. The observations clearly show the evolution from multiple plasma bubbles to broad depletions. Large upward plasma flow occurs inside the depletion region over 3800 km in longitude and exists for approx 5 h. We also present the numerical simulations of bubble merging with the physics-based low-latitude ionospheric model. It is found that two separate plasma bubbles join together and form a single, wider bubble. The simulations show that the merging process of plasma bubbles can indeed occur in incompressible ionospheric plasma. The simulation results support the merging mechanism for the formation of broad plasma depletions.

  3. Laser ablation plasma-assisted stabilization of premixed methane/air flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Yang; Peng, Jiangbo; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Sun, Rui; Chen, Deying

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation plasma has been applied to assist stabilization of premixed methane/air flames with a flow speed up to 15.3 m/s. The ablation plasma was generated using the 50 Hz, 1064 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser onto a tantalum slab. With the ablation plasma, the stabilization equivalence ratio has been extended to the fuel-leaner end and the blow off limits have been enhanced by from 3.6- to 14.8-folds for flames which can stabilize without the plasma. The laser pulse energy required for flameholding was reduced to 10 mJ, a 64 % reduction compared with that of gas breakdown plasma, which will ease the demand for high-power lasers for high-frequency plasma generation. The temporal evolutions of the flame kernels following the ablation plasma were investigated using the OH* chemiluminescence imaging approach, and the flame propagation speed ( v f) was measured from the flame kernel evolutions. With the ablation plasma, the v f with flow speed of 4.7-9.0 m/s and equivalence ratio of 1.4 has been enhanced from 0.175 m/s of laminar premixed methane/air flame to 2.79-4.52 and 1.59-5.46 m/s, respectively, in the early and late time following the ablation plasma. The increase in the combustion radical concentrations by the ablation plasma was thought to be responsible for the v f enhancement and the resulted flame stabilization.

  4. Progress In Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Cassibry, Jason T.; Griffin, Steven; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a coaxial pulsed plasma thruster (Figure 1). It has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approx.50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet has been photographed with 10-ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure (Figure 2). Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes and magnetic probes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma and current transit respectively at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  5. Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners: A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a pulsed plasma thruster and has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approximately 50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet structure has been photographed with 10 ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure. Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma transit at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  6. Formation of nanostructures in a plasma focus discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Krauz, V. I.; Khimchenko, L. N.; Myalton, V. V.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Gureev, V. M.; Koidan, V. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Fortov, V. E.

    2013-04-15

    A new method for creating nanostructures in a plasma focus discharge is proposed. It is shown that the material of a micron-size dust target produced at the discharge axis efficiently evaporates and is then involved in the pinching process. After the pinch decays, the plasma expands with the thermal velocity and the evaporated dust material is deposited on the collectors in the form of fractal particles or nanoclusters organized into various structures. Such structures have a well-developed surface, which is important for various technological applications.

  7. Fullerene and nanotube formation in cool terrestrial ``dusty plasmas''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, A. P.; Silva, S. R. P.

    1998-11-01

    The simultaneous generation of dust during the deposition of semiconducting thin films by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has so far been regarded as a troublesome by-product. However, we present results from recent microstructural investigations of carbonaceous dust particles from a methane precursor that demonstrate that the technique may be suited to generating fullerene molecules, nanotubes, and nanoparticles. Chemical analysis reveals that these particles contain few contaminant species, and we deduce that they nucleated in the plasma, with the carbon ions possibly self-arranging through the action of coulombic forces.

  8. Silver nano particle formation on Ar plasma - treated cinnamyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Dahle, S.; Marschewski, M.; Wegewitz, L.; Maus-Friedrichs, W.; Vioel, W.

    2012-02-01

    Metastable induced electron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy are employed to study the adsorption of silver on cinnamyl alcohol films prepared on Au(111) substrates by thermal evaporation. Additionally, the impact of an Ar atmosphere dielectric barrier discharge plasma applied to the cinnamyl alcohol film preliminary to the Ag adsorption is investigated. In both cases silver nano particles with an average diameter of 9 nm are formed. These particles do not interact chemically with the underlying cinnamyl alcohol film. We do not find any influence of the preliminary Ar plasma-treatment on the adsorption behavior at all.

  9. Elemental evolution of the SiOxFy self-masking layer of plasma textured silicon and its modification during air exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudig, Maria; Hirsch, Jens; Naumann, Volker; Werner, Martina; Großer, Stephan; Hagendorf, Christian; Bernhard, Norbert; Lausch, Dominik

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the SiOxFy selfmasking process on the formation of black-Silicon (b-Si) textures by maskless SF6/O2 plasma etching is of great interest with regard to the optimization of the texturing process for highly antireflective silicon. For that reason, the elemental composition of plasma textured silicon surfaces is analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical composition of a fluorine containing oxide layer on top of the surface was confirmed and determined quantitatively. A strongly reduced F content was found after ambient air exposure. A qualitative model of the chemical and physical processes caused by maskless plasma texturing was developed to explain the observed experimental results. The decrease in the F content is assumed to be caused by hydrolysis of F by air moisture, resulting in a successive desorption of HF and transformation of SiOxFy to silicon oxide.

  10. Formation of field-reversed-configuration plasma with punctuated-betatron-orbit electrons.

    PubMed

    Welch, D R; Cohen, S A; Genoni, T C; Glasser, A H

    2010-07-02

    We describe ab initio, self-consistent, 3D, fully electromagnetic numerical simulations of current drive and field-reversed-configuration plasma formation by odd-parity rotating magnetic fields (RMF{o}). Magnetic-separatrix formation and field reversal are attained from an initial mirror configuration. A population of punctuated-betatron-orbit electrons, generated by the RMF{o}, carries the majority of the field-normal azimuthal electrical current responsible for field reversal. Appreciable current and plasma pressure exist outside the magnetic separatrix whose shape is modulated by the RMF{o} phase. The predicted plasma density and electron energy distribution compare favorably with RMF{o} experiments.

  11. Formation of Field-reversed-Configuration Plasma with Punctuated-betatron-orbit Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D. R.; Cohen, S. A.; Genoni, T. C.; Glasser, A. H.

    2010-06-28

    We describe ab initio, self-consistent, 3D, fully electromagnetic numerical simulations of current drive and field-reversed-configuration plasma formation by odd-parity rotating magnetic fields (RMFo). Magnetic-separatrix formation and field reversal are attained from an initial mirror configuration. A population of punctuated-betatron-orbit electrons, generated by the RMFo, carries the majority of the field-normal azimuthal electrical current responsible for field reversal. Appreciable current and plasma pressure exist outside the magnetic separatrix whose shape is modulated by the RMFo phase. The predicted plasma density and electron energy distribution compare favorably with RMFo experiments. __________________________________________________

  12. Formation of high-{beta} plasma and stable confinement of toroidal electron plasma in Ring Trap 1

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Furukawa, M.; Yano, Y.; Kawai, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Vogel, G.; Mikami, H.

    2011-05-15

    Formation of high-{beta} electron cyclotron resonance heating plasma and stable confinement of pure electron plasma have been realized in the Ring Trap 1 device, a magnetospheric configuration generated by a levitated dipole field magnet. The effects of coil levitation resulted in drastic improvements of the confinement properties, and the maximum local {beta} value has exceeded 70%. Hot electrons are major component of electron populations, and its particle confinement time is 0.5 s. Plasma has a peaked density profile in strong field region [H. Saitoh et al., 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference EXC/9-4Rb (2010)]. In pure electron plasma experiment, inward particle diffusion is realized, and electrons are stably trapped for more than 300 s. When the plasma is in turbulent state during beam injection, plasma flow has a shear, which activates the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability. The canonical angular momentum of the particle is not conserved in this phase, realizing the radial diffusion of charged particles across closed magnetic surfaces. [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys Rev. Lett. 104, 235004 (2010); H. Saitoh et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 112111 (2010).].

  13. Surface functionalization of macroporous polymeric materials by treatment with air low temperature plasma.

    PubMed

    Molina, R; Sole, I; Vílchez, A; Bertran, E; Solans, C; Esquena, J

    2013-04-01

    Polystyrene/divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) macroporous monoliths obtained using highly concentrated emulsions as templates show a superhydrophobic behaviour, restricting their potential technological applications, especially those related to adhesion and wetting. Air plasma treatments were carried out in order to modulate wetting properties, modifying the surface chemical composition of macroporous polystyrene/divinylbenzene materials. The superhydrophobic behaviour was rapidly suppressed by air plasma treatment, greatly reducing the water contact angle, from approximately 150 degrees to approximately 90 degrees, in only 10 seconds of treatment. The new surface chemical groups, promoted by plasma active species, were characterized by surface analysis techniques with different depth penetration specificity (contact angle, XPS, FTIR and SEM). Results demonstrated that very short treatment times produced different chemical functionalities, mainly C-O, C=O, O-C=O and C-N, which provide the materials with predominantly acidic surface properties. However, plasma active species did not penetrate deeply through the interconnected pores of the material. FTIR analysis evidenced that the new hydrophilic surface groups promoted by plasma active species are in a negligibly concentration compared to bulk chemical groups, and are located in a very thin surface region on the PS-DVB monolith surface (significantly below 2 microm). XPS analysis of treated monoliths revealed a progressive increase of oxygen and nitrogen content as a function of plasma treatment time. However, oxidation of the PS-DVB monoliths surface prevails over the incorporation of nitrogen atoms. Finally, SEM studies indicated that the morphology of the plasma treated PS-DVB does not significantly change even for the longest air plasma treatment time studied (120 s).

  14. Computational model of collisional-radiative nonequilibrium plasma in an air-driven type laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2010-05-06

    A thrust power of a gas-driven laser-propulsion system is obtained through interaction with a propellant gas heated by a laser energy. Therefore, understanding the nonequilibrium nature of laser-produced plasma is essential for increasing available thrust force and for improving energy conversion efficiency from a laser to a propellant gas. In this work, a time-dependent collisional-radiative model for air plasma has been developed to study the effects of nonequilibrium atomic and molecular processes on population densities for an air-driven type laser propulsion. Many elementary processes are considered in the number density range of 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3}<=N<=10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} and the temperature range of 300 K<=T<=40,000 K. We then compute the unsteady nature of pulsively heated air plasma. When the ionization relaxation time is the same order as the time scale of a heating pulse, the effects of unsteady ionization are important for estimating air plasma states. From parametric computations, we determine the appropriate conditions for the collisional-radiative steady state, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and corona equilibrium models in that density and temperature range.

  15. Thermophysics Characterization of Multiply Ionized Air Plasma Absorption of Laser Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Rhodes, Robert; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The impact of multiple ionization of air plasma on the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation is investigated for air breathing laser propulsion. Thermochemical properties of multiply ionized air plasma species are computed for temperatures up to 200,000 deg K, using hydrogenic approximation of the electronic partition function; And those for neutral air molecules are also updated for temperatures up to 50,000 deg K, using available literature data. Three formulas for absorption are calculated and a general formula is recommended for multiple ionization absorption calculation. The plasma composition required for absorption calculation is obtained by increasing the degree of ionization sequentially, up to quadruple ionization, with a series of thermal equilibrium computations. The calculated second ionization absorption coefficient agrees reasonably well with that of available data. The importance of multiple ionization modeling is demonstrated with the finding that area under the quadruple ionization curve of absorption is found to be twice that of single ionization. The effort of this work is beneficial to the computational plasma aerodynamics modeling of laser lightcraft performance.

  16. Modified by air plasma polymer tack membranes as drainage material for antiglaucomatous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazantseva, T. V.; Kravets, L. I.; Elinson, V. M.

    2014-06-01

    The morphological and clinical studies of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes modified by air plasma as drainage materials for antiglaucomatous operations were performed. It was demonstrated their compatibility with eye tissues. Moreover, it was shown that a new drainage has a good lasting hypotensive effect and can be used as operation for refractory glaucoma surgery.

  17. Creating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns by direct exposure to radio-frequency air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Stephant, Nicolas; Hamon, Jonathan; Thiry, Damien; Chauvin, Adrien; Chettab, Meriem; Gautron, Eric; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Granier, Agnès; Tessier, Pierre-Yves

    2015-12-01

    Nanoporous materials are of great importance for a broad range of applications including catalysis, optical sensors and water filtration. Although several approaches already exist for the creation of nanoporous materials, the race for the development of versatile methods, more suitable for the nanoelectronics industry, is still ongoing. In this communication we report for the first time on the possibility of generating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns using a dry approach based on the oxidation of silver by direct exposure to a commercially available radio-frequency air plasma. The silver nanocolumns are created by glancing angle deposition using magnetron sputtering of a silver target in pure argon plasma. We show that upon exposure to the rf air plasma, the nanocolumns transform from solid silver into nanoporous silver oxide. We further show that by tuning the plasma pressure and the exposure duration, the oxidation process can be finely adjusted allowing for precisely controlling the morphology and the nanoporosity of the silver oxide nanocolumns. The generation of porosity within the silver nanocolumns is explained according to a cracking-induced oxidation mechanism based on two repeated events occurring alternately during the oxidation process: (i) oxidation of silver upon exposure to the air plasma and (ii) generation of nanocracks and blisters within the oxide layer due to the high internal stress generated within the material during oxidation.

  18. Creating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns by direct exposure to radio-frequency air plasma.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Stephant, Nicolas; Hamon, Jonathan; Thiry, Damien; Chauvin, Adrien; Chettab, Meriem; Gautron, Eric; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Granier, Agnès; Tessier, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-07

    Nanoporous materials are of great importance for a broad range of applications including catalysis, optical sensors and water filtration. Although several approaches already exist for the creation of nanoporous materials, the race for the development of versatile methods, more suitable for the nanoelectronics industry, is still ongoing. In this communication we report for the first time on the possibility of generating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns using a dry approach based on the oxidation of silver by direct exposure to a commercially available radio-frequency air plasma. The silver nanocolumns are created by glancing angle deposition using magnetron sputtering of a silver target in pure argon plasma. We show that upon exposure to the rf air plasma, the nanocolumns transform from solid silver into nanoporous silver oxide. We further show that by tuning the plasma pressure and the exposure duration, the oxidation process can be finely adjusted allowing for precisely controlling the morphology and the nanoporosity of the silver oxide nanocolumns. The generation of porosity within the silver nanocolumns is explained according to a cracking-induced oxidation mechanism based on two repeated events occurring alternately during the oxidation process: (i) oxidation of silver upon exposure to the air plasma and (ii) generation of nanocracks and blisters within the oxide layer due to the high internal stress generated within the material during oxidation.

  19. Nonlinear plasma processes and the formation of electron kappa distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The goal of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics is to establish fundamental relationship between the time irreversible macroscopic dynamics and the underlying time reversible behavior of microscopic system. The paradigm of achieving this seemingly paradoxical goal is through the concept of probability. For classical systems Boltzmann accomplished this through his H theorem and his kinetic equation for dilute gas. Boltzmann's H function is the same as classical extensive entropy aside from the minus sign, and his kinetic equation is applicable for short-range molecular interaction. For plasmas, the long-range electromagnetic force dictates the inter-particular interaction, and the underlying entropy is expected to exhibit non-extensive, or non-additive behavior. Among potential models for the non-additive entropy, the celebrated Tsallis entropy is the most well known. One of the most useful fundamental kinetic equations that governs the long-range plasma interaction is that of weak turbulence kinetic theory. At present, however, there is no clear-cut connection between the Tsallis entropy and the kinetic equations that govern plasma behavior. This can be contrasted to Boltzmann's H theorem, which is built upon his kinetic equation. The best one can do is to show that the consequences of Tsallis entropy and plasma kinetic equation are the same, that is, they both imply kappa distribution. This presentation will overview the physics of electron acceleration by beam-generated Langmuir turbulence, and discuss the asymptotic solution that rigorously can be shown to correspond to the kappa distribution. Such a finding is a strong evidence, if not water-tight proof, that there must be profound inter-relatioship between the Tsallis thermostatistical theory and the plasma kinetic theory.

  20. Formation of a collisionless shock wave in a multi-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, N.; Fraenz, M.

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the theory of the formation of a quasi-transverse collisionless shock wave in a multi-component plasma. We show that in a plasma with a significant admixture of cold heavy ions, a specific MHD mode can be excited. This mode plays the same role for the collisionless shock formation as a quasi-transverse fast magnetosonic wave in a plasma with one sort of ions. As a result of this mode excitation, the solar wind velocity threshold for the formation of a collisionless shock becomes significantly less than in the case of a plasma with only light ions. We derive a nonlinear differential equation which describes a shock wave when perturbations become strong enough. Based on our theoretical results, we argue that upstream of the magnetic pile-up region of Mars or Venus, an additional shock wave may be formed.

  1. Influence of surface finish on the plasma formation at the skin explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsko, I. M.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper reports on experiments to investigate how the quality of surface finish, i.e., surface roughness, influences the plasma formation in a skin explosion of conductors. The experiments were performed on a MIG terawatt generator with a current amplitude of up to 2.5 MA and current rise time of 100 ns. The plasma formation at the conductor surface and the evolution of the plasma boundary was recorded using a four-frame optical camera with an exposure time of 3 ns per frame. It is shown that the quality of surface finish little affects the onset of plasma formation in a skin explosion of stainless steel and St3 steel conductors at a magnetic field of up to 400 T.

  2. Foam and cluster structure formation by latex particles at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Garcia, Jaime; Gámez-Corrales, Rogelio; Ivlev, Boris I.

    1997-02-01

    We report the formation of two-dimensional foam and cluster structures by spherical polystyrene particles trapped at the air/water interface. The colloidal foam is a transient structure that evolves to the formation of clusters, but clusters can also be formed after deposition of the sample. We also observed the formation of small aggregates, whose formation along with the cluster stabilization can be explained in terms of a balance between electrostatic repulsive and van der Waals attractive interactions.

  3. Laser stimulated plasma-induced luminescence for on-air material analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, S.; Barberio, M.; Liberatore, C.; Scisciò, M.; Laramée, A.; Palumbo, L.; Legaré, F.; Antici, P.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a method for performing analysis of the chemical composition and optical properties of materials using In-Air Plasma-Induced Luminescence. This is achieved by interaction of a focused high-energy laser with air, an interaction that produces a sub-millimetric plasma. The energetic electrons generated and accelerated in the plasma at energies higher than 5 keV reach the target surface of the sample to be analyzed, causing luminescence emission and plasmonic resonance. Each material is characterized by different chemical and optical properties that can be determined with the above-described technique. As such, our method allows obtaining an exact analysis of the sample, covering surfaces in the range of tens of mm2, in only a few minutes. We show that the acquired information with our method is identical to what obtained with more sophisticated methods, such as SEM-cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence.

  4. Tomographic optical emission spectroscopy of a high enthalpy air plasma flow.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Tobias; Löhle, Stefan; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Andrianatos, Andreas

    2016-12-20

    A method is presented allowing for locally resolved emission spectroscopy using a tomographic setup. The approach presented in this work is applied to a high enthalpy air plasma flow. The resulting data sets allow for a three-dimensional (3D) representation of the non-symmetric flow field using photographs of the test section and 2D representation of the spectrally resolved radiance of the flow field. An analysis of different exposure times shows that transient fluctuations of the plasma can result in substantial asymmetry that approaches symmetry only for longer exposure times when the temporal averaging of the emission is significant. The spectral data allows the analysis of species selective excitation and emission. A non-equilibrium between atomic and molecular excitation temperatures is concluded for the investigated air plasma flow field. The spatial distribution of atomic electronic excitation temperatures are close to rotational symmetry while molecular rotational and vibrational temperatures exhibit asymmetric behavior.

  5. Formation of H̅ in p̅-Ps collisions embedded in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnavelu, Kuru; Ghoshal, Arijit; Nayek, Sujay; Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, Mohd Zahurin Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Screening effects of plasmas on the formation of antihydrogen (H̅) in an arbitrary s-state from the ground state of the positronium atom (Ps) by antiproton (p̅) impact have been studied within the framework of charge-conjugation and time-reversal invariance. Two types of plasma environments have been considered, namely weakly coupled plasma and dense quantum plasma. For weakly coupled plasma, the interactions among the charged particles in plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel screening model, whereas for dense quantum plasma, interactions among the charged particles in plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Effects of plasma screening on the antihydrogen formation cross section have been studied in the energy range 15-400 keV of incident antiproton. For the free atomic case, our results agree well with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  6. Extended plasma channels created by UV laser in air and their application to control electric discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V. D. Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    Results are presented from a series of experimental and theoretical studies on creating weakly ionized extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by 248-nm UV laser radiation and their application to control long high-voltage discharges. The main mechanisms of air ionization by UV laser pulses with durations from 100 fs to 25 ns and intensities in the ranges of 3×10{sup 11}–1.5×10{sup 13} and 3×10{sup 6}–3×10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}, respectively, which are below the threshold for optical gas breakdown, as well as the main relaxation processes in plasma with a density of 10{sup 9}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, are considered. It is shown that plasma channels in air can be efficiently created by amplitude-modulated UV pulses consisting of a train of subpicosecond pulses producing primary photoelectrons and a long UV pulse suppressing electron attachment and sustaining the density of free electrons in plasma. Different modes of the generation and amplification of trains of subterawatt subpicosecond pulses and amplitude-modulated UV pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were implemented on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid Ti:sapphire-KrF laser facility. The filamentation of such UV laser beams during their propagation in air over distances of up to 100 m and the parameters of the corresponding plasma channels were studied experimentally and theoretically. Laser initiation of high-voltage electric discharges and control of their trajectories by means of amplitude-modulated UV pulses, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of breakdowns in air gaps with length of up to 80 cm, were studied.

  7. Quasi-steady-state air plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse sequence

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Chen, Shi-You; Ma, Jing-Long; Hou, Lei; Liao, Guo-Qian; Wang, Jin-Guang; Han, Yu-Jing; Liu, Xiao-Long; Teng, Hao; Han, Hai-Nian; Li, Yu-Tong; Chen, Li-Ming; Wei, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    A long air plasma channel can be formed by filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses. However, the lifetime of the plasma channel produced by a single femtosecond laser pulse is too short (only a few nanoseconds) for many potential applications based on the conductivity of the plasma channel. Therefore, prolonging the lifetime of the plasma channel is one of the key challenges in the research of femtosecond laser filamentation. In this study, a unique femtosecond laser source was developed to produce a high-quality femtosecond laser pulse sequence with an interval of 2.9 ns and a uniformly distributed single-pulse energy. The metre scale quasi-steady-state plasma channel with a 60–80 ns lifetime was formed by such pulse sequences in air. The simulation study for filamentation of dual femtosecond pulses indicated that the plasma channel left by the previous pulse was weakly affected the filamentation of the next pulse in sequence under our experimental conditions. PMID:26493279

  8. Decay of femtosecond laser-induced plasma filaments in air, nitrogen, and argon for atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Bodrov, S. B.; Tsarev, M. V.; Murzanev, A. A.; Sergeev, Yu. A.; Malkov, Yu. A.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    The temporal evolution of a plasma channel at the trail of a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse was studied experimentally and theoretically in air, nitrogen (with an admixture of ˜3% O2), and argon in a wide range of gas pressures (from 2 to 760 Torr). Measurements by means of transverse optical interferometry and pulsed terahertz scattering techniques showed that plasma density in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure reduces by an order of magnitude within 3-4 ns and that the decay rate decreases with decreasing pressure. The argon plasma did not decay within several nanoseconds for pressures of 50-760 Torr. We extended our theoretical model previously applied for atmospheric pressure air plasma to explain the plasma decay in the gases under study and to show that allowance for plasma channel expansion affects plasma decay at low pressures.

  9. Formation of Intense Plasma Outflows from Laboratory Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. K. P.

    2005-10-01

    Solar prominences have been simulated in a laboratory experiment using a four-electrode magnetized plasma source [1]. An ultra-high speed intensified CCD camera records visual images of the laboratory prominence evolution and a magnetic probe array measures internal magnetic fields. Laboratory prominences produced using low pressure argon and krypton form localized outflow from the main structure. These outflows appear immediately after Ar and Kr prominences become unstable and contact surrounding metal structures. Within a few microseconds after this event, the main structure disappears and the outflow becomes extremely intense and elongated. An analytic model based on Hamiltonian formalism predicts the existence of a critical parameter below which ions lose confinement in a force-free magnetic field and subsequently form intense outflows. This escape of ions from force-free magnetic fields has been verified in numerical computations of ion trajectories.[1] J. F. Hansen, S. K. P. Tripathi, and P. M. Bellan, Phys. Plasmas 11(6), 3177 (2004)

  10. Plasma formation and temperature measurement during single-bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannigan, David J.; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2005-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) results from the extreme temperatures and pressures achieved during bubble compression; calculations have predicted the existence of a hot, optically opaque plasma core with consequent bremsstrahlung radiation. Recent controversial reports claim the observation of neutrons from deuterium-deuterium fusion during acoustic cavitation. However, there has been previously no strong experimental evidence for the existence of a plasma during single- or multi-bubble sonoluminescence. SBSL typically produces featureless emission spectra that reveal little about the intra-cavity physical conditions or chemical processes. Here we report observations of atomic (Ar) emission and extensive molecular (SO) and ionic (O2+) progressions in SBSL spectra from concentrated aqueous H2SO4 solutions. Both the Ar and SO emission permit spectroscopic temperature determinations, as accomplished for multi-bubble sonoluminescence with other emitters. The emissive excited states observed from both Ar and O2+ are inconsistent with any thermal process. The Ar excited states involved are extremely high in energy (>13eV) and cannot be thermally populated at the measured Ar emission temperatures (4,000-15,000K) the ionization energy of O2 is more than twice its bond dissociation energy, so O2+ likewise cannot be thermally produced. We therefore conclude that these emitting species must originate from collisions with high-energy electrons, ions or particles from a hot plasma core.

  11. Plasma formation and temperature measurement during single-bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2005-03-03

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) results from the extreme temperatures and pressures achieved during bubble compression; calculations have predicted the existence of a hot, optically opaque plasma core with consequent bremsstrahlung radiation. Recent controversial reports claim the observation of neutrons from deuterium-deuterium fusion during acoustic cavitation. However, there has been previously no strong experimental evidence for the existence of a plasma during single- or multi-bubble sonoluminescence. SBSL typically produces featureless emission spectra that reveal little about the intra-cavity physical conditions or chemical processes. Here we report observations of atomic (Ar) emission and extensive molecular (SO) and ionic (O2+) progressions in SBSL spectra from concentrated aqueous H2SO4 solutions. Both the Ar and SO emission permit spectroscopic temperature determinations, as accomplished for multi-bubble sonoluminescence with other emitters. The emissive excited states observed from both Ar and O2+ are inconsistent with any thermal process. The Ar excited states involved are extremely high in energy (>13 eV) and cannot be thermally populated at the measured Ar emission temperatures (4,000-15,000 K); the ionization energy of O2 is more than twice its bond dissociation energy, so O2+ likewise cannot be thermally produced. We therefore conclude that these emitting species must originate from collisions with high-energy electrons, ions or particles from a hot plasma core.

  12. Rapid Formation of Distributed Plasma Discharges using X-Band Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xun

    Observations of rapidly formed (<300 ns) distributed plasma discharges using high power X-band microwaves are presented. A cylindrical stainless steel chamber (15.2 cm long, 14.6 cm diameter) enclosed with polycarbonate windows (0.953 cm) was used to observe microwave breakdown in argon and neon gas mixtures from 50 to 250 torr. The chamber was illuminated by the output of a 16.2 kW, 800 ns pulse-width, 9.382 GHz magnetron with a 43 repetitive rate through an X-band waveguide pressed against the first polycarbonate window. Fast (50 ns) time-scale optical images of the plasma revealed the plasma formation and decay processes, as well as the plasma patterns for different plasma formation conditions. CST simulations were conducted to compare the electric field distribution inside the discharge chamber with the plasma patterns in the images. VUV (Vacuum Ultra-Violet) radiation was supported as the mechanism to enhance the plasma expansion and assist the formation of the plasma side lobes. Reflection Measurements showed 63% reflected power once plasma was formed, and a small amount of argon in neon shortened the breakdown time, verifying that the Penning effect lowers the breakdown threshold. Mixer measurements were taken, combined with a 1-D 6-region microwave plasma model to estimate the maximum effective plasma density as 2.2x1012 cm-3 with a corresponding maximum effective electron temperature of 2.5 eV in pure neon plasma at 100 torr under a Maxwellian distribution assumption. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) assisted by the SPECAIR model determined the gas temperature in the microwave plasma as 350 +/- 50 K. OES line ratio measurements provided plasma parameters including time-evolved metastable and resonance densities, effective electron temperatures, electron densities for plasmas formed at 100 torr in pure neon and Ne/Ar (99:1) mixture gases. The comparison of time-evolved neon metastable and resonance densities in pure neon and Ne/Ar (99:1) mixture plasmas

  13. Absorption of laser radiation by femtosecond laser-induced plasma of air and its emission characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. A.; Golik, S. S.; Shmirko, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    The energy absorbed by femtosecond laser plasma has nonlinear dependence on incident laser energy. The threshold power for plasma formation is 5.2 GW. Emission of nitrogen molecule, nitrogen molecule ion, atomic oxygen (unresolved triplet O I 777 nm) and nitrogen (triplet N I 742.4, 744.3 and 746.8 nm) lines is detected. Molecular emission consists of second positive and firs negative systems of nitrogen. Time-resolved spectroscopy of plasmas shows short molecular line emission (up to 1 ns) and long atomic line emission (up to 150 ns).

  14. Streptococci biofilm decontamination on teeth by low-temperature air plasma of dc corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalóvá, Z.; Zahoran, M.; Zahoranová, A.; Machala, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric pressure air direct current corona discharges were investigated for potential applications in dental medicine. The objective of this ex vivo study was to apply cold plasmas for the decontamination of Streptococci biofilm grown on extracted human teeth, and to estimate their antimicrobial efficiency and the plasma's impact on the enamel and dentine of the treated tooth surfaces. The results show that both positive streamer and negative Trichel pulse coronas can reduce bacterial population in the biofilm by up to 3 logs in a 10 min exposure time. This bactericidal effect can be reached faster (within 5 min) by electrostatic spraying of water through the discharge onto the treated tooth surface. Examination of the tooth surface after plasma exposure by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy did not show any significant alteration in the tooth material composition or the tooth surface structures.

  15. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Plasma agents in bio-decontamination by dc discharges in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machala, Zdenko; Chládeková, Lenka; Pelach, Michal

    2010-06-01

    Bio-decontamination of water and surfaces contaminated by bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium) was investigated in two types of positive dc discharges in atmospheric pressure air, in needle-to-plane geometry: the streamer corona and its transition to a novel regime called transient spark with short high current pulses of limited energy. Both generate a cold non-equilibrium plasma. Electro-spraying of treated water through a needle electrode was applied for the first time and resulted in fast bio-decontamination. Experiments providing separation of various biocidal plasma agents, along with the emission spectra and coupled with oxidation stress measurements in the cell membranes helped to better understand the mechanisms of microbial inactivation. The indirect exposure of contaminated surfaces to neutral active species was almost as efficient as the direct exposure to the plasma, whereas applying only UV radiation from the plasma had no biocidal effects. Radicals and reactive oxygen species were identified as dominant biocidal agents.

  16. Influence of metallic vapours on thermodynamic and transport properties of two-temperature air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Linlin; Wang, Xiaohua; Cressault, Yann; Teulet, Philippe; Rong, Mingzhe

    2016-09-01

    The metallic vapours (i.e., copper, iron, and silver in this paper) resulting from walls and/or electrode surfaces can significantly affect the characteristics of air plasma. Different from the previous works assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, this paper investigates the influence of metallic vapours on two-temperature (2 T) air plasma. The 2 T compositions of air contaminated by Cu, Fe, and Ag are first determined based on Saha's and Guldberg-Waage's laws. The thermodynamic properties (including mass density, specific enthalpy, and specific heat) are then calculated according to their definitions. After determining the collision integrals for each pair of species in air-metal mixtures using the newly published methods and source data, the transport coefficients (including electrical conductivity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) are calculated for air-Cu, air-Fe, and air-Ag plasmas with different non-equilibrium degree θ (Te/Th). The influences of metallic contamination as well as non-equilibrium degree are discussed. It is found that copper, iron, and silver exist mainly in the form of Cu2, FeO, and AgO at low temperatures. Generally, the metallic vapours increase mass density at most temperatures, reduce the specific enthalpy and specific heat in the whole temperature range, and affect the transport properties remarkably from 5000 K to 20 000 K. The effect arising from the type of metals is little except for silver at certain temperatures. Besides, the departure from thermal equilibrium results in the delay of dissociation and ionization reactions, leading to the shift of thermodynamic and transport properties towards a higher temperature.

  17. An Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Setup to Investigate the Reactive Species Formation.

    PubMed

    Gorbanev, Yury; Soriano, Robert; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-11-03

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure ('cold') plasmas have received increased attention in recent years due to their significant biomedical potential. The reactions of cold plasma with the surrounding atmosphere yield a variety of reactive species, which can define its effectiveness. While efficient development of cold plasma therapy requires kinetic models, model benchmarking needs empirical data. Experimental studies of the source of reactive species detected in aqueous solutions exposed to plasma are still scarce. Biomedical plasma is often operated with He or Ar feed gas, and a specific interest lies in investigation of the reactive species generated by plasma with various gas admixtures (O2, N2, air, H2O vapor, etc.) Such investigations are very complex due to difficulties in controlling the ambient atmosphere in contact with the plasma effluent. In this work, we addressed common issues of 'high' voltage kHz frequency driven plasma jet experimental studies. A reactor was developed allowing the exclusion of ambient atmosphere from the plasma-liquid system. The system thus comprised the feed gas with admixtures and the components of the liquid sample. This controlled atmosphere allowed the investigation of the source of the reactive oxygen species induced in aqueous solutions by He-water vapor plasma. The use of isotopically labelled water allowed distinguishing between the species originating in the gas phase and those formed in the liquid. The plasma equipment was contained inside a Faraday cage to eliminate possible influence of any external field. The setup is versatile and can aid in further understanding the cold plasma-liquid interactions chemistry.

  18. An Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Setup to Investigate the Reactive Species Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gorbanev, Yury; Soriano, Robert; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure ('cold') plasmas have received increased attention in recent years due to their significant biomedical potential. The reactions of cold plasma with the surrounding atmosphere yield a variety of reactive species, which can define its effectiveness. While efficient development of cold plasma therapy requires kinetic models, model benchmarking needs empirical data. Experimental studies of the source of reactive species detected in aqueous solutions exposed to plasma are still scarce. Biomedical plasma is often operated with He or Ar feed gas, and a specific interest lies in investigation of the reactive species generated by plasma with various gas admixtures (O2, N2, air, H2O vapor, etc.) Such investigations are very complex due to difficulties in controlling the ambient atmosphere in contact with the plasma effluent. In this work, we addressed common issues of 'high' voltage kHz frequency driven plasma jet experimental studies. A reactor was developed allowing the exclusion of ambient atmosphere from the plasma-liquid system. The system thus comprised the feed gas with admixtures and the components of the liquid sample. This controlled atmosphere allowed the investigation of the source of the reactive oxygen species induced in aqueous solutions by He-water vapor plasma. The use of isotopically labelled water allowed distinguishing between the species originating in the gas phase and those formed in the liquid. The plasma equipment was contained inside a Faraday cage to eliminate possible influence of any external field. The setup is versatile and can aid in further understanding the cold plasma-liquid interactions chemistry. PMID:27842375

  19. Low-density plasma formation in aqueous biological media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Genc, Suzanne L; Ma, Huan; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate the formation of low- and high-density plasmas in aqueous media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses delivered at low numerical aperture (NA = 0.25). We observe two distinct regimes of plasma formation in deionized water, phosphate buffered saline, Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), and MEM supplemented with phenol red. Optical breakdown is first initiated in a low-energy regime and characterized by bubble formation without plasma luminescence with threshold pulse energies in the range of Ep ≈ 4-5 μJ, depending on media formulation. The onset of this regime occurs over a very narrow interval of pulse energies and produces small bubbles (Rmax = 2-20 μm) due to a tiny conversion (η < 0.01%) of laser energy to bubble energy EB. The lack of visible plasma luminescence, sharp energy onset, and low bubble energy conversion are all hallmarks of low-density plasma (LDP) formation. At higher pulse energies (Ep = 11-20 μJ), the process transitions to a second regime characterized by plasma luminescence and large bubble formation. Bubbles formed in this regime are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger in size [Formula: see text] due to a roughly two-order-of-magnitude increase in bubble energy conversion (η ≳ 3%). These characteristics are consistent with high-density plasma formation produced by avalanche ionization and thermal runaway. Additionally, we show that supplementation of MEM with fetal bovine serum (FBS) limits optical breakdown to this high-energy regime. The ability to produce LDPs using sub-nanosecond pulses focused at low NA in a variety of cell culture media formulations without FBS can provide for cellular manipulation at high throughput with precision approaching that of femtosecond pulses delivered at high NA.

  20. Comparison of free radicals formation induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound, and ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Plasma medicine is increasingly recognized interdisciplinary field combining engineering, physics, biochemistry and life sciences. Plasma is classified into two categories based on the temperature applied, namely "thermal" and "non-thermal" (i.e., cold atmospheric plasma). Non-thermal or cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is produced by applying high voltage electric field at low pressures and power. The chemical effects of cold atmospheric plasma in aqueous solution are attributed to high voltage discharge and gas flow, which is transported rapidly on the liquid surface. The argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) induces efficient reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aqueous solutions without thermal decomposition. Their formation has been confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping, which is reviewed here. The similarities and differences between the plasma chemistry, sonochemistry, and radiation chemistry are explained. Further, the evidence for free radical formation in the liquid phase and their role in the biological effects induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound and ionizing radiation are discussed.

  1. Kinetic modelling for an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gaens, W.; Bogaerts, A.

    2013-07-01

    A zero-dimensional, semi-empirical model is used to describe the plasma chemistry in an argon plasma jet flowing into humid air, mimicking the experimental conditions of a setup from the Eindhoven University of Technology. The model provides species density profiles as a function of the position in the plasma jet device and effluent. A reaction chemistry set for an argon/humid air mixture is developed, which considers 84 different species and 1880 reactions. Additionally, we present a reduced chemistry set, useful for higher level computational models. Calculated species density profiles along the plasma jet are shown and the chemical pathways are explained in detail. It is demonstrated that chemically reactive H, N, O and OH radicals are formed in large quantities after the nozzle exit and H2, O2(1Δg), O3, H2O2, NO2, N2O, HNO2 and HNO3 are predominantly formed as ‘long living’ species. The simulations show that water clustering of positive ions is very important under these conditions. The influence of vibrational excitation on the calculated electron temperature is studied. Finally, the effect of varying gas temperature, flow speed, power density and air humidity on the chemistry is investigated.

  2. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    PubMed Central

    Théberge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-François; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, François; Châteauneuf , Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electric pulse from a Tesla coil allowed to stimulate and maintain the highly conductive channel during few milliseconds in order to guide a subsequent 500 times more energetic discharge from a 30-kV DC source. This DC discharge was laser-guided over an air gap length of two metres, which is more than two orders of magnitude longer than the expected natural discharge length. Long plasma channel induced by laser pulses and stimulated by an external high-voltage source opens the way for wireless and efficient transportation of energetic current pulses over long air gaps and potentially for guiding lightning. PMID:28053312

  3. Cold Air Plasma To Decontaminate Inanimate Surfaces of the Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Claro, Tânia; O'Connor, Niall; Cafolla, Anthony A.; Stevens, Niall T.; Daniels, Stephen; Humphreys, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The hospital environment harbors bacteria that may cause health care-associated infections. Microorganisms, such as multiresistant bacteria, can spread around the patient's inanimate environment. Some recently introduced biodecontamination approaches in hospitals have significant limitations due to the toxic nature of the gases and the length of time required for aeration. This study evaluated the in vitro use of cold air plasma as an efficient alternative to traditional methods of biodecontamination of hospital surfaces. Cultures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii were applied to different materials similar to those found in the hospital environment. Artificially contaminated sections of marmoleum, mattress, polypropylene, powder-coated mild steel, and stainless steel were then exposed to a cold air pressure plasma single jet for 30 s, 60 s, and 90 s, operating at approximately 25 W and 12 liters/min flow rate. Direct plasma exposure successfully reduced the bacterial load by log 3 for MRSA, log 2.7 for VRE, log 2 for ESBL-producing E. coli, and log 1.7 for A. baumannii. The present report confirms the efficient antibacterial activity of a cold air plasma single-jet plume on nosocomial bacterially contaminated surfaces over a short period of time and highlights its potential for routine biodecontamination in the clinical environment. PMID:24441156

  4. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Théberge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-François; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, François; Châteauneuf, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electric pulse from a Tesla coil allowed to stimulate and maintain the highly conductive channel during few milliseconds in order to guide a subsequent 500 times more energetic discharge from a 30-kV DC source. This DC discharge was laser-guided over an air gap length of two metres, which is more than two orders of magnitude longer than the expected natural discharge length. Long plasma channel induced by laser pulses and stimulated by an external high-voltage source opens the way for wireless and efficient transportation of energetic current pulses over long air gaps and potentially for guiding lightning.

  5. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Marcus, Frederick B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux.

  6. Analysis of Solid State Plasma Formation in Semiconductor Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    construct an ensele Monte Carlo program to model plasma effects under intense optical or electrical illumination in four smiconductor materials. l...INSTABILITY 31 7.2 KINK INSTABILITY 34 7.3 STREAMING INSTABILITIES 34 8.0 THER -FAL PINCH 39 9.0 MONTE CARLO METHOD 43 9.1 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF SEMICONDUCTOR...DEVICES 46 9.2 QUASI-CLASSICAL DESCRIPTION OF CHARGE TRANSPORT 48 9.3 MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 50 9.4 ENSEMBLE MONTE CARLO 51 9.5 ENERGY BAND STRUCTURE

  7. Bomber: The Formation and Early Years of Strategic Air Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    engine Model 299 had its maiden flight on 28 July 1935. The all-metal plane had wing flaps for better performance at slow airspeeds, electric trim tabs...fighting had been on- going for over two years. Airmen, like soldiers and sailors, struggled to catch up . Technology, which lay at the root of air...immediately, however, fundamental issues regarding intelli- gence of the new Soviet adversary, an intelligence bound up with technology to gather and

  8. Physicochemical processes in the indirect interaction between surface air plasma and deionized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. C.; Liu, D. X.; Chen, C.; Li, D.; Yang, A. J.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most central scientific questions for plasma applications in healthcare and environmental remediation is the chemical identity and the dose profile of plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can act on an object inside a liquid. A logical focus is on aqueous physicochemical processes near a sample with a direct link to their upstream gaseous processes in the plasma region and a separation gap from the liquid bulk. Here, a system-level modeling framework is developed for indirect interactions of surface air plasma and a deionized water bulk and its predictions are found to be in good agreement with the measurement of gas-phase ozone and aqueous long-living ROS/RNS concentrations. The plasma region is described with a global model, whereas the air gap and the liquid region are simulated with a 1D fluid model. All three regions are treated as one integrated entity and computed simultaneously. With experimental validation, the system-level modeling shows that the dominant aqueous ROS/RNS are long-living species (e.g. H2O2 aq, O3 aq, nitrite/nitrate, H+ aq). While most short-living gaseous species could hardly survive their passage to the liquid, aqueous short-living ROS/RNS are generated in situ through reactions among long-living plasma species and with water molecules. This plasma-mediated remote production of aqueous ROS/RNS is important for the abundance of aqueous HO2 aq, HO3 aq, OHaq and \\text{O}2- aq as well as NO2 aq and NO3 aq. Aqueous plasma chemistry offers a novel and significant pathway to activate a given biological outcome, as exemplified here for bacterial deactivation in plasma-activated water. Additional factors that may synergistically broaden the usefulness of aqueous plasma chemistry include an electric field by aqueous ions and liquid acidification. The system-modeling framework will be useful in assisting designs and analyses of future investigations of plasma-liquid and plasma-cell interactions.

  9. Microwave interferometry of laser induced air plasmas formed by short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, P.W.

    1993-08-01

    Applications for the interaction of laser induced plasmas with electromagnetic probes requires time varying complex conductivity data for specific laser/electromagnetic probe geometries. Applications for this data include plasma switching (Q switching) and the study of ionization fronts. The plasmas were created in laboratory air by 100 ps laser pulses at a wavelength of 1 {mu}m. A long focal length lens focused the laser pulse into WR90 (X band) rectangular waveguide. Two different laser beam/electromagnetic probe geometries were investigated. For the longitudinal geometry, the laser pulse and the microwave counterpropagated inside the waveguide. For the transverse geometry, the laser created a plasma ``post`` inside the waveguide. The effects of the laser beam deliberately hitting the waveguide were also investigated. Each geometry exhibits its own characteristics. This research project focused on the longitudinal geometry. Since the laser beam intensity varies inside the waveguide, the charge distribution inside the waveguide also varies. A 10 GHz CW microwave probe traveled through the laser induced plasma. From the magnitude and phase of the microwave probe, a spatially integrated complex conductivity was calculated. No measurements of the temporal or spatial variation of the laser induced plasma were made. For the ``plasma post,`` the electron density is more uniform.

  10. Hydrogen Balmer Series Self-Absorption Measurement in Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Parigger, Christian

    2015-05-01

    In experimental studies of laser-induced plasma, we use focused Nd:YAG laser radiation to generate optical breakdown in laboratory air. A Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and an ICCD camera are utilized to record spatially and temporally resolved spectra. Time-resolved spectroscopy methods are employed to record plasma dynamics for various time delays in the range of 0.300 microsecond to typically 10 microsecond after plasma initiation. Early plasma emission spectra reveal hydrogen alpha and ionized nitrogen lines for time delays larger than 0.3 microsecond, the hydrogen beta line emerges from the free-electron background radiation later in the plasma decay for time delays in excess of 1 microsecond. The self-absorption analyses include comparisons of recorded data without and with the use of a doubling mirror. The extent of self-absorption of the hydrogen Balmer series is investigated for various time delays from plasma generation. There are indications of self-absorption of hydrogen alpha by comparison with ionized nitrogen lines at a time delay of 0.3 microsecond. For subsequent time delays, self-absorption effects on line-widths are hardly noticeable, despite the fact of the apparent line-shape distortions. Of interest are comparisons of inferred electron densities from hydrogen alpha and hydrogen beta lines as the plasma decays, including assessments of spatial variation of electron density.

  11. Formation and characterization of the vortices generated by a DBD plasma actuator in burst mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bal Krishan; Panigrahi, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    The present study reports the formation and evolution characteristics of the continuously generated vortical structure and resulting flow field in quiescent air induced by a dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) plasma actuator in burst mode operation. A starting vortex is formed during the initial actuation period, which disappears after a small time interval for continuous mode operation of the DBD plasma actuator. A burst input signal to the actuator generates a train of self-similar vortices. The behaviour of vortices and the average flow field induced by the actuator has been studied using high speed schlieren visualization and particle image velocimetry technique for different actuation amplitude and duty cycle parameters. These repeating vortices travel faster than the starting vortex, and the vortex core velocity of these repeating vortices increases with increase in duty cycle parameter. Fuller u-velocity profile, higher v-velocity near the edge of the outer shear layer region, and higher growth of the wall jet thickness is observed due to enhanced entrainment by repeating vortices for burst mode operation. The repeating vortices travel at an angle of 21° relative to the wall surface for duty cycle parameter of 90.9% in comparison to 31° for the starting vortex. Self-similarity of the velocity profile is delayed in the streamwise direction for burst mode operation in comparison to that for the continuous mode of operation. This can be attributed to delay in attaining the maximum velocity of the wall jet profile and presence of coherent structures for the burst mode operation. The non-dimensional vortex core location and size for repeating vortices follow power law fit similar to the starting vortex with difference in value of the power law exponent. The phase difference between the input voltage and current drawn is in the range of π/12 to π/9 (in radians) for both continuous and burst mode operation indicating identical electrical behaviour of the

  12. Emission, plasma formation, and brightness of a PZT ferroelectric cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.; Caporaso, G.; Trimble, D.; Westenskow, G.

    1995-04-27

    We have measured an 36-A-cm{sup {minus}2} current emission density over the surface area of an 11.4-cm{sup 2}-area Lead-Titanate- Zirconate (PZT) ferroelectric cathode with a pulsed anode-cathode (A-K) potential of 50 kV. We have also observed currents above those predicted by classical Child-Langmuir formula for a wide variety of cases. Since a plasma within the A-K gap could also lead to increase current emission we are attempting to measure the properties of the plasma near the cathode surface at emission time. In other measurements, we have observed strong gap currents in the absence of an A-K potential. Further, we continue to make brightness measurements of the emitted beam and observe spatially non-uniform emission and large shot-to-shot variation. Measurements show individual beamlets with a brightness as high 10{sup 11} Am{sup {minus}2} rad{sup {minus}2}.

  13. Formation of Cosmic Carbon Dust Analogues in Plasma Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic carbon dust analogs are produced, processed and analyzed in the laboratory using NASA's COSmIC (COSmIC Simulation Chamber) Facility. These experiments can be used to derive information on the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars.

  14. Activated air produced by shielded sliding discharge plasma mediates plasmid DNA delivery to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Cold plasma is emerging as a potential method for medical applications. The current study assessed the efficacy of a novel cold plasma reactor based on shielded sliding discharge producing cathode-directed streamers generated in ambient air for the delivery of plasmid DNA. Experiments were performed with mouse melanoma cells (B16F10) and human keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) inoculated with plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. Quantitative results measured over a 72-h period displayed luciferase expression levels as high as 5-fold greater in cells exposed to plasma-activated air (PAA) than levels obtained from the inoculation of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). No effect on cell viability was observed. Delivery of plasmid encoding GFP to HaCaT cells seeded on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was confirmed by immunostaining. The use of cold plasma for DNA delivery is attractive as it provides a non-viral, non-invasive method where the electrode or the plasma itself never directly contacts the exposed site. The current device design provides localized DNA transfer using a novel technology. Our report suggests PAA warrants further exploration as an alternative or supplemental approach for DNA transfer.

  15. Air-water ‘tornado’-type microwave plasmas applied for sugarcane biomass treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundaleska, N.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lino da Silva, M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Amorim, J.

    2014-02-01

    The production of cellulosic ethanol from sugarcane biomass is an attractive alternative to the use of fossil fuels. Pretreatment is needed to separate the cellulosic material, which is packed with hemicellulose and lignin in cell wall of sugarcane biomass. A microwave ‘tornado’-type air-water plasma source operating at 2.45 GHz and atmospheric pressure has been applied for this purpose. Samples of dry and wet biomass (˜2 g) have been exposed to the late afterglow plasma stream. The experiments demonstrate that the air-water highly reactive plasma environment provides a number of long-lived active species able to destroy the cellulosic wrapping. Scanning electron microscopy has been applied to analyse the morphological changes occurring due to plasma treatment. The effluent gas streams have been analysed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Optical emission spectroscopy and FT-IR have been applied to determine the gas temperature in the discharge and late afterglow plasma zones, respectively. The optimal range of the operational parameters is discussed along with the main active species involved in the treatment process. Synergistic effects can result from the action of singlet O2(a 1Δg) oxygen, NO2, nitrous acid HNO2 and OH hydroxyl radical.

  16. Emission spectroscopy of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated with air at low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, L.; Gallego, J. L.; Minotti, F.; Kelly, H.; Grondona, D.

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature, high-pressure plasma jets have an extensive use in plasma biology and plasma medicine, such as pathogen deactivation, wound disinfection, stopping of bleeding without damage of healthy tissue, acceleration of wound healing, control of bio-film proliferation, etc. In this work, a spectroscopic characterization of a typical plasma jet, operated in air at atmospheric pressure, is reported. Within the spectrum of wavelengths from 200 to 450 nm all remarkable emissions of N2 were monitored. Spectra of the N2 2nd positive system (C3Πu-B3Πg) emitted in air are the most convenient for plasma diagnostics, since they enable to determine electronic Te, rotational Tr and vibrational Tv temperatures by fitting the experimental spectra with the simulated ones. We used SPECAIR software for spectral simulation and obtained the best fit with all these temperatures about 3500K. The conclusion that all temperatures are equal, and its relatively high value, is consistent with the results of a previous work, where it was found that the experimentally determined electrical characteristic was consistent with the model of a thermal arc discharge, together with a highly collisional cathode sheet.

  17. Cold atmospheric air plasma sterilization against spores and other microorganisms of clinical interest.

    PubMed

    Klämpfl, Tobias G; Isbary, Georg; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Zimmermann, Julia L; Stolz, Wilhelm; Schlegel, Jürgen; Morfill, Gregor E; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    Physical cold atmospheric surface microdischarge (SMD) plasma operating in ambient air has promising properties for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices where conventional methods are not applicable. Furthermore, SMD plasma could revolutionize the field of disinfection at health care facilities. The antimicrobial effects on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of clinical relevance, as well as the fungus Candida albicans, were tested. Thirty seconds of plasma treatment led to a 4 to 6 log(10) CFU reduction on agar plates. C. albicans was the hardest to inactivate. The sterilizing effect on standard bioindicators (bacterial endospores) was evaluated on dry test specimens that were wrapped in Tyvek coupons. The experimental D(23)(°)(C) values for Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were determined as 0.3 min, 0.5 min, 0.6 min, and 0.9 min, respectively. These decimal reduction times (D values) are distinctly lower than D values obtained with other reference methods. Importantly, the high inactivation rate was independent of the material of the test specimen. Possible inactivation mechanisms for relevant microorganisms are briefly discussed, emphasizing the important role of neutral reactive plasma species and pointing to recent diagnostic methods that will contribute to a better understanding of the strong biocidal effect of SMD air plasma.

  18. Cold Atmospheric Air Plasma Sterilization against Spores and Other Microorganisms of Clinical Interest

    PubMed Central

    Isbary, Georg; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Stolz, Wilhelm; Schlegel, Jürgen; Morfill, Gregor E.; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Physical cold atmospheric surface microdischarge (SMD) plasma operating in ambient air has promising properties for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices where conventional methods are not applicable. Furthermore, SMD plasma could revolutionize the field of disinfection at health care facilities. The antimicrobial effects on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of clinical relevance, as well as the fungus Candida albicans, were tested. Thirty seconds of plasma treatment led to a 4 to 6 log10 CFU reduction on agar plates. C. albicans was the hardest to inactivate. The sterilizing effect on standard bioindicators (bacterial endospores) was evaluated on dry test specimens that were wrapped in Tyvek coupons. The experimental D23°C values for Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were determined as 0.3 min, 0.5 min, 0.6 min, and 0.9 min, respectively. These decimal reduction times (D values) are distinctly lower than D values obtained with other reference methods. Importantly, the high inactivation rate was independent of the material of the test specimen. Possible inactivation mechanisms for relevant microorganisms are briefly discussed, emphasizing the important role of neutral reactive plasma species and pointing to recent diagnostic methods that will contribute to a better understanding of the strong biocidal effect of SMD air plasma. PMID:22582068

  19. Focused excimer laser initiated, radio frequency sustained high pressure air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Giar, Ryan; Scharer, John

    2011-11-15

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes and plasma production by focusing 193 nm, 300 mJ, 15 MW high power laser radiation inside a 6 cm diameter helical radio frequency (RF) coil are presented. Quantum resonant multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and collisional cascade laser ionization processes are exploited that have been shown to produce high-density (n{sub e} {approx} 7 x 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3}) cylindrical seed plasmas at 760 Torr. Air breakdown in lower pressures (from 7-22 Torr), where REMPI is the dominant laser ionization process, is investigated using an UV 18 cm focal length lens, resulting in a laser flux of 5.5 GW/cm{sup 2} at the focal spot. The focused laser power absorption and associated shock wave produce seed plasmas for sustainment by the RF (5 kW incident power, 1.5 s) pulse. Measurements of the helical RF antenna load impedance in the inductive and capacitive coupling regimes are obtained by measuring the loaded antenna reflection coefficient. A 105 GHz interferometer is used to measure the plasma electron density and collision frequency. Spectroscopic measurements of the plasma and comparison with the SPECAIR code are made to determine translational, rotational, and vibrational neutral temperatures and the associated neutral gas temperature. From this and the associated measurement of the gas pressure the electron temperature is obtained. Experiments show that the laser-formed seed plasma allows RF sustainment at higher initial air pressures (up to 22 Torr) than that obtained via RF-only initiation (<18 Torr) by means of a 0.3 J UV laser pulse.

  20. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-15

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are {approx}0.1-2 {mu}s over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  1. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-01

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are ˜0.1-2 μs over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  2. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation of an air plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1996-08-01

    Thermogravimetric methods for evaluating bond coat oxidation in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were assessed by high-temperature testing of TBC systems with air plasma-sprayed (APS) Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and yttria-stabilized zirconia top coatings. High-mass thermogravimetric analysis (at 1150{sup degrees}C) was used to measure bond coat oxidation kinetics. Furnace cycling was used to evaluate APS TBC durability. This paper describes the experimental methods and relative oxidation kinetics of the various specimen types. Characterization of the APS TBCs and their reaction products is discussed.

  3. Organized living: formation mechanisms and functions of plasma membrane domains in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E; Christiano, Romain; Walther, Tobias C

    2012-03-01

    Plasma membrane proteins and lipids organize into lateral domains of specific composition. Domain formation is achieved by a combination of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions, membrane-binding protein scaffolds and protein fences. The resulting domains function in membrane protein turnover and homeostasis, as well as in cell signaling. We review the mechanisms generating plasma membrane domains and the functional consequences of this organization, focusing on recent findings from research on the yeast model system.

  4. Analytic model of nanoparticle formation and growth in a SiH4-Ar plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordiets, B. F.; Bertran, E.

    2009-05-01

    A kinetic model of formation and growth of nanoparticles in a low-pressure plasma-chemical reactor with an rf capacitive discharge in a SiH4-Ar mixture is presented. Analytic formulas are derived for calculating the concentration of monomers, as well as the concentration and average size of nanoparticles. The results are compared with the results of numerical calculations and experimental data for nanoparticles in a SiH4-Ar plasma.

  5. Plasma Parameter Dependence of Critical Particle Size at the Moment of Void Formation in RF Silane Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, C. R.; Chai, K. B.; Choe, W.; Park, S.; Chung, C. W.

    2008-09-07

    Although dust-free voids are frequently observed in many dusty plasmas, experiments regarding the critical particle size for the void formation have not been reported much. In this work, the dust particle size measurement at the critical moment of the void formation was performed by the polarization-sensitive laser light scattering method (PSLLS) as the input rf power was varied in the silane plasmas in which particles were created and grown. The electron temperature and ion density were also measured by a floating probe, and the relation between the parameters was studied. The results show that the critical particle size was decreased from 50 nm to 35 nm as the rf power was increased from 30 W to 100 W. In addition, the electron temperature and ion density were increased from 4.7 eV to 6.2 eV and from 7.0x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} to 1.4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, respectively. To investigate the mechanism of the void formation, we calculated the critical particle size for the void with measured plasma parameters using a simple one-dimensional force balance equation along the horizontal direction (parallel to the electrode). Consequently, the calculated particle sizes were in good agreement with the measured ones.

  6. Investigation of the plasma processability of natural carbon bearing formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    In the south of the Russian Far East, a new perspective source of minerals was pioneered, which is the metal-bearing high carbon rocks of the Ruzhinskaya square. The rocks are rich in crystalline graphite, gold, platinum and carbon nanostructures (fullerene, nanotubes and diamond-like carbon). The technique of extraction of ultrapure (99.98%) crystalline graphite from these rocks has been developed using hydrometallugical methods. The obtained graphite was used as a raw material for plasma-chemical tests succeeded in the separation of nanodimensional carbon structures, part of which could be inherited from the natural graphite-bearing rocks. The results of investigation will be used in the development of resource-saving technology of minerals extraction.

  7. Formation of collisionless shocks in magnetized plasma interaction with kinetic-scale obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, F.; Alves, E. P.; Bamford, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the formation of collisionless magnetized shocks triggered by the interaction between magnetized plasma flows and miniature-sized (order of plasma kinetic-scales) magnetic obstacles resorting to massively parallel, full particle-in-cell simulations, including the electron kinetics. The critical obstacle size to generate a compressed plasma region ahead of these objects is determined by independently varying the magnitude of the dipolar magnetic moment and the plasma magnetization. We find that the effective size of the obstacle depends on the relative orientation between the dipolar and plasma internal magnetic fields, and we show that this may be critical to form a shock in small-scale structures. We study the microphysics of the magnetopause in different magnetic field configurations in 2D and compare the results with full 3D simulations. Finally, we evaluate the parameter range where such miniature magnetized shocks can be explored in laboratory experiments.

  8. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Two Surface Barrier Discharges with Air Plasma against In Vitro Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Matthes, Rutger; Bender, Claudia; Schlüter, Rabea; Koban, Ina; Bussiahn, René; Reuter, Stephan; Lademann, Jürgen; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of infected wounds is one possible therapeutic aspect of plasma medicine. Chronic wounds are often associated with microbial biofilms which limit the efficacy of antiseptics. The present study investigates two different surface barrier discharges with air plasma to compare their efficacy against microbial biofilms with chlorhexidine digluconate solution (CHX) as representative of an important antibiofilm antiseptic. Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG81 and Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A were cultivated on polycarbonate discs. The biofilms were treated for 30, 60, 150, 300 or 600 s with plasma or for 600 s with 0.1% CHX, respectively. After treatment, biofilms were dispensed by ultrasound and the antimicrobial effects were determined as difference in the number of the colony forming units by microbial culture. A high antimicrobial efficacy on biofilms of both plasma sources in comparison to CHX treatment was shown. The efficacy differs between the used strains and plasma sources. For illustration, the biofilms were examined under a scanning electron microscope before and after treatment. Additionally, cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay with L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. The cell toxicity of the used plasma limits its applicability on human tissue to maximally 150 s. The emitted UV irradiance was measured to estimate whether UV could limit the application on human tissue at the given parameters. It was found that the UV emission is negligibly low. In conclusion, the results support the assumption that air plasma could be an option for therapy of chronic wounds. PMID:23894661

  9. In vitro assessment of the formation of ceftriaxone-calcium precipitates in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Hans-Rudolf; Detampel, Pascal; Bühler, Theo; Büttler, André; Gygax, Benjamin; Huwyler, Jörg

    2011-06-01

    Ceftriaxone is a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic, which has a broad spectrum of bactericidal activity. Ceftriaxone is highly soluble as a sodium salt, but far less soluble as a calcium salt. Incompatibility of ceftriaxone with calcium and the possible formation of precipitates have been stated in the product label from early on. It was the objective of the present in vitro study to further assess the risk of precipitation of calcium-ceftriaxone in human plasma. Analytical methods were developed (high-performance liquid chromatography and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy) to quantitate calcium and ceftriaxone in human plasma supernatants and human plasma precipitates. Using high concentrations of ceftriaxone (10 mmol/L) and calcium (4.2 mmol/L) did not result in any precipitation after 2 h incubation in human plasma at 37 °C. Under conditions of forced precipitation only, formation of precipitation was observed. The identity of the precipitated material was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We conclude that calcium-ceftriaxone in human plasma has an apparent kinetic solubility product constant of greater than 0.42 × 10(-4) (mol/L)(2), which exceeds the normal thermodynamic solubility product in water by a factor of 26. Under these conditions, the formation of plasma precipitates is unlikely.

  10. Spectroscopic and electrical characters of SBD plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zi-Lu; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yuan, Hao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an atmospheric surface barrier discharge (SBD) generated by annular electrodes in quartz tube is presented through employing bipolar nanosecond pulse voltage in air. The discharge images, waveforms of pulse voltage and discharge current, and optical emission spectra emitted from the discharges are recorded and calculated. A spectra simulation method is developed to separate the overlap of the secondary diffraction spectra which are produced by grating in monochromator, and N2 (B3Πg → A3Σu+) and O (3p5P → 3s5S2o) are extracted. The effects of pulse voltage and discharge power on the emission intensities of OH (A2Σ+ → X2Пi), N2+ (B2Σu+ → X2Σg+), N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg), N2 (B3Πg → A3Σu+), and O (3p5P → 3s5S2o) are investigated. It is found that increasing the pulse peak voltage can lead to an easier formation of N2+ (B2Σu+) than that of N2 (C3Πu). Additionally, vibrational and rotational temperatures of the plasma are determined by comparing the experimental and simulated spectra of N2+ (B2Σu+ → X2Σg+), and the results show that the vibrational and rotational temperatures are 3250 ± 20 K and 350 ± 5 K under the pulse peak voltage of 28 kV, respectively.

  11. Plasma-assisted decomposition of methanol and trichloroethylene in atmospheric pressure air streams by electrical discharge processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wallman, P.H.

    1995-09-01

    Experiments are presented on the plasma-assisted decomposition of dilute concentrations of methanol and trichloroethylene in atmospheric pressure air streams by electrical discharge processing. This investigation used two types of discharge reactors, a dielectric-barrier and a pulsed corona discharge reactor, to study the effects of gas temperature and electrical energy input on the decomposition chemistry and byproduct formation. Our experimental data on both methanol and trichloroethylene show that, under identical gas conditions, the type of electrical discharge reactor does not affect the energy requirements for decomposition or byproduct formation. Our experiments on methanol show that discharge processing converts methanol to CO{sub {ital x}} with an energy yield that increases with temperature. In contrast to the results from methanol, CO{sub {ital x}} is only a minor product in the decomposition of trichloroethylene. In addition, higher temperatures decrease the energy yield for trichloroethylene. This effect may be due to increased competition from decomposition of the byproducts dichloroacetyl chloride and phosgene. In all cases plasma processing using an electrical discharge device produces CO preferentially over CO{sub 2}.

  12. Formation of Iron Carbide Nanorod by Pulsed Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yooyen, S.; Kawamura, T.; Kotake, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-11-01

    Iron carbide nanorods were produced on the surface of pure iron sheet by means of pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen plasma was used in the initial state, varied from 10 to 60 minute, for the purpose of cleaning and preparing nanoparticles. The formation was done under methane atmosphere, varied from 2 to 30 minute. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns analysis showed that iron carbide was found on all of these experiment conditions. By field emission scanning electron micro spectroscopy (FESEM) observation, iron carbide nanorods, however, were found neatly only on the methane plasma treating at 10 minute.

  13. Hollow structure formation of intense ion beams with sharp edge in background plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhang-Hu; Wang, You-Nian

    2016-02-15

    The transport of intense ion beams with sharp radial beam edge in plasmas has been studied with two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations. The initial solid beam evolves into a hollow beam due to the nonlinear sharp transverse force peak in the regions of beam edge. The magnitude and nonlinearity of this peak are enhanced as the ion beam travels further into the plasma, due to the self-consistent interactions between the beam ions and the plasma electrons. This structure formation is shown to be independent on the beam radius.

  14. Laser plasma formation assisted by ultraviolet pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Yalin, Azer P. Dumitrache, Ciprian; Wilvert, Nick; Joshi, Sachin; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2014-10-15

    We present experimental and modeling studies of air pre-ionization using ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses and its effect on laser breakdown of an overlapped near-infrared (NIR) pulse. Experimental studies are conducted with a 266 nm beam (fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG) for UV pre-ionization and an overlapped 1064 nm NIR beam (fundamental of Nd:YAG), both having pulse duration of ∼10 ns. Results show that the UV beam produces a pre-ionized volume which assists in breakdown of the NIR beam, leading to reduction in NIR breakdown threshold by factor of >2. Numerical modeling is performed to examine the ionization and breakdown of both beams. The modeled breakdown threshold of the NIR, including assist by pre-ionization, is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Formation of a Multi-Charged Plasma in the Directed Gas Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, I. S.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Shalashov, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a gas-dynamic model describing the formation of a plasma with multiply ionized ions under the conditions of resonant heating of the electron component. Based on the isothermal approximation, possible regimes of the plasma flow are classified, the influence of the geometric divergence of the flow on the formation of the ion charge distribution is studied, and optimal regimes for the achievement of the maximum ion charge are identified. The model can be used for optimization and interpretation of modern experiments on generation of the extreme ultraviolet radiation due to the excitation of lines of multiply ionized atoms in a gas flow heated by strong millimeter or submillimeter waves.

  16. Third harmonic generation in air ambient and laser ablated carbon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2015-12-15

    We report the third harmonic generation of a nanosecond laser pulse (1.06 μm) in air ambient and in the presence of nanoparticles from laser ablated carbon plasma. Significant decrease in the threshold of third harmonic generation and multi-fold increment in the intensity of generated third harmonic is observed in presence of carbon plasma. The third harmonic in air is due to the quasi-resonant four photon process involving vibrationally excited states of molecular ion of nitrogen due to electron impact ionization and laser pulse. Following optical emission spectroscopic observations we conclude that the presence of C{sub 2} and CN in the ablated plume play a vital role in the observed third harmonic signals.

  17. Functionalization of graphene by atmospheric pressure plasma jet in air or H2O2 environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weixin; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-03-01

    The functionalization of graphene, which deforms its band structure, can result in a metal-semiconductor transition. In this work, we report a facile strategy to oxidize single-layer graphene using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) that generates a variety of reactive plasma species at close to ambient temperature. We systematically characterized the oxygen content and chemical structure of the graphene films after plasma treatment under different oxidative conditions (ambient air atmosphere or hydrogen peroxide solution) by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Plasma-treated graphene films containing more than 40% oxygen were obtained in both oxidative environments. Interestingly, prolonged irradiation led to the reduction of graphene oxides. N-doping of graphene also occurred during the APPJ treatment in H2O2 solution; the nitrogen content of the doped graphene was dependent on the duration of irradiation and reached up to 8.1% within 40 min. Moreover, the H2O2 solution served as a buffer layer that prevented damage to the graphene during plasma irradiation. Four-point probe measurement revealed an increase in sheet resistance of the plasma-treated graphene, indicating the transition of the material property from semi-metallic to semiconducting.

  18. Plasma column and nano-powder generation from solid titanium by localized microwaves in air

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, Simona; Jerby, Eli Meir, Yehuda; Ashkenazi, Dana; Barkay, Zahava; Mitchell, J. Brian A.; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    2015-07-14

    This paper studies the effect of a plasma column ejected from solid titanium by localized microwaves in an ambient air atmosphere. Nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (titania) are found to be directly synthesized in this plasma column maintained by the microwave energy in the cavity. The process is initiated by a hotspot induced by localized microwaves, which melts the titanium substrate locally. The molten hotspot emits ionized titanium vapors continuously into the stable plasma column, which may last for more than a minute duration. The characterization of the dusty plasma obtained is performed in-situ by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), optical spectroscopy, and microwave reflection analyses. The deposited titania nanoparticles are structurally and morphologically analyzed by ex-situ optical and scanning-electron microscope observations, and also by X-ray diffraction. Using the Boltzmann plot method combined with the SAXS results, the electron temperature and density in the dusty plasma are estimated as ∼0.4 eV and ∼10{sup 19 }m{sup −3}, respectively. The analysis of the plasma product reveals nanoparticles of titania in crystalline phases of anatase, brookite, and rutile. These are spatially arranged in various spherical, cubic, lamellar, and network forms. Several applications are considered for this process of titania nano-powder production.

  19. Plasma surface modification as a new approach to protect urinary catheter against Escherichia coli biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Taheran, Leila; Zarrini, Gholamreza; Khorram, Sirous; Zakerhamidi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Biomaterials are widely used in medical devices such as urinary catheters. One of the main problems associated with long term using of the urinary catheters is biofilm formation on their surfaces. Many techniques have been presented to reduce the biofilm formation. One of the most revolutionary techniques allowing such surface fictionalization is plasma surface modification. Materials and Methods: In this study, a glow discharge plasma (GDP) effect on Escherichia coli biofilm formation on the surface of urinary catheter in the pressure of 1.6 × 10−1 Torr of nitrogen, discharge voltage about 1.2 kV and current of 150 mA for 20 minutes has been investigated. Crystal violet binding assay and sonication method were performed in order to evaluate the amount of biofilm formation on tested biomaterials. Results: Characterization of modified surfaces by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed a noticeable change in hydrophobicity and roughness of catheter surfaces achieved by nitrogen plasma. The results of crystal violet binding assay and sonication method showed that the amount of biofilm formation on modified surface was about 86% less than the pristine sample. Conclusion: Plasma surface modification can reduce the risk of infections in patients with long-term use of urinary catheters. PMID:28210465

  20. Elevated Plasma Endothelin-1 and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure in Children Exposed to Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Vincent, Renaud; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Barragán-Mejía, Gerardo; Garrido-García, Luis; Camacho-Reyes, Laura; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; Paredes, Rogelio; Romero, Lina; Osnaya, Hector; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Hazucha, Milan J.; Reed, William

    2007-01-01

    Background Controlled exposures of animals and humans to particulate matter (PM) or ozone air pollution cause an increase in plasma levels of endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor that regulates pulmonary arterial pressure. Objectives The primary objective of this field study was to determine whether Mexico City children, who are chronically exposed to levels of PM and O3 that exceed the United States air quality standards, have elevated plasma endothelin-1 levels and pulmonary arterial pressures. Methods We conducted a study of 81 children, 7.9 ± 1.3 years of age, lifelong residents of either northeast (n = 19) or southwest (n = 40) Mexico City or Polotitlán (n = 22), a control city with PM and O3 levels below the U.S. air quality standards. Clinical histories, physical examinations, and complete blood counts were done. Plasma endothelin-1 concentrations were determined by immunoassay, and pulmonary arterial pressures were measured by Doppler echocardiography. Results Mexico City children had higher plasma endothelin-1 concentrations compared with controls (p < 0.001). Mean pulmonary arterial pressure was elevated in children from both northeast (p < 0.001) and southwest (p < 0.05) Mexico City compared with controls. Endothelin-1 levels in Mexico City children were positively correlated with daily outdoor hours (p = 0.012), and 7-day cumulative levels of PM air pollution < 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) before endothelin-1 measurement (p = 0.03). Conclusions Chronic exposure of children to PM2.5 is associated with increased levels of circulating endothelin-1 and elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure. PMID:17687455

  1. Sterilization effect of atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma on dental instruments

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Su-Jin; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Chang, Brian Myung W.; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Autoclaves and UV sterilizers have been commonly used to prevent cross-infections between dental patients and dental instruments or materials contaminated by saliva and blood. To develop a dental sterilizer which can sterilize most materials, such as metals, rubbers, and plastics, the sterilization effect of an atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS After inoculating E. coli and B. subtilis the diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were sterilized by exposing them to the plasma for different lengths of time (30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and, 240 seconds). The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were immersed in PBS solutions, cultured on agar plates and quantified by counting the colony forming units. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and significance was assessed by the LSD post hoc test (α=0.05). RESULTS The device was effective in killing E. coli contained in the plasma device compared with the UV sterilizer. The atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device contributed greatly to the sterilization of diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli and B. subtilis. Diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli was effective after 60 and 90 seconds. The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with B. subtilis was effective after 120 and 180 seconds. CONCLUSION The atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was effective in killing both E. coli and B. subtilis, and was more effective in killing E. coli than the UV sterilizer. PMID:23508991

  2. Potential Industrial Applications of the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) Operating in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece Roth, J.

    2004-11-01

    The majority of industrial plasma processing with glow discharges has been conducted at pressures below 10 torr. This tends to limit applications to high value workpieces as a result of the high capital cost of vacuum systems and the production constraints of batch processing. It has long been recognized that glow discharge plasmas would play a much larger industrial role if they could be generated at one atmosphere. The One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP), developed at the University of Tennessee's Plasma Sciences Laboratory, is a non-thermal RF plasma operating on displacement currents with the time-resolved characteristics of a classical low pressure DC normal glow discharge. As a glow discharge, the OAUGDP operates with maximum electrical efficiency at the Stoletow point, where the energy input per ion-electron pair is a minimum [1, 2]. Several interdisciplinary teams have investigated potential applications of the OAUGDP. These teams included collaborators from the UTK Textiles and Nonwovens Development Center (TANDEC), and the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microbiology, and Food Science and Technology, as well as the NASA Langley Research Center. The potential applications of the OAUGDP have all been at one atmosphere and room temperature, using air as the working gas. These applications include sterilizing medical and dental equipment; sterilizable air filters to deal with the "sick building syndrome"; removal of soot from Diesel engine exhaust; subsonic plasma aerodynamic effects, including flow re-attachment to airfoils and boundary layer modification; electrohydrodynamic (EDH) flow control of working gases; increasing the surface energy of materials; improving the adhesion of paints and electroplated layers: improving the wettability and wickability of fabrics; stripping of photoresist; and plasma deposition and directional etching of potential microelectronic relevance. [1] J. R. Roth, Industrial Plasma Engineering

  3. Experimental investigations of the formation of a plasma mirror for high-frequency microwave beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meger, R. A.; Mathew, J.; Gregor, J. A.; Pechacek, R. E.; Fernsler, R. F.; Manheimer, W.; Robson, A. E.

    1995-06-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been studying the use of a magnetically confined plasma sheet as a reflector for high-frequency (X-band) microwaves for broadband radar applications [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-19, 1228 (1991)]. A planar sheet plasma (50 cm×60 cm×1 cm) is produced using a 2-10 kV fast rise time square wave voltage source and a linear hollow cathode. Reproducible plasma distributions with density ≥1.2×1012 cm-3 have been formed in a low-pressure (100-500 mTorr of air) chamber located inside of a 100-300 G uniform magnetic field. One to ten pulse bursts of 20-1000 μs duration plasma sheets have been produced with pulse repetition frequencies of up to 10 kHz. Turn on and off times of the plasma are less than 10 μs each. The far-field antenna pattern of microwaves reflected off the plasma sheet is similar to that from a metal plate at the same location [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci PS-20, 1036 (1992)]. Interferometer measurements show the critical surface to remain nearly stationary during the current pulse. Plasma density measurements and optical emissions indicate that the plasma is produced by a flux of energetic electrons formed near the hollow cathode. The sheet appears to be stable to driver voltage and current fluctuations (NRL Memorandum Report No. 7461, 28 March 1994, NTIS Document No. AD-A278758).

  4. The Effect of the Saharan Air Layer on the Formation of Hurricane Isabel (2003) Simulated with AIRS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, iguang; Braun, Scott A.; Qu, John J.

    2006-01-01

    The crucial physics of how the atmosphere really accomplishes the tropical cyclogenesis process is still poorly understood. The presence of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), an elevated mixed layer of warm and dry air that extends from Africa to the tropical Atlantic and contains a substantial amount of mineral dust, adds more complexity to the tropical cyclogenesis process in the Atlantic basin. The impact of the SAL on tropical cyclogenesis is still uncertain. Karyampudi and Carlson (1988) conclude that a strong SAL can potentially aid tropical cyclone development while Dunion and Velden (2004) argue that the SAL generally inhibits tropical cyclogenesis and intensification. Advancing our understanding of the physical mechanisms of tropical cyclogenesis and the associated roles of the SAL strongly depends on the improvement in the observations over the data-sparse ocean areas. After the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), and the microwave Humidity Sounder of Brazil (HSB) were launched with the NASA Aqua satellite in 2002, new data products retrieved from the AIRS suite became available for studying the effect of the warm, dry air mass associated with the SAL (referred to as the thermodynamic effect). The vertical profiles of the AIRS retrieved temperature and humidity provide an unprecedented opportunity to examine the thermodynamic effect of the SAL. The observational data can be analyzed and assimilated into numerical models, in which the model thermodynamic state is allowed to relax to the observed state from AIRS data. The objective of this study is to numerically demonstrate that the thermodynamic effect of the SAL on the formation of Hurricane Isabel (2003) can be largely simulated through nudging of the AIRS data.

  5. Formation mechanism of steep wave front in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, M. Kasuya, N.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kobayashi, T.; Arakawa, H.; Itoh, K.; Fukunaga, K.; Yamada, T.; Yagi, M.

    2015-03-15

    Bifurcation from a streamer to a solitary drift wave is obtained in three dimensional simulation of resistive drift waves in cylindrical plasmas. The solitary drift wave is observed in the regime where the collisional transport is important as well as fluctuation induced transport. The solitary drift wave forms a steep wave front in the azimuthal direction. The phase of higher harmonic modes are locked to that of the fundamental mode, so that the steep wave front is sustained for a long time compared to the typical time scale of the drift wave oscillation. The phase entrainment between the fundamental and second harmonic modes is studied, and the azimuthal structure of the stationary solution is found to be characterized by a parameter which is determined by the deviation of the fluctuations from the Boltzmann relation. There are two solutions of the azimuthal structures, which have steep wave front facing forward and backward in the wave propagation direction, respectively. The selection criterion of these solutions is derived theoretically from the stability of the phase entrainment. The simulation result and experimental observations are found to be consistent with the theoretical prediction.

  6. A VHF driven coaxial atmospheric air plasma: electrical and optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrns, Brandon; Wooten, Daniel; Lindsay, Alexander; Shannon, Steven

    2012-05-01

    A coaxially driven VHF plasma source for atmospheric air plasmas has been built and characterized. Electrical and optical characterization of this source present a unique operating regime when compared to state of the art atmospheric systems such as dielectric barrier discharge, pulsed dc, microwave, or ac blown arc discharges. The discharge does not appear to produce streamers or arcs, but instead remains as a steady-state glow located at the end of the inner coaxial power feed. Plasma impedance was determined by comparing the loaded and unloaded impedance of the coaxial source RF input; this termination impedance was combined with a simple high-frequency global model to estimate an electron density of approximately 1011 cm-3 at 400 W delivered power in air. Optical emission characterization of the source shows a monotonic increase in emission with respect with power; the relative intensity of the peaks from excited species, however, remains constant over a power range from 300 to 600 W. This unique source geometry presents a possible pathway for high gas throughput, large area, high power density processes such as surface modification, air purification, media removal and chemical surface treatment.

  7. Ultrabroad Terahertz Spectrum Generation from an Air-Based Filament Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, V. A.; Kosareva, O. G.; Panov, N. A.; Shipilo, D. E.; Solyankin, P. M.; Esaulkov, M. N.; González de Alaiza Martínez, P.; Shkurinov, A. P.; Makarov, V. A.; Bergé, L.; Chin, S. L.

    2016-02-01

    We have solved the long-standing problem of the mechanism of terahertz (THz) generation by a two-color filament in air and found that both neutrals and plasma contribute to the radiation. We reveal that the contribution from neutrals by four-wave mixing is much weaker and higher in frequency than the distinctive plasma lower-frequency contribution. The former is in the forward direction while the latter is in a cone and reveals an abrupt down-shift to the plasma frequency. Ring-shaped spatial distributions of the THz radiation are shown to be of universal nature and they occur in both collimated and focusing propagation geometries. Experimental measurements of the frequency-angular spectrum generated by 130-fs laser pulses agree with numerical simulations based on a unidirectional pulse propagation model.

  8. Experimental investigation on plasma-assisted combustion characteristics of premixed propane/air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingjian; He, Liming; Yu, Jinlu; Zeng, Hao; Jin, Tao

    2015-06-01

    A detailed study on the plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) characteristics of premixed propane/air mixture is presented. The PAC is measured electrically, as well as optically with a multichannel spectrometer. The characteristics are demonstrated by stable combustion temperature and combustion stability limits, and the results are compared with conventional combustion (CC). Stable combustion temperature measurements show that the introduction of PAC into combustion system can increase the stable combustion temperature, and the increment is more notable with an increase of discharge voltage. Besides, the rich and weak limits of combustion stability are both enlarged when plasma is applied into the combustion process and the increase of discharge voltage results in the expansion of combustion stability limits as well. The measurements of temperature head and emission spectrum illustrate that the kinetic enhancement caused by reactive species in plasma is the main enhancement pathway for current combustion system.

  9. Optimization of atmospheric air plasma for degradation of organic dyes in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Chaitanya; Dixit, Y; Milosavljevic, Vladimir; Bourke, Paula; Sullivan, Carl; Cullen, P J

    2017-01-01

    This study optimises the degradation of a cocktail of the dyes methyl orange and bromothymol blue by atmospheric air plasma. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to investigate the efficacy of the plasma process parameters on degradation efficiency. A Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to optimise the degradation of dyes by air plasma discharge. A second order polynomial equation was proposed to predict process efficiency. It was observed that the predicted values are significant (p < 0.001) with coefficients of determination 0.98, 0.96, 0.98 for dye degradation, pH value and ozone concentration, respectively. The analysis of variance results showed that the coefficients of the polynomials for the percentage degradation and ozone concentration responses indicated positive linear effects (p < 0.001), whereas a negative linear effect was found for pH. The positive linear effect of variable emphasises that voltage and treatment time were the most dominant factors (p < 0.001), meaning that higher degradation efficiencies are achieved with an increase in treatment duration. This study showed that a BBD model and RSM could be employed to optimize the colour degradation parameters of non-thermal plasma treated model dyes while minimising the number of experiments required.

  10. Study of the expansion characteristics of a pulsed plasma jet in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuewei, ZHAO; Yonggang, YU; Shanshan, MANG; Xiaochun, XUE

    2017-04-01

    In the background of electrothermal-chemical (ETC) emission, an investigation has been conducted on the characteristics of a freely expanding pulsed plasma jet in air. The evolutionary process of the plasma jet is experimentally investigated using a piezoelectric pressure sensor and a digital high-speed video system. The variation relation in the extended volume, axial displacement and radial displacement of the pulsed plasma jet in atmosphere with time under different discharge voltages and jet breaking pressures is obtained. Based on experiments, a two-dimensional axisymmetric unsteady model is established to analyze the characteristics of the two-phase interface and the variation of flow-field parameters resulting from a pulsed plasma jet into air at a pressure of 1.5–3.5 MPa under three nozzle diameters (3 mm, 4 mm and 5 mm, respectively). The images of the plasma jet reveal a changing shape process, from a quasi-ellipsoid to a conical head and an elongated cylindrical tail. The axial displacement of the jet is always larger than that along the radial direction. The extended volume reveals a single peak distribution with time. Compared to the experiment, the numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental data. The parameters of the jet field mutate at the nozzle exit with a decrease in the parameter pulse near the nozzle, and become more and more gradual and close to environmental parameters. Increasing the injection pressure and nozzle diameter can increase the parameters of the flow field such as the expansion volume of the pulsed plasma jet, the size of the Mach disk and the pressure. In addition, the turbulent mixing in the expansion process is also enhanced.

  11. Ring formation in self-focusing of electromagnetic beams in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faisal, M.; Mishra, S. K.; Verma, M. P.; Sodha, M. S.

    2007-10-15

    This article presents a paraxial theory of ring formation as an initially Gaussian beam propagates in a nonlinear plasma, characterized by significant collisional or ponderomotive nonlinearity. Regions in the axial irradiance-(beam width){sup -2} space, for which the ring formation occurs and the paraxial theory is valid, have been characterized; for typical points in these regions the dependence of the beam width parameter and the radial distribution of irradiance on the distance has been specifically investigated and discussed.

  12. O2 on ganymede: Spectral characteristics and plasma formation mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; Johnson, R.E.; Spencer, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Weak absorption features in the visible reflectance spectrum of Jupiter's satellite Ganymede have been correlated to those observed in the spectrum of molecular oxygen. We examine the spectral characteristics of these absorption features in all phases of O2 and conclude that the molecular oxygen is most likely present at densities similar to the liquid or solid ??-phase. The contribution of O2 to spectral features observed on Ganymede in the near-infrared wavelength region affects the previous estimates of photon pathlength in ice. The concentration of the visible absorption features on the trailing hemisphere of Ganymede suggests an origin due to bombardment by magneto-spheric ions. We derive an approximate O2 formation rate from this mechanism and consider the state of O2 within the surface.

  13. The Air Microwave Yield (AMY) experiment to measure the GHz emission from air shower plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Bohacova, M.; Cataldi, G.; Coluccia, M. R.; Creti, P.; De Mitri, I.; Di Giulio, C.; Engel, R.; Facal San Luis, P.; Iarlori, M.; Martello, D.; Monasor, M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Riegel, M.; Rizi, V.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Salamida, F.; Salina, G.; Settimo, M.; Smida, R.; Verzi, V.; Werner, F.; Williams, C.

    2013-06-01

    The AMY experiment aims to measure the Microwave Bremsstrahlung Radiation (MBR) emitted by air-showers secondary electrons accelerating in collisions with neutral molecules of the atmosphere. The measurements are performed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati INFN National Laboratories and the final purpose is to characterize the process to be used in a next generation detectors of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (up to 1020eV). We describe the experimental set-up and the first test measurement performed in November 2011.

  14. Laser-induced plasmas in air studied using two-color interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zefeng; Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Han, Jiaxun; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2016-08-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved density profiles of Cu atoms, electrons, and compressed air, from laser-induced copper plasmas in air, are measured using fast spectral imaging and two-color interferometry. From the intensified CCD images filtered by a narrow-band-pass filter centered at 515.32 nm, the Cu atoms expansion route is estimated and used to determine the position of the fracture surface between the Cu atoms and the air. Results indicate that the Cu atoms density at distances closer to the target (0-0.4 mm) is quite low, with the maximum density appearing at the edge of the plasma's core being ˜4.6 × 1024 m-3 at 304 ns. The free electrons are mainly located in the internal region of the plume, which is supposed to have a higher temperature. The density of the shock wave is (4-6) × 1025 m-3, corresponding to air compression of a factor of 1.7-2.5.

  15. Modeling of the merging, liner formation, implosion of hypervelocity plasma jets for the PLX- α project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; Schillo, Kevin; Samulyak, Roman; Stoltz, Peter; Beckwith, Kris

    2015-11-01

    A suite of numerical tools will support the conical and 4 π plasma-liner-formation experiments for the PLX- α project. A new Lagrangian particles (LP) method will provide detailed studies of the merging of plasma jets and plasma-liner formation/convergence. A 3d smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code will simulate conical (up to 9 jets) and 4 π spherical (up to 60 jets) liner formation and implosion. Both LP and SPH will use the same tabular EOS generated by Propaceos, thermal conductivity, optically thin radiation and physical viscosity models. With LP and SPH,the major objectives are to study Mach-number degradation during jet merging, provide RMS amplitude and wave number of the liner nonuniformity at the leading edge, and develop scaling laws for ram pressure and liner uniformity as a function of jet parameters. USIM, a 3D multi-fluid plasma code, will be used to perform 1D and 2D simulations of plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) to identify initial conditions in which the ``liner gain'' exceeds unity. A brief overview of the modeling program will be provided. Results from SPH modeling to support the PLX- α experimental design will also be presented, including preliminary ram-pressure scaling and non-uniformity characterization.

  16. Modification of plasma proteins by cigarette smoke as measured by protein carbonyl formation.

    PubMed Central

    Reznick, A Z; Cross, C E; Hu, M L; Suzuki, Y J; Khwaja, S; Safadi, A; Motchnik, P A; Packer, L; Halliwell, B

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of human plasma to gas-phase (but not to whole) cigarette smoke (CS) produces oxidative damage to lipids [Frei, Forte, Ames & Cross (1991) Biochem. J. 277, 133-138], which is prevented by ascorbic acid. The ability of CS to induce protein damage was measured by the carbonyl assay and by loss of enzyme activity and protein -SH groups. Both whole and gas-phase CS caused formation of carbonyls in human plasma, which was partially inhibited by GSH but not by ascorbic acid or metal-ion-chelating agents. Isolated albumin exposed to CS showed much faster carbonyl formation (per unit protein) than did whole plasma; damage to isolated albumin was partially prevented by chelating agents. Isolated creatine kinase (CK) lost activity upon exposure to CS much faster than did CK in plasma. Direct addition to plasma of mixtures of some or all of the aldehydes reported to be present in CS caused protein carbonyl formation and inactivation of CK, but neither occurred to the extent produced by CS exposure. PMID:1530591

  17. Air Purification Effect of Positively and Negatively Charged Ions Generated by Discharge Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Kazuo; Nojima, Hideo

    2001-08-01

    In this paper, the air purification effect of positively and negatively charged ions generated by discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure is reported. We have developed a novel ion generation device which consists of a cylindrical glass tube and attached inner and outer mesh electrodes. With the application of AC voltage between the electrodes, positively charged ions and negatively charged ions have been generated at atmospheric pressure. The ion densities of 3.0× 104--7.0× 104 counts/cm3 have been obtained with the AC voltage of 1.8-2.3 kV (effective value). We have examined the air purification properties of this device. By the operation of this device, the initial oxygen nitride (NO) density of 10 ppm in 1 m3 (in cigarette smoke) was decreased to 1 ppm after 30 min. The number of suspended germs in air has been significantly reduced by the use of this type of ion generation device.

  18. Formation of the compression zone in a plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Solyakov, D. G. Petrov, Yu. V.; Garkusha, I. E.; Chebotarev, V. V.; Ladygina, M. S.; Cherednichenko, T. N.; Morgal’, Ya. I.; Kulik, N. V.; Stal’tsov, V. V.; Eliseev, D. V.

    2013-12-15

    Processes occurring in a plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) during the formation of the compression zone are discussed. The paper presents results of measurements of the spatial distribution of the electric current in the plasma flow, the temporal and spatial (along the flow) distributions of the plasma density, and the profiles of the velocity of individual flow layers along the system axis. The spatial distribution of the electromagnetic force in the flow is analyzed. It is shown that the plasma flow is decelerated when approaching the compression zone and reaccelerated after passing it. In this case, the plasma flow velocity decreases from ν = (2–3) × 10{sup 7} cm/s at the MPC output to ν < 10{sup 6} cm/s in the region of maximum compression and then again increases to 10{sup 7} cm/s at a distance of 15–17 cm from the MPC output. In some MPC operating modes, a displacement of the magnetic field from the compression zone and the formation of toroidal electric current vortices in the plasma flow after passing the compression zone were detected.

  19. Study of channel formation and relativistic ultra-short laser pulse propagation in helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changhai; Tian, Ye; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Zhijun; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, plasma channel formation in pure He plasma (ionization electron density 0.01-0.1n c ) interacting with ultra-short relativistic laser pulses (50 fs, >1019 W cm-2) was observed and analyzed. By appropriately selecting the laser pulse and gas backing pressure of the gas jet, a clear density channel longer than 300 μm and wider than 25 μm was achieved in less than 1.5 ps following the passage of the laser pulse, with a radial electron density gradient of ~1023 cm-4 at the channel walls. Numerical simulations for studying the affects of the plasma density, kinetic motion of electrons and ions, and nonlinear laser propagation on the plasma channel formation were carried out, which reproduced the experimental features. These density channels were mainly driven by the radial expulsion of plasma ions, with strong continuous laser self-focusing acting to improve the channeling efficiency. These channels can guide the propagation of ultra-intense laser pulses and supply several advanced applications in high-energy physics, including fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion, plasma-based particle accelerations, and sources of radiation.

  20. Plasma-Jet-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF): Physics and Design for a Plasma Liner Formation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Scott; Cassibry, Jason; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Spherically imploding plasma liners are a potential standoff compression driver for magneto-inertial fusion, which is a hybrid of and operates in an intermediate density between those of magnetic and inertial fusion. We propose to use an array of merging supersonic plasma jets to form a spherically imploding plasma liner. The jets are to be formed by pulsed coaxial guns with contoured electrodes that are placed sufficiently far from the location of target compression such that no hardware is repetitively destroyed. As such, the repetition rate can be higher (e.g., 1 Hz) and ultimately the power-plant economics can be more attractive than most other MIF approaches. During the R&D phase, a high experimental shot rate at reasonably low cost (e.g., < 1 k/shot) may be achieved with excellent diagnostic access, thus enabling a rapid learning rate. After some background on PJMIF and its prospects for reactor-relevant energy gain, this poster describes the physics objectives and design of a proposed 60-gun plasma-liner-formation experiment, which will provide experimental data on: (i) scaling of peak liner ram pressure versus initial jet parameters, (ii) liner non-uniformity characterization and control, and (iii) control of liner profiles for eventual gain optimization.

  1. Peculiarities of the structure formation of nanoscale coatings from the vacuum arc discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrin, D. K.; Pikus, M. I.; Smirnov, E. A.; Lisenkov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper features of the structure formation of nanoscale coatings (TiN)–(AlN)– (Ti–Al–N) in the vacuum arc discharge plasma are considered. The composition and structure of the formed nanoscale coatings are studied. The main factors influencing the quality of the formed coatings are shown.

  2. Effect of pressure on structure and NO sub X formation in CO-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.; Miller, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of nitric oxide formation in a laminar CO-air diffusion flame over a pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The carbon monoxide (CO) issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port coaxially into a coflowing stream of air confined within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. Nitric oxide concentrations from the flame were measured at two carbon monoxide (fuel) flow rates: 73 standard cubic/min and 146 sccm. Comparison of the present data with data in the literature for a methane-air diffusion flame shows that for flames of comparable flame height (8 to 10 mm) and pseudoequivalence ratio (0.162), the molar emission index of a CO-air flame is significantly greater than that of a methane-air flame.

  3. Ammonia formation in N2/H2 plasmas on ITER-relevant plasma facing materials: Surface temperature and N2 plasma content effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, A.; Alegre, D.; Tabarés, F. L.

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia production in N2/H2 direct current glow discharge plasmas, with nitrogen concentrations from 1.5% to 33%, different wall materials (tungsten, stainless steel and aluminium as a proxy for beryllium) and surface temperatures up to 350 °C has been investigated. Ammonia yields on the exposed materials have been deduced, resulting in different values depending on the wall material, its temperature and N2 plasma content. The results indicate weak wall temperature dependence in tungsten and stainless steel. However, wall temperatures above 300 °C have a very clear influence on aluminium walls, as almost all the molecular N2 depleted from the gas phase is converted into ammonia. The amount of implanted N seems to have a direct impact on the ammonia formation yield, pointing to the competition between N implantation and N/H-N/N recombination on the walls as the key mechanism of the ammonia formation.

  4. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  5. Contact-Free Inactivation of Candida albicans Biofilms by Cold Atmospheric Air Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Tetsuji; Isbary, Georg; Heinlin, Julia; Karrer, Sigrid; Klämpfl, Tobias G.; Li, Yang-Fang; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is one of the main species able to form a biofilm on almost any surface, causing both skin and superficial mucosal infections. The worldwide increase in antifungal resistance has led to a decrease in the efficacy of standard therapies, prolonging treatment time and increasing health care costs. Therefore, the aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of atmospheric plasma at room temperature for inactivating C. albicans growing in biofilms without thermally damaging heat-sensitive materials. This so-called cold atmospheric plasma is produced by applying high voltage to accelerate electrons, which ionize the surrounding air, leading to the production of charged particles, reactive species, and photons. A newly developed plasma device was used, which exhibits a large plasma-generating surface area of 9 by 13 cm (117 cm2). Different time points were selected to achieve an optimum inactivation efficacy range of ≥3 log10 to 5 log10 reduction in CFU per milliliter, and the results were compared with those of 70% ethanol. The results obtained show that contact-free antifungal inactivation of Candida biofilms by cold atmospheric plasma is a promising tool for disinfection of surfaces (and items) in both health care settings and the food industry, where ethanol disinfection should be avoided. PMID:22467505

  6. Formation and characterization of hydrophobic glass surface treated by atmospheric pressure He/CH4 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sooryun; Youn Moon, Se

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure helium plasmas, generated in the open air by 13.56 MHz rf power, were applied for the glass surface wettability modification. The plasma gas temperature, measured by the spectroscopic method, was under 400 K which is low enough to treat the samples without thermal damages. The hydrophobicity of the samples determined by the water droplet contact angle method was dependent on the methane gas content and the plasma exposure time. Adding the methane gas by a small amount of 0.25%, the contact angle was remarkably increased from 10° to 83° after the 10 s plasma treatment. From the analysis of the treated surface and the plasma, it was shown that the deposition of alkane functional groups such as C-H stretch, CH2 bend, and CH3 bend was one of the contributing factors for the hydrophobicity development. In addition, the hydrophobic properties lasted over 2 months even after the single treatment. From the results, the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment promises the fast and low-cost method for the thermally-weak surface modification.

  7. Simulations of Plasma-Liner Formation and Implosion for the PLX- α Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samulyak, Roman; Cassibry, Jason; Schillo, Kevin; Shih, Wen; Yates, Kevin; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Detailed numerical studies of the propagation and merger of high-Mach-number plasma jets and the formation and implosion of plasma liners have been performed using the FronTier and SPH codes enhanced with radiation, physical diffusion, and plasma-EOS models. These simulations support the Plasma Liner Experiment-ALPHA (PLX- α) project (see S. Hsu's talk in this session). Simulations predict properties of plasma liners, in particular 4 π-averaged liner density, ram pressure, and Mach number, the degree of non-uniformity, strength of primary and secondary shock waves, and scalings with the number of plasma jets, initial jet parameters, and other input data. In addition to direct analysis of liner states, simulations also provide synthetic data for direct comparison to experimental data from a multi-chord interferometer and survey and high-resolution spectrometers. Code verification and comparisons as well as predictions for the first series of PLX- α experiments with 6 and 7 jets will be presented. Verified against experimental data, both codes will be used for predictive simulations of plasma liners for PLX- α experiments and potential scaled-up future experiments. Supported by the ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  8. Experimental study of current loss and plasma formation in the Z machine post-hole convolute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. R.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jennings, C. A.; McBride, R. D.; Waisman, E. M.; Hutsel, B. T.; Stygar, W. A.; Rose, D. V.; Maron, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The Z pulsed-power generator at Sandia National Laboratories drives high energy density physics experiments with load currents of up to 26 MA. Z utilizes a double post-hole convolute to combine the current from four parallel magnetically insulated transmission lines into a single transmission line just upstream of the load. Current loss is observed in most experiments and is traditionally attributed to inefficient convolute performance. The apparent loss current varies substantially for z-pinch loads with different inductance histories; however, a similar convolute impedance history is observed for all load types. This paper details direct spectroscopic measurements of plasma density, temperature, and apparent and actual plasma closure velocities within the convolute. Spectral measurements indicate a correlation between impedance collapse and plasma formation in the convolute. Absorption features in the spectra show the convolute plasma consists primarily of hydrogen, which likely forms from desorbed electrode contaminant species such as H2O , H2 , and hydrocarbons. Plasma densities increase from 1 ×1016 cm-3 (level of detectability) just before peak current to over 1 ×1017 cm-3 at stagnation (tens of ns later). The density seems to be highest near the cathode surface, with an apparent cathode to anode plasma velocity in the range of 35 - 50 cm /μ s . Similar plasma conditions and convolute impedance histories are observed in experiments with high and low losses, suggesting that losses are driven largely by load dynamics, which determine the voltage on the convolute.

  9. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Applications - Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Cassibry, Jason; Bauer, Bruno S.

    2015-04-27

    The goal of the plasma liner experiment (PLX) was to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach High Energy Density (HED)-relevant (~ 0.1 Mbar) pressures upon stagnation. The plasma liners were to be formed by a spherical array of 30 – 36 railgun-driven hypervelocity plasma jets (Mach 10 – 50). Due to funding and project scope reductions in year two of the project, this initial goal was revised to focus on studies of individual jet propagation, and on two jet merging physics. PLX was a collaboration between a number of partners including Los Alamos National Laboratory, HyperV Technologies, University of New Mexico (UNM), University of Alabama, Huntsville, and University of Nevada, Reno. UNM’s part in the collaboration was primary responsibility for plasma diagnostics. Though full plasma liner experiments could not be performed, the results of single and two jet experiments nevertheless laid important groundwork for future plasma liner investigations. Though challenges were encountered, the results obtained with one and two jets were overwhelmingly positive from a liner formation point of view, and were largely in agreement with predictions of hydrodynamic models.

  10. Formation of imploding plasma liners for fundamental HEDP studies and MIF Standoff Driver Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Cassibry, Jason; Hatcher, Richard; Stanic, Milos

    2013-08-17

    The disciplines of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are characterized by hypervelocity implosions and strong shocks. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is focused on reaching HEDP and/or ICF relevant regimes in excess of 1 Mbar peak pressure by the merging and implosion of discrete plasma jets, as a potentially efficient path towards these extreme conditions in a laboratory. In this work we have presented the first 3D simulations of plasma liner, formation, and implosion by the merging of discrete plasma jets in which ionization, thermal conduction, and radiation are all included in the physics model. The study was conducted by utilizing a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHC) and was a part of the plasma liner experiment (PLX). The salient physics processes of liner formation and implosion are studied, namely vacuum propagation of plasma jets, merging of the jets (liner forming), implosion (liner collapsing), stagnation (peak pressure), and expansion (rarefaction wave disassembling the target). Radiative transport was found to significantly reduce the temperature of the liner during implosion, thus reducing the thermal leaving more pronounced gradients in the plasma liner during the implosion compared with ideal hydrodynamic simulations. These pronounced gradients lead to a greater sensitivity of initial jet geometry and symmetry on peak pressures obtained. Accounting for ionization and transport, many cases gave higher peak pressures than the ideal hydrodynamic simulations. Scaling laws were developed accordingly, creating a non-dimensional parameter space in which performance of an imploding plasma jet liner can be estimated. It is shown that HEDP regimes could be reached with ~ 5 MJ of liner energy, which would translate to roughly 10 to 20 MJ of stored (capacitor) energy. This is a potentially significant improvement over the currently available means via ICF of achieving HEDP and nuclear fusion relevant parameters.

  11. Pattern formation and self-organization in plasmas interacting with surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trelles, Juan Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Pattern formation and self-organization are fascinating phenomena commonly observed in diverse types of biological, chemical and physical systems, including plasmas. These phenomena are often responsible for the occurrence of coherent structures found in nature, such as recirculation cells and spot arrangements; and their understanding and control can have important implications in technology, e.g. from determining the uniformity of plasma surface treatments to electrode erosion rates. This review comprises theoretical, computational and experimental investigations of the formation of spatiotemporal patterns that result from self-organization events due to the interaction of low-temperature plasmas in contact with confining or intervening surfaces, particularly electrodes. The basic definitions associated to pattern formation and self-organization are provided, as well as some of the characteristics of these phenomena within natural and technological contexts, especially those specific to plasmas. Phenomenological aspects of pattern formation include the competition between production/forcing and dissipation/transport processes, as well as nonequilibrium, stability, bifurcation and nonlinear interactions. The mathematical modeling of pattern formation in plasmas has encompassed from theoretical approaches and canonical models, such as reaction-diffusion systems, to drift-diffusion and nonequilibrium fluid flow models. The computational simulation of pattern formation phenomena imposes distinct challenges to numerical methods, such as high sensitivity to numerical approximations and the occurrence of multiple solutions. Representative experimental and numerical investigations of pattern formation and self-organization in diverse types of low-temperature electrical discharges (low and high pressure glow, dielectric barrier and arc discharges, etc) in contact with solid and liquid electrodes are reviewed. Notably, plasmas in contact with liquids, found in diverse

  12. Combined laser induced ignition and plasma spectroscopy: Fundamentals and application to a hydrogen air combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, L.; Okai, K.; Kurosawa, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Combined Laser Induced Ignition and Plasma Spectroscopy (LI2PS) has the potential to give the exact local composition of a mixture at the ignition point and at the ignition time. However, as different laser energies are required to ignite a particular mixture as function of space, the typical approach using two power meters to calibrate the plasma spectroscopy measurement is not well suited. Furthermore, LI2PS requires single shot measurements and therefore high accuracy. In this paper, a novel calibration scheme is presented for application of Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (LIPS) to gaseous analyses. Numerical simulations of air spectra are used to show that species emission can be used directly from the broadband spectra to determine the plasma conditions. The ratio of nitrogen emission around 744 nm and around 870 nm is found to be a sensitive indication of temperature in the emission ranging from 700 to 890 nm. Comparisons with experimental spectra show identical tendencies and validate the findings of the simulations. This approach is used in a partially-premixed hydrogen-air burner. First, helium is used instead of hydrogen. After an explanation of timing issue related to LIPS, it is shown that the calibration required depends only on nitrogen excitation and nitrogen-hydrogen ratio, without the need to know the deposited power. Measurements of the fuel distribution as function of injection momentum and spatial localization are reported. To illustrate the use of such a single shot approach, combined laser ignition and plasma spectroscopy is proposed. In this case, the calibration is based on hydrogen excitation and hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-nitrogen ratio. Results obtained with LI2PS show that ignition is successful only for high power and relatively high hydrogen concentration compared to the local mean. It is expected that LI2PS will become an important tool when dealing with partially-premixed or diffusion flame ignition.

  13. Plasma monitoring of nanoparticles formation in SiH4/H2 discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Giannis; Tsigaras, Giannis; Amanatides, Eleftherios; Mataras, Dimitrios; Plasma Technology Laboratory-Department of Chemical Engineering-University of Patras Team

    2016-09-01

    Radio-frequency SiH4/H2 discharges is the most common technique for the growth of silicon thin films. Nanoparticles formation and uncontrollable agglomeration to dust is common drawback of such type of discharges due to the extensive reactivity of the species produced in the gas phase. In this work, we deposited silicon films in different plasma conditions while monitoring at the same time nanoparticles formation. The experiments were performed under Continuous Wave (CW) and Pulsed Plasma generation in order to control particles formation. Different time-resolved plasma diagnostics, such as Optical Emission Imaging, Laser Light Scattering and self-bias voltage (Vdc) measurements were used for the detection of particles. Mass spectrometry was also used to record higher silanes formation during the deposition. The deposited films were characterized in terms of crystallinity, hydrogen content and optical properties by Laser Raman, Fourier Transformed Infrared and UV/Vis spectroscopy. Finally, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was applied to monitor the morphology and roughness of the films. The properties and the morphology of the deposited films are compared in order to determine the effect of the particles formation on the material's quality.

  14. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs :

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a

  15. Kinetic mechanism of molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air-fuel plasmas.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Igor V; Li, Ting; Lempert, Walter R

    2015-08-13

    This work describes the kinetic mechanism of coupled molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air, H2-air and hydrocarbon-air plasmas sustained by nanosecond pulse discharges (single-pulse or repetitive pulse burst). The model incorporates electron impact processes, state-specific N(2) vibrational energy transfer, reactions of excited electronic species of N(2), O(2), N and O, and 'conventional' chemical reactions (Konnov mechanism). Effects of diffusion and conduction heat transfer, energy coupled to the cathode layer and gasdynamic compression/expansion are incorporated as quasi-zero-dimensional corrections. The model is exercised using a combination of freeware (Bolsig+) and commercial software (ChemKin-Pro). The model predictions are validated using time-resolved measurements of temperature and N(2) vibrational level populations in nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane and sphere-to-sphere geometry; temperature and OH number density after nanosecond pulse burst discharges in lean H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures; and temperature after the nanosecond pulse discharge burst during plasma-assisted ignition of lean H2-mixtures, showing good agreement with the data. The model predictions for OH number density in lean C(3)H(8)-air mixtures differ from the experimental results, over-predicting its absolute value and failing to predict transient OH rise and decay after the discharge burst. The agreement with the data for C(3)H(8)-air is improved considerably if a different conventional hydrocarbon chemistry reaction set (LLNL methane-n-butane flame mechanism) is used. The results of mechanism validation demonstrate its applicability for analysis of plasma chemical oxidation and ignition of low-temperature H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures using nanosecond pulse discharges. Kinetic modelling of low-temperature plasma excited propane-air mixtures demonstrates the need for development of a more accurate

  16. Foam formation and acute air emboli with the maquet paediatric Quadrox I: a word of caution.

    PubMed

    Fouilloux, Virginie; Davey, Lisa; Van Arsdell, Glen S; Honjo, Osami

    2014-07-01

    We report 3 cases of significant foam formation in the venous reservoir with the Maquet Quadrox-I oxygenator and VHK 31 000 reservoir system. All the 3 patients required maximal suction return during procedures, causing pressurization of reservoir and foam formation. Two patients experienced systemic air emboli, which were dealt with by means of retrograde cerebral perfusion and hypothermia with no neurological sequela. These events emphasize the importance of device selection in high-risk patients as well as crisis management.

  17. Plasma-gun-assisted field-reversed configuration formation in a conical θ-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, T. E. Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-04-15

    Injection of plasma via an annular array of coaxial plasma guns during the pre-ionization phase of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation is shown to catalyze the bulk ionization of a neutral gas prefill in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and change the character of outward flux flow during field-reversal from a convective process to a much slower resistive diffusion process. This approach has been found to significantly improve FRC formation in a conical θ-pinch, resulting in a ∼350% increase in trapped flux at typical operating conditions, an expansion of accessible formation parameter space to lower densities and higher temperatures, and a reduction or elimination of several deleterious effects associated with the pre-ionization phase.

  18. Thermodynamic study on the formation of acetylene during coal pyrolysis in the arc plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, W.; Li, F.; Cai, G.; Lu, Y.; Chang, L.

    2009-07-01

    Based on the principle of minimizing the Gibbs free energy, the composition of C-H-O-N-S equilibrium system about acetylene formation during the pyrolysis in arc plasma jet for four kinds of different rank-ordered coals such as Datong, Xianfeng, Yangcheng, and Luan was analyzed and calculated. The results indicated that hydrogen, as the reactive atmosphere, was beneficial to the acetylene formation. The coal ranks and the hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur in coal all could obviously affect the acetylene yield. The mole fraction of acetylene is the maximum when the ratio value of atom H/C was 2. The content of oxygen was related to the acetylene yield, but it does not compete with CO formation. These agreed with the experimental results, and they could help to select the coal type for the production of acetylene through plasma pyrolysis process.

  19. Plasma-gun-assisted field-reversed configuration formation in a conical θ-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-04-01

    Injection of plasma via an annular array of coaxial plasma guns during the pre-ionization phase of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation is shown to catalyze the bulk ionization of a neutral gas prefill in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and change the character of outward flux flow during field-reversal from a convective process to a much slower resistive diffusion process. This approach has been found to significantly improve FRC formation in a conical θ-pinch, resulting in a ˜350% increase in trapped flux at typical operating conditions, an expansion of accessible formation parameter space to lower densities and higher temperatures, and a reduction or elimination of several deleterious effects associated with the pre-ionization phase.

  20. Plasma-gun-assisted field-reversed configuration formation in a conical θ-pinch

    DOE PAGES

    Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-04-29

    We show through injection of plasma via an annular array of coaxial plasma guns, during the pre-ionization phase of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation how to catalyze the bulk ionization of a neutral gas prefill in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and change the character of outward flux flow during field-reversal from a convective process to a much slower resistive diffusion process. Our approach has been found to significantly improve FRC formation in a conical θ-pinch, resulting in a ~350% increase in trapped flux at typical operating conditions, an expansion of accessible formation parameter space to lower densitiesmore » and higher temperatures, and a reduction or elimination of several deleterious effects associated with the pre-ionization phase.« less

  1. Plasma-gun-assisted field-reversed configuration formation in a conical θ-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-04-29

    We show through injection of plasma via an annular array of coaxial plasma guns, during the pre-ionization phase of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation how to catalyze the bulk ionization of a neutral gas prefill in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and change the character of outward flux flow during field-reversal from a convective process to a much slower resistive diffusion process. Our approach has been found to significantly improve FRC formation in a conical θ-pinch, resulting in a ~350% increase in trapped flux at typical operating conditions, an expansion of accessible formation parameter space to lower densities and higher temperatures, and a reduction or elimination of several deleterious effects associated with the pre-ionization phase.

  2. Influence of air pressure on the performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Min; Wu, Yun; Li, Ying-hong; Zong, Hao-hua; Song, Hui-min; Liang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) has a wide application prospect in the high-speed flow control field for its high jet velocity. In this paper, the influence of the air pressure on the performance of a two-electrode PSJA is investigated by the schlieren method in a large range from 7 kPa to 100 kPa. The energy consumed by the PSJA is roughly the same for all the pressure levels. Traces of the precursor shock wave velocity and the jet front velocity vary a lot for different pressures. The precursor shock wave velocity first decreases gradually and then remains at 345 m/s as the air pressure increases. The peak jet front velocity always appears at the first appearance of a jet, and it decreases gradually with the increase of the air pressure. A maximum precursor shock wave velocity of 520 m/s and a maximum jet front velocity of 440 m/s are observed at the pressure of 7 kPa. The averaged jet velocity in one period ranges from 44 m/s to 54 m/s for all air pressures, and it drops with the rising of the air pressure. High velocities of the precursor shock wave and the jet front indicate that this type of PSJA can still be used to influence the high-speed flow field at 7 kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51407197, 51522606, 51336011, 91541120, and 11472306).

  3. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250-1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  4. Field demonstration and commercialization of silent discharge plasma hazardous air pollutant control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.; Coogan, J.J.; Korzekwa, R.A.; Secker, D.A.; Reimers, R.F.; Herrmann, P.G.; Chase, P.J.; Gross, M.P. |; Jones, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    Silent electrical discharge plasma (dielectric barrier) reactors can decompose gas-phase pollutants by free-radical attack or electron-induced fragmentation. The radicals or electrons are produced by the large average volume nonthermal plasmas generated in the reactor. In the past decade, the barrier configuration has attracted attention for destroying toxic chemical agents for the military, removing harmful greenhouse gases, and treating other environmentally- hazardous chemical compounds. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have been studying the silent discharge plasma (SDP) for processing gaseous-based hazardous chemicals for approximately five years. The key objective is to convert hazardous or toxic chemicals into non-hazardous compounds or into materials which are more easily managed. The main applications have been for treating off-gases from thermal treatment units, and for abating hazardous air-pollutant emissions (e.g., industrial air emissions, vapors extracted from contaminated soil or groundwater). In this paper, we will summarize the basic principles of SDP processing, discuss illustrative applications of the technology, and present results from small-scale field tests that are relevant to our commercialization effort.

  5. Discharge modes of a DC operated atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen; Pei, Xuekai; Kredl, Jana; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    By flowing air or nitrogen through a microhollow cathode discharge geometry an afterglow plasma jet can be generated at atmospheric pressure in air. The plasma jet has been successfully used for the inactivation of bacteria and yeast. The responsible reaction chemistry is based on the production of high concentrations of nitric oxide. Production yields depend in particular on gas flow rate and energy dissipated in the plasma. The same parameters also determine different modes of operation for the jet. A true DC operation is achieved for low to moderate gas flow rate of about 1 slm and discharge currents on the order of 10 mA. When increasing the gas flow rate to 10 slm the operation is changing to a self-pulsing mode with characteristics similar to the ones observed for a transient spark. By increasing the current a DC operation can be achieved again also at higher gas flow rates. The parameter regimes for different modes of operation can be described by the reduced electric field E/N.

  6. Latest Researches Advances of Plasma Spraying: From Splat to Coating Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.; Goutier, S.

    2016-12-01

    The plasma spray process with solid feedstock, mainly ceramics powders, studied since the sixties is now a mature technology. The plasma jet and particle in-flight characterizations are now well established. The use of computer-aided robot trajectory allows spraying on industrial parts with complex geometries. Works about splat formation have shown the importance of: the substrate preheating over the transition temperature to get rid of adsorbates and condensates, substrate chemistry, crystal structure and substrate temperature during the whole coating process. These studies showed that coating properties strongly depend on the splat formation and layering. The first part of this work deals with a summary of conventional plasma spraying key points. The second part presents the current knowledge in plasma spraying with liquid feedstock, technology developed for about two decades with suspensions of particles below micrometers or solutions of precursors that form particles a few micrometers sized through precipitation. Coatings are finely structured and even nanostructured with properties arousing the interest of researchers. However, the technology is by far more complex than the conventional ones. The main conclusions are that models should be developed further, plasma torches and injection setups adapted, and new measuring techniques to reliably characterize these small particles must be designed.

  7. Collisionless electrostatic shock formation and ion acceleration in intense laser interactions with near critical density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Weng, S. M.; Li, Y. T.; Yuan, D. W.; Chen, M.; Mulser, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.; Yu, L. L.; Zheng, X. L.; Zhang, J.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock formation and the subsequent ion acceleration have been studied in near critical density plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulations show that both the speed of laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock and the energies of shock-accelerated ions can be greatly enhanced due to fast laser propagation in near critical density plasmas. However, a response time longer than tens of laser wave cycles is required before the shock formation in a near critical density plasma, in contrast to the quick shock formation in a highly overdense target. More important, we find that some ions can be reflected by the collisionless shock even if the electrostatic potential jump across the shock is smaller than the ion kinetic energy in the shock frame, which seems against the conventional ion-reflection condition. These anomalous ion reflections are attributed to the strong time-oscillating electric field accompanying the laser-driven collisionless shock in a near critical density plasma.

  8. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2014-08-15

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000 ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ∼600 ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  9. Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve K-OMS-2 as catalyst in post plasma-catalysis for trichloroethylene degradation in humid air.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh, M T; Giraudon, J-M; Vandenbroucke, A M; Morent, R; De Geyter, N; Lamonier, J-F

    2016-08-15

    The total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in air at low relative humidity (RH=10%) in the presence of CO2 (520ppmv) was investigated in function of energy density using an atmospheric pressure negative DC luminescent glow discharge combined with a cryptomelane catalyst positioned downstream of the plasma reactor at a temperature of 150°C. When using Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) alone, it is found a low COx (x=1-2) yield in agreement with the detection of gaseous polychlorinated by-products in the outlet stream as well as ozone which is an harmful pollutant. Introduction of cryptomelane enhanced trichloroethylene removal, totally inhibited plasma ozone formation and increased significantly the COx yield. The improved performances of the hybrid system were mainly ascribed to the total destruction of plasma generated ozone on cryptomelane surface to produce active oxygen species. Consequently these active oxygen species greatly enhanced the abatement of the plasma non-reacted TCE and completely destroyed the hazardous plasma generated polychlorinated intermediates. The facile redox of Mn species associated with oxygen vacancies and mobility as well as the textural properties of the catalyst might also contribute as a whole to the efficiency of the process.

  10. In vivo stimulation of bone formation by aluminum and oxygen plasma surface-modified magnesium implants.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Man; Zhao, Ying; Tam, Vivian; Wu, Shuilin; Chu, Paul K; Zheng, Yufeng; To, Michael Kai Tsun; Leung, Frankie K L; Luk, Keith D K; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Yeung, Kelvin W K

    2013-12-01

    A newly developed magnesium implant is used to stimulate bone formation in vivo. The magnesium implant after undergoing dual aluminum and oxygen plasma implantation is able to suppress rapid corrosion, leaching of magnesium ions, as well as hydrogen gas release from the biodegradable alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF). No released aluminum is detected from the SBF extract and enhanced corrosion resistance properties are confirmed by electrochemical tests. In vitro studies reveal enhanced growth of GFP mouse osteoblasts on the aluminum oxide coated sample, but not on the untreated sample. In addition to that a small amount (50 ppm) of magnesium ions can enhance osteogenic differentiation as reported previously, our present data show a low concentration of hydrogen can give rise to the same effect. To compare the bone volume change between the plasma-treated magnesium implant and untreated control, micro-computed tomography is performed and the plasma-treated implant is found to induce significant new bone formation adjacent to the implant from day 1 until the end of the animal study. On the contrary, bone loss is observed during the first week post-operation from the untreated magnesium sample. Owing to the protection offered by the Al2O3 layer, the plasma-treated implant degrades more slowly and the small amount of released magnesium ions stimulate new bone formation locally as revealed by histological analyses. Scanning electron microscopy discloses that the Al2O3 layer at the bone-implant interface is still present two months after implantation. In addition, no inflammation or tissue necrosis is observed from both treated and untreated implants. These promising results suggest that the plasma-treated magnesium implant can stimulate bone formation in vivo in a minimal invasive way and without causing post-operative complications.

  11. Formation of surface nano-structures by plasma expansion induced by highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Moslem, W. M.; El-Said, A. S.

    2012-12-15

    Slow highly charged ions (HCIs) create surface nano-structures (nano-hillocks) on the quartz surface. The formation of hillocks was only possible by surpassing a potential energy threshold. By using the plasma expansion approach with suitable hydrodynamic equations, the creation mechanism of the nano-hillocks induced by HCIs is explained. Numerical analysis reveal that within the nanoscale created plasma region, the increase of the temperature causes an increase of the self-similar solution validity domain, and consequently the surface nano-hillocks become taller. Furthermore, the presence of the negative (positive) nano-dust particles would lead to increase (decrease) the nano-hillocks height.

  12. Basic Aspects of the Formation and Activation of Boron Junctions Using Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zschaetzsch, G.; Vandervorst, W.; Hoffmann, T.; Goossens, J.; Everaert, J.-L.; Agua Borniquel, J. I. del; Poon, T.

    2008-11-03

    This study investigates the basic aspects of junction formation using Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation using BF{sub 3} and addresses the role of (pre)amorphization, C(F)-co-implantation, plasma parameters (bias, dose) and the thermal anneal cycle (spike versus msec laser anneal). The basic physics are studied using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, sheet resistance and using four point probe and RsL. Profiles with junction depths ranging from 10-12 nm and sheet resistance values below 800 Ohm/sq are readily achievable.

  13. Plasma ion dynamics and beam formation in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gambino, N.; Chikin, S.

    2010-02-15

    In electron cyclotron resonance ion sources it has been demonstrated that plasma heating may be improved by means of different microwave to plasma coupling mechanisms, including the ''frequency tuning'' and the ''two frequency heating''. These techniques affect evidently the electron dynamics, but the relationship with the ion dynamics has not been investigated in details up to now. Here we will try to outline these relations: through the study of ion dynamics we may try to understand how to optimize the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources brightness. A simple model of the ion confinement and beam formation will be presented, based on particle-in-cell and single particle simulations.

  14. Local Transport Barrier Formation and Relaxation in Reversed Shear Plasmas on TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synakowski, E. J.

    1996-11-01

    Central to discussions of transport barrier formation and sustainment in the plasma core or edge is E× B shear stabilization of plasma turbulence. It has also been suggested that the low core current densities in TFTR reversed shear plasmas yield large gradients in the Shafranov shift that in themselves stabilize the dominant modes in the core of these plasmas without the benefit of E× B shear. (M. Beer, invited presentation, this meeting) Examined here are the possibilities that one, both, or neither mechanism is responsible for the improved core confinement of TFTR Enhanced Reversed Shear (ERS) plasmas. The difficulty in separating the influence of both effects centers in part on the fact that large Shafranov shifts are accompanied by large pressure gradients, implying that shift-induced stabilization will always be favorable when pressure-gradient-driven E× B shear is expected to be large. The roles of these two mechanisms are separated on TFTR by varying the local radial electric field through changes in the velocity shear induced by different combinations of co- and counter-injection of neutral beams at constant heating power. Co- and counter-injection provide the opportunity of generating V_φ-driven contributions to the E× B shear that add both destructively and constructively to the nabla p-driven term in the radial force balance equation. Significant variations in the E× B shear at and near the transport barrier region can thus be realized, permitting detailed examinations of the response of local transport to changes in the local radial electric field with small variations in the Shafranov shift. The relation between shearing rates, predicted growth rates, and the threshold behavior of local barrier formation and losses in confinement will be discussed. Changes in local fluctuation behavior across the transition into and out of ERS confinement will also be examined for these experiments. The characteristics and power thresholds of barrier formation

  15. Transient Plasma Induced Production of OH and its Effects on Ignition in Atmospheric CH4-AIR Quiescent Mixtures (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Sinibaldi, C. Brophy, J. Hoke, F. Schauer, J. Corrigan , J. Yu, E. Barbour, and R. Hanson, “Transient Plasma Ignition for Delay Reduction in Pulse Detonation...contains color. PAO Case Number: WPAFB 07-0549, 29 Nov 2007. 14. ABSTRACT Transient plasma from a 60 kV, 70 ns pulse induced OH production in air...quiescent mixtures inside a cylindrical chamber. The chamber is filled with ambient air or a CH4/dry-air mixture, and a 60 kV electrical pulse 70 ns

  16. The formation of reverse shocks in magnetized high energy density supersonic plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: l.suttle10@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Swadling, G. F.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Grouchy, P. de; Hall, G. N.; Hare, J. D.; Kalmoni, N.; Niasse, N.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Burgess, D.; Clemens, A.; Ciardi, A.; Sheng, L.; Yuan, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    A new experimental platform was developed, based on the use of supersonic plasma flow from the ablation stage of an inverse wire array z-pinch, for studies of shocks in magnetized high energy density physics plasmas in a well-defined and diagnosable 1-D interaction geometry. The mechanism of flow generation ensures that the plasma flow (Re{sub M} ∼ 50, M{sub S} ∼ 5, M{sub A} ∼ 8, V{sub flow} ≈ 100 km/s) has a frozen-in magnetic field at a level sufficient to affect shocks formed by its interaction with obstacles. It is found that in addition to the expected accumulation of stagnated plasma in a thin layer at the surface of a planar obstacle, the presence of the magnetic field leads to the formation of an additional detached density jump in the upstream plasma, at a distance of ∼c/ω{sub pi} from the obstacle. Analysis of the data obtained with Thomson scattering, interferometry, and local magnetic probes suggests that the sub-shock develops due to the pile-up of the magnetic flux advected by the plasma flow.

  17. PIC Simulation of RF Plasma Sheath Formation and Initial Validation of Optical Diagnostics using HPC Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icenhour, Casey; Exum, Ashe; Martin, Elijah; Green, David; Smithe, David; Shannon, Steven

    2014-10-01

    The coupling of experiment and simulation to elucidate near field physics above ICRF antennae presents challenges on both the experimental and computational side. In order to analyze this region, a new optical diagnostic utilizing active and passive spectroscopy is used to determine the structure of the electric fields within the sheath region. Parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields with respect to the sheath electric field have been presented. This work focuses on the validation of these measurements utilizing the Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation method in conjunction with High Performance Computing (HPC) resources on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Plasma parameters of interest include electron density, electron temperature, plasma potentials, and RF plasma sheath voltages and thicknesses. The plasma is modeled utilizing the VSim plasma simulation tool, developed by the Tech-X Corporation. The implementation used here is a two-dimensional electromagnetic model of the experimental setup. The overall goal of this study is to develop models for complex RF plasma systems and to help outline the physics of RF sheath formation and subsequent power loss on ICRF antennas in systems such as ITER. This work is carried out with the support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Tech-X Corporation.

  18. Dust particle charge screening in the dry-air plasma produced by an external ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, I. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2015-08-15

    The ionic composition of the plasma produced by an external ionization source in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature and the screening of the electric field of a dust particle in such a plasma have been investigated. The point sink model based on the diffusion-drift approximation has been used to solve the screening problem. We have established that the main species of ions in the plasma under consideration are O{sub 4}{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, and O{sub 4}{sup -} and that the dust particle potential distribution is described by a superposition of four exponentials with four different constants. We show that the first constant coincides with the inverse Debye length, the second is described by the inverse ambipolar diffusion length of the positive and negative plasma components in the characteristic time of their recombination, the third is determined by the conversion of negative ions, and the fourth is determined by the attachment and recombination of electrons and diatomic ions.

  19. Study of a 2.45 GHz microwave micro-plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorio, J.; Synek, P.; Alves, L. L.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Leroy, O.; Teulé-Gay, L.

    2007-10-01

    This paper studies a 2.45 GHz microwave micro-plasma source, working in air at atmospheric pressure. The discharge, similar to the one developed by Kono et al [1], is sustained within a slit (50-200 μm wide and 1.4cm width) delimited by two metallic blades placed at one end of a microstrip line. At the other end, a movable short circuit works as an impedance matching unit. The plasma source is placed inside a microwave absorbent box. The power coupling is analyzed theoretically by using the commercial software CST Microwave Studio, and experimentally by taking the ratio of the reflected to incident power, with and without plasma and for different slit sizes. A spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy study was also realized, using the SPECAIR software [2] to deduce the gas temperature Tg along the plasma width. In general, Tg is found between 650 and 1650 K, for 60-140W input power and 50-200 μm slit size. [1] A. Kono, T. Sugiyama, T. Goto, H. Furuhashi, Y. Uchida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. Vol. 40 (2001) pp. L238-L241 [2] http://www.specair-radiation.net/

  20. Non-thermal air plasma promotes the healing of acute skin wounds in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kubinova, S.; Zaviskova, K.; Uherkova, L.; Zablotskii, V.; Churpita, O.; Lunov, O.; Dejneka, A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has nonspecific antibacterial effects, and can be applied as an effective tool for the treatment of chronic wounds and other skin pathologies. In this study we analysed the effect of NTP on the healing of the full-thickness acute skin wound model in rats. We utilised a single jet NTP system generating atmospheric pressure air plasma, with ion volume density 5 · 1017 m−3 and gas temperature 30–35 °C. The skin wounds were exposed to three daily plasma treatments for 1 or 2 minutes and were evaluated 3, 7 and 14 days after the wounding by histological and gene expression analysis. NTP treatment significantly enhanced epithelization and wound contraction on day 7 when compared to the untreated wounds. Macrophage infiltration into the wound area was not affected by the NTP treatment. Gene expression analysis did not indicate an increased inflammatory reaction or a disruption of the wound healing process; transient enhancement of inflammatory marker upregulation was found after NTP treatment on day 7. In summary, NTP treatment had improved the healing efficacy of acute skin wounds without noticeable side effects and concomitant activation of pro-inflammatory signalling. The obtained results highlight the favourability of plasma applications for wound therapy in clinics. PMID:28338059

  1. Diffuse plasma treatment of polyamide 66 fabric in atmospheric pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Peng, Ming-yang; Teng, Yun; Gao, Guozhen

    2016-01-01

    The polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics are hard to be colored or glued in industrial production due to the poor hydrophily. Diffuse plasma is a kind of non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure in air. This paper proposes that large-scale diffuse plasma generated between wire electrodes can be employed for improving the hydrophily of PA66 fabrics. A repetitive nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor using a cylindrical wire electrode configuration is presented, which can generate large-scale non-thermal plasmas steadily at atmospheric pressure without any barrier dielectric. Then the reactor is used to treat PA66 fabrics in different discharge conditions. The hydrophilicity property of modified PA66 is measured by wicking test method. The modified PA66 is also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to prove the surface changes in physical microstructure and chemical functional groups, respectively. What's more, the effects of treatment time and treatment frequency on surface modification are investigated and discussed.

  2. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanguo; Li, Ying; Cao, Peng; Zhao, Hongjie

    2013-07-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet.

  3. Air-water microwave plasma torch as a NO source for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C. M.; Gordiets, B.; Tatarova, E.; Henriques, J.; Dias, F. M.

    2012-04-01

    A surface wave (2.45 GHz) driven, atmospheric plasma torch in air with a small admixture of water vapor (2%) is investigated as a source of exogenic NO. A 1D theoretical model of this source based on a self-consistent treatment of particles kinetics, gas dynamics, gas thermal balance, and wave electrodynamics is developed. Mass spectrometry is used to determine the relative NO(X) number density in the exhaust stream and validate the model predictions. The relative NO(X) density reaches values of up to 3% in the discharge zone, the maximum values being observed at the higher powers (400 W) and the lower gas flow rates (500 sccm). The NO(X) relative density is nearly constant along the afterglow plasma jet, with values between 1.1% and 1.6% for microwave powers and gas flow rates in the range 200-400 W and 500-2000 sccm, respectively.

  4. Spectroscopic analysis of the excitation transfer from background air to diffusing aluminum laser produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribière, M.; Karabourniotis, D.; Chéron, B. G.

    2009-04-01

    During the relaxation of the plasma plume generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target, a pronounced intensity enhancement is observed at the central wavelength of the 396.15 nm self-reversed resonant line. This spectral special feature is analyzed and related to the interaction of the plasma edge with the background air excited by the shockwave, prompt electrons, and extreme ultraviolet radiation produced at the earliest times of the ablation. In this article, the electron density, the aluminum ground state, and resonant level populations are determined from the fitting of the 396.15 nm calculated line profile to the experimental one at two background pressures (100 and 1000 Pa). The evolution of these densities is derived from experiments performed at delays, after the laser pulse arrival, ranging from 120 to 180 ns.

  5. Air plasma gasification of RDF as a prospective method for reduction of carbon dioxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsev, A. N.; Kumkova, I. I.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Popov, V. E.; Shtengel', S. V.; Ufimtsev, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    Waste disposal dumps are one of sources of carbonic gas penetration in the atmosphere. The waste is treated into RDF (refuse-derived fuel) and used in boilers for electric power or heat generation for decrease in carbonic gas emissions in the atmosphere. In industry power stations on the basis of the combined cycle have the highest efficiency of burning. The paper deals with the application of an air-plasma gasifier using the down draft scheme of RDF transformation into synthesis gas, which afterwards can be used in the combined cycle. Results of calculations of the process characteristics for various RDF compositions are presented. The advantage of the plasma method in comparison with autothermal one is shown. Experimental data are shown.

  6. Atmospheric pressure discharge plasma decomposition for gaseous air contaminants -- Trichlorotrifluoroethane and trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Tetsuji; Yamashita, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Tadashi; Masuda, Senichi

    1996-03-01

    The decomposition performance of gaseous environmental destructive contaminants in air by using atmospheric pressure discharged plasma including the surface discharge induced plasma chemical processing (SPCP) was examined. The main contaminants tested were chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-113) and trichloroethylene, typically. The discharge exciting frequency range studied was wide--50 Hz to 50 kHz. Results showed the low frequency discharge requires high voltage to inject high electric power in the gas and to decompose the contaminants. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was used to analyze discharge products of dense CFC-113 or trichloroethylene. Among the detected products were HCl, CClFO, and CHCl{sub 3}. Two different electrode configurations; the silent discharge (coaxial) electrode and the coil-electrode were also tested and compared to each other as a gas reactor.

  7. Investigation of mechanism of anode plasma formation in ion diode with dielectric anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, A.

    2015-10-01

    The results of investigation of the anode plasma formation in a diode with a passive anode in magnetic insulation mode are presented. The experiments have been conducted using the BIPPAB-450 ion accelerator (350-400 kV, 6-8 kA, 80 ns) with a focusing conical diode with Br external magnetic field (a barrel diode). For analysis of plasma formation at the anode and the distribution of the ions beam energy density, infrared imaging diagnostics (spatial resolution of 1-2 mm) is used. For analysis of the ion beam composition, time-of-flight diagnostics (temporal resolution of 1 ns) were used. Our studies have shown that when the magnetic induction in the A-C gap is much larger than the critical value, the ion beam energy density is close to the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir limit on the entire working surface of the diode. Formation of anode plasma takes place only by the flashover of the dielectric anode surface. In this mode, the ion beam consists primarily of singly ionized carbon ions, and the delay of the start of formation of the anode plasma is 10-15 ns. By reducing the magnetic induction in the A-C gap to a value close to the critical one, the ion beam energy density is 3-6 times higher than that calculated by the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir limit, but the energy density of the ion beam is non-uniform in cross-section. In this mode, the anode plasma formation occurs due to ionization of the anode material with accelerated electrons. In this mode, also, the delay in the start of the formation of the anode plasma is much smaller and the degree of ionization of carbon ions is higher. In all modes occurred effective suppression of the electronic component of the total current, and the diode impedance was 20-30 times higher than the values calculated for the mode without magnetic insulation of the electrons. The divergence of the ion beam was 4.5°-6°.

  8. Investigation of mechanism of anode plasma formation in ion diode with dielectric anode

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A.

    2015-10-15

    The results of investigation of the anode plasma formation in a diode with a passive anode in magnetic insulation mode are presented. The experiments have been conducted using the BIPPAB-450 ion accelerator (350–400 kV, 6–8 kA, 80 ns) with a focusing conical diode with B{sub r} external magnetic field (a barrel diode). For analysis of plasma formation at the anode and the distribution of the ions beam energy density, infrared imaging diagnostics (spatial resolution of 1–2 mm) is used. For analysis of the ion beam composition, time-of-flight diagnostics (temporal resolution of 1 ns) were used. Our studies have shown that when the magnetic induction in the A-C gap is much larger than the critical value, the ion beam energy density is close to the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir limit on the entire working surface of the diode. Formation of anode plasma takes place only by the flashover of the dielectric anode surface. In this mode, the ion beam consists primarily of singly ionized carbon ions, and the delay of the start of formation of the anode plasma is 10–15 ns. By reducing the magnetic induction in the A-C gap to a value close to the critical one, the ion beam energy density is 3–6 times higher than that calculated by the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir limit, but the energy density of the ion beam is non-uniform in cross-section. In this mode, the anode plasma formation occurs due to ionization of the anode material with accelerated electrons. In this mode, also, the delay in the start of the formation of the anode plasma is much smaller and the degree of ionization of carbon ions is higher. In all modes occurred effective suppression of the electronic component of the total current, and the diode impedance was 20–30 times higher than the values calculated for the mode without magnetic insulation of the electrons. The divergence of the ion beam was 4.5°–6°.

  9. A Scaling Law of Plasma Confining Potential Formation with Electron Cyclotron Heating Powers in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, T.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Fukai, T.; Yoshida, M.; Minami, R.; Kiminami, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Imai, T.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-15

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects are theoretically and experimentally investigated in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In GAMMA 10, the main tandem-mirror operations from 1979 to 2003 are characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials, and (ii) a hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures. In this paper, the externally controllable parameter scaling including electron cyclotron heating (ECH) powers for potential formation covering over these two representative operational modes is investigated; that is, the construction of 'the central-cell plasma-confining potentials' {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH is studied on the basis of the electron energy-balance equation and Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for investigating the formation physics of plasma confining potentials.It is found that our proposed scaling formulae are in good agreement with the experimental data in the two representative operational modes of the high-potential and hot-ion modes in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.This scaling shows a favorable increase in confining potentials with installing more powerful ECH sources by the use of ECH powers over the present 250 kW. On the basis of the scaling prediction, we also report the design of a newly developed 500 kW gyrotron for an application to investigate the validity of the above described {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH aiming at achieving higher plasma parameters.

  10. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Formation of extended plasma channels in a condensed medium upon axicon focusing of a femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosareva, O. G.; Grigor'evskii, A. V.; Kandidov, V. P.

    2005-11-01

    The formation of plasma channels of a femtosecond laser pulse in the bulk of fused silica is studied by numerical simulation, and the advantages of using a conical lens (axicon) over conventional parabolic lenses are shown. It is found that the length of the plasma channel formed with the help of an axicon exceeds the length of the channel formed upon lens focusing.

  11. Silent Discharge Plasma Technology for the Treatment of Air Toxics and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, Louis A.; Chase, Peter J.; Gross, Michael P.

    1998-09-21

    Under this CRADA, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and High Mesa Technologies, Inc. (HMT) carried out a joint project on the development of the silent discharge plasma (SDP) technology for the treatment of hazardous air pollutants and other hazardous or toxic chemicals. The project had two major components: a technology-demonstration part and a scale-up and commercialization part. In the first part, a small-scale, mobile SDP plasma processor, which was being developed under a CRADA with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was the mobile equipment was modified for higher capacity service and employed for an innovative remediation technologies demonstration on soil-vapor extraction off-gases at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, CA. The performance of the SDP system for the variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) encountered at the McClellan site was sufficiently promising to the project HMT and LANL worked together to formulate a scale-up strategy and commercialization/manufacturing plan, and to design a prototype scaled-up SDP unit. HMT and LANL are now in the final stages of completing a licensing agreement for the technology and HMT is in the process of raising funds to engineer and manufacture commercial prototype SDP equipment focused on stack-gas emissions control and environmental remediation. HMT, in collaboration with another Northern New Mexico business, Coyote Aerospace, has also been successful in receiving a Phase I Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) award from the Army Research Office to develop, design, and construct a small non-thermal plasma reactor for laboratory studies ("Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor for Control of Fugitive Emissions of Toxic Gases")

  12. Hydrophilic strips for preventing air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Munseok; Na, Yang; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2015-12-01

    In a microfluidic chamber, unwanted formation of air bubbles is a critical problem. Here, we present a hydrophilic strip array that prevents air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber. The array is located on the top surface of the chamber, which has a large variation in width, and consists of a repeated arrangement of super- and moderately hydrophilic strips. This repeated arrangement allows a flat meniscus (i.e. liquid front) to form when various solutions consisting of a single stream or two parallel streams with different hydrophilicities move through the chamber. The flat meniscus produced by the array completely prevents the formation of bubbles. Without the array in the chamber, the meniscus shape is highly convex, and bubbles frequently form in the chamber. This hydrophilic strip array will facilitate the use of a microfluidic chamber with a large variation in width for various microfluidic applications.

  13. Plasma treatment of aqueous solutes: Some chemical properties of a gliding arc in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benstaali, B.; Moussa, D.; Addou, A.; Brisset, J.-L.

    1998-11-01

    The chemical properties of the gaseous species generated in a humid air gliding arc discharge are investigated. Aqueous solutions are used as the targets exposed to the plasma, and this allows to evidence strong acid and oxidizing effects on various solutes by means of spectrometric or potentiometric methods. The influence of some working parameters such as the input gas flow, the distance from the electrodes to the target or the electrode gap is examined on the chemical transform and simple experimental laws are derived. A general feature is observed for oxidation and suggests the occurrence of an auto-catalytic step in the relevant kinetic mechanism.

  14. Distinctive plume formation in atmospheric Ar and He plasmas in microwave frequency band and suitability for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. Wk.; Kang, S. K.; Won, I. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Kwon, H. C.; Sim, J. Y.; Lee, J. K.

    2013-12-15

    Distinctive discharge formation in atmospheric Ar and He plasmas was observed in the microwave frequency band using coaxial transmission line resonators. Ar plasmas formed a plasma plume whereas He formed only confined plasmas. As the frequency increased from 0.9 GHz to 2.45 GHz, the Ar plasma exhibited contraction and filamentation, and the He plasmas were constricted. Various powers and gas flow rates were applied to identify the effect of the electric field and gas flow rate on plasma plume formation. The He plasmas were more strongly affected by the electric field than the Ar plasmas. The breakdown and sustain powers yielded opposite results from those for low-frequency plasmas (∼kHz). The phenomena could be explained by a change in the dominant ionization process with increasing frequency. Penning ionization and the contribution of secondary electrons in sheath region reduced as the frequency increased, leading to less efficient ionization of He because its ionization and excitation energies are higher than those of Ar. The emission spectra showed an increase in the NO and N{sub 2} second positive band in both the Ar and He plasmas with increasing frequency whereas the hydroxyl radical and atomic O peaks did not increase with increasing frequency but were highest at particular frequencies. Further, the frequency effect of properties such as the plasma impedance, electron density, and device efficiency were presented. The study is expected to be helpful for determining the optimal conditions of plasma systems for biomedical applications.

  15. Spark Plasma Sintering Apparatus Used for the Formation of Strontium Titanate Bicrystals.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Lauren A; van Benthem, Klaus

    2017-02-09

    A spark plasma sintering apparatus was used as a novel method for diffusion bonding of two single crystals of strontium titanate to form bicrystals with one twist grain boundary. This apparatus utilizes high uniaxial pressure and a pulsed direct current for rapid consolidation of material. Diffusion bonding of strontium titanate bicrystals without fracture, in a spark plasma sintering apparatus, is possible at high pressures due to the unusual temperature dependent plasticity behavior of strontium titanate. We demonstrate a method for the successful formation of bicrystals at accelerated time scales and lower temperatures in a spark plasma sintering apparatus compared to bicrystals formed by conventional diffusion bonding parameters. Bond quality was verified by scanning electron microscopy. A clean and atomically abrupt interface containing no secondary phases was observed using transmission electron microscopy techniques. Local changes in bonding across the boundary was characterized by simultaneous scanning transmission electron microscopy and spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

  16. Formation of Non-Monotonic Potential Structure in the Detached Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Pianpanit, Theerasarn; Hasegawa, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    Plasma detachment has been investigated by means of PIC simulation which includes plasma-neutral collision and Coulomb collision. In our previous study, we have shown that a strong gradient in temperature appears in front of the target plate in the case that high density and low temperature neutral gas is introduced. It is observed that a potential hill is created in the neutral gas region where ions lose energy due to the elastic and charge exchange collision and, as a result, the ion density increases. This potential structure traps the low energy electrons and may play a role in the development of plasma detachment state. This work is supported by NIFS Collaboration Research Programs NIFS14KNXN279 and NIFS14KNSS059 and the NIFS/NINS project of Formation of International Scientific Base and Network.

  17. Ultra-intense laser-plasma interaction toward Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Anna; Grech, M.; Amiranoff, F.; Macchi, A.; Riconda, C.

    2016-10-01

    The rapid developments in laser technology will soon offer the opportunity to study in the laboratory the processes driving Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks, typical of various astrophysical scenarii. The interaction of an ultra-intense laser with an overdense plasma has been identified as the preferential configuration. Yet, the experimental requirements still need to be properly investigated. High performance computing simulations are a necessary tool for this study. In this work, we present a series of kinetic simulations performed with the PIC code SMILEI, varying the laser and plasma parameters. In particular, we will study the effect of the laser polarisation and plasma density to obtain the best conditions for the creation of a collisionless shock. The role of the electrons heated at the interaction surface and of particles accelerated via the Hole Boring (laser-piston) mechanism on the generation of the current filamentation instability and the subsequent shock front formation will be highlighted.

  18. Plume splitting and rebounding in a high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Anmin; Jiang Yuanfei; Liu Hang; Jin Mingxing; Ding Dajun

    2012-07-15

    The dynamics of plasma plume formed by high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The laser wavelength is 10.6 {mu}m. Measurements were made using 3 ns gated fast photography as well as space and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The behavior of the plasma plume was studied with a laser energy of 3 J and 10 J. The results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is very complicated. The splitting and rebounding of the plasma plume is observed to occur early in the plumes history.

  19. A High-Latitude Winter Continental Low Cloud Feedback Suppresses Arctic Air Formation in Warmer Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T.; Tziperman, E.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    High latitude continents have warmed much more rapidly in recent decades than the rest of the globe, especially in winter, and the maintenance of warm, frost-free conditions in continental interiors in winter has been a long-standing problem of past equable climates. It has also been found that the high-latitude lapse rate feedback plays an important role in Arctic amplification of climate change in climate model simulations, but we have little understanding of why lapse rates at high latitudes change so strongly with warming. To better understand these problems, we study Arctic air formation - the process by which a high-latitude maritime air mass is advected over a continent during polar night, cooled at the surface by radiation, and transformed into a much colder continental polar air mass - and its sensitivity to climate warming. We use a single-column version of the WRF model to conduct two-week simulations of the cooling process across a wide range of initial temperature profiles and microphysics schemes, and find that a low cloud feedback suppresses Arctic air formation in warmer climates. This cloud feedback consists of an increase in low cloud amount with warming, which shields the surface from radiative cooling, and increases the continental surface air temperature by roughly two degrees for each degree increase of the initial maritime surface air temperature. The time it takes for the surface air temperature to drop below freezing increases nonlinearly to ~10 days for initial maritime surface air temperatures of 20 oC. Given that this is about the time it takes an air mass starting over the Pacific to traverse the north American continent, this suggests that optically thick stratus cloud decks could help to maintain frost-free winter continental interiors in equable climates. We find that CMIP5 climate model runs show large increases in cloud water path and surface cloud longwave forcing in warmer climates, consistent with the proposed low-cloud feedback

  20. Formation processes of nanometer sized particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Vacaresse, G. D. G. J.; Stoffels, W. W.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper, formation and growth processes of nanometer and micrometer sized dust particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf (13.56 MHz) plasmas are investigated as function of temperature in the range 25-100 deg. C. During experiments the pressure was typically 0.8 mbar and the forward power to the plasma was {approx}70 Watt. Measuring the fundamental voltage, current and phase angle together with their harmonics (up to the fourth) gives a good method to monitor the creation and growth of these dust particles in time. Furthermore, laser light scattering measurements are performed to give information about the dust particle density. It has been shown that dust particle formation in these conditions depends greatly on temperature.

  1. Strong double-layer formation by shock waves in nonequilibrium plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bletzinger, P; Ganguly, B N; Garscadden, A

    2003-04-01

    Strong double-layer formation by acoustic shock wave (plasma has been quantified, near the shock front, by measurements of the voltage jump and the enhancements of both the B (3)Pi(g)-A (3)Sigma(+)(u) plasma emission and the electron density. The large polarity dependence (or shock direction) of these effects and potential jumps of more than 20 kT(e) across the shock-created interface indicate that the measured shock-induced electron heating effects (localized excitation and ionization rate) are caused by the formation of strong double layers maintained by the traveling shock front.

  2. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  3. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  4. Three dimensional simulations of pattern formation during high-pressure, freely localized microwave breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtzanidis, K. Boeuf, J. P.; Rogier, F.

    2014-12-15

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that a freely localized 100 GHz microwave discharge can propagate towards the microwave source with high speed, forming a complex pattern of self-organized filaments. We present three-dimensional simulations of the formation and propagation of such patterns that reveal more information on their nature and interaction with the electromagnetic waves. The developed three-dimensional Maxwell-plasma solver permits the study of different forms of incident field polarization. Results for linear and circular polarization of the wave are presented and comparisons with recent experiments show a good overall agreement. The three dimensional simulations provide a quantitative analysis of the parameters controlling the time and length scales of the strongly non-linear plasma dynamics and could be useful for potential microwave plasma applications such as aerodynamic flow and combustion control.

  5. Oligomerization and Pore Formation by Equinatoxin II Inhibit Endocytosis and Lead to Plasma Membrane Reorganization*

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáez, Ana J.; Buschhorn, Sabine B.; Keller, Heiko; Anderluh, Gregor; Simons, Kai; Schwille, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins have evolved to induce membrane injury by formation of pores in the target cell that alter ion homeostasis and lead to cell death. Many pore-forming toxins use cholesterol, sphingolipids, or other raft components as receptors. However, the role of plasma membrane organization for toxin action is not well understood. In this study, we have investigated cellular dynamics during the attack of equinatoxin II, a pore-forming toxin from the sea anemone Actinia equina, by combining time lapse three-dimensional live cell imaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, FRET, and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. Our results show that membrane binding by equinatoxin II is accompanied by extensive plasma membrane reorganization into microscopic domains that resemble coalesced lipid rafts. Pore formation by the toxin induces Ca2+ entry into the cytosol, which is accompanied by hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, plasma membrane blebbing, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and inhibition of endocytosis. We propose that plasma membrane reorganization into stabilized raft domains is part of the killing strategy of equinatoxin II. PMID:21885440

  6. Conditions for the formation of nongyrotropic current sheets in slowly evolving plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Karl; Hesse, Michael

    2010-08-15

    This paper addresses the formation of nongyrotropic current sheets resulting from slow external driving. The medium is a collisionless plasma with one spatial dimension and a three-dimensional velocity space. The study is based on particle simulation and an analytical approach. Earlier results that apply to compression of an initial Harris sheet are generalized in several ways. In a first step a general sufficient criterion for the presence of extra ion and electron currents due to nongyrotropic plasma conditions is derived. Then cases with antisymmetric magnetic and electric fields are considered. After establishing consistency of the criterion with the earlier case, the usefulness of this concept is illustrated in detail by two further particle simulations. The results indicate that the formation of nongyrotropic current sheets is a ubiquitous phenomenon for plasmas with antisymmetric fields that have evolved slowly from initial gyrotropic states. A fourth case concerns a plasma with a unidirectional magnetic field. Consistent with the general criterion, the observed final state is fluidlike in that it is approximately gyrotropic. Momentum balance is shown to include a contribution that results from accumulation of an off-diagonal pressure tensor component during the evolution. Heat flux also plays an important role.

  7. Nanoparticle size matters in the formation of plasma protein coronas on Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengyan; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-09-01

    When nanoparticles (NPs) enter into biological systems, proteins would interact with NPs to form the protein corona that can critically impact the biological identity of the nanomaterial. Owing to their fundamental scientific interest and potential applications, Fe3O4 NPs of different sizes have been developed for applications in cell separation and protein separation and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), etc. Here, we investigated whether nanoparticle size affects the formation of protein coronas around Fe3O4 NPs. Both the identification and quantification results demonstrated that particle size does play an important role in the formation of plasma protein coronas on Fe3O4 NPs; it not only influenced the protein composition of the formed plasma protein corona but also affected the abundances of the plasma proteins within the coronas. Understanding the different binding profiles of human plasma proteins on Fe3O4 NPs of different sizes would facilitate the exploration of the bio-distributions and biological fates of Fe3O4 NPs in biological systems.

  8. Excited-state positronium formation in positron-hydrogen collisions under weakly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2016-06-01

    The effect of screening of weakly coupled plasma on positronium (Ps) formation in excited states in the scattering of a positron from the ground state of a hydrogen atom has been investigated using a distorted wave theory which includes screened dipole polarization potential. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated by using the Debye-Hückel screening model of the interacting charge particles. Variationally determined simple hydrogenic wave functions have been used to obtain the distorted wave scattering amplitude in a closed form. Effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections have been studied in detail in the energy range 20-300 eV of incident positron. For the free atomic case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for Ps formation in highly excited states in positron-hydrogen collisions under weakly coupled plasma is reported first time in the literature.

  9. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Begum, Asma; Laroussi, Mounir; Pervez, Mohammad Rasel

    2013-06-15

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and it reaches to the maximum of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}.

  10. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Thresholds of surface plasma formation by the interaction of laser pulses with a metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1995-04-01

    An analysis is made of a model of the formation of a surface laser plasma which takes account of the heating and vaporisation of thermally insulated surface microdefects. This model is used in an interpretation of experiments in which such a plasma has been formed by irradiation of a titanium target with microsecond CO2 laser pulses. A comparison with the experimental breakdown intensities is used to calculate the average sizes of microdefects and their concentration: the results are in agreement with the published data. The dependence of the delay time of plasma formation on the total energy in a laser pulse is calculated.

  11. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  12. Format and basic geometry of a perspective display of air traffic for the cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael Wallace; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The design and implementation of a perspective display of air traffic for the cockpit is discussed. Parameters of the perspective are variable and interactive so that the appearance of the projected image can be widely varied. This approach makes allowances for exploration of perspective parameters and their interactions. The display was initially used to study the cases of horizontal maneuver biases found in experiments involving a plan view air traffic display format. Experiments to determine the effect of perspective geometry on spatial judgements have evolved from the display program. Several scaling techniques and other adjustments to the perspective are used to tailor the geometry for effective presentation of 3-D traffic situations.

  13. Effects of atmospheric air plasma treatment of graphite and carbon felt electrodes on the anodic current from Shewanella attached cells.

    PubMed

    Epifanio, Monica; Inguva, Saikumar; Kitching, Michael; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Marsili, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    The attachment of electrochemically active microorganisms (EAM) on an electrode is determined by both the chemistry and topography of the electrode surface. Pre-treatment of the electrode surface by atmospheric air plasma introduces hydrophilic functional groups, thereby increasing cell attachment and electroactivity in short-term experiments. In this study, we use graphite and carbon felt electrodes to grow the model EAM Shewanella loihica PV-4 at oxidative potential (0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Cell attachment and electroactivity are measured through electrodynamic methods. Atmospheric air plasma pre-treatment increases cell attachment and current output at graphite electrodes by 25%, while it improves the electroactivity of the carbon felt electrodes by 450%. Air plasma pre-treatment decreased the coulombic efficiency on both carbon felt and graphite electrodes by 60% and 80%, respectively. Microbially produced flavins adsorb preferentially at the graphite electrode, and air plasma pre-treatment results in lower flavin adsorption at both graphite and carbon felt electrodes. Results show that air plasma pre-treatment is a feasible option to increase current output in bioelectrochemical systems.

  14. A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by nanosecond pulse under a double hexagon needle-array electrode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Shuai; Tang, Kai; Jiang, Peng-Chao

    2014-01-01

    A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse is generated under a double hexagon needle-array electrode at atmospheric pressure. The images of the diffuse discharge, electric characteristics, and the optical emission spectra emitted from the diffuse air discharge plasma are obtained. Based on the waveforms of pulse voltage and current, the power consumption, and the power density of the diffuse air discharge plasma are investigated under different pulse peak voltages. The electron density and the electron temperature of the diffuse plasma are estimated to be approximately 1.42×10(11) cm(-3) and 4.4 eV, respectively. The optical emission spectra are arranged to determine the rotational and vibrational temperatures by comparing experimental with simulated spectra. Meanwhile, the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the diffuse discharge plasma are also discussed under different pulse peak voltages and pulse repetition rates, respectively. In addition, the diffuse air discharge plasma can form an area of about 70×50 mm(2) on the surface of dielectric layer and can be scaled up to the required size.

  15. Trapped electron plasma formation and equilibrium with a low-power radio-frequency drive

    SciTech Connect

    Romé, M.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Chen, S.

    2015-06-29

    Penning-Malmberg traps confining electron plasmas usually rely on external sources like thermo- and photocathodes. It has been already demonstrated that electron plasmas of comparable densities can be produced by applying a radio-frequency (RF) power to any inner electrode of the trap. Such excitation may result in significant electron heating and ionization of the residual gas with the formation of a plasma column when the RF frequency is of the order or larger than the typical axial bounce frequencies of few-eV electrons, even at RF amplitude of few volts. While discharges are common in plasma generation at higher pressures and RF power, this mechanism is not yet well explored in our working conditions, namely ultra-high vacuum and very low RF power. This plasma production mechanism is very sensitive to the experimental conditions. Interesting phenomena can be observed: transition from a diffuse to a narrow-section, denser plasma column; presence of low-order diocotron modes in transient and steady-state plasmas; modulation of the m=1 diocotron mode and suppression of its instability despite the presence of positive ions and resistive loads. These observations are reported here, and possible explanations are discussed. In addition, a possible electron heating mechanism is investigated with a single-particle, one-dimensional model described by an area-preserving map where an electron bounces within a square potential well and the RF excitation is modelled by a time-oscillating square barrier. The low-energy part of the Poincaré plot includes both quasi-periodic and chaotic regions, where heating up to ionization energies is achievable. Results of a systematic analysis of the map extracting its chaotic properties and scaling laws as a function of the control parameters are reported.

  16. Trapped electron plasma formation and equilibrium with a low-power radio-frequency drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.

    2015-06-01

    Penning-Malmberg traps confining electron plasmas usually rely on external sources like thermo- and photocathodes. It has been already demonstrated that electron plasmas of comparable densities can be produced by applying a radio-frequency (RF) power to any inner electrode of the trap. Such excitation may result in significant electron heating and ionization of the residual gas with the formation of a plasma column when the RF frequency is of the order or larger than the typical axial bounce frequencies of few-eV electrons, even at RF amplitude of few volts. While discharges are common in plasma generation at higher pressures and RF power, this mechanism is not yet well explored in our working conditions, namely ultra-high vacuum and very low RF power. This plasma production mechanism is very sensitive to the experimental conditions. Interesting phenomena can be observed: transition from a diffuse to a narrow-section, denser plasma column; presence of low-order diocotron modes in transient and steady-state plasmas; modulation of the m=1 diocotron mode and suppression of its instability despite the presence of positive ions and resistive loads. These observations are reported here, and possible explanations are discussed. In addition, a possible electron heating mechanism is investigated with a single-particle, one-dimensional model described by an area-preserving map where an electron bounces within a square potential well and the RF excitation is modelled by a time-oscillating square barrier. The low-energy part of the Poincaré plot includes both quasi-periodic and chaotic regions, where heating up to ionization energies is achievable. Results of a systematic analysis of the map extracting its chaotic properties and scaling laws as a function of the control parameters are reported.

  17. Formation and role of plasma S-nitrosothiols in liver ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Glantzounis, Georgios K; Rocks, Sophie A; Sheth, Hemant; Knight, Iona; Salacinski, Henryk J; Davidson, Brian R; Winyard, Paul G; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2007-03-15

    Plasma S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) may act as a circulating form of nitric oxide that affects vascular function and platelet aggregation. Their role in liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes in plasma RSNOs following liver I/R injury. Two groups of New Zealand white rabbits were used (n=6, each): the I/R group underwent 60 min lobar liver ischemia and 7 h reperfusion, while the sham group underwent laparotomy but no liver ischemia. Serial RSNO levels were measured in plasma by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry, nitrite/nitrates by capillary electrophoresis, hepatic microcirculation by laser Doppler flowmetry, redox state of hepatic cytochrome oxidase by near-infrared spectroscopy, liver iNOS mRNA expression by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the oxidation of dihydrorhodamine to rhodamine by fluorescence. The effect of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on RSNOs formation and DHR oxidation was tested in a third group of animals (n=6) undergoing lobar liver I/R. Hepatic I/R was associated with a significant increase in plasma RSNOs, plasma nitrites, hepatic iNOS mRNA expression, impairment in hepatic microcirculation, decrease in the redox state of cytochrome oxidase, and significant production of rhodamine. The changes were more obvious during the late phase of reperfusion (>4 h). NAC administration decreased plasma RSNOs and oxidation of DHR to RH (P<0.05, 5 and 7 h postreperfusion, respectively). These results suggest that significant upregulation of nitric oxide synthesis during the late phase of reperfusion is associated with impairment in microcirculation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Plasma S-nitrosothiols are a good marker of this nitric oxide-mediated hepatotoxicity.

  18. Improved Ethanol Production from Xylose by Candida shehatae Induced by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huixia; Xiu, Zhilong; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-06-01

    Xylose fermentation is essential for ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Exposure of the xylose-fermenting yeast Candida shehatae (C. shehatae) CICC1766 to atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) air plasma yields a clone (designated as C81015) with stability, which exhibits a higher ethanol fermentation rate from xylose, giving a maximal enhancement in ethanol production of 36.2% compared to the control (untreated). However, the biomass production of C81015 is lower than that of the control. Analysis of the NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide)- and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate)-linked xylose reductases and NAD+-linked xylitol dehydrogenase indicates that their activities are enhanced by 34.1%, 61.5% and 66.3%, respectively, suggesting that the activities of these three enzymes are responsible for improving ethanol fermentation in C81015 with xylose as a substrate. The results of this study show that DBD air plasma could serve as a novel and effective means of generating microbial strains that can better use xylose for ethanol fermentation.

  19. Air plasma assisting microcontact deprinting and printing for gold thin film and PDMS patterns.

    PubMed

    Gou, Hong-Lei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method to fabricate gold film patterns and PDMS patterns by air plasma assisting microcontact deprinting and printing transfer approaches. Chemical gold plating is employed instead of conventional metal evaporation or sputtering to obtain perfect gold film both on flat and topographic PDMS chips, and complicated SAM precoating is replaced by simple air plasma treatment to activate both the surface of gold film and PDMS. In this way, large area patterns of conductive gold film and PDMS patterns could be easily obtained on the elastomeric PDMS substrate. Both the chemical plating gold film and transferred gold film were of good electrochemical properties and similar hydrophilicity with smooth and conductive surface, which made it potentially useful in microfluidic devices and electronics. The gold transfer mechanism is discussed in detail. For typical applications, a cell patterning chip based on the gold pattern was developed to imply the interfacial property, and dielectrophoresis control of live cells was carried out with the patterned gold as interdigital electrodes to show the conductivity.

  20. Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine Employing Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    The effects of air flow on fuel spray and flame formation in a high-speed compression-ignition engine have been investigated by means of the NACA combustion apparatus. The process was studied by examining high-speed motion pictures taken at the rate of 2,200 frames a second. The combustion chamber was of the flat-disk type used in previous experiments with this apparatus. The air flow was produced by a rectangular displacer mounted on top of the engine piston. Three fuel-injection nozzles were tested: a 0.020-inch single-orifice nozzle, a 6-orifice nozzle, and a slit nozzle. The air velocity within the combustion chamber was estimated to reach a value of 425 feet a second. The results show that in no case was the form of the fuel spray completely destroyed by the air jet although in some cases the direction of the spray was changed and the spray envelope was carried away by the moving air. The distribution of the fuel in the combustion chamber of a compression-ignition engine can be regulated to some extent by the design of the combustion chamber, by the design of the fuel-injection nozzle, and by the use of air flow.

  1. Effects of non-thermal plasmas and electric field on hydrocarbon/air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Biswa

    2009-10-01

    Need to improve fuel efficiency, and reduce emission from hydrocarbon combustor in automotive and gas turbine engines have reinvigorated interest in reducing combustion instability of a lean flame. The heat generation rate in a binary reaction is HQ =N^2 c1c2 Q exp(-E/RT), where N is the density, c1 and c2 are mol fractions of the reactants, Q is the reaction heat release, E is the activation energy, R is the gas constant and T is the average temperature. For hydrocarbon-air reactions, the typical value of E/R ˜20, so most heat release reactions are confined to a thin reaction sheet at T >=1400 K. The lean flame burning condition is susceptible to combustion instability due to a critical balance between heat generation and heat loss rates, especially at high gas flow rate. Radical injection can increase flame speed by reducing the hydrocarbon oxidation reaction activation barrier and it can improve flame stability. Advances in nonequilibrium plasma generation at high pressure have prompted its application for energy efficient radical production to enhance hydrocarbon-air combustion. Dielectric barrier discharges and short pulse excited corona discharges have been used to enhance combustion stability. Direct electron impact dissociation of hydrocarbon and O2 produces radicals with lower fuel oxidation reaction activation barriers, initiating heat release reaction CnHm+O <-> CnHm-1+ OH (and other similar sets of reactions with partially dissociated fuel) below the typical cross-over temperature. Also, N2 (A) produced in air discharge at a moderate E/n can dissociate O2 leading to oxidation of fuel at lower gas temperature. Low activation energy reactions are also possible by dissociation of hydrocarbon CnHm+e -> CnHm-2+H2+e, where a chain propagation reaction H2+ O<-> OH+H can be initiated at lower gas temperature than possible under thermal equilibrium kinetics. Most of heat release comes from the reaction CO+OH-> CO2 +H, nonthermal OH production seem to improve

  2. Mechanisms for the formation and transport of ion fluxes in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. N.; Zemchenkova, N. V.; Klyachin, N. A.; Prokhorovich, D. E.

    2010-09-15

    The processes of ion flux formation in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark were investigated experimentally. It is shown that multicharged ions are generated in the neck formed in the erosion products of the inner electrode. The plasma escaping from the neck region plays a role of a piston dragging particles of the cold peripheral plasma into ambient space. As the discharge current increases, the flux of the evaporated electrode material grows, the degree of ionization of the plasma produced decreases, and the efficiency of plasma heating caused by the pinching effect is reduced.

  3. Two-dimensional numerical study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in air at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wen; Sang, Chaofeng; Wang, Dezhen; Liu, Fucheng

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, a computational study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in ambient air is presented. A two-dimensional fluid model is applied to investigate the physical processes of the two plasma jets interaction (PJI) driven by equal and unequal voltages, respectively. In all studied cases, the PJI results in a decrease of both plasma bullets propagation velocity. When the two plasma jets are driven by equal voltages, they never merge but rather approach each other around the middle of the gas gap at a minimum approach distance, and the minimal distance decreases with the increase of both the applied voltages and initial electron density, but increases with the increase of the relative permittivity. When the two plasma jets are driven by unequal voltages, we observe the two plasma jets will merge at the position away from the middle of the gas gap. The effect of applied voltage difference on the PJI is also studied.

  4. Effects of air transient spark discharge and helium plasma jet on water, bacteria, cells, and biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Karol; Kučerová, Katarína; Tarabová, Barbora; Janda, Mário; Machala, Zdenko; Sano, Kaori; Mihai, Cosmin Teodor; Ciorpac, Mitică; Gorgan, Lucian Dragos; Jijie, Roxana; Pohoata, Valentin; Topala, Ionut

    2015-06-06

    Atmospheric pressure DC-driven self-pulsing transient spark (TS) discharge operated in air and pulse-driven dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet (PJ) operated in helium in contact with water solutions were used for inducing chemical effects in water solutions, and the treatment of bacteria (Escherichia coli), mammalian cells (Vero line normal cells, HeLa line cancerous cells), deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA), and protein (bovine serum albumin). Two different methods of water solution supply were used in the TS: water electrode system and water spray system. The effects of both TS systems and the PJ were compared, as well as a direct exposure of the solution to the discharge with an indirect exposure to the discharge activated gas flow. The chemical analysis of water solutions was performed by using colorimetric methods of UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometry. The bactericidal effects of the discharges on bacteria were evaluated by standard microbiological plate count method. Viability, apoptosis and cell cycle were assessed in normal and cancerous cells. Viability of cells was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion test, apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide assay, and cell cycle progression by propidium iodide/RNase test. The effect of the discharges on deoxyribonucleic acid and protein were evaluated by fluorescence and UV absorption spectroscopy. The results of bacterial and mammalian cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle clearly show that cold plasma can inactivate bacteria and selectively target cancerous cells, which is very important for possible future development of new plasma therapeutic strategies in biomedicine. The authors found that all investigated bio-effects were stronger with the air TS discharge than with the He PJ, even in indirect exposure.

  5. Atomic oxygen recombination on the ODS PM 1000 at high temperature under air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balat-Pichelin, M.; Bêche, E.

    2010-06-01

    High temperature materials are necessary for the design of primary heat shields for future reusable space vehicles re-entering atmospheric planet at hypersonic velocity. During the re-entry phase on earth, one of the most important phenomena occurring on the heat shield is the recombination of atomic oxygen and this phenomenon is more or less catalyzed by the material of the heat shield. PM 1000 is planned to be use on the EXPERT capsule to study in real conditions its catalycity. Before the flight, it is necessary to perform measurements on ground test facility. Experimental data of the recombination coefficient of atomic oxygen under air plasma flow were obtained in the diffusion reactor MESOX on pre-oxidized PM 1000, for two total pressures 300 and 1000 Pa in the temperature range (850-1650 K) using actinometry and optical emission spectroscopy. In this investigation, the evolution of the recombination coefficient is dependent of temperature, pressure level and also of the chemical composition of the surface leading to one order of magnitude for a given temperature. The recombination coefficient is increasing with temperature and also dependent on the static pressure. The surface change due to the plasma exposure is inspected with SEM, XRD and XPS. As chromium oxide is the main part of the oxide layer formed during the oxidation in air plasma conditions, a sintered Cr 2O 3 sample was elaborated from powders to compare the data of the recombination coefficient obtained on PM 1000. Pre- and post-test analyses on the several materials were carried out using SEM, WDS, XRD and XPS.

  6. Probe measurements of electron energy spectrum in Helium/air micro-plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Miles, J. A.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Hensley, A. L.; Tolson, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    It is experimentally demonstrated that a wall probe may be a useful instrument for interpretation of electron energy spectrum in a micro-plasma with a nonlocal electron distribution function at atmospheric pressure. Two micro-plasma devices were fabricated with three layers of molybdenum metal foils with thickness of 0.1 mm separated by two sheets of mica insulation with thickness of 0.11 mm. In one device a hole with the diameter of 0.2 mm formed a cylindrical discharge cavity that passed through the entire five layers. In the second device the hole has the diameter of 0.065 mm. In both devices the inner molybdenum layer formed a wall probe, while the outer layers of molybdenum served as the hollow cathode and anode. The discharge was open into air with flow of helium gas. It is found that the wall probe I-V trace is sensitive to the presence of helium metastable atoms. The first derivative of the probe current with respect to the probe potential shows peaks revealing fast electrons at specific energies arising due to plasma chemical reactions. The devices may be applicable for developing analytical sensors for extreme environments, including high radiation and vibration levels and high temperatures. This work was performed while VID held a NRC Research Associateship Award at AFRL.

  7. The Mutation Breeding and Mutagenic Effect of Air Plasma on Penicillium Chrysogenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Fang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Peng; Liu, Hui; Cai, Xiaochun; Hu, Yihua; Yuan, Chengling; Zheng, Zhiming

    2012-04-01

    Low temperature air plasma was used as the mutation tool for penicillin-producing strain Penicillium chrysogenum. The discharge conditions were RF power of 360 W, temperature of 40°C in a sealed chamber, and pressure of 10 Pa to 30 Pa. The result showed that the kinetics of the survival rate followed a typical saddle-shaped curve. Based on a statistic analysis, at the treating duration of 10 min, the positive mutation rate was as high as 37.5% while the negative mutation rate was low. The colonial morphology changed obviously when the plasma treating duration reached or exceeded 45 min. After both primary and secondary screening, a mutant designated as aPc051310 with high productivity of penicillin was obtained, and a strong mutagenic effect on P. chrysogenum was observed in the process. It was proved that after five generations, the mutant aPc051310 still exhibits a high productivity. All the results prove that the plasma mutation method could be developed as a convenient and effective tool to breed high-yield strains in the fermentation industry, while expanding the plasm application at the same time.

  8. Characterization Of Nano-Second Laser Induced Plasmas From Al Target In Air At Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, H.; Abdel-Rahim, F. M.; Nossair, A. M. A.; Allam, S. H.; El-Sherbini, Th. M.

    2008-09-23

    In the present work we study the effect of the laser beam energy on the properties of the plasma generated by focusing an intense laser beam on Al solid target in air at atmospheric pressure. Plasma is generated using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm wavelength, 6 ns pulse duration with a maximum pulse energy of 750mJ. The emission spectrum is collected using an Echelle spectrometer equipped with ICCD camera Andor type. The measurements were performed at several delay times between 0 to 9 {mu}s. Measurements of temperature and electron density of the produced plasmas at different laser energies and at different delay times are described using different emission spectral lines. Based on LTE assumption, excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot using O I spectral lines at 777.34, 794.93, and 848.65 nm and the electron density is determined from Stark width of Al II at 281.6 and 466.3 nm. The determined density is compared with the density determined from H{sub {alpha}} spectral line.

  9. Etching of polymers, proteins and bacterial spores by atmospheric pressure DBD plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzminova, A.; Kretková, T.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Prukner, V.; Doležalová, E.; Šimek, M.; Biederman, H.

    2017-04-01

    Many studies proved that non-equilibrium discharges generated at atmospheric pressure are highly effective for the bio-decontamination of surfaces of various materials. One of the key processes that leads to a desired result is plasma etching and thus the evaluation of etching rates of organic materials is of high importance. However, the comparison of reported results is rather difficult if impossible as different authors use diverse sources of atmospheric plasma that are operated at significantly different operational parameters. Therefore, we report here on the systematic study of the etching of nine different common polymers that mimic the different structures of more complicated biological systems, bovine serum albumin (BSA) selected as the model protein and spores of Bacillus subtilis taken as a representative of highly resistant micro-organisms. The treatment of these materials was performed by means of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in open air at constant conditions. All tested polymers, BSA and spores, were readily etched by DBD plasma. However, the measured etching rates were found to be dependent on the chemical structure of treated materials, namely on the presence of oxygen in the structure of polymers.

  10. Modeling plasma glow discharges in Air near a Mach 3 bow shock with KRONOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassou, Sebastien; Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Elias, Paul-Quentin

    2016-09-01

    In this work, plasma glow discharge in Air is modeled near a Mach 3 bow shock. Numerical simulations are performed using the coupling KRONOS which have been developed at ONERA. The flow field is modeled using the code CFD: CEDRE from ONERA and the electrical and plasma part by the EDF open-source code CODE_SATURNE. The plasma kinetic modeling consists on a two-term Boltzmann equation solver and a chemical reaction solver depending of the electric field. The coupling KRONOS is fully parallelized and run on ONERA supercomputers. The shock wave is formed by the propagation of a supersonic flow (M = 3) through a truncated conical model mounted with a central spike. Depending on the spike's voltage value, corona, glow or arc regime could be obtained in a steady flow. The parameters for the supersonic flow and the spike configurations are chosen to be in glow discharge regime and to reproduce the experimental setup. In our simulations, 12 species and 80 reactions (ionization, electronic or vibrational excitation, attachment etc ...) are considered to properly model the glow discharge and the afterglow. In a stationary flow, glow discharge is observed only at the upstream of the shock wave near the high voltage spike. Behind the bow shock, in the afterglow, negative ions are provided by electrons attachment with O2. The negative ions flow convection ensures the electrical conduction and the establishment of the glow discharge.

  11. A uniform laminar air plasma plume with large volume excited by an alternating current voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying

    2015-12-01

    Using a plasma jet composed of two needle electrodes, a laminar plasma plume with large volume is generated in air through an alternating current voltage excitation. Based on high-speed photography, a train of filaments is observed to propagate periodically away from their birth place along the gas flow. The laminar plume is in fact a temporal superposition of the arched filament train. The filament consists of a negative glow near the real time cathode, a positive column near the real time anode, and a Faraday dark space between them. It has been found that the propagation velocity of the filament increases with increasing the gas flow rate. Furthermore, the filament lifetime tends to follow a normal distribution (Gaussian distribution). The most probable lifetime decreases with increasing the gas flow rate or decreasing the averaged peak voltage. Results also indicate that the real time peak current decreases and the real time peak voltage increases with the propagation of the filament along the gas flow. The voltage-current curve indicates that, in every discharge cycle, the filament evolves from a Townsend discharge to a glow one and then the discharge quenches. Characteristic regions including a negative glow, a Faraday dark space, and a positive column can be discerned from the discharge filament. Furthermore, the plasma parameters such as the electron density, the vibrational temperature and the gas temperature are investigated based on the optical spectrum emitted from the laminar plume.

  12. Secondary organic aerosol formation from photo-oxidation of toluene with NOx and SO2: Chamber simulation with purified air versus urban ambient air as matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei; Liu, Tengyu; Zhang, Yanli; Situ, Shuping; Hu, Qihou; He, Quanfu; Zhang, Zhou; Lü, Sujun; Bi, Xinhui; Wang, Xuemei; Boreave, Antoinette; George, Christian; Ding, Xiang; Wang, Xinming

    2017-02-01

    Chamber studies on the formation of secondary aerosols are mostly performed with purified air as matrix, it is of wide concern in what extent they might be different from the situations in ambient air, where a variety of gaseous and particulate components preexist. Here we compared the photo-oxidation of "toluene + NOx + SO2" combinations in a smog chamber in real urban ambient air matrix with that in purified air matrix. The secondary organic aerosols (SOA) mass concentrations and yields from toluene in the ambient air matrix, after subtracted ambient air background primary and secondary organic aerosols, were 9.0-34.0 and 5.6-12.9 times, respectively, greater than those in purified air matrix. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 were enhanced in ambient air matrix experiments with observed 2.0-7.5 times higher SO2 degradation rates and 2.6-6.8 times faster sulfate formation than that in purified air matrix, resulting in higher in-situ particle acidity and consequently promoting acid-catalyzed SOA formation. In the ambient air experiments although averaged OH radical levels were elevated probably due to heterogeneous formation of OH on particle surface and/or ozonolysis of alkenes, non-OH oxidation pathways of SO2 became even more dominating. Under the same organic aerosol mass concentration, the SOA yields of toluene in purified air matrix experiments matched very well with the two-product model curve by Ng et al. (2007), yet the yields in ambient air on average was over two times larger. The results however were much near the best fit curve by Hildebrandt et al. (2009) with the volatility basis set (VBS) approach.

  13. Low clouds suppress Arctic air formation and amplify high-latitude continental winter warming

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Timothy W.; Tziperman, Eli

    2015-01-01

    High-latitude continents have warmed much more rapidly in recent decades than the rest of the globe, especially in winter, and the maintenance of warm, frost-free conditions in continental interiors in winter has been a long-standing problem of past equable climates. We use an idealized single-column atmospheric model across a range of conditions to study the polar night process of air mass transformation from high-latitude maritime air, with a prescribed initial temperature profile, to much colder high-latitude continental air. We find that a low-cloud feedback—consisting of a robust increase in the duration of optically thick liquid clouds with warming of the initial state—slows radiative cooling of the surface and amplifies continental warming. This low-cloud feedback increases the continental surface air temperature by roughly two degrees for each degree increase of the initial maritime surface air temperature, effectively suppressing Arctic air formation. The time it takes for the surface air temperature to drop below freezing increases nonlinearly to ∼10 d for initial maritime surface air temperatures of 20 °C. These results, supplemented by an analysis of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 climate model runs that shows large increases in cloud water path and surface cloud longwave forcing in warmer climates, suggest that the “lapse rate feedback” in simulations of anthropogenic climate change may be related to the influence of low clouds on the stratification of the lower troposphere. The results also indicate that optically thick stratus cloud decks could help to maintain frost-free winter continental interiors in equable climates. PMID:26324919

  14. Low clouds suppress Arctic air formation and amplify high-latitude continental winter warming.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Timothy W; Tziperman, Eli

    2015-09-15

    High-latitude continents have warmed much more rapidly in recent decades than the rest of the globe, especially in winter, and the maintenance of warm, frost-free conditions in continental interiors in winter has been a long-standing problem of past equable climates. We use an idealized single-column atmospheric model across a range of conditions to study the polar night process of air mass transformation from high-latitude maritime air, with a prescribed initial temperature profile, to much colder high-latitude continental air. We find that a low-cloud feedback--consisting of a robust increase in the duration of optically thick liquid clouds with warming of the initial state--slows radiative cooling of the surface and amplifies continental warming. This low-cloud feedback increases the continental surface air temperature by roughly two degrees for each degree increase of the initial maritime surface air temperature, effectively suppressing Arctic air formation. The time it takes for the surface air temperature to drop below freezing increases nonlinearly to ∼ 10 d for initial maritime surface air temperatures of 20 °C. These results, supplemented by an analysis of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 climate model runs that shows large increases in cloud water path and surface cloud longwave forcing in warmer climates, suggest that the "lapse rate feedback" in simulations of anthropogenic climate change may be related to the influence of low clouds on the stratification of the lower troposphere. The results also indicate that optically thick stratus cloud decks could help to maintain frost-free winter continental interiors in equable climates.

  15. Multi-Group Reductions of LTE Air Plasma Radiative Transfer in Cylindrical Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, James; Magin, Thierry Edouard Bertran; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2013-01-01

    Air plasma radiation in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) within cylindrical geometries is studied with an application towards modeling the radiative transfer inside arc-constrictors, a central component of constricted-arc arc jets. A detailed database of spectral absorption coefficients for LTE air is formulated using the NEQAIR code developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The database stores calculated absorption coefficients for 1,051,755 wavelengths between 0.04 µm and 200 µm over a wide temperature (500K to 15 000K) and pressure (0.1 atm to 10.0 atm) range. The multi-group method for spectral reduction is studied by generating a range of reductions including pure binning and banding reductions from the detailed absorption coefficient database. The accuracy of each reduction is compared to line-by-line calculations for cylindrical temperature profiles resembling typical profiles found in arc-constrictors. It is found that a reduction of only 1000 groups is sufficient to accurately model the LTE air radiation over a large temperature and pressure range. In addition to the reduction comparison, the cylindrical-slab formulation is compared with the finite-volume method for the numerical integration of the radiative flux inside cylinders with varying length. It is determined that cylindrical-slabs can be used to accurately model most arc-constrictors due to their high length to radius ratios.

  16. Experimental investigation on flame pattern formations of DME-air mixtures in a radial microchannel

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Aiwu; Maruta, Kaoru; Nakamura, Hisashi; Kumar, Sudarshan; Liu, Wei

    2010-09-15

    Flame pattern formations of premixed DME-air mixture in a heated radial channel with a gap distance of 2.5 mm were experimentally investigated. The DME-air mixture was introduced into the radial channel through a delivery tube which connected with the center of the top disk. With an image-intensified high-speed video camera, rich flame pattern formations were identified in this configuration. Regime diagram of all these flame patterns was drawn based on the experimental findings in the equivalence ratio range of 0.6-2.0 and inlet velocity range of 1.0-5.0 m/s. Compared with our previous study on premixed methane-air flames, there are several distinct characteristics for the present study. First, Pelton-wheel-like rotary flames and traveling flames with kink-like structures were observed for the first time. Second, in most cases, flames can be stabilized near the inlet port of the channel, exhibiting a conical or cup-like shape, while the conventional circular flame was only observed under limited conditions. Thirdly, an oscillating flame phenomenon occurred under certain conditions. During the oscillation process, a target appearance was seen at some instance. These pattern formation characteristics are considered to be associated with the low-temperature oxidation of DME. (author)

  17. Secondary organic aerosol formation initiated by α-terpineol ozonolysis in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Waring, M S

    2016-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) owing to reactive organic gas (ROG) ozonolysis can be an important indoor particle source. However, SOA formation owing to ozonolysis of α-terpineol, which is emitted by consumer product usage and reacts strongly with ozone, has not been systematically quantified. Therefore, we conducted 21 experiments to investigate the SOA formation initiated by α-terpineol ozonolysis for high (0.84 h(-1) ), moderate (0.61 h(-1) ), and low (0.36 h(-1) ) air exchange rates (AER), which is the frequency with which indoor is replaced by outdoor air. α-Terpineol concentrations of 6.39 to 226 ppb were combined with high ozone (~25 ppm) to ensure rapid and complete ozonolysis. No reactants were replenished, so SOA peaked quickly and then decreased due to AER and surface losses, and peak SOA ranged from 2.03 to 281 μg/m(3) at unit density. SOA mass formation was parameterized with the aerosol mass fraction (AMF), a.k.a. the SOA yield, and AMFs ranged from 0.056 to 0.24. The AMFs strongly and positively correlated with reacted α-terpineol, whereas they weakly and negatively correlated with higher AERs. One-product, two-product, and volatility basis set (VBS) models were fit to the AMF data. Predictive modeling demonstrated that α-terpineol ozonolysis could meaningfully form SOA in indoor air.

  18. Peculiarities of the angular distribution of laser radiation intensity scattered by laser-spark plasma in air

    SciTech Connect

    Malyutin, A A; Podvyaznikov, V A; Chevokin, V K

    2010-02-28

    The spatiotemporal study of the diagram of laser radiation scattering by the laser-spark plasma produced by 3-ns and 50-ns pulses is performed. It is shown that radiation appearing outside the laser beam cone is scattered during the first one - two nanoseconds after the air breakdown, when the spark plasma is located in the vicinity of the laser beam waist and has a shape close to spherical.

  19. Blast Wave Formation by Laser-Sustained Nonequilibrium Plasma in the Laser-Driven In-Tube Accelerator Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sawada, Keisuke; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2006-05-02

    Understanding the dynamics of laser-produced plasma is essentially important for increasing available thrust force in a gas-driven laser propulsion system such as laser-driven in-tube accelerator. A computer code is developed to explore the formation of expanding nonequilibrium plasma produced by laser irradiation. Various properties of the blast wave driven by the nonequilibrium plasma are examined. It is found that the blast wave propagation is substantially affected by radiative cooling effect for lower density case.

  20. Dense plasma heating and Gbar shock formation by a high intensity flux of energetic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeyre, X.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Gus'kov, S.

    2013-06-15

    Process of shock ignition in inertial confinement fusion implies creation of a high pressure shock with a laser spike having intensity of the order of a few PW/cm{sup 2}. However, the collisional (Bremsstrahlung) absorption at these intensities is inefficient and a significant part of laser energy is converted in a stream of energetic electrons. The process of shock formation in a dense plasma by an intense electron beam is studied in this paper in a planar geometry. The energy deposition takes place in a fixed mass target layer with the areal density determined by the electron range. A self-similar isothermal rarefaction wave of a fixed mass describes the expanding plasma. Formation of a shock wave in the target under the pressure of expanding plasma is described. The efficiency of electron beam energy conversion into the shock wave energy depends on the fast electron energy and the pulse duration. The model is applied to the laser produced fast electrons. The fast electron energy transport could be the dominant mechanism of ablation pressure creation under the conditions of shock ignition. The shock wave pressure exceeding 1 Gbar during 200–300 ps can be generated with the electron pulse intensity in the range of 5–10 PW/cm{sup 2}. The conclusions of theoretical model are confirmed in numerical simulations with a radiation hydrodynamic code coupled with a fast electron transport module.

  1. Kinetic aspects of the formation of aluminium oxide by use of a microwave-induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Quade, A; Steffen, H; Hippler, R; Wulff, H

    2002-10-01

    The oxidation of thin aluminium layers in a microwave plasma has been investigated to determine the kinetics of oxide growth. Thin Al-coatings were oxidized by means of a variety of gas mixtures, characterized by different partial pressures of oxygen, in microwave-induced plasmas of different power. To study the whole kinetic process the Al-metal and the oxide formed were investigated by means of a combination of grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry (GIXR) and grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD). XPS and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of stoichiometric Al(2)O(3). The alumina formed is X-ray amorphous. Quantitative description of oxide formation was achieved indirectly by determination of the decrease in the integrated intensity of the Al(111)-peak and the total thickness of the whole coating. These values enabled calculation of kinetic data. It was found that oxide growth was a combination of two simultaneous processes - diffusion and sputter processes. The diffusion coefficient D (cm(2) s(-1)) and the sputter rate S (nm s(-1)) were determined. The effect of the composition of the gas mixture, microwave power, and concentration of activated oxygen species on the oxidation process will be discussed. For calculation of the activation energy, E(A), of this plasma-enhanced diffusion process the temperature-dependence of D was investigated.

  2. Two Dimensional LIF Measurements and Potential Structure of Ion Beam Formation in an Argon Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; Good, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    We report 2-dimensional, spatially resolved observations of ion beam formation in an expanding helicon plasma. Previous studies found that a current free double layer (CFDL) spontaneously arises at low pressure, below 1 mT. We use Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), a non-perturbative diagnostic to measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) of argon ions both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field. We report ion beam formation as a function of the expansion chamber magnetic field (0-108 G). The ion beam appears peaked in the center of the expansion chamber and decays over a few centimeters radially. We also report the potential structure of the plasma obtained with a planar Langmuir probe. To obtain meaningful Langmuir probe measurements, averages of tens of current-voltage are needed to reduce the effects of large electrostatic fluctuations that arise in plasmas that generate ion beams. We report the dependence of density, electron temperature, and floating potential on radial and axial position in the expansion plume. NSF Award PHYS-1360278.

  3. Laboratory studies of the dynamic of resonance cones formation in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, V. V.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Kostrov, A. V.

    2013-03-15

    The paper is devoted to experimental studies of formation of resonance cones in magnetized plasmas by pulsed RF source in the lower-hybrid (whistler) and the upper-hybrid frequency ranges. It is shown that in both frequency ranges, resonance cones exhibit similar dynamics after switching-on the RF source: at first, wide maxima of radiation are formed in non-resonance directions, which then become narrower, with their direction approaching the resonance one. While the resonance cones are being formed, one observes a fine structure in the form of secondary radiation maxima. It is shown that the characteristic formation time of stationary resonance cones is determined by the minimal value of the group velocity of the quasi-electrostatic waves excited by the antenna. In the low-temperature plasma, this value is limited in the lower-hybrid frequency range by the spatial spectrum of the emitting antenna and in the upper-hybrid range, by the effects of spatial plasma dispersion.

  4. Interleaflet Coupling, Pinning, and Leaflet Asymmetry—Major Players in Plasma Membrane Nanodomain Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Parmryd, Ingela

    2017-01-01

    The plasma membrane has a highly asymmetric distribution of lipids and contains dynamic nanodomains many of which are liquid entities surrounded by a second, slightly different, liquid environment. Contributing to the dynamics is a continuous repartitioning of components between the two types of liquids and transient links between lipids and proteins, both to extracellular matrix and cytoplasmic components, that temporarily pin membrane constituents. This make plasma membrane nanodomains exceptionally challenging to study and much of what is known about membrane domains has been deduced from studies on model membranes at equilibrium. However, living cells are by definition not at equilibrium and lipids are distributed asymmetrically with inositol phospholipids, phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylserines confined mostly to the inner leaflet and glyco- and sphingolipids to the outer leaflet. Moreover, each phospholipid group encompasses a wealth of species with different acyl chain combinations whose lateral distribution is heterogeneous. It is becoming increasingly clear that asymmetry and pinning play important roles in plasma membrane nanodomain formation and coupling between the two lipid monolayers. How asymmetry, pinning, and interdigitation contribute to the plasma membrane organization is only beginning to be unraveled and here we discuss their roles and interdependence. PMID:28119914

  5. Inhibition of thrombin generation in plasma by fibrin formation (Antithrombin I).

    PubMed

    de Bosch, N B; Mosesson, M W; Ruiz-Sáez, A; Echenagucia, M; Rodriguez-Lemoin, A

    2002-08-01

    The adsorption of thrombin to fibrin during clotting defines "Antithrombin I" activity. We confirmed that thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or in Reptilase defibrinated normal plasma was higher than in normal plasma. Repletion of these fibrinogen-deficient plasmas with fibrinogen 1 (gamma A/gamma A), whose fibrin has two "low affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding sites, resulted in moderately reduced thrombin generation by 29-37%. Repletion with fibrinogen 2 (gamma'/gamma A), which in addition to low affinity thrombin-binding sites in fibrin, has a "high affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding site in the carboxy-terminal region of its gamma' chain, was even more effective and reduced thrombin generation by 57-67%. Adding peptides that compete for thrombin binding to fibrin [S-Hir53-64 (hirugen) or gamma'414-427] caused a transient delay in the onset of otherwise robust thrombin generation, indicating that fibrin formation is necessary for full expression of Antithrombin I activity. Considered together, 1) the increased thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or fibrinogen-depleted normal plasma that is mitigated by fibrinogen replacement; 2) evidence that prothrombin activation is increased in afibrinogenemia and normalized by fibrinogen replacement; 3) the severe thrombophilia that is associated with defective thrombin-binding in dysfibrinogenemias Naples I and New York I, and 4) the association of afibrinogenemia or hypofibrinogenemia with venous or arterial thromboembolism, indicate that Antithrombin I (fibrin) modulates thromboembolic potential by inhibiting thrombin generation in blood.

  6. Simulation of Plasma Jet Merger and Liner Formation within the PLX- α Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samulyak, Roman; Chen, Hsin-Chiang; Shih, Wen; Hsu, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Detailed numerical studies of the propagation and merger of high Mach number argon plasma jets and the formation of plasma liners have been performed using the newly developed method of Lagrangian particles (LP). The LP method significantly improves accuracy and mathematical rigor of common particle-based numerical methods such as smooth particle hydrodynamics while preserving their main advantages compared to grid-based methods. A brief overview of the LP method will be presented. The Lagrangian particle code implements main relevant physics models such as an equation of state for argon undergoing atomic physics transformation, radiation losses in thin optical limit, and heat conduction. Simulations of the merger of two plasma jets are compared with experimental data from past PLX experiments. Simulations quantify the effect of oblique shock waves, ionization, and radiation processes on the jet merger process. Results of preliminary simulations of future PLX- alpha experiments involving the ~ π / 2 -solid-angle plasma-liner configuration with 9 guns will also be presented. Partially supported by ARPA-E's ALPHA program.

  7. Removal of volatile organic compounds from air streams by making use of a microwave plasma burner with reverse vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji H.; Ma, Suk H.; Cho, Chang H.; Hong, Yong C.; Ahn, Jae Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma burner for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from polluted air streams. This study focused on the destruction of the VOCs in the high flow rate polluted streams required for industrial use. Plasma flames were sustained by injecting liquefied natural gas (LNG), which is composed of CH4, into the microwave plasma torch. With its high temperature and high density of atomic oxygen, the microwave torch attained nearly complete combustion of LNG, thereby providing a large-volume, high-temperature plasma flame. The plasma flame was applied to reactors in which the polluted streams were in one of two vortex flows: a conventional vortex reactor (CVR) or a reverse vortex reactor (RVR). The RVR, using a plasma power of 2 kW and an LNG flow of 20 liters per minute achieved a destruction removal efficiency (DRE) of 98% for an air flow rate of 5 Nm3/min polluted with 550 pm of VOCs.. For the same experimental parameters, the CVR provided a DRE of 90.2%. We expect that this decontamination system will prove effective in purifying contaminated air at high flow rates.

  8. Cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma treatment of C6 glioma cells: effects of reactive oxygen species in the medium produced by the plasma on cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyang, Wang; Cheng, Cheng; Peng, Gao; Shaopeng, Li; Jie, Shen; Yan, Lan; Yongqiang, Yu; Paul, K. Chu

    2017-02-01

    An atmospheric-pressure air plasma is employed to treat C6 glioma cells in vitro. To elucidate on the mechanism causing cell death and role of reactive species (RS) in the medium produced by the plasma, the concentration of the long-lived RS such as hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and ozone in the plasma-treated liquid (phosphate-buffered saline solution) is measured. When vitamin C is added to the medium as a ROS quencher, the viability of C6 glioma cells after the plasma treatment is different from that without vitamin C. The results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2, and O3 constitute the main factors for inactivation of C6 glioma cells and the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) may only play an auxiliary role in cell death.

  9. Wintertime Air Quality Impacts from Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Operations in the Bakken Formation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanoski-Cole, Ashley; Sive, Barkley; Zhou, Yong; Prenni, Anthony; Schurman, Misha; Day, Derek; Sullivan, Amy; Li, Yi; Hand, Jenny; Gebhart, Kristi; Schichtel, Bret; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    Oil and natural gas extraction has dramatically increased in the last decade in the United States due to the increased use of unconventional drilling techniques which include horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. The impact of these drilling activities on local and regional air quality in oil and gas basins across the country are still relatively unknown, especially in recently developed basins such as the Bakken shale formation. This study is the first to conduct a comprehensive characterization of the regional air quality in the Bakken region. The Bakken shale formation, part of the Williston basin, is located in North Dakota and Montana in the United States and Saskatchewan and Manitoba in Canada. Oil and gas drilling operations can impact air quality in a variety of ways, including the generation of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), hazardous air pollutants, ozone, and greenhouse gas emissions. During the winter especially, PM formation can be enhanced and meteorological conditions can favor increased concentrations of PM and other pollutants. In this study, ground-based measurements throughout the Bakken region in North Dakota and Montana were collected over two consecutive winters to gain regional trends of air quality impacts from the oil and gas drilling activities. Additionally, one field site had a comprehensive suite of instrumentation operating at high time resolution to gain detailed characterization of the atmospheric composition. Measurements included organic carbon and black carbon concentrations in PM, the characterization of inorganic PM, inorganic gases, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), precipitation and meteorology. These elevated PM episodes were further investigated using the local meteorological conditions and regional transport patterns. Episodes of elevated concentrations of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide were also detected. The VOC concentrations were analyzed and specific VOCs that are known oil and gas tracers were used

  10. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane

    2012-04-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then

  11. Investigation of nanoparticle formation in a plasma produced by femtosecond laser ablation of gold

    SciTech Connect

    Spiga, P.; Hermann, J.; Itina, T.; Grojo, D.; Neamtu, D.; Pailharey, D.; Marine, W.

    2005-10-31

    The formation of nanoparticles in a plasma produced by the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with gold has been investigated. Three different experimental techniques were employed. (i) The plume expansion was characterized using fast imaging with the aid of an intensified charge-coupled device. (ii) The plasma composition was analyzed using time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. (iii) The ablated material was deposited on mica substrates and analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy. As a result, the size-distribution and the overall number of nanoparticles were determined as a function of the laser energy density incident on the target surface. The detection of particles with sizes in the nanometer range supports theoretical modeling according to which phase explosion is the dominant mechanism of metal ablation by ultrashort laser pulses.

  12. Surface morphology of tungsten exposed to helium plasma at temperatures below fuzz formation threshold 1073 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Bernard, Elodie; Kreter, Arkadi; Yoshida, Naoaki

    2017-01-01

    Impact of crystal orientation on the surface morphology of the helium plasma exposed tungsten has been investigated on the linear device PSI-2. A nanoscale undulating surface structure having a periodic arrangement is formed for temperatures below 1073 K, in contrast to the fuzz nanostructure formation in a higher temperature range. The crests of undulation align with the < 1 0 0> direction. The interval of the undulation is narrowest at the crystal grain of {1 1 0} surface. The interval becomes wider as the crystal grain surface tilts away from the {1 1 0} surface, and the undulating surface structure is not formed near the {1 0 0} surface. The height of undulations is ∼ 8 nm, independently of the interval of the undulations, and it corresponds to the depth of the layer heavily damaged due to helium plasma exposure.

  13. Formation mechanism of graphite hexagonal pyramids by argon plasma etching of graphite substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glad, X.; de Poucques, L.; Bougdira, J.

    2015-12-01

    A new graphite crystal morphology has been recently reported, namely the graphite hexagonal pyramids (GHPs). They are hexagonally-shaped crystals with diameters ranging from 50 to 800 nm and a constant apex angle of 40°. These nanostructures are formed from graphite substrates (flexible graphite and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite) in low pressure helicon coupling radiofrequency argon plasma at 25 eV ion energy and, purportedly, due to a physical etching process. In this paper, the occurrence of peculiar crystals is shown, presenting two hexagonal orientations obtained on both types of samples, which confirms such a formation mechanism. Moreover, by applying a pretreatment step with different time durations of inductive coupling radiofrequency argon plasma, for which the incident ion energy decreases at 12 eV, uniform coverage of the surface can be achieved with an influence on the density and size of the GHPs.

  14. A novel ram-air plasma synthetic jet actuator for near space high-speed flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Xia, Zhixun; Luo, Zhenbing; Wang, Lin; Deng, Xiong

    2017-04-01

    As a promising high-speed flow control technique, plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) has the superiorities of requiring no moving parts or flow supplies, extremely fast response, wide frequency band and high efflux speed. However, it has limitations for application: in near space, the air in the cavity which is used to generate the puled plasma jet becomes rare, and the low refill rate often leads to insufficient recovery which limits the working frequency. In order to overcome these limitations, a novel actuator called ram-air plasma synthetic jet actuator (RPSJA) is proposed. Inspired by the ramjet, the principle of this actuator is to take advantage of the tremendous dynamic pressure of the high-speed inflow using an added ram-air inlet. Numerical investigations were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of such an actuator. The results show that, compared with PSJA, the air in the chamber becomes denser and the refill rate is notably increased owing to the ;ram-air effect; of RPSJA. Based on the flow characteristic analysis, a revised actuator with a stepped ram-air inlet is proposed and investigated as well, and the results show that the performance is improved as the stepped height rises.

  15. Tunable hybrid plasma decomposition of dilute concentrations of CC14 in air

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, M.J. ); Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Koch, M.; Patrick, R.M.; Thomas, P. . Plasma Fusion Center)

    1993-01-01

    At the Department of Energy Hanford site, a large quantity of the industrial solvent carbon tetrachloride (CC14) was used and subsequently disposed of in leaching fields. Efforts under the Volatile Organic Compound - Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) are directed at vapor extraction of carbon tetrachloride from the ground and its subsequent decomposition in the contaminated humid air stream. We are developing a mobile electron-beam driven plasma reactor for versatile efficient on-site decomposition of CC14 and other VOCs in carrier gases at atmospheric pressure. The decomposition of the VOCs could result in the generation of CO[sub 2], light hydrocarbons, and reactive chlorine compounds. The latter dissolve and/or dissociate in aqueous solutions.

  16. Tunable hybrid plasma decomposition of dilute concentrations of CC14 in air

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, M.J.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Koch, M.; Patrick, R.M.; Thomas, P.

    1993-01-01

    At the Department of Energy Hanford site, a large quantity of the industrial solvent carbon tetrachloride (CC14) was used and subsequently disposed of in leaching fields. Efforts under the Volatile Organic Compound - Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) are directed at vapor extraction of carbon tetrachloride from the ground and its subsequent decomposition in the contaminated humid air stream. We are developing a mobile electron-beam driven plasma reactor for versatile efficient on-site decomposition of CC14 and other VOCs in carrier gases at atmospheric pressure. The decomposition of the VOCs could result in the generation of CO{sub 2}, light hydrocarbons, and reactive chlorine compounds. The latter dissolve and/or dissociate in aqueous solutions.

  17. Electrical conductivity of a methane–air burning plasma under the action of weak electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, G.; Pietanza, L. D.; D’Angola, A.; Laricchiuta, A.; Di Vita, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper focuses on the calculation of the electrical conductivity of a methane–air flame in the presence of weak electric fields, solving the Boltzmann equation for free electrons self-consistently coupled with chemical kinetics. The chemical model GRI-Mech 3.0 has been completed with chemi-ionization reactions to model ionization in the absence of fields, and a database of cross sections for electron-impact-induced processes to account for reactions and transitions activated in the flame during discharge. The dependence of plasma properties on the frequency of an oscillating field has been studied under different pressure and gas temperature conditions. Fitting expressions of the electrical conductivity as a function of gas temperature and methane consumption are provided for different operational conditions in the Ansaldo Energia burner.

  18. Comparisons of Force Measurement Methods for DBD Plasma Actuators in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ashpis, David E.

    2009-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the force induced by both single (one electrode insulated) and double (both electrodes insulated) dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators in quiescent air. We have shown that, for single barrier actuators with cylindrical exposed electrodes, as the electrode diameter decrease the force efficiencies increase much faster than a previously reported linear trend. This behavior has been experimentally verified using two different measurement techniques: stagnation probe measurements of the induced flow velocity and direct measurement of the force using an electronic balance. Actuators with rectangular cross-section exposed electrodes do not show the same rapid increase at small thicknesses. We have also shown that the induced force is independent of the material used for the exposed electrode. The same techniques have shown that the induced force of a double barrier actuator increases with decreasing narrow electrode diameter.

  19. Force Measurements of Single and Double Barrier DBD Plasma Actuators in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ashpis, David E.

    2008-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the force induced by both single (one electrode insulated) and double (both electrodes insulated) dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators in quiescent air. We have shown that, for single barrier actuators, as the electrode diameter decreased below those values previously studied the induced Force increases exponentially rather than linearly. This behavior has been experimentally verified using two different measurement techniques: stagnation probe measurements of the induced flow velocity and direct measurement of the force using an electronic balance. In addition, we have shown the the induced force is independent of the material used for the exposed electrode. The same techniques have shown that the induced force of a double barrier actuator increases with decreasing narrow electrode diameter.

  20. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaolong, Wei; Haojun, Xu; Min, Lin; Chen, Su; Jianhai, Li

    2015-05-28

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density (N{sub e}) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm{sup 3} without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N{sub e} achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N{sub e} of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10–50 Pa, power in 300–700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4–5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  1. Morphology and characteristics of laser-induced aluminum plasma in argon and in air: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xueshi; Cao, Fan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Yanping; Yu, Jin

    2015-11-01

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), ablation takes place in general in an ambient gas of the atmospheric pressure, often in air but also in noble gas such as argon or helium. The use of noble gas is known to significantly improve the performance of the technique. We investigate in this work the morphology and the characteristics of induced plasma in argon and in air. The purpose is to understand the mechanism of the analytical performance improvement by the use of argon ambient with respective to air ambient and the dependence on the other experimental parameters such as the laser fluence. The observation of plasma morphology in different ambient gases provides also information for better design of the detection system which optimizes the signal collection according to the used ambient gases. More specifically, the expansion of the plasma induced on an aluminum target with nanosecond infrared (1064 nm) laser pulse in two ambient gases, argon and the atmospheric air, has been studied with spectroscopic imaging at short delays and with emission spectroscopy at longer delays. With relatively low ablation laser fluence (65 J/cm2), similar morphologies have been observed in argon and in air over the early stage of plasma expansion, while diagnostics at longer delay shows stronger emission, higher electron density and temperature for plasma induced in argon. With higher ablation laser fluence (160 J/cm2) however, different expansion behaviors have been observed, with a stagnating aluminum vapor near the target surface in air while a propagating plume away from the target in argon. The craters left on the target surface show as well corresponding difference: in air, the crater is very shallow with a target surface chaotically affected by the laser pulse, indicating an effective re-deposition of the ablated material back to the crater; while in Ar a deeper crater is observed, indicating an efficient mass removal by laser ablation. At longer delays, a brighter

  2. Microwave air plasmas in capillaries at low pressure II. Experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancu, G. D.; Leroy, O.; Coche, P.; Gadonna, K.; Guerra, V.; Minea, T.; Alves, L. L.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents an experimental study of microwave (2.45 GHz excitation frequency) micro-plasmas, generated in dry air (N2 80%: O2 20%) within a small radius silica capillary (345 µm inner radius) at low pressure (300 Pa) and low powers (80-130 W). Experimental diagnostics are performed using optical emission spectroscopy calibrated in absolute intensity. Axial-resolved measurements (50 µm spatial resolution) of atomic transitions N(3p4S)  →  N(3s4P) O(3p5P)  →  O(3s5S) and molecular transitions N2(C,v‧)  →  N2(B,v″) \\text{N}2+ (B,v‧)  →  \\text{N}2+ (X,v″) allow us to obtain, as a function of the coupled power, the absolute densities of N(3p4S), O(3p5P), N2(C), N2(B) and \\text{N}2+ (B), as well as the gas (rotational) temperature (700-1000 K), the vibrational temperature of N2(C,v) (7000-10 000 K) and the excitation temperatures of N2(C) and N2(B) (11 000 K). The analysis of the H β line-width gives an upper limiting value of 1013 cm-3 for the electron density; its axial variation (4  ×  1011-6  ×  1012 cm-3) being estimated by solving the wave electrodynamics equations for the present geometry, plasma length and electron-neutral collision frequency. The experimental results were compared with the results from a 0D model, presented in companion paper I [1], which couples the system of rate balance equations for the dominant neutral and charged plasma species to the homogeneous two-term electron Boltzmann equation, taking the measured gas temperature and the estimated electron density as input parameters. Good qualitative agreement is found between the measurements and calculations of the local species densities for various powers and axial positions. The dissociation degree of oxygen is found above 10%. Moreover, both the measurements and calculations show evidence of the non-equilibrium behavior of low-temperature plasmas, with vibrational and excitation temperatures at least

  3. Study on structural, morphological and thermal properties of surface modified polyvinylchloride (PVC) film under air, argon and oxygen discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganya, Arjunan; Shanmugavelayutham, Gurusamy; Serra Rodríguez, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    The effect of air, argon, oxygen DC glow discharge plasma on the polyvinylchloride (PVC) film synthesized by solution casting technique, were evaluated via changes in physio-chemical properties such as structural, morphological, crystalline, thermal properties. The PVC film was plasma treated as a function of exposure time and different plasma forming gases, while other operating parameters such as power and pressure remained constant at 100 W and 2 Pa respectively. The plasma treated PVC were characterized by static contact angle, ATR-FTIR, XPS, AFM and T-peel analysis. It was found that various gaseous plasma treatments have improved the polar components, surface roughness on the surface of PVC which was confirmed by XPS, AFM, resulting in highly enhanced wettability and adhesion. X-ray diffraction study showed that plasma treatment does not persuade considerable change, even though it vaguely induces the crystallinity. The thermal properties of plasma treated PVC were evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and it was observed that O2 plasma treatment gives higher glass transition temperature of 87.21 °C compared with the untreated one. The glass transition temperature slightly increased for Oxygen plasma treated material due to the presence of higher concentration of the polar functional groups on the PVC surface due to strong intramolecular bonding.

  4. Hysteresis effects in the formation of a neutralizing beam plasma at low ion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the PEGASES II thruster prototype is used as an ion source generating low-energy (<300\\ \\text{eV}) positive Ar ion beam, extracted without an external neutralizer. The ions are extracted and accelerated from the source using a two-grid system. The extracted positive ion beam current is measured on a large beam target that can be translated along the acceleration axis. The ion beam current shows a stepwise transition from a low-current to a high-current extraction regime with hysteresis. The hysteresis region depends strongly upon the beam target position. Langmuir probe measurements in the plume show high plasma potentials and low plasma densities in the low-current mode, while the plasma potential drops and the density increases in the high-current mode. The ion energy distribution functions of the beam are measured for different regimes of ion extraction. The ion beam extracted in the high-current mode is indicated by the presence of an additional low-energy peak corresponding to ions from an ion-beam plasma created in the downstream chamber, as well as 10-20 times higher intensity of the primary ion beam peak. The hysteresis behavior is explained by the formation of a downstream neutralizing beam plasma, that depends on the target position and pressure in agreement with a Paschen-like breakdown by secondary electrons. The obtained results are of high relevance for further development of the PEGASES thruster, as well as for improving existing neutralizer-free concepts of the broad-beam ion sources.

  5. Gap formation processes in a high-density plasma opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, J. M.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.; Commisso, R. J.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Weber, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    A gap opening process in plasma opening switches (POS) is examined with the aid of numerical simulations. In these simulations, a high density (ne=1014-5×1015 cm-3) uniform plasma initially bridges a small section of the coaxial transmission line of an inductive energy storage generator. A short section of vacuum transmission line connects the POS to a short circuit load. The results presented here extend previous simulations in the ne=1012-1013 cm-3 density regime. The simulations show that a two-dimensional (2-D) sheath forms in the plasma near a cathode. This sheath is positively charged, and electrostatic sheath potentials that are large compared to the anode-cathode voltage develop. Initially, the 2-D sheath is located at the generator edge of the plasma. As ions are accelerated out of the sheath, it retains its original 2-D structure, but migrates axially toward the load creating a magnetically insulated gap in its wake. When the sheath reaches the load edge of the POS, the POS stops conducting current and the load current increases rapidly. At the end of the conduction phase a gap exists in the POS whose size is determined by the radial dimensions of the 2-D sheath. Simulations at various plasma densities and current levels show that the radial size of the gap scales roughly as B/ne, where B is the magnetic field. The results of this work are discussed in the context of long-conduction-time POS physics, but exhibit the same physical gap formation mechanisms as earlier lower density simulations more relevant to short-conduction-time POS.

  6. Experimental evidence for collisional shock formation via two obliquely merging supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, Elizabeth C. Adams, Colin S.; Moser, Auna L.; Hsu, Scott C. Dunn, John P.; Miguel Holgado, A.; Gilmore, Mark A.

    2014-05-15

    We report spatially resolved measurements of the oblique merging of two supersonic laboratory plasma jets. The jets are formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns using injected argon, and have electron density ∼10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, electron temperature ≈1.4 eV, ionization fraction near unity, and velocity ≈40 km/s just prior to merging. The jet merging produces a few-cm-thick stagnation layer, as observed in both fast-framing camera images and multi-chord interferometer data, consistent with collisional shock formation [E. C. Merritt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 085003 (2013)].

  7. A Secular Quark Gluon Plasma Phase Preceding Black HoleFormation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Abhas; Glendenning, Norman K.

    2006-01-13

    As spherical collapse of very massive stars would tend to the formation of Black Holes with an Event Horion having a gravitational red-shift of z = {infinity}, the pressure of gravitationally trapped radiation would increase as {approx} (1 + z){sup 2}. Consequently catastrophic collapse must change into a secular collapse as the radioactive luminosity would attain its Eddington value. Since the local temperature of the collapsing body is found to be {approx} 250 MeV, the stellar mass Black Hole Candidates could be in this intermediate state of a hot Quark Gluon Plasma.

  8. Effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas-turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen from a gas-turbine combustor. Combustor inlet-air temperature ranged from 450 F to 1050 F. The tests were run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NO sub x emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet-air humidity at a constant exponential rate of 19 percent per mass percent water vapor in the air. This decrease of NO sub x emission index with increasing humidity was found to be independent of inlet-air temperature.

  9. Plasma treatment of polyethersulfone membrane for benzene removal from water by air gap membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Sara; Mortaheb, Hamid Reza; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2017-03-13

    In order to obtain a durable cost-effective membrane for membrane distillation (MD) process, flat sheet polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were modified by an atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma generated using a dielectric barrier discharge in a mixture of argon and hexamethyldisiloxane as the organosilicon precursor. The surface properties of the plasma-modified membranes were characterized by water contact angle (CA), liquid entry pressure, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The water CA of the membrane was increased from 64° to 104° by depositing a Si(CH3)-rich thin layer. While the pristine PES membrane was not applicable in the MD process, the modified PES membrane could be applied for the first time in an air gap membrane distillation setup for the removal of benzene as a volatile organic compound from water. The experimental design using central composite design and response surface methodology was applied to study the effects of feed temperature, concentration, and flow rate as well as their binary interactions on the overall permeate flux and separation factor. The separation factor and permeation flux of the modified PES membrane at optimum conditions were comparable with those of commercial polytetrafluoroethylene membrane.

  10. Treatment of airborne asbestos and asbestos-like microfiber particles using atmospheric microwave air plasma.

    PubMed

    Averroes, A; Sekiguchi, H; Sakamoto, K

    2011-11-15

    Atmospheric microwave air plasma was used to treat asbestos-like microfiber particles that had two types of ceramic fiber and one type of stainless fiber. The treated particles were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experiment results showed that one type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica=1:1) and the stainless fiber were spheroidized, but the other type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica=7:3) was not. The conversion of the fibers was investigated by calculating the equivalent diameter, the aspect ratio, and the fiber content ratio. The fiber content ratio in various conditions showed values near zero. The relationship between the normalized fiber vanishing rate and the energy needed to melt the particles completely per unit surface area of projected particles, which is defined as η, was examined and seen to indicate that the normalized fiber vanishing rate decreased rapidly with the increase in η. Finally, some preliminary experiments for pure asbestos were conducted, and the analysis via XRD and phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) showed the availability of the plasma treatment.

  11. Microwave air plasmas in capillaries at low pressure I. Self-consistent modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coche, P.; Guerra, V.; Alves, L. L.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents the self-consistent modeling of micro-plasmas generated in dry air using microwaves (2.45 GHz excitation frequency), within capillaries (<1 mm inner radius) at low pressure (300 Pa). The model couples the system of rate balance equations for the most relevant neutral and charged species of the plasma to the homogeneous electron Boltzmann equation. The maintenance electric field is self-consistently calculated adopting a transport theory for low to intermediate pressures, taking into account the presence of O- ions in addition to several positive ions, the dominant species being O{}2+ , NO+ and O+ . The low-pressure small-radius conditions considered yield very-intense reduced electric fields (˜600-1500 Td), coherent with species losses controlled by transport and wall recombination, and kinetic mechanisms strongly dependent on electron-impact collisions. The charged-particle transport losses are strongly influenced by the presence of the negative ion, despite its low-density (˜10% of the electron density). For electron densities in the range (1-≤ft. 4\\right)× {{10}12} cm-3, the system exhibits high dissociation degrees for O2 (˜20-70%, depending on the working conditions, in contrast with the  ˜0.1% dissociation obtained for N2), a high concentration of O2(a) (˜1014 cm-3) and NO(X) (5× {{10}14} cm-3) and low ozone production (<{{10}-3}% ).

  12. Microwave interrogation of an air plasma plume as a model system for hot spots in explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Ronald J.; Tringe, Joseph W.; Klunder, Gregory L.; Baluyot, Emer V.; Densmore, John M.; Converse, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of hot spots within explosives is critical to understand for predicting how detonation waves form and propagate. However, it is challenging to observe hot spots directly because they are small (˜micron diameter), form quickly (much less than a microsecond), and many explosives of interest are optically opaque. Microwaves are well-suited to characterize hot spots because they readily penetrate most explosives. They also have sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to measure the coalescence of an ensemble of hot spots inside explosives. Here we employ 94 GHz microwaves to characterize the evolution of individual plasma plumes formed by laser ionization of air. We use interferometry to obtain plume diameter as a function of time. Although the plasma plumes are larger than individual hot spots in explosives, they expand rapidly and predictably, and their structure can be optically imaged. They are therefore useful model systems to establish the spatial and temporal limits of microwave interferometry (MI) for understanding more complex hot spot behavior in solid explosives.

  13. Microwave interrogation of an air plasma plume as a model system for hot spots in explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Ron; Tringe, Joseph; Klunder, Greg; Baluyot, Emer; Densmore, John; Converse, Mark

    2015-06-01

    The evolution of hot spots within explosives is critical to understand for predicting how detonation waves form and propagate. However, it is challenging to observe hot spots directly because they are small (~ micron diameter), form quickly (much less than a microsecond), and many explosives of interest are optically opaque. Microwaves are well-suited to characterize hot spots because they readily penetrate most explosives. They also have sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to measure the coalescence of an ensemble of hot spots inside explosives. Here we employ 94 GHz microwaves to characterize the evolution of individual plasma plumes formed by laser ionization of air. We use interferometry to obtain velocity records as a function of plume position and orientation. Although the plasma plumes are larger than individual hot spots in explosives, they expand rapidly and predictably, and their structure can be optically imaged. They are therefore useful model systems to establish the spatial and temporal limits of microwave interferometry (MI) for understanding more complex hot spot behavior in solid explosives. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Properties of sintered glass-ceramics prepared from plasma vitrified air pollution control residues.

    PubMed

    Roether, J A; Daniel, D J; Rani, D Amutha; Deegan, D E; Cheeseman, C R; Boccaccini, A R

    2010-01-15

    Air pollution control (APC) residues, obtained from a major UK energy from waste (EfW) plant, processing municipal solid waste, have been blended with silica and alumina and melted using DC plasma arc technology. The glass produced was crushed, milled, uni-axially pressed and sintered at temperatures between 750 and 1150 degrees C, and the glass-ceramics formed were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mechanical properties assessed included Vickers's hardness, flexural strength, Young's modulus and thermal shock resistance. The optimum sintering temperature was found to be 950 degrees C. This produced a glass-ceramic with high density (approximately 2.58 g/cm(3)), minimum water absorption (approximately 2%) and relatively high mechanical strength (approximately 81+/-4 MPa). Thermal shock testing showed that 950 degrees C sintered samples could withstand a 700 degrees C quench in water without micro-cracking. The research demonstrates that glass-ceramics can be readily formed from DC plasma treated APC residues and that these have comparable properties to marble and porcelain. This novel approach represents a technically and commercially viable treatment option for APC residues that allow the beneficial reuse of this problematic waste.

  15. Ionospheric plasma flow over large high-voltage space platforms. I - Ion-plasma-time scale interactions of a plate at zero angle of attack. II - The formation and structure of plasma wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Hastings, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the theory and particle simulation results for the ionospheric plasma flow over a large high-voltage space platform at a zero angle of attack and at a large angle of attack. Emphasis is placed on the structures in the large, high-voltage regime and the transient plasma response on the ion-plasma time scale. Special consideration is given to the transient formation of the space-charge wake and its steady-state structure.

  16. In situ observation of peptide bond formation at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Elizabeth C; Vaida, Veronica

    2012-09-25

    We report unambiguous spectroscopic evidence of peptide bond formation at the air-water interface, yielding a possible mechanism providing insight into the formation of modern ribosomal peptide bonds, and a means for the emergence of peptides on early Earth. Protein synthesis in aqueous environments, facilitated by sequential amino acid condensation forming peptides, is a ubiquitous process in modern biology, and a fundamental reaction necessary in prebiotic chemistry. Such reactions, however, are condensation reactions, requiring the elimination of a water molecule for every peptide bond formed, and are thus unfavorable in aqueous environments both from a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We use the hydrophobic environment of the air-water interface as a favorable venue for peptide bond synthesis, and demonstrate the occurrence of this chemistry with in situ techniques using Langmuir-trough methods and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. Leucine ethyl ester (a small amino acid ester) first partitions to the water surface, then coordinates with Cu(2+) ions at the interface, and subsequently undergoes a condensation reaction selectively forming peptide bonds at the air-water interface.

  17. Formation and growth of indoor air aerosol particles as a result of D-limonene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartiainen, E.; Kulmala, M.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Taipale, R.; Rinne, J.; Vehkamäki, H.

    Oxidation of D-limonene, which is a common monoterpene, can lead to new aerosol particle formation in indoor environments. Thus, products containing D-limonene, such as citrus fruits, air refresheners, household cleaning agents, and waxes, can act as indoor air aerosol particle sources. We released D-limonene into the room air by peeling oranges and measured the concentration of aerosol particles of three different size ranges. In addition, we measured the concentration of D-limonene, the oxidant, and the concentration of ozone, the oxidizing gas. Based on the measurements we calculated the growth rate of the small aerosol particles, which were 3-10 nm in diameter, to be about 6300nmh-1, and the losses of the aerosol particles that were due to the coagulation and condensation processes. From these, we further approximated the concentration of the condensable vapour and its source rate and then calculated the formation rate of the small aerosol particles. For the final result, we calculated the nucleation rate and the maximum number of molecules in a critical cluster. The nucleation rate was in the order of 105cm-3s-1 and the number of molecules in a critical-sized cluster became 1.2. The results were in agreement with the activation theory.

  18. Generation of Non-Propagating Electromagnetic-Plasma Structures and Formation of Quasi-Static and Alfvenic Discrete Auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Lysak, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    The nonlinear interaction of incident and reflected Alfven wave packets in auroral acceleration regions can create non-propagating electromagnetic-plasma structures, such as transverse Alfvenic double layers and charge holes. These dynamical structures are often characterized by localized strong electrostatic electric fields, localized density cavities and enhanced magnetic or mechanical stresses, and are responsible for auroral particle acceleration and the formation of both Alfvenic and quasi-static inverted-V discrete auroras. Similar electromagnetic-plasma structures should also be generated in other cosmic plasmas, and would constitute effective high energy accelerators of charged particles in cosmic plasmas.

  19. The role of foehn in the formation of heavy air pollution events in Urumqi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Xia, X.; Wang, L.; Cai, R.; Zhao, L.; Feng, Z.; Ren, Q.; Zhao, K.

    2015-06-01

    The impact of sandwich foehn on air pollution in Urumqi, a gap town located on the northern lee side of the Tianshan Mountains of China, is analyzed. The results show that during days with high pollution, the boundary layer over the city and the down-valley area can be divided into a three-layer structure, with the southeasterly foehn sandwiched between the northwesterly winds on top and the cold air surface pool beneath. The southeasterly foehn at heights between 480 and 2100 m results in a very stable boundary layer structure. In combination with the decoupling between the foehn flow and cold air pool, such boundary layer structure prevents vertical mixing of atmospheric pollutants. In the up-valley area from the northern lee side flank to the southern urban area, the ground-based foehn confronts the thermally driven valley breeze and forms a "minifront," which moves northward in the morning and retreats southward in the afternoon. Although the minifront disappears in the early evening, the wind shear of the mountain breeze between the southern suburb and downtown areas is still remarkable, which is favorable for a convergence line to persist around the city all day long. In this case, air pollutants emitted from the up-valley and down-valley areas are transported toward the urban area. Therefore, the air pollutants accumulate daily, leading to the frequent occurrence of heavy pollution events in Urumqi. This indicates that the sandwich foehn plays a critical role in the formation of heavy air pollution events in Urumqi.

  20. Characteristics of magnetic island formation due to resistive interchange instability in helical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, R.; Matsumoto, Y.; Itagaki, M.; Oikawa, S.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Sato, M.

    2014-05-15

    Focusing attention on the magnetic island formation, we investigate the characteristics of the resistive interchange magnetohydrodynamics instabilities, which would limit a high beta operational regime in helical type fusion reactors. An introduction of a new index, i.e., the ratio of the magnetic fluctuation level to the radial displacement, enables us to make a systematic analysis on the magnetic island formation in the large helical device-like plasmas during the linear growth phase; (i) the interchange instability with the second largest growth rate makes the magnetic island larger than that with the largest growth rate when the amplitude of the radial displacement in both cases is almost the same as each other; (ii) applied to a typical tearing instability, the index is smaller than that for the interchange instability with the second largest growth rate.

  1. Formation and evolution of vortices in a collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Sayanee; Banerjee, Debabrata; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2016-07-01

    Formation and evolution of vortices are studied in a collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma in the framework of a Generalized Hydrodynamic model (GH). Here we mainly present the nonlinear dynamical response of this strongly coupled system in presence of dust-neutral collisional drag. It is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear elastic stress and the dust-neutral collisional drag results in the generation of non-propagating monopole vortex for some duration before it starts to propagate like transverse shear wave. It is also found that the interaction between two unshielded monopole vortices having both same (co-rotating) and opposite (counter rotating) rotations result in the formation of two propagating dipole vortices of equal and unequal strength respectively. These results will provide some new understanding on the transport properties in such a strongly coupled system. The numerical simulation is carried out using a de-aliased doubly periodic pseudo-spectral code with Runge-Kutta-Gill time integrator.

  2. High-density formation of Ta nanodot induced by remote hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaping; Takeuchi, Daichi; Ohta, Akio; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Makihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the formation of Ta nanodots (NDs) on thermally grown SiO2/Si by exposing a thin metal layer to a remote H2 plasma (H2-RP) without external heating. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses show that a combination of a Ge (˜30.0 nm)/Ta (˜2.0 nm) bilayer stack with subsequent H2-RP exposure is effective for forming electrically isolated Ta NDs with an areal dot density as high as ˜1011 cm-2, where the Ge layer plays an important role as a barrier layer against the oxidation of the ultrathin Ta layer surface. The change in the chemical structure of the Ge/Ta bilayer stack on SiO2/Si upon Ta ND formation by H2-RP exposure is investigated by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  3. Air plasma-material interactions at the oxidized surface of the PM1000 nickel-chromium superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panerai, Francesco; Marschall, Jochen; Thömel, Jan; Vandendael, Isabelle; Hubin, Annick; Chazot, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are promising options for the thermal protection systems of hypersonic re-entry vehicles operating under moderate aerothermal heating conditions. We present an experimental study on the interactions between PM1000, an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium superalloy, and air plasma at surface temperatures between 1000 and 1600 K and pressures of 1500, 7500 and 10,000 Pa. Pre-oxidized PM1000 specimens are tested in high-enthalpy reactive air plasma flows generated by the Plasmatron wind tunnel at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics. Microscopic analysis of plasma-exposed specimens shows enhanced damage to the chromia scale at the lowest plasma pressure. Elemental surface analysis reveals the loss of Cr and the enhancement of Ni at the scale surface. A thermodynamic analysis supports the accelerated volatilization of Cr2O3 and the relative stability of NiO in the presence of atomic oxygen. Changes in the reflectance and emissivity of the oxidized surfaces due to plasma-exposure are presented. The catalytic efficiencies for dissociated air species recombination are determined as a function of surface temperature and pressure through a numerical rebuilding procedure and are compared with values presented in the literature for the same material.

  4. Surface modification of polyester fabrics by atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma for color strength and adhesion enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunming; Zhao, Meihua; Wang, Libing; Qu, Lijun; Men, Yajing

    2017-04-01

    Surface properties of water-based pigmented inks for ink-jet printed polyester fabrics were modified with atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma to improve the color strength and pigment adhesion of the treated surfaces. The influence of various parameters, including the surface morphology, chemical compositions, surface energy and dynamic contact angles of the control and plasma treated samples was studied. Color strength and edge definition were used to evaluate the ink-jet printing performance of fabrics. The change in pigment adhesion to polyester fibers was analyzed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). AFM (Atomic force microscope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses indicated the increase in surface roughness and the oxygen-containing polar groups(Cdbnd O, Csbnd OH and COOH) reinforced the fixation of pigments on the fiber surface. The result from this study suggested that the improved pigment color yield was clearly affected by alteration of pigment adhesion enhanced by plasma surface modification. Polyester fabrics exhibited better surface property and ink-jet printing performance after the air/He mixture plasma treatment comparing with those after air plasma treatment.

  5. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.

  6. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Peng, Zhe; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-03-01

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen-Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4-1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic

  7. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; ...

    2016-03-08

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen–Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed formore » semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of

  8. Shock Separation and Dead-Zone Formation from Detonations in an Internal Air-Well Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molitoris, John; Andreski, Henry; Garza, Raul; Batteux, Jan; Vitello, Peter; Souers, Clark

    2007-06-01

    Here we report on measurements of dead-zone formation due to shock separation from detonations attempting to corner-turn in an internal air-well geometry. This geometry is also known as a ``hockey-puck'' configuration. These measurements were performed on detonations in LX-17 and PBX9502 using time sequence radiography to image the event with surface contact timing pins as an additional diagnostic. In addition to an open corner in the high-explosive component we also examined the effects of steel defining the corner. In these experiments we find a long lived dead-zone consisting of shocked explosive that persists to very late times. Data and numerical modeling will be presented in addition to a comparison with previous work using an external air well. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  9. Plasma Formation and Evolution on Cu, Al, Ti, and Ni Surfaces Driven by a Mega-Ampere Current Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Kevin C.

    Metal alloy mm-diameter rods have been driven by a 1-MA, 100-ns current pulse from the Zebra z-pinch. The intense current produces megagauss surface magnetic fields that diffuse into the load, ohmically heating the metal until plasma forms. Because the radius is much thicker than the skin depth, the magnetic field reaches a much higher value than around a thin-wire load. With the "barbell" load design, plasma formation in the region of interest due to contact arcing or electron avalanche is avoided, allowing for the study of ohmically heated loads. Work presented here will show first evidence of a magnetic field threshold for plasma formation in copper 101, copper 145, titanium, and nickel, and compare with previous work done with aluminum. Copper alloys 101 and 145, titanium grade II, and nickel alloy 200 form plasma when the surface magnetic field reaches 3.5, 3.0, 2.2, and 2.6 megagauss, respectively. Varying the element metal, as well as the alloy, changes multiple physical properties of the load and affects the evolution of the surface material through the multiple phase changes. Similarities and differences between these metals will be presented, giving motivation for continued work with different material loads. During the current rise, the metal is heated to temperatures that cause multiple phase changes. When the surface magnetic field reaches a threshold, the metal ionizes and the plasma becomes pinched against the underlying cooler, dense material. Diagnostics fielded have included visible light radiometry, two-frame shadowgraphy (266 and 532 nm wavelengths), time-gated EUV spectroscopy, single-frame/2ns gated imaging, and multi-frame/4ns gated imaging with an intensified CCD camera (ICCD). Surface temperature, expansion speeds, instability growth, time of plasma formation, and plasma uniformity are determined from the data. The time-period of potential plasma formation is scrutinized to understand if and when plasma forms on the surface of a heated

  10. Helium plasma implantation on metals: Nanostructure formation and visible-light photocatalytic response

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Yoshida, Tomoko; Kitaoka, Daiki; Etoh, Reo; Yajima, Miyuki; Ohno, Noriyasu; Yoshida, Hisao; Yoshida, Naoaki; Terao, Yoshitaka

    2013-04-07

    It has been found recently that low-energy helium (He) plasma irradiation to tungsten (W) leads to the growth of W nanostructures on the surface. The process to grow the nanostructure is identified as a self-growth process of He bubbles and has a potential to open up a new plasma processing method. Here, we show that the metallic nanostructure formation process by the exposure to He plasma can occur in various metals such as, titanium, nickel, iron, and so on. When the irradiation conditions alter, the metallic cone arrays including nanobubbles inside are formed on the surface. Different from W cases, other processes than growth of fiberform structure, i.e., physical sputtering and the growth of large He bubbles, can be dominant on other metals during irradiation; various surface morphology changes can occur. The nanostructured W, part of which was oxidized, has revealed a significant photocatalytic activity under visible light (wavelength >700 nm) in decolorization of methylene blue without any co-catalyst.

  11. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-11-15

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1 s → nlm excitations of hydrogen by positron impact, for arbitrary n, l, m, in dense quantum plasma has been investigated using a distorted wave theory which includes screened dipole polarization potential. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogen wave function, it has been possible to obtain the distorted wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made to explore the structure of differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1 s → nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions in dense quantum plasma is the first reported in the literature.

  12. Plasma formation and dynamics in conical wire arrays in the Llampudken pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, C. Gonzalo E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Valenzuela, Vicente E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Veloso, Felipe E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Favre, Mario E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Wyndham, Edmund E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl

    2014-12-15

    Plasma formation and dynamics from conical wire array is experimentally studied. Ablation from the wires is observed, forming plasma accumulation at the array axis and subsequently a jet outflow been expelled toward the top of the array. The arrays are composed by 16 equally spaced 25μ diameter tungsten wires. Their dimensions are 20mm height, with base diameters of 8mm and 16mm top diameter. The array loads are design to be overmassed, hence no complete ablation of the wires is observed during the current rise. The experiments have been carried out in the Llampudken. pulsed power generator (∼350kA in ∼350ns). Plasma dynamics is studied in both side-on and end-on directions. Laser probing (shadowgraphy) is achieved using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm, 12ps FWHM) captured by CCD cameras. Pinhole XUV imaging is captured using gated microchannel plate cameras with time resolution ∼5ns. Results on the jet velocity and the degree of collimation indicating the plausibility on the use of these jets as comparable to the study astrophysically produced jets are presented and discussed.

  13. The effect of polycarboxylate shell of magnetite nanoparticles on protein corona formation in blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekeres, Márta; Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Turcu, R.; Tombácz, Etelka

    2017-04-01

    The development of protein corona around nanoparticles upon administration to the human body is responsible in a large part for their biodistribution, cell-internalization and toxicity or biocompatibility. We studied the influence of the chemical composition of polyelectrolyte shells (citric acid (CA) and poly(acrylic-co-maleic acid) (PAM)) of core-shell magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) on the evolution of protein corona in human plasma (HP). The aggregation state and zeta potential of the particles were measured in the range of HP concentration between 1 and 80 (v/v)% 3 min and 20 h after dispersing the particles in HP diluted with Tris buffered saline. Naked MNPs aggregated in HP solution, but the carboxylated MNPs became stabilized colloidally at higher plasma concentrations. Significant differences were observed at low plasma concentration. CA@MNPs aggregated instantly while the hydrodynamic diameter of PAM@MNP increased only slightly at 1-3 v/v % HP concentrations. The observed differences in protein corona formation can be explained by the differences in the steric effects of the polycarboxylate shells. It is interesting that relatively small but systematic changes in zeta potential alter the aggregation state significantly.

  14. Formation of microchannels from low-temperature plasma-deposited silicon oxynitride

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Bridges, Monica M.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming one or more fluid microchannels on a substrate is disclosed that is compatible with the formation of integrated circuitry on the substrate. The microchannels can be formed below an upper surface of the substrate, above the upper surface, or both. The microchannels are formed by depositing a covering layer of silicon oxynitride over a mold formed of a sacrificial material such as photoresist which can later be removed. The silicon oxynitride is deposited at a low temperature (.ltoreq.100.degree. C.) and preferably near room temperature using a high-density plasma (e.g. an electron-cyclotron resonance plasma or an inductively-coupled plasma). In some embodiments of the present invention, the microchannels can be completely lined with silicon oxynitride to present a uniform material composition to a fluid therein. The present invention has applications for forming microchannels for use in chromatography and electrophoresis. Additionally, the microchannels can be used for electrokinetic pumping, or for localized or global substrate cooling.

  15. Helium plasma implantation on metals: Nanostructure formation and visible-light photocatalytic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Shin; Yoshida, Tomoko; Kitaoka, Daiki; Etoh, Reo; Yajima, Miyuki; Ohno, Noriyasu; Yoshida, Hisao; Yoshida, Naoaki; Terao, Yoshitaka

    2013-04-01

    It has been found recently that low-energy helium (He) plasma irradiation to tungsten (W) leads to the growth of W nanostructures on the surface. The process to grow the nanostructure is identified as a self-growth process of He bubbles and has a potential to open up a new plasma processing method. Here, we show that the metallic nanostructure formation process by the exposure to He plasma can occur in various metals such as, titanium, nickel, iron, and so on. When the irradiation conditions alter, the metallic cone arrays including nanobubbles inside are formed on the surface. Different from W cases, other processes than growth of fiberform structure, i.e., physical sputtering and the growth of large He bubbles, can be dominant on other metals during irradiation; various surface morphology changes can occur. The nanostructured W, part of which was oxidized, has revealed a significant photocatalytic activity under visible light (wavelength >700 nm) in decolorization of methylene blue without any co-catalyst.

  16. On the mechanism of zirconium nitride formation by zirconium, zirconia and yttria burning in air

    SciTech Connect

    Malikova, Ekaterina; Pautova, Julia; Gromov, Alexander; Monogarov, Konstantin; Larionov, Kirill; Teipel, Ulrich

    2015-10-15

    The combustion of Zr and (Zr+ZrO{sub 2}) powdery mixtures in air was accompanied by major ZrN stabilization. The synthesis of cheap ZrN with the high yield in air was facile and utile. The influence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive on the content of ZrN the solid combustion products (SCP) was investigated. The reagents and SCP were analyzed by BET, DTA–TGA, XRD, SEM and EDS. Burning temperature was measured by thermal imager. The yield of ZrN in the SCP has been varied by the time regulation of the combustion process. The burning samples were quenched at a certain time to avoid the re-oxidation of the obtained ZrN by oxygen. The quenching of the burned (Zr+ZrO{sub 2}) samples with the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive was allowed increasing the ZrN yield in SCP up to 66 wt%. The chemical mechanism of ZrN formation in air was discussed and the probable source of ZrN massive formation is suggested. - Highlights: • Combustion of Zr, (Zr+ZrO{sub 2}) and (Zr+ZrO{sub 2}+Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powdery mixtures in air was studied. • The new combustion phenomenon has been found: metal (Zr) chemically reacts with its oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) in the burning wave. • The effective influence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive (2–3 wt%) on ZrN yield in combustion products is shown. • The yield of ZrN in the combustion products can be varied by the burning time regulation (quenching)

  17. Biofilm formation at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces by Acinetobacter species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The members of the genus Acinetobacter are Gram-negative cocobacilli that are frequently found in the environment but also in the hospital setting where they have been associated with outbreaks of nosocomial infections. Among them, Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as the most common pathogenic species involved in hospital-acquired infections. One reason for this emergence may be its persistence in the hospital wards, in particular in the intensive care unit; this persistence could be partially explained by the capacity of these microorganisms to form biofilm. Therefore, our main objective was to study the prevalence of the two main types of biofilm formed by the most relevant Acinetobacter species, comparing biofilm formation between the different species. Findings Biofilm formation at the air-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces was investigated in different Acinetobacter spp. and it appeared to be generally more important at 25°C than at 37°C. The biofilm formation at the solid-liquid interface by the members of the ACB-complex was at least 3 times higher than the other species (80-91% versus 5-24%). In addition, only the isolates belonging to this complex were able to form biofilm at the air-liquid interface; between 9% and 36% of the tested isolates formed this type of pellicle. Finally, within the ACB-complex, the biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface was almost 4 times higher for A. baumannii and Acinetobacter G13TU than for Acinetobacter G3 (36%, 27% & 9% respectively). Conclusions Overall, this study has shown the capacity of the Acinetobacter spp to form two different types of biofilm: solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces. This ability was generally higher at 25°C which might contribute to their persistence in the inanimate hospital environment. Our work has also demonstrated for the first time the ability of the members of the ACB-complex to form biofilm at the air-liquid interface, a feature that was not observed in other

  18. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  19. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  20. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  1. On the Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Lean Partially Premixed Combustion, Burning Speed, Flame Instability and Plasma Formation of Alternative Fuels at High Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, Omid

    This dissertation investigates the combustion and injection fundamental characteristics of different alternative fuels both experimentally and theoretically. The subjects such as lean partially premixed combustion of methane/hydrogen/air/diluent, methane high pressure direct-injection, thermal plasma formation, thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air mixtures at high temperatures, laminar flames and flame morphology of synthetic gas (syngas) and Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels were extensively studied in this work. These subjects will be summarized in three following paragraphs. The fundamentals of spray and partially premixed combustion characteristics of directly injected methane in a constant volume combustion chamber have been experimentally studied. The injected fuel jet generates turbulence in the vessel and forms a turbulent heterogeneous fuel-air mixture in the vessel, similar to that in a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Direct-Injection (DI) engines. The effect of different characteristics parameters such as spark delay time, stratification ratio, turbulence intensity, fuel injection pressure, chamber pressure, chamber temperature, Exhaust Gas recirculation (EGR) addition, hydrogen addition and equivalence ratio on flame propagation and emission concentrations were analyzed. As a part of this work and for the purpose of control and calibration of high pressure injector, spray development and characteristics including spray tip penetration, spray cone angle and overall equivalence ratio were evaluated under a wide range of fuel injection pressures of 30 to 90 atm and different chamber pressures of 1 to 5 atm. Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air plasma mixtures at ultra-high temperatures must be precisely calculated due to important influence on the flame kernel formation and propagation in combusting flows and spark discharge applications. A new algorithm based on the statistical thermodynamics was developed to calculate the ultra-high temperature plasma

  2. Formation of calcium in the products of iron oxide-aluminum thermite combustion in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, A. A.; Gromov, A. M.; Popenko, E. M.; Sergienko, A. V.; Sabinskaya, O. G.; Raab, B.; Teipel, U.

    2016-10-01

    The composition of condensed products resulting from the combustion of thermite mixtures (Al + Fe2O3) in air is studied by precise methods. It is shown that during combustion, calcium is formed and stabilized in amounts of maximal 0.55 wt %, while is missing from reactants of 99.7 wt % purity. To explain this, it is hypothesized that a low-energy nuclear reaction takes place alongside the reactions of aluminum oxidation and nitridation, resulting in the formation of calcium (Kervran-Bolotov reaction).

  3. Taking the Blood Bank to the Field: The Design and Rationale of the Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMPer) Trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua B; Guyette, Francis X; Neal, Matthew D; Claridge, Jeffrey A; Daley, Brian J; Harbrecht, Brian G; Miller, Richard S; Phelan, Herb A; Adams, Peter W; Early, Barbara J; Peitzman, Andrew B; Billiar, Timothy R; Sperry, Jason L

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage and trauma induced coagulopathy remain major drivers of early preventable mortality in military and civilian trauma. Interest in the use of prehospital plasma in hemorrhaging patients as a primary resuscitation agent has grown recently. Trauma center-based damage control resuscitation using early and aggressive plasma transfusion has consistently demonstrated improved outcomes in hemorrhaging patients. Additionally, plasma has been shown to have several favorable immunomodulatory effects. Preliminary evidence with prehospital plasma transfusion has demonstrated feasibility and improved short-term outcomes. Applying state-of-the-art resuscitation strategies to the civilian prehospital arena is compelling. We describe here the rationale, design, and challenges of the Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMPer) trial. The primary objective is to determine the effect of prehospital plasma transfusion during air medical transport on 30-day mortality in patients at risk for traumatic hemorrhage. This study is a multicenter cluster randomized clinical trial. The trial will enroll trauma patients with profound hypotension (SBP ≤ 70 mmHg) or hypotension (SBP 71-90 mmHg) and tachycardia (HR ≥ 108 bpm) from six level I trauma center air medical transport programs. The trial will also explore the effects of prehospital plasma transfusion on the coagulation and inflammatory response following injury. The trial will be conducted under exception for informed consent for emergency research with an investigational new drug approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration utilizing a multipronged community consultation process. It is one of three ongoing Department of Defense-funded trials aimed at expanding our understanding of the optimal therapeutic approaches to coagulopathy in the hemorrhaging trauma patient.

  4. Theoretical study of nanoparticle formation in thermal plasma processing: Nucleation, coagulation and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Gonzalez, Norma Yadira

    This work presents a mathematical modeling study of the synthesis of nanoparticles in radio frequency (RF) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors. The purpose is to further investigate the influence of process parameters on the final size and morphology of produced particles. The proposed model involves the calculation of flow and temperature fields of the plasma gas. Evaporation of raw particles is also accounted with the particle trajectory and temperature history calculated with a Lagrangian approach. The nanoparticle formation is considered by homogeneous nucleation and the growth is caused by condensation and Brownian coagulation. The growth of fractal aggregates is considered by introducing a power law exponent Df. Transport of nanoparticles occurs by convection, thermophoresis and Brownian diffusion. The method of moments is used to solve the particle dynamics equation. The model is validated using experimental results from plasma reactors at laboratory scale. The results are presented in the following manner. First, use is made of the computational fluid dynamics software (CFD), Fluent 6.1 with a commercial companion package specifically developped for aerosols named: Fine Particle Model (FPM). This package is used to study the relationship between the operating parameters effect and the properties of the end products at the laboratory scale. Secondly, a coupled hybrid model for the synthesis of spherical particles and fractal aggregates is developped in place of the FPM package. Results obtained from this model will allow to identify the importance of each parameter in defining the morphology of spherical primary particles and fractal aggregates of nanoparticles. The solution of the model was made using the geometries and operating conditions of existing reactors at the Centre de Recherche en Energie, Plasma et Electrochimie (CREPE) of the Universite de Sherbrooke, for which experimental results were obtained experimentally. Additionally, this study

  5. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  6. Plasma flows and magnetic field interplay during the formation of a pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolli, I.; Cristaldi, A.; Giorgi, F.; Giannattasio, F.; Stangalini, M.; Romano, P.; Tritschler, A.; Zuccarello, F.

    2017-04-01

    Aims: Recent simulations of solar magneto-convection have offered new levels of understanding of the interplay between plasma motions and magnetic fields in evolving active regions. We aim at verifying some aspects of the formation of magnetic regions derived from recent numerical studies in observational data. Methods: We studied the formation of a pore in the active region (AR) NOAA 11462. We analysed data obtained with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope on April 17, 2012, consisting of full Stokes measurements of the Fe I 617.3 nm lines. Furthermore, we analysed SDO/HMI observations in the continuum and vector magnetograms derived from the Fe I 617.3 nm line data taken from April 15 to 19, 2012. We estimated the magnetic field strength and vector components and the line-of-sight (LOS) and horizontal motions in the photospheric region hosting the pore formation. We discuss our results in light of other observational studies and recent advances of numerical simulations. Results: The pore formation occurs in less than 1 h in the leading region of the AR. We observe that the evolution of the flux patch in the leading part of the AR is faster (<12 h) than the evolution (20-30 h) of the more diffuse and smaller scale flux patches in the trailing region. During the pore formation, the ratio between magnetic and dark area decreases from 5 to 2. We observe strong downflows at the forming pore boundary and diverging proper motions of plasma in the vicinity of the evolving feature that are directed towards the forming pore. The average values and trends of the various quantities estimated in the AR are in agreement with results of former observational studies of steady pores and with their modelled counterparts, as seen in recent numerical simulations of a rising-tube process. The agreement with the outcomes of the numerical studies holds for both the signatures of the flux emergence process (e.g. appearance of small

  7. Advection fog formation and aerosols produced by combustion-originated air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The way in which pollutants produced by the photochemical reaction of NO(X) and SO(X) affect the quality of the human environment through such phenomena as the formation of advection fog is considered. These pollutants provide the major source of condensation nuclei for the formation of fog in highways, airports and seaports. Results based on the monodisperse, multicomponent aerosol model show that: (1) condensation nuclei can grow and form a dense fog without the air having attained supersaturation; (2) the mass concentration range for NO(X) is one-third that of SO(X); and (3) the greater the mass concentration, the particle concentration, and the radius of condensation nuclei, the denser the fog that is formed.

  8. Relation between crust development and heterocyclic aromatic amine formation when air-roasting a meat cylinder.

    PubMed

    Kondjoyan, Alain; Chevolleau, Sylvie; Portanguen, Stéphane; Molina, Jérôme; Ikonic, Predrag; Clerjon, Sylvie; Debrauwer, Laurent

    2016-12-15

    The meat crust that develops during cooking is desired by consumers for its organoleptic properties, but it is also where heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAs) are formed. Here we measured HAs formation during the development of a colored crust on the surface of a beef meat piece. HAs formation was lower in the crust than previously measured in meat slices subjected to the same air jet conditions. This difference is explained by a lower average temperature in the colored crust than in the meat slices. Temperature effects can also explain why colored crust failed to reproduce the plateauing and decrease in HAs content observed in meat slices. We observed a decrease in creatine content from the center of the meat piece to the crust area. In terms of the implications for practice, specific heating conditions can be found to maintain a roast beef meat aspect while dramatically reducing HAs content.

  9. The influence of gravity levels on soot formation for the combustion of ethylene-air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, D.; Li, S.; Li, Y.; Lou, C.

    2014-12-01

    The reduced mechanism coupled with 2D flame code using CHEMKIN II to investigate the effect of gravity on flame structure and soot formation in diffusion flames. The results show that the gravity has a rather significant effect on flame structure and soot formation. The visible flame height and peak soot volume fraction in general increases with the gravity from 1 g decreased to 0 g. The peak flame temperature decreases with decreasing gravity level. Comparing the calculated results from 1 g to 0 g, the flame shape becomes wider, the high temperature zone becomes shorter, the mixture velocity has a sharp decrease, the soot volume fraction has a sharp increase and CO and unprovided species distribution becomes wider along radial direction. At normal and half gravity, the flame is buoyancy controlled and the axial velocity is largely independent of the coflow air velocity. At microgravity (0 g), the flame is momentum controlled.

  10. A Feasibility Study on Operating Large Scale Compressed Air Energy Storage in Porous Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Pfeiffer, W. T.; Li, D.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous formations has been considered as one promising option of large scale energy storage for decades. This study, hereby, aims at analyzing the feasibility of operating large scale CAES in porous formations and evaluating the performance of underground porous gas reservoirs. To address these issues quantitatively, a hypothetic CAES scenario with a typical anticline structure in northern Germany was numerically simulated. Because of the rapid growth in photovoltaics, the period of extraction in a daily cycle was set to the early morning and the late afternoon in order to bypass the massive solar energy production around noon. The gas turbine scenario was defined referring to the specifications of the Huntorf CAES power plant. The numerical simulations involved two stages, i.e. initial fill and cyclic operation, and both were carried out using the Eclipse E300 simulator (Schlumberger). Pressure loss in the gas wells was post analyzed using an analytical solution. The exergy concept was applied to evaluate the potential energy amount stored in the specific porous formation. The simulation results show that porous formations prove to be a feasible solution of large scale CAES. The initial fill with shut-in periods determines the spatial distribution of the gas phase and helps to achieve higher gas saturation around the wells, and thus higher deliverability. The performance evaluation shows that the overall exergy flow of stored compressed air is also determined by the permeability, which directly affects the deliverability of the gas reservoir and thus the number of wells required.

  11. Formation of plasma induced surface damage in silica glass etching for optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, D. S.; Jung, S. T.

    2004-06-01

    Ge, B, P-doped silica glass films are widely used as optical waveguides because of their low losses and inherent compatibility with silica optical fibers. These films were etched by ICP (inductively coupled plasma) with chrome etch masks, which were patterned by reactive ion etching (RIE) using chlorine-based gases. In some cases, the etched surfaces of silica glass were very rough (root-mean square roughness greater than 100 nm) and we call this phenomenon plasma induced surface damage (PISD). Rough surface cannot be used as a platform for hybrid integration because of difficulty in alignment and bonding of active devices. PISD reduces the etch rate of glass and it is very difficult to remove residues on a rough surface. The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism of PISD formation. To achieve this goal, PISD formation during different etching conditions of chrome etch mask and silica glass was investigated. In most cases, PISD sources are formed on a glass surface after chrome etching, and metal compounds are identified in theses sources. Water rinse after chrome etching reduces the PISD, due to the water solubility of metal chlorides. PISD is decreased or even disappeared at high power and/or low pressure in glass etching, even if PISD sources were present on the glass surface before etching. In conclusion, PISD sources come from the chrome etching process, and polymer deposition on these sources during the silica etching cause the PISD sources to grow. In the area close to the PISD source there is a higher ion flux, which causes an increase in the etch rate, and results in the formation of a pit.

  12. Ammonia sources in the California South Coast Air Basin and their impact on ammonium nitrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J. A.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Observations from the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during CalNex in May and June 2010 are used to quantify ammonia (NH3) emissions from automobiles and dairy facilities in the California South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) and assess their impact on particulate ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) formation. These airborne measurements in the SoCAB are used to estimate automobile NH3 emissions, 62 ± 24 metric tons day-1, and dairy facility NH3 emissions, 33 ± 16 to 176 ± 88 metric tons day-1. Emission inventories agree with the observed automobile NH3:CO emission ratio, but substantially underpredict dairy facility NH3 emissions. Conditions observed downwind of the dairy facilities were always thermodynamically favorable for NH4NO3 formation due to high NH3 mixing ratios from the concentrated sources. Although automobile emissions generated lower NH3 mixing ratios, they also can thermodynamically favor NH4NO3 formation. As an aerosol control strategy, addressing the dairy NH3 source would have the larger impact on reducing SoCAB NH4NO3 formation.

  13. Inhibitory effect of silver nanoparticles mediated by atmospheric pressure air cold plasma jet against dermatophyte fungi.

    PubMed

    Ouf, Salama A; El-Adly, Amira A; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H

    2015-10-01

    In an in vitro study with five clinical isolates of dermatophytes, the MIC(50) and MIC(100) values of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) ranged from 5 to 16 and from 15 to 32 μg ml(- 1), respectively. The combined treatment of AgNPs with atmospheric pressure-air cold plasma (APACP) induced a drop in the MIC(50) and MIC100 values of AgNPs reaching 3-11 and 12-23 μg ml(- 1), respectively, according to the examined species. Epidermophyton floccosum was the most sensitive fungus to AgNPs, while Trichophyton rubrum was the most tolerant. AgNPs induced significant reduction in keratinase activity and an increase in the mycelium permeability that was greater when applied combined with plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy showed electroporation of the cell walls and the accumulation of AgNPs on the cell wall and inside the cells, particularly when AgNPs were combined with APACP treatment. An in vivo experiment with dermatophyte-inoculated guinea pigs indicated that the application of AgNPs combined with APACP was more efficacious in healing and suppressing disease symptoms of skin as compared with the application of AgNPs alone. The recovery from the infection reached 91.7 % in the case of Microsporum canis-inoculated guinea pigs treated with 13 μg ml(- 1) AgNPs combined with APACP treatment delivered for 2  min. The emission spectra indicated that the efficacy of APACP was mainly due to generation of NO radicals and excited nitrogen molecules. These reactive species interact and block the activity of the fungal spores in vitro and in the skin lesions of the guinea pigs. The results achieved are promising compared with fluconazole as reference antifungal drug.

  14. Effects of Atmospheric Pressure Air Plasma Pretreatment on the Seed Germination and Early Growth of Andrographis paniculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Jiayun; He, Rui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhan, Ruoting; Chen, Weiwen; Yang, Size

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate whether air plasma can change the seed germination characteristics, seedling emergence, as well as biochemical reactivity, in Andrographis paniculata (A. paniculata) seedlings by modifying the seed coat and finding a beneficial treatment dose. Eight treatment doses and one control were used to conduct electrical conductivity determination, a germination test, a seedling emergence test and a biochemical assay. The results showed that after being treated with air plasma excited at 5950 V for 10 s, the permeability of the seeds was improved significantly, resulting in the acceleration of seed germination and seedling emergence. In the meantime, the catalase activity and catalase isoenzyme expression were also improved, while the malondialdehyde content in the seedlings was decreased (which means greater counteraction with environmental stress). After being treated with 4250 V for 10 s and 5950 V for 20 s, the seed germination was enhanced, but without an obvious change in seedling emergence. However, after treatment with 3400 V for 20 s and 5100 V for 10 s, the permeability of the seeds was decreased, resulting in a delay in seedling emergence. These results indicate that air plasma can change the physiological and biochemical characteristics of Andrographis paniculata seeds by modifying the seed coat, combined with the effects of the active plasma species, and that different treating doses have different effects.

  15. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  16. Biofilm Formation Derived from Ambient Air and the Characteristics of Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, H.; Kougo, H.; Kuroda, D.; Itho, H.; Ogino, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Biofilm is a kind of thin film on solidified matters, being derived from bacteria. Generally, planktonic bacteria float in aqueous environments, soil or air, most of which can be regarded as oligotrophic environments. Since they have to survive by instinct, they seek for nutrients that would exist on materials surfaces as organic matters. Therefore, bacteria attach materials surfaces reversibly. The attachment and detachment repeat for a while and finally, they attach on them irreversibly and the number of bacteria on them increases. At a threshold number, bacteria produce polymeric matters at the same time by quorum sensing mechanism and the biofilm produces on material surfaces. The biofilm produced in that way generally contains water (more than 80%), EPS (Exopolymeric Substance) and bacteria themselves. And they might bring about many industrial problems, fouling, corrosion etc. Therefore, it is very important for us to control and prevent the biofilm formation properly. However, it is generally very hard to produce biofilm experimentally and constantly in ambient atmosphere on labo scale. The authors invented an apparatus where biofilm could form on specimen's surfaces from house germs in the ambient air. In this experiment, we investigated the basic characteristics of the apparatus, reproducibility, the change of biofilm with experimental time, the quality change of water for biofilm formation and their significance for biofilm research.

  17. The relationship between ozone formation and air temperature in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belan, Boris D.; Savkin, Denis; Tolmachev, Gennadii

    2016-04-01

    Studying the formation and dynamics of ozone in the atmosphere is important due to several reasons. First, the contribution of tropospheric ozone to the global greenhouse effect is only slightly less than that of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. Second, tropospheric ozone acts as a strong poison that has negative effects on human health, animals, and vegetation. Third, being a potent oxidizer, ozone destroys almost all materials, including platinum group metals and compounds. Fourthly, ozone is formed in situ from precursors as a result of photochemical processes, but not emitted into the atmosphere by any industrial enterprises directly. In this work, we present some results of the study aimed at the revealing relationship between ozone formation rate and surface air temperature in the background atmosphere. It has been found that this relationship is nonlinear. Analysis of the possible reasons showed that the nonlinear character of this relationship may be due to a nonlinear increase in the reaction constants versus air temperature and a quadratic increase in the concentration of hydrocarbons with increasing temperature. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science contract no.14.613.21.0013 (ID: RFMEFI61314X0013).

  18. Effect of nitric oxide on photochemical ozone formation in mixtures of air with molecular chlorine and with trichlorofluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Wong, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone formation in a reaction chamber at room temperature and atmospheric pressure were studied for the photolysis of mixtures of NO with either Cl2 or CFCl3 in air. Both Cl2 + NO and CFCl3 + NO in air strongly inhibited O3 formation during the entire 3 to 4 hour reaction. A chemical mechanism that explains the results was presented. An important part of this mechanism was the formation and destruction of chlorine nitrate. Computations were performed with this same mechanism for CFCl3-NO-air mixtures at stratospheric temperatures, pressures, and concentrations. Results showed large reductions in steady-state O3 concentrations in these mixtures as compared with pure air.

  19. Experimental verification of the capillary plasma triggered long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, D.; Yang, L. J. Ma, J. B.; Liu, S.; Wang, W.; Ding, W. D.; Huo, P.; Li, G.; Yao, S. L.

    2016-01-15

    The paper has proposed a new triggering method for long spark gap based on capillary plasma ejection and conducted the experimental verification under the extremely low working coefficient, which represents that the ratio of the spark gap charging voltage to the breakdown voltage is particularly low. The quasi-neutral plasma is ejected from the capillary and develops through the axial direction of the spark gap. The electric field in the spark gap is thus changed and its breakdown is incurred. It is proved by the experiments that the capillary plasma ejection is effective in triggering the long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air. The study also indicates that the breakdown probabilities, the breakdown delay, and the delay dispersion are all mainly determined by the characteristics of the ejected plasma, including the length of the plasma flow, the speed of the plasma ejection, and the ionization degree of the plasma. Moreover, the breakdown delay and the delay dispersion increase with the length of the long spark gap, and the polarity effect exists in the triggering process. Lastly, compared with the working patterns of the triggering device installed in the single electrode, the working pattern of the devices installed in both the two electrodes, though with the same breakdown process, achieves the ignition under longer gap distance. To be specific, at the gap length of 14 cm and the working coefficient of less than 2%, the spark gap is still ignited accurately.

  20. Formation and dynamics of plasma bullets in a non-thermal plasma jet: influence of the high-voltage parameters on the plume characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrige, Julien; Laroussi, Mounir; Karakas, Erdinc

    2010-12-01

    Non-thermal plasma jets in open air are composed of ionization waves commonly known as 'plasma bullets' propagating at high velocities. We present in this paper an experimental study of plasma bullets produced in a dielectric barrier discharge linear-field reactor fed with helium and driven by microsecond high-voltage pulses. Two discharges were produced between electrodes for every pulse (at the rising and falling edge), but only one bullet was generated. Fast intensified charge coupled device camera imaging showed that bullet velocity and diameter increase with applied voltage. Spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements provided evidence of the hollow structure of the jet and its contraction. It was shown that the pulse amplitude significantly enhances electron energy and production of active species. The plasma bullet appeared to behave like a surface discharge in the tube, and like a positive streamer in air. A kinetics mechanism based on electron impact, Penning effect and charge transfer reactions is proposed to explain the propagation of the ionization front and temporal behavior of the radiative species.

  1. Negative Ion Crystal Formation in Nonequilibrium Dusty Plasma at a Gas Evacuation from Technological Devices for Vacuum Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarenkov, Nikolai A.; Egorov, Alexei M.; Maslov, Vasyl I.; Onishchenko, Ivan N.; Frolova, Darya Yu.

    2002-11-01

    Plasma crystal formation (or so called ion crystal formation) are investigated now intensively (see, for example, [1-5]). In particular, the formation of the plasma crystals has been observed in experiments at providing of nonequilibrium state. If in equilibrium dusty plasma there was no plasma crystal but at providing of nonequilibrium state at a gas evacuation from devices for vacuum support in a dusty plasma in experiment an ion crystal has been formed. In this case at gas evacuation the plasma flow has been appeared due to gradient of the pressure. The flow excites the perturbations of large amplitudes. The generalised equation is derived for the spatial distribution of field of any amplitude. It is shown that these perturbations of large amplitude lead to spatial ordering of heavy negative ions. It is shown that the crystal is almost motionless, because heavy negative ions are trapped by chain of perturbations formed due to instability development on generalised dusty-ion-acoustic mode with velocity equal almost zero. 1.H.M.Thomas, G.E. Morfill. Nature. 379 (1996) 806. 2.R.K.Varma, P.K.Shukla. Physica Scripta. 51 (1995) 522. 3.M.Nambu, S.V.Vladimirov, P.K.Shukla. Phys. Lett. A. 203 (1995) 40. 4.A.Melzer, A.Piel et al. Proc. Int. Top. Conf. on Plasma Physics. Trieste. Italy. 2000. 5.V.E.Fortov, A.P.Nefedov et al. Proc. Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics. Trieste. Italy. 2000. 6.D.A.Law, B.M.Annaratone, J.E.Allen et al. Dust Particle Interaction in RF Plasma Sheaths.

  2. Prospective study of malabsorption induced risk of gall stone formation in relation to fall in plasma cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, T I; Andersen, B; Hylander, E; Jensen, L I; Laursen, K; Klein, H C

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between cholesterol in plasma and risk of gall stone formation was investigated in 210 obese patients who underwent jejunoileal bypass surgery and were free of gall stone disease at the time. Among 185, successfully reexamined on average 19 months after surgery, 26 (14%) developed gall stones. The fall in plasma cholesterol after surgery exhibited a U-shaped relation to risk of gall stone formation with a minimum risk around the average fall (2.6 mmol/l). This was confirmed by multivariate logistic regression analysis (p less than 0.01) taking into account other possible determinants. The relation was not significantly dependent on weight loss or ratio between jejunum and ileum left in function. The study suggests that malabsorption induced fall in plasma cholesterol is related to risk of gall stone formation by two oppositely working mechanisms, one enhancing and one reducing the risk.

  3. Theoretical investigation of the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct current argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, P.; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. K.

    2014-03-01

    In this study the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct-current (DC) argon plasma is theoretically investigated. By coupling fluid equations with Poisons equation for such multi-component plasma, the Mach number and amplitude of the soliton are determined following pseudo potential method. Addition of hydrogen in argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron, Ar+ ion density while a reverse trend was observed for ArH+ and hydrogen like ions. It was found that presence of hydrogen like ions in argon plasma affects the formation of soliton with its amplitude significantly decreases as concentration of hydrogen increases. On the other hand, increase in ion to electron temperature ratios of the lighter ions in the discharge also has a significant influence on the amplitude and formation of soliton. The inverse relation between solitons width and amplitude is found to be consistent for the entire range of study.

  4. Theoretical investigation of the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct current argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, P. Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. K.

    2014-03-15

    In this study the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct-current (DC) argon plasma is theoretically investigated. By coupling fluid equations with Poisons equation for such multi-component plasma, the Mach number and amplitude of the soliton are determined following pseudo potential method. Addition of hydrogen in argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron, Ar{sup +} ion density while a reverse trend was observed for ArH{sup +} and hydrogen like ions. It was found that presence of hydrogen like ions in argon plasma affects the formation of soliton with its amplitude significantly decreases as concentration of hydrogen increases. On the other hand, increase in ion to electron temperature ratios of the lighter ions in the discharge also has a significant influence on the amplitude and formation of soliton. The inverse relation between solitons width and amplitude is found to be consistent for the entire range of study.

  5. Oxidation of metals by a plasma formed as a result of low-threshold breakdown of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, I. N.; Goncharov, Yu N.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Minaev, I. M.; Skvortsov, Yu A.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1981-12-01

    The characteristics of the oxidation of copper, aluminum, and titanium were determined in the case when breakdown of air was initiated by CO2 laser pulses incident on targets made of these metals. A study was made of the influence of surface oxide films on the threshold radiation intensity necessary to produce a plasma. The dependence of the efficiency of the thermal interaction of an optical-breakdown plasma on the magnitude and sign of the charge carried by the surface of a metal target was investigated for the first time in the specific case of titanium.

  6. Geopolymers prepared from DC plasma treated air pollution control (APC) residues glass: properties and characterisation of the binder phase.

    PubMed

    Kourti, Ioanna; Devaraj, Amutha Rani; Bustos, Ana Guerrero; Deegan, David; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2011-11-30

    Air pollution control (APC) residues have been blended with glass-forming additives and treated using DC plasma technology to produce a high calcium aluminosilicate glass (APC glass). This has been used to form geopolymer-glass composites that exhibit high strength and density, low porosity, low water absorption, low leaching and high acid resistance. The composites have a microstructure consisting of un-reacted residual APC glass particles imbedded in a complex geopolymer and C-S-H gel binder phase, and behave as particle reinforced composites. The work demonstrates that materials prepared from DC plasma treated APC residues have potential to be used to form high quality pre-cast products.

  7. Characteristic Features of the Formation of a Combined Magnetron-Laser Plasma in the Processes of Deposition of Film Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmakov, A. P.; Kuleshov, V. N.; Prokopchik, K. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    A block diagram of a facility for combined magnetron-laser deposition of coatings and of the systems of controlling and managing this process is considered. The results of analysis of the influence of the gas medium and of laser radiation parameters on the emission-optical properties of laser plasma are considered. The influence of the laser plasma on the electric characteristics of a magnetron discharge is analyzed. The formation of the laser plasma-initiated pulse arc discharge has been established and the influence of the laser radiation parameters on the electric characteristics of this discharge has been determined. The emission optical spectra of the magnetron discharge plasma and of erosion laser plasma are compared separately and in combination.

  8. Long-term antibacterial efficacy of air plasma-activated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traylor, Matthew J.; Pavlovich, Matthew J.; Karim, Sharmin; Hait, Pritha; Sakiyama, Yukinori; Clark, Douglas S.; Graves, David B.

    2011-11-01

    Indirect air dielectric barrier discharge in close proximity to water creates an acidified, nitrogen-oxide containing solution known as plasma-activated water (PAW), which remains antibacterial for several days. Suspensions of E. coli were exposed to PAW for either 15 min or 3 h over a 7-day period after PAW generation. Both exposure times yielded initial antibacterial activity corresponding to a ~5-log reduction in cell viability, which decreased at differing rates over 7 days to negligible activity and a 2.4-log reduction for 15 min and 3 h exposures, respectively. The solution remained at pH ~2.7 for this period and initially included hydrogen peroxide, nitrate and nitrite anions. The solution composition varied significantly over this time, with hydrogen peroxide and nitrite diminishing within a few days, during which the antibacterial efficacy of 15 min exposures decreased significantly, while that of 3 h exposures produced a 5-log reduction or more. These results highlight the complexity of PAW solutions where multiple chemical components exert varying biological effects on differing time scales.

  9. The study of gas species on THz generation from laser-induced air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji; Zhang, LiangLiang; Wu, YiJian; Wu, Tong; Yuan, Hui; Zhang, CunLin; Zhao, YueJin

    2015-08-01

    Intense Terahertz waves generated from air-induced plasma and serving as broadband THz source provide a promising broadband source for innovative technology. Terahertz generation in selected gases has attracted more and more researchers' interests in recent years. In this research, the THz emission from different atoms is described, such as nitrogen, argon and helium in Michelson. The THz radiation is detected by a Golay Cell equipped with a 6-mm-diameter diamond-inputting window. It can be seen in the first time that when the pump power lies at a stable level, the THz generation created by the femtosecond laser focusing on the nitrogen is higher than which focusing on the helium, and lower than that produced in the argon gas environment. We believe that the THz intensity is Ar > N > Ne because of its atomic mass, which is Ar > N > Ne as well. It is clear that the Gas molecular decides the release of free electrons ionized from ultra short femtosecond laser through the electronic dynamic analysis. The higher the gas mass is, the stronger the terahertz emission will be. We further explore the THz emission at the different laser power levels, and the experimental results can be commendably quadratic fitted. It can be inferred that THz emission under different gas medium environment still complies with the law of four-wave mixing (FWM) process and has nothing to do with the gas environment: the radiation energy is proportional to the quadratic of incident laser power.

  10. Spatial diagnostics of the laser-produced tin plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Javed; Ahmed, R.; Rafique, M.; Anwar-ul-Haq, M.; Baig, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present here new experimental studies on the laser-produced tin plasma generated by focusing the beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) on the sample in air at atmospheric pressure. The optical emission spectra were recorded with a set of five spectrometers covering the spectral range from 200-720 nm. The electron temperature has been calculated to be about (10 600  ±  600) K using three methods; the two-line ratio, Boltzmann plot and the Saha-Boltzmann plot method, whereas the electron number density of about (9.0  ±  0.8)  ×  1016 cm-3 has been calculated using the Stark broadened line profiles of tin lines and the hydrogen Hα-line. Furthermore, the branching fractions have been deduced for 15 spectral lines of the 5p5d  →  5p2 transition array in tin, whereas the absolute values of the transition probabilities have been calculated by combining the experimental branching fractions with the lifetimes of the excited levels. Our measured values are compared with those reported in the literature and NIST data base, showing good agreement.

  11. Conclusive evidence of abrupt coagulation inside the void during cyclic nanoparticle formation in reactive plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Nijdam, S.; Beckers, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results that confirm in a direct way our earlier explanation of an abrupt coagulation event as the cause for the void hiccup. In a recent paper, we reported on the fast and interrupted expansion of voids in a reactive dusty argon-acetylene plasma. The voids appeared one after the other, each showing a peculiar, though reproducible, behavior of successive periods of fast expansion, abrupt contraction, and continued expansion. The abrupt contraction was termed "hiccup" and was related to collective coagulation of a new generation of nanoparticles growing in the void using relatively indirect methods: electron density measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. In this letter, we present conclusive evidence using SEM of particles collected at different moments in time spanning several growth cycles, which enables us to follow the nanoparticle formation process in great detail.

  12. Effect of Saturation Pressure Difference on Metal–Silicide Nanopowder Formation in Thermal Plasma Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Shigeta, Masaya; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    A computational investigation using a unique model and a solution algorithm was conducted, changing only the saturation pressure of one material artificially during nanopowder formation in thermal plasma fabrication, to highlight the effects of the saturation pressure difference between a metal and silicon. The model can not only express any profile of particle size–composition distribution for a metal–silicide nanopowder even with widely ranging sizes from sub-nanometers to a few hundred nanometers, but it can also simulate the entire growth process involving binary homogeneous nucleation, binary heterogeneous co-condensation, and coagulation among nanoparticles with different compositions. Greater differences in saturation pressures cause a greater time lag for co-condensation of two material vapors during the collective growth of the metal–silicide nanopowder. The greater time lag for co-condensation results in a wider range of composition of the mature nanopowder.

  13. Computational analysis of debris formation in SXPL laser-plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.; Grady, D.; Olson, R.; Farnsworth, A.

    1993-08-01

    One of the goals of soft X-ray projection lithography (SXPL) is to devise laser plasma X-ray sources that minimize or entirely eliminate condensed debris. Our progress in developing a computational methodology for analyzing and predicting the formation of target debris in laser generated soft X-ray sources is presented. Our numerical approach requires (1) simulation of the laser/target interaction using the LASNEX radiation hydrodynamics code; (2) simulation of the thermomechanical response of the target using the CTH strong shock code; (3) and detailed debris predictions from extrapolation of CTH results to millisecond time scales via post-processing techniques. We will discuss scaling issues, give examples of calculations, and discuss experimental data.

  14. Formation of a Spinel Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, Maximilian; Simchen, Frank; Scharf, Ingolf; Lampke, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a common means for the surface modification of light metals. However, PEO of magnesium substrates in dilute electrolytes generally leads to the formation of coatings consisting of unfavorable MgO magnesium oxide. By incorporation of electrolyte components, the phase constitution of the oxide coatings can be modified. Coatings consisting exclusively of MgAl2O4 magnesium-aluminum spinel are produced by PEO in an electrolyte containing hydroxide, aluminate, and phosphate anions. The hardness of the coatings is 3.5 GPa on Martens scale on average. Compared to the bare substrate, the coatings reduce the corrosion current density in dilute sodium chloride solution by approx. one order of magnitude and slightly shift the corrosion potential toward more noble values.

  15. Evolution of collectivity as a signal of quark gluon plasma formation in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Payal; Alam, Jan-e; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2011-08-15

    A measurement for studying the mass dependence of dilepton interferometry in relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments as a tool to characterize the quark gluon phase is proposed. In calculations involving dileptons, we show that the mass dependence of radii extracted from the virtual photon (dilepton) interferometry provide access to the development of collective flow with time. It is argued that the nonmonotonic variation of Hanbury Brown-Twiss radii with invariant mass of the lepton pairs signals the formation of quark gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions. Our proposal of experimentally measuring the ratio, R{sub out}/R{sub side} for dileptons can be used to estimate the average lifetimes of the partonic as well as the hadronic phases.

  16. Electromagnetic particle in cell modeling of the plasma focus: Current sheath formation and lift off

    SciTech Connect

    Seng, Y. S.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-02-15

    The shaping and formation of the current sheath takes place in the breakdown phase of a plasma focus device and critically controls the device performance. Electrostatic particle in cell codes, with magnetic effects ignored, have been used to model the breakdown phase. This Letter reports the successful development and implementation of an electromagnetic particle in cell (EMPIC) code, including magnetic effects self-consistently, to simulate the breakdown phase; from the ionization, localization and gliding discharge along the insulator to the time instant of current sheath lift off. The magnetic field was found to be appreciable from the time the current sheath came into contact with the anode with increased local current, initiating the voltage breakdown of the device as a result.

  17. Are v2 measurements consistent with the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma at RHIC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Roy A.

    2002-04-01

    Two-particle and multi-particle correlation measurements have been predicted to serve as an important probe for the high energy density nuclear matter expected in Au + Au collisions at RHIC [1,2,3]. In recent experiments, the PHENIX collaboration has made such measurements for a wide range of transverse momentum and impact parameter selections. Selected results from these measurements will be presented, and I will discuss whether or not they are compatible with possible quark gluon plasma formation in RHIC collisions. [1] Teaney & Shuryak PRL 83, 4951, (1999). [2] M. Gyulassy and X.N. Wang, Nucl. Phys. B420 583 (1994). [3] X.N. Wang, Phys. Rev. C58 2321 (1998).

  18. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  19. Dynamin regulates metaphase furrow formation and plasma membrane compartmentalization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Rikhy, Richa; Mavrakis, Manos; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The successive nuclear division cycles in the syncytial Drosophila embryo are accompanied by ingression and regression of plasma membrane furrows, which surround individual nuclei at the embryo periphery, playing a central role in embryo compartmentalization prior to cellularization. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle changes in dynamin localization and activity at the plasma membrane (PM) regulate metaphase furrow formation and PM organization in the syncytial embryo. Dynamin was localized on short PM furrows during interphase, mediating endocytosis of PM components. Dynamin redistributed off ingressed PM furrows in metaphase, correlating with stabilized PM components and the associated actin regulatory machinery on long furrows. Acute inhibition of dynamin in the temperature sensitive shibire mutant embryo resulted in morphogenetic consequences in the syncytial division cycle. These included inhibition of metaphase furrow ingression, randomization of proteins normally polarized to intercap PM and disruption of the diffusion barrier separating PM domains above nuclei. Based on these findings, we propose that cell cycle changes in dynamin orchestrate recruitment of actin regulatory machinery for PM furrow dynamics during the early mitotic cycles in the Drosophila embryo. PMID:25661871

  20. Formation of a bifurcated current layer by the collision of supersonic magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttle, Lee; Hare, Jack; Lebedev, Sergey; Ciardi, Andrea; Loureiro, Nuno; Burdiak, Guy; Chittenden, Jerry; Clayson, Thomas; Ma, Jiming; Niasse, Nicolas; Robinson, Timothy; Smith, Roland; Stuart, Nicolas; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    We present detailed experimental data showing the formation and structure of a current layer produced by the collision of two supersonic and well magnetized plasma flows. The pulsed-power driven setup provides two steady and continuous flows, whose embedded magnetic fields mutually annihilate inside the interaction region giving rise to the current layer. Spatially resolved measurements with Faraday rotation polarimetry, Thomson scattering and laser interferometry diagnostics show the detailed distribution of the magnetic field and other plasma parameters throughout the system. We show that the pile-up of magnetic field ahead of the annihilation gives rise to the multi-layered / bi-directional nature of the current sheet, and we discuss pressure balance and energy exchange mechanisms within the system. This work was supported in part by the Engi