Science.gov

Sample records for air plasma produced

  1. Quasi-steady-state air plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse sequence

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Chen, Shi-You; Ma, Jing-Long; Hou, Lei; Liao, Guo-Qian; Wang, Jin-Guang; Han, Yu-Jing; Liu, Xiao-Long; Teng, Hao; Han, Hai-Nian; Li, Yu-Tong; Chen, Li-Ming; Wei, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    A long air plasma channel can be formed by filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses. However, the lifetime of the plasma channel produced by a single femtosecond laser pulse is too short (only a few nanoseconds) for many potential applications based on the conductivity of the plasma channel. Therefore, prolonging the lifetime of the plasma channel is one of the key challenges in the research of femtosecond laser filamentation. In this study, a unique femtosecond laser source was developed to produce a high-quality femtosecond laser pulse sequence with an interval of 2.9 ns and a uniformly distributed single-pulse energy. The metre scale quasi-steady-state plasma channel with a 60–80 ns lifetime was formed by such pulse sequences in air. The simulation study for filamentation of dual femtosecond pulses indicated that the plasma channel left by the previous pulse was weakly affected the filamentation of the next pulse in sequence under our experimental conditions. PMID:26493279

  2. Quasi-steady-state air plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Chen, Shi-You; Ma, Jing-Long; Hou, Lei; Liao, Guo-Qian; Wang, Jin-Guang; Han, Yu-Jing; Liu, Xiao-Long; Teng, Hao; Han, Hai-Nian; Li, Yu-Tong; Chen, Li-Ming; Wei, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    A long air plasma channel can be formed by filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses. However, the lifetime of the plasma channel produced by a single femtosecond laser pulse is too short (only a few nanoseconds) for many potential applications based on the conductivity of the plasma channel. Therefore, prolonging the lifetime of the plasma channel is one of the key challenges in the research of femtosecond laser filamentation. In this study, a unique femtosecond laser source was developed to produce a high-quality femtosecond laser pulse sequence with an interval of 2.9 ns and a uniformly distributed single-pulse energy. The metre scale quasi-steady-state plasma channel with a 60-80 ns lifetime was formed by such pulse sequences in air. The simulation study for filamentation of dual femtosecond pulses indicated that the plasma channel left by the previous pulse was weakly affected the filamentation of the next pulse in sequence under our experimental conditions. PMID:26493279

  3. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Marcus, Frederick B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux.

  4. Dust particle charge screening in the dry-air plasma produced by an external ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, I. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2015-08-15

    The ionic composition of the plasma produced by an external ionization source in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature and the screening of the electric field of a dust particle in such a plasma have been investigated. The point sink model based on the diffusion-drift approximation has been used to solve the screening problem. We have established that the main species of ions in the plasma under consideration are O{sub 4}{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, and O{sub 4}{sup -} and that the dust particle potential distribution is described by a superposition of four exponentials with four different constants. We show that the first constant coincides with the inverse Debye length, the second is described by the inverse ambipolar diffusion length of the positive and negative plasma components in the characteristic time of their recombination, the third is determined by the conversion of negative ions, and the fourth is determined by the attachment and recombination of electrons and diatomic ions.

  5. Production of geopolymers using glass produced from DC plasma treatment of air pollution control (APC) residues.

    PubMed

    Kourti, Ioanna; Rani, D Amutha; Deegan, D; Boccaccini, A R; Cheeseman, C R

    2010-04-15

    Air pollution control (APC) residues are the hazardous waste produced from cleaning gaseous emissions at energy-from-waste (EfW) facilities processing municipal solid waste (MSW). APC residues have been blended with glass-forming additives and treated using DC plasma technology to produce a high calcium alumino-silicate glass. This research has investigated the optimisation and properties of geopolymers prepared from this glass. Work has shown that high strength geopolymers can be formed and that the NaOH concentration of the activating solution significantly affects the properties. The broad particle size distribution of the APC residue glass used in these experiments results in a microstructure that contains unreacted glass particles included within a geopolymer binder phase. The high calcium content of APC residues may cause the formation of some amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. A mix prepared with S/L=3.4, Si/Al=2.6 and [NaOH]=6M in the activating solution, produced high strength geopolymers with compressive strengths of approximately 130 MPa. This material had high density (2070 kg/m(3)) and low porosity. The research demonstrates for the first time that glass derived from DC plasma treatment of APC residues can be used to form high strength geopolymer-glass composites that have potential for use in a range of applications. PMID:20022170

  6. Spatial diagnostics of the laser-produced tin plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Javed; Ahmed, R.; Rafique, M.; Anwar-ul-Haq, M.; Baig, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present here new experimental studies on the laser-produced tin plasma generated by focusing the beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) on the sample in air at atmospheric pressure. The optical emission spectra were recorded with a set of five spectrometers covering the spectral range from 200–720 nm. The electron temperature has been calculated to be about (10 600  ±  600) K using three methods; the two-line ratio, Boltzmann plot and the Saha–Boltzmann plot method, whereas the electron number density of about (9.0  ±  0.8)  ×  1016 cm‑3 has been calculated using the Stark broadened line profiles of tin lines and the hydrogen Hα-line. Furthermore, the branching fractions have been deduced for 15 spectral lines of the 5p5d  →  5p2 transition array in tin, whereas the absolute values of the transition probabilities have been calculated by combining the experimental branching fractions with the lifetimes of the excited levels. Our measured values are compared with those reported in the literature and NIST data base, showing good agreement.

  7. Experimental study of the behavior of two laser produced plasmas in air

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zefeng; Wei, Wenfu; Han, Jiaxun; Wu, Jian Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli

    2015-07-15

    The interactions among two laser ablated Al plasmas and their shock wave fronts (SWFs) induced by double laser pulses in air were studied experimentally. The evolution processes, including the expansion and interaction of the two plasmas and their shocks, were investigated by laser shadowgraphs, schlieren images, and interferograms. Remarkably, the distribution of the compressed air and the laser plasmas during the colliding process was clearly obtained using the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. From the refractive index profiles, typical plasmas density and gas density behind the shock front were estimated as ∼5.2 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} and ∼2.4 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}. A stagnation layer formed by the collision of gas behind the shock front is observed. The SWFs propagated, collided, and reflected with a higher velocity than plasmas. The results indicated that the slower plasma collided at middle, leading to the formation of the soft stagnation.

  8. Measurement of transient force produced by a propagating arc magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator in quiescent atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Joon; Sirohi, Jayant; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted on a magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator consisting of two parallel, six inch long, copper electrodes flush mounted on an insulating ceramic plate. An electrical arc is generated by a  ∼1 kA current pulse at  ∼100 V across the electrodes. A self-induced Lorentz force drives the arc along the electrodes. The motion of the arc induces flow in the surrounding air through compression as well as entrainment, and generates a transient force, about  ∼4 ms in duration. Experiments were performed on a prototype actuator in quiescent atmospheric air to characterize the motion of the arc and the momentum transferred to the surrounding air. Measurements included transient force and total impulse generated by the actuator as well as the armature voltage and current. The arc shape and transit velocity were determined by high-speed imaging. A peak force of 0.4 N imparting an impulse of 0.68 mN-s was measured for a peak current of 1.2 kA. The force scaled with the square of the armature current and the impulse scaled linearly with the spent capacitor energy. The results provide insight into the mechanisms of body force generation and momentum transfer of a magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator.

  9. The interaction of polarized microwaves with planar arrays of femtosecond laser-produced plasma filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, Anca; El Morsli, Mbark; Vidal, Francois; Payeur, Stephane; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Chateauneuf, Marc; Theberge, Francis; Dubois, Jacques

    2013-02-15

    The interaction of polarized microwaves with subwavelength arrays of parallel plasma filaments, such as those produced by the propagation of high-power femtosecond laser pulses in ambient air, was investigated by calculating the reflection and transmission coefficients as a function of the incidence angles using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The time evolution of these coefficients was calculated and compared with experiments. It is found that the plasma filaments array becomes transparent when the polarization of the microwave radiation is perpendicular to the filaments axis, regardless the incidence angle of the microwave with respect to the filaments, except near grazing incidence. Increasing the filaments electron density or diameter, or decreasing the electron collision frequency or filaments spacing, decreases the transmission and increases the reflection. Transmission decreases when increasing the number of filament layers while reflection remains unchanged as the number of filament layers exceeds a given number ({approx}3 in our case). Transmission slightly increases when disorder is introduced in the filament arrays. The detailed calculation results are compared with those obtained from the simple birefringent slab model, which provides a convenient framework to calculate approximately the properties of filament arrays.

  10. Lifecycle of laser-produced air sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harilal, S. S.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the lifecycle of laser-generated air sparks or plasmas using multiple plasma diagnostic tools. The sparks were generated by focusing the fundamental radiation from an Nd:YAG laser in air, and studies included early and late time spark dynamics, decoupling of the shock wave from the plasma core, emission from the spark kernel, cold gas excitation by UV radiation, shock waves produced by the air spark, and the spark's final decay and turbulence formation. The shadowgraphic and self-emission images showed similar spark morphology at earlier and late times of its lifecycle; however, significant differences are seen in the midlife images. Spectroscopic studies in the visible region showed intense blackbody-type radiation at early times followed by clearly resolved ionic, atomic, and molecular emission. The detected spectrum at late times clearly contained emission from both CN and N2+. Additional spectral features have been identified at late times due to emission from O and N atoms, indicating some degree of molecular dissociation and excitation. Detailed spatially and temporally resolved emission analysis provides insight about various physical mechanisms leading to molecular and atomic emission by air sparks, including spark plasma excitation, heating of cold air by UV radiation emitted by the spark, and shock-heating.

  11. Lifecycle of laser-produced air sparks

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S. Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the lifecycle of laser-generated air sparks or plasmas using multiple plasma diagnostic tools. The sparks were generated by focusing the fundamental radiation from an Nd:YAG laser in air, and studies included early and late time spark dynamics, decoupling of the shock wave from the plasma core, emission from the spark kernel, cold gas excitation by UV radiation, shock waves produced by the air spark, and the spark's final decay and turbulence formation. The shadowgraphic and self-emission images showed similar spark morphology at earlier and late times of its lifecycle; however, significant differences are seen in the midlife images. Spectroscopic studies in the visible region showed intense blackbody-type radiation at early times followed by clearly resolved ionic, atomic, and molecular emission. The detected spectrum at late times clearly contained emission from both CN and N{sub 2}{sup +}. Additional spectral features have been identified at late times due to emission from O and N atoms, indicating some degree of molecular dissociation and excitation. Detailed spatially and temporally resolved emission analysis provides insight about various physical mechanisms leading to molecular and atomic emission by air sparks, including spark plasma excitation, heating of cold air by UV radiation emitted by the spark, and shock-heating.

  12. Antimicrobial Applications of Ambient--Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew John

    The emerging field of plasma biotechology studies the applications of the plasma phase of matter to biological systems. "Ambient-condition" plasmas created at or near room temperature and atmospheric pressure are especially promising for biomedical applications because of their convenience, safety to patients, and compatibility with existing medical technology. Plasmas can be created from many different gases; plasma made from air contains a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or RONS, involved in various biological processes, including immune activity, signaling, and gene expression. Therefore, ambient-condition air plasma is of particular interest for biological applications. To understand and predict the effects of treating biological systems with ambient-air plasma, it is necessary to characterize and measure the chemical species that these plasmas produce. Understanding both gaseous chemistry and the chemistry in plasma-treated aqueous solution is important because many biological systems exist in aqueous media. Existing literature about ambient-air plasma hypothesizes the critical role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; a major aim of this dissertation is to better quantify RONS by produced ambient-air plasma and understand how RONS chemistry changes in response to different plasma processing conditions. Measurements imply that both gaseous and aqueous chemistry are highly sensitive to operating conditions. In particular, chemical species in air treated by plasma exist in either a low-power ozone-dominated mode or a high-power nitrogen oxide-dominated mode, with an unstable transition region at intermediate discharge power and treatment time. Ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) are mutually exclusive in this system and that the transition region corresponds to the transition from ozone- to nitrogen oxides-mode. Aqueous chemistry agrees well with to air plasma chemistry, and a similar transition in liquid-phase composition

  13. Evolution of a plasma vortex in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a vortex-shaped plasma in air by using a capacitively coupled dielectric barrier discharge system. We show that a vortex-shaped plasma can be produced inside a helium gas vortex and is capable of propagating for 3 cm. The fluctuation of the plasma ring shows a scaling relation with the Reynolds number of the vortex. The transient discharge reveals the property of corona discharge, where the conducting channel within the gas vortex and the blur plasma emission are observed at each half voltage cycle.

  14. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  15. Laser Initiated, RF Sustained Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, John; Giar, Ryan; Hummelt, Jason; Way, Jesse

    2009-11-01

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes by focusing 193 nm, 260 mJ, 10 MW high power UV laser radiation to 18 cm and 1.3 cm zones are examined. Quantum resonant multi-photon (REMPI) and collisional cascade ionization processes affect the breakdown and plasma formation. Our spectroscopic measurements show that REMPI (2+1) processes on nitrogen play a substantial role at lower pressures due to the high photon energy (6.4 eV). The REMPI process yields high density air plasmas (5 x 10^16/cc) for the 18 cm focus with the laser flux three orders of magnitude below the classical breakdown threshold intensity. Measurements of the f = 1.3 cm core laser plasma density (8x10^17/cc) and electron temperature decay via two color laser interferometry are made. The 18 cm focal length lens and its ionizing shock wave front are utilized to produce air seed plasma to initiate a large volume (500 cc) RF sustainment discharge coupled by means of a 6 cm diameter helical coil at up to 10 kW power levels.

  16. Radiofrequency plasma antenna generated by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Brelet, Y.; Houard, A.; Point, G.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; Andre, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Arantchouk, L.; Pellet, M.

    2012-12-24

    We demonstrate tunable radiofrequency emission from a meter-long linear plasma column produced in air at atmospheric pressure. A short-lived plasma column is initially produced by femtosecond filamentation and subsequently converted into a long-lived discharge column by application of an external high voltage field. Radiofrequency excitation is fed to the plasma by induction and detected remotely as electromagnetic radiation by a classical antenna.

  17. APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING AND MANIPULATING PLASMAS

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.; Ferguson, J.P.; Furth, H.P.; Wright, R.E.

    1960-07-26

    An electrical pinch discharge apparatus is described for producing and manipulating high-temperature plasmas. The apparatus may be of either the linear or toroidal pinch discharge type. Arrangements are provided whereby stabilizing fields may be trapped in the plasma external to the main pinch discharge path and the boundary condition of the stabilizing field programed so as to stabilize the discharge or to promote instabilities in the discharge as desired. The produced plasmas may be employed for various purposes, and fusion neutrons have been produced with the apparatus.

  18. High beta plasma operation in a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John F.

    1978-01-01

    A high beta plasma is produced in a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration by ohmic heating and auxiliary heating. The plasma pressure is continuously monitored and used in a control system to program the current in the poloidal field windings. Throughout the heating process, magnetic flux is conserved inside the plasma and the distortion of the flux surfaces drives a current in the plasma. As a consequence, the total current increases and the poloidal field windings are driven with an equal and opposing increasing current. The spatial distribution of the current in the poloidal field windings is determined by the plasma pressure. Plasma equilibrium is maintained thereby, and high temperature, high beta operation results.

  19. Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskii, Iu. M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskii, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The ambient-pressure dependences of the dynamic and optical characteristics of a laser plasma generated by CO2-laser irradiation of an obstacle are investigated experimentally. The change of the sample's surface roughness after irradiation is investigated as a function of air pressure. It is concluded that the transition from the air plasma to the erosion plasma takes place at an air pressure of about 1 mm Hg. The results confirm the existing theory of plasma formation near the surface of an obstacle under the CO2-laser pulse effect in air.

  20. Portable nanosecond pulsed air plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2011-08-22

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas are of great importance in many emerging biomedical and materials processing applications. The redundancy of a vacuum system opens the gateway for highly portable plasma systems, for which air ideally becomes the plasma-forming gas and remote plasma processing is preferred to ensure electrical safety. Typically, the gas temperature observed in air plasma greatly exceeds that suitable for the processing of thermally liable materials; a large plasma-sample distance offers a potential solution but suffers from a diluted downstream plasma chemistry. This Letter reports a highly portable air plasma jet system which delivers enhanced downstream chemistry without compromising the low temperature nature of the discharge, thus forming the basis of a powerful tool for emerging mobile plasma applications.

  1. Plasma Properties of Microwave Produced Plasma in a Toroidal Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajay; Edwards, W. F.; Held, Eric

    2011-10-01

    We have modified a small tokamak, STOR-1M, on loan from University of Saskatchewan, to operate as a low-temperature (~5 eV) toroidal plasma machine with externally induced toroidal magnetic fields ranging from zero to ~50 G. The plasma is produced using microwave discharges at relatively high pressures. Microwaves are produced by a kitchen microwave-oven magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz in continuous operating mode, resulting in pulses ~0.5 s in duration. Initial measurements of plasma formation in this device with and without applied magnetic fields are presented. Plasma density and temperature profiles have been measured using Langmuir probes and the magnetic field profile inside the plasma has been obtained using Hall probes. When the discharge is created with no applied toroidal magnetic field, the plasma does not fill the entire torus due to high background pressure. However, when a toroidal magnetic field is applied, the plasma flows along the applied field, filling the torus. Increasing the applied magnetic field seems to aid plasma formation - the peak density increases and the density gradient becomes steeper. Above a threshold magnetic field, the plasma develops low-frequency density oscillations due to probable excitation of flute modes in the plasma.

  2. Three Modes of Air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet operating in air have gained a high interest due to its various applications in industry and biomedical. The presented air plasma jet system is consisted of stainless steel hollow needle electrode of 1 mm inner diameter which is covered with a quartz tube with a 1 mm diameter side hole. The hole is above the tube nozzle by 5 mm and it is covered by a copper ring which is connected to the ground. The needle is connected to sinusoidal 27 kHz high voltage power supply (25 kV) though a current limiting resistor of 50 k Ω. The tested distance between the needle tip and the side hole was 1 mm or 2.1 mm gape. The electric and plasma jet formation characteristics show three modes of operations. Through these modes the plasma length changes with air flow rate to increase in the first mode and to confine inside the quartz tube in the second mode, then it start to eject from the nozzle again and increase with flow rate to reach a maximum length of 7 mm at 4.5 SLM air flow rate in the third mode. The measured gas temperature of the plasma jet can approach room temperature (300 K). Moreover, the plasma jet emission spectra shows the presence of reactive O and OH radical in the plasma jet. These results indicate that the generated air plasma jet can be used a plasma sterilization.

  3. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitomer, Steven J.; Jones, Roger D.

    1990-06-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper, we examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g. lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g. kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g. laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  4. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitomer, S. J.; Jones, R. D.

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. Those areas of laser medicine are examined in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. Examples are examined for the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  5. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gitomer, S.J. ); Jones, R.D. . Applied Theoretical Physics Div.)

    1991-12-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photodynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper the authors examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation), and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented, along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  6. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gitomer, S.J.; Jones, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper, we examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included. 63 refs.

  7. Parametric instabilities in helicon-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Yu.M.; Kraemer, M.

    2005-07-15

    Parametric instabilities arising in the pump field of a helicon wave are analyzed for typical parameters of helicon-produced plasmas. The pump wavenumber parallel to the magnetic field is assumed to be finite according to recent experimental findings obtained on a high-density helicon discharge. The parametric decay of the helicon pump wave into ion-sound and Trivelpiece-Gould waves is investigated. The approach takes into account that the damping rate of the Trivelpiece-Gould wave is generally much higher than the ion-sound frequency. The theoretical results are in agreement with the growth rates and thresholds of this instability, as well as the dispersion properties of the decay waves observed in helicon experiments. Estimates of the level of the decay parametric turbulence turn out to be sufficiently high to account for the strong absorption observed in helicon-produced plasmas.

  8. Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M

    2006-01-13

    In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

  9. Producing Hydrogen by Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James; Akse, James; Wheeler, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Plasma pyrolysis of methane has been investigated for utility as a process for producing hydrogen. This process was conceived as a means of recovering hydrogen from methane produced as a byproduct of operation of a life-support system aboard a spacecraft. On Earth, this process, when fully developed, could be a means of producing hydrogen (for use as a fuel) from methane in natural gas. The most closely related prior competing process - catalytic pyrolysis of methane - has several disadvantages: a) The reactor used in the process is highly susceptible to fouling and deactivation of the catalyst by carbon deposits, necessitating frequent regeneration or replacement of the catalyst. b) The reactor is highly susceptible to plugging by deposition of carbon within fixed beds, with consequent channeling of flow, high pressure drops, and severe limitations on mass transfer, all contributing to reductions in reactor efficiency. c) Reaction rates are intrinsically low. d) The energy demand of the process is high.

  10. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  11. Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don Mayo; Walter, Kevin Carl

    2001-01-01

    Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

  12. Laser produced plasma light source for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomenkov, Igor V.; Ershov, Alex I.; Partlo, William N.; Myers, David W.; Brown, Daniel; Sandstrom, Richard L.; La Fontaine, Bruno; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Khodykin, Oleh V.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Das, Palash; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Zhang, Kevin; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Rajyaguru, Chirag; De Dea, Silvia; Hou, Richard R.; Dunstan, Wayne J.; Baumgart, Peter; Ishihara, Toshihiko; Simmons, Rod D.; Jacques, Robert N.; Bergstedt, Robert A.; Brandt, David C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the development of laser-produced-plasma (LPP) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) source architecture for advanced lithography applications in high volume manufacturing. EUV lithography is expected to succeed 193 nm immersion technology for sub-22 nm critical layer patterning. In this paper we discuss the most recent results from high qualification testing of sources in production. Subsystem performance will be shown including collector protection, out-of-band (OOB) radiation measurements, and intermediate-focus (IF) protection as well as experience in system use. This presentation reviews the experimental results obtained on systems with a focus on the topics most critical for an HVM source.

  13. Spectroscopic Analysis and Thomson Scattering Diagnostics of Wire Produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechaty, Christopher; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel; Caplinger, James; Wallerstein, Austin; Kim, Tony

    2014-10-01

    The Lower Hybrid Drift Instability (LHDI) in plasma is driven by the presence of inhomogeneities in density, temperature, or magnetic field (Krall 1971, Davidson 1977), and occurs in systems where the electrons are magnetized and the ions are effectively unmagnetized. The LHDI is thought to occur in magnetic reconnection (Huba 1977), and has also been investigated as a mitigation technique which can allow for communications to take place through the plasma formed around hypersonic aircraft (Sotnikov 2010). To further understand the phenomenology of the LHDI, we plan to carry out experiments at the Air Force Research Laboratory, in the newly formed Plasma Physics Sensors Laboratory. In experiment, a pulsed power generator is employed to produce plasma by passing current through single, or dual-wire configurations. To characterize the plasma, a Thomson scattering diagnostic is employed, along with a visible spectroscopy diagnostic. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Defense by Riverside Research under Contract BAA-FA8650-13-C-1539.

  14. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincke, J. R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C. G.

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing.

  16. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, S.; Kuo, S. P.; Murata, R. M.; Chen, C. Y.; Saxena, D.; Huang, K. J.; Popovic, S.

    2011-07-01

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  17. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, S.; Murata, R. M.; Saxena, D.; Kuo, S. P.; Chen, C. Y.; Huang, K. J.; Popovic, S.

    2011-07-15

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  18. Molybdenum disilicide composites produced by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.; Bartlett, A.H.

    1998-05-25

    The intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) is being considered for high temperature structural applications because of its high melting point and superior oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. The lack of high temperature strength, creep resistance and low temperature ductility has hindered its progress for structural applications. Plasma spraying of coatings and structural components of MoSi{sub 2}-based composites offers an exciting processing alternative to conventional powder processing methods due to superior flexibility and the ability to tailor properties. Laminate, discontinuous and in situ reinforced composites have been produced with secondary reinforcements of Ta, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Laminate composites, in particular, have been shown to improve the damage tolerance of MoSi{sub 2} during high temperature melting operations. A review of research which as been performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory on plasma spraying of MoSi{sub 2}-based composites to improve low temperature fracture toughness, thermal shock resistance, high temperature strength and creep resistance will be discussed.

  19. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  20. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  1. Measurement of Debye length in laser-produced plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Debye length of an expanded plasma created by placing an evacuated chamber with an entrance slit in the path of a freely expanding laser produced plasma was measured, using the slab geometry. An independent measurement of electron density together with the observed value for the Debye length also provided a means for evaluating the plasma electron temperature. This temperature has applications in ascertaining plasma conductivity and magnetic field necessary for confinement of the laser produced plasma. Also, the temperature obtained would be useful in analyzing electron-ion recombination rates in the expanded plasma and the dynamics of the cooling process of the plasma expansion.

  2. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  3. Asphaltene Surface Erosion in Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, M.; Calixto-Rodriguez, M.; Martinez, H.; Poveda C., J.; Reyes G., P.; Altuzar, P.

    2010-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was applied for plasma characterization during erosion of substrates of asphaltene. The amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an AC generator with a frequency of 60 Hz and an output power of about 60 W. The electron temperature was found to be 6.88 eV, and the ion density is about 3.5 × 1016 cm-3. As the asphaltene was exposed to the air plasma, the surface was etched. The emission from molecular bands CS2, O3, N2+, NO, O2, CS, S2, CN, C7H7, C2, H2, C2-, NiO, N2 and SO, and atomic line O, were observed and some of them were used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene weight was reduced gradually with an etching rate of about 0.844 mg/min, during the first 20 min.

  4. Temporal Behaviour of ECR Plasmas Produced by a Lisitano Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Yusuke; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1984-02-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of production of a plasma produced by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) using a Lisitano coil, the temporal behaviour of the plasma was measured in detail by a sampling method. It was found that the plasma is produced not only around the Lisitano coil but also near the center. The plasma density was also confirmed to attain a value above the cutoff density by measuring the field intensities of the microwaves.

  5. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  6. Characteristics of dielectric barrier discharge plasmas in atmospheric humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Y.; Fukui, K.; Iwami, R.; Matsuoka, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a great advantage for industrial applications such as surface modifications, sterilization and film preparation. In particular, reactive plasmas including OH radicals can be generated in humid air. On the other hand, it is known that dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas in air are strongly affected by humidity. In this study, a twisted pair sample is used as a DBD electrode. The twisted pair consists of two enameled wires, and it is installed in a climate chamber to control ambient temperature and humidity. Repetitive impulse voltage pulses were applied to the twisted pair to produce DBD plasmas. Light emission, electromagnetic wave and current pulses were used to detect discharge activities. The discharge inception voltage (DIV) is basically determined by Paschen curve in air, however, the DIV was decreased by increasing the humidity. In addition, it was found that there were largely scattered data of DIV at the low humidity condition. After the pre-discharges, the DIV reached to the steady state value. On the other hand, there was no scattering of the observed DIV at the high humidity condition. Measurements of surface potential of the sample after the discharge show these behaviors could be explained by surface charge accumulation on the enameled wire. It is noted that there was no fluctuation in the DIV data in the case of unipolar voltage pulse.

  7. Air trichloroethylene oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The oxidative decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE; 300 ppm) by non-thermal corona plasma was investigated in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, both in the absence and presence of catalysts including MnOx, CoOx. The catalysts were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the catalysts were characterized by BET surface area measurement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) methods. Decomposition of TCE and distribution of products were evaluated by a gas chromatograph (GC) and an FTIR. In the absence of the catalyst, TCE removal is increased with increases in the applied voltage and current intensity. Higher TCE removal and CO2 selectivity is observed in presence of the corona and catalysts, as compared to those with the plasma alone. The results show that MnOx and CoOx catalysts can dissociate the in-plasma produced ozone to oxygen radicals, which enhances the TCE decomposition.

  8. Design and characterization of a novel coaxial VHF plasma source for air plasma formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrns, Brandon; Wooten, Daniel; Shannon, Steven

    2011-10-01

    A key challenge in the expansion of atmospheric plasma applicators into new markets is the effective surface area that these systems can efficiently treat. To this end, a large area atmospheric air glow discharge, with approximately 9.5 cm2 cross sectional area, is obtained using a simple coaxial structure. The room air plasma is driven by a 162MHz generator at powers ranging from 300W-1000W. The VHF drive appears to produce a steady state glow void of streamers or arcs typically found in atmospheric air systems. Electrical measurements coupled with a global plasma model and transmission line theory allow for the calculation of electron density. Densities calculated for 400W are approximately 1011 cm-3. Spectroscopy data shows dominant emissions consist of OH, N2, and N2+,along with a continuum indicating neutral bremsstrahlung radiation; this is used for electron density calculations and model validation. In this presentation, source design, plasma characterization, and preliminary surface treatments of HDPE will be presented. A key challenge in the expansion of atmospheric plasma applicators into new markets is the effective surface area that these systems can efficiently treat. To this end, a large area atmospheric air glow discharge, with approximately 9.5 cm2 cross sectional area, is obtained using a simple coaxial structure. The room air plasma is driven by a 162MHz generator at powers ranging from 300W-1000W. The VHF drive appears to produce a steady state glow void of streamers or arcs typically found in atmospheric air systems. Electrical measurements coupled with a global plasma model and transmission line theory allow for the calculation of electron density. Densities calculated for 400W are approximately 1011 cm-3. Spectroscopy data shows dominant emissions consist of OH, N2, and N2+,along with a continuum indicating neutral bremsstrahlung radiation; this is used for electron density calculations and model validation. In this presentation, source design

  9. Light source employing laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S

    2013-09-17

    A system and a method of generating radiation and/or particle emissions are disclosed. In at least some embodiments, the system includes at least one laser source that generates a first pulse and a second pulse in temporal succession, and a target, where the target (or at least a portion the target) becomes a plasma upon being exposed to the first pulse. The plasma expand after the exposure to the first pulse, the expanded plasma is then exposed to the second pulse, and at least one of a radiation emission and a particle emission occurs after the exposure to the second pulse. In at least some embodiments, the target is a solid piece of material, and/or a time period between the first and second pulses is less than 1 microsecond (e.g., 840 ns).

  10. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  11. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  12. Filter media properties of mineral fibres produced by plasma spray.

    PubMed

    Prasauskas, Tadas; Matulevicius, Jonas; Kliucininkas, Linas; Krugly, Edvinas; Valincius, Vitas; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the properties of fibrous gas filtration media produced from mineral zeolite. Fibres were generated by direct current plasma spray. The paper characterizes morphology, chemical composition, geometrical structure of elementary fibres, and thermal resistance, as well as the filtration properties of fibre media. The diameter of the produced elementary fibres ranged from 0.17 to 0.90 μm and the length ranged from 0.025 to 5.1 mm. The release of fibres from the media in the air stream was noticed, but it was minimized by hot-pressing the formed fibre mats. The fibres kept their properties up to the temperature of 956°C, while further increase in temperature resulted in the filter media becoming shrunk and brittle. The filtration efficiency of the prepared filter mats ranged from 95.34% to 99.99% for aerosol particles ranging in a size between 0.03 and 10.0 μm. Unprocessed fibre media showed the highest filtration efficiency when filtering aerosol particles smaller than 0.1 µm. Hot-pressed filters were characterized by the highest quality factor values, ranging from 0.021 to 0.064 Pa(-1) (average value 0.034 Pa(-1)). PMID:26583905

  13. Enhanced line emission from laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmer, C.; Srivastava, S. K.; Hall, T. E.; Fucaloro, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    This communication reports the first systematic study on background gas-induced spectral-line-emission enhancement from laser-produced plasmas. Line emission from aluminum plasmas was enhanced by factors of up to 35 by the introduction of He, Ne, Xe, or N2. The enhancement has been attributed to three-body recombination.

  14. The effect of air on solvated electron chemistry at a plasma/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbach, Paul; Bartels, David M.; Mohan Sankaran, R.; Go, David B.

    2015-10-01

    Plasmas in contact with liquids initiate complex chemistry that leads to the generation of a wide range of reactive species. For example, in an electrolytic configuration with a cathodic plasma electrode, electrons from the plasma are injected into the solution, leading to solvation and ensuing reactions. If the gas contains oxygen, electronegative oxygen molecules may react with the plasma electrons via attachment to reduce the electron flux to the solution reducing the production of solvated electrons or produce reactive oxygen species that quickly scavenge solvated electrons in solution. Here, we applied a total internal reflection absorption spectroscopy technique to compare the concentration of solvated electrons produced in solution by an argon plasma containing various amounts of oxygen, nitrogen, and air. Our measurements indicate that in oxygen or air ambients, electron attachment in the plasma phase greatly attenuates the electron flux incident on the liquid surface. The remaining electrons then solvate but are quickly scavenged by reactive oxygen species in the liquid phase.

  15. Origin of 'energetic' ions from laser-produced plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.; Linlor, W. I.

    1973-01-01

    A fast-ion current peak, measured with an ion collector placed in the path of an expanding laser-produced plasma, was identified as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen contaminants which originated from a tungsten target surface.

  16. Asphaltene Erosion Process in Air Plasma: Emission Spectroscopy and Surface Analysis for Air-Plasma Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, H.; Flores, O.; C. Poveda, J.; Campillo, B.

    2012-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was applied for plasma characterization during the erosion of asphaltene substrates. An amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air-plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an ac generator at a frequency of 60 Hz, output power of 50 W and a gas flow rate of 1.8 L/min. The electron temperature and ion density were estimated to be 2.15±0.11 eV and (1.24±0.05) × 1016 m-3, respectively, using a double Langmuir probe. OES was employed to observe the emission from the asphaltene exposed to air plasma. Both molecular band emission from N2, N+2, OH, CH, NH, O2 as well as CN, and atomic light emission from V and Hγ were observed and used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene erosion was analyzed with the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector. The EDX analysis showed that the time evolution of elements C, O, S and V were similar; and the chemical composition of the exposed asphaltenes remained constant. Particle size evolution was measured, showing a maximum size of 2307 μm after 60 min. This behavior is most likely related to particle agglomeration as a function of time.

  17. Non-LTE Steady-State Kinetics of He-Air Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tzvetelina; Petrov, George; Gillman, Eric; Boris, David; Hernández, Sandra; Walton, Scott

    2015-11-01

    A non-LTE, steady-state collisional-radiative kinetics model is developed to study discharges produced in mixtures of He, N2 and O2 (He-Air) at atmospheric pressures. The model is based on a self-consistent solution of coupled Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function, electron energy balance equation, gas thermal balance equation, and a system of non-linear equations for species that govern plasma chemistry (electrons, ions, radicals, atoms and molecules in ground and excited states). The model and results can be applied to study a variety of atmospheric pressure plasmas generated in He-Air mixtures, such as plasma jets, dielectric barrier discharges, laser-induced plasmas, microwave plasmas, etc. In this talk, collisional rates and species densities are obtained as a function of He-to-air ratio and the results are benchmarked against available experimental data. Work supported by the NRL Base Program.

  18. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  19. Collisional coupling in counterstreaming laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, D. W.; Goforth, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The collisional processes which transfer momentum between counterstreaming plasmas are reviewed and applied to the example of a laser-produced plasma expanding into a partially ionized background. Experimental measurements of the dependence of the ion flow field on collisional momentum transfer demonstrate the validity of the simplified treatment of collision processes which have been adopted. A numerical model which simulates the laser-plasma interaction with the background confirms the importance of collisions in previous experimental studies of momentum coupling, and provides some insight into the distinction between collisional and collisionless flow regimes.

  20. METHOD OF PRODUCING ENERGETIC PLASMA FOR NEUTRON PRODUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Simon, A.; Mackin, R.J. Jr.

    1961-01-24

    A method is given for producing an energetic plasma for neutron production. An energetic plasma is produced in a small magnetically confined subvolume of the device by providing a selected current of energetic molecular ions at least greater than that required for producing a current of atomic ions sufficient to achieve "burnout" of neutral particles in the subvolume. The atomic ions are provided by dissociation of the molecular ions by an energetic arc discharge within the subvolume. After burnout, the arc discharge is terminated, the magnetic fields increased, and cold fuel feed is substituted for the molecular ions. After the subvolume is filled with an energetic plasma, the size of the magnetically confined subvolume is gradually increased until the entire device is filled with an energetic neutron producing plasma. The reactions which take place in the device to produce neutrons will generate a certain amount of heat energy which may be converted by the use of a conventional heat cycle to produce electrical energy.

  1. Studies of Magnetic Reconnection in Colliding Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Novel images of magnetic fields and measurements of electron and ion temperatures have been obtained in the magnetic reconnection region of high- β, laser-produced plasmas. Experiments using laser-irradiated foils produce expanding, hemispherical plasma plumes carrying MG Biermann-battery magnetic fields, which can be driven to interact and reconnect. Thomson-scattering measurements of electron and ion temperatures in the interaction region of two colliding, magnetized plasmas show no thermal enhancement due to reconnection, as expected for β ~ 8 plasmas. Two different proton radiography techniques used to image the magnetic field structures show deformation, pileup, and annihilation of magnetic flux. High-resolution images reveal unambiguously reconnection-induced jets emerging from the interaction region and show instabilities in the expanding plasma plumes and supersonic, hydrodynamic jets due to the plasma collision. Quantitative magnetic flux data show that reconnection in experiments with asymmetry in the scale size, density, temperature, and plasma flow across the reconnection region occurs less efficiently than in similar, symmetric experiments. This result is attributed to disruption of the Hall mechanism mediating collisionless reconnection. The collision of plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields has also been probed, illustrating the deformation of magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas in the absence of reconnection. These experiments are particularly relevant to high- β reconnection environments, such as the magnetopause. This work was performed in collaboration with C. Li, F. Séguin, A. Zylstra, H. Rinderknecht, H. Sio, J. Frenje, and R. Petrasso (MIT), I. Igumenshchev, V. Glebov, C. Stoeckl, and D. Froula (LLE), J. Ross and R. Town (LLNL), W. Fox (UNH), and A. Nikroo (GA), and was supported in part by the NLUF, FSC/UR, U.S. DOE, LLNL, and LLE.

  2. Modeling of Magnetron Argon Plasma Issuing into Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Cun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented to describe the heat transfer and fluid flow in a magnetron plasma torch, by means of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code fluent. Specific calculations are presented for a gas-mixing system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an air environment), operating in a laminar mode. Numerical results show that an external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of an arc plasma, i.e., the AMF will impel the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. In addition, the use of an AMF induces a strong air indraft at the torch spout, and the air mixing with the argon gas results in a marked increase in arc voltage. An increment in the amount of the oncoming argon gas restrains the quantity of the air indraft, and this should be responsible for a lower arc voltage in such an AMF torch when a larger gas inflow is used.

  3. Terahertz generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-K.; Kim, Jae Hun; Yang, C.-E.; Yin, Stuart Shizhuo; Hui Rongqing; Ruffin, Paul

    2008-12-08

    An investigation of the terahertz wave generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas is presented. First, it is demonstrated that the intensity of the terahertz wave increases as the number of air plasmas increases. Second, the physical mechanism of this enhancement effect of the terahertz generation is studied by quantitatively measuring the intensity of the generated terahertz wave as a function of phase difference between adjacent air plasmas. It is found out that the superposition is the main mechanism to cause this enhancement. Thus, the results obtained in this paper not only provide a technique to generate stronger terahertz wave but also enable a better understanding of the mechanism of the terahertz generation in air plasma.

  4. Infrared Signatures of Laser Induced Plasma in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hening, Alexandru; Lu, Ryan; Ramirez, Ayax; Advanced Technology Team

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of the temporal and spatial evolution of laser generated plasma in air is necessary for the development of potential applications which range from laser induced ionized micro channels and filaments able to transfer high electric pulses over few hundreds of meters, to the generation of plasma artifacts in air, far away from the laser source. This work is focused mainly on the infrared spectrum. The influence of laser parameters (energy per pulse, pulse duration, repetition rate, wavelength and etc.) on the plasma formation and evolution has been investigated. Laser transmission losses through the air as well as through the breakdown plasma as well as their effect on infrared plasma signature are to be presented.

  5. Producing nitric oxide by pulsed electrical discharge in air for portable inhalation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binglan; Muenster, Stefan; Blaesi, Aron H; Bloch, Donald B; Zapol, Warren M

    2015-07-01

    Inhalation of nitric oxide (NO) produces selective pulmonary vasodilation and is an effective therapy for treating pulmonary hypertension in adults and children. In the United States, the average cost of 5 days of inhaled NO for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is about $14,000. NO therapy involves gas cylinders and distribution, a complex delivery device, gas monitoring and calibration equipment, and a trained respiratory therapy staff. The objective of this study was to develop a lightweight, portable device to serve as a simple and economical method of producing pure NO from air for bedside or portable use. Two NO generators were designed and tested: an offline NO generator and an inline NO generator placed directly within the inspiratory line. Both generators use pulsed electrical discharges to produce therapeutic range NO (5 to 80 parts per million) at gas flow rates of 0.5 to 5 liters/min. NO was produced from air, as well as gas mixtures containing up to 90% O2 and 10% N2. Potentially toxic gases produced in the plasma, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), were removed using a calcium hydroxide scavenger. An iridium spark electrode produced the lowest ratio of NO2/NO. In lambs with acute pulmonary hypertension, breathing electrically generated NO produced pulmonary vasodilation and reduced pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance index. In conclusion, electrical plasma NO generation produces therapeutic levels of NO from air. After scavenging to remove NO2 and O3 and filtration to remove particles, electrically produced NO can provide safe and effective treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26136478

  6. Collimation of laser-produced plasmas using axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassan, Syed M.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Hassanein, A.

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the expansion dynamics of laser-produced plasmas expanding into an axial magnetic field. Plasmas were generated by focusing 1.064 µm Nd:YAG laser pulses onto a planar tin target in vacuum and allowed to expand into a 0.5 T magnetic-filed where field lines were aligned along the plume expansion direction. Gated images employing intensified CCD showed focusing of the plasma plume, which were also compared with results obtained using particle-in-cell modelling methods. The estimated density and temperature of the plasma plumes employing emission spectroscopy revealed significant changes in the presence and absence of the 0.5T magnetic field. In the presence of the field, the electron temperature is increased with distance from the target, while the density showed opposite effects.

  7. Collision dynamics of laser produced carbon plasma plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, M.; Ruiz, H. M.; Cortés, D.; Merello, F.; Bhuyan, H.; Veloso, F.; Wyndham, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present preliminary experimental observations of the collision processes between two orthogonal laser produced plasmas in a low pressure neutral gas background. A Nd:YAG laser, 340 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, operating at 10 Hz, is used in the experiments. The main laser beam is divided in two beams by a 50% beam splitter, and then focused over two rotating graphite targets, with characteristic fluence 3.5 J/cm2. Experiments are conducted in a range from a base pressure of 0.3 mTorr, up to 50 mTorr argon. The dynamics of the laser plasmas is characterized by time resolved and time integrated optical emission spectroscopy (OES), with 20 ns and 10 ms time resolution, and 50 ns time resolved plasma imaging of visible plasma emission. Clear effects of the neutral gas background on the postcollision plasma dynamics are identified. The overall dynamics of the post-collision plasma is found to be consistent with high collisionality of the carbon plasma plumes, which results in full stagnation on collisioning.

  8. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron–positron pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron–positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 1016 cm-3 and 1013 cm-3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 1018 cm-3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  9. Interaction of plasma clouds produced from two laser targets

    SciTech Connect

    Annenkov, V. I.; Bessarab, A. V.; Bondarenko, G. A.; Dolgoleva, G. V.; Zhmailo, V. A.; Krotov, V. A.; Kovalenko, V. P.; Kunin, A. V.; Nikitin, I. N.; Novikiova, E. A.; Panov, A. I.; Sobolev, I. V.; Sokolov, S. S.; Starodubtsev, V. A.; Sungatullin, R. R.; Shirokov, A. E.

    2007-05-15

    Results are presented from studies of the interaction of two plasma clouds produced from two different-type laser targets in an ambient gas in the MKV-4 stand of the Iskra-5 facility. The experimental data are compared with the results of numerical simulations.

  10. Effect of glow discharge air plasma on grain crops seed

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, A.E.; Lazarenko, E.M.; Selemir, V.D.

    2000-02-01

    Oat and barley seeds have been exposed to both continuous and pulsed glow discharge plasmas in air to investigate the effects on germination and sprout growth. Statistical analysis was used to evaluate the effect of plasma exposure on the percentage germination and length of sprout growth. A stimulating effect of plasma exposure was found together with a strong dependence on whether continuous or pulsed discharges were used.

  11. Investigation of the optical characteristics of a laser-produced plasma cloud expanding into a background gas

    SciTech Connect

    Annenkov, A I; Bessarab, A V; Galakhov, I V; Garanin, Sergey G; Gusakov, A V; Zhidkov, N V; Zhmailo, V A; Izgorodin, V M; Kovalenko, V P; Krotov, V A; Mis'ko, V V; Novikova, E A; Starodubtsev, V A; Starodubtsev, K V; Statsenko, V P; Sungatullin, R R; Tachaev, G V; Sheremet'ev, Yu N

    2010-12-09

    An investigation is made of the dynamics and visible-range luminosity of the plasma cloud produced behind the front of a shock wave in air at a pressure of 1 Torr. The shock wave was produced on introducing the radiation of the twelve-channel Iskra-5 laser facility with a total energy of {approx}2300 J into a hollow spherical plastic target of mass {approx}10{sup -4} g. Experimental data are compared with simulations. (laser plasma)

  12. Quantification of air plasma chemistry for surface disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew J.; Clark, Douglas S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air plasmas, created by a variety of discharges, are promising sources of reactive species for the emerging field of plasma biotechnology because of their convenience and ability to operate at ambient conditions. One biological application of ambient-air plasma is microbial disinfection, and the ability of air plasmas to decontaminate both solid surfaces and liquid volumes has been thoroughly established in the literature. However, the mechanism of disinfection and which reactive species most strongly correlate with antimicrobial effects are still not well understood. We describe quantitative gas-phase measurements of plasma chemistry via infrared spectroscopy in confined volumes, focusing on air plasma generated via surface micro-discharge (SMD). Previously, it has been shown that gaseous chemistry is highly sensitive to operating conditions, and the measurements we describe here extend those findings. We quantify the gaseous concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) throughout the established ‘regimes’ for SMD air plasma chemistry: the low-power, ozone-dominated mode; the high-power, nitrogen oxides-dominated mode; and the intermediate, unstable transition region. The results presented here are in good agreement with previously published experimental studies of aqueous chemistry and parameterized models of gaseous chemistry. The principal finding of the present study is the correlation of bacterial inactivation on dry surfaces with gaseous chemistry across these time and power regimes. Bacterial decontamination is most effective in ‘NOx mode’ and less effective in ‘ozone mode’, with the weakest antibacterial effects in the transition region. Our results underscore the dynamic nature of air plasma chemistry and the importance of careful chemical characterization of plasma devices intended for biological applications.

  13. Cavitations induced by plasmas, plasmas induced by cavitations, and plasmas produced in cavitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation bubbles are not static bubbles but have dynamics of expansion, shrinkage, and collapse. Since the collapse of a cavitation bubble is roughly an adiabatic process, the inside of the bubble at the collapse has a high temperature and a high pressure, resulting in the production of a plasma. This talk will be focused on cavitation-related plasma phenomena and the role of the cavitation bubble in the synthesis of nanoparticles. A method for inducing a cavitation bubble is laser ablation in liquid. After the disappearance of laser-produced plasma with optical emission, we have observed the formation of a cavitation bubble. We have found that the inside of the cavitation bubble is the reaction field for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The atomic and molecular species ejected from the ablation target toward the liquid are transported into the cavitation bubble, and they condense into nanoparticles inside it. It is important to note that nanoparticles are stored inside the cavitation bubble until its collapse. We have shown that the size and the structure of nanoparticles are controlled by controlling the dynamics of the cavitation bubbles. Another method for inducing cavitation bubbles is to use ultrasonic power. We have found a simple method for the efficient production of standing cavitation bubbles. The method is just inserting a punching metal plate into water irradiated by ultrasonic wave. The depth of water and the position of the punching plate should be tuned precisely. We have proposed the mechanism of the efficient production of cavitation bubbles by this method. Currently, we try to have electric discharges in cavitation bubbles with the intention of realizing nonequilibrium sonochemistry. In particular, the electric discharge in a laser-induced cavitation bubble shows interesting distortion of the bubble shape, which suggests the electrostatic characteristics of the cavitation bubble.

  14. Microwave Produced Plasma Study in a Cylindrical System

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, V. K.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Bora, D.

    2008-03-19

    Hydrogen plasma using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is produced and is studied in a small linear system for breakdown parameters. Microwave power in the experimental system is delivered by a magnetron at 2.45 GHz for 30 ms during which the breakdown of neutral gas occurs. The axial magnetic field required for ECR in the system is such that the fundamental ECR surface (B = 875 G) resides at the geometrical centre of the plasma system. ECR breakdown parameters such as plasma delay and plasma decay time are observed from plasma density measurements, carried out at the centre of plasma system using a specially designed Langmuir probe. The operating parameters such as working gas pressure (10{sup -5}-10{sup -2} mbar) and input microwave power (160-800 W) are varied and the corresponding effect on the breakdown parameters is observed and the parameter space for operating the pulsed experimental system has been identified. All the relevant experimental results obtained are presented.

  15. Doppler spectroscopy on plasma discharges produced in Proto-MPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaliwal, Runpal; Biewer, Theodore; Klepper, Chris; Martin, Elijah; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear machine that produces pulsed plasma discharges, and is intended to study plasma-material interactions in conditions similar to those found in future fusion reactors. A high-resolution McPherson Czerny-Turner visible range spectrometer has been installed to study the behavior of ions in the plasma. Together with a Princeton Instruments EMCCD camera and an external trigger box, this system provides excellent spectral and temporal resolution for viewing the emission spectra of the discharges. Around 100 lines of sight have been established for use by this and other diagnostics in the lab. Initial data from recent experiments validate the utility of this setup. Analysis of spectral lines in helium and deuterium plasmas yields valuable information regarding the temperature and density of plasma ions at various locations in the machine as the various RF heating sources are implemented. Differentiating the thermal width of lines from other sources of broadening is an ongoing process. In addition to He I lines, data indicates the presence of the He II line at 468.5 nm, which corresponds to emission from singly ionized atoms at higher temperatures.

  16. Electrostatic structure of a magnetized laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Jeffrey; Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the structure of the electrostatic fields produced by the expansion of a laser-produced plasma into a background magnetized plasma are presented. The three-dimensional measurements of the electrostatic field are made using an emissive probe that measures the time-varying plasma potential on two orthogonal planes, one across and one containing the background magnetic field. The inductive electric field is also calculated from probe measurements of the time-varying magnetic fields. Deviations from local charge neutrality at the level of 10(-4) generate a radial electrostatic field with peak strength an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding inductive field. The electrostatic energy density near full expansion is over an order of magnitude larger than that of the induced azimuthal electric field. These measurements show that electrostatic fields must be included in theoretical and computational models of collisionless coupling in magnetized point explosions of laser-produced plasmas and their relation to similar phenomena such as magnetospheric chemical releases. PMID:26651639

  17. Plume Dynamics of Laser-Produced Swine Muscle Tissue Plasma.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Joaquin J; Diaz, Luis; Marin-Roldan, Alicia; Moncayo, Samuel; Caceres, Jorge O

    2016-07-01

    We report on the plume dynamics of the plasma induced by laser ablation of a swine skeletal muscle tissue sample in different vacuum conditions. Pulses from a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser were focused onto a target sample and the induced plasma was allowed to expand in different air pressures. The expansion features were studied using fast photography of the overall visible emission by using a gated intensified charged coupled device. Free expansion and plume splitting were observed at different pressure levels. The expansion of the plasma plume front was analyzed using various expansion models and the velocity of the plume front was estimated. The effect of the number of accumulated laser shots on the crater volume at different ambient air pressures and an elemental analysis of the sample were performed using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The surface morphology of the irradiated surface showed that increasing the pressure of the ambient gas decreased the ablated mass, or in other words it reduced significantly the laser-target coupling. PMID:27301327

  18. Tailoring the air plasma with a double laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-06-15

    We present a comprehensive model of plasma dynamics that enables a detailed understanding of the ways the air plasma induced in the atmosphere in the wake of a laser-induced filament can be controlled by an additional laser pulse. Our model self-consistently integrates plasma-kinetic, Navier-Stokes, electron heat conduction, and electron-vibration energy transfer equations, serving to reveal laser-plasma interaction regimes where the plasma lifetime can be substantially increased through an efficient control over plasma temperature, as well as suppression of attachment and recombination processes. The model is used to quantify the limitations on the length of uniform laser-filament heating due to the self-defocusing of laser radiation by the radial profile of electron density. The envisaged applications include sustaining plasma guides for long-distance transmission of microwaves, standoff detection of impurities and potentially hazardous agents, as well as lightning control and protection.

  19. Tailoring the air plasma with a double laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Miles, R. B.

    2011-06-01

    We present a comprehensive model of plasma dynamics that enables a detailed understanding of the ways the air plasma induced in the atmosphere in the wake of a laser-induced filament can be controlled by an additional laser pulse. Our model self-consistently integrates plasma-kinetic, Navier-Stokes, electron heat conduction, and electron-vibration energy transfer equations, serving to reveal laser-plasma interaction regimes where the plasma lifetime can be substantially increased through an efficient control over plasma temperature, as well as suppression of attachment and recombination processes. The model is used to quantify the limitations on the length of uniform laser-filament heating due to the self-defocusing of laser radiation by the radial profile of electron density. The envisaged applications include sustaining plasma guides for long-distance transmission of microwaves, standoff detection of impurities and potentially hazardous agents, as well as lightning control and protection.

  20. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  1. Plasma species dynamics in a laser produced carbon plasma expanding in low pressure neutral gas background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, H. M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Bhuyan, H.; Chuaqui, H.; Wyndham, E.

    2012-06-01

    We present time and space resolved spectroscopic observations of a laser produced carbon plasma, in an argon background. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 370 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, with a fluence of 6.8 J/cm2, is used to produce a plasma from a solid graphite target, at a base pressure of 0.5 mTorr, and with 80 mTorr Argon background. The spectral emission in the visible is recorded with 15 ns time resolution. 20 ns time resolution plasma imagining, filtered at characteristic carbon species emission wavelengths, is used to study the dynamics of the expanding plasma. Two different fronts with ionic or molecular compositions are seen to detach from de laser target plasma.

  2. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L [Knoxville, TN; Paulauskas, Felix L [Knoxville, TN; Bigelow, Timothy S [Knoxville, TN

    2010-11-02

    A system to continuously produce fully carbonized or graphitized carbon fibers using microwave-assisted plasma (MAP) processing comprises an elongated chamber in which a microwave plasma is excited in a selected gas atmosphere. Fiber is drawn continuously through the chamber, entering and exiting through openings designed to minimize in-leakage of air. There is a gradient of microwave power within the chamber with generally higher power near where the fiber exits and lower power near where the fiber enters. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN), pitch, or any other suitable organic/polymeric precursor fibers can be used as a feedstock for the inventive system. Oxidized or partially oxidized PAN or pitch or other polymeric fiber precursors are run continuously through a MAP reactor in an inert, non-oxidizing atmosphere to heat the fibers, drive off the unwanted elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen, and produce carbon or graphite fibers faster than conventionally produced carbon fibers.

  3. Amateur scientists - producing light from a bubble of air

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, R.A.; Barber, B.P.

    1995-02-01

    A glowing bubble of air cannot be bought anywhere at any price. But with an oscilloscope, a moderately precise sound generator, a home stereo amplifier and about $100, readers can turn sound into light through a process called sonoluminescence. The apparatus is relatively simple. A glass spherical flask filled with water serves as the resonator - the cavity in which sound is created to trap and drive the bubble. Small speakers, called piezoelectric transducers, are cemented to the flask and powered by an audo generator and amplifier. Bubbles introduced into the water coalesce at the center of the flask and produce a dim light visible to the unaided eye in a darkened room.

  4. Artifact peroxides produced during cryogenic sampling of ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staffelbach, Thomas; Neftel, Albrecht; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    Peroxides were found to be produced as artifacts during cryogenic sampling with Horibe traps. Cryogenic trap sampling was compared to collection with a wet effluent diffusion denuder and a Nafion membrane diffusion denuder. Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide measured in the cryogenic trap samples were significantly higher. In comparison, no evidence of artifact methyl hydroperoxide production was found. The amount of artifact H2O2 and HMHP produced increased with decreasing trap temperature. Spiking ambient air with ethene or isoprene showed that these hydrocarbons, in the presence of ozone, can be responsible for the artifact production of peroxides. Our results clearly suggest that the peroxide data obtained by cryogenic sampling and reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution.

  5. High-speed sterilization technique using dielectric barrier discharge plasmas in atmospheric humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamae, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma produced by an ac voltage application of 1 kHz in atmospheric humid air was investigated in order to develop low-temperature, low-cost and high-speed plasma sterilization technique. The biological indicators covered with a Tyvek sheet were set just outside the DBD plasma region, where the air temperature and humidity as a discharge gas were precisely controlled by an environmental test chamber. The results show that the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores was found to be dependent strongly on the humidity, and was completed within 15 min at a relative humidity of 90 % and a temperature of 30 C. The treatment time for sterilization is shorter than those of conventional sterilization methods using ethylene oxide gas and dry heat treatment. It is considered that reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals that are effective for the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores could be produced by the DBD plasma in the humid air. Repetitive micro-pulsed discharge plasmas in the humid air will be applied for the sterilization experiment to enhance the sterilization efficiency.

  6. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man; Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-01

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H2O), glycerol (C3H8O3) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  7. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  8. Air Plasma Formation in MHD Slipstream Accelerator for Mercury Lightcraft

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L.N.; Raizer, Y.P.; Surzhikov, S.

    2004-03-30

    This paper investigates the physics of air plasma formation at the entrance of the MHD slipstream accelerator for the 'tractor-beam' Mercury Lightcraft. Two scenarios are analyzed. The first addresses the needs of the minimum power airspike assuming that all the power required for air plasma formation must come from the remote laser beam. The second case considers the constant-focus airspike and assumes that the breakdown criteria is satisfied by an on-board auxiliary source (e.g., electric discharge, RF source, microwave source, or E-beam)

  9. Air Plasma Formation in MHD Slipstream Accelerator for Mercury Lightcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Raizer, Y. P.; Surzhikov, S.

    2004-03-01

    This paper investigates the physics of air plasma formation at the entrance of the MHD slipstream accelerator for the `tractor-beam' Mercury Lightcraft. Two scenarios are analyzed. The first addresses the needs of the minimum power airspike assuming that all the power required for air plasma formation must come from the remote laser beam. The second case considers the constant-focus airspike and assumes that the breakdown criteria is satisfied by an on-board auxiliary source (e.g., electric discharge, RF source, microwave source, or E-beam).

  10. Volume Diffuse Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Produced by Nanosecond High Voltage Pulse in Airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haicheng; Gao, Wei; Fan, Zhihui; Liu, Yidi; Ren, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Volume diffuse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced in subsonic airflow by nanosecond high-voltage pulse power supply with a plate-to-plate discharge cell at 6 mm air gap length. The discharge images, optical emission spectra (OES), the applied voltage and current waveforms of the discharge at the changed airflow rates are obtained. When airflow rate is increased, the transition of the discharge mode and the variations of discharge intensity, breakdown characteristics and the temperature of the discharge plasma are investigated. The results show that the discharge becomes more diffuse, discharge intensity is decreased accompanied by the increased breakdown voltage and time lag, and the temperature of the discharge plasma reduces when airflow of small velocity is introduced into the discharge gap. These phenomena are because that the airflow changes the spatial distribution of the heat and the space charge in the discharge gap. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51437002)

  11. Portable microwave air plasma device for wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S. K.; Kim, H. Y.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. K.

    2015-06-01

    A portable microwave air plasma has been developed for safe and effective wound healing. The device is operated by a fixed microwave power and two different air gas flows (main and cooling air flow). It was found that the speeds of the two air flows determine the stability of the plasma jet and gas temperature and thereby regulate the concentrations of the individual reactive species. Two different regimes, i.e. the NO abundant (0.1 slm main air flow) and ozone abundant regimes (4 slm main air flow), were identified as suitable for wound healing without thermal damage and toxicity. These regimes show similar plasma characteristics (e.g. less than 40 °C at the treatment point, less than 4 ppm of NO2) except for different NO and ozone amounts. Both regimes show more than twice as fast wound healing speed compared with the untreated case without any histological damages. Faster healing speed with intrinsic ozone safety make the NO abundant regime the best operation regime for wound healing. Finally, the stability of the developed device was demonstrated by a one-hour continuous operation test with a 24 V battery.

  12. Plasma Bragg density gratings produced by optical-field ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lule; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2009-11-15

    Plasma Bragg density gratings produced by optical-field ionization in underdense gas under the irradiation of two counterpropagating laser pulses at laser intensities around 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} are investigated by particle-in-cell simulation. The grating is composed of interlacing layers of neutral gas and plasma (or partially ionized gas) with its density and period controlled by the initial gas density, laser wavelengths, and intersecting angles of the two laser pulses. The study shows that such gratings have a longer lifetime, about nanoseconds, as compared with those driven by the laser ponderomotive force at higher laser intensities around 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. They may be used for phase-matched high-harmonic generation, laser self-guiding, laser pulse compression and stretching, etc.

  13. Acceleration of neutrals in a nanosecond laser produced nickel plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Philip, Reji

    2014-12-15

    Time of flight dynamics of slow neutrals, fast neutrals, and ions from a nanosecond laser produced nickel (Ni) plasma are investigated. Species arrival times confirm the hypothesis that fast neutrals are formed by the recombination of fast ions with free electrons. Both neutrals and ions are found to accelerate for a short interval immediately after ablation, which is attributed to internal Coulomb forces which create electrostatic potentials resulting in the charged particle acceleration. This process is further enhanced by laser-plasma energy coupling. Emission from neutrals could be measured for longer axial distances in the plume compared to that of ions confirming that the ions recombine to form neutrals as they move away from the target surface.

  14. Miniature Distillation Column for Producing LOX From Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozzi, Jay C.

    2006-01-01

    The figure shows components of a distillation column intended for use as part of a system that produces high-purity liquid oxygen (LOX) from air by distillation. (The column could be easily modified to produce high-purity liquid nitrogen.) Whereas typical industrial distillation columns for producing high-purity liquid oxygen and/or nitrogen are hundreds of feet tall, this distillation column is less than 3 ft (less than about 0.9 m) tall. This column was developed to trickle-charge a LOX-based emergency oxygen system (EOS) for a large commercial aircraft. A description of the industrial production of liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen by distillation is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the present miniaturized distillation column. Typically, such industrial production takes place in a chemical processing plant in which large quantities of high-pressure air are expanded in a turboexpander to (1) recover a portion of the electrical power required to compress the air and (2) partially liquefy the air. The resulting two-phase flow of air is sent to the middle of a distillation column. The liquid phase is oxygen-rich, and its oxygen purity increases as it flows down the column. The vapor phase is nitrogen-rich and its nitrogen purity increases as it flows up the column. A heater or heat exchanger, commonly denoted a reboiler, is at the bottom of the column. The reboiler is so named because its role is to reboil some of the liquid oxygen collected at the bottom of the column to provide a flow of oxygen-rich vapor. As the oxygen-rich vapor flows up the column, it absorbs the nitrogen in the down-flowing liquid by mass transfer. Once the vapor leaves the lower portion of the column, it interacts with down-flowing nitrogen liquid that has been condensed in a heat exchanger, commonly denoted a condenser, at the top of the column. Liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen products are obtained by draining some of the purified product at the bottom and top of the column

  15. Analysis of extreme ultraviolet spectra from laser produced rhenium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Liu, Luning; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly-charged rhenium ions were observed in the 1-7 nm region using two Nd:YAG lasers with pulse lengths of 150 ps and 10 ns, respectively, operating at a number of laser power densities. The maximum focused peak power density was 2.6 × 1014 W cm-2 for the former and 5.5 × 1012 W cm-2 for the latter. The Cowan suite of atomic structure codes and unresolved transition array (UTA) approach were used to calculate and interpret the emission properties of the different spectra obtained. The results show that n = 4-n = 4 and n = 4-n = 5 UTAs lead to two intense quasi-continuous emission bands in the 4.3-6.3 nm and 1.5-4.3 nm spectral regions. As a result of the different ion stage distributions in the plasmas induced by ps and ns laser irradiation the 1.5-4.3 nm UTA peak moves to shorter wavelength in the ps laser produced plasma spectra. For the ns spectrum, the most populated ion stage during the lifetime of this plasma that could be identified from the n = 4-n = 5 transitions was Re23+ while for the ps plasma the presence of significantly higher stages was demonstrated. For the n = 4-n = 4 4p64dN-4p54dN+1 + 4p64dN-14f transitions, the 4d-4f transitions contribute mainly in the most intense 4.7-5.5 nm region while the 4p-4d subgroup gives rise to a weaker feature in the 4.3-4.7 nm region. A number of previously unidentified spectral features produced by n = 4-n = 5 transitions in the spectra of Re XVI to Re XXXIX are identified.

  16. Relative ion expansion velocity in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, S.; Moreno, J. C.; Griem, H. R.; Cohen, Leonard; Richardson, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    The spectra of highly ionized titanium, Ti XIII through Ti XXI, and C VI Lyman lines were excited in laser-produced plasmas. The plasma was produced by uniformly irradiating spherical glass microballoons coated with thin layers of titanium and parylene. The 24-beam Omega laser system produced short, 0.6 ns, and high-intensity, 4 x 10 to the 14th W/sq cm, laser pulses at a wavelength of 351 nm. The measured wavelength for the 2p-3s Ti XIII resonance lines had an average shift of + 0.023 A relative to the C VI and Ti XX spectral lines. No shift was found between the C VI, Ti XIX, and Ti XX lines. The shift is attributed to a Doppler effect, resulting from a difference of (2.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the 7th cm/s in the expansion velocities of Ti XIX and Ti XX ions compared to Ti XIII ions.

  17. Producing air-stable monolayers of phosphorene and their defect engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jiajie; Gai, Xin; Yang, Jiong; Wang, Xibin; Yu, Zongfu; Choi, Duk-Yong; Luther-Davies, Barry; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-01-01

    It has been a long-standing challenge to produce air-stable few- or monolayer samples of phosphorene because thin phosphorene films degrade rapidly in ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate a new highly controllable method for fabricating high quality, air-stable phosphorene films with a designated number of layers ranging from a few down to monolayer. Our approach involves the use of oxygen plasma dry etching to thin down thick-exfoliated phosphorene flakes, layer by layer with atomic precision. Moreover, in a stabilized phosphorene monolayer, we were able to precisely engineer defects for the first time, which led to efficient emission of photons at new frequencies in the near infrared at room temperature. In addition, we demonstrate the use of an electrostatic gate to tune the photon emission from the defects in a monolayer phosphorene. This could lead to new electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as electrically tunable, broadband near infrared lighting devices operating at room temperature. PMID:26794866

  18. Producing air-stable monolayers of phosphorene and their defect engineering.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jiajie; Gai, Xin; Yang, Jiong; Wang, Xibin; Yu, Zongfu; Choi, Duk-Yong; Luther-Davies, Barry; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-01-01

    It has been a long-standing challenge to produce air-stable few- or monolayer samples of phosphorene because thin phosphorene films degrade rapidly in ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate a new highly controllable method for fabricating high quality, air-stable phosphorene films with a designated number of layers ranging from a few down to monolayer. Our approach involves the use of oxygen plasma dry etching to thin down thick-exfoliated phosphorene flakes, layer by layer with atomic precision. Moreover, in a stabilized phosphorene monolayer, we were able to precisely engineer defects for the first time, which led to efficient emission of photons at new frequencies in the near infrared at room temperature. In addition, we demonstrate the use of an electrostatic gate to tune the photon emission from the defects in a monolayer phosphorene. This could lead to new electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as electrically tunable, broadband near infrared lighting devices operating at room temperature. PMID:26794866

  19. Producing air-stable monolayers of phosphorene and their defect engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Jiajie; Gai, Xin; Yang, Jiong; Wang, Xibin; Yu, Zongfu; Choi, Duk-Yong; Luther-Davies, Barry; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-01-01

    It has been a long-standing challenge to produce air-stable few- or monolayer samples of phosphorene because thin phosphorene films degrade rapidly in ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate a new highly controllable method for fabricating high quality, air-stable phosphorene films with a designated number of layers ranging from a few down to monolayer. Our approach involves the use of oxygen plasma dry etching to thin down thick-exfoliated phosphorene flakes, layer by layer with atomic precision. Moreover, in a stabilized phosphorene monolayer, we were able to precisely engineer defects for the first time, which led to efficient emission of photons at new frequencies in the near infrared at room temperature. In addition, we demonstrate the use of an electrostatic gate to tune the photon emission from the defects in a monolayer phosphorene. This could lead to new electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as electrically tunable, broadband near infrared lighting devices operating at room temperature.

  20. Spectroscopic analysis of femtosecond laser plasma filament in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, J.; Liu, W.; Théberge, F.; Xu, H. L.; Daigle, J. F.; Châteauneuf, M.; Dubois, J.; Chin, S. L.

    2008-03-01

    We report a spectroscopic analysis of a filament generated by a femtosecond laser pulse in air. In the filament spectra, the characteristic Stark broadened atomic oxygen triplet centered at 777.4 nm has been observed. The measured electron impact Stark broadening parameter of the triplet is larger than the theoretical value by Griem [H.R. Griem, Plasma Spectroscopy, McGraw Hill, New York, 1964] by a factor 6.7 . Using the experimental value 0.0166nm , the plasma densities derived from Stark broadening agree well with those most recently obtained from Théberge et al.'s measurement of the nitrogen fluorescence calibrated by longitudinal diffraction [F. Théberge, W. Liu, P.T. Simard, A. Becker, S. L. Chin, Phys. Rev. E 74 (2006) 036406]. However, the Stark broadening approach is much simpler and can be used to non-invasively measure the filament plasma density distribution in air under different propagation conditions.

  1. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  2. Focused excimer laser initiated and radio frequency sustained plasma formation in high pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giar, Ryan

    A doctoral thesis project was performed to experimentally investigate the feasibility of focused excimer laser initiation of air plasmas for radio frequency sustainment. A 193 nm, 15 MW, 300 mJ laser was focused with a 18 cm focal length lens to form a small, high density (ne ~ 10 14 cm--3) seed plasma. These laser plasmas were produced inside a borosilicate glass tube around which was wrapped a 5 turn helical antenna. This antenna was powered with 5 kW of 13.56 MHz of radiation for 1.5 s. This was accomplished at a pressure of 22 Torr, resulting in a large volume (300 cm3) air plasma. Diagnostic measurements of this air plasma determined an electron density of 5E10 cm-3 and an electron temperature 1.3 eV with a neutral temperature of 3500 K. The collision frequency was measured to be 9E10 Hz which resulted in a plasma-loaded antenna resistance of 6 O with a voltage reflection coefficient of 0.7.

  3. Sterilization of soybean powder with plasma treatment in atmospheric humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwami, R.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Nakayama, A.; Nakagawa, K.

    2013-10-01

    Sterilization of foods has been performed by conventional methods such as heat, steam and chemical solutions. However, these sterilization techniques could cause damages to the food material. It is considered that plasma sterilization at atmospheric pressure is one of the promising alternative methods because of the low temperature process. In our previous study, the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeusspores by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma produced in atmospheric humid air was investigated in order to develop low-temperature, low-cost and high-speed plasma sterilization technique. The results showed that the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeusspores was found to be dependent strongly on the humidity. In the present study, the plasma treatment technique in humid air is applied to sterilization of soybean powder. Effects of plasma sterilization were successfully confirmed by a colony counting method. It was found that the sterilization efficiency was increased by using the humid air as the discharge gas. In the conference, an improvement of the plasma treatment system to enhance the sterilization efficiency will be shown.

  4. Surface-dependent inactivation of model microorganisms with shielded sliding plasma discharges and applied air flow.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Loree C

    2015-06-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma inactivates bacteria through reactive species produced from the applied gas. The use of cold plasma clinically has gained recent interest, as the need for alternative or supplementary strategies are necessary for preventing multi-drug resistant infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of a novel shielded sliding discharge based cold plasma reactor operated by nanosecond voltage pulses in atmospheric air on both biotic and inanimate surfaces. Bacterial inactivation was determined by direct quantification of colony forming units. The plasma activated air (afterglow) was bactericidal against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis seeded on culture media, laminate, and linoleum vinyl. In general, E. coli was more susceptible to plasma exposure. A bacterial reduction was observed with the application of air alone on a laminate surface. Whole-cell real-time PCR revealed a decrease in the presence of E. coli genomic DNA on exposed samples. These findings suggest that plasma-induced bacterial inactivation is surface-dependent. PMID:25200988

  5. An investigation of an underwater steam plasma discharge as alternative to air plasmas for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah N.; Foster, John E.; Garcia, Maria C.

    2015-10-01

    An underwater steam plasma discharge, in which water itself is the ionizing media, is investigated as a means to introduce advanced oxidation species into contaminated water for the purpose of water purification. The steam discharge avoids the acidification observed with air discharges and also avoids the need for a feed gas, simplifying the system. Steam discharge operation did not result in a pH changes in the processing of water or simulated wastewater, with the actual pH remaining roughly constant during processing. Simulated wastewater has been shown to continue to decompose significantly after steam treatment, suggesting the presence of long-lived plasma produced radicals. During steam discharge operation, nitrate production is limited, and nitrite production was found to be below the detection threshold of (roughly 0.2 mg L-1). The discharge was operated over a broad range of deposited power levels, ranging from approximately 30 W to 300 W. Hydrogen peroxide production was found to scale with increasing power. Additionally, the hydrogen peroxide production efficiency of the discharge was found to be higher than many of the rates reported in the literature to date.

  6. Saturation of Langmuir waves in laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    This dissertation deals with the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma (a quasineutral collection of electrons and ions). During this interaction, the laser drives large-amplitude waves through a class of processes known as parametric instabilities. Several such instabilities drive one type of wave, the Langmuir wave, which involves oscillations of the electrons relative to the nearly-stationary ions. There are a number of mechanisms which limit the amplitude to which Langmuir waves grow. In this dissertation, these mechanisms are examined to identify qualitative features which might be observed in experiments and/or simulations. In addition, a number of experiments are proposed to specifically look for particular saturation mechanisms. In a plasma, a Langmuir wave can decay into an electromagnetic wave and an ion wave. This parametric instability is proposed as a source for electromagnetic emission near half of the incident laser frequency observed from laser-produced plasmas. This interpretation is shown to be consistent with existing experimental data and it is found that one of the previous mechanisms used to explain such emission is not. The scattering version of the electromagnetic decay instability is shown to provide an enhanced noise source of electromagnetic waves near the frequency of the incident laser.

  7. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Harilal, S S; LaHaye, N L; Phillips, M C

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of a solid aluminum target at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous wave (cw) Ti:sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the cw laser at one transition. Time-delayed, gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate resonantly excited fluorescence emission from thermally excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable cw laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultrahigh resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing cw laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods. PMID:27472615

  8. Observation and numerical analysis of plasma parameters in a capillary discharge-produced plasma channel waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bobrova, Nadezhda; Sasorov, Pavel; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sasaki, Toru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2011-03-01

    We observed the parameters of the discharge-produced plasma in cylindrical capillary. Plasma parameters of the waveguide were investigated by use of both a Normarski laser interferometer and a hydrogen plasma line spectrum. A space-averaged maximum temperature of 3.3 eV with electron densities of the order of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} was observed at a discharge time of 150 ns and a maximum discharge current of 200 A. One-dimensional dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code was used to analyze the discharge dynamics in the gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-intensity laser pulses. Simulations were performed for the conditions of the experiment. We compared the temporal behavior of the electron temperature and the radial electron density profiles, measured in the experiment with the results of the numerical simulations. They occurred to be in a good agreement. An ultrashort, intense laser pulse was guided by use of this plasma channel.

  9. Numerical analysis of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, T.; Sakata, N.; Kato, S.; Nagayama, T.; Fujita, K.

    1999-07-01

    For this study, the Arcjet Plasmodynamic Analysis Code (APAC) developed by Fujita has been significantly modified in order to investigate the physical phenomena of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system. For self-consistent determination of the heating process of working gas, plasma flow, which contains complicated physical phenomena, is obtained by interconnecting flow field analysis with electric field analysis. The main conclusions obtained are summarized as follows: (1) Discharge voltage decreased with discharge current significantly. On the other hand, it increases slightly with hydrogen flow rate. (2) Current density distribution governs physical phenomena in plasma flow. (3) Temperature and velocity distribution at the nozzle exit depend on the discharge current.

  10. Electron temperature and average density in spherical laser-produced plasmas - Ultraviolet plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, S.; Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Behring, W. E.; Cohen, L.

    1985-01-01

    The average values of the electron temperature Te and the electron density Ne in the corona plasmas of spherically irradiated high-Z targets have been estimated. Targets composed of the elements Cu through Br, Rb, and Mo were irradiated using the fundamental (1.06 microns) and the frequency-tripled (351 nm) output of the Omega laser system. Spectra were recorded in the wavelength region 15-200 A. Using various extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic techniques, it is found that for the case of a Mo plasma produced by frequency-tripled laser irradiation, Te = 2600 + or - 600 eV and Ne is greater than 6 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm. This is consistent with a 'flux limit' smaller than 0.1. The estimated values of Te and Ne are lower in the corona plasmas produced using the fundamental (1.06 micron) irradiation.

  11. Effect of high-power laser divergence on the plasma structural parameters during multiple filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu. E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Multiple filamentation of an infrared high-power laser pulse in air is considered. Based on the numerical solution to the unidirectional pulse propagation equation, the effect of radiation external focusing on the spatial structure of the plasma area produced in the filamentation region is studied. We show that the number of generated plasma channels in the beam wake and the density of their spatial distribution over the filamentation region depend on the initial divergence of laser radiation. We found that in a specific range of beam focusing the number of produced plasma channels could be minimized due to the formation of a consolidated thick plasma bunch at the beam axis.

  12. Spectroscopic temperature measurements of air breakdown plasma using a 110 GHz megawatt gyrotron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hummelt, J. S.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2012-12-15

    Temperature measurements are presented of a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy. A plasma is created with a focused 110 GHz 3 {mu}s pulse gyrotron beam in air that produces power fluxes exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Rotational and vibrational temperatures are spectroscopically measured over a pressure range of 1-100 Torr as the gyrotron power is varied above threshold. The temperature dependence on microwave field as well as pressure is examined. Rotational temperature measurements of the plasma reveal gas temperatures in the range of 300-500 K and vibrational temperatures in the range of 4200-6200 K. The vibrational and rotational temperatures increase slowly with increasing applied microwave field over the range of microwave fields investigated.

  13. Cold atmospheric pressure air plasma jet for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, J. F.; Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Price, R. O.; Swanson, R. J.; Bowman, A.; Chiavarini, R. L.; Stacey, M.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2008-06-01

    By flowing atmospheric pressure air through a direct current powered microhollow cathode discharge, we were able to generate a 2cm long plasma jet. With increasing flow rate, the flow becomes turbulent and temperatures of the jet are reduced to values close to room temperature. Utilizing the jet, yeast grown on agar can be eradicated with a treatment of only a few seconds. Conversely, animal studies show no skin damage even with exposures ten times longer than needed for pathogen extermination. This cold plasma jet provides an effective mode of treatment for yeast infections of the skin.

  14. Plasma channel localisation during multiple filamentation in air

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, N A; Kosareva, O G; Kandidov, V P; Akoezbek, N; Scalora, M; Chin, S L

    2007-12-31

    It is shown by numerical simulations that multiple filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse with a negative initial phase modulation in air leads to an increase in the density of self-induced laser plasma compared to the case when a transform-limited laser pulse of the same duration is used. Simultaneous control of the duration of the chirped pulse and the beam diameter results in an increase in the distance over which the first filament is formed, the length of the plasma channel, and its linear density. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  15. Inactivation of the biofilm by the air plasma containing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Ryota; Yasuoka, Koichi; Yasuoka Takeuchi lab Team

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factory and medical facilities. Inactivation of biofilm has the method of making it react to chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone. Although inactivation by chemicals has the problem that hazardous property of a residual substance and hydrogen peroxide have slow reaction velocity. We achieved advanced oxidation process (AOP) with air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were able to be generated selectively by adjusting the amount of water supplied to the plasma. We inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in five minutes with OH radicals generated by using hydrogen peroxide and ozone.

  16. Cold Air Plasma To Decontaminate Inanimate Surfaces of the Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Claro, Tânia; O'Connor, Niall; Cafolla, Anthony A.; Stevens, Niall T.; Daniels, Stephen; Humphreys, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The hospital environment harbors bacteria that may cause health care-associated infections. Microorganisms, such as multiresistant bacteria, can spread around the patient's inanimate environment. Some recently introduced biodecontamination approaches in hospitals have significant limitations due to the toxic nature of the gases and the length of time required for aeration. This study evaluated the in vitro use of cold air plasma as an efficient alternative to traditional methods of biodecontamination of hospital surfaces. Cultures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii were applied to different materials similar to those found in the hospital environment. Artificially contaminated sections of marmoleum, mattress, polypropylene, powder-coated mild steel, and stainless steel were then exposed to a cold air pressure plasma single jet for 30 s, 60 s, and 90 s, operating at approximately 25 W and 12 liters/min flow rate. Direct plasma exposure successfully reduced the bacterial load by log 3 for MRSA, log 2.7 for VRE, log 2 for ESBL-producing E. coli, and log 1.7 for A. baumannii. The present report confirms the efficient antibacterial activity of a cold air plasma single-jet plume on nosocomial bacterially contaminated surfaces over a short period of time and highlights its potential for routine biodecontamination in the clinical environment. PMID:24441156

  17. Computational model of collisional-radiative nonequilibrium plasma in an air-driven type laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2010-05-06

    A thrust power of a gas-driven laser-propulsion system is obtained through interaction with a propellant gas heated by a laser energy. Therefore, understanding the nonequilibrium nature of laser-produced plasma is essential for increasing available thrust force and for improving energy conversion efficiency from a laser to a propellant gas. In this work, a time-dependent collisional-radiative model for air plasma has been developed to study the effects of nonequilibrium atomic and molecular processes on population densities for an air-driven type laser propulsion. Many elementary processes are considered in the number density range of 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3}<=N<=10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} and the temperature range of 300 K<=T<=40,000 K. We then compute the unsteady nature of pulsively heated air plasma. When the ionization relaxation time is the same order as the time scale of a heating pulse, the effects of unsteady ionization are important for estimating air plasma states. From parametric computations, we determine the appropriate conditions for the collisional-radiative steady state, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and corona equilibrium models in that density and temperature range.

  18. Plasma processes for producing silanes and derivatives thereof

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Richard M; Massey, Dean Richard; Peterson, Peter Young

    2014-03-25

    The invention is generally related to process for generating one or more molecules having the formula Si.sub.xH.sub.y, Si.sub.xD.sub.y, Si.sub.xH.sub.yD.sub.z, and mixtures thereof, where x,y and z are integers .gtoreq.1, H is hydrogen and D is deuterium, such as silane, comprising the steps of: providing a silicon containing material, wherein the silicon containing material includes at least 20 weight percent silicon atoms based on the total weight of the silicon containing material; generating a plasma capable of vaporizing a silicon atom, sputtering a silicon atom, or both using a plasma generating device; and contacting the plasma to the silicon containing material in a chamber having an atmosphere that includes at least about 0.5 mole percent hydrogen atoms and/or deuterium atoms based on the total moles of atoms in the atmosphere; so that a molecule having the formula Si.sub.xH.sub.y; (e.g., silane) is generated. The process preferably includes a step of removing one or more impurities from the Si.sub.xH.sub.y (e.g., the silane) to form a clean Si.sub.xH.sub.y, Si.sub.xD.sub.y, Si.sub.xH.sub.yD.sub.z (e.g., silane). The process may also include a step of reacting the Si.sub.xH.sub.y, Si.sub.xD.sub.y, Si.sub.xH.sub.yD.sub.z (e.g., the silane) to produce a high purity silicon containing material such as electronic grade metallic silicon, photovoltaic grade metallic silicon, or both.

  19. [Testing of medicinal products produced from pooled plasma].

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, U; Hunfeld, A; Breitner-Ruddock, S

    2014-10-01

    Medicinal products produced from human plasma fall under the administrative batch release procedure of the competent authority. In Germany, this has been carried out since 1995 by the Paul Ehrlich Institute (PEI), the responsible state control agency for blood products. Medicinal products released for the European and national market are tested for quality, efficacy and safety. Experimental testing of the final product and the starting materials, the plasma pools, as well as control of the production documentation guarantee a constantly high product safety. In the 28,000 batches tested since the beginning of the state controlled batch release testing of these blood products at the PEI, there has been no transmission of infectious viruses (HIV, HBV and HCV) to any patient. The batch release has made a contribution to the improvement of product quality. This procedure is still an important tool to ensure safety of blood products. The PEI is integrated in the batch release network of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & Health Care (EDQM) in Strasbourg. Regulations and guidelines for official control authority batch release (OCABR) ensure harmonized procedures for mutual recognition of batch release on the European level. The EU certificates and German national certificates are requested and accepted in over 70 countries worldwide. Experimental testing in the EU and the requisite certificates have developed into a seal of quality for the world market. PMID:25213735

  20. Storage of ions from laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    A method of storing large numbers of metal ions created in laser-produced plasmas is presented. The outer electrode of the electrostatic ion trap is designed to give a harmonic axial potential. The ions trapped by the technique included Be(+), C(+), Al(+), Fe(+), and Pb(+). The initial number of ions stored (2 x 10 to the 8th) appeared to be the trap maximum since increasing the laser power beyond 2-3 MW did not change the ion number. An initial rapid decay in the 30-50 msec range was generally followed by a long tail at the 10% level with times greater than 100 msec. The technique should be valuable for refractory elements which cannot be easily vaporized for electron impact ionization.

  1. Emission analysis of a laser-produced barium plasma plume.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Joshi, H C; Kumar, Ajai

    2015-09-01

    In the present work we report the characteristic emission features of a laser-produced barium plasma plume. The time-resolved analysis for the different spectral lines of neutral and singly charged ionic barium has been carried out. It has been observed that the temporal evolution of electron temperature and density shows a peculiar behavior which is significantly different from the reported results of laser ablation of materials. The electron density increases with increase in delay time but the temperature does not change to any significant extent. Strong self-reversal in the emission of a resonant singly charged barium ionic line (455.4 nm) with time delay indicates the increase of population of singly charged barium ion with time. The results are explained on the basis of the increased population of barium metastables and subsequent ionization (Penning type). PMID:26368891

  2. Plasma Parameter of a Capillary Discharge-Produced Plasma Channel to Guide an Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bai, Jin-xiang; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-01-22

    We have observed the optical guiding of a 100-fs laser pulse with the laser intensity in the range of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} using a 1.5-cm long capillary discharge-produced plasma channel for compact electron acceleration applications. The optical pulse propagation using the plasma channel is achieved with the electron densities of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and the electron temperatures of 0.5-4 eV at a discharge time delay of around 150 ns and a discharge current of 500 A with a pulse duration of 100-150 ns. An energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons from a laser-plasma acceleration scheme showed a peak at 1.3 MeV with a maximum energy tail of 1.6 MeV.

  3. Decomposition of Methylene Blue by using an Atmospheric Plasma Jet with Ar, N2, O2, or Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Hara, Tamio

    2013-05-01

    We have performed experiments on the decomposition of methylene blue by using an atmospheric plasma jet with various working gases. The decomposition efficiencies of Ar, N2, and O2 plasmas are almost equivalent; on the other hand, the rate of methylene blue decomposition by air plasma is lower than those by the other plasmas. From the absorption spectra, it has been found that HONO (nitrous acid) is produced by air plasma-liquid reactions. It has been clarified by a series of experiments, where oxygen concentration in N2 plasma is varied, that the concentration of HONO increases and the rate of methylene blue decomposition degrades with increasing oxygen gas flow rate. Furthermore, the presence of nitrate ions and nitrite ions was confirmed by ion chromatography and pH measurement.

  4. Indoor air cleaning using a pulsed discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Akira; Kisanuki, Yoshiyuki; Noguchi, Masanobu; Katsura, Shinji; Lee, S.H.; Hong, Y.K.; Shin, S.Y.; Kang, J.H.

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a high-efficiency air-cleaning system for air pollutants such as tobacco smoke found in indoor environments. The authors investigated the basic characteristics of treating particulate matter and acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) in a one-pass test using a pulse generator and a plasma-driven catalyst reactor, both of which are attachable to an air conditioner. Using a circulation test, the decrease in acetaldehyde concentration was measured in a closed vessel where the reactor had been placed. The removal efficiencies of particulate matter and acetaldehyde in the one-pass test (residence time of 10 ms) were 70% and 27%, respectively. In the circulation test, 98% of the suspended particles were collected after 2 min of operation and the acetaldehyde concentration decreased by 70% after 50 mins. It is believed that the TiO{sub 2} catalyst is excited by plasma-induced high-energy particles (electrons, photons, and metastable molecules), resulting in an enhanced pollutant removal. These test results indicate that the combination of plasma with TiO{sub 2} is a potential alternative in treating the pollutants in environmental tobacco smoke.

  5. Laser produced plasma for efficient extreme ultraviolet light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Tony; Cummins, Thomas; O' Gorman, Colm; Li Bowen; Harte, Colm S.; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2012-05-25

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasma and their relevance to EUV source development is discussed. The current state of the field for Sn LPP sources operating at 13.5 nm is described and initial results are given for EUV emission from CO{sub 2} laser irradiation of a bulk Sn target. A maximum conversion efficiency of 1.7% has been measured and the influence of the CO{sub 2} laser temporal profile on the CE is discussed. A double pulse irradiation scheme is shown to increase CE up to a maximum value of 2.1% for an optimum prepulse - pulse delay of 150 ns. The emergence of a new EUVL source wavelength at 6.7 nm based on Gd and Tb LPPs has been outlined. An initial experiment investigating picosecond laser irradiation as a means to produce strong 6.7 nm emission from a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} target has been performed and verified.

  6. Focused excimer laser initiated, radio frequency sustained high pressure air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Giar, Ryan; Scharer, John

    2011-11-15

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes and plasma production by focusing 193 nm, 300 mJ, 15 MW high power laser radiation inside a 6 cm diameter helical radio frequency (RF) coil are presented. Quantum resonant multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and collisional cascade laser ionization processes are exploited that have been shown to produce high-density (n{sub e} {approx} 7 x 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3}) cylindrical seed plasmas at 760 Torr. Air breakdown in lower pressures (from 7-22 Torr), where REMPI is the dominant laser ionization process, is investigated using an UV 18 cm focal length lens, resulting in a laser flux of 5.5 GW/cm{sup 2} at the focal spot. The focused laser power absorption and associated shock wave produce seed plasmas for sustainment by the RF (5 kW incident power, 1.5 s) pulse. Measurements of the helical RF antenna load impedance in the inductive and capacitive coupling regimes are obtained by measuring the loaded antenna reflection coefficient. A 105 GHz interferometer is used to measure the plasma electron density and collision frequency. Spectroscopic measurements of the plasma and comparison with the SPECAIR code are made to determine translational, rotational, and vibrational neutral temperatures and the associated neutral gas temperature. From this and the associated measurement of the gas pressure the electron temperature is obtained. Experiments show that the laser-formed seed plasma allows RF sustainment at higher initial air pressures (up to 22 Torr) than that obtained via RF-only initiation (<18 Torr) by means of a 0.3 J UV laser pulse.

  7. Extended plasma channels created by UV laser in air and their application to control electric discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V. D. Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    Results are presented from a series of experimental and theoretical studies on creating weakly ionized extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by 248-nm UV laser radiation and their application to control long high-voltage discharges. The main mechanisms of air ionization by UV laser pulses with durations from 100 fs to 25 ns and intensities in the ranges of 3×10{sup 11}–1.5×10{sup 13} and 3×10{sup 6}–3×10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}, respectively, which are below the threshold for optical gas breakdown, as well as the main relaxation processes in plasma with a density of 10{sup 9}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, are considered. It is shown that plasma channels in air can be efficiently created by amplitude-modulated UV pulses consisting of a train of subpicosecond pulses producing primary photoelectrons and a long UV pulse suppressing electron attachment and sustaining the density of free electrons in plasma. Different modes of the generation and amplification of trains of subterawatt subpicosecond pulses and amplitude-modulated UV pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were implemented on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid Ti:sapphire-KrF laser facility. The filamentation of such UV laser beams during their propagation in air over distances of up to 100 m and the parameters of the corresponding plasma channels were studied experimentally and theoretically. Laser initiation of high-voltage electric discharges and control of their trajectories by means of amplitude-modulated UV pulses, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of breakdowns in air gaps with length of up to 80 cm, were studied.

  8. Cold Micro-Plasma Jets in Atmospheric Pressure Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A. H.; Suddala, S.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2003-10-01

    Direct current microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) have been operated in air, nitrogen and oxygen at pressures of one atmosphere. The electrodes are 250 μm thick molybdenum foils, separated by an alumina insulator of the same thickness. A cylindrical hole with a diameter in the 100 μm range is drilled through all layers. By flowing gases at high pressure through this hole, plasma jets with radial dimensions on the same order as the microhole dimensions, and with lengths of up to one centimeter are generated. The gas temperature in these jets was measured by means of a micro-thermocouple. The lowest temperatures of close to room temperature were measured when the flow changed from laminar to turbulent. The results of spectral emission and absorption studies indicate high concentrations of byproducts, such as ozone, when the discharge is operated in air or oxygen. This work is supported by the U.S Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  9. Observations of microwave continuum emission from air shower plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P. W.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Varner, G. S.; Hebert, C. L.; Miki, C.; Kowalski, J.; Ruckman, L.; Stokes, B. T.; Beatty, J. J.; Connolly, A.; Saltzberg, D.; Chen, P.; Hast, C.; Ng, J.; Reil, K.; Walz, D.; Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate a possible new technique for microwave detection of cosmic-ray extensive air showers which relies on detection of expected continuum radiation in the microwave range, caused by free-electron collisions with neutrals in the tenuous plasma left after the passage of the shower. We performed an initial experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator laboratory in 2003 and measured broadband microwave emission from air ionized via high-energy electrons and photons. A follow-up experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in the summer of 2004 confirmed the major features of the previous Argonne Wakefield Accelerator observations with better precision. Prompted by these results we built a prototype detector using satellite television technology and have made measurements suggestive of the detection of cosmic-ray extensive air showers. The method, if confirmed by experiments now in progress, could provide a high-duty cycle complement to current nitrogen fluorescence observations.

  10. Visible spectral power emitted from a laser produced uranium plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Jalufka, N. W.

    1975-01-01

    The development of plasma-core nuclear reactors for advanced terrestrial and space-power sources is researched. Experimental measurements of the intensity and the spectral distribution of radiation from a nonfissioning uranium plasma are reported.

  11. The Influence of spot size on the expansion dynamics of nanosecond-laser-produced copper plasmas in atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xingwen; Wei, Wenfu; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-06-28

    Laser produced copper plasmas of different spot sizes in air were investigated using fast photography and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The laser energy was 33 mJ. There were dramatic changes in the plasma plume expansion into the ambient air when spot sizes changed from {approx}0.1 mm to {approx}0.6 mm. A stream-like structure and a hemispherical structure were, respectively, observed. It appeared that the same spot size resulted in similar expansion dynamics no matter whether the target was located in the front of or behind the focal point, although laser-induced air breakdown sometimes occurred in the latter case. Plasma plume front positions agree well with the classic blast wave model for the large spot-size cases, while an unexpected stagnation of {approx}80 ns occurred after the laser pulse ends for the small spot size cases. This stagnation can be understood in terms of the evolution of enhanced plasma shielding effects near the plasma front. Axial distributions of plasma components by OES revealed a good confinement effect. Electron number densities were estimated and interpreted using the recorded Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) images.

  12. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue Fang, Jing

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  13. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  14. Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Air Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam; Al-Mashraqi, Ahmed; Benghanem, Mohamed; Al Shariff, Samir

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure air cold plasma jet is introduced in this work. It is AC (60 Hz to 20 kHz) cold plasma jet in air. The system is consisted of a cylindrical alumina insulator tube with outer diameter of 1.59 mm and 26 mm length and 0.80 mm inner diameter. AC sinusoidal high voltage was applied to the powered electrode which is a hollow needle inserted in the Alumina tube. The inner electrode is a hollow needle with 0.80 mm and 0.46 mm outer and inner diameters respectively. The outer electrode is grounded which is a copper ring surrounded the alumina tube locates at the nozzle end. Air is blowing through the inner electrode to form a plasma jet. The jet length increases with flow rate and applied voltage to reach 1.5 cm. The gas temperature decreases with distance from the end of the nozzle and with increasing the flow rate. The spectroscopic measurement between 200 nm and 900 nm indicates that the jet contains reactive species such as OH, O in addition to the UV emission. The peak to peak current values increased from 6 mA to 12 mA. The current voltage waveform indicates that the generated jet is homogenous plasma. The jet gas temperature measurements indicate that the jet has a room temperature. This work was supported by the National Science, Technology and Innovation Plan(NSTIP) through the Science and Technology Unit (STU) at Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawwarah, KSA, with the grant number 08-BIO24-5.

  15. Structure of an exploding laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, A.; Gekelman, W.

    2011-05-15

    Currents and instabilities associated with an expanding dense plasma embedded in a magnetized background plasma are investigated by direct volumetric probe measurements of the magnetic field and floating potential. A diamagnetic cavity is formed and found to collapse rapidly compared to the expected magnetic diffusion time. The three-dimensional current density within the expanding plasma includes currents along the background magnetic field, in addition to the diamagnetic current. Correlation measurements reveal that flutelike structures at the plasma surface translate with the expanding plasma across the magnetic field and extend into the current system that sustains the diamagnetic cavity, possibly contributing to its collapse.

  16. Generation of extended plasma channels in air using femtosecond Bessel beams.

    PubMed

    Polynkin, Pavel; Kolesik, Miroslav; Roberts, Adam; Faccio, Daniele; Di Trapani, Paolo; Moloney, Jerome

    2008-09-29

    Extending the longitudinal range of plasma channels created by ultrashort laser pulses in atmosphere is important in practical applications of laser-induced plasma such as remote spectroscopy and lightning control. Weakly focused femtosecond Gaussian beams that are commonly used for generating plasma channels offer only a limited control of filamentation. Increasing the pulse energy in this case typically results in creation of multiple filaments and does not appreciably extend the longitudinal range of filamentation. Bessel beams with their extended linear foci intuitively appear to be better suited for generation of long plasma channels. We report experimental results on creating extended filaments in air using femtosecond Bessel beams. By probing the linear plasma density along the filament, we show that apertured Bessel beams produce stable single plasma channels that span the entire extent of the linear focus of the beam. We further show that by temporally chirping the pulse, the plasma channel can be longitudinally shifted beyond the linear-focus zone, an important effect that may potentially offer additional means of controlling filament formation. PMID:18825212

  17. Laser produced plasma EUV sources for device development and HVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, David C.; Fomenkov, Igor V.; Lercel, Michael J.; La Fontaine, Bruno M.; Myers, David W.; Brown, Daniel J.; Ershov, Alex I.; Sandstrom, Richard L.; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Das, Palash; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Zhang, Kevin; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Rajyaguru, Chirag; De Dea, Silvia; Dunstan, Wayne J.; Baumgart, Peter; Ishihara, Toshi; Simmons, Rod D.; Jacques, Robert N.; Bergstedt, Robert A.; Porshnev, Peter I.; Wittak, Christian J.; Woolston, Michael R.; Rafac, Robert J.; Grava, Jonathan; Schafgans, Alexander A.; Tao, Yezheng

    2012-03-01

    Laser produced plasma (LPP) systems have been developed as the primary approach for the EUV scanner light source for optical imaging of circuit features at sub-22nm and beyond nodes on the ITRS roadmap. This paper provides a review of development progress and productization status for LPP extreme-ultra-violet (EUV) sources with performance goals targeted to meet specific requirements from leading scanner manufacturers. We present the latest results on exposure power generation, collection, and clean transmission of EUV through the intermediate focus. Semiconductor industry standards for reliability and source availability data are provided. We report on measurements taken using a 5sr normal incidence collector on a production system. The lifetime of the collector mirror is a critical parameter in the development of extreme ultra-violet LPP lithography sources. Deposition of target material as well as sputtering or implantation of incident particles can reduce the reflectivity of the mirror coating during exposure. Debris mitigation techniques are used to inhibit damage from occuring, the protection results of these techniques will be shown over multi-100's of hours.

  18. Pulsed power produced counter-propagating supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Valenzuela, J.; Collins, G.; Mariscal, D.; Narkis, J.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Haque, S.; Hammel, B.; Wallace, M.; Covington, A.; Beg, F.

    2015-11-01

    High-Mach-number, ionized, flowing gases are ubiquitous in the universe, and in many astrophysical environments they take the shape of highly collimated and unidirectional jets. Pulsed power current drivers provide the opportunity to create plasma jets while achieving conditions required to explore radiative cooling, magnetic field advection, shock formation and microinstabilities, all of which are important in the astrophysical environment. We present results from an experimental campaign carried out with the ZEBRA driver (long pulse mode: 0.5 MA in 200 ns current rise) at the Nevada Terawatt Facility where we have performed a comprehensive study of the physics of conical wire array outflows. We have implemented a double conical array configuration in which two counter-propagating jets are produced. Characterization of the jets was done with Faraday rotation, interferometry and an optical streak camera. We will present available data comparing two wire materials (Al and Cu) and the shock formation in different parameter regimes. The work is funded by the Department of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0001063 and DE-NA0001995.

  19. Inactivation of a 25.5 µm Enterococcus faecalis biofilm by a room-temperature, battery-operated, handheld air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, X.; Lu, X.; Liu, J.; Liu, D.; Yang, Y.; Ostrikov, K.; Chu, Paul K.; Pan, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Effective biofilm inactivation using a handheld, mobile plasma jet powered by a 12 V dc battery and operated in open air without any external gas supply is reported. This cold, room-temperature plasma is produced in self-repetitive nanosecond discharges with current pulses of ˜100 ns duration, current peak amplitude of ˜6 mA and repetition rate of ˜20 kHz. It is shown that the reactive plasma species penetrate to the bottom layer of a 25.5 µm-thick Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and produce a strong bactericidal effect. This is the thickest reported biofilm inactivated using room-temperature air plasmas.

  20. Parameters of atmospheric plasmas produced by electrosurgical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alexey; Canady, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    Electrosurgical systems are extensively utilized in general surgery, surgical oncology, plastic and reconstructive surgery etc. In this work we study plasma parameters created by electrosurgical system SS-200E/Argon 2 of US Medical Innovations. The maximal length of the discharge plasma column at which the discharge can be sustained was determined as function of discharge power and argon flow rate. Electrical parameters including discharge current and voltage were measured. Recently proposed Rayleigh microwave scattering method for temporally resolved density measurements of small-size atmospheric plasmas was utilized. Simultaneously, evolution of plasma column was observed using intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera.

  1. Experimental characterization of ultraviolet radiation of air in a high enthalpy plasma torch facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casses, C. J.; Bertrand, P. J.; Jacobs, C. M.; Mac Donald, M. E.; Laux, Ch. O.

    2015-06-01

    During atmospheric reentry, a plasma is formed ahead of the surface of the vehicle and the excited particle present in the plasma produces radiative heating fluxes to the surface of the vehicle. A high-temperature air plasma torch operating at atmospheric pressure was used to experimentally reproduce atmospheric reentry conditions. A high-resolution and absolute intensity emission spectrum (full width at half maximum (FWHM) = 0.064 nm) was obtained from 200 to 450 nm and then compared with computational results provided by the SPECAIR code [1]. This paper discusses the comparison of the two spectra over this wavelength range in order to confirm the validity of the calculation and provide direction to improve the calculated spectrum.

  2. Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler; Kulkarni, Anand

    2009-04-15

    A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

  3. Investigation of Nd:YAG laser produced tin droplet plasma expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ziqi; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang; Wang, Junwu

    2016-05-01

    The present work reports an investigation of plasma expansion produced by Nd:YAG laser irradiating tin droplets. An intensified charged coupled device camera was used to record the plasma plume images, and the temporal evolution of the plasma plume was studied at various laser intensities. Our results demonstrate that the shape of the plasma plume develops from an approximate circle to an ellipse. The temporal evolutions of plasma boundary and plasma centroid were calculated by the secondary moment of plasma image intensity. The angle distributions of the plasma expanding velocity were obtained; the results show that the plasma expanding velocity decreases with increase of the angle to the incoming laser axis. In addition, the eccentricity of the plasma ellipse decreases with time. Meanwhile, we found that the centroid of plasma clusters moves toward the laser incoming direction during the expansion stage and the velocity of this motion is independent of laser intensity.

  4. Man-made vitreous fiber produced from incinerator ash using the thermal plasma technique and application as reinforcement in concrete.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Fu; Wang, To-Mai; Lee, Wen-Cheng; Sun, Kin-Seng; Tzeng, Chin-Ching

    2010-10-15

    This study proposes using thermal plasma technology to treat municipal solid waste incinerator ashes. A feasible fiberization method was developed and applied to produce man-made vitreous fiber (MMVF) from plasma vitrified slag. MMVF were obtained through directly blending the oxide melt stream with high velocity compressed air. The basic technological characteristics of MMVF, including morphology, diameter, shot content, length and chemical resistance, are described in this work. Laboratory experiments were conducted on the fiber-reinforced concrete. The effects of fibrous content on compressive strength and flexural strength are presented. The experimental results showed the proper additive of MMVF in concrete can enhance its mechanical properties. MMVF products produced from incinerator ashes treated with the thermal plasma technique have great potential for reinforcement in concrete. PMID:20580155

  5. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-31

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H{sub 2}O), glycerol (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O{sub 3}) and diiodomethane (CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  6. Moisture resistant and anti-reflection optical coatings produced by plasma polymerization of organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    The need for protective coatings on critical optical surfaces, such as halide crystal windows or lenses used in spectroscopy, has long been recognized. It has been demonstrated that thin, one micron, organic coatings produced by polymerization of flourinated monomers in low temperature gas discharge (plasma) exhibit very high degrees of moisture resistence, e.g., hundreds of hours protection for cesium iodide vs. minutes before degradation sets in for untreated surfaces. The index of refraction of these coatings is intermediate between that of the halide substrate and air, a condition for anti-reflection, another desirable property of optical coatings. Thus, the organic coatings not only offer protection, but improved transmittance as well. The polymer coating is non-absorbing over the range 0.4 to 40 microns with an exception at 8.0 microns, the expected absorption for C-F bonds.

  7. Persistence of uranium emission in laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S. Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-04-28

    Detection of uranium and other nuclear materials is of the utmost importance for nuclear safeguards and security. Optical emission spectroscopy of laser-ablated U plasmas has been presented as a stand-off, portable analytical method that can yield accurate qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of a variety of samples. In this study, optimal laser ablation and ambient conditions are explored, as well as the spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma for spectral analysis of excited U species in a glass matrix. Various Ar pressures were explored to investigate the role that plasma collisional effects and confinement have on spectral line emission enhancement and persistence. The plasma-ambient gas interaction was also investigated using spatially resolved spectra and optical time-of-flight measurements. The results indicate that ambient conditions play a very important role in spectral emission intensity as well as the persistence of excited neutral U emission lines, influencing the appropriate spectral acquisition conditions.

  8. Laser propagation and channel formation in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. E.

    1996-05-01

    The understanding of laser beam propagation through underdense plasmas is of vital importance to inertial confinement fusion schemes, as well as being a fundamental physics issue. Formation of plasma channels has numerous applications including table-top x-ray lasers and laser-plasma induced particle accelerators. The fast ignitor concept (M. Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 1), 1626 (1994)., for example, requires the formation of an evacuated channel through a large, underdense plasma. Scaled experiments (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 63), 2812 (1989). (S. Wilks et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73), 2994 (1994). (P.E. Young et al, Phys. Plasmas 2), 2825 (1995). have shown that the axial extent of a channel formed by a 100 ps pulse is limited by the onset of the filamentation instability (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 61), 2336 (1988).. We have obtained quantitative comparison between filamentation theory and experiment (P.E. Young, Phys. Plasmas 2), 2815 (1995).. More recent experiments (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 1082 (1995). have shown that by increasing the length of the channel-forming pulse, the filamentation instability is overcome and the channel forms at higher densities. This result has important implications for the fast ignitor design and the understanding of time-dependent beam dynamics. In addition, we will present measurements of ion energies ejected by the ponderomotive force which is a measurement of the peak laser intensity in the plasma; the ion energies indicate filamented laser intensities above 1.5× 10^17 W/cm^2. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48. ^ In collaboration with S. Wilks, J. Hammer, W. Kruer, M. Foord, G. Guethlein, and M. Tabak.

  9. A new DBD-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet source on air or nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnin, Eduard A.; Panarin, Victir A.; Skakun, Victor S.; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Pechenitsin, Dmitrii S.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir S.

    2015-12-01

    The paper proposes a new atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source for operation in air and nitrogen. The conditions for the formation of stable plasma jets 4 cm long are determined. Energy and spectral measurement data are presented.

  10. Harmonic generation in the extended plasmas produced on the non-metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    The review of the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) studies in the extended plasma plumes produced on the surfaces of non-metal targets (elemental semiconductors, oxygen- and fluorine-contained crystals) is presented. The objective of those studies was to reveal the attractive properties of non-metal plasmas. We discuss the results of HHG optimization in the above plasma plumes using different methods. These studies demonstrate the usefulness of the plasma harmonic approach for the analysis of the nonlinear optical and spectroscopic properties of the extended laser-produced plasmas formed on the non-metal surfaces.

  11. Effects of atmospheric air plasma treatment of graphite and carbon felt electrodes on the anodic current from Shewanella attached cells.

    PubMed

    Epifanio, Monica; Inguva, Saikumar; Kitching, Michael; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Marsili, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    The attachment of electrochemically active microorganisms (EAM) on an electrode is determined by both the chemistry and topography of the electrode surface. Pre-treatment of the electrode surface by atmospheric air plasma introduces hydrophilic functional groups, thereby increasing cell attachment and electroactivity in short-term experiments. In this study, we use graphite and carbon felt electrodes to grow the model EAM Shewanella loihica PV-4 at oxidative potential (0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Cell attachment and electroactivity are measured through electrodynamic methods. Atmospheric air plasma pre-treatment increases cell attachment and current output at graphite electrodes by 25%, while it improves the electroactivity of the carbon felt electrodes by 450%. Air plasma pre-treatment decreased the coulombic efficiency on both carbon felt and graphite electrodes by 60% and 80%, respectively. Microbially produced flavins adsorb preferentially at the graphite electrode, and air plasma pre-treatment results in lower flavin adsorption at both graphite and carbon felt electrodes. Results show that air plasma pre-treatment is a feasible option to increase current output in bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:25862431

  12. Dependence of terahertz power from laser-produced plasma on laser intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Jin, Z.; Hosokai, T.; Kodama, R.

    2012-07-11

    Power of terahertz radiation from plasma which is generated from air irradiated by coupled ({omega}, 2{omega}) femtosecond laser pulses is analyzed for high laser intensities, for which non-linear plasma effects on the pulse propagation become essential, with multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations including the self-consistent plasma kinetics. The growth rate of THz power becomes slower as the laser intensity increases. A reason of such a lowering of efficiency in THz emission is found to be ionization of air by the laser pulse, which results in poor focusing of laser pulses.

  13. Generation of collisionless shock in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2015-08-01

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments and are tightly connected with magnetic-field amplification and particle acceleration. The fast progress in high-power laser technology is bringing the study of high Mach number shocks into the realm of laboratory plasmas, where in situ measurements can be made helping us understand the fundamental kinetic processes behind shocks. I will discuss the recent progress in laser-driven shock experiments at state-of-the-art facilities like NIF and Omega and how these results, together with ab initio massively parallel simulations, can impact our understanding of magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration in astrophysical plasmas.

  14. Suprathermal electrons produced by beam-plasma-discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments conducted with a low energy plasma lens, HARP, in the electron beam of the large vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center indicate that an enhanced population of 50 to 300 volt electrons appear when the beam goes into the Beam-Plasma Discharge (BPD) mode. Below the BPD instability the electron distribution appears to be characterized as non-energized single particle scattering and energy loss. At 100 cm from the beam core in the BPD mode the fluxes parallel to the beam are reduced by a factor of 20 with respect to the fluxes at 25 cm. Some evidence for isotropy near the beam core is presented.

  15. Laser plasma plume structure and dynamics in the ambient air: The early stage of expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirisan, M.; Jouvard, J. M.; Lavisse, L.; Hallo, L.; Oltra, R.

    2011-05-01

    Laser ablation plasma plume expanding into the ambient atmosphere may be an efficient way to produce nanoparticles. From that reason it would be interesting to study the properties of these laser induced plasmas formed under conditions that are known to be favorable for nanoparticles production. In general, plume behavior can be described as a two-stage process: a "violent" plume expansion due to the absorption of the laser beam energy (during the laser pulse) followed by a fast adiabatic expansion in the ambient gas (after the end of the laser pulse). Plasma plume may last a few microseconds and may have densities 10-6 times lower than the solid densities at temperatures close to the ambient temperature. Expansion of the plasma plume induced by the impact of a nanosecond laser beam (λ = 1064 nm) on the surface of metallic samples in the open air has been investigated by means of fast photography. Spatio-temporal evolution of the plume at the early stage of its expansion (first 330 ns) has been recorded. Structure and dynamics of the plasma plume have been investigated and compared to numerical simulations obtained with a hydro-code, as well as some scaling laws. In addition, measurements using different sample materials (Al, Fe, and Ti) have been performed in order to analyze the influence of target material on plume expansion.

  16. Contact-Free Inactivation of Candida albicans Biofilms by Cold Atmospheric Air Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Tetsuji; Isbary, Georg; Heinlin, Julia; Karrer, Sigrid; Klämpfl, Tobias G.; Li, Yang-Fang; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is one of the main species able to form a biofilm on almost any surface, causing both skin and superficial mucosal infections. The worldwide increase in antifungal resistance has led to a decrease in the efficacy of standard therapies, prolonging treatment time and increasing health care costs. Therefore, the aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of atmospheric plasma at room temperature for inactivating C. albicans growing in biofilms without thermally damaging heat-sensitive materials. This so-called cold atmospheric plasma is produced by applying high voltage to accelerate electrons, which ionize the surrounding air, leading to the production of charged particles, reactive species, and photons. A newly developed plasma device was used, which exhibits a large plasma-generating surface area of 9 by 13 cm (117 cm2). Different time points were selected to achieve an optimum inactivation efficacy range of ≥3 log10 to 5 log10 reduction in CFU per milliliter, and the results were compared with those of 70% ethanol. The results obtained show that contact-free antifungal inactivation of Candida biofilms by cold atmospheric plasma is a promising tool for disinfection of surfaces (and items) in both health care settings and the food industry, where ethanol disinfection should be avoided. PMID:22467505

  17. Multilayer refractory nozzles produced by plasma-spray process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliton, J. L.; Rausch, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Multilayer rocket nozzles formed by plasma spraying have good thermal shock resistance and can be reheated in an oxidizing environment without loss of coating adherence. Suggested application of this process are for the production of refractory components, which can be formed as surfaces of revolution.

  18. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  19. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  20. Cold atmospheric air plasma jet for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen F.; Price, Robert O.; Stacey, Michael; Swanson, R. James; Bowman, Angela; Chiavarini, Robert L.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2008-10-01

    By flowing ambient air through the discharge channel of a microhollow cathode geometry, we were able to sustain a stable 1.5-2 cm long afterglow plasma jet with dc voltages of only a few hundred volts. The temperature in this expelled afterglow plasma is close to room temperature. Emission spectra show atomic oxygen, hydroxyl ions and various nitrogen compounds. The low heavy-particle temperature allows us to use this exhaust stream on biological samples and tissues without thermal damage. The high levels of reactive species suggest an effective treatment for pathological skin conditions caused, in particular, by infectious agents. In first experiments, we have successfully tested the efficacy on Candida kefyr (a yeast), E.coli, and a matching E.coli strain-specific virus. All pathogens investigated responded well to the treatment. In the yeast case, complete eradication of the organism in the treated area could be achieved with an exposure of 90 seconds at a distance of 5 mm. A 10-fold increase of exposure, to 900 seconds caused no observable damage to murine integument.

  1. Surface modification of air plasma spraying WC-12%Co cermet coating by laser melting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, M.; Ajmal, M.; Nusair Khan, A.; Hussain, A.; Akhter, R.

    2014-03-01

    Tungsten carbide cermet powder with 12%Co was deposited on stainless steel substrate by air plasma spraying method. Two types of coatings were produced i.e. thick (430 µm) and thin (260 µm) with varying porosity and splat morphology. The coated samples were treated with CO2 laser under the shroud of inert atmosphere. A series of experimentation was done in this regard, to optimize the laser parameters. The plasma sprayed coated surfaces were then laser treated on the same parameters. After laser melting the treated surfaces were characterized and compared with as-sprayed surfaces. It was observed that the thickness of the sprayed coatings affected the melt depth and the achieved microstructures. It was noted that phases like Co3W3C, Co3W9C4 and W were formed during the laser melting in both samples. The increase in hardness was attributed to the formation of these phases.

  2. Generation of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma by Repetitive Nanosecond Pulses in Air Using Water Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Cheng; Jiang, Hui; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Yuanxiang

    2011-12-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) excitated by pulsed power is a promising method for producing nonthermal plasma at atmospheric pressure. Discharge characteristic in a DBD with salt water as electrodes by a home-made unipolar nanosecond-pulse power source is presented in this paper. The generator is capable of providing repetitive pulses with the voltage up to 30 kV and duration of 70 ns at a 300 Ω resistive load. Applied voltage and discharge current are measured under various experimental conditions. The DBD created between two liquid electrodes shows that the discharge is homogeneous and diffuse in the whole discharge regime. Spectra diagnosis is conducted by an optical emission spectroscopy. The air plasma has strong emission from nitrogen species below 400 nm, notably the nitrogen second positive system.

  3. Spectroscopic Challenges in the Modelling and Diagnostics of High Temperature Air Plasma Radiation for Aerospace Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, Christophe O.

    2007-04-06

    State-of-the-art spectroscopic models of the radiative transitions of interest for Earth re-entry and ground-based diagnostic facilities for aerospace applications are reviewed. The spectral range considered extends from the vacuum ultraviolet to the mid-infrared range (80 nm to 5.5 {mu}m). The modeling results are compared with absolute intensity measurements of the ultraviolet-visible-infrared emission of a well-characterized high-temperature air plasma produced with a 50 kW inductively coupled radio-frequency plasma torch, and with high-resolution absorption spectra from the Center for Astrophysics in the vacuum ultraviolet. The Spectroscopic data required to better model the spectral features of interest for aerospace applications are discussed.

  4. Energy relaxation of intense laser pulse-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab, M.; Abou-Koura, G. H.; El-Siragy, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a collisional radiative model (CRE) of homogeneously expanded nickel plasmas in vacuum. The CRE model is coupled with two separate electron and ion temperature magneto-hydrodynamic equations. On the output, the model provides the temporal variation of the electron temperature, ion temperature, and average charge state. We demonstrate the effect of three-body recombination ({∝}N_e T^{-9/2}_e) on plasma parameters, as it changes the time dependence of electron temperature from t^{-2} to t^{-1} and exhibits a pronounced effect leading to a freezing feature in the average charge state. In addition, the effect of the three-body recombination on the warm up of ions and delaying the equilibration is addressed.

  5. Topical applications of resonance internal conversion in laser produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2007-04-01

    Physical aspects of resonance effects arising in plasma due to interactions of nuclei with the electrons are considered. Among them are resonance conversion (TEEN) and the reverse process of NEET. These processes are of great importance for pumping the excited nuclear states (isomers) and for accelerating their decay. Experiment is discussed on studying the unique 3.5-eV 229m Th nuclide.

  6. Astrophysical Weibel instability in counterstreaming laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, William; Fiksel, Gennady; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Change, Po-Yu; Germaschewski, Kai; Hu, Suxing; Nilson, Philip

    2014-06-01

    Astrophysical shock waves play diverse roles, including energizing cosmic rays in the blast waves of astrophysical explosions, and generating primordial magnetic fields during the formation of galaxies and clusters. These shocks are typically collisionless and require collective electromagnetic fields to couple the upstream and downstream plasmas. The Weibel instability has been proposed to provide the requisite interaction mechanism for shock formation in weakly-magnetized shocks by generating turbulent electric and magnetic fields in the shock front. This work presents the first laboratory identification of this Weibel instability between counterstreaming supersonic plasma flows and confirms its basic features, a significant step towards understanding these shocks. In the experiments, conducted on the OMEGA EP laser facility at the University of Rochester, a pair of plasmas plumes are generated by irradiating of a pair of opposing parallel plastic (CH) targets. The ion-ion interaction between the two plumes is collisionless, so as the plumes interpenetrate, supersonic, counterstreaming ion flow conditions are obtained. Electromagnetic fields formed in the interaction of the two plumes were probed with an ultrafast laser-driven proton beam, and we observed the growth of a highly striated, transverse instability with extended filaments parallel to the flows. The instability is identified as an ion-driven Weibel instability through agreement with analytic theory and particle-in-cell simulations, paving the way for further detailed laboratory study of this instability and its consequences for particle energization and shock formation.[1] W. Fox, G. Fiksel, A. Bhattacharjee, P. Y. Chang, K. Germaschewski, S. X. Hu, and P. M. Nilson, “Filamentation instability of counterstreaming laser-driven plasmas,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 225002 (2013).

  7. Field demonstration and commercialization of silent discharge plasma hazardous air pollutant control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.; Coogan, J.J.; Korzekwa, R.A.; Secker, D.A.; Reimers, R.F.; Herrmann, P.G.; Chase, P.J.; Gross, M.P. |; Jones, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    Silent electrical discharge plasma (dielectric barrier) reactors can decompose gas-phase pollutants by free-radical attack or electron-induced fragmentation. The radicals or electrons are produced by the large average volume nonthermal plasmas generated in the reactor. In the past decade, the barrier configuration has attracted attention for destroying toxic chemical agents for the military, removing harmful greenhouse gases, and treating other environmentally- hazardous chemical compounds. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have been studying the silent discharge plasma (SDP) for processing gaseous-based hazardous chemicals for approximately five years. The key objective is to convert hazardous or toxic chemicals into non-hazardous compounds or into materials which are more easily managed. The main applications have been for treating off-gases from thermal treatment units, and for abating hazardous air-pollutant emissions (e.g., industrial air emissions, vapors extracted from contaminated soil or groundwater). In this paper, we will summarize the basic principles of SDP processing, discuss illustrative applications of the technology, and present results from small-scale field tests that are relevant to our commercialization effort.

  8. Angular emission of ions and mass deposition from femtosecond and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the angular distribution of ions and atoms emanating from femto- and nanosecond laser-produced metal plasmas under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, aluminum targets are ablated in vacuum employing pulses from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) and an Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). The angular distribution of ion emission as well as the kinetic energy distribution is characterized by a Faraday cup, while a quartz microbalance is used for evaluating deposited mass. The ion and deposited mass features showed that fs laser ablated plasmas produced higher kinetic energy and more mass per pulse than ns plumes over all angles. The ion flux and kinetic energy studies show fs laser plasmas produce narrower angular distribution while ns laser plasmas provide narrower energy distribution.

  9. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements. PMID:23794223

  10. Simulations of electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin plasma by a continuously injected electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin beam-plasma system are studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, the problem of emission generation in such a system is considered in a realistic formulation allowing for the continuous injection of a relativistic electron beam through a plasma boundary. Specific attention is given to the thin plasma case in which the transverse plasma size is comparable to the typical wavelength of beam-driven oscillations. Such a case is often implemented in laboratory beam-plasma experiments and has a number of peculiarities. Emission from a thin plasma does not require intermediate generation of the electromagnetic plasma eigenmodes, as in an infinite case, and is more similar to the regular antenna radiation. In this work, we determine how efficiently the fundamental and the second harmonic emissions can be generated in previously modulated and initially homogeneous plasmas.

  11. Interaction of multiple atmospheric-pressure micro-plasma jets in small arrays: He/O2 into humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-02-01

    Arrays of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets are being considered as a means to increase the area being treated in surface modification and in plasma medicine in particular. A unique challenge of scaling plasma jet arrays is that individual plasma jets in an array tend to interact with each other, which can lead to quenching of some individual jets. To investigate these potential interactions, a computational study of one-, two- and three-tube arrays of micro-plasma jet arrays was performed. An atmospheric-pressure He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 mixture was flowed through the tubes into humid room air. We found that the jets interact through electrostatic, hydrodynamic and photolytic means. The hydrodynamic interactions result from the merging of individual He channels emerging from individual tubes as air diffuses into the extended gas jets. Ionization waves (IWs) or plasma bullets, which form the jets on the boundaries of an array, encounter higher mole fractions of air earlier compared with the center jet and so are slower or are quenched earlier. The close proximity of the jets produces electrostatic repulsion, which affects the trajectories of the IWs. If the jets are close enough, photoionizing radiation from their neighbors is an additional form of interaction. These interactions are sensitive to the spacing of the jets.

  12. The Effect of Air Plasma on Sterilization of Escherichia coli in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Miao; Guo, Yun

    2012-08-01

    In this work, a Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) air plasma was used to sterilize Escherichia coli (E. coli) on the surface of medical Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) film. The leakage of cellular DNA and protein by optical absorbance measurement at 260 nm and 280 nm, together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) about cell morphology were performed after sterilization to analyse inactivation mechanisms. The results indicated that the DBD air plasma was very effective in E. coli sterilization. The plasma germicidal efficiency depended on the plasma treatment time, the air-gap distance, and the applied voltage. Within 5 min of plasma treatment, the germicidal efficiency against E. coli could reach 99.99%. An etching action on cell membranes by electrons, ions and radicals is the primary mechanism for DBD air plasma sterilization, which leads to the effusion of cellular contents (DNA and protein) and bacterial death.

  13. Ion beam and plasma methods of producing diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of plasma and ion beam techniques was employed to generate diamondlike carbon films. These methods included the use of RF sputtering, dc glow discharge, vacuum arc, plasma gun, ion beam sputtering, and both single and dual ion beam deposition. Since films were generated using a wide variety of techniques, the physico-chemical properties of these films varied considerably. In general, these films had characteristics that were desirable in a number of applications. For example, the films generated using both single and dual ion beam systems were evaluated for applications including power electronics as insulated gates and protective coatings on transmitting windows. These films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicated hydrogen to carbon ratios to be 1.00, which allowed the films to have good transmittance not only in the infrared, but also in the visible. Other evaluated properties of these films include band gap, resistivity, adherence, density, microhardness, and intrinsic stress. The results of these studies and those of the other techniques for depositing diamondlike carbon films are presented.

  14. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Air plasma coupled with antibody-conjugated nanoparticles: a new weapon against cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. C.; Kim, G. J.; Park, S. R.; Jeon, S. M.; Seo, H. J.; Iza, F.; Lee, J. K.

    2009-02-01

    Ambient air plasmas have been known to kill cancer cells. To enhance selectivity we have used antibody-conjugated nanoparticles. We achieved five times enhancement of melanoma cell death over the case of the plasma alone by using an air plasma with gold nanoparticles bound to anti-FAK antibodies. Our results show that this new interdisciplinary technique has enormous potential for use as a complement to conventional therapies.

  15. Beam heated linear theta-pinch device for producing hot plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1981-01-01

    A device for producing hot plasmas comprising a single turn theta-pinch coil, a fast discharge capacitor bank connected to the coil, a fuel element disposed along the center axis of the coil, a predetermined gas disposed within the theta-pinch coil, and a high power photon, electron or ion beam generator concentrically aligned to the theta-pinch coil. Discharge of the capacitor bank generates a cylindrical plasma sheath within the theta-pinch coil which heats the outer layer of the fuel element to form a fuel element plasma layer. The beam deposits energy in either the cylindrical plasma sheath or the fuel element plasma layer to assist the implosion of the fuel element to produce a hot plasma.

  16. Treatment Characteristics of Polysaccharides and Endotoxin Using Oxygen Plasma Produced by RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kitazaki, Satoshi; Hayashi, Nobuya; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-10-13

    Treatment of polysaccharides and endotoxin were attempted using oxygen plasma produced by RF discharge. Oxygen radicals observed by optical light emission spectra are factors of decomposition of polysaccharides and endotoxin. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicate that most of chemical bonds in the polysaccharides are dissociated after irradiation of the oxygen plasma. Also, the decomposition rate of endotoxin was approximately 90% after irradiation of the oxygen plasma for 180 min.

  17. Properties of thermal air plasma with admixing of copper and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesenko, S.; Veklich, A.; Boretskij, V.; Cressault, Y.; Gleizes, A.; Teulet, Ph

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with investigations of air plasma with admixing of copper and carbon. Model plasma source unit with real breaking arc was used for the simulation of real discharges, which can be occurred during sliding of Cu-C composite electrodes on copper wire at electromotive vehicles. The complex technique of plasma property studies is developed. From one hand, the radial profiles of temperature and electron density in plasma of electric arc discharge in air between Cu-C composite and copper electrodes in air flow were measured by optical spectroscopy techniques. From another hand, the radial profiles of electric conductivity of plasma mixture were calculated by solution of energy balance equation. It was assumed that the thermal conductivity of air plasma is not depending on copper or carbon vapor admixtures. The electron density is obtained from electric conductivity profiles by calculation in assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium in plasma. Computed in such way radial profiles of electron density in plasma of electric arc discharge in air between copper electrodes were compared with experimentally measured profiles. It is concluded that developed techniques of plasma diagnostics can be reasonably used in investigations of thermal plasma with copper and carbon vapors.

  18. Bragg scattering of electromagnetic waves by microwave-produced plasma layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1990-01-01

    A set of parallel plasma layers is generated by two intersecting microwave pulses in a chamber containing dry air at a pressure comparable to the upper atmosphere. The dependencies of breakdown conditions on the pressure and pulse length are examined. The results are shown to be consistent with the appearance of tail erosion of the microwave pulse caused by air breakdown. A Bragg scattering experiment, using the plasma layers as a Bragg reflector, is then performed. Both time domain and frequency domain measurements of wave scattering are conducted. The experimental results are found to agree very well with the theory.

  19. Clarification of THz Electromagnetic Radiation mechanism from the Laser Produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hideta, Masataka; Hyuga, Yusuke; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Yugami, Noboru

    2015-11-01

    Conical forward Terahertz radiation from ultra-short pulse laser produced plasma has been observed. The radiation frequency is smaller than the plasma frequency that is estimated by the initial gas density and laser intensity. This radiation mechanism has not been clarified. To study the radiation mechanism, 2D PIC code is used. The radiation is described by the following equation, ∇2 -1/c2∂2/∂t2 +ωp2/c2 B =μ0 e∇n × v where, ωp, n and v represent the plasma frequency, the plasma density and the electron velocity, respectively. The right hand side is considered as the radiation source which strongly depend on the gradient of the plasma density and the electron velocity. In the experiment, the laser propagates with creating the plasma, the plasma density profile is a function of the radial direction. Therefore, the strong gradient is at the edge of the plasma column, not the center of the plasma, the radiation is expected to generate there and its frequency is also equal to the local plasma frequency. The 2D calculation shows the EM wave is generated around the edge of the plasma column and its frequency is lower than the plasma frequency.

  20. Ballistic pendula for measuring the momentum of a laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Grun, J.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-12-01

    We describe the use of a ballistic pendulum array to measure the momentum of a laser-produced plasma. An in situ calibration method is described and the pendulum results are compared to measurements made with other diagnostics.

  1. Ballistic pendula for measuring the momentum of a laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Grun, J.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-09-17

    We describe the use of a ballistic pendulum array to measure the momentum of a laser-produced plasma. An insitu calibration method is described and the pendulum results are compared to measurements made with other diagnostics.

  2. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S.; Sheppard, J. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S.

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  3. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater. PMID:27056469

  4. Surface Wave Plasma Driven by Ring Dielectric Line for Producing Dense, Large Area, Uniform Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoki

    1999-10-01

    Surface Wave excited Plasma (SWP), has been put into practice as a plasma source for the fabrication process of ULSI and LCD devices. This plasma has several advanced features: 1) Very high electron density with relatively low electron temperature; 2) Very uniform plasma density over large areas; 3) Operation from gas pressure of few mT to the order of thousands of mT. We present a newly developed microwave driven surface wave plasma source called a Ring Dielectric Line (RDL). The RDL is a metal ring wave-guide, filled with dielectric material, driven by a microwave. Slots for coupling the microwave power are symmetrically arrayed under the dielectric, facing towards the processing chamber. The electromagnetic power generates an electromagnetic surface wave, which in turn excites a plasma surface wave on the bottom side of the quartz plate in the processing chamber. In terms of its plasma characteristics, the uniformly distributed argon plasma with wide range of pressure of 20, 40 and 80mT as well as with high density about 5×10^17/m^3 over the cutoff density was observed. The electron temperature was about 2eV. In addition, in the 5000-minutes continuous running test for C_4F8 etching, it achieved repeatability of +/-0.7% and non-uniformity of about +/-3%.

  5. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  6. Thomson scattering measurement of a shock in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Moritaka, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Takabe, H.; Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikane-yama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 ; Tomita, K.; Nakayama, K.; Inoue, K.; Uchino, K.; Ide, T.; Tsubouchi, K.; Nishio, K.; Ide, H.; Kuwada, M.

    2013-09-15

    We report the first direct measurement of temporally and spatially resolved plasma temperatures at a shock as well as its spatial structure and propagation in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas. Two shocks are formed in counter-streaming collisionless plasmas early in time, and they propagate opposite directions. This indicates the existence of counter-streaming collisionless flows to keep exciting the shocks, even though the collisional effects increase later in time. The shock images are observed with optical diagnostics, and the upstream and downstream plasma parameters of one of the shocks are measured using Thomson scattering technique.

  7. Heating dynamics and extreme ultraviolet radiation emission of laser-produced Sn plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yuspeh, S.; Sequoia, K. L.; Tao, Y.; Tillack, M. S.; Burdt, R. A.; Najmabadi, F.

    2010-06-28

    The impact of 1.064 mum laser absorption depth on the heating and in-band (2% bandwidth) 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emissions in Sn plasmas is investigated experimentally and numerically. In-band emission lasting longer than the laser pulse and separation between the laser absorption and in-band emission region are observed. Maximum efficiency is achieved by additional heating of the core of the plasma to allow the optimal temperature to expand to a lower and more optically thin density. This leads to higher temperature plasma that emits less in-band light as compared to CO{sub 2} produced plasma sources for the same application.

  8. Reinjection of transmitted laser light into laser-produced plasma for efficient laser ignition.

    PubMed

    Endo, Takuma; Takenaka, Yuhei; Sako, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Tomohisa; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Namba, Shinichi

    2016-02-10

    For improving the laser absorption efficiency in laser ignition, the transmitted laser light was returned to the laser-produced plasma by using a corner cube. In the experiments, the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma at different times. The laser absorption efficiency was found to be substantially improved when the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma after adequate plasma expansion. Furthermore, through visualization experiments on gas-dynamics phenomena, it was found that the reinjection of the transmitted light affected not only the laser absorption efficiency but also the gas dynamics after breakdown, and thereby the initial flame kernel development. PMID:26906388

  9. Characteristics of the soft X-ray emission from laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Arai, Goki; Kondo, Yoshiki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Ejima, Takeo; Hatano, Tadashi; Jiang, Weihua; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    We characterized the spectral structure of the soft X-ray emission and determined the plasma parameters in laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas. The spectral structure observed originated from Pt21+ to Pt34+ ions, emissions from which overlapped to produce a high output flux in the carbon-window soft X-ray spectral region. Using dual laser pulse irradiation, we observed the maximum output flux, which was 20% larger than that obtained under single-laser irradiation, and the evolution of a strongly absorbed spectral structure, which was attributed to the effects of both opacity and long-scale length of the expanding pre-plasma.

  10. Characteristics of laser produced plasmas and lasers for pulsed ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, K.; Suzuki, T.; Itoh, Y.; Kamiya, T.; Watanabe, M.; Kawakita, Y.; Shioda, K.; Kanazawa, H.

    1996-05-01

    Preliminary experiments were performed to investigate the fundamental characteristics of the laser produced plasmas and the KrF lasers for the pulsed ion beam production. (1) Lithium target was irradiated by a small e-beam pumped KrF laser and the exhausted plasmas were measured. (2) A larger KrF laser of the same kind was operated and the output characteristics were observed. (3) The mode patterns of a discharge-pumped KrF laser was also measured most recently to prepare the future target irradiation to produce ion-source plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Injection of a coaxial-gun-produced magnetized plasma into a background helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2014-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental investigation of plasma bubble relaxation into a lower density background plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear device HelCat at UNM. The gun is powered by a 120-uF ignitron-switched capacitor bank, which is operated in a range of 5 to 10 kV and 100 kA. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate the plasma relaxation process. Magnetized argon plasma bubbles with velocities 1.2Cs, densities 1020 m-3 and electron temperature 13eV have been achieved. The background helicon plasma has density 1013 m-3, magnetic field from 200 to 500 Gauss and electron temperature 1eV. Several distinct operational regimes with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images. Additionally a B-dot probe array has been employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  12. Breakdown voltages for discharges initiated from plasma pulses produced by high-frequency excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2006-06-19

    The triggering ability under the different electric field was investigated using a KrF excimer laser with a high repetition rate of kilohertz order. Measurements were made of the magnitude of impulse voltages that were required to initiate a discharge from plasmas produced by a high-frequency excimer laser. Breakdown voltages were found to be reduced by 50% through the production of plasmas in the discharge gap by a high-frequency excimer laser. However, under direct-current electric field, triggering ability decreased drastically due to low plasma density. It is considered that such laser operation applied for laser-triggered lightning due to the produced location of plasma channel is formed under the impulse electric field since an electric field of the location drastically reduces temporary when the downward leader from thunderclouds propagates to the plasma channel.

  13. Formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by repetitive negatively pulsed helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets propagating into humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have many beneficial effects in their use in surface treatment and, in particular, plasma medicine. One of these benefits is the controlled production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the active discharge through the molecular gases added to the primary noble gas in the input mixture, and through the interaction of reactive species in the plasma effluent with the ambient air. In this computational investigation, a parametric study was performed on the production of RONS in a multiply pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet sustained in a He/O2 mixture and flowing into ambient humid air. The consequences of flow rate, O2 fraction, voltage, and repetition rate on reactant densities after a single discharge pulse, after 30 pulses, and after the same total elapsed time were investigated. At the end of the first discharge pulse, voltage has the greatest influence on RONS production. However, the systematic trends for production of RONS depend on repetition rate and flow rate in large part due to the residence time of RONS in the plasma zone. Short residence times result in reactive species produced by the previous pulse still being in the discharge tube or in the path of the ionization wave at the next pulse. The RONS therefore accumulate in the tube and in the near effluent on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This accumulation enables species requiring multiple reactions among the primary RONS species to be produced in greater numbers.

  14. Electron properties and air mixing in radio frequency driven argon plasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gessel, Bram van; Bruggeman, Peter; Brandenburg, Ronny

    2013-08-05

    A time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet operated with an Ar mixture is investigated by measuring the electron density and electron temperature using Thomson scattering. The measurements have been performed spatially resolved for two different electrode configurations and as a function of the plasma dissipated power and air concentration admixed to the Ar. Time resolved measurements of electron densities and temperatures during the RF cycle and after plasma power switch-off are presented. Furthermore, the influence of the plasma on the air entrainment into the effluent is studied using Raman scattering.

  15. Ion species control in high flux deuterium plasma beams produced by a linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, G.-N.; Shu, W.M.; Nakamura, H.; O'Hira, S.; Nishi, M.

    2004-11-01

    The ion species ratios in low energy high flux deuterium plasma beams formed in a linear plasma generator were measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. And the species control in the plasma generator was evaluated by changing the operational parameters like neutral pressure, arc current, and axial magnetic confinement to the plasma column. The measurements reveal that the lower pressures prefer to form more D{sup +} ions, and the medium magnetic confinement at the higher pressures results in production of more D{sub 2}{sup +}, while the stronger confinement and/or larger arc current are helpful to D{sub 2}{sup +} conversion into D{sub 3}{sup +}. Therefore, the ion species can be controlled by adjusting the operational parameters of the plasma generator. With suitable adjustment, we can achieve plasma beams highly enriched with a single species of D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, or D{sub 3}{sup +}, to a ratio over 80%. It has been found that the axial magnetic configuration played a significant role in the formation of D{sub 3}{sup +} within the experimental pressure range.

  16. Particle Dynamics in Neutral-Gas Confined Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong W.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-produced plasma from a metallic target can be confined to higher plasma densities by immersing the target in an inert gas medium at increasingly high density. The plasma becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, however, when the mass density of the neutral gas exceeds the plasma mass density substantially.[1] A new plasma diagnostic method is developed to help examine the early time development of the gas-plasma interfacial structure. A preliminary study based on plasma polarization spectroscopy is presented, in which the dynamics of atoms and ions are visualized in the presence of electromagnetic fields due to charge separation. The ambient gas pressure of argon is varied as active control in the low-pressure regime. Time-resolved multi-directional projections of an aluminum plasma are obtained in line and continuum emissions, polarization and spectral broadening including Doppler shifts. The electrostatic potential of the target is also followed. The results indicate a bifurcation of the phase-space distribution function and structural segmentation of the plasma into a thermalized core and a crown with highly aligned, energetic atoms and ions. Reconstruction of the plasma structure appears possible by generalization of the two new algorithms we have developed.[1,2] 1. Y.W. Kim and J.-C. Oh, Rev. Sci. Inst. 72, 948 (2001). 2. Y.W. Kim and C.D. Lloyd-Knight, Rev. Sci. Inst. 72, 944 (2001).

  17. Compact High-Velocity Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Plasma Jet in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annette, Meiners; Michael, Leck; Bernd, Abel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet at high streaming velocity operating with ambient air is highlighted. In the present technological approach, the employment of air poses a significant challenge. The high oxygen concentration in air results in a reduced concentration of reactive species in combination with a short species lifetime. The plasma jet assembly presented here contains a special dielectric barrier with a high secondary emission coefficient. In this way, the electron density and in turn the density of reactive species is increased. In addition, the plasma jet assembly is equipped with a short electrode. This leads to a higher voltage across the discharge gap and in turn to an increased density of reactive plasma species. The plasma jet is formed within and emitted by a small conical nozzle. A high-speed gas flow with gas velocity of 340 m/s was achieved at the end of the nozzle. In the jet the concentration of toxic and unwanted neutral plasma species like O3 or NOx is significantly reduced because of the shorter residence time within the plasma. The range of short-lived active plasma species is in turn considerably enhanced. The jet efficiency and action range measured through the oxidation of a test surface were determined by measuring the increase of surface tension of a polypropylene substrate via contact angle measurements after plasma treatment. Numerical modeling of the plasma plume indicates that oxygen atoms are in fact the main active species in the plasma plume.

  18. Characterization Of Nano-Second Laser Induced Plasmas From Al Target In Air At Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, H.; Abdel-Rahim, F. M.; Nossair, A. M. A.; Allam, S. H.; El-Sherbini, Th. M.

    2008-09-23

    In the present work we study the effect of the laser beam energy on the properties of the plasma generated by focusing an intense laser beam on Al solid target in air at atmospheric pressure. Plasma is generated using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm wavelength, 6 ns pulse duration with a maximum pulse energy of 750mJ. The emission spectrum is collected using an Echelle spectrometer equipped with ICCD camera Andor type. The measurements were performed at several delay times between 0 to 9 {mu}s. Measurements of temperature and electron density of the produced plasmas at different laser energies and at different delay times are described using different emission spectral lines. Based on LTE assumption, excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot using O I spectral lines at 777.34, 794.93, and 848.65 nm and the electron density is determined from Stark width of Al II at 281.6 and 466.3 nm. The determined density is compared with the density determined from H{sub {alpha}} spectral line.

  19. The Mutation Breeding and Mutagenic Effect of Air Plasma on Penicillium Chrysogenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Fang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Peng; Liu, Hui; Cai, Xiaochun; Hu, Yihua; Yuan, Chengling; Zheng, Zhiming

    2012-04-01

    Low temperature air plasma was used as the mutation tool for penicillin-producing strain Penicillium chrysogenum. The discharge conditions were RF power of 360 W, temperature of 40°C in a sealed chamber, and pressure of 10 Pa to 30 Pa. The result showed that the kinetics of the survival rate followed a typical saddle-shaped curve. Based on a statistic analysis, at the treating duration of 10 min, the positive mutation rate was as high as 37.5% while the negative mutation rate was low. The colonial morphology changed obviously when the plasma treating duration reached or exceeded 45 min. After both primary and secondary screening, a mutant designated as aPc051310 with high productivity of penicillin was obtained, and a strong mutagenic effect on P. chrysogenum was observed in the process. It was proved that after five generations, the mutant aPc051310 still exhibits a high productivity. All the results prove that the plasma mutation method could be developed as a convenient and effective tool to breed high-yield strains in the fermentation industry, while expanding the plasm application at the same time.

  20. Instabilities observed at the bubble edge of a laser produced plasma during its expansion in an ambient tenuous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Clark, S. E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Niemann, C.

    2014-10-01

    The Raptor kJ class 1053 nm Nd:Glass laser in the Phoenix laser laboratory at University of California, Los Angeles, is used to ablate a dense debris plasma from a graphite or plastic target embedded in a tenuous, uniform, and quiescent ambient magnetized plasma in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) which provides a peak plasma density of ni ~ 1013 cm-3. Its background magnetic field can vary between 200 and 1200 G. Debris ions from laser produced plasma expand out conically with super-Alfvénic speed (MA ~ 2) and expel the background magnetic field and ambient ions to form a diamagnetic bubble. The debris plasma interacts with the ambient plasma and the magnetic field and acts as a piston which can create collisionless shocks. Flute-type instabilities, which are probably large Larmor radius Rayleigh Taylor instabilities or lower hybrid drift instabilities, are developed at the bubble edge and also observed in the experiment. The amplitude and wavelength dependence of the instabilities, which might be a strong function of debris to ambient mass to charge ratio, is studied and the experimental results are compared to the two dimensional hybrid simulations. the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the Excellence Initiative Darmstadt Graduate School of Energy Science and Engineering (GSC1070).

  1. Enhanced laser-induced plasma channels in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanlei, Zuo; Xiaofeng, Wei; Kainan, Zhou; Xiaoming, Zeng; Jingqin, Su; Zhihong, Jiao; Na, Xie; Zhaohui, Wu

    2016-03-01

    Plasma is a significant medium in high-energy density physics since it can hardly be damaged. For some applications such as plasma based backward Raman amplification (BRA), uniform high-density and large-scale plasma channels are required. In the previous experiment, the plasma transverse diameter and density are 50-200 μm and 1-2 × 1019 cm-3, here we enhance them to 0.8 mm and 8 × 1019 cm-3, respectively. Moreover, the gradient plasma is investigated in our experiment. A proper plasma gradient can be obtained with suitable pulse energy and delay. The experimental results are useful for plasma physics and nonlinear optics. Project supported by the Development Foundation of the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2012A0401019 and 2013A0401019).

  2. Optimizing laser produced plasmas for efficient extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-08-15

    Photon sources produced by laser beams with moderate laser intensities, up to 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, are being developed for many industrial applications. The performance requirements for high volume manufacture devices necessitate extensive experimental research supported by theoretical plasma analysis and modeling predictions. We simulated laser produced plasma sources currently being developed for several applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography using 13.5% ± 1% nm bandwidth, possibly beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography using 6.× nm wavelengths, and water-window microscopy utilizing 2.48 nm (La-α) and 2.88 nm (He-α) emission. We comprehensively modeled plasma evolution from solid/liquid tin, gadolinium, and nitrogen targets as three promising materials for the above described sources, respectively. Results of our analysis for plasma characteristics during the entire course of plasma evolution showed the dependence of source conversion efficiency (CE), i.e., laser energy to photons at the desired wavelength, on plasma electron density gradient. Our results showed that utilizing laser intensities which produce hotter plasma than the optimum emission temperatures allows increasing CE for all considered sources that, however, restricted by the reabsorption processes around the main emission region and this restriction is especially actual for the 6.× nm sources.

  3. Colliding laser-produced plasmas: a new tool for nuclear astrophysics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Tudisco, S.; Bonanno, A.; Gambino, N.; Ivanovski, S.; Anzalone, A.; Gammino, S.; Miracoli, R.; Musumeci, F.

    2010-10-01

    Laser-generated plasmas, formed when a high power pulsed laser is focused onto a solid target, have been used since the 1960s. At higher power densities (>109-1010 W/cm2), such non-equilibrium plasmas expand in vacuum with supersonic velocities. Hydrodynamic simulations and experimental data show that at the beginning of the expansion the plasma temperature may reach several hundreds of eV, while the density is in the order of 1016 cm-3 or higher. Colliding laser-produced plasmas have constituted a largely unexplored and unexploited research domain until quite recent times, either for applications in materials or energy science. In this article, we propose the use of colliding laser-produced plasmas as an unique opportunity for nuclear astrophysics studies. We present a series of calculations about fusion reaction rates in laser-produced plasmas where the electron screening puzzle is taken into account. The numerical simulations have been carried out using the hydro code ZEUSMP2, while Monte Carlo codes have been used to simulate the fusion reaction rates according to the plume density and temperature evolution predicted by the simulations. We think that this type of investigation can be important in understanding the efficiency of nuclear reaction rates during the red giant phase of stellar evolution, as a significant part of the produced energy is dissipated in the low-density radiative envelope by shock waves.

  4. Properties of sintered glass-ceramics prepared from plasma vitrified air pollution control residues.

    PubMed

    Roether, J A; Daniel, D J; Rani, D Amutha; Deegan, D E; Cheeseman, C R; Boccaccini, A R

    2010-01-15

    Air pollution control (APC) residues, obtained from a major UK energy from waste (EfW) plant, processing municipal solid waste, have been blended with silica and alumina and melted using DC plasma arc technology. The glass produced was crushed, milled, uni-axially pressed and sintered at temperatures between 750 and 1150 degrees C, and the glass-ceramics formed were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mechanical properties assessed included Vickers's hardness, flexural strength, Young's modulus and thermal shock resistance. The optimum sintering temperature was found to be 950 degrees C. This produced a glass-ceramic with high density (approximately 2.58 g/cm(3)), minimum water absorption (approximately 2%) and relatively high mechanical strength (approximately 81+/-4 MPa). Thermal shock testing showed that 950 degrees C sintered samples could withstand a 700 degrees C quench in water without micro-cracking. The research demonstrates that glass-ceramics can be readily formed from DC plasma treated APC residues and that these have comparable properties to marble and porcelain. This novel approach represents a technically and commercially viable treatment option for APC residues that allow the beneficial reuse of this problematic waste. PMID:19773123

  5. An investigation of particle trajectories and melting in an air plasma sprayed zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The partially stabilized zirconia powders used to plasma spray thermal barrier coatings typically exhibit broad particle-size distributions. There are conflicting reports in the literature about the extent of injection-induced particle-sizing effects in air plasma-sprayed materials. If significant spatial separation of finer and coarser particles in the jet occurs, then one would expect it to play an important role in determining the microstructure and properties of deposits made from powders containing a wide range of particle sizes. This paper presents the results of a study in which a commercially available zirconia powder was fractionated into fine, medium, and coarse cuts and sprayed at the same torch conditions used for the ensemble powder. Diagnostic measurements of particle surface temperature, velocity, and number-density distributions in the plume for each size-cut and for the ensemble powder are reported. Deposits produced by traversing the torch back and forth to produce a raised bead were examined metallographically to study their shape and location with respect to the torch centerline and to look at their internal microstructure. The results show that, for the torch conditions used in this study, the fine, medium, and coarse size-cuts all followed the same mean trajectory. No measureable particle segregation effects were observed. Considerable differences in coatings microstructure were observed. These differences can be explained by the different particle properties measured in the plume.

  6. Propagation velocities of laser-produced plasmas from copper wire targets and water droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the plasma propagation velocities resulting from KrF laser irradiation of copper wire target (75 microns diameter) and water droplets (75 microns diameter) at irradiance levels ranging from 25 to 150 GW/sq cm. Plasma propagation velocities were measured using a streak camera system oriented orthogonally to the high-energy laser propagation axis. Plasma velocities were studied as a function of position in the focused beam. Results show that both the shape of the plasma formation and material removal from the copper wire are different and depend on whether the targets are focused or slightly defocused (approximately = 0.5 mm movement in the beam axis). Plasma formation and its position relative to the target is an important factor in determining the practical focal point during high-energy laser interaction with materials. At irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm, the air plasma has two weak-velocity components which propagate toward and away from the incident laser while a strong-velocity component propagates away from the laser beam as a detonation wave. Comparison of the measured breakdown velocities (in the range of 2.22-2.27 x 10(exp 5) m/s) for air and the value calculated by the nonlinear breakdown wave theory at irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm showed a quantitative agreement within approximately 50% while the linear theory and Gaussian pulse theory failed. The detonation wave velocities of plasma generated from water droplets and copper wire targets for different focused cases were measured and analyzed theoretically. The propagation velocities of laser-induced plasma liquid droplets obtained by previous research are compared with current work.

  7. Apparatus for recording emissions from a rapidly generated plasma from a single plasma producing event

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Tai Ho; Williams, Arthur H.

    1985-01-01

    An optical fiber-coupled detector visible streak camera plasma diagnostic apparatus. Arrays of optical fiber-coupled detectors are placed on the film plane of several types of particle, x-ray and visible spectrometers or directly in the path of the emissions to be measured and the output is imaged by a visible streak camera. Time and spatial dependence of the emission from plasmas generated from a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation or from a single particle beam burst can be recorded.

  8. Apparatus for recording emissions from a rapidly generated plasma from a single plasma producing event

    DOEpatents

    Tan, T.H.; Williams, A.H.

    An optical fiber-coupled detector visible streak camera plasma diagnostic apparatus. Arrays of optical fiber-coupled detectors are placed on the film plane of several types of particle, x-ray and visible spectrometers or directly in the path of the emissions to be measured and the output is imaged by a visible streak camera. Time and spatial dependence of the emission from plasma generated from a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation or from a single particle beam burst can be recorded.

  9. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  10. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  11. Impurity Ions in a Plasma Produced by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonesu, Akira; Komori, Akio; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism of the generation of impurity ions is experimentally evidenced in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma produced with a copper Lisitano coil. It is shown that neutral copper particles are sputtered from the Lisitano coil by argon ions and are ionized by the collisions with electrons. The argon ions are accelerated by the ion sheath formed on the Lisitano coil surface, so that the plasma space potential plays an important role in producing the impurities. The impurity flux calculated by using plasma parameters and the sputtering yield of copper is found to be consistent with the observed value. The production of a pure ECR plasma is also attempted with an aluminum Lisitano coil which has a smaller sputtering yield than that of the copper Lisitano coil.

  12. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M.

    2011-09-01

    We report a late-time ''fireworks-like'' particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma during its evolution. Plasmas were produced using graphite targets excited with 1064 nm Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser in vacuum. The time evolution of graphite plasma was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma is rapidly changing with time and the delayed firework-like emission from the graphite target followed a black-body curve. Our studies indicated that such firework-like emission is strongly depended on target material properties and explained due to material spallation caused by overheating the trapped gases through thermal diffusion along the layer structures of graphite.

  13. Experimental observation of the ion energy spectra of Al, Co, and Cu laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanol Apiñaniz, Jon; Peralta Conde, Alvaro; Martínez Perez de Mendiola, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that nanosecond laser produced plasmas (LPPs) produce high kinetic energy ions when they expand to vacuum. The acceleration process is nowadays accepted to be due to the formation of a sharp double layer (DL) in the plasma-vacuum boundary. With the purpose of studying this acceleration process, kinetic energy spectra of the plasma ions are measured for each charge state separately. Experimental results are obtained by irradiating planar targets of Cu, Co and Al at a laser wavelength of 532 nm and fluences up to 58.1 J cm-2. The obtained results show two new insights in the ion energy spectra. Firstly, they are non-maxwellian despite the widely accepted local thermal equilibrium in these type of plasmas. Secondly they show non-expected bicomponents distributions. The average energy of each species does not vary linearly with the charge state, suggesting complex acceleration processes.

  14. Measurement of Noise Produced by a Plasma Contactor Operating in Ground Based Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Steve

    1996-01-01

    Methods to measure electric field fluctuations accurately in a plasma with an active monopole antenna are described. It is shown that the conductive surfaces of the antenna must be adequately isolated from the ambient plasma and that the monopole must be sufficiently short to avoid antenna amplifier saturation. Experimental results illustrate that the noise produced by plasma contactor operation and sensed by the antenna is due to plasma phenomena and is not induced by laboratory power supplies. A good correlation is shown between the current fluctuations in the contactor electrical circuit and the noise detected by the antenna. A large body of experimental data support the conclusion that the majority of noise sensed by the antenna at frequencies less than 1 MHz is due to current fluctuations (electrostatic waves) in the plasma adjacent to the antenna and not to electromagnetic wave radiation. Caution is suggested when comparing antenna noise measurements to conventional specifications for radiated emissions.

  15. Effect of transverse magnetic field on laser produced plasma expansion into vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D.; Djebli, M.

    2011-08-15

    A one-dimensional time-dependent magneto-hydrodynamic ideal model is used to investigate the dynamics of initially magnetized laser produced plasma expansion into vacuum, in the context of inertial fusion. The plasma is assumed to be fully ionized and in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), allowing all charged particles to have the same temperatures. Self-similar solution shows that the density, velocity, and temperature increase with the strength of the magnetic field. The transverse magnetic field causes significant changes in the plasma expansion dynamics, including the plasma confinement. The plasma velocity increasing is also observed and the temperature is found to be larger compared to temperature in un-magnetized case.

  16. Fokker Planck and Krook theory of energetic electron transport in a laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Manheimer, Wallace; Colombant, Denis

    2015-09-15

    Various laser plasma instabilities, such as the two plasma decay instability and the stimulated Raman scatter instability, produce large quantities of energetic electrons. How these electrons are transported and heat the plasma are crucial questions for laser fusion. This paper works out a Fokker Planck and Krook theory for such transport and heating. The result is a set of equations, for which one can find a simple asymptotic approximation for the solution, for the Fokker Planck case, and an exact solution for the Krook case. These solutions are evaluated and compared with one another. They give rise to expressions for the spatially dependent heating of the background plasma, as a function of the instantaneous laser and plasma parameters, in either planar or spherical geometry. These formulas are simple, universal (depending weakly only on the single parameter Z, the charge state), and can be easily be incorporated into a fluid simulation.

  17. Fokker Planck and Krook theory of energetic electron transport in a laser produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, Wallace; Colombant, Denis

    2015-09-01

    Various laser plasma instabilities, such as the two plasma decay instability and the stimulated Raman scatter instability, produce large quantities of energetic electrons. How these electrons are transported and heat the plasma are crucial questions for laser fusion. This paper works out a Fokker Planck and Krook theory for such transport and heating. The result is a set of equations, for which one can find a simple asymptotic approximation for the solution, for the Fokker Planck case, and an exact solution for the Krook case. These solutions are evaluated and compared with one another. They give rise to expressions for the spatially dependent heating of the background plasma, as a function of the instantaneous laser and plasma parameters, in either planar or spherical geometry. These formulas are simple, universal (depending weakly only on the single parameter Z, the charge state), and can be easily be incorporated into a fluid simulation.

  18. External magnetic field influence on properties of high-power laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołowski, J.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.

    1996-03-01

    The paper presents results of formation of expanding plasma by combining laser-produced plasma with an external strong magnetic field. The plasma was generated by means of a Nd-glass laser which was focused on a solid target located on the axis of a single-turn coil providing magnetic field of up to 50 T. Spatial characteristics of the dynamics of interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field were registered by means of a three-frame interferometry. For registration and analysis of interferograms, CCD cameras and a multichannel image acquisition system were used. An interesting influence of the strong magnetic field on the plasma dynamics and shape was observed. Preliminary results of numerical modelling are compared with the experimental data.

  19. Plasma flame for mass purification of contaminated air with chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Shin, Dong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2006-09-18

    An elimination of airborne simulated chemical and biological warfare agents was carried out by making use of a plasma flame made of atmospheric plasma and a fuel-burning flame, which can purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces such as buildings, public transportation systems, and military vehicles. The plasma flame generator consists of a microwave plasma torch connected in series to a fuel injector and a reaction chamber. For example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22 cm diameter and 30 cm length, purifies an airflow rate of 5000 lpm contaminated with toluene (the simulated chemical agent) and soot from a diesel engine (the simulated aerosol for biological agents). Large volumes of purification by the plasma flame will free mankind from the threat of airborne warfare agents. The plasma flame may also effectively purify air that is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, in addition to eliminating soot from diesel engines as an environmental application.

  20. Plasma flame for mass purification of contaminated air with chemical and biological warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Shin, Dong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2006-09-01

    An elimination of airborne simulated chemical and biological warfare agents was carried out by making use of a plasma flame made of atmospheric plasma and a fuel-burning flame, which can purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces such as buildings, public transportation systems, and military vehicles. The plasma flame generator consists of a microwave plasma torch connected in series to a fuel injector and a reaction chamber. For example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22cm diameter and 30cm length, purifies an airflow rate of 5000lpm contaminated with toluene (the simulated chemical agent) and soot from a diesel engine (the simulated aerosol for biological agents). Large volumes of purification by the plasma flame will free mankind from the threat of airborne warfare agents. The plasma flame may also effectively purify air that is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, in addition to eliminating soot from diesel engines as an environmental application.

  1. Sputter-produced plasma as a measure of satellite surface composition - The Cassini mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the co-orbiting neutral cloud or the plasma produced by sputtering of the icy Saturnian satellites can be used to determine the relative abundance of a minority surface species which would be difficult to determine from reflectance spectra. This is due to the fact that the sputter source rates, hence the plasma supply rates, are directly proportional to the bulk concentrations of mixed solids or clathrates, although the surface grains may be depleted in the most volatile species.

  2. Plasma waves produced by the xenon ion beam experiment on the Porcupine sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Kelley, M.

    1982-01-01

    The production of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves by a perpendicular ion beam in the F-region ionosphere is described. The ion beam experiment was part of the Porcupine program and produced electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves just above harmonics of the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. The plasma process may be thought of as a magnetized background ionosphere through which an unmagnetized beam is flowing. The dispersion equation for this hypothesis is constructed and solved. Preliminary solutions agree well with the observed plasma waves.

  3. Short-pulse laser-produced plasma from C60 molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wuelker, Cornelius; Theobald, Wolfgang; Ouw, Donald; Schaefer, Fritz P.; Chichkov, Boris N.

    1995-05-01

    The first experimental observations of a plasma produced in a vapor of C60 molecules with a high-intensity subpicosecond KrF laser (6x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) are reported. It differs from a plasma created in an ordinary carbon preplasma by reaching much higher ionization stages under the same experimental conditions. This remarkable property of C60 molecules (and other clusters) opens new prospects for short-pulse driven X-ray lasers.

  4. Laboratory spectroscopic diagnostics of TLE-like air plasmas: methods to derive the rotational (gas) temperature in TLEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F.; Parra-Rojas, F.; Passas, M.; Carrasco, E.; Luque, A.; Tanarro, I.; Simek, M.

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory low pressure (0.1 mbar < p < 2 mbar) glow air discharges have been studies by optical emission spectroscopy to illustrate several spectroscopic techniques that, depending on the available spectral resolution, could be implemented by different field spectrographs to experimentally quantify the gas temperature associated with Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) occurring at different altitudes including blue jets, giant blue jets and sprites. The laboratory air plasmas investigated have been analysed from the near UV (300 nm) to the near IR (1060 nm) with high (up to 0.01 nm) and low (2 nm) spectral resolution commercial grating spectrographs and by an in-house developed intensified CCD grating spectrograph that we have recently developed in our group at IAA - CSIC for TLE spectral diagnostic surveys with 0.45 nm spectral resolution. We discuss the results of laboratory tests and comment on the convenience of using one or another technique for rotational (gas) temperature determination during TLE spectroscopic campaigns. Finally, we will also show a comparison of the vibrational distribution function (VDF) of N2(B) obtained from (a) experiments in low pressure laboratory air plasmas produced in conditions similar to TLEs, (b) spectroscopic emissions from real TLE air plasmas and (c) compute from kinetic modeling.

  5. Generation of High-Density Electrons Based on Plasma Grating Induced Bragg Diffraction in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Liping; Li Wenxue; Wang Yongdong; Lu Xin; Ding Liang'en; Zeng Heping

    2011-08-26

    Efficient nonlinear Bragg diffraction was observed as an intense infrared femtosecond pulse was focused on a plasma grating induced by interference between two ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulses in air. The preformed electrons inside the plasma grating were accelerated by subsequent intense infrared laser pulses, inducing further collisional ionization and significantly enhancing the local electron density.

  6. Broadband field-resolved terahertz detection via laser induced air plasma with controlled optical bias.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Yeh; Seletskiy, Denis V; Yang, Zhou; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2015-05-01

    We report a robust method of coherent detection of broadband THz pulses using terahertz induced second-harmonic (TISH) generation in a laser induced air plasma together with a controlled second harmonic optical bias. We discuss a role of the bias field and its phase in the process of coherent detection. Phase-matching considerations subject to plasma dispersion are also examined. PMID:25969238

  7. On the atomic state densities of plasmas produced by the ``torche à injection axiale''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkers, J.; Vos, H. P. C.; van der Mullen, J. A. M.; Timmermans, E. A. H.

    1996-04-01

    The atomic state densities of helium and argon plasmas produced by the microwave driven plasma torch called the "torche à injection axiale" are presented. They are obtained by absolute line intensity measurements of the excited states and by applying the ideal gas law to the ground state. It will be shown that the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) does not obey the Saha-Boltzmann law: the ASDF cannot be described by one temperature. From the shape of the ASDF it can be concluded that the plasma is ionising. By extrapolating the measured state densities towards the ionisation limit, a minimum value of the electron density can be determined.

  8. Balmer-beta line asymmetry characteristics in a high pressure, microwave-produced argon plasma.

    PubMed

    Palomares, J M; Torres, J; Gigosos, M A; van der Mullen, J J A M; Gamero, A; Sola, A

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a study on the asymmetry of the Balmer H(beta) profile in plasmas produced by microwaves at high pressure with the help of some functions of asymmetry for the whole profile, as well as by means of some specific parameters characterizing only its central dip. The study shows how this asymmetry--very low in our case--depends on the electron density and flux of gases and how the existence of inhomogeneities in the plasma can affect the shape and symmetry of this line. Also, limitations on the determination of the asymmetry are pointed out and the use of this profile for plasma diagnosis is discussed. PMID:19891830

  9. Silicon surface periodic structures produced by plasma flow induced capillary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcinovic, I. P.; Kuraica, M. M.; Obradovic, B. M.; Puric, J.

    2006-08-14

    Silicon single crystal surface modification by the action of nitrogen quasistationary compression plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor is studied. It has been found that highly oriented silicon periodic cylindrical shape structures are produced during a single pulse surface treatment. The periodical structure formation can be related to the driven capillary waves quenched during fast cooling and resolidification phase of the plasma flow interaction with silicon surface. These waves are induced on the liquid silicon surface due to the compression plasma flow intrinsic oscillations.

  10. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  11. Simple method of improving harvest by nonthermal air plasma irradiation of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kazunori; Thapanut, Sarinont; Amano, Takaaki; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the effects of air nonthermal plasma irradiation of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) on their growth from the beginning of cultivation to their harvest. Three minute plasma irradiation of dry seeds resulted in growth acceleration in all the growth stages. Compared with the control, the plasma irradiation led to an 11% shorter harvest period, a 56% increase in total seed weight, a 12% increase in each seed weight, and a 39% increase in seed number.

  12. On the different regimes of gas heating in air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of the gas temperature in air (N2-20%O2) plasma discharges are presented for different values of the reduced electric field, E/N g, electron density n e, pressure and tube radius. This study is based on the solutions to the time-dependent gas thermal balance in a cylindrical geometry coupled to the electron, vibrational and chemical kinetics, for E/{{N}\\text{g}}=50 and 100 Td (1 Td = 10-17 V cm2), 109  ⩽  n e  ⩽  1011 cm-3, pressure in the range 1-20 Torr, and also considering different tube radius, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 cm. The competing role of different gas heating mechanisms is discussed in detail within the time range 0.01-100 ms. For times below 1 ms, gas heating occurs from O2 dissociation by electron impact through pre-dissociative excited states, e + O2  →  e + \\text{O}2*   →  e + 2O(3P) and …  →  e + O(3P) + O(1D), as well as through the quenching of N2 electronically excited states by O2. For longer times, simulation results show that gas heating comes from processes N(4S) + NO(X)  →  N2(X, v ~ 3) + O, N2(A) + O  →  NO(X) + N(2D), V-T N2-O collisions and the recombination of oxygen atoms at the wall. Depending on the given E/N g and n e values, each one of these processes can be an important gas-heating channel. The contribution of V-T N2-O exchanges to gas heating is important in the analysis of the gas temperature for different pressures and values of the tube radius. A global picture of these effects is given by the study of the fraction of the discharge power spent on gas heating, which is always ~15%. The values for the fractional power transferred to gas heating from vibrational and electronic excitation are also presented and discussed.

  13. Understanding Potential Air Emissions from a Cellulosic Biorefinery Producing Renewable Diesel Blendstock.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yimin; Heath, Garvin A.; Renzaglia, Jason; Thomas, Mae

    2015-06-22

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, through the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), mandates increased use of biofuels, including cellulosic biofuels. The RFS is expected to spur the development of advanced biofuel technologies (e.g., new and innovative biofuel conversion pathways) as well as the construction of biorefineries (refineries that produce biofuels) using these technologies. To develop sustainable cellulosic biofuels, one of the goals of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy is to minimize air pollutants from the entire biofuel supply chain, as stated in their 2014 Multi-Year Program Plan (2014). Although biofuels in general have been found to have lower life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum fuels on an energy basis, biomass feedstock production, harvesting, transportation, processing and conversion are expected to emit a wide range of other air pollutants (e.g., criteria air pollutants, hazardous air pollutants), which could affect the environmental benefits of biofuels when displacing petroleum fuels. While it is important for policy makers, air quality planners and regulators, biofuel developers, and investors to understand the potential implications on air quality from a growing biofuel industry, there is a general lack of information and knowledge about the type, fate and magnitude of potential air pollutant emissions from the production of cellulosic biofuels due to the nascent stage of this emerging industry. This analysis assesses potential air pollutant emissions from a hypothetical biorefinery, selected by BETO for further research and development, which uses a biological conversion process of sugars to hydrocarbons to produce infrastructural-compatible renewable diesel blendstock from cellulosic biomass.

  14. Experimental discovery of charge-exchange-caused dips in spectral lines from laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Leboucher-Dalimier, E; Oks, E; Dufour, E; Sauvan, P; Angelo, P; Schott, R; Poquerusse, A

    2001-12-01

    We report the first experimental observation of charge-exchange-caused dips (also called x dips) in spectral lines of multicharged ions in laser-produced plasmas. Specifically, in the process of a laser irradiation of targets made out of aluminum carbide, we observed two x dips in the Ly(gamma) line of Al XIII perturbed by fully stripped carbon. From the practical point of view, this opens up a way to experimentally produce not-yet-available fundamental data on charge exchange between multicharged ions, virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. From the theoretical viewpoint, the results are important because the x dips are the only one signature of charge exchange in profiles of spectral lines emitted by plasmas and they are the only one quasimolecular phenomenon that could be observed at relatively "low" densities of laser-produced plasmas. PMID:11736229

  15. Numerical Investigation of Radiative Heat Transfer in Laser Induced Air Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Y. S.; Wang, T. S.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is one of the most important phenomena in the laser induced plasmas. This study is intended to develop accurate and efficient methods for predicting laser radiation absorption and plasma radiative heat transfer, and investigate the plasma radiation effects in laser propelled vehicles. To model laser radiation absorption, a ray tracing method along with the Beer's law is adopted. To solve the radiative transfer equation in the air plasmas, the discrete transfer method (DTM) is selected and explained. The air plasma radiative properties are predicted by the LORAN code. To validate the present nonequilibrium radiation model, several benchmark problems are examined and the present results are found to match the available solutions. To investigate the effects of plasma radiation in laser propelled vehicles, the present radiation code is coupled into a plasma aerodynamics code and a selected problem is considered. Comparisons of results at different cases show that plasma radiation plays a role of cooling plasma and it lowers the plasma temperature by about 10%. This change in temperature also results in a reduction of the coupling coefficient by about 10-20%. The present study indicates that plasma radiation modeling is very important for accurate modeling of aerodynamics in a laser propelled vehicle.

  16. OH(A,X) radicals in microwave plasma-assisted combustion of methane/air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Fuh, Che; Wang, Chuji; Laser Spectroscopy and Plasma Team

    2014-10-01

    A novel microwave plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) system, which consists of a microwave plasma-assisted combustor, a gas flow control manifold, and a set of optical diagnostic systems, was developed as a new test platform to study plasma enhancement of combustion. Using this system, we studied the state-resolved OH(A,X) radicals in the plasma-assisted combustion and ignition of a methane/air mixture. Experimental results identified three reaction zones in the plasma-assisted combustor: the plasma zone, the hybrid plasma-flame zone, and the flame zone. The OH(A) radicals in the three distinct zones were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Results showed a surge of OH(A) radicals in the hybrid zone compared to the plasma zone and the flame zone. The OH(X) radicals in the flame zone were measured using cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), and the absolute number density distribution of OH(X) was quantified in two-dimension. The effect of microwave argon plasma on combustion was studied with two different fuel/oxidizer injection patterns, namely the premixed methane/air injection and the nonpremixed (separate) methane/air injection. Parameters investigated included the flame geometry, the lean flammability limit, the emission spectra, and rotational temperature. State-resolved OH(A,X) radicals in the PAC of both injection patterns were also compared. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation through the Grant No. CBET-1066486.

  17. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Augustoni, A.L.; Gerardo, J.B.; Raymond, T.D.

    1992-12-29

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography is disclosed. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser. 8 figs.

  18. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Augustoni, Arnold L.; Gerardo, James B.; Raymond, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser.

  19. Proton imaging of an electrostatic field structure formed in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, T.; Kugland, N. L.; Wan, W.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Fiuza, F.; Gregori, G.; Huntington, C.; Ishikawa, T.; Koenig, M.; Kuranz, C.; Levy, M. C.; Martinez, D.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Pelka, A.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.; Quirós, N.; Remington, B. A.; Reville, B.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Steele, L.; Takabe, H.; Yamaura, Y.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.

    2016-03-01

    We report the measurements of electrostatic field structures associated with an electrostatic shock formed in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas with proton imaging. The thickness of the electrostatic structure is estimated from proton images with different proton kinetic energies from 4.7 MeV to 10.7 MeV. The width of the transition region is characterized by electron scale length in the laser-produced plasma, suggesting that the field structure is formed due to a collisionless electrostatic shock.

  20. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  1. Plasma test on industrial diamond powder in hydrogen and air for fracture strength study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Rohit Asuri Sudharshana

    Diamonds are the most precious material all over the world. Ever since their discovery, the desire for natural diamonds has been great; recently, the demand has steeply increased, leading to scarcity. For example, in 2010, diamonds worth $50 billion were marketed. This increased demand has led to discovering alternative sources to replace diamonds. The diamond, being the hardest material on earth, could be replaced with no other material except another diamond. Thus, the industrial or synthetic diamond was invented. Because of extreme hardness is one of diamond's properties, diamonds are used in cutting operations. The fracture strength of diamond is one of the crucial factors that determine its life time as a cutting tool. Glow discharge is one of the techniques used for plasma formation. The glow discharge process is conducted in a vacuum chamber by ionizing gas atoms. Ions penetrate into the atomic structure, ejecting a secondary electron. The objective of this study is to determine the change in fracture strength of industrial diamond powder before and after plasma treatment. This study focuses mainly on the change in crystal defects and crushing strength (CS) of industrial diamond powder after the penetration of hydrogen gas, air and hydrogen-air mixture ions into the sample powder. For this study, an industrial diamond powder sample of 100 carats weight, along with its average fracture strength value was received from Engis Corporation, Illinois. The sample was divided into parts, each weighing 10-12 carats. At the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), a plasma test was conducted on six sample parts for a total of 16 hours on each part. The three gas types mentioned above were used during plasma tests, with the pressure in vacuum chamber between 200 mTorr and 2 Torr. The plasma test on four sample parts was in the presence of hydrogen-air mixture. The first sample had chamber pressures between 200 mTorr and 400 mTorr. The remaining three samples had chamber

  2. Measurements of Electron Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2013-10-01

    Knowing spatial profiles of electron density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (n plasma is essential to understanding LPI initiation in inertial confinement fusion research. In the recent Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) was deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. Plasmas were produced from flat CH targets illuminated by Nike KrF laser with total energies up to 1 kJ of 0.5 ~ 1 nsec FWHM pulses. The GIR resolved ne up to 3 ×1021 /cm3 in space taking 2D snapshot images of probe laser (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. The individual beamlet transmittances were also measured for Te estimation. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera simultaneously detected light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay instabilities. The measured spatial profiles are compared with simulation results from the FAST3D radiation hydrocode and their effects on the LPI observations are investigated. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  3. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  4. Dynamics of neutrals and ions in an ultrafast laser produced Zn plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Rao, Kavya H.; Philip, Reji

    2015-03-15

    Optical time of flight dynamics of neutrals and ions in an ultrafast laser produced zinc plasma generated by irradiating a solid zinc target using 100 fs laser pulses is investigated. An acceleration of ions is observed which arises from internal Coulomb forces acting between charged species in the plasma. Some of the fast ions recombine with electrons in the plasma and generate fast neutrals. Plasma plume imaging performed at various ambient pressures indicates adiabatic expansion at lower pressures and plume front deceleration at higher pressures: at lower pressures the plume front-time (R-t) plot displays a linear expansion, shock wave model fits to the data at 5 Torr and at higher pressures the data fits better to the drag model. Furthermore, around an intermediate pressure of 10 Torr, the R-t plot fits to the shock wave model at earlier stages of plasma expansion, while it fits to the drag model at the later stages. These investigations provide relevant information on the acceleration of ions and neutrals in an expanding zinc plasma plume produced by ultrafast laser pulses.

  5. [Preliminary study of atomic emission spectrometry of Ti (H) plasma produced by vacuum arc ion source].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-Feng; Wu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Fu; Lu, Biao; Wen, Zhong-Wei

    2014-03-01

    In order to study the discharge process of vacuum arc ion source, make a detail description of the discharge plasma, and lay the foundation for further research on ion source, atomic emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the parameters of plasma produced by vaccum arc ion source. In the present paper, two kinds of analysis method for the emission spectra data collected by a spectrometer were developed. Those were based in the stark broadening of spectral lines and Saba-Boltzmann equation. Using those two methods, the electron temperature, electron number density and the ion temperature of the plasma can be determined. The emission spectroscopy data used in this paper was collected from the plasma produced by a vacuum are ion source whose cathode was made by Ti material (which adsorbed hydrogen during storage procedure). Both of the two methods were used to diagnose the plasma parameters and judge the thermal motion state of the plasma. Otherwise, the validity of the diagnostic results by the two methods were analyzed and compared. In addition, the affection from laboratory background radiation during the spectral acquisition process was discussed. PMID:25208416

  6. Studies on Trapping of Laser-Produced Plasma by SL-1 Surmac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoshi, Sumio; Asano, Hiroshi; Kisaka, Masashi; Sekiguchi, Tadashi

    1983-01-01

    A beryllium plasma was produced in a small “Surmac” container (named SL-1 Surmac), by utilizing a neodymium-glass laser of ˜5J and ˜35ns (FWHM). The dependence of the initial particle loss due to the plasma effusion across the container field on the magnetic field strength of the Surmac was observed, and it was found that the effusion decreases drastically above a certain threshold value of the magnetic field. At stronger field, the total amount of plasma particles trapped by the container attains its maximum about 20 μs after the laser shot and it is 25 to 37 percent of that initially produced by the laser pulse. The plasma parameters obtained are as follows: average electron density 3× 1012 cm-3, electron temperature ˜ 10 eV and maximum plasma-beta value at outer “bridge” position, three percent. The plasma particle confinement time is about 44 μs, it exhibits a very weak dependence on the magnetic field and agrees approximately with that calculated from the particle loss to the mechanical supports for the internal current conductors and the beryllium target alone.

  7. Laser-rf creation and diagnostics of seeded atmospheric pressure air and nitrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Siqi; Denning, C. Mark; Scharer, John E.

    2008-07-01

    A laser initiation and radio frequency (rf) sustainment technique has been developed and improved from our previous work to create and sustain large-volume, high-pressure air and nitrogen plasmas. This technique utilizes a laser-initiated, 15 mTorr partial pressure tetrakis (dimethylamino) ethylene seed plasma with a 75 Torr background gas pressure to achieve high-pressure air/nitrogen plasma breakdown and reduce the rf power requirement needed to sustain the plasma. Upon the laser plasma initiation, the chamber pressure is raised to 760 Torr in 0.5 s through a pulsed gas valve, and the end of the chamber is subsequently opened to the ambient air. The atmospheric-pressure plasma is then maintained with the 13.56 MHz rf power. Using this technique, large-volume (1000 cm{sup 3}), high electron density (on the order of 10{sup 11-12} cm{sup -3}), 760 Torr air and nitrogen plasmas have been created while rf power reflection is minimized during the entire plasma pulse utilizing a dynamic matching method. This plasma can project far away from the antenna region (30 cm), and the rf power budget is 5 W/cm{sup 3}. Temporal evolution of the plasma electron density and total electron-neutral collision frequency during the pulsed plasma is diagnosed using millimeter wave interferometry. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) aided by SPECAIR, a special OES simulation program for air-constituent plasmas, is used to analyze the radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma. Rotational and vibrational temperatures of 4400-4600{+-}100 K are obtained from the emission spectra from the N{sub 2}(2+) and N{sub 2}{sup +}(1-) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results. Based on the relation between the electron collision frequency and the neutral density, utilizing millimeter wave interferometry, the electron temperature of the 760 Torr nitrogen plasma is found to be 8700{+-}100 K (0.75{+-}0.1 eV). Therefore, the plasma

  8. Spatio-temporal evolution of uranium emission in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; LaHaye, N. L.; Phillips, M. C.

    2015-09-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy provides much impetus as a nuclear forensics tool because of its capability of standoff detection and real-time analysis. However, special nuclear materials like U, Pu, etc. provide very crowded spectra and, when combined with shifts and broadening of spectral lines caused by ambient atmospheric operation, generate a complex plasma spectroscopy system. We explored the spatio-temporal evolution of excited U species in a laser ablation plume under various ambient pressure conditions. Plasmas were generated using 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser on a U containing glass matrix target. The role of air ambient pressure on U line intensities, signal-to-background ratios, and linewidths were investigated. Spatially and temporally resolved optical time-of-flight emission spectroscopy of excited uranium atoms were used for studying the expansion hydrodynamics and the persistence of U species in the plume. Our results showed that U emission linewidths increased with pressure due to increased Stark broadening; however, the broadening was less than that for Ca. A comparison with U emission features in the presence of an inert gas showed the persistence of U species in plasmas in ambient air is significantly reduced; this could be due to oxide and other reactive species formation.

  9. A Novel Technique to Treat Air Leak Following Lobectomy: Intrapleural Infusion of Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinou, Froso; Potaris, Konstantinos; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.; Tsipas, Panteleimon; Karagkiouzis, Grigorios; Konstantinou, Marios

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent air leak following pulmonary lobectomy can be very difficult to treat and results in prolonged hospitalization. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a new method of postoperative air leak management using intrapleurally infused fresh frozen plasma via the chest tube. Material/Methods Between June 2008 and June 2014, we retrospectively reviewed 98 consecutive patients who underwent lobectomy for lung cancer and postoperatively developed persistent air leak treated with intrapleural instillation of fresh frozen plasma. Results The study identified 89 men and 9 women, with a median age of 65.5 years (range 48–77 years), with persistent postoperative air leak. Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma was successful in stopping air leaks in 90 patients (92%) within 24 hours, and in 96 patients (98%) within 48 hours, following resumption of the procedure. In the remaining 2, air leak ceased at 14 and 19 days. Conclusions Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma is a safe, inexpensive, and remarkably effective method for treatment of persistent air leak following lobectomy for lung cancer. PMID:27079644

  10. Simulated experiment for elimination of air contaminated with odorous chemical agents by microwave plasma burner

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Shin, Dong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-10-15

    An experimental study on elimination of odorous chemical agent was carried out by making use of a microwave plasma burner, which consists of a microwave plasma torch and a reaction chamber with a fuel injector. Injection of hydrocarbon fuels into a high-temperature microwave torch plasma generates a plasma flame. The plasma flame can eliminate the odorous chemical agent diluted in air or purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces. The specially designed reaction chamber eliminated H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} diluted in airflow rate of 5000 lpm (liters per minute), showing {beta} values of 46.52 and 39.69 J/l, respectively.

  11. Extreme-ultraviolet radiation transport in small scale length laser-produced tin plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequoia, Kevin Lamar Williams

    The majority of the studies on laser-produced plasmas as an efficient extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light source have focused on relatively large plasmas produced at large laser facilities. However, to develop a commercially viable light source for EUV lithography, much smaller lasers and hence much smaller plasmas must be employed. Smaller plasmas behave quite differently than large plasmas in that the temperature and density are less uniform, and lateral expansion is more important. These differences affect the energy transport and, in particular, the radiation transport. This work studies the EUV radiation transport in small scale length tin plasmas, focusing on the effects of target geometry and laser pulse duration. Both planar and spherical tin targets were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 microm. Conversion efficiency of laser light to 13.5 nm radiation (in-band), EUV emission spectrum, two-dimensional in-band emission profile, and the plasma electron density were measured experimentally. These measurements provide insight into where the laser is absorbed, where the in-band emission is produced, and how the radiation is transmitted. The plasma evolution in these experiments were simulated with a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code, while the radiation transport and atomic kinetics where modeled with a collisional radiative code. Additional experiments were conducted using planar targets where the pulse duration was varied from 0.5 ns to 16 ns to understand the effects of laser pulse duration. It was found that the optimum plasma temperature for efficient generation and transmission of in-band emission is 20 eV. This is lower than the previously reported optimum temperature of 30 eV. The use of a 1.064 microm heating laser results in overheating of the plasma in a region that is much too dense to transmit the in-band emission. This overheating is necessary for the plasma to reach the optimum temperature in the region where the density is

  12. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Xinbing; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui; Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-05-01

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer-Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  13. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-04-15

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β ∼ 10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  14. On the highly directional expansion of laser-produced plasmas. [metallic targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Burkhalter, P. G.; Finn, T.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    The expansion of plasmas produced by focusing a CO2 laser pulse onto solid planar targets is discussed. The plasmas are studied using an extreme-ultraviolet spectroheliograph. With titanium and iron targets the plasma blow-off observed in transitions within highly ionized species (e.g., Fe XVI) occurs parallel to the target normal. The plasma is tightly confined to narrow cylindrical structures about 0.7 mm in diameter and is observed as far as 1 cm from the target surface. The electron density is about 2.8 by 10 to the 18th power per cu cm at a distance of 0.7 mm from the target surface and decreases to approximately 6.5 by 10 to the 17th power per cu cm at a distance of 2.9 mm from the surface.

  15. Apoptotic effects on cultured cells of atmospheric-pressure plasma produced using various gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominami, Kanako; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kudo, Tada-aki; Sasaki, Shota; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma on various cells such as rat fibroblastic Rat-1 cell line, rat neuroblastoma-like PC12 cell line, and rat macrophage-like NR8383 cell line. The plasma was irradiated directly to a culture medium containing plated cells for 0-20 s. The applied voltage, excitation frequency, and argon or helium gas flow were, respectively, 3-6 kV, 10 kHz, and 3 L/min. Cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated using annexin-V/propidium iodide staining. Results showed that the low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation promoted cell death in a discharge-voltage-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. Furthermore, different effects are produced depending on the cell type. Moreover, entirely different mechanisms might be responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cells by helium and argon plasma.

  16. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui; Wang, Xinbing Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-05-21

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer–Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry

    SciTech Connect

    Craxton, R.S.; Turner, F.S.; Hoefen, R. ); Darrow, C. ); Gabl, E.F.; Busch, G.E. )

    1993-12-01

    Grid image refractometry (GIR) is proposed as a technique for determining the two-dimensional density profiles of long scale-length laser-produced plasmas. Its distinctive feature is that an optical probe beam is broken up into rays'' by being passed through a grid before traversing the plasma. The refraction angles of the rays are measured by imaging the plasma at two or more object planes and are integrated to yield the phase front. For cylindrically symmetric plasmas the density profile is then determined using Abel inversion. The feasibility of GIR is illustrated by an experiment in which a thick CH target was irradiated with [similar to]100 J of 527 nm radiation and diagnosed with a 20 ps, 263 nm probe. The resulting density profile is substantially larger than any that have previously been reported using interferometry and compares quite closely with hydrodynamic simulations.

  18. Characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craxton, R. S.; Turner, F. S.; Hoefen, R.; Darrow, C.; Gabl, E. F.; Busch, Gar. E.

    1993-12-01

    Grid image refractometry (GIR) is proposed as a technique for determining the two-dimensional density profiles of long scale-length laser-produced plasmas. Its distinctive feature is that an optical probe beam is broken up into ``rays'' by being passed through a grid before traversing the plasma. The refraction angles of the rays are measured by imaging the plasma at two or more object planes and are integrated to yield the phase front. For cylindrically symmetric plasmas the density profile is then determined using Abel inversion. The feasibility of GIR is illustrated by an experiment in which a thick CH target was irradiated with ˜100 J of 527 nm radiation and diagnosed with a 20 ps, 263 nm probe. The resulting density profile is substantially larger than any that have previously been reported using interferometry and compares quite closely with hydrodynamic simulations.

  19. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  20. Four-color laser diagnostics for Z-pinch and laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Anderson, A A; Begishev, I A

    2016-01-20

    Four-color laser diagnostics were developed for Z-pinch and laser plasma at the 1 MA pulsed power generator. Four harmonics of the Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 266, and 213 nm were produced during the cascade conversion in three nonlinear crystals and propagated together in one beampath. Deep UV probing allows better penetration of the dense plasma. Laser probing at four wavelengths allows observation of plasma in a wide range of densities in one shot of the diagnostic laser. Examples of four-color laser shadowgraphy and interferometry of the wire-array load and laser plasma interaction are presented and discussed. PMID:26835923

  1. Atmospheric cold plasma inactivation of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Ziuzina, D; Patil, S; Cullen, P J; Keener, K M; Bourke, P

    2014-09-01

    Atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) represents a potential alternative to traditional methods for non-thermal decontamination of foods. In this study, the antimicrobial efficacy of a novel dielectric barrier discharge ACP device against Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on cherry tomatoes and strawberries, was examined. Bacteria were spot inoculated on the produce surface, air dried and sealed inside a rigid polypropylene container. Samples were indirectly exposed (i.e. placed outside plasma discharge) to a high voltage (70 kVRMS) air ACP and subsequently stored at room temperature for 24 h. ACP treatment for 10, 60 and 120 s resulted in reduction of Salmonella, E. coli and L. monocytogenes populations on tomato to undetectable levels from initial populations of 3.1, 6.3, and 6.7 log10 CFU/sample, respectively. However, an extended ACP treatment time was necessary to reduce bacterial populations attached on the more complex surface of strawberries. Treatment time for 300 s resulted in reduction of E. coli, Salmonella and L. monocytogenes populations by 3.5, 3.8 and 4.2 log10 CFU/sample, respectively, and also effectively reduced the background microflora of tomatoes. PMID:24929725

  2. Shock formation in supersonic cluster jets and its effect on axially modulated laser-produced plasma waveguides.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S J; Goers, A J; Hine, G A; Magill, J D; Elle, J A; Chen, Y-H; Milchberg, H M

    2013-07-01

    We examine the generation of axially modulated plasmas produced from cluster jets whose supersonic flow is intersected by thin wires. Such plasmas have application to modulated plasma waveguides. By appropriately limiting shock waves from the wires, plasma axial modulation periods can be as small as 70 μm, with plasma structures as narrow as 45 µm. The effect of shocks is eliminated with increased cluster size accompanied by a reduced monomer component of the flow. PMID:23842374

  3. XUV spectral analysis of ns- and ps-laser produced platinum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-12-01

    XUV spectra of ns- and ps-laser produced platinum (Pt) plasmas in the 1-7 nm wavelength region, where Δn = 1 n = 4-5 and Δn = 0 n = 4-4 transitions dominate the observed emission, were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Ab initio calculations using the Hartree-Fock with configuration interaction (HFCI) Cowan suite of codes and the unresolved transition array (UTA) formalism, as well as consideration of previous predictions of isoelectronic trends, together with spectra obtained under different laser power densities are all employed to identify lines and a number of new features in spectra from Pt XX to Pt XLII. The possible reasons for the main differences between the ns- and ps-laser plasmas spectra are also demonstrated. This work extends previous analyses of the XUV spectra of laser produced gold, tungsten, tantalum, hafnium and rhenium plasmas in the 1-7 nm wavelength range.

  4. Numerical simulation of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser produced plasma jets using MAG code

    SciTech Connect

    Diyankov, O. V.; Glazyrin, I. V.; Koshelev, S. V.; Lykov, V. A.

    1997-04-15

    The results of numerical simulation of spontaneous magnetic field generation and influence of this field on laser produced plasma jet expansion in vacuum and low density gas are presented. The numerical simulation has been carried out using MAG code for the case of aluminum plate of 5 {mu}m of thickness irradiated by Nd laser. The laser pulse duration was 0.5 nsec at half-width, laser irradiation intensity was up to 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} and laser focal spot diameter was about 100 {mu}m. According to the received results, the magnetic field amplitude achieves the value of 150 kGs. This fact has no considerable influence on the temperature maximum in laser produced plasma, but significantly affects the process of the energy transport from plasma jet to low density gas.

  5. Plasma density inside a femtosecond laser filament in air: strong dependence on external focusing.

    PubMed

    Théberge, Francis; Liu, Weiwei; Simard, Patrick Tr; Becker, Andreas; Chin, See Leang

    2006-09-01

    Our experiment shows that external focusing strongly influences the plasma density and the diameter of femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser filaments generated in air. The control of plasma filament parameters is suitable for many applications such as remote spectroscopy, laser induced electrical discharge, and femtosecond laser material interactions. The measurements of the filament showed the plasma density increases from 10(15)cm(-3) to 2 x 10(18)cm(-3) when the focal length decreases from 380 cm to 10 cm while the diameter of the plasma column varies from 30 microm to 90 microm. The experimental results are in good qualitative agreement with the results of numerical simulations. PMID:17025753

  6. Fast tomographic measurements of temperature in an air plasma cutting torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlína, J.; Šonský, J.; Gruber, J.; Cressault, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Temperatures in an air plasma jet were measured using a tomographic experimental arrangement providing time-resolved scans of plasma optical radiation in the spectral band 559-601 nm from two directions. The acquired data and subsequent processing yielded time-resolved temperature distributions in measurement planes perpendicular to the plasma jet axis with a temporal resolution of 1 μs. The measurement system and evaluation methods afforded detailed information about the influence of high-frequency ripple modulation of the arc current on plasma temperature.

  7. An in situ and downstream study of non-thermal plasma chemistry in an air fed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abduly, Abdullah; Christensen, Paul

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports a spectroscopic study of non-thermal plasma chemistry in an air-fed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet. In situ analysis (i.e. the analysis of the plasma glow) and downstream analysis were carried out to identify and monitor species produced in the plasma as they propagate from the plasma glow to downstream regions. The analyses were carried out using Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) and UV-Vis spectroscopies. The species: O3, N2O5, N2O, HNO3, CO2, CO and, for the first time, a vibrationally excited form of CO2 (i.e. \\text{CO}2* (v)) were identified in the plasma glow, while O3, N2O5, HNO3 and N2O were detected in the downstream exhaust. The behaviour of these species was monitored as a function of a range of experimental conditions including: input power, gas flow rate, relative humidity, gas temperature and feed gas composition. In addition, the uncertainty associated with UV-vis detection of ozone in the presence of N2O5 and/or HNO3 as interfering species was determined.

  8. Measuring the electron density, temperature, and electronegativity in electron beam-generated plasmas produced in argon/SF6 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, D. R.; Fernsler, R. F.; Walton, S. G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents measurements of electron density (ne0), electron temperature (Te), and electronegativity (α) in electron beam-generated plasmas produced in mixtures of argon and SF6 using Langmuir probes and plasma resonance spectroscopy. Langmuir probe measurements are analyzed using a model capable of handling multi-component plasmas with both positive and negative ions. Verification of the model is provided through plasma frequency resonance measurements of ne0. The results suggest a simple approach to ascertaining α in negative-ion-containing plasmas using Langmuir probes alone. In addition, modest amounts of SF6 are shown to produce sharp increases in both Te and α in electron beam generated plasmas.

  9. A scheme to produce high density and high temperature plasma for opacity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi

    2015-04-15

    The opacity of shock-compressed material is of general scientific interest for astrophysical plasmas and for inertial confinement fusion research. A proposal is suggested to produce high temperature plasma with density around 1 g/cm{sup −3}. Two types of opacity target (the sandwich target and the foam enhanced sandwich target) are investigated numerically. The foam enhanced sandwich target has structure of foam–solid-sample-solid-foam. The foam will increase laser absorption efficiency and the ablating pressure. Hydrodynamic simulations confirm that the laser can be fully absorbed by the under-critical-density foam and a faster shock is produced inside the CH layer. High intensity lasers heat opacity target from both sides. The CH layers must be thick enough to keep the laser away from the sample. The laser-driven shocks move inward and collide at the center. Part of their kinetic energy is converted into internal energy and high density and high temperature local thermodynamic equilibrium sample plasma is produced. The plasma produced by laser heating the foam enhanced sandwich target has higher sample temperature than by laser heating the sandwich target. It may be useful for measuring the opacity of shock compressed material in laboratory.

  10. Possibility of deexcitation of isomeric nuclei in plasmas produced by subpicosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, V. I.

    2009-02-15

    Possible schemes of X-ray-activated deexcitation of isomers of rhodium, silver, tellurium, and bismuth are considered. It is shown that conditions necessary for deexcitation of rhodium isomer can, in principle, be achieved in a high-temperature solid-body-density plasma produced by an ultrashort laser pulse.

  11. Towards laboratory-produced relativistic electron-positron pair-plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Beiersdorfer, P; Cauble, R; Dollar, F; Falk, K; Hazi, A; Murphy, C D; Park, J; Seely, J; Szabo, C I; Shepherd, R; Tommasini, R; Zulick, K

    2010-08-31

    Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the last few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} and 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, respectively. With the advent of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a charge-neutral, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter. This talk will present some details of the laser-produced pair-plasma experiments.

  12. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane

    2012-04-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then

  13. The AMY experiment: Microwave emission from air shower plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Blanco, M.; Boháčová, M.; Buonomo, B.; Cataldi, G.; Coluccia, M. R.; Creti, P.; De Mitri, I.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Foggetta, L.; Gaïor, R.; Garcia-Fernandez, D.; Iarlori, M.; Le Coz, S.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Louedec, K.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Monasor, M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Salamida, F.; Salina, G.; Settimo, M.; Valente, P.; Vazquez, J. R.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2016-07-01

    You The Air Microwave Yield (AMY) experiment investigate the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted in the GHz frequency range from an electron beam induced air-shower. The measurements have been performed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati INFN National Laboratories with a 510 MeV electron beam in a wide frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. We present the apparatus and the results of the tests performed.

  14. Plasma shield for in-air beam processesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2008-05-01

    A novel concept/apparatus, the Plasma Shield, is introduced in this paper. The purpose of the Plasma Shield is designed to shield a target object chemically and thermally by engulfing an area subjected to beam treatment with inert plasma. The shield consists of a vortex-stabilized arc that is employed to shield beams and workpiece area of interaction from an atmospheric or liquid environment. A vortex-stabilized arc is established between a beam generating device (laser, ion or electron gun) and a target object. The arc, which is composed of a pure noble gas, engulfs the interaction region and shields it from any surrounding liquids like water or reactive gases. The vortex is composed of a sacrificial gas or liquid that swirls around and stabilizes the arc. The successful Plasma Shield was experimentally established and very high-quality electron beam welding with partial plasma shielding was performed. The principle of the operation and experimental results are discussed in the paper.

  15. Plasma shield for in-air beam processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2008-05-15

    A novel concept/apparatus, the Plasma Shield, is introduced in this paper. The purpose of the Plasma Shield is designed to shield a target object chemically and thermally by engulfing an area subjected to beam treatment with inert plasma. The shield consists of a vortex-stabilized arc that is employed to shield beams and workpiece area of interaction from an atmospheric or liquid environment. A vortex-stabilized arc is established between a beam generating device (laser, ion or electron gun) and a target object. The arc, which is composed of a pure noble gas, engulfs the interaction region and shields it from any surrounding liquids like water or reactive gases. The vortex is composed of a sacrificial gas or liquid that swirls around and stabilizes the arc. The successful Plasma Shield was experimentally established and very high-quality electron beam welding with partial plasma shielding was performed. The principle of the operation and experimental results are discussed in the paper.

  16. Evaluation of an air spinning process to produce tailored biosynthetic nanofibre scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sabbatier, Gad; Abadie, Pierre; Dieval, Florence; Durand, Bernard; Laroche, Gaétan

    2014-02-01

    We optimised the working parameters of an innovative air spinning device to produce nanofibrous polymer scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on the fibre scaffolds which were then used to identify various scaffold morphologies based on the ratio of surface occupied by the polymer fibres on that covered by the entire polymer scaffold assembly. Scaffolds were then produced with the spinning experimental parameters, resulting in 90% of fibres in the overall polymer construct, and were subsequently used to perform a multiple linear regression analysis to highlight the relationship between nanofibre diameter and the air spinning parameters. Polymer solution concentration was deemed as the most significant parameter to control fibre diameter during the spinning process, despite interactions between experimental parameters. Based on these findings, viscosity measurements were performed to clarify the effect of the polymer solution property on scaffold morphology. PMID:24411387

  17. 2-D Interferometric Measurements of Electron Density in an Air Breakdown Plasma Using a 124.5 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    A 1 MW, 124.5 GHz gyrotron was used to produce a linearly polarized, quasioptical beam in 2.2 μs pulses. The beam was focused to a 2.6 mm spot size, producing a peak electric field of 70 kV/cm, after transmission losses. This electric field is great enough to produce a breakdown plasma in air at pressures ranging from a few Torr up to atmospheric pressure. The resulting breakdown plasma spontaneously forms a two-dimensional array of filaments, oriented parallel to the polarization of the beam, that propagate toward the microwave source. A needlepoint initiator was placed at the focal point of the beam, creating highly reproducible plasma arrays. An intensified CCD, with a minimum exposure of 2 ns, was combined with a two-wavelength laser interferometer, operating at 532 and 635 nm, to make spatially and temporally resolved electron density measurements of the plasma array.

  18. Degradation of volatile organic compounds in a non-thermal plasma air purifier.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Stefan; Jecklin, Matthias C; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-03-01

    The degradation of volatile organic compounds in a commercially available non-thermal plasma based air purifying system was investigated. Several studies exist that interrogate the degradation of VOCs in closed air systems using a non-thermal plasma combined with a heterogeneous catalyst. For the first time, however, our study was performed under realistic conditions (normal indoor air, 297.5K and 12.5 g m(-3) water content) on an open system, in the absence of an auxiliary catalyst, and using standard operating air flow rates (up to 320 L min(-1)). Cyclohexene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the xylene isomers were nebulized and guided through the plasma air purifier. The degradation products were trapped by activated charcoal tubes or silica gel tubes, and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Degradation efficiencies of 11+/-1.6% for cyclohexene, <2% for benzene, 11+/-2.4% for toluene, 3+/-1% for ethylbenzene, 1+/-1% for sigma-xylene, and 3+/-0.4% for m-/rho-xylene were found. A fairly wide range of degradation products could be identified. On both trapping media, various oxidized species such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and one epoxide were observed. The formation of adipaldehyde from nebulized cyclohexene clearly indicates an ozonolysis reaction. Other degradation products observed suggests reactions with OH radicals. We propose that mostly ozone and OH radicals are responsible for the degradation of organic molecules in the plasma air purifier. PMID:20167347

  19. Morphological and structural effects on tungsten targets produced by fusion plasma pulses from a table top plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inestrosa-Izurieta, M. J.; Ramos-Moore, E.; Soto, L.

    2015-09-01

    A table top plasma focus device operating at hundreds of joules was used to simulate an equivalent damage factor than the obtained on the divertor in tokamak experiments. Using the ejected plasma produced after the pinch disruptions, the effects on tungsten targets from 50 cumulative plasma shocks with power fluxes per shot between 2.6 and 9200 kW cm-2 and with a duration time in the order of tens of nanoseconds (damage factor in the order of 100-103 (W cm-2)s1/2) were studied. Morphological analysis shows an increasing appearance of cracked surfaces with holes, fissures and defects, suggesting a potential progression of stress effects and a fast heat load that melts the surface, ending in thermal contractions that recrystallize the surface of the target. A structural analysis demonstrates a compressive stress development and suggests that part of the energy is released in the melting of the surface in case of a plasma shock with a power flux of 9.2 MW cm-2, 75 ns duration pulse, 2.5   ×   103 (W cm-2)s1/2 damage factor. How to increase the damage factor by one order of magnitude up to the expected value from type I ELMs on the ITER divertor, i.e. 104 (W cm-2)s1/2 is discussed.

  20. Radio-Frequency Sustainment of Laser Initiated, High-Pressure Air Constituent Plasmas*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Kamran; Scharer, John; Tysk, Shane; Denning, Mark

    2003-10-01

    We investigate the feasibility of creating a high-density sim 10^12 -10^14 /cc, large volume plasma in air constituents by laser (300 mJ, 20(+/-2) ns) preionization of an organic gas. Tetrakis (dimethyl-amino) ethylene (TMAE) is seeded in high-pressure air constituent gases and then sustained by the efficient absorption of the radio-frequency (RF) power (1-25 kW pulsed) through inductive coupling of the wave fields, thereby reducing the rf initiation power budget.1 A multi-turn helical antenna is used to couple rf power through a capacitive matching network to sustain the plasma. Plasma density and decay recombination mechanisms with and without the background gas are examined using a 105 GHz interferometr.2 The effect of gas heating on plasma life-time enhancement through reduced formation of negative oxygen ions will also be presented. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to study the process of delayed ionization of the seed gas and RF creation of air constituent plasma and calculate the plasma temperature. RF wave penetration and projection of plasma away from the source region are also examined for different gas flow rates. 1. Kelly K, Scharer J, Paller E, and Ding G, J. App. Phys., 92,698(2002). 2. Akhtar K, Scharer J, Tysk S., and Kho E., Rev. Sci. Instrum., 74, 996 (2003).

  1. Novel approach to produce polymerized hydrocarbon coatings using dielectric barrier controlled atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, K. K.; Khardekar, R. K.; Singh, Rashmi; Pant, H. C.

    2002-09-01

    Conventionally, low-pressure (<1 Torr) electrical discharges are used for material processing and thin-film deposition. These schemes suffer mainly due to the high cost of equipment and the complexity of operations. The atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma is developed using a threaded styled electrode in different configurations, and these reactors are used to produce plasma polymerized coatings, required on plane substrates as self-supporting films to obtain membranes for blocking holes in cavities, and on microballoon targets, which are used as fuel containers for inertial confinement fusion, to avoid DT gas permeation. Helium gas is used as the supporting gas for formation and stabilization of atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma reactors. Ethylene and acetylene gases are used as monomers to produce plasma polymerized hydrocarbon films. These films are characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Plasma polymerized coatings of thickness 100 nm-10 μm with a smooth surface finish (rms<100 nm) are deposited successfully. The surface finish is further improved using a postdischarge configuration. Preliminary results are very encouraging but further progress is to be made in this area. We are also planning to extend this technique for C:H coating of microballoons, which are used as fuel containers in inertial confinement fusion.

  2. Surface modification of a biomedical poly(ether)urethane by a remote air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. E.; Norton, P. R.; Griffiths, K.

    2003-07-01

    Plasma modification of polymer surfaces is widely used, but the plasma/polymer interaction is very complex and still not fully understood. In this paper, the interaction of a biomedical poly(ether)urethane with a remote air plasma treatment has been studied. Atomic force microscopy studies show the domain structure of the polymer as well as the absence of any surface roughening due to plasma treatment. Contact angle goniometry shows an improved wettability of the surface after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates an increase in CO and CC at the surface, as well as the presence of new functional groups such as alcohols, ketones, aldehydes and imines. There is also evidence that the energy imparted to the polymer during plasma treatment causes surface segregation of polyol segments.

  3. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  4. Collisionless shock generation in counter-streaming plasmas produced by a high-power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Y.; Morita, T.; Aoki, H.; Tanji, H.; Shibata, S.; Ide, T.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Shiroshita, A.; Shigemori, K.; Sano, T.; Norimatsu, T.; Kato, T.; Takabe, H.; Waugh, J.; Woolsey, N.; Loupias, B.; Gregory, C.; Koenig, M.

    2009-11-01

    Laboratory experiments to study collisionless shock generation in counter-streaming plasmas have been investigated using Gekko XII HIPER laser system (352 nm (3φ), 500 ps, ˜100 J / beam, one or four beams, < 10^15 W/cm^2) at ILE. Two types of double-plane targets, Jet and Ablation types were used. In the Jet (Ablation) type, 10 μm (60 μm) and 60 μm thick CH planes were placed with the separation of 4.5 mm; beams were irradiated on the 1st CH and a rear-side (an ablation) plasma is formed, and the plasma from the 2nd CH is created by radiation and/or plasmas from the1st CH. The plasmas and shocks were diagnosed transverse to the main laser propagation direction; shadowgraphy and modified Nomarski interferometry using a probe laser with ICCD and streak cameras, and SOP and GOI using a visible (450 nm) self-emission. Counter-streaming plasmas were produced, and shock waves were observed. The width of the transition region is much shorter than ion-ion mean-free-path. A particle-in-cell simulation has predicted generation of an electrostatic shock.

  5. Characterization of the Horizontal Confinement Produced by a Glass Box in a Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jace; Douglass, Angela

    2013-10-01

    The majority of plasmas in the visible universe are complex plasmas, consisting of not only electrons, ions, and neutral particles, but also small, usually micron-sized particles called ``dust.'' Recent complex plasma experiments have placed a glass box on the lower electrode of a GEC RF reference cell in order to alter the electric confinement experienced by micrometer-sized particles in the plasma. While this has led to interesting observations, such as vertical chains and Coulomb balls, the nature of the confinement is not well understood. In this experiment, a single melamine formaldehyde dust particle was levitated in the plasma sheath and contained by a glass box. The dust particle was then struck by a laser pulse to perturb the particle from its equilibrium position. The trajectory of the particle was analyzed to determine the nature of the electric potential produced by the walls of the glass box. Trials were run with varying pressures, particle sizes, box sizes, and plasma powers to determine the effect of each parameter on the confinement.

  6. Characterization of Wet Air Plasma Jet Powered by Sinusoidal High Voltage and Nanosecond Pulses for Plasma Agricultural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Shimada, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Not only for the plasma sterilization but also for many of plasma life-science applications, atmospheric pressure plasma devices that allowed us to control its state and reactive species production are deserved to resolve the roles of the chemical species. Influence of the hydroxyl radical and ozone on germination of conidia of a strawberry pathogen is presented. Water addition to air plasma jet significantly improves germination suppression performance, while measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) are reduced. Although the results show a negative correlation between ROS and the germination suppression, this infers the importance of chemical composition generated by plasma. For further control of the plasma product, a plasma jet powered by sinusoidal high voltage and nanosecond pulses is developed and characterized with the voltage-charge Lissajous. Control of breakdown phase and discharge power by pulse-imposed phase is presented. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) Grant Number 15K17480 and Exploratory Research Grant Number 23644199.

  7. Effects of 2 mass % Si admixture in a laser-produced Fe plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Krasa, Josef; Laska, Leos; Rohlena, Karel; Velyhan, Andriy; Lorusso, Antonella; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Czarnecka, Agata; Parys, Piotr; Ryc, Leszek; Wolowski, Jerzy

    2008-11-10

    Emission of multiply charged ions and soft x-rays from the plasmas produced by laser pulses focused on (111) surface of Fe and Fe-2 mass % Si single crystals is investigated for wavelengths of 1064 and 248 nm and intensities up to {approx_equal}1x10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}. It is demonstrated that the Si admixture in the Fe plasma results in a higher emission of Fe{sup q+} ions (1{<=}q{<=}4) but in a markedly lower x-ray emission. The relation of wavelengths and pulse durations of laser beams used is figured in the fluence dependence of the ion emission.

  8. Stark profiles of forbidden and allowed transitions in a dense, laser produced helium plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ya'akobi, B.; George, E. V.; Bekefi, G.; Hawryluk, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Comparisons of experimental and theoretical Stark profiles of the allowed 2(1)P-3(1)D helium line at 6678 A and of the forbidden 2(1)P-3(1)P component at 6632 A in a dense plasma were carried out. The plasma was produced by optical breakdown of helium by means of a repetitive, high power CO2 laser. The allowed line shows good agreement with conventional theory, but discrepancies are found around the centre of the forbidden component. When normally neglected ion motions are taken into consideration, the observed discrepancies are partially removed. Tables of the Stark profiles for the pair of lines are given.

  9. Characterization of laser-produced carbon plasmas relevant to laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Everson, E. T.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Niemann, C.

    2016-07-01

    Experiments, analytic modeling, and numerical simulations are presented to characterize carbon plasmas produced by high-intensity ( 109-1013 W cm-2) lasers relevant to experimental laboratory astrophysics. In the large-scale limit, the results agree well with a self-similar isentropic, adiabatic fluid model. Laser-target simulations, however, show small-scale structure in the velocity distribution of different ion species, which is also seen in experiments. These distributions indicate that most of the plasma energy resides in moderate charge states (C+3-C+4), most of the mass resides in the lowest charge states, and the highest charge states move fastest.

  10. Diamagnetic cavitization of laser-produced barium plasma in transverse magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Raju, Makaraju Srinivasa; Singh, R K; Kumar, Ajai; Gopinath, Pramod

    2015-05-15

    Influence of uniform transverse magnetic field and ambient Ar pressure on the plasma plume produced by Nd:YAG laser ablation of barium has been investigated by time-of-flight optical emission spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out with laser pulse energy of 150 mJ and 0.45 Tesla magnetic field. The time-of-flight profiles showed ambient pressure independent behavior at 6-mm distance from the target, which is attributed to the diamagnetic behavior of the laser plasma. A theoretical model is proposed that may explain the compression of temporal profiles of the ionic lines. PMID:26393695

  11. The cold and atmospheric-pressure air surface barrier discharge plasma for large-area sterilization applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dacheng; Zhao Di; Feng Kecheng; Zhang Xianhui; Liu Dongping; Yang Size

    2011-04-18

    This letter reports a stable air surface barrier discharge device for large-area sterilization applications at room temperature. This design may result in visually uniform plasmas with the electrode area scaled up (or down) to the required size. A comparison for the survival rates of Escherichia coli from air, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} surface barrier discharge plasmas is presented, and the air surface plasma consisting of strong filamentary discharges can efficiently kill Escherichia coli. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH generated in the room temperature air plasmas play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  12. Urban Air Pollution Produces Up-Regulation of Myocardial Inflammatory Genes and Dark Chocolate Provides Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Reed, William; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Keefe, Sheyla; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution is a serious environmental problem. Elderly subjects show increased cardiac morbidity and mortality associated with air pollution exposure. Mexico City (MC) residents are chronically exposed to high concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and PM-associated lipopolysaccharides (PM-LPS). To test the hypothesis that chronic exposure to urban pollution produces myocardial inflammation, female Balb-c mice age 4 weeks were exposed for 16 months to two distinctly different polluted areas within MC: Southwest (SW) and Northwest (NW). SW mice were given either no treatment or chocolate 2g/9.5 mg polyphenols/3 times per week. Results were compared to mice kept in clean air. Key inflammatory mediator genes: cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the LPS receptor CD14 (cluster of differentiation antigen 14) were measured by real time polymerase chain reaction. Also explored were target NFκB (Nuclear Factor κ B), oxidative stress and antioxidant defense genes. TNF-α, IL-6, and COX-2 were significantly increased in both NW and SWMC mice (p=0.0001). CD14 was up-regulated in SW mice in keeping with the high exposures to particulate matter associated endotoxin. Chocolate administration resulted in a significant down-regulation of TNF-α (p<0.0001), IL-6 (p=0.01), and IL-1β (p=0.02). The up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and the down-regulation of potent oxidases, toll-like receptors, and pro-apoptotic signaling genes completed the protective profile. Exposure to air pollution produces up-regulation of inflammatory myocardial genes and endotoxin plays a key role in the inflammatory response. Regular consumption of dark chocolate may reduce myocardial inflammation and have cardioprotective properties in the setting of air pollution exposures. PMID:20932730

  13. Urban air pollution produces up-regulation of myocardial inflammatory genes and dark chocolate provides cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Reed, William; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Keefe, Sheyla; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2012-05-01

    Air pollution is a serious environmental problem. Elderly subjects show increased cardiac morbidity and mortality associated with air pollution exposure. Mexico City (MC) residents are chronically exposed to high concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) and PM-associated lipopolysaccharides (PM-LPS). To test the hypothesis that chronic exposure to urban pollution produces myocardial inflammation, female Balb-c mice age 4 weeks were exposed for 16 months to two distinctly different polluted areas within MC: southwest (SW) and northwest (NW). SW mice were given either no treatment or chocolate 2g/9.5 mg polyphenols/3 times per week. Results were compared to mice kept in clean air. Key inflammatory mediator genes: cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the LPS receptor CD14 (cluster of differentiation antigen 14) were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Also explored were target NFκB (nuclear factor κB), oxidative stress and antioxidant defense genes. TNF-α, IL-6, and COX-2 were significantly increased in both NW and SWMC mice (p=0.0001). CD14 was up-regulated in SW mice in keeping with the high exposures to particulate matter associated endotoxin. Chocolate administration resulted in a significant down-regulation of TNF-α (p<0.0001), IL-6 (p=0.01), and IL-1β (p=0.02). The up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and the down-regulation of potent oxidases, toll-like receptors, and pro-apoptotic signaling genes completed the protective profile. Exposure to air pollution produces up-regulation of inflammatory myocardial genes and endotoxin plays a key role in the inflammatory response. Regular consumption of dark chocolate may reduce myocardial inflammation and have cardioprotective properties in the setting of air pollution exposures. PMID:20932730

  14. Effect of plasma suppression additives on electrodynamic characteristics of the torch discharge burning in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyaev, D.; Lutsenko, Yu; Boretsky, E.

    2016-06-01

    The paper shows the results of measurements of wave number of electromagnetic wave, which supports burning of high-frequency torch discharge in the mixture of air with water vapor and carbon dioxide. The nonmonotonic dependence of attenuation factor of electromagnetic waves is set on a concentration of water vapor. It is shown that the attenuation degree of electromagnetic field in the plasma with water vapor significantly exceeds the attenuation degree of electromagnetic field in the plasma with carbon dioxide.

  15. Pulsed IR laser ablation of organic polymers in air: shielding effects and plasma pipe formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, A. N.; Shulepov, M. A.; Tel'minov, A. E.; Zakharov, L. A.; Paletsky, A. A.; Bulgakova, N. M.

    2011-09-01

    We report the effect of 'plasma pipe' formation on pulsed laser ablation of organic polymers in air under normal conditions. Ablation of polymers (PMMA, polyimide) is carried out in a wide range of CO2 laser fluences with special attention to plasma formation in the ablation products. Evolution of laser ablation plumes in air under different pressures is investigated with simultaneous registration of radiation spectra of the ablation products. An analysis based on thermo-chemical modelling is performed to elucidate the effects of laser light attenuation upon ablation, including plasma and chemical processes in a near-target space. The analysis has shown that the experimental observations of plume development in air can be explained by a combination of processes including formation of a pre-ionized channel along the laser beam propagation, laser-supported detonation wave and effective combustion of the polymer ablation products. A scenario of a streamer-like polymer plasma flow within an air plasma pipe created via laser-induced breakdown is proposed.

  16. Simulation of cold atmospheric plasma component composition and particle densities in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, Gennady; Bekasov, Vladimir; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    Recently discharges in air at atmospheric pressure were the subject of numerous studies. Of particular interest are the cold streams of air plasma, which contains large amounts of chemically active species. It is their action can be decisive in the interaction with living tissues. Therefore, in addition to its physical properties, it is important to know the component composition and particle densities. The goal was to develop a numerical model of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge in air with the definition of the component composition of plasma. To achieve this goal the task was broken down into two sub-tasks, in the first simulated microdischarge atmospheric pressure in air using a simplified set of plasma chemical reactions in order to obtain the basic characteristics of the discharge, which are the initial approximations in the problem of the calculation of the densities with detailed plasma chemistry, including 53 spices and over 600 chemical reactions. As a result of the model was created, which can be adapted for calculating the component composition of plasma of various sources. Calculate the density of particles in the glow microdischarges and dynamics of their change in time.

  17. Simulation of cold atmospheric plasma component composition and particle densities in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, Gennady; Chirtsov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy

    2015-11-01

    Recently discharges in air at atmospheric pressure were the subject of numerous studies. Of particular interest are the cold streams of air plasma, which contains large amounts of chemically active species. It is their action can be decisive in the interaction with living tissues. Therefore, in addition to its physical properties, it is important to know the component composition and particle densities. The goal was to develop a numerical model of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge in air with the definition of the component composition of plasma. To achieve this goal the task was divided into two sub-tasks, in the first simulated microdischarge atmospheric pressure in air using a simplified set of plasma chemical reactions in order to obtain the basic characteristics of the discharge, which are the initial approximations in the problem of the calculation of the densities with detailed plasma chemistry, including 53 spices and over 600 chemical reactions. As a result of the model was created, which can be adapted for calculating the component composition of plasma of various sources. Calculate the density of particles in the glow microdischarges and dynamics of their change in time.

  18. Functionalization of Hydrogen-free Diamond-like Carbon Films using Open-air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Atmospheric Plasma Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Instituto de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Quimica-Fisica"Rocasolano"C.S.I.C., 28006 Madrid, Spain; Mahasarakham University, Mahasarakham 44150, Thailand; CASTI, CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory, L'Aquila 67100, Italy; SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA; Endrino, Jose; Endrino, J. L.; Marco, J. F.; Poolcharuansin, P.; Phani, A.R.; Allen, M.; Albella, J. M.; Anders, A.

    2007-12-28

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique has been employed to produce uniform atmospheric plasmas of He and N2 gas mixtures in open air in order to functionalize the surface of filtered-arc deposited hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. XPS measurements were carried out on both untreated and He/N2 DBD plasma treated DLC surfaces. Chemical states of the C 1s and N 1s peaks were collected and used to characterize the surface bonds. Contact angle measurements were also used to record the short- and long-term variations in wettability of treated and untreated DLC. In addition, cell viability tests were performed to determine the influence of various He/N2 atmospheric plasma treatments on the attachment of osteoblast MC3T3 cells. Current evidence shows the feasibility of atmospheric plasmas in producing long-lasting variations in the surface bonding and surface energy of hydrogen-free DLC and consequently the potential for this technique in the functionalization of DLC coated devices.

  19. Investigation of a Gas Jet-Produced Hollow Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N; Blumenfeld, I.; Hogan, M.J.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; Davidson, A.W.; Huang, C.; /UCLA

    2009-05-21

    The effect of ion motion and the need for practical positron propagation in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) have incited interest in hollow plasma channels. These channels are typically assumed to be cylindrically symmetric; however, a different geometry might be easier to achieve. The introduction of an obstruction into the outlet of a high Mach number gas jet can produce two parallel slabs of gas separated by a density depression. Here, there is a detailed simulation study of the density depression created in such a system. This investigation reveals that the density depression is insufficient at the desired plasma density. However, insights from the simulations suggest another avenue for the creation of the hollow slab geometry.

  20. High-order harmonic generation from laser plasma produced by pulses of different duration

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Suzuki, M.; Baba, M.; Kuroda, H.

    2007-08-15

    The high-order harmonic generation was analyzed by interaction of the femtosecond pulses with the laser plasma produced on the surfaces of various targets. The plasma formation was accomplished by the interaction of the prepulse radiation of different pulse duration (160 fs, 1.5 ps, 210 ps, and 20 ns) with the low-Z (lithium, boron, carbon), medium-Z (manganese, zinc, nickel), and high-Z (silver, barium) targets. We showed that plasma formation conditions play a crucial role in harmonic generation and the optimization of this process mostly depends on the energy of prepulse rather than its intensity at the target surface. These studies also demonstrated that the delay between the prepulse and femtosecond pulse is another important parameter, which distinguishes harmonic generation in the cases of the low- and high-Z targets.

  1. The reflection of an electromagnetic wave from the self-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzaie, M.; Shokri, B.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    2010-01-15

    The dynamic behavior of a high power microwave beam propagating through a gaseous medium, which is ionized in the wave field is investigated. By solving the wave equation, the reflection index of the produced plasma is obtained. It is shown that the cut off condition is different from that of the steady state approximation. The reflection index is less than unity when the plasma density reaches the critical value estimated in the steady state approximation. So, the wave can still propagate through the plasma. By comparing the reflection indexes in the presence and absence of the time delay of the ionization process at different points of the medium, it is shown that it becomes unity much later in the first case. Therefore, the wave propagation takes much more time and consequently the medium is ionized much more.

  2. Momentum transfer interaction of a laser-produced plasma with a low-pressure background.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The expansion of a laser-produced metallic plasma into a photoionized hydrogen background has been experimentally studied. Langmuir probe and microwave diagnostics have detected an interaction front which decelerates with a dependence on background density and time consistent with a momentum coupling between the laser plasma and the ionized fraction of the background. An ion percursor has also been observed. Calculations of scattering cross sections indicate that multiple-encounter Coulomb scattering will dominate collisional momentum transfer. The leading edge of the laser plasma contains multiply charged ions of charge state z greater than or equal to 5, and collisional effects appear adequate to explain the principal features of the momentum coupling. The ion precursor may have a collisionless origin.

  3. Structure of the plasma fireball produced by a CO2 laser.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. V.; Bekefi, G.; Ya'akobi, B.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the space and time resolved structure of a helium plasma produced with a repetitive CO2 laser during the first 15 microsec of the afterglow period. The spectra of several neutral and ionized helium lines are used in the determination of the density and temperature profiles of the luminous fireball. It is found that the plasma is comprised of a dense hot core, which emits primarily ionic lines, and a well-defined tenuous outer shell, which is primarily the source of neutral emission lines. This ?two-component' plasma structure develops at about 0.4 microsec after breakdown, at about the time when the luminous fireball dissipates its expansion energy and comes to a virtual standstill.

  4. Parabolic lithium mirror for a laser-driven hot plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Baird, James K.

    1979-06-19

    A hot plasma producing device is provided, wherein pellets, singly injected, of frozen fuel are each ignited with a plurality of pulsed laser beams. Ignition takes place within a void area in liquid lithium contained within a pressure vessel. The void in the liquid lithium is created by rotating the pressure vessel such that the free liquid surface of molten lithium therein forms a paraboloid of revolution. The paraboloid functions as a laser mirror with a reflectivity greater than 90%. A hot plasma is produced when each of the frozen deuterium-tritium pellets sequentially arrive at the paraboloid focus, at which time each pellet is illuminated by the plurality of pulsed lasers whose rays pass through circular annuli across the top of the paraboloid. The beams from the lasers are respectively directed by associated mirrors, or by means of a single conical mirror in another embodiment, and by the mirror-like paraboloid formed by the rotating liquid lithium onto the fuel pellet such that the optical flux reaching the pellet can be made to be uniform over 96% of the pellet surface area. The very hot plasma produced by the action of the lasers on the respective singly injected fuel pellets in turn produces a copious quantity of neutrons and X-rays such that the device has utility as a neutron source or as an x-ray source. In addition, the neutrons produced in the device may be utilized to produce tritium in a lithium blanket and is thus a mechanism for producing tritium.

  5. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J.; Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic oxygen number density [O] is measured in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Gas flow is fixed at 8 slpm, the RF power coupled into the plasma jet varied between 5 W and 20 W, and the resulting changes in atomic oxygen density measured. Photolysis of molecular oxygen is employed to allow in situ calibration of the TALIF system. During calibration, O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting oxygen atoms are achieved within the same laser pulse. The atomic oxygen density produced by photolysis is time varying and spatially non-uniform which needs to be corrected for to calibrate the TALIF system for measurement of atomic oxygen density in plasma. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I 0(t), wavelength, and focal spot size allows correction factors to be determined using a rate equation model. Atomic oxygen is used for calibration and measurement, so the laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power dependence region without affecting the calibration reliability as the laser power dependence will still be the same for both. The atomic O density results obtained are not directly benchmarked against other known density measurement techniques. The results show that the plasma jet atomic oxygen content increases as the RF power coupled into the plasma increases.

  6. Resonant- and avalanche-ionization amplification of laser-induced plasma in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili; Jiang, Naibo; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2014-10-14

    Amplification of laser-induced plasma in air is demonstrated utilizing resonant laser ionization and avalanche ionization. Molecular oxygen in air is ionized by a low-energy laser pulse employing (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) to generate seed electrons. Subsequent avalanche ionization of molecular oxygen and nitrogen significantly amplifies the laser-induced plasma. In this plasma-amplification effect, three-body attachments to molecular oxygen dominate the electron-generation and -loss processes, while either nitrogen or argon acts as the third body with low electron affinity. Contour maps of the electron density within the plasma obtained in O₂/N₂ and O₂/Ar gas mixtures are provided to show relative degrees of plasma amplification with respect to gas pressure and to verify that the seed electrons generated by O₂ 2 + 1 REMPI are selectively amplified by avalanche ionization of molecular nitrogen in a relatively low-pressure condition (≤100 Torr). Such plasma amplification occurring in air could be useful in aerospace applications at high altitude.

  7. Study of Plasma Treatment of Produced Water from Oil and Gas Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Kamau

    Unconventional gas and hydraulic fracturing is helping to increase natural gas production, which is widely viewed in the U.S. as a key asset to bolstering a clean and energy-independent future. Safe and economical management and treatment of water produced during such processes remain of key importance. With the increase of hydrocarbon production and national shale gas production expected to increase threefold and account for nearly half of all natural gas produced by 2035, advanced water treatment and management processes must be investigated, to ensure water conservation and associated economic prudence. The state of the art of produced water treatment technologies is described including the efficacy of plasma to modulate the contents of such aqueous solutions, meeting target parameters and potentially enabling the operation of other treatment technologies. Among other effects, progress is presented on the enhancement of an arc-in-water system to remove bicarbonate ions and prevent the mineral fouling ability of water which causes formation of CaCO3 in heat exchangers and distillation units. Qualitative and quantitative treatment targets of produced water treatment are discussed. Experimental work is conducted to test theories and identify and reproduce favorable effects useful to treating wastewaters. Plasma arc-in-water systems demonstrated capability of producing bicarbonate-depleted wastewaters, with experiments with gas-field produced waters indicating that generation of H+ ions plays a greater role in bicarbonate ion removal than local heating. Tests showed abatement of bicarbonate ions from a range of 684--778 mg/L down to zero. Subsequent scaling/fouling tests with waters ranging from 0 to 500 mg/L bicarbonate ions, in the presence of high calcium ion concentrations, showed that scale thickness, as well as mass on a 1-kW heating element was an order of magnitude less for process water containing 100 mg/L bicarbonate ions compared to process water with 500

  8. Detailed energy distributions in laser-produced plasmas of solid gold and foam gold planar targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yunsong; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Jiamin; Shang, Wanli

    2013-12-15

    Foam gold was proposed to increase the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency due to its important applications. To understand the mechanism of x-ray enhancement, the detailed energy distributions and plasma profiles for laser-irradiated solid gold and foam gold targets were studied comparatively by hydrodynamic simulations using the code Multi-1D. It is confirmed that the radiation heat wave is subsonic for the normal solid gold target, while supersonic for the foam gold target. The shock wave, which is behind the supersonic radiation heat wave for the foam gold target, generates a plasma temperature gradient with high temperature near the shock wave front to produce an additional net outward radiation for enhancement of the x-ray emission. Much larger inward plasma velocity is also driven by the shock wave as an initial plasma velocity for the laser deposition and electron thermal conduct zone, which decreases the expanding plasma kinetic energy loss and helps to increase the x-ray radiation.

  9. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Seguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Soures, J. M.

    2009-07-15

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m>{approx}[8{pi}{beta}(1+D{sub m}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}{gamma}{sub max}{sup -1})]{sup 1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  10. Characterization of Fast Ion and Neutral Debris from Laser-Produced Lithium Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekioka, Tsuguhisa; Nagano, Akihisa; Ohtani, Nobuyuki; Miyamoto, Shuji; Amano, Sho; Inoue, Takahiro; Mochizuki, Takayasu

    2007-03-01

    Emissions of fast ion and neutral debris from laser-produced lithium plasmas have been investigated. We found that Li+, Li2+, and Li3+ ion energy spectra look similar. The peak positions and maximum energies in their energy spectra were about 700-800 eV and about 800-900 eV, respectively, which were much lower than those of such high-Z targets as Xe and Sn. These indicate that most of the fast Li+ and Li2+ ions were produced by the recombination of Li3+ ions while the plasma expanded, and that they were not accelerated to a high energy range as much as the high-Z targets. We did not observe any fast neutral Li atoms. These results suggest that the use of the Li target for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source would be advantageous for practical applications.

  11. The expansion velocities of laser-produced plasmas determined from extreme ultraviolet spectral line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Behring, W. E.; Cohen, L.

    1977-01-01

    The expansion of laser-produced plasma is determined from the shapes of spectral lines of highly ionized iron emitted in the extreme ultraviolet. The plasmas were produced by focusing the pulse from a Nd:glass laser onto solid planar targets, and spectra were recorded with a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrograph. From the Doppler broadening of lines of Fe XX and Fe XXI, expansion velocities of about 830 km/s were determined. The relative time-averaged ion abundances of Fe XVIII, Fe XIX, Fe XX, and Fe XXI are estimated for three different spectra. The abundances do not differ by more than a factor of 4 for any of the spectra.

  12. Analytical characterization of plasma membrane-derived vesicles produced via osmotic and chemical vesiculation.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Chan, Robin B; Zhou, Bowen; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane-derived vesicles are being used in biophysical and biochemical research as a simple, yet native-like model of the cellular membrane. Here we report on the characterization of vesicles produced via two different vesiculation methods from CHO and A431 cell lines. The first method is a recently developed method which utilizes chloride salts to induce osmotic vesiculation. The second is a well established chemical vesiculation method which uses DTT and formaldehyde. We show that both vesiculation methods produce vesicles which contain the lipid species previously reported in the plasma membrane of these cell lines. The two methods lead to small but statistically significant differences in two lipid species only; phosphatidylcholine (PC) and plasmalogen phosphatidylethanolamine (PEp). However, highly significant differences were observed in the degree of incorporation of a membrane receptor and in the degree of retention of soluble cytosolic proteins within the vesicles. PMID:25896659

  13. Detection of electromagnetic pulses produced by hypervelocity micro particle impact plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Sigrid; Lee, Nicolas; Johnson, Theresa; Goel, Ashish; Fletcher, Alexander; Linscott, Ivan; Strauss, David; Lauben, David; Srama, Ralf; Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian

    2013-09-15

    Hypervelocity micro particles (mass < 1 ng), including meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and produce plasmas that are initially dense (∼10{sup 28} m{sup −3}), but rapidly expand into the surrounding vacuum. We report the detection of radio frequency (RF) emission associated with electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) from hypervelocity impacts of micro particles in ground-based experiments using micro particles that are 15 orders of magnitude less massive than previously observed. The EMP production is a stochastic process that is influenced by plasma turbulence such that the EMP detection rate that is strongly dependent on impact speed and on the electrical charge conditions at the impact surface. In particular, impacts of the fastest micro particles occurring under spacecraft charging conditions representative of high geomagnetic activity are the most likely to produce RF emission. This new phenomenon may provide a source for unexplained RF measurements on spacecraft charged to high potentials.

  14. Picosecond soft-x-ray source from subpicosecond laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, J.; Maksimchuk, A.; Liu, X.; Ellenberger, U.; Coe, J. S.; Chien, C.-Y.; Umstadter, D.

    1996-01-01

    Short-pulse high-intensity laser-plasma interactions are investigated experimentally with temporally and spectrally resolved soft-x-ray diagnostics. We demonstrate that, by adjustment of the incident laser flux, the pulse width of the laser-produced x rays emitted from solid targets may be varied to as short as the picosecond time scale. Bright, picosecond, broadband emission characteristic of a short-scale-length high-density plasma is produced only when a high laser contrast (1010) is used. The results are found to be in qualitative agreement with both the predictions of a simple model of radiation from a collisionally dominated atomic system and the results obtained from a numerical simulation. 52.40.Nk.

  15. High-quality electron beam from laser wake-field acceleration in laser produced plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Moorti, Anand; Rathore, Ranjana; Ali Chakera, Juzer; Anant Naik, Prasad; Dass Gupta, Parshotam

    2013-06-10

    Generation of highly collimated ({theta}{sub div}{approx}10 mrad), quasi-monoenergetic electron beam with peak energy 12 MeV and charge {approx}50 pC has been experimentally demonstrated from self-guided laser wake-field acceleration (LWFA) in a plasma plume produced by laser ablation of solid nylon (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sub n} target. A 7 TW, 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser system was used for LWFA, and the plasma plume forming pulse was derived from the Nd:YAG pump laser of the same system. The results show that a reproducible, high quality electron beam could be produced from this scheme which is simple, low cost and has the capability for high repetition rate operation.

  16. Modification of semiconductor materials with the use of plasma produced by low intensity repetitive laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wolowski, J.; Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Czarnecka, A.; Parys, P.; Turan, R.; Yerci, S.

    2008-03-19

    This work reports experiments concerning specific application of laser-produced plasma at IPPLM in Warsaw. A repetitive pulse laser system of parameters: energy up to 0.8 J in a 3.5 ns-pulse, wavelength of 1.06 {mu}m, repetition rate of up to 10 Hz, has been employed in these investigations. The characterisation of laser-produced plasma was performed with the use of 'time-of-flight' ion diagnostics simultaneously with other diagnostic methods. The results of laser-matter interaction were obtained in dependence on laser pulse parameters, illumination geometry and target material. The modified SiO{sub 2} layers and sample surface properties were characterised with the use of different methods at the Middle-East Technological University in Ankara and at the Warsaw University of technology. The production of the Ge nanocrystallites has been demonstrated for annealed samples prepared in different experimental conditions.

  17. Distribution and mycotoxin-producing ability of some fungal isolates from the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetnić, Zdenka; Pepeljnjak, S.

    Research was carried out on presence and prevalence of common fungal air spores at locations in Croatia. The sampling method employed in the study was by exposure 350 of Petri agar plates to the air for 10 min. Approximately 3400 colonies were found and mould spores belonging to 22 fungal genera were identified. Cladosporium (44.7%), Penicillium (34.4%), Alternaria (26.3%), Aspergillus (21.6%) and Absidia (12.2%) were the most prevalent fungi encountered. Investigation of toxigenic potential of airborne fungi isolates of genera Aspergillus, Fusarium and Trichoderma showed 16.9% mycotoxin-producing strains. The production of aflatoxin B 1 by A. flavus sterigmatocystin by A. versicolor zearalenon and T-2 toxin by F. graminearum and diacetoscirpenol by strains of T. viride were obtained.

  18. Enhanced filament ablation of metals based on plasma grating in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Di; Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Fengjiang; Ding, Liangen; Zeng, Heping

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate efficient ablation of metals with filamentary plasma grating generated by two intense blue femtosecond filaments and a third focused infrared pulse. This scheme leads to significant promotion of ablation efficiency on metal targets in air in comparison with single infrared or blue filament with equal pulse energy. The reason is that the blue plasma grating firstly provides stronger intensity and a higher density of background electrons, then the delayed infrared pulse accelerates local electrons inside the plasma grating. These two processes finally results in robustly increased electron density and highly ionized metallic atoms.

  19. Enhanced filament ablation of metals based on plasma grating in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Di; Liu, Fengjiang; Ding, Liangen; Yuan, Shuai; Zeng, Heping

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate efficient ablation of metals with filamentary plasma grating generated by two intense blue femtosecond filaments and a third focused infrared pulse. This scheme leads to significant promotion of ablation efficiency on metal targets in air in comparison with single infrared or blue filament with equal pulse energy. The reason is that the blue plasma grating firstly provides stronger intensity and a higher density of background electrons, then the delayed infrared pulse accelerates local electrons inside the plasma grating. These two processes finally results in robustly increased electron density and highly ionized metallic atoms.

  20. Genetic effects of an air discharge plasma on Staphylococcus aureus at the gene transcription level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zimu; Wei, Jun; Shen, Jie; Liu, Yuan; Ma, Ronghua; Zhang, Zelong; Qian, Shulou; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Weidong; Sun, Qiang; Cheng, Cheng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of gene expression regulation (at transcription level) in Staphylococcus aureus after different doses of atmospheric-pressure room-temperature air plasma treatments are investigated by monitoring the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The plasma treatment influences the transcription of genes which are associated with several important bio-molecular processes related to the environmental stress resistance of the bacteria, including oxidative stress response, biofilm formation, antibiotics resistance, and DNA damage protection/repair. The reactive species generated by the plasma discharge in the gas phase and/or induced in the liquid phase may account for these gene expression changes.

  1. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun

    2013-10-01

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  2. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  3. Elastic properties of porous structural ceramics produced by plasma-spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, A.

    1998-12-31

    This study focuses on the relationship between porosity and elastic stiffness of structural ceramic materials produced by plasma-spraying. Mg-Al-spinel was chosen as a model material and studied in as-sprayed condition as well as upon annealing to increasingly higher temperatures up to 1650 C. The detailed analysis of the stiffness and mass density evolution offers a deep insight into the initial microstructural state of the material and into the morphological changes that occur upon heat treatment.

  4. Laser plasma of poly (methyl methacrylate) in air: modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, L. A.; Bulgakova, N. M.; Tel'Minov, A. E.; Panchenko, A. N.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2010-09-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on laser ablation of polymers (PMMA, polyimide) have been performed in a wide range of CO2-laser fluences. Evolution of polymer laser plume in air has been investigated with simultaneous registration of radiation spectra of the ablation products, spatial dynamics of plasma flare, and temporal behavior of plasma emission on separate spectral lines. It has been found that spectral lines have intensity peak after laser pulse termination while plasma emission spectra are similar to those of organic material combusting. The results confirm that combustion of the laser-vaporized polymers occurs in the plasma plume. A thermo-chemical model of heating and ablation of organic polymers by CO2 laser pulses has been developed which takes into account attenuation of radiation in laser plasmas and chemical processes leading to heating the plume of the ablation products. Temperature evolution in the irradiated sample, ablation dynamics, and laser beam attenuation are analyzed. The modeling results are compared with the experimental data on high-speed imaging of the plasma plume. The effect of the formation of a "plasma pipe" is revealed under polymer ablation in air under normal conditions.

  5. Rapid inactivation of biological species in the air using atmospheric pressure nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yongdong; Wu, Yan; Sun, Ke; Chen, Qi; Shen, Fangxia; Zhang, Jue; Yao, Maosheng; Zhu, Tong; Fang, Jing

    2012-03-20

    Here, nonthermal plasma generated by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system was applied to inactivating aerosolized Bacillus subtilis cells and Pseudomonas fluorescens as well as indoor and outdoor bioaerosols. The culturability, viability, and diversity losses of the microorganisms in air samples treated by the plasma for 0.06-0.12 s were studied using culturing, DNA stain as well as polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) methods. In addition, the viable fraction of bacterial aerosols with and without the plasma treatment was also quantified using qPCR coupled with ethidium monoazide (EMA). It was shown that less than 2% of B. subtilis aerosols survived the plasma treatment of 0.12 s, while none of the P. fluorescens aerosols survived. Viability tests, EMA-qPCR results, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images demonstrated that both bacterial species suffered significant viability loss, membrane, and DNA damages. Exposure of environmental bacterial and fungal aerosols to the plasma for 0.06 s also resulted in their significant inactivations, more than 95% for bacteria and 85-98% for fungal species. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that plasma exposure of 0.06 s resulted in culturable bacterial aerosol diversity loss for both environments, especially pronounced for indoor environment. The results here demonstrate that nonthermal plasma exposure could offer a highly efficient air decontamination technology. PMID:22385302

  6. Laser-produced plasma EUV source using a colloidal microjet target containing tin dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2006-10-01

    We realized a low-debris laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a colloidal microjet target, which contained low-concentration (6 wt%) tin-dioxide nanoparticles. An Nd:YAG laser was used to produce a plasma at the intensity on the order of 10^11 W/cm^2. The use of low concentration nanoparticles in a microjet target with a diameter of 50 μm regulated the neutral debris emission from a target, which was monitored by a silicon witness plate placed 30 cm apart from the source in a vacuum chamber. No XPS signals of tin and/or oxygen atoms were observed on the plate after ten thousand laser exposures. The low concentration nature of the target was compensated and the conversion efficiency (CE) was improved by introducing double pulses of two Nd:YAG lasers operated at 532 and 1064 nm as a result of controlling the micro-plasma characteristics. The EUV CE reached its maximum of 1.2% at the delay time of approximately 100 ns with the main laser intensiy of 2 x10^11 W/cm^2. The CE value was comparable to that of a tin bulk target, which, however, produced a significant amount of neutral debris.

  7. Geopolymers prepared from DC plasma treated air pollution control (APC) residues glass: properties and characterisation of the binder phase.

    PubMed

    Kourti, Ioanna; Devaraj, Amutha Rani; Bustos, Ana Guerrero; Deegan, David; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2011-11-30

    Air pollution control (APC) residues have been blended with glass-forming additives and treated using DC plasma technology to produce a high calcium aluminosilicate glass (APC glass). This has been used to form geopolymer-glass composites that exhibit high strength and density, low porosity, low water absorption, low leaching and high acid resistance. The composites have a microstructure consisting of un-reacted residual APC glass particles imbedded in a complex geopolymer and C-S-H gel binder phase, and behave as particle reinforced composites. The work demonstrates that materials prepared from DC plasma treated APC residues have potential to be used to form high quality pre-cast products. PMID:21963174

  8. Laser ablation plasma-assisted stabilization of premixed methane/air flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Yang; Peng, Jiangbo; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Sun, Rui; Chen, Deying

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation plasma has been applied to assist stabilization of premixed methane/air flames with a flow speed up to 15.3 m/s. The ablation plasma was generated using the 50 Hz, 1064 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser onto a tantalum slab. With the ablation plasma, the stabilization equivalence ratio has been extended to the fuel-leaner end and the blow off limits have been enhanced by from 3.6- to 14.8-folds for flames which can stabilize without the plasma. The laser pulse energy required for flameholding was reduced to 10 mJ, a 64 % reduction compared with that of gas breakdown plasma, which will ease the demand for high-power lasers for high-frequency plasma generation. The temporal evolutions of the flame kernels following the ablation plasma were investigated using the OH* chemiluminescence imaging approach, and the flame propagation speed ( v f) was measured from the flame kernel evolutions. With the ablation plasma, the v f with flow speed of 4.7-9.0 m/s and equivalence ratio of 1.4 has been enhanced from 0.175 m/s of laminar premixed methane/air flame to 2.79-4.52 and 1.59-5.46 m/s, respectively, in the early and late time following the ablation plasma. The increase in the combustion radical concentrations by the ablation plasma was thought to be responsible for the v f enhancement and the resulted flame stabilization.

  9. Spectroscopic diagnostics of laboratory air plasmas as a benchmark for spectral rotational (gas) temperature determination in TLEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, F. C.; Passas, M.; Carrasco, E.; Luque, A.; Tanarro, I.; Simek, M.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2013-07-01

    We have studied laboratory low pressure (0.1 mbar ≤ p ≤2 mbar) glow air discharges by optical emission spectroscopy to discuss several spectroscopic techniques that could be implemented by field spectrographs, depending on the available spectral resolution, to experimentally quantify the gas temperature associated to transient luminous events (TLEs) occurring at different altitudes including blue jets, giant blue jets, and sprites. Laboratory air plasmas have been analyzed from the near UV (300 nm) to the near IR (1060 nm) with high (up to 0.01 nm) and low (2 nm) spectral resolution commercial grating spectrographs and by an in-house intensified CCD grating spectrograph that we have recently developed for TLE spectral diagnostic surveys with ≃0.45 nm spectral resolution. We discuss the results of lab tests and comment on the convenience of using one or another technique for rotational (gas) temperature determination depending on the altitude and available spectral resolution. Moreover, we compare available low resolution (3 nm ≤Δλ≤7 nm) N2 1PG field recorded sprite spectra at 53 km (≃1 mbar), and resulting vibrational distribution function, with 1 mbar laboratory glow discharge spectrum (Δλ=2 nm) and synthetic sprite spectra from models. We found that while the relative population of N2(B3Πg,v=2-7) in sprites and laboratory produced air glow plasmas are similar, the N2(B3Πg,v=1) vibrational level in sprites is more efficiently populated (in agreement with model predictions) than in laboratory air glow plasmas at similar pressures.

  10. ELM simulation experiments using transient heat and particle load produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoda, K.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2011-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. It is predicted that the heat load onto the PFCs during type I ELMs in ITER is 0.2-2MJ/m2 with pulse length of ~0.1-1ms. We have investigated interaction between transient heat and particle load and the PFCs by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) at University of Hyogo. In the experiment, a pulsed plasma with duration of ~0.5ms, incident ion energy of ~30eV, and surface absorbed energy density of ~0.3-0.7MJ/m2 was produced by the MCPG. However, no melting occurred on a tungsten surface exposed to a single plasma pulse of ~0.7MJ/m2, while cracks clearly appeared at the edge part of the W surface. Thus, we have recently started to improve the performance of the MCPG in order to investigate melt layer dynamics of a tungsten surface such as vapor cloud formation. In the modified MCPG, the capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is increased from 24.5 kJ to 144 kJ. In the preliminary experiments, the plasmoid with duration of ~0.6 ms, incident ion energy of ~ 40 eV, and the surface absorbed energy density of ~2 MJ/m2 was successfully produced at the gun voltage of 6 kV.

  11. Modified by air plasma polymer tack membranes as drainage material for antiglaucomatous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazantseva, T. V.; Kravets, L. I.; Elinson, V. M.

    2014-06-01

    The morphological and clinical studies of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes modified by air plasma as drainage materials for antiglaucomatous operations were performed. It was demonstrated their compatibility with eye tissues. Moreover, it was shown that a new drainage has a good lasting hypotensive effect and can be used as operation for refractory glaucoma surgery.

  12. Thermophysics Characterization of Multiply Ionized Air Plasma Absorption of Laser Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Rhodes, Robert; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The impact of multiple ionization of air plasma on the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation is investigated for air breathing laser propulsion. Thermochemical properties of multiply ionized air plasma species are computed for temperatures up to 200,000 deg K, using hydrogenic approximation of the electronic partition function; And those for neutral air molecules are also updated for temperatures up to 50,000 deg K, using available literature data. Three formulas for absorption are calculated and a general formula is recommended for multiple ionization absorption calculation. The plasma composition required for absorption calculation is obtained by increasing the degree of ionization sequentially, up to quadruple ionization, with a series of thermal equilibrium computations. The calculated second ionization absorption coefficient agrees reasonably well with that of available data. The importance of multiple ionization modeling is demonstrated with the finding that area under the quadruple ionization curve of absorption is found to be twice that of single ionization. The effort of this work is beneficial to the computational plasma aerodynamics modeling of laser lightcraft performance.

  13. Complex utilization of snf processing wastes in air plasma of high-frequency torch discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karengin, A. G.; Karengin, A. A.; Podgornaya, O. D.; Shlotgauer, E. E.

    2014-10-01

    We present results of complex spent nuclear fuel wastes utilization process in air plasma of high-frequency torch discharge in form of dispersed water-organic compositions. We demonstrate the possibility to apply magnetic separation for effective extraction of obtained dispersed solid products including magnetic iron oxide from water suspension.

  14. Transverse evolution of a plasma channel in air induced by a femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y P; Zhu, J B; Ji, Z G; Liu, J S; Shuai, B; Li, R X; Xu, Z Z; Théberge, F; Chin, S L

    2006-02-15

    We investigate the evolution of filamentation in air by using a longitudinal diffraction method and a plasma fluorescence imaging technique. The diameter of a single filament in which the intensity is clamped increases as the energy of the pump light pulse increases, until multiple filaments appear. PMID:16496915

  15. Creating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns by direct exposure to radio-frequency air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Stephant, Nicolas; Hamon, Jonathan; Thiry, Damien; Chauvin, Adrien; Chettab, Meriem; Gautron, Eric; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Granier, Agnès; Tessier, Pierre-Yves

    2015-12-01

    Nanoporous materials are of great importance for a broad range of applications including catalysis, optical sensors and water filtration. Although several approaches already exist for the creation of nanoporous materials, the race for the development of versatile methods, more suitable for the nanoelectronics industry, is still ongoing. In this communication we report for the first time on the possibility of generating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns using a dry approach based on the oxidation of silver by direct exposure to a commercially available radio-frequency air plasma. The silver nanocolumns are created by glancing angle deposition using magnetron sputtering of a silver target in pure argon plasma. We show that upon exposure to the rf air plasma, the nanocolumns transform from solid silver into nanoporous silver oxide. We further show that by tuning the plasma pressure and the exposure duration, the oxidation process can be finely adjusted allowing for precisely controlling the morphology and the nanoporosity of the silver oxide nanocolumns. The generation of porosity within the silver nanocolumns is explained according to a cracking-induced oxidation mechanism based on two repeated events occurring alternately during the oxidation process: (i) oxidation of silver upon exposure to the air plasma and (ii) generation of nanocracks and blisters within the oxide layer due to the high internal stress generated within the material during oxidation.

  16. Creating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns by direct exposure to radio-frequency air plasma.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Stephant, Nicolas; Hamon, Jonathan; Thiry, Damien; Chauvin, Adrien; Chettab, Meriem; Gautron, Eric; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Granier, Agnès; Tessier, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Nanoporous materials are of great importance for a broad range of applications including catalysis, optical sensors and water filtration. Although several approaches already exist for the creation of nanoporous materials, the race for the development of versatile methods, more suitable for the nanoelectronics industry, is still ongoing. In this communication we report for the first time on the possibility of generating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns using a dry approach based on the oxidation of silver by direct exposure to a commercially available radio-frequency air plasma. The silver nanocolumns are created by glancing angle deposition using magnetron sputtering of a silver target in pure argon plasma. We show that upon exposure to the rf air plasma, the nanocolumns transform from solid silver into nanoporous silver oxide. We further show that by tuning the plasma pressure and the exposure duration, the oxidation process can be finely adjusted allowing for precisely controlling the morphology and the nanoporosity of the silver oxide nanocolumns. The generation of porosity within the silver nanocolumns is explained according to a cracking-induced oxidation mechanism based on two repeated events occurring alternately during the oxidation process: (i) oxidation of silver upon exposure to the air plasma and (ii) generation of nanocracks and blisters within the oxide layer due to the high internal stress generated within the material during oxidation. PMID:26611109

  17. The study of gas species on THz generation from laser-induced air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji; Zhang, LiangLiang; Wu, YiJian; Wu, Tong; Yuan, Hui; Zhang, CunLin; Zhao, YueJin

    2015-08-01

    Intense Terahertz waves generated from air-induced plasma and serving as broadband THz source provide a promising broadband source for innovative technology. Terahertz generation in selected gases has attracted more and more researchers' interests in recent years. In this research, the THz emission from different atoms is described, such as nitrogen, argon and helium in Michelson. The THz radiation is detected by a Golay Cell equipped with a 6-mm-diameter diamond-inputting window. It can be seen in the first time that when the pump power lies at a stable level, the THz generation created by the femtosecond laser focusing on the nitrogen is higher than which focusing on the helium, and lower than that produced in the argon gas environment. We believe that the THz intensity is Ar > N > Ne because of its atomic mass, which is Ar > N > Ne as well. It is clear that the Gas molecular decides the release of free electrons ionized from ultra short femtosecond laser through the electronic dynamic analysis. The higher the gas mass is, the stronger the terahertz emission will be. We further explore the THz emission at the different laser power levels, and the experimental results can be commendably quadratic fitted. It can be inferred that THz emission under different gas medium environment still complies with the law of four-wave mixing (FWM) process and has nothing to do with the gas environment: the radiation energy is proportional to the quadratic of incident laser power.

  18. Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer series in laboratory air.

    PubMed

    Swafford, Lauren D; Parigger, Christian G

    2014-01-01

    Stark-broadened emission profiles for the hydrogen alpha and beta Balmer series lines in plasma are measured to characterize electron density and temperature. Plasma is generated using a typical laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) arrangement that employs a focused Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd : YAG) laser, operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The temporal evolution of the hydrogen Balmer series lines is explored using LIBS. Spectra from the plasma are measured following laser-induced optical breakdown in laboratory air. The electron density is primarily inferred from the Stark-broadened experimental data collected at various time delays. Due to the presence of nitrogen and oxygen in air, the hydrogen alpha and beta lines become clearly discernible from background radiation for time delays of 0.4 and 1.4 μs, respectively. PMID:25226255

  19. Microbiological quality of fresh produce from open air markets and supermarkets in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Vital, Pierangeli G; Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn B; Widmer, Kenneth W; Rivera, Windell L

    2014-01-01

    This study is the first in the Philippines to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the prevalence of bacterial pathogens and somatic phages in retailed fresh produce used in salad preparation, namely, bell pepper, cabbage, carrot, lettuce, and tomato, using culture and molecular methods. Out of 300 samples from open air and supermarkets, 16.7% tested positive for thermotolerant Escherichia coli, 24.7% for Salmonella spp., and 47% for somatic phages. Results show that counts range from 0.30 to 4.03 log10 CFU/g for E. coli, 0.66 to ≥ 2.34 log10 MPN/g for Salmonella spp., and 1.30 to ≥ 3.00 log 10 PFU/g for somatic phages. Statistical analyses show that there was no significant difference in the microbial counts between open air and supermarkets (α = 0.05). TaqMan and AccuPower Plus DualStar real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to confirm the presence of these organisms. The relatively high prevalence of microorganisms observed in produce surveyed signifies reduction in shelf-life and a potential hazard to food safety. This information may benefit farmers, consumers, merchants, and policy makers for foodborne disease detection and prevention. PMID:24963502

  20. Microwave plasma-assisted ignition and flameholding in premixed ethylene/air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Che A.; Wu, Wei; Wang, Chuji

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a 2.45 GHz microwave source and a surfatron were used, coupled with a T-shaped quartz combustor, to investigate the role of a nonthermal microwave argon plasma jet on the plasma-assisted ignition and flameholding of a premixed ethylene/air mixture. A modified U-shaped plot of the minimum plasma power required for ignition versus fuel equivalence ratio was obtained, whereby the plasma power required for plasma-assisted ignition decreased with increase in fuel equivalence ratios in the range 0.2–0.6, but for fuel equivalence ratios of 0.7 and above, the plasma power required for ignition remained fairly constant throughout. It was observed that leaner fuel/air mixtures were more sensitive to heat losses to the surrounding and this sensitivity decreased with increase in the fuel equivalence ratio. Comparison with results obtained from previous studies suggested that the mixing scheme between the plasma and the premixed fuel/air mixture and the energy density of the fuel used played an important role in influencing the minimum plasma power required for ignition with the effect being more pronounced for near stoichiometric to rich fuel equivalence ratios (0.7–1.4). Flame images obtained showed a dual layered flame with an inner white core and a bluish outer layer. The images also showed an increased degree of flameholding (tethering of the flame to the combustor orifice) with increase in plasma power. The concurrency of the dual peaks in the emission intensity profiles for OH(A), CH(A), C2(d), and the rotational temperature profiles obtained via optical emission spectroscopy along with the ground state OH(X) number density profiles in the flame using cavity ringdown spectroscopy led to the proposal that the mechanism of plasma-assisted flameholding in ethylene/air flames is predominantly radical dependent with the formation of an inner radical rich flame core which enhances the ignition and stabilization of the surrounding coflow.

  1. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compressionmore » and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.« less

  2. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-07-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 {mu}m radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N{sub 2}C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation.

  3. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-07-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 μm radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation.

  4. Measurement of the degree of polarization of the spectra from laser produced recombining Al plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Dong-Eon

    2002-07-01

    Using a polarization-resolved UV-visible spectrometer, the degree of polarization of the spectra from laser produced Al plasmas was measured. The polarization resolution was achieved by using either a dichroic polarizer or a calcite crystal. The degree of polarization of Al III 4s(2)S(1/2)-4p(2)P(o)(3/2) transition at 569.66 nm was measured at different positions from a target surface. The degree of polarization was observed to be 2.1+/-0.13% at a distance of 220 microm from the target and decreased as the distance from the target increased, vanishing at a distance of about 1.3 mm from the target. To avoid the possible error due to the shot-to-shot variation of the line intensity, a calcite crystal was used to simultaneously observe the two polarization components, obtaining a similar result. The electron temperature of about 3 eV and the density of 2 x 10(17) cm(-3) measured spectroscopically indicates that the plasma was in the recombining phase. This is a report on the observation of the polarization of a transition in a laser-produced recombining Al plasma. PMID:12241524

  5. Inactivation of Escherichia coli ATCC 11775 in fresh produce using atmospheric pressure cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez-Aguirre, Daniela; Wemlinger, Erik; Barbosa-Canovas, Gustavo; Pedrow, Patrick; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Food-borne outbreaks are associated with the presence of pathogenic bacteria in food products such as fresh produce. One of the target microorganisms is Escherichia coli which exhibits resistance to being inactivated with conventional disinfection methods for vegetables. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP) was tested to disinfect three vegetables with challenge surfaces, lettuce, carrots and tomatoes. The produce was inoculated with the bacteria to reach an initial microbial concentration of 107 cfu/g. Vegetables were initially exposed to the APCP discharges from a needle array at 5.7 kV RMS in argon, processing times of 0.5, 3 and 5 min. Initial results indicate that microbial decontamination is effective on the lettuce (1.2 log reduction) when compared with other vegetables. To claim disinfection, a 3 log reduction or more is needed, which makes APCP treatment very promising technology for decontamination of produce. We propose that with method refinements full disinfection can be achieved using APCP.

  6. Decay of femtosecond laser-induced plasma filaments in air, nitrogen, and argon for atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, N L; Bodrov, S B; Tsarev, M V; Murzanev, A A; Sergeev, Yu A; Malkov, Yu A; Stepanov, A N

    2016-07-01

    The temporal evolution of a plasma channel at the trail of a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse was studied experimentally and theoretically in air, nitrogen (with an admixture of ∼3% O_{2}), and argon in a wide range of gas pressures (from 2 to 760 Torr). Measurements by means of transverse optical interferometry and pulsed terahertz scattering techniques showed that plasma density in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure reduces by an order of magnitude within 3-4 ns and that the decay rate decreases with decreasing pressure. The argon plasma did not decay within several nanoseconds for pressures of 50-760 Torr. We extended our theoretical model previously applied for atmospheric pressure air plasma to explain the plasma decay in the gases under study and to show that allowance for plasma channel expansion affects plasma decay at low pressures. PMID:27575227

  7. Decay of femtosecond laser-induced plasma filaments in air, nitrogen, and argon for atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Bodrov, S. B.; Tsarev, M. V.; Murzanev, A. A.; Sergeev, Yu. A.; Malkov, Yu. A.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    The temporal evolution of a plasma channel at the trail of a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse was studied experimentally and theoretically in air, nitrogen (with an admixture of ˜3% O2), and argon in a wide range of gas pressures (from 2 to 760 Torr). Measurements by means of transverse optical interferometry and pulsed terahertz scattering techniques showed that plasma density in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure reduces by an order of magnitude within 3-4 ns and that the decay rate decreases with decreasing pressure. The argon plasma did not decay within several nanoseconds for pressures of 50-760 Torr. We extended our theoretical model previously applied for atmospheric pressure air plasma to explain the plasma decay in the gases under study and to show that allowance for plasma channel expansion affects plasma decay at low pressures.

  8. Spectra of plasmas of Ru, Rh, Pd and Mo produced with nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokasani, Ragava; Long, Elaine; Sheridan, Paul; Hayden, Patrick; O'Reilly, Fergal; Dunne, Padraig; Endo, Akira; Limpouch, Jiri; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray emission recorded in the 2-12 nm region from Mo, Ru, Rh and Pd ions present in the laser produced plasmas. The spectra were found to be dominated by 3p-3d transitions in the 5-8 nm region, which shift slowly to shorter wavelengths with the increasing atomic number, and by 3d-4p and 3d-4f transitions at shorter wavelengths. These transitions, in a number of neighbouring ion stages, were distinguished by comparison with Cowan code calculations and previously reported data. The experimental results show that strong emission can be observed at the 6.X nm region for Ru, Rh and Pd plasmas.

  9. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Loisel, G.; Yahia, V.; Rafelski, J.

    2013-10-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

  10. Optical pyrometer system for collisionless shock experiments in high-power laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sano, T.; Takabe, H.; Dono, S.; Ide, T.; Tanji, H.; Shiroshita, A.; Shibata, S.; Aoki, H.; Waugh, J. N.; Woolsey, N. C.; Gregory, C. D.

    2012-10-15

    A temporally and spatially resolved optical pyrometer system has been fielded on Gekko XII experiments. The system is based on the self-emission measurements with a gated optical imager (GOI) and a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). Both detectors measure the intensity of the self-emission from laser-produced plasmas at the wavelength of 450 nm with a bandpass filter with a width of {approx}10 nm in FWHM. The measurements were calibrated with different methods, and both results agreed with each other within 30% as previously reported [T. Morita et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 336, 283 (2011)]. As a tool for measuring the properties of low-density plasmas, the system is applicable for the measurements of the electron temperature and density in collisionless shock experiments [Y. Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)].

  11. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Labaune, C; Baccou, C; Depierreux, S; Goyon, C; Loisel, G; Yahia, V; Rafelski, J

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments. PMID:24104859

  12. Consolidation of TiB{sub 2} powders produced by plasma synthesis of cheap raw materials

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, G.L.; Bhaduri, S.B.; Radhakrishnan, R.

    1995-12-31

    TiB{sub 2} powders were produced in a non-transferred arc thermal plasma reactor. The starting raw materials were rutile and boron oxide, which reacted in the plasma chamber using methane to form TiB{sub 2}. As received powders were treated to remove any adherent oxide. The powders were consolidated using two different approaches. In the first case the powders were CIPed at 30 ksi, sintered at 1825{center_dot}C, followed by HIPing at 1825{center_dot}C and 28 ksi. In the other approach, the samples were CIPed followed by direct HIPing. The as compacted samples were characterized for microstructure and mechanical properties. The results will be reported in this paper.

  13. In-package nonthermal plasma degradation of pesticides on fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Misra, N N; Pankaj, S K; Walsh, Tony; O'Regan, Finbarr; Bourke, Paula; Cullen, P J

    2014-04-30

    In-package nonthermal plasma (NTP) technology is a novel technology for the decontamination of foods and biological materials. This study presents the first report on the potential of the technology for the degradation of pesticide residues on fresh produce. A cocktail of pesticides, namely azoxystrobin, cyprodinil, fludioxonil and pyriproxyfen was tested on strawberries. The concentrations of these pesticides were monitored in priori and post-plasma treatment using GC-MS/MS. An applied voltage and time dependent degradation of the pesticides was observed for treatment voltages of 60, 70 and 80 kV and treatment durations ranging from 1 to 5 min, followed by 24h in-pack storage. The electrical characterisation revealed the operation of the discharge in a stable filamentary regime. The discharge was found to generate reactive oxygen and excited nitrogen species as observed by optical emission spectroscopy. PMID:24598029

  14. Correlation between laser absorption and radiation conversion efficiency in laser produced tin plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukuma, Hiraku Hosoda, Tatsuya; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Tomuro, Hiroaki; Kouge, Kouichiro; Kodama, Takeshi

    2015-09-21

    The correlation between the laser absorption and the conversion efficiency (CE) for 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in a laser-produced tin plasma was investigated. The absorption rate α and the CE were measured simultaneously for a laser-pre-formed low-density tin target as a function of the time delay between the pre-pulse and the main laser pulse. A clear and positive correlation between α and CE was found with increasing delay time; however, the CE decreases rapidly at longer delay times. This result is partly attributed to a reduction in the absorption rate, but is mainly attributed to the self-absorption of EUV light in excessively long-scale plasmas.

  15. Non-Spitzer heat flow in a steadily ablating laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, A.R.

    1985-06-01

    Electron energy transport in a laser-produced ablating plasma is modeled by the Vlasov--Fokker--Planck equation for electrons and the fluid equations for cold ions. These equations are solved using approximations which maintain good accuracy but allow faster computational solution than was previously possible. It is found that the spatial profiles for temperature and density in planar geometry differ very little from those calculated from the Spitzer conductivity. At high laser intensities, the plasma flow diverges as it flows away from the solid target and the effects of nonplanar flow are important. This is modeled by the adoption of spherical geometry, and it is found that the Spitzer conductivity breaks down and the temperature and density profiles differ significantly from those calculated using the Spitzer conductivity.

  16. Electron energy transport in ion waves and its relevance to laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Electron energy transport in plasmas is examined in the context of ion waves which are intermediate between collisionless isothermal ion acoustic waves and collisional adiabatic sound waves. The conductivity is found to be much less than the Spitzer-Haerm result for wavelengths less than 1000 electron mean free paths. This is expected to be relevant to laser-produced ablating plasmas in which the temperature can vary considerably over a distance of 10 to 100 mean free paths. The reduction in conductivity is independent of the wave amplitude thus differing from the reduction due to saturation found recently by numerical solution of the Fokker--Planck equation. At short wavelengths the heat flow approaches an upper limit which depends on the phase velocity of the wave. Diffusive ion wave damping is strong over a large range of wavelengths.

  17. Streptococci biofilm decontamination on teeth by low-temperature air plasma of dc corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalóvá, Z.; Zahoran, M.; Zahoranová, A.; Machala, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric pressure air direct current corona discharges were investigated for potential applications in dental medicine. The objective of this ex vivo study was to apply cold plasmas for the decontamination of Streptococci biofilm grown on extracted human teeth, and to estimate their antimicrobial efficiency and the plasma's impact on the enamel and dentine of the treated tooth surfaces. The results show that both positive streamer and negative Trichel pulse coronas can reduce bacterial population in the biofilm by up to 3 logs in a 10 min exposure time. This bactericidal effect can be reached faster (within 5 min) by electrostatic spraying of water through the discharge onto the treated tooth surface. Examination of the tooth surface after plasma exposure by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy did not show any significant alteration in the tooth material composition or the tooth surface structures.

  18. Atmospheric-air plasma enhances coating of different lubricating agents on polyester fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, I.; Kiumarsi, A.; Parvinzadeh Gashti, M.; Rashidian, R.; Norouzi, M. Hossein

    2011-10-01

    This research work involves the plasma treatment of polyethylene terephthalate fiber to improve performance of various ionic lubricating agents. To do this, polyester fabric was pre-scoured with detergent, treated with atmospheric-air plasma and then coated with anionic, cationic and nonionic emulsions. Chemical and physical properties of samples were investigated by the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), bending lengths (BL), wrinkle recovery angles (WRA), fiber friction coefficient analysis (FFCA), moisture absorbency (MA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and reflectance spectroscopy (RS). Study on chemical properties of fibers revealed that the plasma pretreatment modifies the surface of fibers and increases the reactivity of substrate toward various ionic emulsions. Physical properties of textiles indicated that the combination of plasma and emulsion treatments on polyester can improve crease resistant, drapeability and water repellency due to uniform coating of various emulsions on surface of textiles.

  19. A brush-shaped air plasma jet operated in glow discharge mode at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Jia, Pengying; Di, Cong

    2014-07-01

    Using ambient air as working gas, a direct-current plasma jet is developed to generate a brush-shaped plasma plume with fairly large volume. Although a direct-current power supply is used, the discharge shows a pulsed characteristic. Based on the voltage-current curve and fast photography, the brush-shaped plume, like the gliding arc plasma, is in fact a temporal superposition of a moving discharge filament in an arched shape. During it moves away from the nozzle, the discharge evolves from a low-current arc into a normal glow in one discharge cycle. The emission profile is explained qualitatively based on the dynamics of the plasma brush.

  20. Millimeter wave scattering and diffraction in 110 GHz air breakdown plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-04-15

    We present measurements of the scattering, reflection, absorption, and transmission of a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz quasioptical gyrotron beam by a self-induced air breakdown plasma. The breakdown forms a periodic array of plasma filaments, oriented parallel to the incident electric field polarization that propagates toward the microwave source. For incident intensity of 3 MW/cm{sup 2}, calorimetric measurements show that as much as 45% of the full beam power is absorbed by the plasma, averaged over the pulse, 1% is reflected backward, and the remainder is transmitted and also scattered into a wide angular spread. We observe that approximately 10 times more power is scattered in the direction perpendicular to the filaments than parallel. The far-field angular distribution of transmitted power exhibits a diffraction pattern that changes throughout the 2-{mu}s life of the plasma.

  1. Surface modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) fibers induced by radio frequency air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, Claudia; Barni, Ruggero; Selli, Elena; Mazzone, Giovanni; Massafra, Maria Rosaria; Marcandalli, Bruno; Poletti, Giulio

    2003-04-01

    The surface chemical and physical modifications of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers induced by radiofrequency air plasma treatments were correlated with the characteristics of the discharge parameters and the chemical composition of the plasma itself, to identify the plasma-induced surface processes prevailing under different operating conditions. Treated polymer surfaces were characterized by water droplet absorption time measurements and XPS analysis, as a function of the aging time in different media, and by AFM analysis. They exhibited a remarkable increase in hydrophilicity, accompanied by extensive etching and by the implantation of both oxygen- and nitrogen-containing polar groups. Etching was mainly a consequence of ion bombardment, yielding low molecular weight, water soluble oxidation products, while surface chemical modifications were mainly due to the action of neutral species on the plasma-activated polymer surface.

  2. Plasma produced by impacts of fast dust particles on a thin film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried

    1994-01-01

    The thin-film impact plasma detector was pioneered by Berg for detecting small cosmic dust particles and measuring their approximate velocities in a time-of-flight configuration. While Berg's device was highly successful in establishing the flux of interplanetary dust, the accuracy of measuring the velocities of individual particles was a moderate 18 percent in magnitude and 27 degrees in angle. A much greater accuracy of less than or equal to 1 percent in determining the velocity components appears desirable in order to associate a particle with its parent body. In order to meet that need, research was initiated to determine if a thin-film detector can be designed to provide such accurate velocity measurements. Previous laboratory investigations of the impact plasma uncovered two difficulties: (1) solid or liquid spray is ejected from a primary impact crater and strikes neighboring walls where it produces secondary impact craters and plasma clouds; as a result, both quantity and time of detection of the plasma can vary significantly with the experiment configuration. Particles from an accelerator rarely have speeds v greater than or equal to 10-15 km/s, while cosmic dust particles typically impact at v = 10-72 km/s. The purpose of the tests discussed in this paper was to resolve the two difficulties mentioned. That is, the experiment configuration was designed to reduce the contribution of plasma from secondary impacts. In addition, most particles with v less than or equal to 25 km/s and all particles with v less than or equal to 10 km/s were eliminated from the beam.

  3. High-power EUV lithography sources based on gas discharges and laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Uwe; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Balogh, Istvan; Birner, H.; Bolshukhin, D.; Brudermann, J.; Enke, S.; Flohrer, Frank; G„bel, Kai; G÷tze, S.; Hergenhan, G.; Kleinschmidt, J.'rgen; Kl÷pfel, Diethard; Korobotchko, Vladimir; Ringling, Jens; Schriever, Guido; Tran, C. D.; Ziener, C.

    2003-06-01

    Semiconductor chip manufacturers are expecting to use extreme UV lithography for production in 2009. EUV tools require high power, brilliant light sources at 13.5 nm with collector optics producing 120 W average power at entrance of the illuminator system. Today the power and lifetime of the EUV light source are considered as the most critical issue for EUV lithography. The present paper gives an update of the development status of EUV light sources at XTREME technologies, a joint venture of Lambda Physik AG, Goettingen, and Jenoptik LOS GmbH, Jena, Germany. Results on both laser produced plasma (LPP) and gas discharge produced plasma (GDPP), the two major technologies in EUV sources, are given. The LPP EUV sources use xenon-jet target systems and pulsed lasers with 400 W average power at 10 kHz developed at XTREME technologies. The maximum conversion efficiency form laser power into EUV in-band power is 0.75% into 2π solid angle. With 300 W laser average power at 3300 Hz repetition rate up to 1.5 W EUV radiation is generated at 13.5 nm. After a collector of 5 sr this corresponds to 0.6 W in intermediate focus without spectral purity filter and 0.5 W in intermediate focus with spectral purity filter. The direct generation of the EUV emitting plasma from electrical discharges is much simpler than LPP because the electrical energy has not to be converted into laser radiation before plasma excitation. XTREME technologies' Xenon GDPP EUV sources use the Z-pinch principle with efficient sliding discharge pre-ionization. The plasma pinch size and the available emission angle have been matched to the etendue of the optical system of 2-3 mm2 sr, i.e. no additional etendue related loss reduces the usable EUV power from the source. In continuous operation at 1000 Hz the GDPP sources emit 50W into 2π solid angle are obtained from the Z-pinch sources. Spatial and temporal emission stability of the EUV sources is in the range of a few percent. Debris shields for EUV sources

  4. Physicochemical processes in the indirect interaction between surface air plasma and deionized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. C.; Liu, D. X.; Chen, C.; Li, D.; Yang, A. J.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most central scientific questions for plasma applications in healthcare and environmental remediation is the chemical identity and the dose profile of plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can act on an object inside a liquid. A logical focus is on aqueous physicochemical processes near a sample with a direct link to their upstream gaseous processes in the plasma region and a separation gap from the liquid bulk. Here, a system-level modeling framework is developed for indirect interactions of surface air plasma and a deionized water bulk and its predictions are found to be in good agreement with the measurement of gas-phase ozone and aqueous long-living ROS/RNS concentrations. The plasma region is described with a global model, whereas the air gap and the liquid region are simulated with a 1D fluid model. All three regions are treated as one integrated entity and computed simultaneously. With experimental validation, the system-level modeling shows that the dominant aqueous ROS/RNS are long-living species (e.g. H2O2 aq, O3 aq, nitrite/nitrate, H+ aq). While most short-living gaseous species could hardly survive their passage to the liquid, aqueous short-living ROS/RNS are generated in situ through reactions among long-living plasma species and with water molecules. This plasma-mediated remote production of aqueous ROS/RNS is important for the abundance of aqueous HO2 aq, HO3 aq, OHaq and \\text{O}2- aq as well as NO2 aq and NO3 aq. Aqueous plasma chemistry offers a novel and significant pathway to activate a given biological outcome, as exemplified here for bacterial deactivation in plasma-activated water. Additional factors that may synergistically broaden the usefulness of aqueous plasma chemistry include an electric field by aqueous ions and liquid acidification. The system-modeling framework will be useful in assisting designs and analyses of future investigations of plasma-liquid and plasma-cell interactions.

  5. Present Status and Future of EUV (Extreme Ultra Violet) Light Source Research 4.Laser Produced Plasma Light Sources 4.2High Average Power Laser Produced Plasma EUV Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira

    This paper reviews the research and development of the high average power, extreme ultraviolet light source based on laser produced plasma by EUVA. The technology is based on a liquid Xe micro jet, high repetition rate short pulse Nd:YAG laser, and various diagnostics for plasma optimization are described.

  6. Hydrogen Balmer Series Self-Absorption Measurement in Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Parigger, Christian

    2015-05-01

    In experimental studies of laser-induced plasma, we use focused Nd:YAG laser radiation to generate optical breakdown in laboratory air. A Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and an ICCD camera are utilized to record spatially and temporally resolved spectra. Time-resolved spectroscopy methods are employed to record plasma dynamics for various time delays in the range of 0.300 microsecond to typically 10 microsecond after plasma initiation. Early plasma emission spectra reveal hydrogen alpha and ionized nitrogen lines for time delays larger than 0.3 microsecond, the hydrogen beta line emerges from the free-electron background radiation later in the plasma decay for time delays in excess of 1 microsecond. The self-absorption analyses include comparisons of recorded data without and with the use of a doubling mirror. The extent of self-absorption of the hydrogen Balmer series is investigated for various time delays from plasma generation. There are indications of self-absorption of hydrogen alpha by comparison with ionized nitrogen lines at a time delay of 0.3 microsecond. For subsequent time delays, self-absorption effects on line-widths are hardly noticeable, despite the fact of the apparent line-shape distortions. Of interest are comparisons of inferred electron densities from hydrogen alpha and hydrogen beta lines as the plasma decays, including assessments of spatial variation of electron density.

  7. Microwave interferometry of laser induced air plasmas formed by short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, P.W.

    1993-08-01

    Applications for the interaction of laser induced plasmas with electromagnetic probes requires time varying complex conductivity data for specific laser/electromagnetic probe geometries. Applications for this data include plasma switching (Q switching) and the study of ionization fronts. The plasmas were created in laboratory air by 100 ps laser pulses at a wavelength of 1 {mu}m. A long focal length lens focused the laser pulse into WR90 (X band) rectangular waveguide. Two different laser beam/electromagnetic probe geometries were investigated. For the longitudinal geometry, the laser pulse and the microwave counterpropagated inside the waveguide. For the transverse geometry, the laser created a plasma ``post`` inside the waveguide. The effects of the laser beam deliberately hitting the waveguide were also investigated. Each geometry exhibits its own characteristics. This research project focused on the longitudinal geometry. Since the laser beam intensity varies inside the waveguide, the charge distribution inside the waveguide also varies. A 10 GHz CW microwave probe traveled through the laser induced plasma. From the magnitude and phase of the microwave probe, a spatially integrated complex conductivity was calculated. No measurements of the temporal or spatial variation of the laser induced plasma were made. For the ``plasma post,`` the electron density is more uniform.

  8. Robe Development for Electrical Conductivity Analysis in an Electron Gun Produced Helium Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Bitteker, Leo; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The use of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power conversion systems, potentially coupled with a fission power source, is currently being investigated as a driver for an advanced propulsion system, such as a plasma thruster. The efficiency of a MHD generator is strongly dependent on the electrical conductivity of the fluid that passes through the generator; power density increases as fluid conductivity increases. Although traditional MHD flows depend on thermal ionization to enhance the electrical conductivity, ionization due to nuclear interactions may achieve a comparable or improved conductivity enhancement while avoiding many of the limitations inherent to thermal ionization. Calculations suggest that nuclear-enhanced electrical conductivity increases as the neutron flux increases; conductivity of pure He-3 greater than 10 mho/m may be achievable if exposed to a flux greater than 10(exp 12) neutrons/cm2/s.) However, this remains to be demonstrated experimentally. An experimental facility has been constructed at the Propulsion Research Center at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using helium as the test fluid. High energy electrons will be used to simulate the effects of neutron-induced ionization of helium gas to produce a plasma. These experiments will be focused on diagnosis of the plasma in a virtually static system; results will be applied to future tests with a MHD system. Initial experiments will utilize a 50 keV electron gun that can operate at up to a current of 200 micro A. Spreading the electron beam over a four inch diameter window results in an electron flux of 1.5x 10(exp 13) e/sq cm/s. The equivalent neutron flux that would produce the same ionization fraction in helium is 1x10(exp 12) n/sq cm/s. Experiments will simulate the neutron generated plasma modeled by Bitteker, which takes into account the products of thermal neutron absorption in He-3, and includes various ion species in estimating the conductivity of the resulting plasma. Several

  9. Computational model for non-LTE atomic process in laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi

    1994-02-01

    A computational model for simulating hydro-radiation phenomena has been studied relating to the partially ionized gold plasma produced by irradiation of intense laser light. The screened hydrogenic model with l-splitting effect and the average ion model are used to determine the atomic state of gold ions in the collisional radiative equilibrium. A statistical method is used to evaluate the spectral opacity and emissivity due to the clusters of line transitions. The x-ray conversion rate and spectrum calculated with the hydrodynamic code ILESTA coupled with opacity and emissivity are compared with those observed experimentally.

  10. SiC/C nanocable structure produced in silicon carbide by arc plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, B. B.

    2012-01-01

    Defect-free and long SiC/C nanocables have been produced by heating SiC powder at 3000°C by employing dc arc plasma (Ar) in a specially designed configuration of graphite arc. Microstructural characterizations of the heat-treated powder carried out by TEM, HRTEM, SAED, EDS, and micro Raman spectroscopy showed the nanocables to consist of a SiC shell/sheath stuffed with wire type solid C core. A possible mechanism is discussed to explain the cable-type growth.

  11. Spark plasma sintering of alumina nanopowders produced by electrical explosion of wires.

    PubMed

    An, Vladimir; Khasanov, Alexey; de Izarra, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Alumina nanopowders produced by electrical explosion of wires were sintered using the spark plasma sintering technique. The results of XRD analysis show that the main phase in the compacted nanopowders is α-Al2O3. According to the SEM observations, the sintered alumina nanopowder consists of micron-sized faceted grains and nano-sized necked grains. The increase in sintering temperature resulted in a higher density of the sintered powders: from 78.44 to 98.21 % of theoretical density. PMID:26543716

  12. Gas dynamic effects on formation of carbon dimers in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the effect of helium and nitrogen pressures on the dynamics of molecular species formation during laser ablation of carbon. For producing plasmas, planar carbon targets were irradiated with 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from an Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The emission from excited C2 and CN molecules was studied using space resolved optical time-of-flight emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast imaging. The intensity oscillations in C2 and CN monochromatic fast imaging and their emission space-time contours suggest that recombination is the major mechanism of C2 formation within the laser ablation carbon plumes in the presence of ambient gas.

  13. F.T. spectroscopy of OH produced in a microwave surface plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benidar, A.; Farrenq, R.; Guelachvili, G.; Chapey, M. Morillon; Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Emission spectra of the hydroxyl radical have been recorded between 450 and 4200/cm at 0.0027/cm unapodized resolution from an air+oxygen+water vapor plasma, using a surface microwave discharge. The characteristics of the source are described. The emission spectra were recorded with the F.T. spectrometer using a GeCu detector and KCl beams plitter. High J values were observed both for the pure rotational transition in v=0 and v=1 vibrational levels, and for the rovibrational transition in the 0-1 and 1-2 bands. The set of line intensity data will be used to compute the electric dipole moment function of OH.

  14. Surface treatment of aramid fiber by air dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Caixia; Chen, Ping; Liu, Wei; Li, Bin; Wang, Qian

    2011-02-01

    Aramid fiber samples are treated by air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure; the plasma treatment time is investigated as the major parameter. The effects of this treatment on the fiber surface physical and chemical properties are studied by using surface characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is performed to determine the surface morphology changes, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is analyzed to reveal the surface chemical composition variations and dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) is used to examine the changes of the fiber surface wettability. In addition, the wetting behavior of a kind of thermoplastic resin, poly(phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (PPESK), on aramid fiber surface is also observed by SEM photos. The study shows that there seems to be an optimum treatment condition for surface modification of aramid fiber by the air DBD plasma. In this paper, after the 12 s, 27.6 W/cm3 plasma treatment the aramid fiber surface roughness is significantly improved, some new oxygen-containing groups such as C-O, Cdbnd O and Odbnd C-O are generated on the fiber surface and the fiber surface wettability is greatly enhanced, which results in the better wetting behavior of PPESK resin on the plasma-treated aramid fiber.

  15. Air-water ‘tornado’-type microwave plasmas applied for sugarcane biomass treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundaleska, N.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lino da Silva, M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Amorim, J.

    2014-02-01

    The production of cellulosic ethanol from sugarcane biomass is an attractive alternative to the use of fossil fuels. Pretreatment is needed to separate the cellulosic material, which is packed with hemicellulose and lignin in cell wall of sugarcane biomass. A microwave ‘tornado’-type air-water plasma source operating at 2.45 GHz and atmospheric pressure has been applied for this purpose. Samples of dry and wet biomass (˜2 g) have been exposed to the late afterglow plasma stream. The experiments demonstrate that the air-water highly reactive plasma environment provides a number of long-lived active species able to destroy the cellulosic wrapping. Scanning electron microscopy has been applied to analyse the morphological changes occurring due to plasma treatment. The effluent gas streams have been analysed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Optical emission spectroscopy and FT-IR have been applied to determine the gas temperature in the discharge and late afterglow plasma zones, respectively. The optimal range of the operational parameters is discussed along with the main active species involved in the treatment process. Synergistic effects can result from the action of singlet O2(a 1Δg) oxygen, NO2, nitrous acid HNO2 and OH hydroxyl radical.

  16. Cold atmospheric air plasma sterilization against spores and other microorganisms of clinical interest.

    PubMed

    Klämpfl, Tobias G; Isbary, Georg; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Zimmermann, Julia L; Stolz, Wilhelm; Schlegel, Jürgen; Morfill, Gregor E; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    Physical cold atmospheric surface microdischarge (SMD) plasma operating in ambient air has promising properties for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices where conventional methods are not applicable. Furthermore, SMD plasma could revolutionize the field of disinfection at health care facilities. The antimicrobial effects on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of clinical relevance, as well as the fungus Candida albicans, were tested. Thirty seconds of plasma treatment led to a 4 to 6 log(10) CFU reduction on agar plates. C. albicans was the hardest to inactivate. The sterilizing effect on standard bioindicators (bacterial endospores) was evaluated on dry test specimens that were wrapped in Tyvek coupons. The experimental D(23)(°)(C) values for Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were determined as 0.3 min, 0.5 min, 0.6 min, and 0.9 min, respectively. These decimal reduction times (D values) are distinctly lower than D values obtained with other reference methods. Importantly, the high inactivation rate was independent of the material of the test specimen. Possible inactivation mechanisms for relevant microorganisms are briefly discussed, emphasizing the important role of neutral reactive plasma species and pointing to recent diagnostic methods that will contribute to a better understanding of the strong biocidal effect of SMD air plasma. PMID:22582068

  17. Emission spectroscopy of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated with air at low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, L.; Gallego, J. L.; Minotti, F.; Kelly, H.; Grondona, D.

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature, high-pressure plasma jets have an extensive use in plasma biology and plasma medicine, such as pathogen deactivation, wound disinfection, stopping of bleeding without damage of healthy tissue, acceleration of wound healing, control of bio-film proliferation, etc. In this work, a spectroscopic characterization of a typical plasma jet, operated in air at atmospheric pressure, is reported. Within the spectrum of wavelengths from 200 to 450 nm all remarkable emissions of N2 were monitored. Spectra of the N2 2nd positive system (C3Πu-B3Πg) emitted in air are the most convenient for plasma diagnostics, since they enable to determine electronic Te, rotational Tr and vibrational Tv temperatures by fitting the experimental spectra with the simulated ones. We used SPECAIR software for spectral simulation and obtained the best fit with all these temperatures about 3500K. The conclusion that all temperatures are equal, and its relatively high value, is consistent with the results of a previous work, where it was found that the experimentally determined electrical characteristic was consistent with the model of a thermal arc discharge, together with a highly collisional cathode sheet.

  18. Cold Atmospheric Air Plasma Sterilization against Spores and Other Microorganisms of Clinical Interest

    PubMed Central

    Isbary, Georg; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Stolz, Wilhelm; Schlegel, Jürgen; Morfill, Gregor E.; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Physical cold atmospheric surface microdischarge (SMD) plasma operating in ambient air has promising properties for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices where conventional methods are not applicable. Furthermore, SMD plasma could revolutionize the field of disinfection at health care facilities. The antimicrobial effects on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of clinical relevance, as well as the fungus Candida albicans, were tested. Thirty seconds of plasma treatment led to a 4 to 6 log10 CFU reduction on agar plates. C. albicans was the hardest to inactivate. The sterilizing effect on standard bioindicators (bacterial endospores) was evaluated on dry test specimens that were wrapped in Tyvek coupons. The experimental D23°C values for Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were determined as 0.3 min, 0.5 min, 0.6 min, and 0.9 min, respectively. These decimal reduction times (D values) are distinctly lower than D values obtained with other reference methods. Importantly, the high inactivation rate was independent of the material of the test specimen. Possible inactivation mechanisms for relevant microorganisms are briefly discussed, emphasizing the important role of neutral reactive plasma species and pointing to recent diagnostic methods that will contribute to a better understanding of the strong biocidal effect of SMD air plasma. PMID:22582068

  19. Applications of web produced by hot air assisted melt differential electrospinning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubakir, Mahmoud M.; Li, Haoyi; Wu, Weifeng; Li, Xiaohu; Ma, Shuai; Yang, Weimin

    2014-08-01

    Melt electrospinning, a technique that has gained increasing attention since it easily can generate continuous ultrafine fibers directly from polymer melts without the use of any solvent. Therefore, it is considered as a safe, cost effective, and environmental friendly technique. However, with all those great advantages, the technique still suffers some drawbacks such as: large fiber diameter and low throughput. The hot air assisted melt differential electrospinning (MDES) is a new technique invented by our research team that can solve or eliminate those drawbacks. The most important features of our used apparatus are: Needleless nozzle that could generate multiple Taylor cones around the bottom edge of the nozzle, which can result in a high throughput. The stretching force acting on the jets can be further strengthened by an air current provided by an air pressure gun. Interference between the high voltage supply and temperature sensors could be prevented through the grounding of the nozzle. The ultrafine pp webs produced using the same apparatus was in the micro/nano scale with a diameter of 600nm-6um and a smooth surface. Porosity of the webs ranges from 86.5%-99.4% when different collecting devices are used. The resultant ultrafine webs were applied in three areas: oil sorption, water treatment, and hydrophilic PP membrane. The results were very promising as for oil the sorption capacity was 129.0g/g; for water treatment, the rejection rate for 3um particles was 95%. And for the hydrophilic PP membrane, the water sorption capacity was 12.3 g/g.

  20. Light Transmission Fluctuations from Extended Air Showers Produced by Cosmic-Rays and Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart

    Cosmic-ray and gamma-ray experiments that use the atmosphere as a calorimeter, such as the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) and the Telescope Array (TA), require understanding the transmission of the light from the air shower of particles produced by the cosmic-ray or gamma-ray striking the atmosphere. To better understand the scattering and transmission of light to the detectors, HiRes measures light from different calibrated sources. We compare scattered light from laser shots a few kilometers away from the two HiRes detectors with direct light from stable portable light sources placed a few meters in front of the phototubes. We use two HiRes detectors to study and isolate contributions to fluctuations of the measured light. These contributions include fluctuations in the source intensity, the night sky background, scattering and transmission of the laser beam, the phototubes and electronics, and photostatistics. N o rth Mirror Fields of View

  1. Advection fog formation and aerosols produced by combustion-originated air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The way in which pollutants produced by the photochemical reaction of NO(X) and SO(X) affect the quality of the human environment through such phenomena as the formation of advection fog is considered. These pollutants provide the major source of condensation nuclei for the formation of fog in highways, airports and seaports. Results based on the monodisperse, multicomponent aerosol model show that: (1) condensation nuclei can grow and form a dense fog without the air having attained supersaturation; (2) the mass concentration range for NO(X) is one-third that of SO(X); and (3) the greater the mass concentration, the particle concentration, and the radius of condensation nuclei, the denser the fog that is formed.

  2. Sonic booms produced by US Air Force and US Navy aircraft: Measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. A.; Downing, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    A sonic measurement program was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base. Sonic boom signatures, produced by F-4, F-14, F-15, F-16, F-18, F-111, SR-71, and T-38 aircraft, were obtained under the flight track and at various lateral sites which were located up to 18 miles off-track. Thirteen monitors developed by Det 1 AL/BBE were used to collect full sonic boom waveforms, and nine modified dosimeters were used to collect supplemental peak overpressures and the C-weighted Sound Exposure Levels (CSEL) for 43 near steady supersonic flights of the above United States Air Force and United States Navy aircraft. This report describes the measured database (BOOMFILE) that contains sonic boom signatures and overpressures, aircraft tracking, and local weather data. These measured data highlight the major influences on sonic boom propagation and generation. The data from this study show that a constant offset of 26 from the peak overpressure expressed in dB gives a good estimate of the CSEL of a sonic boom.

  3. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation of an air plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1996-08-01

    Thermogravimetric methods for evaluating bond coat oxidation in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were assessed by high-temperature testing of TBC systems with air plasma-sprayed (APS) Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and yttria-stabilized zirconia top coatings. High-mass thermogravimetric analysis (at 1150{sup degrees}C) was used to measure bond coat oxidation kinetics. Furnace cycling was used to evaluate APS TBC durability. This paper describes the experimental methods and relative oxidation kinetics of the various specimen types. Characterization of the APS TBCs and their reaction products is discussed.

  4. Generation of metal ions in the beam plasma produced by a forevacuum-pressure electron beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G. Zolotukhin, D. B.; Klimov, A. S.; Savkin, K. P.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the production of metal ions of magnesium and zinc in the beam plasma formed by a forevacuum-pressure electron source. Magnesium and zinc vapor were generated by electron beam evaporation from a crucible and subsequently ionized by electron impact from the e-beam itself. Both gaseous and metallic plasmas were separately produced and characterized using a modified RGA-100 quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The fractional composition of metal isotopes in the plasma corresponds to their fractional natural abundance.

  5. Note: Characterization of the plasma parameters of a capillary discharge-produced plasma channel waveguide to guide an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Hikida, Masafumi; Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bai Jinxiang; Kikuchi, Takashi; Tao Yezheng

    2010-04-15

    We demonstrated the production of an optical waveguide in a capillary discharge-produced plasma using a cylindrical capillary. Plasma parameters of its waveguide were characterized by use of both a Nomarski laser interferometer and a hydrogen plasma line spectrum. A space-averaged maximum temperature of 3.3 eV with electron densities of the order of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} was observed at a discharge time of 150 ns and a maximum discharge current of 400 A. An ultrashort, intense laser pulse was guided by use of this plasma channel.

  6. Emission dynamics of an expanding ultrafast-laser produced Zn plasma under different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Philip, Reji

    2013-09-07

    We report time and space resolved spectral measurements of neutral Zn emission from an ultrafast laser produced plasma, generated by the irradiation of a Zn target with laser pulses of 100 femtoseconds duration, carried out in a broad ambient pressure range of 0.05 to 100 Torr. The measurement is done for three different axial positions in the expanding plume. The spectra are rich in neutral Zn (Zn I) emissions at 334.5 nm, 468 nm, 472 nm, 481 nm, and 636 nm, respectively, depicting the characteristic triplet structure of Zn. Fast as well as slow peaks are observed in the time of flight data of 481 nm emission, which arise from recombination and atomic contributions, respectively, occurring at different time scales. Average speeds of the fast atomic species do not change appreciably with ambient pressure. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and number density) are evaluated from the measured optical emission spectra. The rates of ionization and recombination can be enhanced by a double-pulse excitation configuration in which optical energy is coupled to the ultrafast plasma through a delayed laser pulse.

  7. Transient fields produced by a cylindrical electron beam flowing through a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firpo, Marie-Christine

    2012-10-01

    Fast ignition schemes (FIS) for inertial confinement fusion should involve in their final stage the interaction of an ignition beam composed of MeV electrons laser generated at the critical density surface with a dense plasma target. In this study, the out-of-equilibrium situation in which an initially sharp-edged cylindrical electron beam, that could e.g. model electrons flowing within a wire [1], is injected into a plasma is considered. A detailed computation of the subsequently produced magnetic field is presented [2]. The control parameter of the problem is shown to be the ratio of the beam radius to the electron skin depth. Two alternative ways to address analytically the problem are considered: one uses the usual Laplace transform approach, the other one involves Riemann's method in which causality conditions manifest through some integrals of triple products of Bessel functions.[4pt] [1] J.S. Green et al., Surface heating of wire plasmas using laser-irradiated cone geometries, Nature Physics 3, 853--856 (2007).[0pt] [2] M.-C. Firpo, http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00695629, to be published (2012).

  8. Ion flux enhancements and oscillations in spatially confined laser produced aluminum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Fallon, C.; Hayden, P.; Yeates, P.; Costello, J. T.; Mujawar, M.

    2014-09-15

    Ion signals from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) generated inside aluminum rectangular cavities at a fixed depth d = 2 mm and varying width, x = 1.0, 1.6, and 2.75 mm were obtained by spatially varying the position of a negatively biased Langmuir probe. Damped oscillatory features superimposed on Maxwellian distributed ion signals were observed. Depending on the distance of the probe from the target surface, three to twelve fold enhancements in peak ion density were observed via confinement of the LPP, generated within rectangular cavities of varying width which constrained the plasma plume to near one dimensional expansion in the vertical plane. The effects of lateral spatial confinement on the expansion velocity of the LPP plume front, the temperature, density and expansion velocity of ions, enhancement of ion flux, and ion energy distribution were recorded. The periodic behavior of ion signals was analyzed and found to be related to the electron plasma frequency and electron-ion collision frequency. The effects of confinement and enhancement of various ion parameters and expansion velocities of the LPP ion plume are explained on the basis of shock wave theory.

  9. Mitigation of ion and particulate emission from laser-produced plasmas used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lazzaro, Paolo; Bollanti, Sarah; Flora, Francesco; Mezi, Luca; Murra, Daniele; Torre, Amalia

    2013-05-01

    While developing a laboratory-scale micro-exposure tool for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography which uses a laser-produced plasma emitting EUV pulsed radiation, we faced the problem of suppressing the various debris (ions, neutrals, particulate, clusters, droplets) emitted by the plasma target. The suppression of debris is a crucial task in the frame of EUV projection lithography, mainly because debris seriously limit both lifetime and performance of the expensive optics and filters put close to the plasma source. In this paper we present the experimental measurements of main debris characteristics (velocity, size, charge, momentum, spectral energy, spatial distribution). Then, we present the operating results of a patented debris mitigation systems (DMS) specifically designed to suppress debris with the measured characteristics. We achieved reduction factors ˜800 for atoms and nm-size clusters, and ˜1600 for particles larger than 500 nm. These results are at the forefront in this field. The excellent performance of our DMS was a breakthrough to achieve a 90-nm patterning on commercial resists by our micro-exposure tool EUV projection lithography.

  10. Ultrafast laser produced zinc plasma: Stark broadening of emission lines in nitrogen ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Kavya H.; Smijesh, N.; Nivas, Jijil JJ; Philip, Reji

    2016-04-01

    The effect of ambient pressure on Stark broadening of emission lines from neutrals and ions in an ultrafast laser (100 fs, 800 nm) produced zinc plasma is investigated. Measured spectra reveal that the full width at half maximum (δλ) of neutral lines remains unchanged in the pressure range of 10-6 to 10-1 Torr, shows an even fluctuation in the pressure range of 0.1 to 100 Torr, and then increases with pressure. On the other hand, δλ of ion lines is nearly a constant from 10-6 to 10-3 Torr, and then increases consistently with ambient pressure. A line narrowing of neutral emissions observed in the region of 1 to 100 Torr can be attributed to larger plasma temperatures, whereas the consistent increase in δλ with pressure seen for ion emission results from the prevalence of additional broadening mechanisms related to Coulomb interactions, ion-ion interaction, and Debye shielding. An accurate knowledge of emission line width is crucial for unambiguously calculating number density values for any given ambient pressure. Moreover, it can be relevant for the design of narrow line width, bright plasma sources for various applications.

  11. Colliding laser-produced plasmas as targets for laser-generated extreme ultraviolet sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, T.; O'Gorman, C.; Dunne, P.; Sokell, E.; O'Sullivan, G.; Hayden, P.

    2014-07-28

    Colliding plasmas produced by neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser illumination of tin wedge targets form stagnation layers, the physical parameters of which can be controlled to optimise coupling with a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) heating laser pulse and subsequent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) production. The conversion efficiency (CE) of total laser energy into EUV emission at 13.5 nm ± 1% was 3.6%. Neglecting both the energy required to form the stagnation layer and the EUV light produced before the CO{sub 2} laser pulse is incident results in a CE of 5.1% of the CO{sub 2} laser energy into EUV light.

  12. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Two Surface Barrier Discharges with Air Plasma against In Vitro Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Matthes, Rutger; Bender, Claudia; Schlüter, Rabea; Koban, Ina; Bussiahn, René; Reuter, Stephan; Lademann, Jürgen; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of infected wounds is one possible therapeutic aspect of plasma medicine. Chronic wounds are often associated with microbial biofilms which limit the efficacy of antiseptics. The present study investigates two different surface barrier discharges with air plasma to compare their efficacy against microbial biofilms with chlorhexidine digluconate solution (CHX) as representative of an important antibiofilm antiseptic. Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG81 and Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A were cultivated on polycarbonate discs. The biofilms were treated for 30, 60, 150, 300 or 600 s with plasma or for 600 s with 0.1% CHX, respectively. After treatment, biofilms were dispensed by ultrasound and the antimicrobial effects were determined as difference in the number of the colony forming units by microbial culture. A high antimicrobial efficacy on biofilms of both plasma sources in comparison to CHX treatment was shown. The efficacy differs between the used strains and plasma sources. For illustration, the biofilms were examined under a scanning electron microscope before and after treatment. Additionally, cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay with L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. The cell toxicity of the used plasma limits its applicability on human tissue to maximally 150 s. The emitted UV irradiance was measured to estimate whether UV could limit the application on human tissue at the given parameters. It was found that the UV emission is negligibly low. In conclusion, the results support the assumption that air plasma could be an option for therapy of chronic wounds. PMID:23894661

  13. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopic measurement of air entrainment in argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into an argon plasma jet has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition to turbulence occurs, air is rapidly entrained into the jet core. The location of the transition region is thought to be driven by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopic measurement of air entrainment in argon plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincke, J. R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C. G.

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into an argon plasma jet has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition to turbulence occurs, air is rapidly entrained into the jet core. The location of the transition region is thought to be driven by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number.

  15. Aerosynthesis: Growths of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers with Air DC Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kodumagulla, A; Varanasi, V; Pearce, Ryan; Wu, W-C; Hensley, Dale K; Tracy, Joseph B; McKnight, Timothy E; Melechko, Anatoli

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNF) have been synthesized in a mixture of acetone and air using catalytic DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Typically, ammonia or hydrogen is used as etchant gas in the mixture to remove carbon that otherwise passivates the catalyst surface and impedes growth. Our demonstration of using air as the etchant gas opens up a possibility that ion etching could be sufficient to maintain the catalytic activity state during synthesis. It also demonstrates the path toward growing VACNFs in open atmosphere.

  16. Radiative properties of Z-pinch and laser produced plasmas from mid-atomic-number materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouart, Nicholas D.

    The investigation of Z-pinches on university-scale pulsed power generators allows for the study of plasmas with a broad range of temperatures, densities, and sizes in cost effective experiments. In particular, X-pinches produce the hottest and densest plasma and are very suitable for x-ray radiation studies. The planar wire array has shown to be a powerful radiation source on the 1 MA Zebra generator at UNR. The radiative and implosion dynamics from such loads with mid-atomic-number materials were not studied previously in detail and are a topic of this dissertation. Specifically, the radiative and implosion characteristics of Z-pinch and X-pinch plasmas with mid-atomic-number materials (iron, nickel, copper, and zinc) will be discussed. The theoretical tool used to accomplish this is non-LTE kinetic modeling. This tool is not limited to Z-pinches, but can be applied to any plasma radiation source like laser produced plasmas which will be demonstrated. In addition, since the radiative characteristics of wire arrays are connected with the implosion characteristics, another theoretical tool, the Wire Ablation Dynamics Model was used in this dissertation to understand the ablation and implosion dynamics of wire arrays. The experiments were analyzed from two university-scale pulsed power machines: the 1 MA Zebra and COBRA generators. The research completed in this dissertation emphasizes the unique capabilities and usefulness of spectroscopy, particularly time-gated x-ray spectroscopy. For example, modeling of time-gated L-shell spectra captured from the precursor column of low-wire-number copper cylindrical wire arrays reveals electron temperatures ˜400 eV, which is significantly higher than any previous precursor measurements. From the analysis of experiments on COBRA, total energy was higher for the implosion of a compact cylindrical wire array made with alternating brass and aluminum wires than a uniform wire array made with just brass or aluminum. Comparison of L

  17. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  18. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  19. Plasma immunoreactive gamma melanotropin in patients with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism, aldosterone-producing adenomas, and essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, G T; Berelowitz, B; Hudson, M; Salzman, R; Manson, J A; Aurrechia, S; Melby, J C; Pedersen, R C; Brownie, A C

    1985-01-01

    A non-ACTH aldosterone-stimulating factor(s) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA). Although this factor has not been fully characterized, some evidence suggests that it may be related to a pro-gamma-melanotropin (pro-gamma-MSH), derived from the NH2-terminal region of pro-opiomelanocortin. In the present study, plasma immunoreactive (IR-) gamma-MSH levels at 0800 h in patients with IHA were evaluated (90 +/- 17 fmol/ml; range: 13-173 fmol/ml) and found to be significantly higher (P less than 0.05) than those in subjects with aldosterone-producing adenomas (33 +/- 8 fmol/ml), essential hypertension (33 +/- 6 fmol/ml), and normotensive controls (19 +/- 2 fmol/ml). Seven of nine IHA subjects had circulating IR-gamma-MSH levels above the normal range (greater than 35 fmol/ml). In plasmas sampled at 1200 h, IR-gamma-MSH was significantly higher in patients with IHA (95 +/- 26 fmol/ml) and adenomas (63 +/- 23 fmol/ml), as compared with essential hypertensives (31 +/- 6 fmol/ml) and normotensives (19 +/- 3 fmol/ml). Mean plasma IR-ACTH, plasma cortisol, and urinary cortisol levels did not differ significantly between any of these groups. In order to evaluate the effect of a pro-gamma-MSH in vitro, adrenal adenoma tissue was obtained from two patients, one with elevated IR-gamma-MSH (61 fmol/ml) and a second with low IR-gamma-MSH (12 fmol/ml). Aldosterone secretion by dispersed adenoma cells from the former, but not the latter, underwent a fourfold dose-dependent (10(-14)-10(-9) M) increase in response to human Lys-gamma 3-MSH. These data suggest that a pro-gamma-MSH may be implicated as a pathogenic factor in a subset of patients with primary aldosteronism, particularly among those differentially diagnosed as having IHA. Images PMID:4019776

  20. Beeswax corticosterone implants produce long-term elevation of plasma corticosterone and influence condition.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michelle L; Davies, Scott; Moore, Ignacio T; Schoenle, Laura A; Kerman, Kaan; Vernasco, Ben J; Sewall, Kendra B

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids can play a critical role in modulating life-history trade-offs. However, studying the effects of glucocorticoids on life-history often requires experimentally elevating plasma glucocorticoid concentrations for several weeks within normal physiological limits and without repeated handling of the animal. Recently, implants made of beeswax and testosterone (T) were shown to have release dynamics superior to some currently available T implants, and these beeswax implants dissolved, eliminating the need to recapture the animal. We evaluated the utility of beeswax implants containing four different dosages of corticosterone (CORT; the primary glucocorticoid in birds) and their effect on several condition indices in a captive colony of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). The three implants with the greatest CORT doses (0.05, 0.1, and 0.5mg) produced spikes in plasma CORT concentrations 20h after treatment, but were within the limits that zebra finches may normally experience. The 0.5mg CORT implant elevated plasma CORT between typical baseline and restraint stress levels reported in other studies of zebra finches for the entire 35day experiment. Birds in the 0.5mg implant group were heavier, had greater furcular fat scores, and had lower hematocrit than birds in the control and other CORT implant groups. Beeswax CORT implants are a low cost method of elevating plasma CORT for a prolonged time. Furthermore, because there is no need to remove these implants at the end of a study, this method may be amenable to studies of free-ranging animals. PMID:27222349

  1. Emerging trends in X-ray spectroscopic studies of plasma produced by intense laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, V.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2015-07-31

    X-ray line emission from hot dense plasmas, produced by ultra-short high intensity laser systems, has been studied experimentally in recent years for applications in materials science as well as for back-lighter applications. By virtue of the CPA technology, several laser facilities delivering pulses with peak powers in excess of one petawatt (focused intensities > 10{sup 20} W-cm{sup −2}) have either been commissioned across the globe during the last few years or are presently under construction. On the other hand, hard x-ray sources on table top, generating ultra-short duration x-rays at a repetition rate up to 10 kHz, are routinely available for time resolved x-ray diffraction studies. In this paper, the recent experiments on x-ray spectroscopic studies of plasma produced by 45 fs, Ti:sapphire laser pulses (focused iintensity > 10{sup 18} W-cm{sup −2}) at RRCAT Indore will be presented.

  2. Identification of hydrogenlike and heliumlike transitions in the spectrum of laser-produced magnesium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, J. C.; Goldsmith, S.; Griem, H. R.; Cohen, Leonard; Knauer, J.

    1990-01-01

    Nonresonance spectral lines of Mg XII and Mg XI emitted by magnesium laser-produced plasmas have been observed in the extreme-vacuum-ultraviolet region and their transitions classified. As many as eight beams of the Omega laser system of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester were linearly focused onto magnesium-coated flat targets to produce linear plasma radiation sources from 3 to 6 mm long. The spectra were photographed end-on with a grazing-incidence spectrograph. The identified Mg XII lines are classified as 2s-3p, 2p-3d, 2s-4p, 2p-4d, and 3d-4f transitions. The identified Mg XI lines are classified as 1s2s-1s3p, 1s2p-1s3d, 1s2p-1s4d, 1s3p-1s4d, and 1s3d-1s4f.

  3. Plasma characteristics of argon glow discharge produced by AC power supply operating at low frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Kongpiboolkid, Watcharapon; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat

    2015-04-24

    Non-thermal properties of Argon glow discharge operating with various operating pressures were measured and presented in this work. The Argon plasma is produced by a parallel conducting electrodes coupling with a high voltage AC power supply. The power supply can generate high AC voltage at various frequencies. The frequencies for the operation are in the range of a few kHz. The system is capable of generating electric field between the two metal electrodes discharge system. The characteristics of plasma produced were measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) technique where electron temperature (T{sub e}) and electron number density (n{sub e}) can be determined by line intensity ratio method. The value of electron number density was then determined from the Saha-Eggert equation. Our results show that the electron number density of the discharge obtained is of the order of 10{sup −17} − 10{sup −18} m{sup −3} where the electron temperature is between 1.00−2.00 eV for various operating frequencies used which are in good agreement with similar results published earlier.

  4. Diamond-like carbon produced by plasma source ion implantation as a corrosion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Taylor, T.N.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-03-01

    There currently exists a broad range of applications for which the ability to produce an adherent, hard, wear and, corrosion-resistant coating plays a vital role. These applications include engine components, orthopedic devices, textile manufacturing components, hard disk media, optical coatings, and cutting and machining tools (e.g., punches, taps, scoring dies, and extrusion dies). Ion beam processing can play an important role in all of these technologies. Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is an emerging technology which has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional ion implantation by: (1) reducing the time and expense for implanting onto complex shapes and large areas and (2) extending the thickness of the modification zone through ion beam enhanced plasma growth of surface coatings. In PSII, targets are placed directly in a plasma source and then pulse biased to produce a non-line-of-sight process for complex-shaped targets without complex fixturing. If the pulse bias is a relatively high negative potential (20 to 100 kV) ion implantation will result. If however, a low voltage (50--1,200 eV) high duty cycle pulse bias is applied, film deposition from the chamber gas will result, thereby increasing the extent of the surface modification into the 1--10 micron regime. To evaluate the potential for DLC to be used as a corrosion barrier, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and traditional electrochemistry techniques were used to investigate the breakdown mechanism in chloride and nonchloride containing environments. The effect of surface preparation on coating breakdown was also evaluated.

  5. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji

    2014-07-07

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7 ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10⁻⁶Torr to 10²Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1 Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9 nm (3d⁹(²D) 4p → 3d⁹(²D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5 nm (3p⁶3d⁸(³P) 4s→ 3p⁶3d⁹ 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  6. Time resolved optical diagnostics of ZnO plasma plumes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shyam L.; Singh, Ravi Pratap; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-10-15

    We report dynamical evolution of laser ablated ZnO plasma plumes using interferometry and shadowgraphy; 2-D fast imaging and optical emission spectroscopy in air ambient at atmospheric pressure. Recorded interferograms using Nomarski interferometer and shadowgram images at various time delays show the presence of electrons and neutrals in the ablated plumes. The inference drawn from sign change of fringe shifts is consistent with two dimensional images of the plume and optical emission spectra at varying time delays with respect to ablating pulse. Zinc oxide plasma plumes are created by focusing 1.06 μm radiation on to ZnO target in air and 532 nm is used as probe beam.

  7. Third harmonic generation in air ambient and laser ablated carbon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2015-12-15

    We report the third harmonic generation of a nanosecond laser pulse (1.06 μm) in air ambient and in the presence of nanoparticles from laser ablated carbon plasma. Significant decrease in the threshold of third harmonic generation and multi-fold increment in the intensity of generated third harmonic is observed in presence of carbon plasma. The third harmonic in air is due to the quasi-resonant four photon process involving vibrationally excited states of molecular ion of nitrogen due to electron impact ionization and laser pulse. Following optical emission spectroscopic observations we conclude that the presence of C{sub 2} and CN in the ablated plume play a vital role in the observed third harmonic signals.

  8. Numerical Analysis of MHD Accelerator with Non-Equilibrium Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwari, M.; H. Qazi, H.; Sukarsan; Harada, N.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator is proposed as a next generation propulsion system. It can be used to increase the performance of a propulsion system. The objective of this study is to investigate the performance of MHD accelerator using non-equilibrium air plasma as working gas. In this study, the fundamental performance of MHD accelerator such as flow performance and electrical performance is evaluated at different levels of applied magnetic field using 1-D numerical simulation. The numerical simulation is developed based on a set of differential equations with MHD approximation. To solve this set of differential equations the MacCormack scheme is used. A specified channel designed and developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Centre is used in the numerical simulation. The composition of the simulated air plasma consists of seven species, namely, N2, N, O2, O, NO, NO+, and e-. The performance of the non-equilibrium MHD accelerator is also compared with the equilibrium MHD accelerator.

  9. Formation of plasma channels in air under filamentation of focused ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of plasma channels in air under filamentation of focused ultrashort laser pulses was experimentally and theoretically studied together with theoreticians of the Moscow State University and the Institute of Atmospheric Optics. The influence of various characteristics of ultrashort laser pulses on these plasma channels is discussed. Plasma channels formed under filamentation of focused laser beams with a wavefront distorted by spherical aberration (introduced by adaptive optics) and by astigmatism, with cross-section spatially formed by various diaphragms and with different UV and IR wavelengths, were experimentally and numerically studied. The influence of plasma channels created by a filament of a focused UV or IR femtosecond laser pulse (λ = 248 nm or 740 nm) on characteristics of other plasma channels formed by a femtosecond pulse at the same wavelength following the first one with varied nanosecond time delay was also experimentally studied. An application of plasma channels formed due to the filamentation of focused UV ultrashort laser pulses including a train of such pulses and a combination of ultrashort and long (~100 ns) laser pulses for triggering and guiding long (~1 m) electric discharges is discussed.

  10. Functionalization of graphene by atmospheric pressure plasma jet in air or H2O2 environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weixin; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-03-01

    The functionalization of graphene, which deforms its band structure, can result in a metal-semiconductor transition. In this work, we report a facile strategy to oxidize single-layer graphene using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) that generates a variety of reactive plasma species at close to ambient temperature. We systematically characterized the oxygen content and chemical structure of the graphene films after plasma treatment under different oxidative conditions (ambient air atmosphere or hydrogen peroxide solution) by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Plasma-treated graphene films containing more than 40% oxygen were obtained in both oxidative environments. Interestingly, prolonged irradiation led to the reduction of graphene oxides. N-doping of graphene also occurred during the APPJ treatment in H2O2 solution; the nitrogen content of the doped graphene was dependent on the duration of irradiation and reached up to 8.1% within 40 min. Moreover, the H2O2 solution served as a buffer layer that prevented damage to the graphene during plasma irradiation. Four-point probe measurement revealed an increase in sheet resistance of the plasma-treated graphene, indicating the transition of the material property from semi-metallic to semiconducting.

  11. Plasma column and nano-powder generation from solid titanium by localized microwaves in air

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, Simona; Jerby, Eli Meir, Yehuda; Ashkenazi, Dana; Barkay, Zahava; Mitchell, J. Brian A.; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    2015-07-14

    This paper studies the effect of a plasma column ejected from solid titanium by localized microwaves in an ambient air atmosphere. Nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (titania) are found to be directly synthesized in this plasma column maintained by the microwave energy in the cavity. The process is initiated by a hotspot induced by localized microwaves, which melts the titanium substrate locally. The molten hotspot emits ionized titanium vapors continuously into the stable plasma column, which may last for more than a minute duration. The characterization of the dusty plasma obtained is performed in-situ by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), optical spectroscopy, and microwave reflection analyses. The deposited titania nanoparticles are structurally and morphologically analyzed by ex-situ optical and scanning-electron microscope observations, and also by X-ray diffraction. Using the Boltzmann plot method combined with the SAXS results, the electron temperature and density in the dusty plasma are estimated as ∼0.4 eV and ∼10{sup 19 }m{sup −3}, respectively. The analysis of the plasma product reveals nanoparticles of titania in crystalline phases of anatase, brookite, and rutile. These are spatially arranged in various spherical, cubic, lamellar, and network forms. Several applications are considered for this process of titania nano-powder production.

  12. Elevated Plasma Endothelin-1 and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure in Children Exposed to Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Vincent, Renaud; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Barragán-Mejía, Gerardo; Garrido-García, Luis; Camacho-Reyes, Laura; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; Paredes, Rogelio; Romero, Lina; Osnaya, Hector; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Hazucha, Milan J.; Reed, William

    2007-01-01

    Background Controlled exposures of animals and humans to particulate matter (PM) or ozone air pollution cause an increase in plasma levels of endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor that regulates pulmonary arterial pressure. Objectives The primary objective of this field study was to determine whether Mexico City children, who are chronically exposed to levels of PM and O3 that exceed the United States air quality standards, have elevated plasma endothelin-1 levels and pulmonary arterial pressures. Methods We conducted a study of 81 children, 7.9 ± 1.3 years of age, lifelong residents of either northeast (n = 19) or southwest (n = 40) Mexico City or Polotitlán (n = 22), a control city with PM and O3 levels below the U.S. air quality standards. Clinical histories, physical examinations, and complete blood counts were done. Plasma endothelin-1 concentrations were determined by immunoassay, and pulmonary arterial pressures were measured by Doppler echocardiography. Results Mexico City children had higher plasma endothelin-1 concentrations compared with controls (p < 0.001). Mean pulmonary arterial pressure was elevated in children from both northeast (p < 0.001) and southwest (p < 0.05) Mexico City compared with controls. Endothelin-1 levels in Mexico City children were positively correlated with daily outdoor hours (p = 0.012), and 7-day cumulative levels of PM air pollution < 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) before endothelin-1 measurement (p = 0.03). Conclusions Chronic exposure of children to PM2.5 is associated with increased levels of circulating endothelin-1 and elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure. PMID:17687455

  13. In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

  14. A model for residual stress evolution in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, B. G.; Singh, J. P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2000-02-28

    Ruby fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that residual stress in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings is a function of the local interface geometry. The stress profile of a simulated rough interface characterized by ``peaks'' and ``valleys'' was modeled with a finite-element approach that accounted for thermal mismatch, oxide scale growth, and top coat sintering. Dependence of the stress profile on interface geometry and microstructure was investigated, and the results were compared with measured stresses.

  15. Very Low Frequency Radio Waves Produced by Electron Beam Injection in Space Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Geoffrey David

    On the Space Shuttle flights STS-3 in 1982, and Spacelab-2 in 1985, a 1 keV, 100 mA, square wave modulated electron beam was used to stimulate waves in the ionosphere. The resultant electric and magnetic AC fields were measured by the instruments on a Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP). The PDP included a wideband wave receiver which probed the electric and magnetic wave response in the range 0-30 kHz. The STS-3 experiments provided qualitative information about the wave response to beam injection showing that (1) when the electron beam is operated broadband and narrowband waves are produced, (2) both electric and magnetic wave response is observed, (3) narrowband waves are produced at harmonics of the pulsing frequency, (4) the harmonic structure varies from one pulsing sequence to another, and (5) other narrowband beam-generated waves are also produced and these included 'satellite lines' and 'sub -harmonics'. The Spacelab-2 experiments used enhanced experimental and analytic techniques to continue this investigation. Over 300 separate electron beam experiments were performed. Two of the most important were the so-called 'Pulsed' and 'DC' flux tube connection sequences which provided information on the wave response at distances from the beam of ~5-250 m during a six hour free-flight of the PDP. The technique was developed to calibrate the wideband wave receiver data after the mission, allowing more quantitative analysis of the data from Spacelab-2. The primary results were (1) the amplitudes of the beam generated AC fields was determined, (2) an electromagnetic component of the broadband and narrowband radiation was observed, (3) the component was whistler mode radiation produced through the Cherenkov resonance, (4) features such as cut-off frequencies and spatial zones of wave amplitude could be understood in terms of the propagation of this radiation and the presence of near-field contributions, and (5) the levels of EMI and the dependance of the beam generated

  16. Sterilization effect of atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma on dental instruments

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Su-Jin; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Chang, Brian Myung W.; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Autoclaves and UV sterilizers have been commonly used to prevent cross-infections between dental patients and dental instruments or materials contaminated by saliva and blood. To develop a dental sterilizer which can sterilize most materials, such as metals, rubbers, and plastics, the sterilization effect of an atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS After inoculating E. coli and B. subtilis the diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were sterilized by exposing them to the plasma for different lengths of time (30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and, 240 seconds). The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were immersed in PBS solutions, cultured on agar plates and quantified by counting the colony forming units. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and significance was assessed by the LSD post hoc test (α=0.05). RESULTS The device was effective in killing E. coli contained in the plasma device compared with the UV sterilizer. The atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device contributed greatly to the sterilization of diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli and B. subtilis. Diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli was effective after 60 and 90 seconds. The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with B. subtilis was effective after 120 and 180 seconds. CONCLUSION The atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was effective in killing both E. coli and B. subtilis, and was more effective in killing E. coli than the UV sterilizer. PMID:23508991

  17. Potential Industrial Applications of the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) Operating in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece Roth, J.

    2004-11-01

    The majority of industrial plasma processing with glow discharges has been conducted at pressures below 10 torr. This tends to limit applications to high value workpieces as a result of the high capital cost of vacuum systems and the production constraints of batch processing. It has long been recognized that glow discharge plasmas would play a much larger industrial role if they could be generated at one atmosphere. The One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP), developed at the University of Tennessee's Plasma Sciences Laboratory, is a non-thermal RF plasma operating on displacement currents with the time-resolved characteristics of a classical low pressure DC normal glow discharge. As a glow discharge, the OAUGDP operates with maximum electrical efficiency at the Stoletow point, where the energy input per ion-electron pair is a minimum [1, 2]. Several interdisciplinary teams have investigated potential applications of the OAUGDP. These teams included collaborators from the UTK Textiles and Nonwovens Development Center (TANDEC), and the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microbiology, and Food Science and Technology, as well as the NASA Langley Research Center. The potential applications of the OAUGDP have all been at one atmosphere and room temperature, using air as the working gas. These applications include sterilizing medical and dental equipment; sterilizable air filters to deal with the "sick building syndrome"; removal of soot from Diesel engine exhaust; subsonic plasma aerodynamic effects, including flow re-attachment to airfoils and boundary layer modification; electrohydrodynamic (EDH) flow control of working gases; increasing the surface energy of materials; improving the adhesion of paints and electroplated layers: improving the wettability and wickability of fabrics; stripping of photoresist; and plasma deposition and directional etching of potential microelectronic relevance. [1] J. R. Roth, Industrial Plasma Engineering

  18. Experimental study of wood downdraft gasification for an improved producer gas quality through an innovative two-stage air and premixed air/gas supply approach.

    PubMed

    Jaojaruek, Kitipong; Jarungthammachote, Sompop; Gratuito, Maria Kathrina B; Wongsuwan, Hataitep; Homhual, Suwan

    2011-04-01

    This study conducted experiments on three different downdraft gasification approaches: single stage, conventional two-stage, and an innovative two-stage air and premixed air/gas supply approach. The innovative two-stage approach has two nozzle locations, one for air supply at combustion zone and the other located at the pyrolysis zone for supplying the premixed gas (air and producer gas). The producer gas is partially bypassed to mix with air and supplied to burn at the pyrolysis zone. The result shows that producer gas quality generated by the innovative two-stage approach improved as compared to conventional two-stage. The higher heating value (HHV) increased from 5.4 to 6.5 MJ/Nm(3). Tar content in producer gas reduced to less than 45 mg/Nm(3). With this approach, gas can be fed directly to an internal combustion engine. Furthermore, the gasification thermal efficiency also improved by approximately 14%. The approach gave double benefits on gas qualities and energy savings. PMID:21292477

  19. A Langmuir Probe Diagnostic for Use in Inhomogeneous, Time-Varying Plasmas Produced by High-Energy Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J R; Emig, J A; Fournier, K B; Jenkins, P P; Trautz, K M; Seiler, S W; Davis, J F

    2012-05-01

    Langmuir probes (LP) are used extensively to characterize plasma environments produced by radio frequency, pulsed plasma thrusters, and laser ablation. We discuss here the development of a LP diagnostic to examine high-density, high-temperature inhomogeneous plasmas such as those that can be created at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility. We have configured our diagnostic to examine the velocity of the plasma expanding from the target. We observe velocities of approximately 16-17 cm/{micro}s, with individual LP currents displaying complex structures, perhaps due to the multiple atomic species and ionization states that exist.

  20. Spectroscopic and electrical characters of SBD plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Lu; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yuan, Hao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, an atmospheric surface barrier discharge (SBD) generated by annular electrodes in quartz tube is presented through employing bipolar nanosecond pulse voltage in air. The discharge images, waveforms of pulse voltage and discharge current, and optical emission spectra emitted from the discharges are recorded and calculated. A spectra simulation method is developed to separate the overlap of the secondary diffraction spectra which are produced by grating in monochromator, and N2 (B(3)Πg→A(3)Σu(+)) and O (3p(5)P→3s(5)S2(o)) are extracted. The effects of pulse voltage and discharge power on the emission intensities of OH (A(2)Σ(+)→X(2)Пi), N2(+) (B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+)), N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg), N2 (B(3)Πg→A(3)Σu(+)), and O (3p(5)P→3s(5)S2(o)) are investigated. It is found that increasing the pulse peak voltage can lead to an easier formation of N2(+) (B(2)Σu(+)) than that of N2 (C(3)Πu). Additionally, vibrational and rotational temperatures of the plasma are determined by comparing the experimental and simulated spectra of N2(+) (B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+)), and the results show that the vibrational and rotational temperatures are 3250±20K and 350±5K under the pulse peak voltage of 28kV, respectively. PMID:26924210

  1. Spectroscopic and electrical characters of SBD plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zi-Lu; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yuan, Hao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an atmospheric surface barrier discharge (SBD) generated by annular electrodes in quartz tube is presented through employing bipolar nanosecond pulse voltage in air. The discharge images, waveforms of pulse voltage and discharge current, and optical emission spectra emitted from the discharges are recorded and calculated. A spectra simulation method is developed to separate the overlap of the secondary diffraction spectra which are produced by grating in monochromator, and N2 (B3Πg → A3Σu+) and O (3p5P → 3s5S2o) are extracted. The effects of pulse voltage and discharge power on the emission intensities of OH (A2Σ+ → X2Пi), N2+ (B2Σu+ → X2Σg+), N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg), N2 (B3Πg → A3Σu+), and O (3p5P → 3s5S2o) are investigated. It is found that increasing the pulse peak voltage can lead to an easier formation of N2+ (B2Σu+) than that of N2 (C3Πu). Additionally, vibrational and rotational temperatures of the plasma are determined by comparing the experimental and simulated spectra of N2+ (B2Σu+ → X2Σg+), and the results show that the vibrational and rotational temperatures are 3250 ± 20 K and 350 ± 5 K under the pulse peak voltage of 28 kV, respectively.

  2. Frontal vitrification of PDMS using air plasma and consequences for surface wrinkling.

    PubMed

    Nania, Manuela; Matar, Omar K; Cabral, João T

    2015-04-21

    We study the surface oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by air plasma exposure and its implications for the mechanically-induced surface wrinkling of the resulting glass-elastomer bilayers. The effect of plasma frequency (kHz and MHz), oxygen content (from O2 to air), pressure (0.5 ≤ P ≤ 1.5 mbar), as well as exposure time and power, is quantified in terms of the resulting glassy skin thickness h, inferred from wrinkling experiments. The glassy skin thickness is found to increase logarithmically with an exposure time t, for different induction powers p, and all data collapse in terms of a plasma dose, D ≡ p × t. The kinetics of film propagation are found to increase with the oxygen molar fraction yO2 and decrease with the gas pressure P, allowing both the wrinkling wavelength λ and amplitude A to be effectively controlled by gas pressure and composition. A generalised relationship for frontal vitrification is obtained by re-scaling all λ and h data by D/P. A coarse-grained wave propagation model effectively describes and quantifies the process stages (induction, skin formation and propagation) under all the conditions studied. Equipped with this knowledge, we further expand the capabilities of plasma oxidation for PDMS wrinkling, and a wavelength of λ ≈ 100 nm is readily attained with a modest strain εprestrain ≈ 20%. PMID:25742777

  3. Optimization of laser-produced plasmas for nanolithography and materials detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Justin R.

    In this work, laser-matter interactions and resultant plasma emission using traditional short pulsed lasers are studied in the context of semiconductor lithography and material sensing applications. Ultrafast laser ablation and plasma emission results are then compared to those using traditional short pulsed lasers. Then fundamental laser-matter interactions and ablation processes of ultrafast lasers are investigated. This work focuses on laser-produced plasma (LPP) light sources at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The out-of-band (OoB) light emission as well as ionic and atomic debris from the plasma source, which are capable of damaging collection optics, have been studied as a function of incident laser wavelength to characterize the angular distributions of debris and identify the differences in debris from longer and shorter laser excitation wavelengths. By applying a prepulse to create improved laser-target coupling conditions, conversion efficiency (CE) from laser energy to 13.5 nm light emission from the plasma source can be improved by 30% or higher. Energetic ions escaping from the plasma can cause significant damage to light collection optics, greatly reducing their lifetimes, but by implementing a prepulse, it has been shown that most-probable ion energies can be reduced significantly, minimizing damage caused to collection optics. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique used to identify the elemental constituents of unknown samples by studying the optical light spectra emitted from a LPP. Despite advantages such as in situ capabilities and near-instant results, detection limits of LIBS systems are not as competitive as other laboratory-based systems. To overcome such limitations, a double pulse (DP) LIBS system is arranged using a long-wavelength laser for the second pulse and heating of the plume created by the first pulse. Detector gating parameters were optimized and different first-pulse laser energies were investigated to

  4. Surface, electrical and mechanical modifications of PMMA after implantation with laser produced iron plasma ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Qazi Salman; Bashir, Shazia; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Mahmood, Khaliq; Akram, Mahreen; Khalid, Ayesha; Yaseen, Nazish; Arshad, Atiqa

    2016-07-01

    Laser Produced Plasma (LPP) was employed as an ion source for the modifications in surface, electrical and mechanical properties of poly methyl (methacrylate) PMMA. For this purpose Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 6 ns, 10 Hz) at a fluence of 12.7 J/cm2 was employed to generate Fe plasma. The fluence and energy measurements of laser produced Fe plasma ions were carried out by employing Thomson Parabola Technique in the presence of magnetic field strength of 0.5 T, using CR-39 as Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD). It has been observed that ion fluence ejecting from ablated plasma was maximum at an angle of 5° with respect to the normal to the Fe target surface. PMMA substrates were irradiated with Fe ions of constant energy of 0.85 MeV at various ion fluences ranging from 3.8 × 106 ions/cm2 to 1.8 × 108 ions/cm2 controlled by varying laser pulses from 3000 to 7000. Optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were utilized for the analysis of surface features of irradiated PMMA. Results depicted the formation of chain scission, crosslinking, dendrites and star like structures. To explore the electrical behavior, four probe method was employed. The electrical conductivity of ion irradiated PMMA was increased with increasing ion fluence. The surface hardness was measured by shore D hardness tester and results showed the monotonous increment in surface hardness with increasing ion fluence. The increasing trend of surface hardness and electrical conductivity with increasing Fe ion fluence has been well correlated with the surface morphology of ion implanted PMMA. The temperature rise of PMMA surface due to Fe ion irradiation is evaluated analytically and comes out to be in the range of 1.72 × 104 to 1.82 × 104 K. The values of total Linear Energy Transfer (LET) or stopping power of 0.8 MeV Fe ions in PMMA is 61.8 eV/Å and their range is 1.34 μm evaluated by SRIM simulation.

  5. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  6. Open Air Silicon Deposition by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma under Local Ambient Gas Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Teruki; Konno, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Yukihisa

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report open air silicon (Si) deposition by combining a silane free Si deposition technology and a newly developed local ambient gas control technology. Recently, material processing in open air has been investigated intensively. While a variety of materials have been deposited, there were only few reports on Si deposition due to the susceptibility to contamination and the hazardous nature of source materials. Since Si deposition is one of the most important processes in device fabrication, we have developed open air silicon deposition technologies in BEANS project. For a clean and safe process, a local ambient gas control head was designed. Process gas leakage was prevented by local evacuation, and air contamination was shut out by inert curtain gas. By numerical and experimental investigations, a safe and clean process condition with air contamination less than 10 ppm was achieved. Si film was deposited in open air by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical transport under the local ambient gas control. The film was microcrystalline Si with the crystallite size of 17 nm, and the Hall mobility was 2.3 cm2/V .s. These properties were comparable to those of Si films deposited in a vacuum chamber. This research has been conducted as one of the research items of New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization ``BEANS'' project.

  7. Laser Cladding to Improve Oxidation Behavior of Air Plasma-Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, M. Mudassar; Shahid, Muhammad; Nusair Khan, A.; Mehmood, K.

    2015-09-01

    Air plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr coating on stainless steel (AISI-304) substrate was re-melted using CO2 laser to remove the inherent defects, i.e., porosity, splat boundaries, and oxides of air plasma-sprayed coating. The (1) uncoated, (2) air plasma-sprayed, and (3) laser-re-melted specimens were exposed to cyclic oxidation at 900 °C for a hundred cycles run. The oxidation products were characterized using XRD and SEM. Weight changes were determined after every 4th cycle; Uncoated samples showed severe oxidation indicated by substantial weight loss, whereas air plasma-coated samples demonstrated noticeable weight gain. However, oxidation resistance of laser-cladded samples was found to be significantly improved as the samples showed negligible weight change; porosity within the coating was minimized with an improvement in interface quality causing reduction in delamination damage.

  8. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2014-08-15

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000 ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ∼600 ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  9. Few femtosecond, few kiloampere electron bunch produced by a laser-plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundh, O.; Lim, J.; Rechatin, C.; Ammoura, L.; Ben-Ismaïl, A.; Davoine, X.; Gallot, G.; Goddet, J.-P.; Lefebvre, E.; Malka, V.; Faure, J.

    2011-03-01

    Particle accelerators driven by the interaction of ultraintense and ultrashort laser pulses with a plasma can generate accelerating electric fields of several hundred gigavolts per metre and deliver high-quality electron beams with low energy spread, low emittance and up to 1GeV peak energy. Moreover, it is expected they may soon be able to produce bursts of electrons shorter than those produced by conventional particle accelerators, down to femtosecond durations and less. Here we present wide-band spectral measurements of coherent transition radiation which we use for temporal characterization. Our analysis shows that the electron beam, produced using controlled optical injection, contains a temporal feature that can be identified as a 15pC, 1.4-1.8fs electron bunch (root mean square) leading to a peak current of 3-4kA depending on the bunch shape. We anticipate that these results will have a strong impact on emerging applications such as short-pulse and short-wavelength radiation sources, and will benefit the realization of laboratory-scale free-electron lasers.

  10. Laser produced plasma sources for nanolithography—Recent integrated simulation and benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, T.

    2013-05-15

    Photon sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) are still facing challenging problems to achieve high volume manufacturing in the semiconductor industry. The requirements for high EUV power, longer optical system and components lifetime, and efficient mechanisms for target delivery have narrowed investigators towards the development and optimization of dual-pulse laser sources with high repetition rate of small liquid tin droplets and the use of multi-layer mirror optical system for collecting EUV photons. We comprehensively simulated laser-produced plasma sources in full 3D configuration using 10–50 μm tin droplet targets as single droplets as well as, for the first time, distributed fragmented microdroplets with equivalent mass. The latter is to examine the effects of droplet fragmentation resulting from the first pulse and prior to the incident second main laser pulse. We studied the dependence of target mass and size, laser parameters, and dual pulse system configuration on EUV radiation output and on atomic and ionic debris generation. Our modeling and simulation included all phases of laser target evolution: from laser/droplet interaction, energy deposition, target vaporization, ionization, plasma hydrodynamic expansion, thermal and radiation energy redistribution, and EUV photons collection as well as detail mapping of photons source size and location. We also simulated and predicted the potential damage to the optical mirror collection system from plasma thermal and energetic debris and the requirements for mitigating systems to reduce debris fluence. The debris effect on mirror collection system is analyzed using our three-dimensional ITMC-DYN Monte Carlo package. Modeling results were benchmarked against our CMUXE laboratory experimental studies for the EUV photons production and for debris and ions generation.

  11. Vacuum ultraviolet spectral emission properties of Ga, In and Sn droplet-based laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Brandstätter, Markus; Abhari, Reza S.

    2016-08-01

    The Emission Spectra of gallium, indium and tin droplet-based laser produced plasmas are presented in the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) emission range from 30 nm to 160 nm. The Ga ion transitions are investigated in detail as a function of background pressure level and laser irradiance. Different wavelength emission regions were detected according to the level of background gas. At short wavelengths (i.e. 30-50 nm) the line emission from the higher charge states is reduced with increasing pressure, while at longer wavelengths (i.e. 100-160 nm) the trend is inverted, as the plasma emission intensity of the lower charge states increases with higher background gas pressure level. The emitted lines are fitted with Voigt profiles to determine the electron density. The electron temperature is obtained from a fit based on the Planck distribution. These estimations are then used to identify the relevant processes that lead to the different charge state emissions as a function of background gas. Langmuir Probe measurements are also reported for evaluating the ion kinetic energy as a function of background gas. The gallium spectra are calibrated in units of spectral radiance, together with spectra from indium and tin. This calibration allows absolute power estimations from the light source in the VUV region. The presented experimental results are relevant as fundamental plasma emission spectroscopic measurements in an almost unexplored wavelength region as well as for applications such as Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography to determine the so-called Out-of-Band (OoB) radiation emission and for metrology applications for future inspection tools.

  12. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  13. Laboratory Magnetic Reconnection Experiments with Colliding, Magnetized Laser-Produced Plasma Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W. R., II; Bhattacharjee, A.; Deng, W.; Moissard, C.; Germaschewski, K.; Fiksel, G.; Barnak, D.; Chang, P. Y.; Hu, S.; Nilson, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from experiments and simulations of magnetic reconnection between colliding plumes of laser-produced plasma. In the experiments, which open up a new experimental regime for reconnection study, bubbles of high-temperature, high-density plasma are created by focusing lasers down to sub-millimeter-scale spots on a plastic or metal foil, ionizing the foil into hemispherical bubbles that expand supersonically off the surface of the foil. If multiple bubbles are created at small separation, the bubbles expand into one another, and the embedded magnetic fields (either self-generated or externally imposed) are squeezed together and reconnect. We will review recent experiments, which have observed magnetic field annihilation, outflow jets, particle energization, and the formation of elongated current sheets. We compare the results against experiments with unmagnetized plumes, which observe the Weibel instability as the two plumes collide and interact. Particle-in-cell simulations of the strongly driven reconnection in these experiments show fast reconnection due to two-fluid effects, flux pile-up, and plasmoid formation, and show particle energization by reconnection.

  14. Kinetics of ion and prompt electron emission from laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, N.; Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian ; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2013-07-15

    We investigated ion emission dynamics of laser-produced plasma from several elements, comprised of metals and non-metals (C, Al, Si, Cu, Mo, Ta, W), under vacuum conditions using a Faraday cup. The estimated ion flux for various targets studied showed a decreasing tendency with increasing atomic mass. For metals, the ion flux is found to be a function of sublimation energy. A comparison of temporal ion profiles of various materials showed only high-Z elements exhibited multiple structures in the ion time of flight profile indicated by the observation of higher peak kinetic energies, which were absent for low-Z element targets. The slower ions were seen regardless of the atomic number of target material propagated with a kinetic energy of 1–5 keV, while the fast ions observed in high-Z materials possessed significantly higher energies. A systematic study of plasma properties employing fast photography, time, and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and electron analysis showed that there existed different mechanisms for generating ions in laser ablation plumes. The origin of high kinetic energy ions is related to prompt electron emission from high-Z targets.

  15. Plasma waves produced by an ion beam: Observations by the VLF experiment on Porcupine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.

    1980-06-01

    Results are presented from the VLF electric field experiments flown on Porcupine flights F3 and F4, which also had ejectable xenon ion sources. The xenon ion beam was found to produce plasma instabilities whose frequencies could be linked to the local proton gyrofrequency. The main energy in the instabilities lies at 3kHz for events when the Xe+ source is close to the rocket, and at 7kHz when the source is farther away. Theory predicts that these frequencies should be the lower-hybrid-resonance and this implies that Xe+ is the dominant ion in the first case and that it is the ambient plasma that dominates later. There is no discernable antenna spin-modulation during the Xe events which indicates that the wave k-vectors are not unidirectional. A theory is cited based on the setting up of the proton cyclotron harmonic waves by the Xe+ or 0+ cyclotron harmonic waves. The second Xe+ event on both flights exhibited an, as yet, unexplained harmonic structure related to half the local proton gyrofrequency.

  16. Neutral cluster debris dynamics in droplet-based laser-produced plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Duane; Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Abhari, Reza

    2016-05-01

    The neutral cluster debris dynamics of a droplet-based laser-produced plasma is studied experimentally and analytically. Experiments were done imaging the debris with a high-speed shadowgraph system and using image processing to determine the droplet debris mean radial velocity \\overline{V} dependence on laser pulse irradiance E e. The data shows a power law dependence between the mean radial debris velocity and the incident irradiance giving \\overline{V}\\propto E\\text{e}n with n≈ 0.65 . A scaled analytical model was derived modeling the plasma ablation pressure on the droplet surface as the primary momentum exchange mechanism between the unablated droplet material and the laser pulse. The relationship between droplet debris trajectory and the droplet alignment with the laser was quantified analytically. The derived analytical model determines that the neutral cluster debris trajectory for an ablated droplet is a function of the laser profile f L, the droplet diameter D and the axial misalignment h between the laser axis and the droplet center. The analytical calculations from these models were found to be in good agreement with the measurements. This analysis has practical significance for understanding ablated droplet debris, droplet deformation by laser pulsing, and droplet breakup from very short timescale shocks.

  17. Simulation of particle velocity in a laser-produced tin plasma extreme ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect

    Masnavi, Majid; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Araghy, Homaira Parchamy; Endo, Akira

    2011-06-15

    In connection with fast heating in a laser produced plasma (LPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source, the superheating behavior of bulk tin (Sn) at high heating rates is investigated. A constant temperature and pressure molecular dynamics simulation using modified Lennard-Jones and Coulomb potentials suitable for studying the liquid structure of Sn is employed in order to derive the caloric curves of the solid and liquid phases. The results have shown transient effects on the phase transitions. Superheating is observed during the melting and vaporizing processes. The velocity distribution of Sn particles against typical laser fluence in a LPP EUV light source has been numerically investigated using a simplified method including a one-dimensional, two-temperature, molecular dynamics, and steady-state ionization model. In the framework of our model, it was found that ejected Sn particles have a maximum velocity on the order of 10 to 40 km/s in plasma created using a nanosecond pre-pulse neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG, 1.06 {mu}m) laser in EUV lithography experiments.

  18. Analysis of laser produced plasmas of gold in the 1-7 nm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Yugami, Noboru; Dunne, Padraig; Kilbane, Deirdre; Sokell, Emma; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2014-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from gold laser produced plasmas were recorded in the 1-7 nm region using two Nd:YAG lasers with pulse lengths of 150 ps and 10 ns, respectively, operating at a range of power densities. The maximum focused peak power density was 9.5 × 1013 W cm-2 for the former and 5.3 × 1012 W cm-2 for the latter. Two intense quasicontinuous intensity bands resulting from n = 4-n = 4 and n = 4-n = 5 unresolved transition arrays dominate the 4-5.5 and 1.5-3.6 nm regions of both spectra. Comparison with atomic structure calculations performed with the Cowan suite of atomic structure codes as well as consideration of previous experimental and theoretical results aided identification of the most prominent features in the spectra. For the ns spectrum, the highest ion stage that could be identified from the n = 4-n = 5 arrays was Au28+ while for the ps plasma the presence of significantly higher stages was deduced and lines due to 4d104f-4d94f2 transitions in Ag-like Au32+ give rise to the strongest observed features within the n = 4-n = 4 array while in the n = 4-n = 5 array it was possible to identify a number of previously unidentified spectral features as resulting from 4f-5g transitions in the spectra of Au XX to Au XXXIII.

  19. Magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2012-05-15

    Recently, novel experiments on magnetic reconnection have been conducted in laser-produced plasmas in a high-energy-density regime. Individual plasma bubbles self-generate toroidal, mega-gauss-scale magnetic fields through the Biermann battery effect. When multiple bubbles are created at small separation, they expand into one another, driving reconnection of this field. Reconnection in the experiments was reported to be much faster than allowed by both Sweet-Parker, and even Hall-MHD theories, when normalized to the nominal magnetic fields self-generated by single bubbles. Through particle-in-cell simulations (both with and without a binary collision operator), we model the bubble interaction at parameters and geometry relevant to the experiments. This paper discusses in detail the reconnection regime of the laser-driven experiments and reports the qualitative features of simulations. We find substantial flux-pileup effects, which boost the relevant magnetic field for reconnection in the current sheet. When this is accounted for, the normalized reconnection rates are much more in line with standard two-fluid theory of reconnection. At the largest system sizes, we additionally find that the current sheet is prone to breakup into plasmoids.

  20. Studies of air, water, and ethanol vapor atmospheric pressure plasmas for antimicrobial applications.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, James R; Bogovich, Erinn R; Lee, Nicholas R; Gray, Robert L; Pappas, Daphne D

    2015-01-01

    The generation of air-based plasmas under atmospheric plasma conditions was studied to assess their antimicrobial efficacy against commonly found pathogenic bacteria. The mixture of initial gases supplied to the plasma was found to be critical for the formation of bactericidal actives. The optimal gas ratio for bactericidal effect was determined to be 99% nitrogen and 1% oxygen, which led to a 99.999% reduction of a pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli on stainless steel surfaces. The experimental substrate, soil load on the substrate, flow rate of the gases, and addition of ethanol vapor all were found to affect antimicrobial efficacy of studied plasmas. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to identify the species that were present in the plasma bulk phase for multiple concentrations of nitrogen and oxygen ratios. The collected spectra indicate a unique series of bands present in the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum that can be attributed to nitric oxide species known to be highly antimicrobial. This intense spectral profile dramatically changes as the concentration of nitrogen decreases. PMID:25810273

  1. CANFIS: A non-linear regression procedure to produce statistical air-quality forecast models

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, W.R.; Montpetit, J.; Pudykiewicz, J.

    1997-12-31

    Statistical models for forecasts of environmental variables can provide a good trade-off between significance and precision in return for substantial saving of computer execution time. Recent non-linear regression techniques give significantly increased accuracy compared to traditional linear regression methods. Two are Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and the Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (NFIS). Both can model predict and distributions, including the tails, with much better accuracy than linear regression. Given a learning data set of matched predict and predictors, CART regression produces a non-linear, tree-based, piecewise-continuous model of the predict and data. Its variance-minimizing procedure optimizes the task of predictor selection, often greatly reducing initial data dimensionality. NFIS reduces dimensionality by a procedure known as subtractive clustering but it does not of itself eliminate predictors. Over-lapping coverage in predictor space is enhanced by NFIS with a Gaussian membership function for each cluster component. Coefficients for a continuous response model based on the fuzzified cluster centers are obtained by a least-squares estimation procedure. CANFIS is a two-stage data-modeling technique that combines the strength of CART to optimize the process of selecting predictors from a large pool of potential predictors with the modeling strength of NFIS. A CANFIS model requires negligible computer time to run. CANFIS models for ground-level O{sub 3}, particulates, and other pollutants will be produced for each of about 100 Canadian sites. The air-quality models will run twice daily using a small number of predictors isolated from a large pool of upstream and local Lagrangian potential predictors.

  2. Magnetic properties of Co-Zr-B magnets produced by spark plasma sintering method

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tetsuji Akiyama, Tomoya

    2014-05-07

    Magnets of Co-Zr-B, one of the permanent magnetic compounds without rare-earth elements, were successfully produced by the spark plasma sintering method. The resultant Co-Zr-B magnets had high densities of 92%–96% and consisted mainly of the Co{sub x}Zr (x ≈ 5) phase. The coercivity of the Co-Zr-B magnets was highly dependent on the consolidation temperature and the boron content. The highest maximum energy product of 6.0 MGOe, with a remanence of 6.4 kG and the coercivity of 4.0 kOe, was achieved by the Co{sub 80}Zr{sub 18}B{sub 2} magnets consolidated at 873 K.

  3. Potential effects of Plasma on the Development of Laser Produced Craters

    SciTech Connect

    Batani, Dimitri; Desai, Tara; Rossetti, Stefano; Lucchini, Gianni

    2006-04-07

    Laser ablation and crater formation have been studied on a copper target using a 10 Hz, Nd:YAG laser system delivering pulses up to 100 mJ in 40 ps with a flux on target F{<=} 5000 J/cm2. Crater dimensions were measured using optical microscope or SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). In order to understand the process of crater formation, we considered various theoretical models present in the literature and revised them taking into account the occurrence of plasma phenomena, which are important at the intensities used in this experiment. We also compared our experimental results with other results obtained at the PALS laboratory, using a 0.44 {mu}m wavelength laser and much higher laser intensities. Finally we explore the possibility of extending the information derived from laser produced craters to other types of craters.

  4. Features in the ion emission of Cu, Al, and C plasmas produced by ultrafast laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, T. J.; Butler, T.; Walsh, N.; Hayden, P.; Costello, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The bi-modal nature of charge integrated ion kinetic energy distributions, which result from ultrafast laser produced plasmas, is discussed in this paper. A negatively biased Faraday cup was used as a charge collector to measure ion distributions from three different solid targets that had been irradiated with an ultrafast laser in the fluence range 0.1 -1 J/cm 2 . A bi-modal time of flight distribution is found for all three targets (C, Al, and Cu). In the case of the metallic targets (Al and Cu), high- and low-kinetic energy peaks exhibit quite different dependencies on laser fluence, whereas for the semi-metallic target (C), both peaks scale similarly with ultrafast laser fluence. The results are discussed within the framework of a one dimensional capacitor model resulting in ion acceleration.

  5. Calibration of a Flat Field Soft X-ray Grating Spectrometer for Laser Produced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Brown, G V; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Beiersdorfer, P; Cone, K V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E; May, M J; Porter, F S

    2010-05-12

    We have calibrated the x ray response of a variable line spaced grating spectrometer, known as the VSG, at the Fusion and Astrophysics Data and Diagnostic Calibration Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VSG has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasmas, such as those created at the Jupiter Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility at LLNL, and at both the Omega and Omega EP lasers at University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The bandwidth of the VSG spans the range from {approx} 6 to 60 {angstrom}. The calibration results present here include the VSG's dispersion and quantum efficiency. The dispersion is determined by measuring the x rays emitted from hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, and aluminum. The quantum efficiency is calibrated to an accuracy of 30% or better by normalizing the x ray intensities recorded by the VSG to those simultaneously recorded by an x ray microcalorimeter spectrometer.

  6. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Kanngießer, Birgit; Witte, Katharina; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Systems and methods for imaging using radiation from laser produced plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Renard-Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Cowan, Thomas E.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Rassuchine, Jennifer

    2009-06-30

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides systems and methods for imaging a subject using radiation emitted from a laser produced plasma generating by irradiating a target with a laser. In particular examples, the target includes at least one radiation enhancing component, such as a fluor, cap, or wire. In further examples, the target has a metal layer and an internal surface defining an internal apex, the internal apex of less than about 15 .mu.m, such as less than about 1 .mu.m. The targets may take a variety of shapes, including cones, pyramids, and hemispheres. Certain aspects of the present disclosure provide improved imaging of a subject, such as improved medical images of a radiation dose than typical conventional methods and systems.

  8. Physical and chemical properties of dust produced in a N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} RF plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Ouni, F.; Alcouffe, G.; Szopa, C.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Adande, G.; Thissen, R.; Quirico, E.; Brissaud, O.; Schmitz-Afonso, I.; Laprevote, O.

    2008-09-07

    Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated using a Capacitively Coupled Plasma discharge produced in a N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} mixture. The produced solid particles are analysed ex-situ. Chemical properties are deduced from: elemental composition, FTIR and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Optical properties are deduced from reflectivity in visible and IR range.

  9. Light Transmission From Extended Air Showers Produced By Cosmic-Rays and Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. F.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Belov, K.; Cao, Z.; Chen, G.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kieda, D. B.; Matthews, J. N.; Salamon, M.; Sokolsky, P. V.; Smith, J. D.; Sommers, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Thomas, S. B.; Wiencke, L. R.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Clay, R. W.; Dawson, B. R.; Simpson, K.; Bells, J.; Boyer, J.; Knapp, B.; Song, B. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; SDSS Collaboration; High Resolution Fly's Eye Collaboration; Telescope Array/U. Tokyo Collaboration

    1999-05-01

    Cosmic-ray and gamma-ray experiments that use the atmosphere as a calorimeter, such as the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) and the Telescope Array (TA), require understanding the transmission of the light from the air shower of particles produced by the cosmic-ray or gamma-ray striking the atmosphere. To better understand the scattering and transmission of light to the detectors, HiRes measures light from different calibrated sources. We compare scattered light from laser shots a few kilometers away from the two HiRes detectors, with direct light from stable portable light sources placed a few meters in front of the phototubes. We use two HiRes detectors to study and isolate contributions to fluctuations of the measured light. These contributions include fluctuations in the source intensity, the night sky background, scattering and transmission of the laser beam, the phototubes and electronics, and photostatistics. The High Resolution Fly's Eye Collaboration gratefully acknowledges the support of the US National Science Foundation, DOE, the US Army's Dugway Proving Grounds, and the support of our member universities.

  10. Structure and properties of commercially pure titanium nitrided in the plasma of a low-pressure gas discharge produced by a PINK plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu F.; Akhmadeev, Yu H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Petrikova, E. A.; Krysina, V.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    The paper analyzes the surface structure and properties of commercially pure VT1-0 titanium nitrided in the plasma of a low-pressure gas discharge produced by a PINK plasma generator. The analysis demonstrates that the friction coefficient of the nitrided material decreases more than four times and its wear resistance and microhardness increases more than eight and three times, respectively. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of strength and tribological properties of the material are discussed.

  11. Investigation of temporal-resolved emission spectra of highly charged Al ions from laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, M. G.; Cao, S. Q.; Sun, D. X.; Min, Q.; Dong, C. Z.

    2016-03-01

    Temporal evolution of extreme ultraviolet emission from laser-produced aluminum (Al) plasma has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. Al plasmas have been measured by using the temporal-spatially resolved laser-produced plasma technique. The emission lines can be identified from 2p-3s, 3d, 4s, 4d, 5d transition lines from Al3+ to Al6+ ions. In order to quickly diagnose the plasma, the assumptions of a normalized Boltzmann distribution among the excited states and a steady-state collisional-radiative model are used to estimate the values of electron temperature and electron density in plasma. We succeeded in reproducing the simulated spectra related to the different time delays, which are in good agreement with experiments. Temporal evolution behavior of highly charged Al ions in plasma has been analyzed, and the exponential decay about electron temperature and electron density has been obtained. The results indicate that the temporal-spatially resolved measurement is essential for accurate understanding of evolution behavior of highly charged ions in laser-produced plasmas.

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor-Induced Electromagnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario J.-E.

    Spontaneous electromagnetic fields can be important to the dynamic evolution of a plasma by directing heat flow as well as providing additional pressures on the conducting fluids through the Lorentz force. Electromagnetic fields are predicted to affect fluid behavior during the core-collapse of supernovae through generation of fields due to hydrodynamic instabilities. In the coronae of stars, self-generated magnetic fields lead to filamentary structure in the hot plasma. Recent experiments by Gregori et al. investigated sources of protogalactic magnetic fields generated by laser-produced shock waves. In inertial confinement fusion experiments, self-generated electromagnetic fields can also play a role and have recently become of great interest to the community. Present day laser facilities provide a unique opportunity to study spontaneous field-generation in these extreme environments under controlled conditions. Instability-induced electromagnetic fields were investigated using a novel monoenergetic-proton radiography system. Fusion protons generated by an 'exploding-pusher' implosion were used to probe laser-irradiated plastic foils with various preimposed surface perturbations. Imaging protons are sensitive to electromagnetic fields and density modulations in the plasma through the Lorentz force and Coulomb collisions, respectively. Corresponding x-ray radiographs of these targets provided mass density distributions and Coulomb effects on protons were assessed using a Monte Carlo code written using the Geant4 framework. Proton fluence distributions were recorded on CR-39 detectors and Fourier analyzed to infer path-integrated field strengths. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth of preimposed surface perturbations generated magnetic fields by the RT-induced Biermann battery and were measured for the first time. Good data were obtained during linear growth and when compared to ideal calculations, demonstrated that field diffusion near the source played an important role

  13. Kinetic studies of NO formation in pulsed air-like low-pressure dc plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, M.; Gortschakow, S.; Guaitella, O.; Marinov, D.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the formation of NO in pulsed air-like dc plasmas at a pressure of 1.33 mbar and mean currents between 50 and 150 mA of discharge pulses with 5 ms duration has been investigated both experimentally and by self-consistent numerical modelling. Using time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the densities of NO, NO2 and N2O have been measured in synthetic air as well as in air with 0.8% of NO2 and N2O, respectively. The temporal evolution of the NO density shows four distinct phases during the plasma pulse and the early afterglow in the three gas mixtures that were used. In particular, a steep density increase during the ignition phase and after termination of the discharge current pulse has been detected. The NO concentration has been found to reach a constant value of 0.57× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , 1.05× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , and 1.3× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} for mean plasma currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA, respectively, in the afterglow. The measured densities of NO2 and N2O in the respective mixture decrease exponentially during the plasma pulse and remain almost constant in the afterglow, especially where the admixture of NO2 has a remarkable impact on the NO production during the ignition. The numerical results of the coupled solution of a set of rate equations for the various heavy particles and the time-dependent Boltzmann equation of the electrons agree quite well with the experimental findings for the different air-like plasmas. The main reaction processes have been analysed on the basis of the model calculations and the remaining differences between the experiment and modelling especially during the afterglow are discussed.

  14. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250–1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  15. Influence of a Static Magnetic Field on Laser Induced Tungsten Plasma in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ding; Liu, Ping; Sun, Liying; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-04-01

    In this work, laser induced tungsten plasma has been investigated in the absence and presence of 0.6 T static transverse magnetic field at atmospheric pressure in air. The spectroscopic characterization of laser induced tungsten plasma was experimentally studied using space-resolved emission spectroscopy. The atomic emission lines of tungsten showed a significant enhancement in the presence of a magnetic field, while the ionic emission lines of tungsten presented little change. Temporal variation of the optical emission lines of tungsten indicated that the atomic emission time in the presence of a magnetic field was longer than that in the absence of a magnetic field, while no significant changes occurred for the ionic emission time. The spatial resolution of optical emission lines of tungsten demonstrated that the spatial distribution of atoms and ions were separated. The influence of a magnetic field on the spatial distribution of atoms was remarkable, whereas the spatial distribution of ions was little influenced by the magnetic field. The different behaviors between ions and atoms with and without magnetic field in air were related to the various atomic processes especially the electrons and ions recombination process during the plasma expansion and cooling process.

  16. Photoionization capable, extreme and vacuum ultraviolet emission in developing low temperature plasmas in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J.; Fierro, A.; Beeson, S.; Laity, G.; Trienekens, D.; Joshi, R. P.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental observation of photoionization capable extreme ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet emission from nanosecond timescale, developing low temperature plasmas (i.e. streamer discharges) in atmospheric air is presented. Applying short high voltage pulses enabled the observation of the onset of plasma formation exclusively by removing the external excitation before spark development was achieved. Contrary to the common assumption that radiative transitions from the b{{}1}{{\\Pi}u} (Birge-Hopfield I) and b{{}\\prime 1}Σu+ (Birge-Hopfield II) singlet states of N2 are the primary contributors to photoionization events, these results indicate that radiative transitions from the c{{4\\prime}1}Σu+ (Carroll-Yoshino) singlet state of N2 are dominant in developing low temperature plasmas in air. In addition to c{}4\\prime transitions, photoionization capable transitions from atomic and singly ionized atomic oxygen were also observed. The inclusion of c{{4\\prime}1}Σu+ transitions into a statistical photoionization model coupled with a fluid model enabled streamer growth in the simulation of positive streamers.

  17. One-dimensional Numerical Model of Transient Discharges in Air of a Spatial Plasma Ignition Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saceleanu, Florin N.

    This thesis examines the modes of discharge of a plasma ignition device. Oscilloscope data of the discharge voltage and current are analyzed for various pressures in air at ambient temperature. It is determined that the discharge operates in 2 modes: a glow discharge and a postulated streamer discharge. Subsequently, a 1-dimensional fluid simulation of plasma using the finite volume method (FVM) is developed to gain insight into the particle kinetics. Transient results of the simulation agree with theories of electric discharges; however, quasi-steady state results were not reached due to high diffusion time of ions in air. Next, an ordinary differential equation (ODE) is derived to understand the discharge transition. Simulated results were used to estimate the voltage waveform, which describes the ODE's forcing function; additional simulated results were used to estimate the discharge current and the ODE's non-linearity. It is found that the ODE's non-linearity increases exponentially for capacitive discharges. It is postulated that the non-linearity defines the mode transition observed experimentally. The research is motivated by Spatial Plasma Discharge Ignition (SPDI), an innovative ignition system postulated to increase combustion efficiency in automobile engines for up to 9%. The research thus far can only hypothesize SPDI's benefits on combustion, based on the literature review and the modes of discharge.

  18. Studies of H-Mode Plasmas Produced Directly by Pellet Injection in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    P. Gohil; L.R. Baylor; T.C. Jernigan; K.H. Burrell; T.N. Carlstrom; G.R. McKee; T.L. Rhodes

    2000-08-01

    A key issue for the physics of H-mode plasmas is to determine which plasma quantities are critical for the formation of the edge transport barrier. One approach is to directly perturb the edge plasma and observe the subsequent changes. In DIII-D, pellet injection has been used to directly change the edge plasma conditions and produce H-mode transitions. One hypothesis for the H-mode transition is that the attainment of a critical edge electron temperature is required for the transition [1-3]. This hypothesis is disproved in this paper. H-mode transitions were produced by injecting frozen deuterium pellets of diameter 2.7 mm from the inner wall of the DIII-D vessel into the high toroidal field side (HFS) and from the outer wall into the low field side (LFS) of the plasma. Both the HFS and LFS pellets produced significant increases in the edge electron density, which led to substantial reductions in the edge electron and ion temperatures. However, H-mode transitions were still produced with the lowered edge temperatures, implying that a critical edge temperature is not necessary for H-mode transitions. The pellet induced H-mode plasma exhibited clear pedestals in electron density and electron and ion temperatures at the plasma edge and persisted for the duration of the applied neutral beam power. The HFS pellet's penetration and deposition profiles were substantially deeper (up to {rho} {approx} 0.2) than that of the LFS pellet (up to {rho} {approx} 0.7). However, since both HFS and LFS pellets produced H-mode transitions, this implies that pellet penetration depth is not important the important factor is the large increase in the electron density right at the plasma edge produced by both types of pellets. The values of the edge plasma quantities at the H-mode transition were expressed in the parametric terms described in several theories and models of the H-mode transitions [4-6]. On comparison, the experimentally determined parameters at the H-mode transition were

  19. From the regulatory functions of B cells to the identification of cytokine-producing plasma cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Dang, Van Duc; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Ries, Stefanie; Shen, Ping; Fillatreau, Simon

    2014-06-01

    B lymphocytes have a unique role as antibody-producing cells. Antibodies are key mediators of humoral immunity against infections, and are thought to account for the protection afforded by successful vaccines. B cells can also secrete cytokines and subsequently regulate immune responses mediated by T and innate cells. Remarkably, recent studies identified plasma blasts/plasma cells as the main types of activated B cells producing the cytokines interleukin (IL)-10, IL-35, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17, and GM-CSF in various contexts in mice. Here, we discuss these observations, which suggest the existence of various subsets of plasma blast/plasma cells distinguishable through their cytokine expression pattern. PMID:24637161

  20. Traveling-wave laser-produced-plasma energy source for photoionization laser pumping and lasers incorporating said

    DOEpatents

    Sher, Mark H.; Macklin, John J.; Harris, Stephen E.

    1989-09-26

    A traveling-wave, laser-produced-plasma, energy source used to obtain single-pass gain saturation of a photoionization pumped laser. A cylindrical lens is used to focus a pump laser beam to a long line on a target. Grooves are cut in the target to present a surface near normal to the incident beam and to reduce the area, and hence increase the intensity and efficiency, of plasma formation.

  1. Increased Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yaun-Min; Bennett, Murray S.; Yang, Liyou

    1997-07-08

    High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

  2. Increasing Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yaun-Min; Bennett, Murray S.; Yang, Liyou

    1999-08-24

    High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

  3. Characterization of air pollution control residues produced in a municipal solid waste incinerator in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Quina, Margarida J; Santos, Regina C; Bordado, João C; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    This study is mainly related with the physical and chemical characterization of a solid waste, produced in a municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process, which is usually referred as air pollution control (APC) residue. The moisture content, loss on ignition (LOI), particle size distribution, density, porosity, specific surface area and morphology were the physical properties addressed here. At the chemical level, total elemental content (TC), total availability (TA) and the leaching behaviour with compliance tests were determined, as well as the acid neutralization capacity (ANC). The main mineralogical crystalline phases were identified, and the thermal behaviour of the APC residues is also shown. The experimental work involves several techniques such as laser diffraction spectrometry, mercury porosimetry, helium pycnometry, gas adsorption, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), ion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous thermal analysis (STA). The results point out that the APC residues do not comply with regulations in force at the developed countries, and therefore the waste should be considered hazardous. Among the considered heavy metals, lead, zinc and chromium were identified as the most problematic ones, and their total elemental quantities are similar for several samples collected in an industrial plant at different times. Moreover, the high amount of soluble salts (NaCl, KCl, calcium compounds) may constitute a major problem and should be taken into account for all management strategies. The solubility in water is very high (more than 24% for a solid/liquid ratio of 10) and thus the possible utilizations of this residue are very limited, creating difficulties also in the ordinary treatments, such as in solidification/stabilization with binders. PMID:17728059

  4. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanguo; Li, Ying; Cao, Peng; Zhao, Hongjie

    2013-07-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet.

  5. Diffuse plasma treatment of polyamide 66 fabric in atmospheric pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Peng, Ming-yang; Teng, Yun; Gao, Guozhen

    2016-01-01

    The polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics are hard to be colored or glued in industrial production due to the poor hydrophily. Diffuse plasma is a kind of non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure in air. This paper proposes that large-scale diffuse plasma generated between wire electrodes can be employed for improving the hydrophily of PA66 fabrics. A repetitive nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor using a cylindrical wire electrode configuration is presented, which can generate large-scale non-thermal plasmas steadily at atmospheric pressure without any barrier dielectric. Then the reactor is used to treat PA66 fabrics in different discharge conditions. The hydrophilicity property of modified PA66 is measured by wicking test method. The modified PA66 is also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to prove the surface changes in physical microstructure and chemical functional groups, respectively. What's more, the effects of treatment time and treatment frequency on surface modification are investigated and discussed.

  6. Surface modification of polyelectrolyte multilayers by high radio frequency air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago Dias; Bataglioli, Rogério Aparecido; Taketa, Thiago Bezerra; Vasconcellos, Fernando da Cruz; Beppu, Marisa Masumi

    2015-02-01

    Low-temperature plasma treatments are used to perform surface modification on polymers, aiming to improve the surface properties according to the desired application. In this work, polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs), built by layer-by-layer deposition technique, were treated using high frequency low-temperature air plasma. We evaluated the effect of the exposure time (20 and 300 s) and its effects on PEMs with two different top layers: alginate and carboxymethylcellulose. Chitosan was used as the cationic polymer to build the LbL films with the oppositely charged anionic polymers, alginate and carboxymethylcellulose. Our results showed that the surface topology, wettability and free charges within layers are highly correlated to the polymer pair used. PEMs of the chitosan/alginate system are thinner and hydrophilic, and present a surface with wider peaks. We found that plasma treatment promotes substantial changes on the PEMs and that 20 s of exposure time is enough to perform these changes. In all cases, after plasma treatment, PEMs' thickness and free charge distribution were reduced and wettability was enhanced.

  7. ADI-FDTD modeling of microwave plasma discharges in air towards fully three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Rogier, François; Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Plasma formation and propagation during microwave breakdown has been extensively studied during the last decades. Numerical modeling of the strong coupling between the high frequency electromagnetic waves and the plasma is still a challenging topic due to the different time and space scales involved. In this article, an Alternative Direction Implicit (ADI) formulation of the Finite Difference Time Domain method for solving Maxwell's equations coupled with a simplified plasma model via the electric current is being proposed, leading to a significant reduction of the computational cost as the CFL criterion for stability of the FDTD method is being removed. An energy estimate has been used to prove the unconditional stability of the ADI-FDTD leapfrog scheme as well as its coupled formulation. The computational efficiency and accuracy of this approach has been studied in a simplified case. The proposed method is applied and validated in two dimensional microwave breakdown in air while its computational efficiency allows for fully three dimensional simulations, an important step for understanding the complex nature and evolution of a microwave plasma discharge and its possible applicability as an aerodynamic flow control method.

  8. Atmospheric pressure discharge plasma decomposition for gaseous air contaminants -- Trichlorotrifluoroethane and trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Tetsuji; Yamashita, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Tadashi; Masuda, Senichi

    1996-03-01

    The decomposition performance of gaseous environmental destructive contaminants in air by using atmospheric pressure discharged plasma including the surface discharge induced plasma chemical processing (SPCP) was examined. The main contaminants tested were chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-113) and trichloroethylene, typically. The discharge exciting frequency range studied was wide--50 Hz to 50 kHz. Results showed the low frequency discharge requires high voltage to inject high electric power in the gas and to decompose the contaminants. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was used to analyze discharge products of dense CFC-113 or trichloroethylene. Among the detected products were HCl, CClFO, and CHCl{sub 3}. Two different electrode configurations; the silent discharge (coaxial) electrode and the coil-electrode were also tested and compared to each other as a gas reactor.

  9. Influence of laser polarization on plasma fluorescence emission during the femtosecond filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan; Chen, Anmin; Jiang, Yuanfei; Li, Suyu; Jin, Mingxing

    2016-05-01

    The laser polarization state has a great influence on the plasma fluorescence emission during femtoseond filamentation in air. For the spectral lines from N2, in the case of focusing lens with longer focal length (f=100 cm), due to the impact excitation, circular polarization leads to stronger fluorescence emission when the laser energy is higher than the 'energy threshold' (2.0 mJ). As a lens with shorter focal length (f=40 cm) is used, a similar phenomenon can be observed, however, the 'energy threshold' is much lower, which is lower than 0.8 mJ. For the lines from N2+, especially for the 391 nm one, their emission is stronger in the linear polarization state. The mechanism of plasma fluorescence emission during femtosecond filamentation is discussed based on the analysis of these phenomena, which will be helpful to the remote sensing and spectrum analysis.

  10. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, M A; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Taylor, T A; Meier, G H

    2012-10-01

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  11. Air plasma gasification of RDF as a prospective method for reduction of carbon dioxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsev, A. N.; Kumkova, I. I.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Popov, V. E.; Shtengel', S. V.; Ufimtsev, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    Waste disposal dumps are one of sources of carbonic gas penetration in the atmosphere. The waste is treated into RDF (refuse-derived fuel) and used in boilers for electric power or heat generation for decrease in carbonic gas emissions in the atmosphere. In industry power stations on the basis of the combined cycle have the highest efficiency of burning. The paper deals with the application of an air-plasma gasifier using the down draft scheme of RDF transformation into synthesis gas, which afterwards can be used in the combined cycle. Results of calculations of the process characteristics for various RDF compositions are presented. The advantage of the plasma method in comparison with autothermal one is shown. Experimental data are shown.

  12. Measurements of ion temperature and flow of pulsed plasmas produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device using an ion Doppler spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know surface damage characteristics of plasma-facing component materials during transient heat and particle loads such as type I ELMs. A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device has been used as transient heat and particle source in ELM simulation experiments. Characteristics of pulsed plasmas produced by the MCPG device play an important role for the plasma material interaction. In this study, ion temperature and flow velocity of pulsed He plasmas were measured by an ion Doppler spectrometer (IDS). The IDS system consists of a light collection system including optical fibers, 1m-spectrometer and a 16 channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. The IDS system measures the width and Doppler shift of HeII (468.58 nm) emission line with the time resolution of 1 μs. The Doppler broadened and shifted spectra were measured with 45 and 135 degree angles with respect to the plasmoid traveling direction. The observed emission line profile was represented by sum of two Gaussian components to determine the temperature and flow velocity. The minor component at around the wavelength of zero-velocity was produced by the stationary plasma. As the results, the ion velocity and temperature were 68 km/s and 19 eV, respectively. Thus, the He ion flow energy is 97 eV. The observed flow velocity agrees with that measured by a time of flight technique.

  13. Silent Discharge Plasma Technology for the Treatment of Air Toxics and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, Louis A.; Chase, Peter J.; Gross, Michael P.

    1998-09-21

    Under this CRADA, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and High Mesa Technologies, Inc. (HMT) carried out a joint project on the development of the silent discharge plasma (SDP) technology for the treatment of hazardous air pollutants and other hazardous or toxic chemicals. The project had two major components: a technology-demonstration part and a scale-up and commercialization part. In the first part, a small-scale, mobile SDP plasma processor, which was being developed under a CRADA with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was the mobile equipment was modified for higher capacity service and employed for an innovative remediation technologies demonstration on soil-vapor extraction off-gases at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, CA. The performance of the SDP system for the variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) encountered at the McClellan site was sufficiently promising to the project HMT and LANL worked together to formulate a scale-up strategy and commercialization/manufacturing plan, and to design a prototype scaled-up SDP unit. HMT and LANL are now in the final stages of completing a licensing agreement for the technology and HMT is in the process of raising funds to engineer and manufacture commercial prototype SDP equipment focused on stack-gas emissions control and environmental remediation. HMT, in collaboration with another Northern New Mexico business, Coyote Aerospace, has also been successful in receiving a Phase I Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) award from the Army Research Office to develop, design, and construct a small non-thermal plasma reactor for laboratory studies ("Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor for Control of Fugitive Emissions of Toxic Gases")

  14. Spectroscopic diagnosis of laboratory air plasmas as a benchmark for spectral diagnosis of TLEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, F. C.; Passas, M.; Carrasco, E.; Luque, A.; Tanarro, I.; Simek, M.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2013-09-01

    Laboratory low pressure (0.1 mbar ≤ p ≤ 2 mbar) glow air discharges are studied by optical emission spectroscopy to discuss several spectroscopic techniques that could be implemented by field spectrographs, depending on the available spectra resolution, to experimentally quantify the gas temperature associated with Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) occurring at different altitudes including blue jets, giant blue jets and sprites. Laboratory air plasmas have been analysed from the near UV (300 nm) to the near IR (1060 nm) with high (up to 0.01 nm) and low (2 nm) spectral resolution commercial grating spectrographs and by an in-house developed intensified CCD grating spectrograph (GRASSP) recently developed by our group (www.trappa.es) at IAA-CSIC for TLE spectral diagnostic surveys with ≤ 0.45 nm spectral resolution. We discuss the results of lab tests and comment on the convenience of using one or another technique for rotational (gas) temperature determination during TLE spectroscopic campaigns.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulations of multi-MeV pulsed X-ray induced air plasmas at low pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribière, M.; Cessenat, O.; d'Almeida, T.; de Gaufridy de Dortan, F.; Maulois, M.; Delbos, C.; Garrigues, A.; Azaïs, B.

    2016-03-01

    A full kinetic modelling of the charge particles dynamics generated upon the irradiation of an air-filled cavity by a multi-MeV pulsed x-ray is performed. From the calculated radiative source generated by the ASTERIX generator, we calculated the electromagnetic fields generated by x-ray induced air plasmas in a metallic cavity at different pressures. Simulations are carried out based on a Particle-In-Cell interpolation method which uses 3D Maxwell-Vlasov calculations of the constitutive charged species densities of air plasmas at different pressures at equilibrium. The resulting electromagnetic fields within the cavity are calculated for different electron densities up to 4 × 1010 cm-3. For each air pressure, we show electronic plasma waves formation followed by Landau damping. As electron density increases, the calculations exhibit space-charged neutralization and return current formation.

  16. Generation of concatenated long high-density plasma channels in air by a single femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papeer, J.; Bruch, R.; Dekel, E.; Pollak, O.; Botton, M.; Henis, Z.; Zigler, A.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a stable and reproducible generation of long concatenated high-density plasma channels in air by a single femtosecond laser pulse. Each segment of the plasma channel is created by a plasma filament left in the wake of the same single high power laser pulse. Our method enables a control of a few millimeters over the position of each segment as well as exact temporal synchronization between them. The combined plasma channel can extend up to several meters long. The plasma density along the entire concatenated plasma channels is measured to be above 1015 cm-3. The demonstrated approach can be further extrapolated to a higher number of filament segments, thus to much longer high-density plasma channels.

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes produced by a combination of suspension plasma spray and very low pressure plasma spray.

    SciTech Connect

    Slamovich, Elliot; Fleetwood, James; McCloskey, James F.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Trice, Rodney Wayne

    2010-07-01

    Plasma spray coating techniques allow unique control of electrolyte microstructures and properties as well as facilitating deposition on complex surfaces. This can enable significantly improved solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), including non-planar designs. SOFCs are promising because they directly convert the oxidization of fuel into electrical energy. However, electrolytes deposited using conventional plasma spray are porous and often greater than 50 microns thick. One solution to form dense, thin electrolytes of ideal composition for SOFCs is to combine suspension plasma spray (SPS) with very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS). Increased compositional control is achieved due to dissolved dopant compounds in the suspension that are incorporated into the coating during plasma spraying. Thus, it is possible to change the chemistry of the feed stock during deposition. In the work reported, suspensions of sub-micron diameter 8 mol.% Y2O3-ZrO2 (YSZ) powders were sprayed on NiO-YSZ anodes at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Thermal Spray Research Laboratory (TSRL). These coatings were compared to the same suspensions doped with scandium nitrate at 3 to 8 mol%. The pressure in the chamber was 2.4 torr and the plasma was formed from a combination of argon and hydrogen gases. The resultant electrolytes were well adhered to the anode substrates and were approximately 10 microns thick. The microstructure of the resultant electrolytes will be reported as well as the electrolyte performance as part of a SOFC system via potentiodynamic testing and impedance spectroscopy.

  18. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Praphairaksit, N.

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at {approximately}70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of {approximately}4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression

  19. Efficient new process for the desulfurization of mixtures of air and hydrogen sulfide via a dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahle, S.

    2015-10-01

    The efficient removal of hydrogen sulfide, H2S, from streams of H2S in air via a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been investigated using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A suitable plasma device with a reservoir for storing sorbent powder of various kinds within the plasma region was constructed. Plasma treatments of gas streams with high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in air yielded a removal of more than 98% of the initial hydrogen sulfide and a deposition of sulfur at the surface of the dielectric, while small amounts of sulfur dioxide were generated. The presence of calcium carbonate within the plasma region of the DBD device resulted in the removal of over 99% of the initial hydrogen sulfide content and the removal of 98% of the initial sulfur dioxide impurities from the gas mixture.

  20. Development of a collective Thomson scattering system for laser-produced tin plasmas for extreme-ultraviolet light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Kentaro; Sato, Yuta; Nishikawa, Kazutaka; Uchino, Kiichiro; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Tomuro, Hiroaki; Wada, Yasunori; Kunishima, Masahito; Kodama, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    Spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te) of laser-produced Sn plasmas for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) light sources have been obtained using a new collective Thomson scattering system, which has been optimized for the measurement of the ion feature spectrum. The system has an 18 pm spectral resolution, a 5 ns temporal resolution, a 50 µm spatial resolution, and sufficient stray-light rejection near the probing laser wavelength. With this system, measurements of the laser-produced Sn plasmas in the parameter ranges of 3 × 1023 < ne < 1025 m-3 and 10 < Te < 20 eV have been performed.

  1. Enthalpy probe measurements and three-dimensional modelling on air plasma jets generated by a non-transferred plasma torch with hollow electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keun Su; Park, Jin Myung; Choi, Sooseok; Kim, Jongin; Hong, Sang Hee

    2008-03-01

    Thermal flow characteristics of air plasma jets generated by a non-transferred plasma torch with hollow electrodes are experimentally and numerically investigated in order to provide more reliable scientific and technical information, which has been insufficient for their practical applications to material and environmental industries. In this work, a thermal plasma torch of hollow electrode type is first designed and fabricated, and similarity criteria for predicting operational conditions for the scale-up to high-power torches are derived from the arc voltage characteristics measured with various operating and geometry conditions of the torch. The thermal flow characteristics of air plasma jets ejected from the torch are measured by enthalpy probe diagnostics and turn out to have relatively low temperatures of around 3000-7000 K, but show features of other unique properties, such as high energy flux, broad high temperature region and long plasma jet with moderate axial velocity, which are promising for their applications to material syntheses and hazardous waste treatments. Such high enthalpy at a relatively low temperature of air thermal plasma compared with the argon one is due to the high thermal energy residing in the vibrational and rotational states and oxygen dissociation, besides the translational states in monatomic gases such as argon. It is expected that this high specific enthalpy of the air plasma will enable material and environmental industries to treat a large amount of precursors and waste materials effectively at a lower temperature for a longer residence time by the low plasma velocity. It is also found from the measurements that the turbulence intensity influenced by the size of the electrode diameter has a significant effect on the axial and radial profiles of plasma jet properties and that a longer plasma jet is more readily achievable with a larger electrode diameter reducing the turbulence intensity in the external region of the torch. In

  2. Space-resolved spectra of laser-produced plasmas in the XUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Prinz, D. K.; Nagel, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The design and imaging properties of an XUV (extreme ultraviolet, 200-550 A) normal-incidence slitless spectrograph, the spectrum obtained from laser-generated plasmas, and the monochromatic plasma images are described. The electron temperature of the plasmas, electron density as a function of position in the plasma, and the thickness of material penetrated by the laser pulse are determined. Elements from Z = 6 to Z = 28 were investigated, in addition to Nb. Secondary plasma-emission regions were observed 2-3 mm from the flat (thick or thin) targets. Time-integrated photographs of the expanding plasmas were recorded by the slitless spectrograph. A technique for obtaining time-resolved images of the plasmas in picosecond time intervals is proposed, and problems in the design of a stigmatic XUV spectrograph are discussed.

  3. Self-organized electromagnetic field structures in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugland, N. L.; Ryutov, D. D.; Chang, P.-Y.; Drake, R. P.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gregori, G.; Grosskopf, M.; Koenig, M.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kuranz, C.; Levy, M. C.; Liang, E.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Morita, T.; Pelka, A.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.; Ravasio, A.; Remington, B. A.; Reville, B.; Ross, J. S.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Park, H.-S.

    2012-11-01

    Self-organization occurs in plasmas when energy progressively transfers from smaller to larger scales in an inverse cascade. Global structures that emerge from turbulent plasmas can be found in the laboratory and in astrophysical settings; for example, the cosmic magnetic field, collisionless shocks in supernova remnants and the internal structures of newly formed stars known as Herbig-Haro objects. Here we show that large, stable electromagnetic field structures can also arise within counter-streaming supersonic plasmas in the laboratory. These surprising structures, formed by a yet unexplained mechanism, are predominantly oriented transverse to the primary flow direction, extend for much larger distances than the intrinsic plasma spatial scales and persist for much longer than the plasma kinetic timescales. Our results challenge existing models of counter-streaming plasmas and can be used to better understand large-scale and long-time plasma self-organization.

  4. Plume splitting and rebounding in a high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Anmin; Jiang Yuanfei; Liu Hang; Jin Mingxing; Ding Dajun

    2012-07-15

    The dynamics of plasma plume formed by high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The laser wavelength is 10.6 {mu}m. Measurements were made using 3 ns gated fast photography as well as space and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The behavior of the plasma plume was studied with a laser energy of 3 J and 10 J. The results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is very complicated. The splitting and rebounding of the plasma plume is observed to occur early in the plumes history.

  5. Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve K-OMS-2 as catalyst in post plasma-catalysis for trichloroethylene degradation in humid air.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh, M T; Giraudon, J-M; Vandenbroucke, A M; Morent, R; De Geyter, N; Lamonier, J-F

    2016-08-15

    The total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in air at low relative humidity (RH=10%) in the presence of CO2 (520ppmv) was investigated in function of energy density using an atmospheric pressure negative DC luminescent glow discharge combined with a cryptomelane catalyst positioned downstream of the plasma reactor at a temperature of 150°C. When using Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) alone, it is found a low COx (x=1-2) yield in agreement with the detection of gaseous polychlorinated by-products in the outlet stream as well as ozone which is an harmful pollutant. Introduction of cryptomelane enhanced trichloroethylene removal, totally inhibited plasma ozone formation and increased significantly the COx yield. The improved performances of the hybrid system were mainly ascribed to the total destruction of plasma generated ozone on cryptomelane surface to produce active oxygen species. Consequently these active oxygen species greatly enhanced the abatement of the plasma non-reacted TCE and completely destroyed the hazardous plasma generated polychlorinated intermediates. The facile redox of Mn species associated with oxygen vacancies and mobility as well as the textural properties of the catalyst might also contribute as a whole to the efficiency of the process. PMID:27107238

  6. Structure and surface correlations to the optical properties of nonthermal plasma-produced silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Rebecca Joy

    Nanomaterials have diverse capabilities to enable new technology and to deepen our understanding of our world, providing exciting prospects for scientists and the public alike in a vast span of uses. In the past decade, however, the potential held by nanotechnology has been reframed in the context of helping to slow global climate change and to alter the ways in which we use our energy to reflect more efficient technology and renewable energy sources. Silicon is a standout material in this new framework: as a nanomaterial, silicon can emit light when exposed to an applied voltage or ultraviolet optical excitation source. Silicon nanocrystals also exhibit size-dependent light emission, due to quantum confinement. This thesis is an exploration of the synthesis and processing parameters that affect the optical performance of silicon nanocrystals produced in a nonthermal plasma reactor. The efficiency of this light emission is sensitive to both synthesis environment and post-synthesis treatment. The work presented here is an attempt to deepen our understanding of the effects of different reactor and treatment parameters on the light emission efficiency from silicon nanoparticles, such that the luminescence behavior of the nanoparticles can be specifically engineered. Being able to fine-tune the structure, surface, and optical characteristics of the silicon nanocrystals is key in maximizing their use in luminescence applications. For all of the experiments described here, a nonthermal plasma flow-through reactor has been used to create the silicon nanoparticles. Silane gas is dissociated in the plasma and fragments come together to form silicon clusters, then grow to create nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were collected from the reactor for further processing, characterization, and experiments. The first discovery in this project was that by adjusting the power to the plasma reactor, the crystallinity of the silicon particles can be tuned: low power results in

  7. Stark broadening measurements in plasmas produced by laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Miloš; Hermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for the measurement of Stark broadening parameters of atomic and ionic spectral lines based on laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds. Therefore, plume emission spectra, recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector, were compared to the spectral radiance of a plasma in local thermal equilibrium. Producing material ablation with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses in argon at near atmospheric pressure, the recordings take advantage of the spatially uniform distributions of electron density and temperature within the ablated vapor. By changing the delay between laser pulse and detector gate, the electron density could be varied by more than two orders of magnitude while the temperature was altered in the range from 6,000 to 14,000 K. The Stark broadening parameters of transitions were derived from their simultaneous observation with the hydrogen Balmer alpha line. In addition, assuming a linear increase of Stark widths and shifts with electron density for non-hydrogenic lines, our measurements indicate a change of the Stark broadening-dependence of Hα over the considered electron density range. The presented results obtained for hydrated calcium sulfate (CaSO4ṡ2H2O) can be extended to any kind of hydrogen containing compounds.

  8. Optical properties of analogs of Titan's aerosols produced by dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.-B.; Mahjoub, A.; Gautier, T.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Szopa, C.

    2013-10-01

    Analogs of Titan's aerosols are produced in the laboratory as grains in a gas mixture, or as layers on a substrate. This production procedure enables the methane-nitrogen mixture composition to be changed. The aim of this paper is to understand the variations observed on the linear polarization of the scattered light as a function of the production conditions. The influence of the concentration of methane injected in the plasma will be discussed and compared with the previous work of Hadamcik et al. (2009a). The diameter of the grains are measured by SEM-FEG images. The decrease of absorption with increasing wavelength, measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry on layers, is observed for a decreasing initial methane ratio and analyzed in terms of an increasing `amine' content in the materials. The phase function parameters of the linear polarization of the scattered light are discussed in terms of the diameters of the aggregates and of the constituent grains, and the variation of the refractive indices (mainly absorption). The polarization is found to be highly correlated with the constituent grain size. Finally, the experimental results are compared to polarization measurements from space of the Titan's atmosphere.

  9. Calibration of a flat field soft x-ray grating spectrometer for laser produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Brown, G V; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Beiersdorfer, P; Cone, K V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E W; May, M J; Porter, F S

    2010-10-01

    We have calibrated the x-ray response of a variable line spaced grating spectrometer, known as the VSG, at the Fusion and Astrophysics Data and Diagnostic Calibration Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VSG has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasmas, such as those created at the Jupiter Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility at LLNL and at both the Omega and Omega EP lasers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The bandwidth of the VSG spans the range of ∼6-60 Å. The calibration results presented here include the VSG's dispersion and quantum efficiency. The dispersion is determined by measuring the x rays emitted from the hydrogenlike and heliumlike ions of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, and aluminum. The quantum efficiency is calibrated to an accuracy of 30% or better by normalizing the x-ray intensities recorded by the VSG to those simultaneously recorded by an x-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer. PMID:21034017

  10. Rapid, absolute calibration of x-ray filters employed by laser-produced plasma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Emig, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Heeter, R F; Magee, E; Thorn, D B; Widmann, K; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S

    2008-10-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to absolutely calibrate the transmission efficiency of x-ray filters employed by diodes and spectrometers used to diagnose laser-produced plasmas. EBIT emits strong, discrete monoenergetic lines at appropriately chosen x-ray energies. X rays are detected using the high resolution EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), developed for LLNL at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. X-ray filter transmission efficiency is determined by dividing the x-ray counts detected when the filter is in the line of sight by those detected when out of the line of sight. Verification of filter thickness can be completed in only a few hours, and absolute efficiencies can be calibrated in a single day over a broad range from about 0.1 to 15 keV. The EBIT calibration lab has been used to field diagnostics (e.g., the OZSPEC instrument) with fully calibrated x-ray filters at the OMEGA laser. Extensions to use the capability for calibrating filter transmission for the DANTE instrument on the National Ignition Facility are discussed. PMID:19044471

  11. Spectroscopic and interferometric measurements of laser-plasma produced blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, E. A.; Stamper, J. A.; Manka, C. K.; Griem, H. R.; Ali, A. W.; Ripin, B. H.

    1986-08-01

    A laser-produced plasma generates blast waves as it expands supersonically into a stationary photoionized background gas (N2) at a pressure of 1-5 Torr.1 Using a combination of spectroscopic and interferometric measurements, time- and space-resolved values of the temperature and density are obtained. This study was performed on targets in the NRL Pharos III laser facility with laser energies of 20-120 J and pulse durations of ˜5 ns. A 1-m spectrograph equipped with three photomultiplier channels, which are calibrated on an absolute scale, is used for the spectroscopic measurements. The interferometry is done with a folded-wavefront interferometer. It uses an optical probe pulse at 5270 Å that is split off of the main laser pulse, reduced in pulse duration (˜300 ps), and time delayed. Interferometric measurements can be made simultaneously with the spectroscopic measurements. Experimental data and the technique of analysis will be shown. This work was supported by the Defense Nuclear Agency.

  12. Chemically produced nanostructured ODS-lanthanum oxide-tungsten composites sintered by spark plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yar, Mazher Ahmed; Wahlberg, Sverker; Bergqvist, Hans; Salem, Hanadi G.; Johnsson, Mats; Muhammed, Mamoun

    2011-01-01

    High purity W and W-0.9La 2O 3 (wt.%) nanopowders were produced by a wet chemical route. The precursor was prepared by the reaction of ammonium paratungstate (APT) with lanthanum salt in aqueous solutions. High resolution electron microscopy investigations revealed that the tungstate particles were coated with oxide precipitates. The precursor powder was reduced to tungsten metal with dispersed lanthanum oxide. Powders were consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 1300 and 1400 °C to suppress grain growth during sintering. The final grain size relates to the SPS conditions, i.e. temperature and heating rate, regardless of the starting powder particle size. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that oxide phases were mainly accumulated at grain boundaries while the tungsten matrix constituted of nanosized sub-grains. The transmission electron microscopy revealed that the tungsten grains consist of micron-scale grains and finer sub-grains. EDX analysis confirmed the presence of W in dispersed oxide phases with varying chemical composition, which evidenced the presence of complex oxide phases (W-O-La) in the sintered metals.

  13. Laser-produced plasma measurement of thermal diffusivity of molten metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong W.; Park, C.S.

    1995-12-01

    We have shown that a laser-produced plasma plume which is representative in composition of the condensed phase target can be reproducibly generated if the movement of the surface due to evaporation is kept in pace with the thermal diffusion front propagating into the bulk. The resulting mass loss is then strongly controlled by the thermal diffusivity of the target matter, and this relationship has been exploited to measure the thermal diffusivity of metallic alloys. We have developed a novel RF levitator-heater as a contamination-free molten metal source to be used as a target for LPP plume generation. In order to determine the mass loss due to LPP excitation, a new high sensitivity transducer has been constructed for measurement of the resulting impulse imparted on the specimen. The impulse transducer is built onto the specimen holder within the levitation-assisted molten metal source. The LPP method has been fully excercised for measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a molten specimen relative to the value for its room temperature solid. The results for SS304 and SS316 are presented together with a critique of the results. A numerical modeling of specimen heating in the molten metal source and the physical basis of the new hod are also presented.

  14. Laser-produced plasma measurement of thermal diffusivity of molten metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. W.; Park, C. S.

    1996-09-01

    We have shown that a laser-produced plasma plume which is representative in elemental composition of the condensed phase target can be reproducibly generated if the movement of the surface due to evaporation is kept in pace with the thermal diffusion front propagating into the bulk. The resulting mass loss is then strongly controlled by the thermal diffusivity of the target matter, and this relationship has been exploited to measure the thermal diffusivity of metallic alloys. We have developed a novel RF Ievitator-heater as a contamination-free molten metal source to be used as a target for LPP plume generation. In order to determine the mass loss due to LPP excitation, a new high-sensitivity transducer has been constructed for measurement of the resulting impulse imparted on the specimen. The impulse transducer is built onto the specimen holder within the levitation-assisted molten metal source. The LPP method has been fully exercised for measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a molten specimen relative to the value for its room temperature solid. The results for SS304 and SS316 are presented, together with a critique of the results. A numerical modeling of the specimen heating in the molten metal source and the physical basis of the new method are also presented.

  15. Characterization of gas targets for laser produced extreme ultraviolet plasmas with a Hartmann-Shack sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Peth, Christian; Kranzusch, Sebastian; Mann, Klaus; Vioel, Wolfgang

    2004-10-01

    A table top extreme ultraviolet (EUV)-source was developed at Laser-Laboratorium Goettingen for the characterization of optical components and sensoric devices in the wavelength region from 11 to 13 nm. EUV radiation is generated by focusing the beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser into a pulsed xenon gas jet. Since a directed gas jet with a high number density is needed for an optimal performance of the source, conical nozzles with different cone angles were drilled with an excimer laser to produce a supersonic gas jet. The influence of the nozzle geometry on the gas jet was characterized with a Hartmann-Shack wave front sensor. The deformation of a planar wave front after passing the gas jet was analyzed with this sensor, allowing a reconstruction of the gas density distribution. Thus, the gas jet was optimized resulting in an increase of EUV emission by a factor of two and a decrease of the plasma size at the same time.

  16. Rapid, absolute calibration of x-ray filters employed by laser-produced plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G. V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Emig, J.; Frankel, M.; Gu, M. F.; Heeter, R. F.; Magee, E.; Thorn, D. B.; Widmann, K.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2008-10-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to absolutely calibrate the transmission efficiency of x-ray filters employed by diodes and spectrometers used to diagnose laser-produced plasmas. EBIT emits strong, discrete monoenergetic lines at appropriately chosen x-ray energies. X rays are detected using the high resolution EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), developed for LLNL at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. X-ray filter transmission efficiency is determined by dividing the x-ray counts detected when the filter is in the line of sight by those detected when out of the line of sight. Verification of filter thickness can be completed in only a few hours, and absolute efficiencies can be calibrated in a single day over a broad range from about 0.1 to 15 keV. The EBIT calibration lab has been used to field diagnostics (e.g., the OZSPEC instrument) with fully calibrated x-ray filters at the OMEGA laser. Extensions to use the capability for calibrating filter transmission for the DANTE instrument on the National Ignition Facility are discussed.

  17. Rapid, Absolute Calibration of X-ray Filters Employed By Laser-Produced Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Emig, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Heeter, R F; Magee, E; Thorn, D B; Widmann, K; . Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S

    2008-05-11

    The electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to absolutely calibrate the transmission efficiency of X-ray filters employed by diodes and spectrometers used to diagnose laser-produced plasmas. EBIT emits strong, discrete monoenergetic lines at appropriately chosen X-ray energies. X-rays are detected using the high-resolution EBIT calorimeter spectrometer (ECS), developed for LLNL at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. X-ray filter transmission efficiency is determined by dividing the X-ray counts detected when the filter is in the line of sight by those detected when out of the line of sight. Verification of filter thickness can be completed in only a few hours, and absolute efficiencies can be calibrated in a single day over a broad range from about 0.1 to 15 keV. The EBIT calibration lab has been used to field diagnostics (e.g., the OZSPEC instrument) with fully calibrated X-ray filters at the OMEGA laser. Extensions to use the capability for calibrating filter transmission for the DANTE instrument on the National Ignition Facility are discussed.

  18. Instantaneous x-ray radiation energy from laser produced polystyrene plasmas for shock ignition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Wanli; Wei, Huiyue; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Zhu, Tuo; Song, Tianmin; Huang, Chengwu; Yang, Jiamin

    2013-10-15

    Laser target energy coupling mechanism is crucial in the shock ignition (SI) scheme, and x-ray radiation energy is a non-negligible portion of the laser produced plasma energy. To evaluate the x-ray radiation energy amount at conditions relevant to SI scheme, instantaneous x-ray radiation energy is investigated experimentally with continuum phase plates smoothed lasers irradiating layer polystyrene targets. Comparative laser pulses without and with shock spike are employed. With the measured x-ray angular distribution, full space x-ray radiation energy and conversion efficiency are observed. Instantaneous scaling law of x-ray conversion efficiency is obtained as a function of laser intensity and time. It should be pointed out that the scaling law is available for any laser pulse shape and intensity, with which irradiates polystyrene planar target with intensity from 2 × 10{sup 14} to 1.8 × 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Numerical analysis of the laser energy transformation is performed, and the simulation results agree with the experimental data.

  19. Surface plasma preionization produced on a specially patterned PCB and its application in a pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanzadeh, Atamalek; Pakmanesh, Nahid; Rastegari, Ali; Abdolghader, Pedram; Feizollah, Peyman; Siadati, Neda

    2016-04-01

    The performance of an atmospheric pressure pulsed carbon dioxide laser employing surface plasma preionization, produced on a specially patterned printed circuit board (PCB), is reported. The surface plasma is formed due to many tiny plasma channels produced in millimeter sized open circular gaps, made by lithography on one side of PCB. The preionizing plasma is mostly consisted of corona or glow stage and transition to spark one hardly occurs. This type of preionization allows a maximum of 220 J/l energy deposition into the main plasma, while up scaling is yet possible by more optimization of PCB and the pattern. The laser output energy of 1.2 J per pulse with overall efficiency of 7% has been obtained with gas mixture of He:CO2:N2=3:1:1. This type of surface plasma preionization is specifically appropriate for very large volumes and high pressures, where the conventional UV emitting preionizations like spark arrays or corona are not effective.

  20. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaolong; Xu, Haojun; Li, Jianhai; Lin, Min; Su; Chen

    2015-05-01

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density ( N e ) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm3 without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N e achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N e of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10-50 Pa, power in 300-700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4-5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.