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Sample records for air plasma-sprayed conventional

  1. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation of an air plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1996-08-01

    Thermogravimetric methods for evaluating bond coat oxidation in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were assessed by high-temperature testing of TBC systems with air plasma-sprayed (APS) Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and yttria-stabilized zirconia top coatings. High-mass thermogravimetric analysis (at 1150{sup degrees}C) was used to measure bond coat oxidation kinetics. Furnace cycling was used to evaluate APS TBC durability. This paper describes the experimental methods and relative oxidation kinetics of the various specimen types. Characterization of the APS TBCs and their reaction products is discussed.

  2. Failure of thick, low density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminiak, Michael Aaron

    This research was directed at developing fundamental understandings of the variables that influence the performance of air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Focus was placed on understanding how and why each variable influenced the performance of the TBC system along with how the individual variables interacted with one another. It includes research on the effect of surface roughness of NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying, the interdiffusion behavior of bond coats coupled to commercial superalloys, and the microstructural and compositional control of APS topcoats to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation. The specimens used for this research were prepared by Praxair Surface Technologies and have been evaluated using cyclic oxidation and thermal shock tests. TBC performance was sensitive to bond coat roughness with the rougher bond coats having improved cyclic performance than the smoother bond coats. The explanation being the rough bond coat surface hindered the propagation of the delamination cracks. The failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on a combination of the topcoat thickness, topcoat microstructure and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the superalloy and topcoat. Thinner topcoats tended to fail at the topcoat/TGO interface due to bond coat oxidation whereas thicker topcoats failed within the topcoat due to the strain energy release rate of the thicker coating exceeding the fracture strength of the topcoat. Properties of free-standing high and conventional purity YSZ topcoats of both a lowdensity (LD) and dense-vertically fissure (DVF) microstructures were evaluated. The densification rate and phase evolution were sensitive to the YSZ purity and the starting microstructure. Increasing the impurity content resulted in enhanced sintering and phase decomposition rates, with the exception of the

  3. Plasma spraying with wire feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, M.

    1994-12-31

    Plasma spraying has been limited to using powder feedstocks for a number of reasons. One limitation has been the low energy output of conventional plasma guns. The advent of high energy plasma spraying (HEPS) devices and the associated technology has effectively removed this functional limitation. With HEPS, the combination of high gas velocities and high thermal plasma temperatures coupled with a large exit gas volume enables wire and rod feedstocks to be effectively utilized. Rather than a bulk melting mechanism, a model based on ablation phenomena is considered. The paper examines an analysis of melting phenomena and presents a simple model for molten droplet formation for plasma spraying using wire feedstocks.

  4. Plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Douglas S.; Folser, George R.

    2006-01-10

    A plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer is provided. The interlayer has particular application in connection with a solid oxide fuel cell used within a power generation system. The fuel cell advantageously comprises an air electrode, a plasma sprayed interlayer disposed on at least a portion of the air electrode, a plasma sprayed electrolyte disposed on at least a portion of the interlayer, and a fuel electrode applied on at least a portion of the electrolyte.

  5. Thermal Insulation and Thermal Shock Behavior of Conventional and Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed TBCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddon Masoule, S.; Valefi, Z.; Ehsani, N.; Qazi Lavasani, H.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the thermal insulation and thermal shock resistance behavior of nanostructured versus conventional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings. To evaluate their coating performance in service conditions, samples were furnace sintered at 1150 °C for 100 h in ambient atmosphere. The results show that the nanostructured coatings exhibited better heat transfer resistance and thermal shock resistance compared with the conventional coating. In addition, the larger size of the initial agglomerates in the nanostructured coatings increased the percentage area of nanozones and decreased the heat transfer resistance. The thermal insulation behavior of the conventional coating was improved after heat treatment because of horizontal cracking. Disappearance of cracks, bridging between grains, and their growth by connecting with each other were observed in the conventional coating. However, in the nanostructured coatings, the nanoareas and their related properties disappeared. Microstructural and phase investigations were carried out by optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The thermal behavior was investigated by thermal insulation capability testing.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  7. Phase Evolution upon Aging of Air-Plasma Sprayed t'-Zirconia Coatings: I-Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, Don M; Krogstad, Jessica A; Gao, Yan; Johnson, Curtis A; Nelson, Warren A; Levi, Carlos G

    2012-10-08

    Phase evolution accompanying the isothermal aging of free-standing air-plasma sprayed (APS) 7–8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is described. Aging was carried out at temperatures ranging from 982°C to 1482°C in air. The high-temperature kinetics of the phase evolution from the metastable t' phase into a mixture of transformable Y-rich (cubic) and Y-lean (tetragonal) phases are documented through ambient temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization. A Hollomon–Jaffe parameter (HJP), T[27 + ln(t)], was used to satisfactorily normalize the extent of phase decomposition over the full range of times and temperatures. Comparison to vapor deposited TBCs reveal potential differences in the destabilization mechanism in APS coatings. Furthermore, the lattice parameters extracted from Rietveld refinement of the XRD patterns were used to deduce the stabilizer concentrations of the respective phases, which suggest a retrograde tetragonal solvus over the temperature range studied. In concert with a complementary microstructural study presented in Part II, this effort offers new insights into the mechanisms governing the phase evolution and raises implications for the high-temperature use of 8YSZ ceramics.

  8. Phosphor-Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray for In-Depth Temperature Sensing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Di; Yang, Lixia; Cai, Tao; Liu, Yingzheng; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Yao, Zhiqi

    2016-09-28

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coating (TBC) has been integrated with thermographic phosphors through air plasma spray (APS) for in-depth; non-contact temperature sensing. This coating consisted of a thin layer of Dy-doped YSZ (about 40 µm) on the bottom and a regular YSZ layer with a thickness up to 300 µm on top. A measurement system has been established; which included a portable; low-cost diode laser (405 nm); a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and the related optics. Coating samples with different topcoat thickness were calibrated in a high-temperature furnace from room temperature to around 900 °C. The results convincingly showed that the current sensor and the measurement system was capable of in-depth temperature sensing over 800 °C with a YSZ top layer up to 300 µm. The topcoat thickness was found to have a strong effect on the luminescent signal level. Therefore; the measurement accuracy at high temperatures was reduced for samples with thick topcoats due to strong light attenuation. However; it seemed that the light transmissivity of YSZ topcoat increased with temperature; which would improve the sensor's performance at high temperatures. The current sensor and the measurement technology have shown great potential in on-line monitoring of TBC interface temperature.

  9. Calibration of Raman spectroscopy in the stress measurement of air-plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Lord, Oliver; Flewitt, Peter E J

    2012-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used widely on a range of components that operate at high temperatures. We report measurement of the factor that is required to convert the Raman shift to stress for air plasma sprayed yttria (7 wt %) stabilized tetragonal zirconia (ZrO(2)) (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings. The factor is evaluated for the as-coated condition and also following a heat treatment at 1000 °C for 1050 h. Two Raman bands at 608 cm(-1) and 640 cm(-1) have been investigated in a diamond anvil cell under hydrostatic pressure up to ~24 GPa. In the range of zero to ~1.6 GPa, a linear behavior was observed in terms of the shifts of these two Raman bands with a gradient similar to dense bulk tetragonal ZrO(2). From these measurements the factors to convert wavenumber shift to stress have been derived. The application of these conversion factors to stress measurement in TBC coated test specimens and components is discussed.

  10. Phosphor-Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray for In-Depth Temperature Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Di; Yang, Lixia; Cai, Tao; Liu, Yingzheng; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Yao, Zhiqi

    2016-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coating (TBC) has been integrated with thermographic phosphors through air plasma spray (APS) for in-depth; non-contact temperature sensing. This coating consisted of a thin layer of Dy-doped YSZ (about 40 µm) on the bottom and a regular YSZ layer with a thickness up to 300 µm on top. A measurement system has been established; which included a portable; low-cost diode laser (405 nm); a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and the related optics. Coating samples with different topcoat thickness were calibrated in a high-temperature furnace from room temperature to around 900 °C. The results convincingly showed that the current sensor and the measurement system was capable of in-depth temperature sensing over 800 °C with a YSZ top layer up to 300 µm. The topcoat thickness was found to have a strong effect on the luminescent signal level. Therefore; the measurement accuracy at high temperatures was reduced for samples with thick topcoats due to strong light attenuation. However; it seemed that the light transmissivity of YSZ topcoat increased with temperature; which would improve the sensor’s performance at high temperatures. The current sensor and the measurement technology have shown great potential in on-line monitoring of TBC interface temperature. PMID:27690037

  11. Preliminary study of cyclic thermal shock resistance of plasma-sprayed zirconium oxide turbine outer air seal shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Several experimental concepts representing potential high pressure turbine seal material systems were subjected to cyclic thermal shock exposures similar to those that might be encountered under severe engine start-up and shut-down sequences. All of the experimental concepts consisted of plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized ZrO2 on the high temperature side of the blade tip seal shroud. Between the ZrO2 and a cooled, dense metal backing, various intermediate layer concepts intended to mitigate thermal stresses were incorporated. Performance was judged on the basis of the number of thermal shock cycles required to cause loss of seal material through spallation. The most effective approach was to include a low modulus, sintered metal pad between the ZrO2 and the metallic backing. It was also found that reducing the density of the ZrO2 layer significantly improved the performance of specimens with plasma-sprayed metal/ceramic composite intermediate layers.

  12. Plasma-sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, H.

    1988-09-01

    Plasma spraying is one way to apply protective coatings. The hot, high-speed flame of a plasma gun can melt a powder of almost any ceramic or metal and spray it to form a coating for protection against corrosion, wear or high temperature. The technique carries much less risk of degrading the coating and substrate than many other high-temperature processes do, because the gas in the plasma flame is chemically inert and the target can be kept fairly cool. And yet a plasma gun can be only a little more cumbersome than a paint sprayer. Investigators are applying this technique to new materials. The General Electric Company is using vacuum plasma spraying to make freestanding components: intricate aircraft engine parts formed by plasma-spraying a superalloy on a removable substrate. Other workers spray ceramic particles or fibers and metal powder simulatious wrong, stiff composite materials: the ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix of metal. The author and colleagues at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have fabricated a thick film of high-temperature superconductor by plasma-spraying the compound in the form of a powder. 7 figs.

  13. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  14. Friction and wear of plasma-sprayed coatings containing cobalt alloys from 25 deg to 650 deg in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.

    1979-01-01

    Four different compositions of self-lubricating, plasma-sprayed, composite coatings with calcium fluoride dispersed throughout cobalt alloy-silver matrices were evaluated on a friction and wear apparatus. In addition, coatings of the cobalt alloys alone and one coating with a nickel alloy-silver matrix were evaluated for comparison. The wear specimens consisted of two, diametrically opposed, flat rub shoes sliding on the coated, cylindrical surface of a rotating disk. Two of the cobalt composite coatings gave a friction coefficient of about 0.25 and low wear at room temperature, 400 and 650 C. Wear rates were lower than those of the cobalt alloys alone or the nickel alloy composite coating. However, oxidation limited the maximum useful temperature of the cobalt composite coating to about 650 C compared to about 900 C for the nickel composite coating.

  15. Development of a Thermal Transport Database for Air Plasma Sprayed ZrO2 ? Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Porter, Wallace D

    2010-01-01

    Thermal Diffusivities of Air Plasma Sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are measured by the laser flash method. The data are used to calculate thermal conductivity of TBCs when provided with density and specific heat data. Due to the complicated microstructure and other processing related parameters, thermal diffusivity of TBCs can vary as much as three to four fold. Data collected from over 200 free-standing ZrO2 7-8 wt%Y2O3 TBCs are presented. The large database gives a clear picture of the expected band of thermal diffusivity values. When this band is used as reference for thermal diffusivity of a specific TBC, the thermal transport property of TBC can be more precisely described. The database is intended to serve researchers and manufacturers of TBCs as a valuable source for evaluating their coatings.

  16. Thermal Shock Behavior of Air Plasma Sprayed CoNiCrAlY/YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi Wei; Wu, Wei; Hua, Jia Jie; Lin, Chu Cheng; Zheng, Xue Bin; Zeng, Yi

    2014-07-01

    The structural changes and failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during thermal shock cycling were investigated. TBCs consisting of CoNiCrAlY bond coat and partially yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) on a nickel-based alloy substrate and its thermal shock resistance performance was evaluated. TBCs were heated at 1100°C for 15 min followed by cold water quenching to ambient temperature. Microstructural evaluation and elemental analysis of TBCs were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The crack features of YSZ coatings in TBCs during thermal shock cycling, including those of horizontal (parallel to the substrate) and vertical cracks (perpendicular to the substrate), were particularly investigated by means of SEM and image analysis. Results show that horizontal and vertical cracks have different influences on the thermal shock resistance of the coatings. Horizontal cracks that occur at the interface of YSZ and thermally growth oxidation (TGO) cause partial or large-area spalling of coatings. When vertical and horizontal cracks encounter, network segments are formed which lead to partial spalling of the coatings.

  17. Study of the microstructure of plasma sprayed coatings obtained from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–13TiO{sub 2} nanostructured and conventional powders

    SciTech Connect

    Góral, A.; Żórawski, W.; Lityńska-Dobrzyńska, L.

    2014-10-15

    The microstructure of coatings obtained from nanostructured or conventional Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–13TiO{sub 2} powders and deposited by plasma spraying technique on low-carbon steel was examined by transmission electron microscopy techniques. The dominating phase in both coatings was γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. It has been observed that the grains of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grew in various shapes and sizes, that are particularly visible in the case of coating sprayed from nanostructured powder. The coatings obtained from the fully melted conventional powders exhibited a typical lamellar microstructure, into which the strips of TiO{sub 2} phase were extended. The microstructure of coatings produced from agglomerates of nanostructured particles also revealed the regions consisting of partially melted α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders surrounded by the net-like structure formed from fully melted oxides that improved the coating properties. Along with the observed morphology diversity some changes in the chemical composition on the cross sections of obtained coatings have been also noticed. - Highlights: • Plasma sprayed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–13TiO{sub 2} coatings reveal diversity of microstructure. • Microstructure of conventional coating was formed from fully melted crushed powders. • Nanostructured coating contains completely and partially melted initial agglomerates.

  18. Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

  19. Insights on the High-Temperature Operational Limits of ZrO2-Y2O3 TBCs Manufactured via Air Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Rogerio S.; Marple, Basil R.

    2017-02-01

    The effective high-temperature operation limit of a ZrO2-7-8 wt.%Y2O3 (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) manufactured via air plasma spray (APS) is considered to be 1300 °C. This is related to the metastable tetragonal t'-phase formed during the rapid quenching of the YSZ particles during spraying. The t'-phase transforms into the equilibrium tetragonal and cubic phases at temperatures ≥ 1300 °C, which can lead to the formation of the monoclinic phase of YSZ upon cooling to room temperature. This formation of the monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume expansion that leads to TBC failure due to extensive micro-cracking. To further investigate this limitation, an APS YSZ TBC was sprayed on a CMSX-4 substrate. By using a thermal (laser) gradient cyclic testing, a temperature gradient was generated across the TBC/substrate system. The YSZ T-front and substrate backside T-back temperature levels were 1500 and 1000 °C, respectively. In cycle conditions (5-min or 1-h hot and 2-min cool), no TBC failure has been observed. This behavior was partially attributed to the unexpected absence of the monoclinic phase of the YSZ in the cycled coatings. Although preliminary, these results are promising regarding increasing the effective high-temperature operational limits of APS YSZ TBCs.

  20. Microstructure studies of air-plasma-spray-deposited CoNiCrAlY coatings before and after thermal cyclic loading for high-temperature application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dipak; Pandey, K. N.; Das, Dipak Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, bond-coats for thermal barrier coatings were deposited via air plasma spraying (APS) techniques onto Inconel 800 and Hastelloy C-276 alloy substrates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate the phases and microstructure of the as-sprayed, APS-deposited CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings. The aim of this work was to study the suitability of the bond-coat materials for high temperature applications. Confirmation of nanoscale grains of the γ/γ'-phase was obtained by TEM, high-resolution TEM, and AFM. We concluded that these changes result from the plastic deformation of the bond-coat during the deposition, resulting in CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings with excellent thermal cyclic resistance suitable for use in high-temperature applications. Cyclic oxidative stability was observed to also depend on the underlying metallic alloy substrate.

  1. Insights on the High-Temperature Operational Limits of ZrO2-Y2O3 TBCs Manufactured via Air Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Rogerio S.; Marple, Basil R.

    2017-03-01

    The effective high-temperature operation limit of a ZrO2-7-8 wt.%Y2O3 (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) manufactured via air plasma spray (APS) is considered to be 1300 °C. This is related to the metastable tetragonal t'-phase formed during the rapid quenching of the YSZ particles during spraying. The t'-phase transforms into the equilibrium tetragonal and cubic phases at temperatures ≥ 1300 °C, which can lead to the formation of the monoclinic phase of YSZ upon cooling to room temperature. This formation of the monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume expansion that leads to TBC failure due to extensive micro-cracking. To further investigate this limitation, an APS YSZ TBC was sprayed on a CMSX-4 substrate. By using a thermal (laser) gradient cyclic testing, a temperature gradient was generated across the TBC/substrate system. The YSZ T- front and substrate backside T- back temperature levels were 1500 and 1000 °C, respectively. In cycle conditions (5-min or 1-h hot and 2-min cool), no TBC failure has been observed. This behavior was partially attributed to the unexpected absence of the monoclinic phase of the YSZ in the cycled coatings. Although preliminary, these results are promising regarding increasing the effective high-temperature operational limits of APS YSZ TBCs.

  2. Plasma Spraying Reclaims Compressor Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissler, George W.; Yuhas, John S.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma-spraying process used to build up material in worn and pitted areas. Newly applied material remachined to specified surface contours. Effective technique for addition of metal to out-of-tolerance magnesium-alloy turbine-engine compressor housings.

  3. A structural investigation of a plasma sprayed Ni--Cr based alloy coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, S.; Neiser, R.A.; Herman, H. ); Kirkland, J.P.; Elam, W.T. )

    1993-01-01

    A Ni--Cr based hardfacing alloy has been plasma sprayed in ambient and low pressure atmospheres onto mild steel substrates. These coatings exhibit excellent wear and corrosion resistance; however, the significance of microstructure on properties has not been reported. This study relates the structure of the sprayed coatings to the processing conditions. X-ray diffraction results indicate phase separation in air plasma sprayed deposits, while low pressure plasma sprayed deposits exhibit a single supersaturated solid solution. Annealing of the air plasma sprayed coating shows dissolution of the bcc chromium phase, confirming its metastable nature. These results were confirmed using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis, which further suggests a highly disordered structure, with partial oxidation of selected alloying elements, such as chromium. Transmission electron microscopy indicates a wide variety of microstructures in the air plasma sprayed deposit. In the case of low pressure sprayed deposit, the microstructures are homogeneous and uniform.

  4. Molybdenum disilicide composites produced by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.; Bartlett, A.H.

    1998-05-25

    The intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) is being considered for high temperature structural applications because of its high melting point and superior oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. The lack of high temperature strength, creep resistance and low temperature ductility has hindered its progress for structural applications. Plasma spraying of coatings and structural components of MoSi{sub 2}-based composites offers an exciting processing alternative to conventional powder processing methods due to superior flexibility and the ability to tailor properties. Laminate, discontinuous and in situ reinforced composites have been produced with secondary reinforcements of Ta, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Laminate composites, in particular, have been shown to improve the damage tolerance of MoSi{sub 2} during high temperature melting operations. A review of research which as been performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory on plasma spraying of MoSi{sub 2}-based composites to improve low temperature fracture toughness, thermal shock resistance, high temperature strength and creep resistance will be discussed.

  5. Plasma Spray-PVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Deposit Out of the Vapor Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, Konstantin; Gindrat, Malko

    2011-06-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland). Even though it is a thermal spray process, it can deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. The basis of PS-PVD is the low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology that has been well established in industry for several years. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) or low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS), the new proposed process uses a high energy plasma gun operated at a reduced work pressure of 0.1 kPa (1 mbar). Owing to the high energy plasma and further reduced work pressure, PS-PVD is able to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional physical vapor deposition (PVD) technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) coatings. In contrast to EB-PVD, PS-PVD incorporates the vaporized coating material into a supersonic plasma plume. Owing to the forced gas stream of the plasma jet, complex shaped parts such as multi-airfoil turbine vanes can be coated with columnar thermal barrier coatings using PS-PVD. Even shadowed areas and areas which are not in the line of sight of the coating source can be coated homogeneously. This article reports on the progress made by Sulzer Metco in developing a thermal spray process to produce coatings out of the vapor phase. Columnar thermal barrier coatings made of Yttria-stabilized Zircona (YSZ) are optimized to serve in a turbine engine. This process includes not only preferable coating properties such as strain tolerance and erosion

  6. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOEpatents

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  7. Modelling the Plasma Jet in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Schein, J.; Zimmermann, S.; Möhwald, K.; Lummer, C.

    2016-08-01

    Particle in-flight characteristics in atmospheric plasma spraying process are determined by impulse and heat energy transferred between the plasma jet and injected powder particles. One of the important factors for the quality of the plasma-sprayed coatings is thus the distribution of plasma gas temperatures and velocities in plasma jet. Plasma jets generated by conventional single-arc plasma spraying systems and their interaction with powder particles were subject matter of intensive research. However, this does not apply to plasma jets generated by means of multi-arc plasma spraying systems yet. In this study, a numerical model has been developed which is designated to dealing with the flow characteristics of the plasma jet generated by means of a three-cathode spraying system. The upstream flow conditions, which were calculated using a priori conducted plasma generator simulations, have been coupled to the plasma jet simulations. The significances of the relevant numerical assumptions and aspects of the models are analyzed. The focus is placed on to the turbulence and diffusion/demixing modelling. A critical evaluation of the prediction power of the models is conducted by comparing the numerical results to the experimental results determined by means of emission spectroscopic computed tomography. It is evident that the numerical models exhibit a good accuracy for their intended use.

  8. Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, S.; Koenig, D. E.; Dardi, L. E.

    1981-10-01

    Recognizing the fundamental cost advantage, technical capabilities, and compositional flexibility of reduced pressure (vacuum) plasma spraying compared to other overlay coating methods, an advanced, second generation, closed chamber deposition process called VPX (a Howmet trademark) was developed. An automated experimental facility for coating gas turbine engine components was also constructed. This paper describes several important features of the process and equipment. It shows that the use of optimized spray parameters combined with an appropriate schedule of relative orientations between the gun and work-piece can be used to produce dense and highly reproducible coatings of either uniform or controlled thickness distributions. The chemical composition, microstructure, and interfacial characteristics of typical MCrAlY coatings are reported. Some effects of operating procedures and MCrAlY chemical composition on coating density are noted. The results of mechanical property and burner rig tests of coated material are also described.

  9. Plasma sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coating for NiAl-based intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Doychak, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system consists of two layers of a zirconia-yttria ceramic. The first layer is applied by low pressure plasma spraying. The second layer is applied by conventional atmospheric pressure plasma spraying. This facilitates the attachment of a durable thermally insulating ceramic coating directly to the surface of a highly oxidation resistant NiAl-based intermetallic alloy after the alloy has been preoxidized to promote the formation of a desirable Al2O3 scale.

  10. Deposition of Hard Chrome Coating onto Heat Susceptible Substrates by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma spray requires relatively low power, which is lower than 1 kW in comparison to other plasma spraying method. Until now, we are able to deposit Cu and Hydroxyapatite coating onto heat susceptible substrate, CFRP which are difficult for conventional plasma spray due to the excessive heat input. In this paper, a hard chromium coating was deposited onto SUS304 and CFRP by a low power microwave plasma spray technique. By controlling the working gas flow rate and spraying distance, a hard chrome coating with thickness of approximately 30 μm was successfully deposited onto CFRP substrate with hardness of 1110 Hv0.05. Furthermore, the coating produced here is higher than that produced by hard chrome plating.

  11. Plasma-Sprayed Photocatalytic Zinc Oxide Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Kalantari, Y.; Salehi, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Amirnasr, M.; Rismanchian, M.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.

    2017-03-01

    Fabrication of semiconductor coatings with photocatalytic action for photodegradation of organic pollutants is highly desirable. In this research, pure zinc oxide, which is well known for its promising photocatalytic activity, was deposited on stainless-steel plates by plasma spraying. The phase composition and microstructure of the deposited films were studied by x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Despite the low-energy conditions of the plasma spraying process, the zinc oxide coatings showed good mechanical integrity on the substrate. Their photocatalytic activity was evaluated using aqueous solution of methylene blue at concentration of 5 mg L-1. The results showed the potential of the plasma spraying technique to deposit zinc oxide coatings with photocatalytic action under ultraviolet illumination. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma spraying method could deposit zinc oxide films with higher photoabsorption ability relative to the initial powder.

  12. Vapor Phase Deposition Using Plasma Spray-PVD™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, K.; Gindrat, M.; Refke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma spray—physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology to deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. PS-PVD is a part of the family of new hybrid processes recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland) on the basis of the well-established low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology. Included in this new process family are plasma spray—chemical vapor deposition (PS-CVD) and plasma spray—thin film (PS-TF) processes. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying and LPPS, these new processes use a high energy plasma gun operated at a work pressure below 2 mbar. This leads to unconventional plasma jet characteristics which can be used to obtain specific and unique coatings. An important new feature of PS-PVD is the possibility to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats, but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional PVD technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and EB-PVD coatings. This paper reports on the progress made at Sulzer Metco to develop functional coatings build up from vapor phase of oxide ceramics and metals.

  13. Plasma spray forming metals, intermetallics, and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Sanjay; Herman, Herbert

    1993-07-01

    Plasma spray processing is a droplet deposition method that combines the steps of melting, rapid solidification, and consolidation into a single step. The versatility of the technology enables the processing of freestanding bulk, near-net shapes of a wide range of alloys, intermetallics, ceramics, and composites, while still retaining the benefits of rapid solidification processing. In particular, it is possible to produce dense forms through vacuum plasma spraying.

  14. Creep of plasma sprayed zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Logan, W. R.; Adams, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings with three different porosities and different initial particle sizes were deformed in compression at initial loads of 1000, 2000, and 3500 psi and temperatures of 1100 C, 1250 C, and 1400 C. The coatings were stabilized with lime, magnesia, and two different concentrations of yttria. Creep began as soon as the load was applied and continued at a constantly decreasing rate until the load was removed. Temperature and stabilization had a pronounced effect on creep rate. The creep rate for 20% Y2O3-80% ZrO2 was 1/3 to 1/2 that of 8% Y2O3-92% ZrO2. Both magnesia and calcia stabilized ZrO2 crept at a rate 5 to 10 times that of the 20% Y2O3 material. A near proportionality between creep rate and applied stress was observed. The rate controlling process appeared to be thermally activated, with an activation energy of approximately 100 cal/gm mole K. Creep deformation was due to cracking and particle sliding.

  15. New generation of plasma-sprayed mullite coatings on silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Mullite is promising as a protective coating for silicon-based ceramics in aggressive high-temperature environments. Conventionally plasma-sprayed mullite on SiC tends to crack and debond on thermal cycling. It is shown that this behavior is due to the presence of amorphous mullite in the conventionally sprayed mullite. Heating the SiC substrate during the plasma spraying eliminated the amorphous phase and produced coatings with dramatically improved properties. The new coating exhibits excellent adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 to 1400 C. Preliminary tests showed good resistance to Na2CO3-induced hot corrosion.

  16. Use of plasma sprayed coatings as surface treatments for aluminum adherends

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.D.; Whisnant, P.L.; Groff, G.B.

    1996-12-31

    Surface treatments for metal adherends prior to adhesive bonding typically use chromates and/or strong acids and bases. Such materials are hazardous to personnel and harmful to the environment following disposal. To reduce release of these substances into the environment and lower disposal costs, plasma spray treatments are being developed as surface treatments for aluminum adherends. These treatments eliminate liquid and gaseous wastes and provide bond strength and durability comparable to that provided by the conventional chemical treatments. They have other potential advantages of being more suited for repair/refurbishment and less sensitive to metallurgical differences from alloy to alloy. Plasma sprayed coatings are used in a variety of applications where a coating tailored for specific properties is needed that may or may not be chemically or structurally similar to the base substrate. Plasma spraying has been shown to provide excellent high-temperature bond performance with titanium (unlike conventional oxidation treatments) and durability approaching that of phosphoric acid anodization for aluminum. Success has also been reported using other coatings on aluminum, titanium, and steel. Plasma spraying has the important advantage of versatility. A wide range of coatings (metals, ceramics, and polymers) can be deposited onto an equally wide range of substrates, and the coating properties can be optimized for a given application, independent of the substrate. Because of this versatility, plasma-sprayed coatings have been used for wear resistance, thermal barriers, EMI/RF shielding, corrosion resistance, slip/slide resistance, and biocompatibility in addition to adhesion.

  17. Stress rupture and creep behavior of a low pressure plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, M. G.; Miner, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The creep behavior of a NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum at 660 and 850 C is studied. The microstructure of the coating alloy is described. Analysis of the creep curves reveal that the secondary creep rates, the transition from secondary to tertiary creep, and the strain-to-failure are affected by the environment, preexposure, stress, and temperature. It is observed that the rupture lives of the NiCoCrAlY alloy at 660 and 850 C are greater in air than in vacuum. Several mechanisms that may explain the lack of crack growth from surface-connected pores during tests in air are proposed.

  18. Application of Plasma Spraying as a Precursor in the Synthesis of Oxidation-Resistant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, P.; Lu-Steffes, O.; Sakidja, R.; Perepezko, J. H.; Lenling, W.; Crawmer, D.; Beske, J.

    2013-08-01

    Thermal spray methods offer a versatile and flexible approach to the manufacture of coatings as a final product. A novel application of thermal spray coating is demonstrated by incorporating a plasma-sprayed Mo layer coating as a precursor step within an integrated costing design. The effectiveness of the two-step design is illustrated for aluminoborosilica coatings on SiC/C composites and W substrates based on the plasma-sprayed Mo precursor and subsequent codeposition of Si and B by a pack cementation method. Even with incomplete precursor coverage, an aluminoborosilica coating is developed because of the high initial fluidity of the as-pack coating. An effective oxidation resistance is observed following exposure at elevated temperatures (1373-1673 K) in ambient air and during torch testing at 1773 K, providing clear evidence that the plasma spraying of Mo is a viable precursor step in the formation of the oxidation-resistant Mo-Si-B-based coating.

  19. Oxidation and degradation of a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) specimens consisting of single-crystal superalloy substrates, vacuum plasma-sprayed Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and air plasma-sprayed 7.5 wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia top coatings was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis at 1150{degrees}C for up to 200 hours. Coating durability was assessed by furnace cycling at 1150{degrees}C. Coatings and reaction products were identified by x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  20. Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, K. E.; Lagedrost, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed materials were determined for the following plasma sprayed materials: CaO - stabilized ZrO2, Y2O3 - stabilized ZerO2, Al2O3, HfO2 Mo, nichrome, NiAl, Mo-ZrO2, and MoAl2O3 mixtures. In all cases the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed materials was found to be considerably lower than that of the bulk material. The flash-laser thermal diffusivity technique was used both for diffusivity determination of single-layer materials and to determine the thermal contact resistance at the interface of two-layer specimens.

  1. High power plasma spraying of oxide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Jungklaus, H.; Schwier, G.; Mathesius, H.; Heinrich, P.

    1995-12-31

    New developed high power plasma spray (HPPS) systems offer opportunities for generating both high thermal as well as high kinetic energy transfer to the powder particles. The operation level can be elevated up to 250 kW for continuous processing. PLCs and mass flow controls support high power processing under production conditions. The process is designed for applying large quantities even of high melt materials, such as oxide ceramics. High power plasma processing may result in enhanced coating characteristics. The work in this paper shows first conclusions for processing commercial powders such as alumina, alumina-titania, chromia and a recently developed multicomponent oxide with a HPPS system. Particle velocities were measured after optimizing spraying parameters. Coatings were evaluated by optical microscopy (microstructure and porosity), microhardness and pin-on-disc abrasive wear tests. Powder types and sizes as well as the systems configuration are considered for a general discussion of the capability and limitation in high power plasma spraying.

  2. The effects of plasma spray parameters and atmosphere on the properties and microstructure of WC-Co coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Lamy, D.; Sopkow, T.; Smuga-Otto, I.

    Wear- and corrosion-resistant coatings deposited by plasma spray process are increasingly used in severe environments in resource industries, such as oil and gas, oil sands, mining, pulp and paper, etc. While there is a large volume of literature in the area of plasma spray coatings, comparatively few papers deal with the co-relation between coating properties and microstructure as a function of plasma spray processing parameters. In this study, the effect of some plasma spray processing variables and atmosphere (air or inert gas) on the microstructure and the properties of WC-Co coatings were studied. The properties of the coatings measured include: microhardness, porosity by image analysis, wear resistance by dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion test (ASTM G 65-91) and corrosion properties by AC impedance technique. Phase analyses of the coatings were also performed by X-ray diffraction. From the above, optimized coatings were developed for oil and gas industry applications.

  3. Automatic targeting of plasma spray gun

    DOEpatents

    Abbatiello, Leonard A.; Neal, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    A means for monitoring the material portion in the flame of a plasma spray gun during spraying operations is provided. A collimated detector, sensitive to certain wavelengths of light emission, is used to locate the centroid of the material with each pass of the gun. The response from the detector is then relayed to the gun controller to be used to automatically realign the gun.

  4. Microstructural characteristics of plasma sprayed nanostructured partially stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Rogerio Soares

    Thermal barrier coatings have been extensively applied in the aerospace industry in turbines and rocket engines as an insulation system. Partially stabilized zirconia, due to its high thermal stability and low thermal conductivity at high temperatures has been traditionally employed as the ceramic element of the thermal barrier coating system. Different approaches have been taken in order to improve the performance of these coatings. Nanostructured materials are promising an interesting future in the beginning of the 21st century. Due to its enhanced strain to failure and superplasticity new applications may be accomplished or the limits of materials utilization may be placed at higher levels. Single nanostructured particles can not be thermal sprayed by conventional thermal spray equipment. Due to its low mass, they would be deviated to the periphery of the thermal spray jet. To overcome this characteristic, single nanostructured particles were successively agglomerated into large microscopic particles, with particle size distribution similar to the conventional feedstocks for thermal spray equipment. Agglomerated nanostructured particles of partially stabilized zirconia were plasma sprayed in air with different spray parameters. According to traditional thermal spray procedure, the feedstock has to be melted in the thermal spray jet in order to achieve the necessary conditions for adhesion and cohesion on the substrate. Due to the nature of the nanostructured particles, a new step has to be taken in the thermal spray processing; particle melting has to be avoided in order to preserve the feedstock nanostructure in the coating overall microstructure. In this work, the adhesion/cohesion system of nanostructured coatings is investigated and clarified. A percentage of molten particles will retain and hold the non-molten agglomerated nanostructured particles in the coating overall microstructure. Controlling the spray parameters it was possible to produce coatings

  5. Synthesis of functional oxides through plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xianzhong

    Thermal spray coatings have become an important part of modern industry, offering customized surface properties for a variety of industrial applications, e.g. thermal barrier coatings, wear resistant coatings, erosion resistant coatings and functional coatings. Although the usage of thermal spray coatings has increased dramatically, the scientific research of these coatings has lagged behind. Good understanding of thermal spray processes can provide the optimistic combination of operation parameters to obtain high quality of coating, improve service life of the product, and lower cost of the system. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the synthesis of functional oxide coatings through plasma spraying techniques. The materials studied in this research are: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) which can be the thermal barrier coating and environmental barrier coating; doped YAG as phosphor; yttrium iron garnet (YIG) applied in telecommunication and data storage; aluminum substituted YIG for biomedical applications; and zirconium substituted yttrium titanate pyrochlore in developing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The synthesis processes, phase formation, microstructure, and physical properties of above materials have been investigated in a comprehensive and integrated way. The precursor powders or solutions were prepared via different chemical routes. The experiments suggest that formation of phase-pure oxides occurs through different phase evolution pathways and depending on the reaction conditions. Chemically derived precursors and/or powders were used as feedstock in plasma spray to form functional oxide coatings. Due to its rapid heating and cooling features, plasma spraying techniques provide a novel opportunity for functional oxides to transfer from amorphous into crystallized structure at a relatively low temperature in a single step. The properties of assprayed and post-heated coatings strongly depend on their microstructure and phase content.

  6. Modeling Plasma-Particle Interaction in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2017-02-01

    The properties of plasma-sprayed coatings are controlled by the heat, momentum, and mass transfer between individual particles and the plasma jet. The particle behavior in conventional single-arc plasma spraying has been the subject of intensive numerical research, whereas multi-arc plasma spraying has not yet received the same attention. We propose herein a numerical model to serve as a scientific tool to investigate particle behavior in multi-arc plasma spraying. In the Lagrangian description of particles in the model, the mathematical formulations describing the heat, momentum, and mass transfer are of great importance for good predictive power, so such formulations proposed by different authors were compared critically, revealing that different mathematical formulations lead to significantly different results. The accuracy of the different formulations was evaluated based on theoretical considerations, and those found to be more accurate were implemented in the final model. Furthermore, a mathematical formulation is proposed to enable simplified calculation of partial particle melting and resolidification.

  7. Modeling Plasma-Particle Interaction in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2017-01-01

    The properties of plasma-sprayed coatings are controlled by the heat, momentum, and mass transfer between individual particles and the plasma jet. The particle behavior in conventional single-arc plasma spraying has been the subject of intensive numerical research, whereas multi-arc plasma spraying has not yet received the same attention. We propose herein a numerical model to serve as a scientific tool to investigate particle behavior in multi-arc plasma spraying. In the Lagrangian description of particles in the model, the mathematical formulations describing the heat, momentum, and mass transfer are of great importance for good predictive power, so such formulations proposed by different authors were compared critically, revealing that different mathematical formulations lead to significantly different results. The accuracy of the different formulations was evaluated based on theoretical considerations, and those found to be more accurate were implemented in the final model. Furthermore, a mathematical formulation is proposed to enable simplified calculation of partial particle melting and resolidification.

  8. Automated Plasma Spray (APS) process feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetheroff, C. W.; Derkacs, T.; Matay, I. M.

    1981-01-01

    An automated plasma spray (APS) process was developed to apply two layer (NiCrAlY and ZrO2-12Y2O3) thermal barrier coatings to aircraft and stationary gas turbine engine blade airfoils. The APS process hardware consists of four subsystems: a mechanical positioning subsystem incorporating two interlaced six degree of freedom assemblies (one for coating deposition and one for coating thickness monitoring); a noncoherent optical metrology subsystem (for in process gaging of the coating thickness buildup at specified points on the specimen); a microprocessor based adaptive system controller (to achieve the desired overall thickness profile on the specimen); and commerical plasma spray equipment. Over fifty JT9D first stage aircraft turbine blade specimens, ten W501B utility turbine blade specimens and dozens of cylindrical specimens were coated with the APS process in preliminary checkout and evaluation studies. The best of the preliminary turbine blade specimens achieved an overall coating thickness uniformity of 53 micrometers (2.1 mils), much better than is achievable manually. Comparative evaluations of coating thickness uniformity for manually sprayed and APS coated specimens were performed. One of the preliminary turbine blade evaluation specimens was subjected to a torch test and metallographic evaluation. Some cylindrical specimens coated with the APS process survived up to 2000 cycles in subsequent burner rig testing.

  9. Current problems in plasma spray processing

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, C.C.; Brindley, W.; Goland, A.N.; Herman, H.; Houck, D.L.; Jones, K.; Miller, R.A.; Neiser, R.; Riggs, W.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.; Spanne, P. . Thermal Spray Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    This detailed report summarizes 8 contributions from a thermal spray conference that was held in late 1991 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, Long Island, NY, USA). The subject of Plasma Spray Processing'' is presented under subject headings of Plasma-particle interactions, Deposit formation dynamics, Thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings, Mechanical properties of coatings, Feed stock materials, Porosity: An integrated approach, Manufacture of intermetallic coatings, and Synchrotron x-ray microtomographic methods for thermal spray materials. Each section is intended to present a concise statement of a specific practical and/or scientific problem, then describe current work that is being performed to investigate this area, and finally to suggest areas of research that may be fertile for future activity.

  10. Current problems in plasma spray processing

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, C.C.; Brindley, W.; Goland, A.N.; Herman, H.; Houck, D.L.; Jones, K.; Miller, R.A.; Neiser, R.; Riggs, W.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.; Spanne, P.

    1991-12-31

    This detailed report summarizes 8 contributions from a thermal spray conference that was held in late 1991 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, Long Island, NY, USA). The subject of ``Plasma Spray Processing`` is presented under subject headings of Plasma-particle interactions, Deposit formation dynamics, Thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings, Mechanical properties of coatings, Feed stock materials, Porosity: An integrated approach, Manufacture of intermetallic coatings, and Synchrotron x-ray microtomographic methods for thermal spray materials. Each section is intended to present a concise statement of a specific practical and/or scientific problem, then describe current work that is being performed to investigate this area, and finally to suggest areas of research that may be fertile for future activity.

  11. Thermal Shock Properties of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Deposited Using Low-Energy Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings have been frequently used as a thermal protective layer on the metal or alloy component surfaces. In the present study, ZrO2-7%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were successfully deposited by DC (direct current) plasma spray process under very low pressure conditions (less than 1 mbar) using low-energy plasma guns F4-VB and F100. The experiments were performed to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of different TBC specimens which were heated to 1373 K at a high-temperature cycling furnace and held for 0.5 h, followed by air cooling at room temperature for 0.2 h. For comparison, a corresponding atmospheric plasma spray (APS) counterpart was also elaborated to carry out the similar experiments. The results indicated that the very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS) coatings displayed better thermal shock resistance. Moreover, the failure mechanism of the coatings was elucidated.

  12. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  13. Latest Researches Advances of Plasma Spraying: From Splat to Coating Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.; Goutier, S.

    2016-12-01

    The plasma spray process with solid feedstock, mainly ceramics powders, studied since the sixties is now a mature technology. The plasma jet and particle in-flight characterizations are now well established. The use of computer-aided robot trajectory allows spraying on industrial parts with complex geometries. Works about splat formation have shown the importance of: the substrate preheating over the transition temperature to get rid of adsorbates and condensates, substrate chemistry, crystal structure and substrate temperature during the whole coating process. These studies showed that coating properties strongly depend on the splat formation and layering. The first part of this work deals with a summary of conventional plasma spraying key points. The second part presents the current knowledge in plasma spraying with liquid feedstock, technology developed for about two decades with suspensions of particles below micrometers or solutions of precursors that form particles a few micrometers sized through precipitation. Coatings are finely structured and even nanostructured with properties arousing the interest of researchers. However, the technology is by far more complex than the conventional ones. The main conclusions are that models should be developed further, plasma torches and injection setups adapted, and new measuring techniques to reliably characterize these small particles must be designed.

  14. Effect of Gun Current on Electrical Properties of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Lanthanum Silicate Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Liao, Han-Lin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Apatite-type lanthanum silicate (ATLS) electrolyte coatings for use in intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). Plasma-sprayed coatings with typical composition La10(SiO4)6O3 exhibiting good densification and high oxide ionic conductivity were obtained by properly adjusting the spraying parameters, particularly the gun current. The highest obtained ionic conductivity value of 3.3 mS/cm at 1,173 K in air is comparable to other ATLS conductors. This work demonstrated empirically that utilization of the APS technique is feasible to synthesize dense La10(SiO4)6O3 electrolyte coatings using gun currents within an unusually broad range.

  15. Self-lubricating plasma-sprayed composites for sliding contact bearings to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed composites which have good oxidation-resistance and self-lubricating characteristics to 900 C were developed. The composites are a Nichrome matrix containing dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication. They are applied to bearing surfaces in layers about 0.050 cm thick by plasma-spraying; the layers are then machined to a thickness of 0.025 cm. Oscillating bearing tests were performed in air to 900 C at unit radial loads up to 3.5 times 10 to the 7th power Newtons per square meter (5000 psi) and a thrust load of 1960 Newtons (440 lb). Bearings with a composite liner in the bore were in good condition after over 50,000 oscillating cycles accumulated during repeated bearing temperature cycles between 25 and 900 C.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Al-11 wt% Si Alloy via Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosa, Ahmed A.; Mohamed, Mohamed I.; Ismael, Mustafa K.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different portions (0.5, l, 2, 4) wt% were added to a gas atomized Al-ll wt% Si powder. The Al-ll wt% /MWCNTS nanocomposite powder was examined by FESEM, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD). Air plasma spraying (APS) was used to spray Al-ll wt% Si/MwCNTs nanocomposite powder on aluminum alloy AA6082-T6 substrates. Al-ll wt% Si/MWCNTs nanocomposite coating layer was examined using FESEM/EDS, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and HRTEM. SEM/EDS showed that Al4C3 is formed at the interface e between the coating layer and the substrate in Al-ll wt% Si/4 wt% MWCNTs plasma spray coating. The adhesion test showed good adhesion in the ranges 5-l5 MPa between the coating layer and the substrate. Microhardness test of the air plasma sprayed (APS) Al-ll wt% Si/MWNTs nanocomposite layer is increased with the MWCNTs wt%.

  17. Numerical Study of Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhpanah, Amirsaman; Coyle, Thomas W.; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-01-01

    A numerical study of suspension plasma spraying is presented in the current work. The liquid suspension jet is replaced with a train of droplets containing the suspension particles injected into the plasma flow. Atomization, evaporation, and melting of different components are considered for droplets and particles as they travel toward the substrate. Effect of different parameters on particle conditions during flight and upon impact on the substrate is investigated. Initially, influence of the torch operating conditions such as inlet flow rate and power is studied. Additionally, effect of injector parameters like injection location, flow rate, and angle is examined. The model used in the current study takes high-temperature gradients and non-continuum effects into account. Moreover, the important effect of change in physical properties of suspension droplets as a result of evaporation is included in the model. These mainly include variations in heat transfer properties and viscosity. Utilizing this improved model, several test cases have been considered to better evaluate the effect of different parameters on the quality of particles during flight and upon impact on the substrate.

  18. Evaluation of titanium plasma-sprayed and plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite implants in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ong, Joo L; Carnes, David L; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2004-08-01

    In this study, bone interfacial strength and bone contact length at the plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) and titanium plasma-sprayed (TPS) implants were evaluated in vivo. Non-coated titanium (Ti) implants were used as controls. Cylindrical coated or non-coated implants (4.0mm diameter by 8mm long) were implanted in the dogs' mandibles. Loading of the implants was performed at 12 weeks after implantation. At 12 weeks after implantation (prior to loading) and 1 year after loading, implants were evaluated for interfacial bone-implant strength and bone-implant contact length. No significant differences in interfacial bone-implant strength for all groups at 12 weeks after implantation and after 1 year loading in normal bone were found. However, bone contact length for HA implants was significantly higher than the TPS and Ti implants for both periods tested (12 weeks after implantation and 1 year after loading). It was concluded that TPS implants exhibited similar pull-out strength compared to the HA implants. In addition, the lower bone contact length on the TPS surface compared to HA surfaces did not affect the interfacial bone-implant strength for both implants.

  19. Microstructure and thermal behaviour of plasma sprayed zirconia/alumina composite coating.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Ando, Y; Kurokawa, K; Hejwowski, T

    2011-10-01

    In thermal barrier coatings (TBC), failure occurs near or at the interface between the metallic bondcoat and topcoat. On high temperature conditions, an oxide scale which is named thermally grown oxide (TGO) occurs along the bond/topcoat interface. For diminishing the creation of TGO, a dense coating with low residual stress and thermal stress buffer layer was preferable. High hardness ceramic coatings could be obtained by gas tunnel type plasma spraying, and the deposited coating had superior property in comparison with those deposited by conventional type plasma spray method. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying system was utilized to produce a zirconia/alumina functionally graded thermal barrier coating and discussed its physical and mechanical properties, thermal behavior and high temperature oxidation resistance of the coating are discussed. Consequently, the proposed system exhibited superior mechanical properties and oxidation resistance at the expenses of a slightly lower thermal insulating effect. This interlayer is preferred in order to minimize the detrimental effect of the phase transformation of gamma-Al2O3 to alpha-Al2O3.

  20. Thermal Expansion of Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S V.; Palczer, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic Cu-8%Cr, Cu-26%Cr, Cu-8%Cr-1%Al, NiAl and NiCrAlY monolithic coatings were fabricated by vacuum plasma spray deposition processes for thermal expansion property measurements between 293 and 1223 K. The corrected thermal expansion, (DL/L(sub 0) varies with the absolute temperature, T, as (DL/L(sub 0) = A(T - 293)(sup 3) + BIT - 293)(sup 2) + C(T - 293) + D, where, A, B, C and D are thermal, regression constants. Excellent reproducibility was observed for all of the coatings except for data obtained on the Cu-8%Cr and Cu-26%Cr coatings in the first heat-up cycle, which deviated from those determined in the subsequent cycles. This deviation is attributed to the presence of residual stresses developed during the spraying of the coatings, which are relieved after the first heat-up cycle. In the cases of Cu-8%Cr and NiAl, the thermal expansion data were observed to be reproducible for three specimens. The linear expansion data for Cu-8% Cr and Cu-26%Cr agree extremely well with rule of mixture (ROM) predictions. Comparison of the data for the Cu-8%Cr coating with literature data for Cr and Cu revealed that the thermal expansion behavior of this alloy is determined by the Cu-rich matrix. The data for NiAl and NiCrAlY are in excellent agreement with published results irrespective of composition and the methods used for processing the materials. The implications of these results on coating GRCop-84 copper alloy combustor liners for reusable launch vehicles are discussed.

  1. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  2. Processing-microstructure-properties relationships in small-particle plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawdsley, Jennifer Renee

    The objective of this study was to determine processing-microstructure-properties relationships for small-particle plasma-sprayed (SPPS) ceramic coatings. Plasma-sprayed yttria partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, which are used to protect superalloys from heat and the environment in turbine engines, and plasma-sprayed alumina coatings, which are being investigated as a potential replacement for chrome in corrosion protection applications, were fabricated using SPPS technology and their microstructure and pertinent properties were examined. The properties of plasma-sprayed YSZ and alumina coatings were investigated with designed experiments. The parameters varied include power, spray distance, total plasma gas flow, percent hydrogen in the plasma gas, injector angle, injector offset and carrier gas flow. The variations in thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, and hardness for the YSZ SPPS coatings were found to correlate to the variations in density, which were related to the processing variables. It was found that surface roughness was related to the amount of splashing and debris associated with the single splats. In four-point bending strain tolerance and fatigue tests, the SPPS YSZ coatings showed very little acoustic emission activity, except in the case of tensile fatigue of a coating without network cracks. Small angle X-ray scattering experiments revealed that SPPS YSZ coatings have significantly less submicron intersplat porosity than conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, and that the pore and microcrack scattering area decreases with heat treatment due to the sintering of microcracks and small pores. The SPPS alumina coatings were optimized to produce a coating with excellent corrosion protection capabilities. It was found that the hardest SPPS alumina coatings did not provide the best corrosion protection due to unique porosity defect structures associated with surface bumps in the coatings. The surface bumps were

  3. Characterization of plasma sprayed and explosively consolidated simulated lunar soil

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, S.J.; Inal, O.T.; Smith, M.F.

    1997-06-01

    Two methods for the use of lunar materials for the construction of shelters on the Moon are being proposed: explosive consolidation of the soil into structural components and plasma spraying of the soil to join components. The plasma-sprayed coating would also provide protection from the intense radiation. In this work, a mare simulant was plasma-sprayed onto a stainless steel substrate. Deposition of a 0.020 inch coating using power inputs of 23, 25, 27 and 29 kW were compared. Hardness of the coatings increased with each increase of power to the system, while porosity at the interface decreased. All coatings exhibited good adhesion. Simultaneously, an explosively consolidated sample was similarly characterized to afford a comparison of structural features associated with each mode of proposed use.

  4. Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Berndt, C. C.; Herman, H.

    1983-01-01

    Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed 8 wt pct-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings and powders was carried out by X-ray diffraction. Step scanning was used for increased peak resolution. Plasma spraying of the YSZ powder into water or onto a steel substrate to form a coating reduced the cubic and monoclinic phases with a simultaneous increase in the tetragonal phase. Heat treatment of the coating at 1150 C for 10 h in an Ar atmosphere increased the amount of cubic and monoclinic phases. The implications of these transformations on coating performance and integrity are discussed.

  5. Metallurgy and properties of plasma spray formed materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Liaw, Y. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Poorman, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental metallurgy of vacuum plasma spray formed materials is the key to enhancing and developing full material properties. Investigations have shown that the microstructure of plasma sprayed materials must evolve from a powder splat morphology to a recrystallized grain structure to assure high strength and ductility. A fully, or near fully, dense material that exhibits a powder splat morphology will perform as a brittle material compared to a recrystallized grain structure for the same amount of porosity. Metallurgy and material properties of nickel, iron, and copper base alloys will be presented and correlated to microstructure.

  6. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  7. The effect of plasma-sprayed coatings on the fatigue of titanium alloy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Todd

    1994-02-01

    The application of titanium plasma-spray coatings to Ti-6Al-4V orthopedic implants results in a dramatic decrease in high-cycle fatigue performance. The better bonding of the plasma sprayed and heat-treated implants results in a lower high-cycle fatigue strength. Therefore, the use of plasma-spray textured coatings on implants must be considered with caution.

  8. Preventing Clogging In A Vacuum Plasma Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotz, Phillip D.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.; Davis, William M.

    1994-01-01

    Modification of powder-injection ports enables lengthy, high-temperature deposition operations. Graphite inserts prevent clogging of ports through which copper powder injected into vacuum plasma spray (VPS) gun. Graphite liners eliminate need to spend production time refurbishing VPS gun, reducing cost of production and increasing productivity. Concept also applied to other material systems used for net-shape fabrication via VPS.

  9. Mathematical simulation of surface heating during plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovich, V. I.; Giorbelidze, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    A mathematical model of temperature distribution over the flat ‘coating-substrate’ system section during plasma spraying, taking into account a plasma gun travel and coating buildup has been developed. It has been shown that the temperature value in the near-surface layer of the sprayed coating during the plasma gun passage can significantly exceed the temperature values in underlayers.

  10. Alignment Fixtures For Vacuum-Plasma-Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, William H.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Power, Christopher A.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Fixtures for alignment of vacuum-plasma-spray guns built. Each fixture designed to fit specific gun and holds small, battery-powered laser on centerline of gun. Laser beam projects small red dot where centerline intersects surface of workpiece to be sprayed. After laser beam positioned on surface of workpiece, fixture removed from gun and spraying proceeds.

  11. Mechanical and physical properties of plasma-sprayed stabilized zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. A.; Mehan, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties were determined for plasma-sprayed MgO- or Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings. Properties were determined for the ceramic coating in both the freestanding condition and as-bonded to a metal substrate. The properties of the NiCrAlY bond coating were also investigated.

  12. Removable Mandrels For Vacuum-Plasma-Spray Forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotz, Phillip D.; Davis, William M.; Power, Christopher A.; Woodford, William H.; Todd, Douglas M.; Liaw, Yoon K.; Holmes, Richard R.; Zimmerman, Frank R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1995-01-01

    Improved mandrels developed for use in vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) forming of refractory metal and ceramic furnace cartridge tubes. Designed so after tubes formed on them by VPS, mandrels shrink away from tubes upon cooling back to room temperature and simply slip out of tube.

  13. Electroform/Plasma-Spray Laminates for X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.; Graham, Michael; Vaynman, Semyon

    2007-01-01

    Electroform/plasma-spray laminates have shown promise as lightweight, strong, low-thermal-expansion components for xray optics. The basic idea is to exploit both (1) the well-established art of fabrication of optical components by replication and (2) plasma spraying as a means of reinforcing a thin replica optic with one or more backing layer(s) having tailorable thermomechanical properties. In x-ray optics as in other applications, replication reduces the time and cost of fabrication because grinding and polishing can be limited to a few thick masters, from which many lightweight replicas can thereafter be made. The first step in the fabrication of a component of the type in question is to make a replica optic by electroforming a thin layer of nickel on a master. Through proper control of the electroforming process conditions, it is possible to minimize residual stress and, hence, to minimize distortion in the replica. Next, a powder comprising ceramic particles coated with a metal compatible with the electroformed nickel is plasma-sprayed onto the backside of the nickel replica. Then through several repetitions and variations of the preceding steps or perhaps a small compressive stress, alternating layers of electroformed nickel and plasma-sprayed metal-coated ceramic powder are deposited. The thicknesses of the layers and the composition of the metal-coated ceramic powder are chosen to optimize the strength, areal mass density, and toughness of the finished component. An important benefit of using both electroforming and plasma spraying is the possibility of balancing stresses to a minimum level, which could be zero or perhaps a small net compressive stress designed to enhance the function of the component in its intended application.

  14. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) of Ceramics for Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate advanced multilayer thermal and environmental protection systems, a new deposition process is needed to bridge the gap between conventional plasma spray, which produces relatively thick coatings on the order of 125-250 microns, and conventional vapor phase processes such as electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) which are limited by relatively slow deposition rates, high investment costs, and coating material vapor pressure requirements. The use of Plasma Spray - Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) processing fills this gap and allows thin (< 10 microns) single layers to be deposited and multilayer coatings of less than 100 microns to be generated with the flexibility to tailor microstructures by changing processing conditions. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were applied to NiCrAlY bond coated superalloy substrates using the PS-PVD coater at NASA Glenn Research Center. A design-of-experiments was used to examine the effects of process variables (Ar/He plasma gas ratio, the total plasma gas flow, and the torch current) on chamber pressure and torch power. Coating thickness, phase and microstructure were evaluated for each set of deposition conditions. Low chamber pressures and high power were shown to increase coating thickness and create columnar-like structures. Likewise, high chamber pressures and low power had lower growth rates, but resulted in flatter, more homogeneous layers

  15. Study on Ceramic Interconnect Manufactured by Slurry Dip Coating and Plasma Spray Coating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Yong; Kim, Jong-Hee; Ryoo, Sung-Nam; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Doo-Hwan; Shul, Yong-Gun; Shin, Dong-Ryul; Song, Rak-Hyun

    To get a stable and dense interconnect layer of anode-supported flat tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack, we have studied on the synthesis of precursors with a fine particle size and the ceramic interconnect coating technology. Coated interconnects by slurry dipping and air plasma spray processes were sintered by 2-step sintering method. Ca-doped LaCrO3 perovskites such as La0.75Ca0.27CrO3(LCC27), La0.6Ca0.41CrO3(LCC41), and La0.8Sr0.05Ca0.15CrO3(LSCC), were synthesized by Pechini process and their average particle sizes were about 1 μm. LSCC layer is a functional layer to prevent Ca migration and then LCC41 layer is coated onto it. The Ca migration in the LSCC layer did not occur. The LCC41 was coated on the air plasma spray-coated LCC27 layer by slurry dip coating process and sintered at 1200°C for 20hr. Its electrical conductivity indicated about 27 S/cm at 800°C and the bubble test showed that there is no gas permeation at pressure difference of 0.4 kgf/cm2 at room temperature.

  16. Phase distributions in plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Garlick, R. G.; Smialek, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of phases in plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria has been determined over a range of yttria levels from 0 to 26.1 molpct YO(1.5) using room temperature X-ray diffractometry. Pure, plasma-sprayed zirconia is composed almost entirely of the monoclinic phase. At levels of yttria between 4 and 10 percent, a quenched-in tetragonal phase predominates, and at higher levels the cubic phase predominates. The phase distributions are compared with previously reported test lives of thermal barrier coatings formed from these materials. Regions of optimal lives were found to correlate with regions having high amounts of the tetragonal phase, small but nonzero amounts of the monoclinic phase, and little or none of the cubic phase. Possible relationships between phase composition and coating performance are discussed.

  17. Effects of plasma spray parameters on two layer thermal barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1981-01-01

    The power level and the type of arc gas used during plasma spraying of a two layer thermal barrier system (TBS) were found to affect the life of the system. Life at 1095 C in a cyclic furnace test was improved by about 140 percent by increasing the power during plasma spray applications of the bond and thermal barrier coatings. This improvement is due to increases in the densities of the bond and thermal barrier coatings by 3 and 5 percent, respectively. These increases in densities are equivalent to about 45 and 30 percent reduction in mean porosities, respectively. The addition of hydrogen to the argon arc gas had the same effect as the reduction in power level and caused a reduction in TBS life.

  18. Electrochemical Evaluation of Pyrite Films Prepared by Plasma Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1998-10-30

    Thermally activated batteries use electrodes that are typically fabricated by cold pressing of powder. In the LiSi/FeS2 system, natural (mineral) pyrite is used for the cathode. In an effort to increase the energy density and specific energy of these batteries, flame and plasma spraying to form thin films of pyrite cathodes were evaluated. The films were deposited on a 304 stainless steel substrate (current collector) and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray dlfllaction. The films were electrochemically tested in single cells at 5000C and the petiormance compared to that of standard cells made with cold-pressed powders. The best results were obtained with material deposited by de-arc plasma spraying with a proprietq additive to suppress thermal decomposion of the pyrite.

  19. Characterization of Plasma Sprayed Beryllium ITER First Wall Mockups

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Richard G.; Vaidya, Rajendra U.; Hollis, Kendall J.

    1997-12-31

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/sq m without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of plasma sprayed HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Khor, K A; Gu, Y W; Pan, D; Cheang, P

    2004-08-01

    Plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on titanium alloy substrate have been used extensively due to their excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. However, the erratic bond strength between HA and Ti alloy has raised concern over the long-term reliability of the implant. In this paper, HA/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Ti-6Al-4V composite coatings that possess superior mechanical properties to conventional plasma sprayed HA coatings were developed. Ti-6Al-4V powders coated with fine YSZ and HA particles were prepared through a unique ceramic slurry mixing method. The so-formed composite powder was employed as feedstock for plasma spraying of the HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V coatings. The influence of net plasma energy, plasma spray standoff distance, and post-spray heat treatment on microstructure, phase composition and mechanical properties were investigated. Results showed that coatings prepared with the optimum plasma sprayed condition showed a well-defined splat structure. HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V solid solution was formed during plasma spraying which was beneficial for the improvement of mechanical properties. There was no evidence of Ti oxidation from the successful processing of YSZ and HA coated Ti-6Al-4V composite powders. Small amount of CaO apart from HA, ZrO(2) and Ti was present in the composite coatings. The microhardness, Young's modulus, fracture toughness, and bond strength increased significantly with the addition of YSZ. Post-spray heat treatment at 600 degrees C and 700 degrees C for up to 12h was found to further improve the mechanical properties of coatings. After the post-spray heat treatment, 17.6% increment in Young's modulus (E) and 16.3% increment in Vicker's hardness were achieved. The strengthening mechanisms of HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V composite coatings were related to the dispersion strengthening by homogeneous distribution of YSZ particles in the matrix, the good mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V and the formation of solid solution among HA

  1. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass and metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed composites, which have good oxidation-resistance and self-lubricating characteritics to 900 C, were developed. The composites are a nichrome matrix containing dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication; they are applied to bearing surfaces by plasma spraying layers about 0.050 centimeters thick which are then machined to 0.025 centimeters. Oscillating bearing tests were performed in air to 900 C at unit radial loads up to 3.5 x 10 to the 7th power N/sq M (5000 psi) and a thrust load of 1960N (440 lbs). Bearings with a composite liner in the bore were in good condition after over 50,000 oscillating cycles accumulated during repeated, bearing temperatures cycles between 25 and 900 C.

  2. Production of flexible metal matrix composites reinforced with continuous Si-Ti-C-O fibers by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waku, Y.; Nakagawa, N.; Ohsora, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Shimizu, K.; Yamamura, T.; Ohmori, A.

    1992-06-01

    An experiment is conducted to fabricate a flexible prepreg sheet with a continuous Si-Ti-C-O fiber by means of an air-plasma spraying method for use as an MMC plate. Plasma spraying is conducted under atmospheric conditions, and the prepreg and MMC sheets are investigated by means of a three-point flexural test and Auger electron spectroscopy to study strength and oxidation qualities. The oxidation layer is found to be about 200 A in depth, and the longitudinal and transverse flexural strengths of a unidirectionally reinforced MMC plate fabricated by hot pressing at 660 C are given as 1.0 and 0.25 GPa, respectively. The technique outlined is shown to be useful for developing squeeze-cast MMCs reinforced with Si-Ti-C-O that have high specific strength, specific modulus, and heat resistance.

  3. Production of flexible metal matrix composites reinforced with continuous Si-Ti-C-O fibers by atmospheric plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Waku, Y.; Nakagawa, N.; Ohsora, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Shimizu, K.; Yamamura, T.; Ohmori, A. Osaka University, )

    1992-06-01

    An experiment is conducted to fabricate a flexible prepreg sheet with a continuous Si-Ti-C-O fiber by means of an air-plasma spraying method for use as an MMC plate. Plasma spraying is conducted under atmospheric conditions, and the prepreg and MMC sheets are investigated by means of a three-point flexural test and Auger electron spectroscopy to study strength and oxidation qualities. The oxidation layer is found to be about 200 A in depth, and the longitudinal and transverse flexural strengths of a unidirectionally reinforced MMC plate fabricated by hot pressing at 660 C are given as 1.0 and 0.25 GPa, respectively. The technique outlined is shown to be useful for developing squeeze-cast MMCs reinforced with Si-Ti-C-O that have high specific strength, specific modulus, and heat resistance. 18 refs.

  4. Spheroidized Hydroxyapatite (HA) Powders Plasma Spraying of Combustion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Wang, Y.; Cheang, P.

    1998-06-01

    Tailoring powder characteristics to suit the plasma spray process can alleviate difficulties associated with the preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. Commercial HA feedstock normally exhibit an angular morphology and a wide particle size range that present difficulties in powder transport from the powder hopper to the plasma spray gun and in nonuniform melting of the powders in the plasma flame. Hence, combustion flame spheroidized hydroxyapatite (SHA) was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying. Spherical particles within a narrow particle size range are found to be more effective for the plasma spray processes. Results show coatings generated from spheroidized HA powders have unique surface and microstructure characteristics. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation of the coating surface revealed well-formed splats that spread and flatten into disc configurations with no disintegration, reflecting adequate melting of the HA in the plasma and subsequent deposition consistency. The surface topography is generally flat with good overlapping of subsequent spreading droplets. Porosity in the form of macropores is substantially reduced. The cross-section microstructure reveals a dense coating comprised of randomly stacked lamellae. The tensile bond strengths of the SHA coatings, phase composition, and characteristics of the coatings generated with different particle sizes (125 to 75 µm, 45 to 75 µm, 20 to 45 µm, and 5 to 20 µm) showed that a high bond strength of ˜16 MPa can be obtained with SHA in the size range from 20 to 45 µm. This can be improved further by a postspray treatment by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). However, larger particle size ranges exhibited higher degrees of crystallinity and relatively higher HA content among the various calcium phosphate phases found in the coatings.

  5. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  6. Improved Small-Particle Powders for Plasma Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QuynhGiao, N.; Miller, Robert A.; Leissler, George W.

    2005-01-01

    Improved small-particle powders and powder-processing conditions have been developed for use in plasma spray deposition of thermal-barrier and environmental barrier coatings. Heretofore, plasma-sprayed coatings have typically ranged in thickness from 125 to 1,800 micrometers. As explained below, the improved powders make it possible to ensure complete coverage of substrates at unprecedently small thicknesses of the order of 25 micrometers. Plasma spraying involves feeding a powder into a hot, high-velocity plasma jet. The individual powder particles melt in the plasma jet as they are propelled towards a substrate, upon which they splat to build up a coating. In some cases, multiple coating layers are required. The size range of the powder particles necessarily dictates the minimum thickness of a coating layer needed to obtain uniform or complete coverage. Heretofore, powder particle sizes have typically ranged from 40 to 70 micrometers; as a result, the minimum thickness of a coating layer for complete coverage has been about 75 micrometers. In some applications, thinner coatings or thinner coating layers are desirable. In principle, one can reduce the minimum complete-coverage thickness of a layer by using smaller powder particles. However, until now, when powder particle sizes have been reduced, the powders have exhibited a tendency to cake, clogging powder feeder mechanisms and feed lines. Hence, the main problem is one of synthesizing smaller-particle powders having desirable flow properties. The problem is solved by use of a process that begins with a spray-drying subprocess to produce spherical powder particles having diameters of less than 30 micrometers. (Spherical-particle powders have the best flow properties.) The powder is then passed several times through a commercial sifter with a mesh to separate particles having diameters less than 15 micrometers. The resulting fine, flowable powder is passed through a commercial fluidized bed powder feeder into a

  7. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  8. Temperature Measurement Challenges and Limitations for In-Flight Particles in Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Bishoy; Gougeon, Patrick; Moreau, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) acquires a significant interest from the industry. The deposited coatings using this technique were proved to have unique microstructural features compared to those built by conventional plasma spraying techniques. In order to optimize this process, in-flight particle diagnostics is considered a very useful tool that helps to control various spraying parameters and permits better coating reproducibility. In that context, the temperature of in-flight particles is one of the most important key elements that helps to optimize and control the SPS process. However, the limitations and challenges associated with this process have a significant effect on the accuracy of two-color pyrometric techniques used to measure the in-flight particle temperature. In this work, the influence of several nonthermal radiation sources on the particle temperature measurement is studied. The plasma radiation scattered by in-flight particles was found to have no significant influence on temperature measurement. Moreover, the detection of the two-color signals at two different locations was found to induce a significant error on temperature measurement. Finally, the plasma radiation surrounding the in-flight particles was identified as the main source of error on the temperature measurement of in-flight particles.

  9. Suspension Plasma Spraying of Sub-micron Silicon Carbide Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarok, F.; Espallargas, N.

    2015-06-01

    Thermal spraying of silicon carbide (SiC) material is a challenging task since SiC tends to decompose during atmospheric spraying process. The addition of metal or ceramic binders is necessary to facilitate the bonding of SiC particles, allowing SiC composite coating to be deposited. In the conventional procedures, the binders are added through mechanical mixing of powder constituents, making it difficult to achieve homogeneous distribution. In the new procedure proposed in this work, the binder is delivered as a nano-film of the surface of the individual SiC particles through co-precipitation treatment. Suspension plasma spray (SPS) coating technique has been used with the aim at avoiding the decomposition of SiC typically expected with atmospheric techniques, such as atmospheric plasma spray. The deposited SiC coatings by SPS showed identical SiC phase peak as identified in the suspension feedstock, indicating that the nano-film binder was able to protect SiC particles from decomposition. Further analysis by XPS revealed that SiC particles underwent some minor oxidation. Unfortunately, all the SiC coatings exhibited poor mechanical performance due to low cohesive strength, high porosity, and powdery structure making the coatings vulnerable to grain pull-out. This was due to the absence of sintering process during the spraying process contributing to the low performance of SiC SPS coatings.

  10. Column formation in suspension plasma-sprayed coatings and resultant thermal properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, K.; Krane, M. J. M.; Trice, R. W.; Wang, H.; Porter, W.; Besser, M.; Sordelet, D.; Ilavsky, J.; Almer, J.

    2011-06-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  11. Column Formation in Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Coatings and Resultant Thermal Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, Kent; Krane, Matthew; Trice, Rodney; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Besser, Matthew; Sordelet, Daniel; Ilavsky, Dr. Jan; Almer, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  12. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  13. Plasma sprayed Fe(76)Nd(16)B(8) permanent magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, R. A.; Anderson, C. D.; Flanagan, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Thin coatings (0.16 mm) and thick coatings (0.50 mm) of Fe(76)Nd(16)B(8) were deposited on stainless-steel substrates by low pressure plasma spraying. Microscopic examination of the coatings in a light microscope revealed excessive porosity, but good bonding to the substrate. Fracture cross sections examined in a scanning electron microscope showed the grains to be equiaxed and approximately 1 micron or less in diameter in the as-sprayed condition. The intrinsic coercivities of the as-sprayed coatings varied from 5.8 to 10.9 kOe. The effects of postspray heat treatments on the intrinsic coercivity are also given.

  14. Plasma Spray for Difficult-To-Braze Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, A.

    1982-01-01

    Nickel plating on surfaces makes brazing easier for some alloys. Sometimes nickel plating may not be feasible because of manufacturing sequence, size of hardware, or lack of suitable source for nickel plating. Alternative surface preparation in such cases is to grit-blast surface lightly and then plasma-spray 1 1/2 to 2 mils of fine nickel powder or braze-alloy material directly on surface. Powder is sprayed from plasma gun, using argon as carrier gas to prevent oxidation of nickel or braze alloy.

  15. Producing titanium aluminide foil from plasma-sprayed preforms

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, S.C.; Forster, J.A. )

    1993-07-01

    A new method was used to fabricate foils of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-6-4) alloy and Ti-14Al-21Nb(Ti-14-21) titanium aluminide, starting from a plasma-sprayed (PS) preform. The foils were 100 percent dense, with microstructures similar to those of wrought (IM) foil material. The foil made from PS preforms were characterized by the mechanical properties equivalent to their IM-processed counterparts. It is concluded that the method of roll consolidation of a PS preform is well suited for alloys and intermetallics that do not possess extensive hot and cold workability. 6 refs.

  16. Performance of air plasma spraying parameters in the fabrication of ZrO2-10%Y2O3-18% TiO2 thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liscano, S.; Gil, L.

    2013-11-01

    In this research, ZrO2-10%Y2O3-18% TiO2 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were sprayed by employing an air plasma thermal spray (APS) technique following a 23 factorial design experiment in order to obtain the best favorable spraying conditions able to enhance their properties. The effect of the spraying parameters on the porosity, microhardness, microstructure and morphology were determined by using different techniques such as optical microscopy (OP), image analysis, Vickers indentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique, this latter coupled with X-Ray microanalysis (EDS). It was found that both the arc voltage and the powder feed rate, as well as their interaction had a significant effect on the values of the reported hardness and these results were related to the existing level of porosity in the coatings. It was concluded that the best coatings properties, for the level of the variables studied in this work, could be obtained if the arc voltage is maintained at 36 V, the arc current at 900 A and the powder feed rate to 24 g/min.

  17. The production of porous layers for the solid oxide fuel cell by vacuum plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, E.; Henne, R.; Lang, M.

    1995-12-31

    The vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) method was used to produce porous perovskite and Ni/YSZ (Yttria Stabilized Zirconia) cermet layers as cathode and anode for a SOFC, respectively. The perovskite powder was deposited without decomposition of the perovskite phase due to the use of Laval-nozzles and the adaption of spray parameters. The deposition of porous Ni/YSZ cermets demanded a modification of the Laval-nozzle. With this modification high deposition rates compared to conventional nozzles could be attained. The deposition of NiAl-YSZ and subsequently etching of Al is a successful method to produce anode layers with very fine porosity. Up to now the feasibility of producing porous deposits was examined. The next step of investigation will be the electrochemical testing of the electrodes. The results of those tests will influence the further development of anode`s and cathode`s microstructure.

  18. Effect of Zr on microstructure of metallic glass coatings prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Kuroda, T; Kimura, H; Inoue, A

    2012-06-01

    Metallic glass is one of the most attractive advanced materials, and many researchers have conducted various developmental research works. Metallic glass is expected to be used as a functional material because of its excellent physical and chemical functions such as high strength and high corrosion resistance. However, the application for small size parts has been carried out only in some industrial fields. In order to widen the industrial application fields, a composite material is preferred for the cost performance. In the coating processes of metallic glass with the conventional deposition techniques, there is a difficulty to form thick coatings due to their low deposition rate. Thermal spraying method is one of the potential candidates to produce metallic glass composites. Metallic glass coatings can be applied to the longer parts and therefore the application field can be widened. The gas tunnel plasma spraying is one of the most important technologies for high quality ceramic coating and synthesizing functional materials. As the gas tunnel type plasma jet is superior to the properties of other conventional type plasma jets, this plasma has great possibilities for various applications in thermal processing. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying was used to form the metallic glass coatings on the stainless-steel substrate. The microstructure and surface morphology of the metallic glass coatings were examined using Fe-based metallic glass powder and Zr-based metallic glass powder as coating material. For the mechanical properties the Vickers hardness was measured on the cross section of both the coatings and the difference between the powders was compared.

  19. Anisotropic resistivity in plasma-sprayed silicon thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharas, Boris Dave; Sampath, Sanjay; Gambino, Richard J.

    2005-05-01

    Silicon thick films deposited by thermal plasma spray are of interest as inexpensive electronic materials for conformal meso-scale electronics applications. In addition they also serve as a model system for the investigation of electrical properties of coatings with layered anisotropy. In this study impedance spectroscopy was used to measure the complex resistivity of free-standing 64μm-thick polycrystalline silicon films deposited by thermal plasma spraying in an atmospheric ambient. Impedance spectroscopy measurements were taken in the through-thickness (across-splat) and edge-to-edge (in-splat) directions and revealed a resistivity difference of approximately 7.5±0.23 between the two directions. The complex resistivity results are explained on the basis of a brick-layer type model, associated with the layered splat microstructure obtained from cross-sectional transmission electron microscope imaging of the films. In addition a circuit-based model made up of parallel, resistor-capacitor elements in series, and Cole-Cole and Davidson-Cole impedance functions were used to fit the impedance data to extract material parameters and contributions from the grains and splat boundaries. Furthermore, thermal processing and phosphorus doping is shown to lead to higher and lower resistivity, respectively, in the films.

  20. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  1. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Tungsten Lorentz Force Accelerator Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank R.

    2001-01-01

    The Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a fabrication technique using the VPS process to form anode sections for a Lorentz force accelerator from tungsten. Lorentz force accelerators are an attractive form of electric propulsion that provides continuous, high-efficiency propulsion at useful power levels for such applications as orbit transfers or deep space missions. The VPS process is used to deposit refractory metals such as tungsten onto a graphite mandrel of the desired shape. Because tungsten is reactive at high temperatures, it is thermally sprayed in an inert environment where the plasma gun melts and accelerates the metal powder onto the mandrel. A three-axis robot inside the chamber controls the motion of the plasma spray torch. A graphite mandrel acts as a male mold, forming the required contour and dimensions of the inside surface of the anode. This paper describes the processing techniques, design considerations, and process development associated with the VPS forming of the Lorentz force accelerator.

  2. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Tungsten Lorentz Force Accelerator Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank R.

    2004-01-01

    The Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, working with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has developed and demonstrated a fabrication technique using the VPS process to form anode and cathode sections for a Lorentz force accelerator made from tungsten. Lorentz force accelerators are an attractive form of electric propulsion that provides continuous, high-efficiency propulsion at useful power levels for such applications as orbit transfers or deep space missions. The VPS process is used to deposit refractory metals such as tungsten onto a graphite mandrel of the desired shape. Because tungsten is reactive at high temperatures, it is thermally sprayed in an inert environment where the plasma gun melts and deposits the molten metal powder onto a mandrel. A three-axis robot inside the chamber controls the motion of the plasma spray torch. A graphite mandrel acts as a male mold, forming the required contour and dimensions for the inside surface of the anode or cathode of the accelerator. This paper describes the processing techniques, design considerations, and process development associated with the VPS forming of Lorentz force accelerator components.

  3. Failure analysis of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermally induced failure processes of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings are examined. Cracking processes give rise to noise which was monitored by acoustic emission (AE) techniques. The sequential failure of coatings was examined from samples which were thermally cycled. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia with and without a NiCrAlZr bond coat were plasma-sprayed onto U700 alloy rod. In some cases the substrate was intentionally overheated during deposition of the thermal protection system to check how this process variable influenced the AE response of the specimen. In this way a qualitative appraisal of how process variables affect coating integrity could be discerned in terms of cracking behavior. Results from up to seven consecutive thermal cycles are reported here. Coating failure was observed in all cases. Failure of the thermal protection system is progressive, since cracking and crack growth were observed prior to ultimate failure. Thus castastrophic failure occurs at some stage when there is a transformation from the microcrack to a macrocrack network.

  4. Effect of plasma spraying regimes on structure and properties of Ni3Al coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornienko, E. E.; Mul', D. O.; Rubtsova, O. A.; Vaschenko, S. P.; Kuzmin, V. I.; Gulyaev, I. P.; Sergachev, D. V.

    2016-11-01

    The structure and tribological properties of coatings made of PN85YU15 powder were studied. The coatings were deposited on the mild steel blanks by the technology of air-plasma spraying using a unit of annular input and gas-dynamic powder focusing. Efficiency of heating and acceleration of powder particles was studied preliminarily. Measurement results on temperature and velocity distributions of particles at a certain spraying distance by the method of spectral pyrometry and time-of-flight method are presented. The effect of plasmatorch arc current and amount of propane-butane in the plasma flow on the structure and properties of coatings is analyzed in this paper. It is determined that the phase composition of coatings and initial powder is the same: the main phase is Ni3Al compound; moreover, the structure contains Ni5Al3 phase. It is shown that an increase in the amount of propane-butane increases coatings porosity. The densest coatings (5.77%) were obtained at the plasmatorch arc current of 200 A with the reduced amount of propane-butane. The coatings obtained at the minimal arc current of 100 A with an increased amount of propane-butane are characterized by maximal porosity (20.38%). The results of tribological testing of the coatings under the conditions of sliding friction with a lubricant by the disc-plane scheme are presented. From the standpoint of obtaining the densest coatings with high performance, the optimal regimes of plasma spraying of PN85YU15 powder are the current from 140 A to 200 and using the air and propane-butane mixture only as the shielding gas (anode curtain).

  5. Program for plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for preparing composite powders of the three coating components was developed and a procedure that can be used in applying uniform coatings of the composite powders was demonstrated. Composite powders were prepared by adjusting particle sizes of the components and employing a small amount of monoaluminum phosphate as an inorganic binder. Quantitative microscopy (image analysis) was found to be a convenient method of characterizing the composition of the multiphase plasma-sprayed coatings. Area percentages and distribution of the components were readily obtained by this method. The adhesive strength of the coating to a nickel-chromium alloy substrate was increased by about 40 percent by a heat treatment of 20 hours at 650 C.

  6. Sea water corrosion behavior of plasma sprayed abradable coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, M.; Nanda, S. P.; Mishra, S. C.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminum based abradable coating is used for sealing purpose in compressor casing of aero engines to withstand up to a service temperature of 450°C. Al-BNSiO2 composite coating is deposited using thermal plasma spray technique. Coating thickness measured and porosity of the coating is evaluated.Coating morphology is observed and EDSanalysis is done with SEM (Jeol make). The effect of time on the sea water corrosion behavior of the coating is evaluated. It is observed that, there is a sharp increase in weight gain of the coating up to six weeks of immersion. This behavior is attributed to the adsorption/deposition of other elements/reactions taking place during interaction with sea water.

  7. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W.; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces. PMID:27091306

  8. Characterization of the WC coatings deposited by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, M. L.; Benea, L. P.

    2015-06-01

    Tungsten monocarbide (WC) is deposited using a plasma jet on the martensitic noncorrosive steel support (Z12CNDV12), in three different thicknesses.The characteristics of the coatings are determined by: its chemical composition, optical microscopy, RX analysis, tensile adhesion strength, Vickers hardness, the nature and the processing degree of the substrate and the deposition conditions.The method used for determining the behaviour in a corrosive environment of the WC coatings deposited by plasma spraying consists in measuring the electrochemical potential difference between the coating and the substrate, which are immersed in a solution containing NaCl as a corrosive agent. The experimental results are then mathematically processed in order to determine a law and the mechanisms involved.

  9. Caracterisation of Titanium Nitride Layers Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Popescu, Mihaela; Uţu, Dragoş

    2011-01-01

    Forming and cutting tools are subjected to the intense wear solicitations. Usually, they are either subject to superficial heat treatments or are covered with various materials with high mechanical properties. In recent years, thermal spraying is used increasingly in engineering area because of the large range of materials that can be used for the coatings. Titanium nitride is a ceramic material with high hardness which is used to cover the cutting tools increasing their lifetime. The paper presents the results obtained after deposition of titanium nitride layers by reactive plasma spraying (RPS). As deposition material was used titanium powder and as substratum was used titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) images of the deposited layers and the X ray diffraction of the coatings are presented. Demonstration program with layers deposited with thickness between 68,5 and 81,4 μm has been achieved and presented.

  10. Plasma spray nozzle with low overspray and collimated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beason, Jr., George P. (Inventor); McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Power, Christopher A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An improved nozzle for reducing overspray in high temperature supersonic plasma spray devices comprises a body defining an internal passageway having an upstream end and a downstream end through which a selected plasma gas is directed. The nozzle passageway has a generally converging/diverging Laval shape with its upstream end converging to a throat section and its downstream end diverging from the throat section. The upstream end of the passageway is configured to accommodate a high current cathode for producing an electrical arc in the passageway to heat and ionize the gas flow to plasma form as it moves along the passageway. The downstream end of the nozzle is uniquely configured through the methodology of this invention to have a contoured bell-shape that diverges from the throat to the exit of the nozzle. Coating material in powder form is injected into the plasma flow in the region of the bell-shaped downstream end of the nozzle and the powder particles become entrained in the flow. The unique bell shape of the nozzle downstream end produces a plasma spray that is ideally expanded at the nozzle exit and thus virtually free of shock phenomena, and that is highly collimated so as to exhibit significantly reduced fanning and diffusion between the nozzle and the target. The overall result is a significant reduction in the amount of material escaping from the plasma stream in the form of overspray and a corresponding improvement in the cost of the coating operation and in the quality and integrity of the coating itself.

  11. Impacts of the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution on air quality in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bull, Keith; Johansson, Matti; Krzyzanowski, Michal

    2008-01-01

    The Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution has been one of the main ways of protecting the environment in Europe from air pollution. This convention has successfully bridged different political systems even through times of political change, and is a prime example of what can be achieved through intergovernmental cooperation. Through creating an effective framework for controlling and reducing the damage to human health and the environment from transboundary air pollution, this convention has proved successful. This article considers the development of the convention and its work on adverse air pollution effects, in particular on activities related to quantifying effects on human health as carried out by the convention's joint (with WHO) Task Force on the Health Effects of Air Pollution (Task Force on Health), and concludes with some indications of the convention's future priorities.

  12. Phase transformation and wear studies of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings containing various mol% of yttria

    SciTech Connect

    Aruna, S.T. Balaji, N.; Rajam, K.S.

    2011-07-15

    Plasma sprayable grade zirconia powders doped with various mol% of yttria (0, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 mol%) were synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation route. The coprecipitation conditions were adjusted such that the powders possessed good flowability in the as calcined condition and thus avoiding the agglomeration step like spray drying. Identical plasma spray parameters were used for plasma spraying all the powders on stainless steel plates. The powders and plasma sprayed coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Zirconia powders are susceptible to phase transformations when subjected to very high temperatures during plasma spraying and XRD is insensitive to the presence of some non crystalline phases and hence Raman spectroscopy was used as an important tool. The microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings showed a bimodal distribution containing fully melted and unmelted zones. The microhardness and wear resistance of the plasma sprayed coatings were determined. Among the plasma sprayed coatings, 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia coating containing pure tetragonal zirconia showed the highest wear resistance. - Research Highlights: {yields} Preparation plasma sprayable YSZ powders without any agglomeration process and plasma spraying {yields} Phase transformation studies of plasma sprayed YSZ coatings by XRD and Raman spectroscopy {yields} Microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings exhibited bimodal distribution {yields} Plasma sprayed 3 mol% YSZ coating exhibited the highest wear resistance {yields} Higher wear resistance is due to the higher fracture toughness of tetragonal 3 mol% YSZ phase.

  13. Robotic air vehicle. Blending artificial intelligence with conventional software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, Christa; Graham, Joyce; Roewer, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The Robotic Air Vehicle (RAV) system is described. The program's objectives were to design, implement, and demonstrate cooperating expert systems for piloting robotic air vehicles. The development of this system merges conventional programming used in passive navigation with Artificial Intelligence techniques such as voice recognition, spatial reasoning, and expert systems. The individual components of the RAV system are discussed as well as their interactions with each other and how they operate as a system.

  14. Fireside Corrosion Behavior of HVOF and Plasma-Sprayed Coatings in Advanced Coal/Biomass Co-Fired Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Dudziak, T.; Simms, N. J.; Nicholls, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a systematic evaluation of coatings for advanced fossil fuel plants and addresses fireside corrosion in coal/biomass-derived flue gases. A selection of four candidate coatings: alloy 625, NiCr, FeCrAl and NiCrAlY were deposited onto superheaters/reheaters alloy (T91) using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma spraying. A series of laboratory-based fireside corrosion exposures were carried out on these coated samples in furnaces under controlled atmosphere for 1000 h at 650 °C. The tests were carried out using the "deposit-recoat" test method to simulate the environment that was anticipated from air-firing 20 wt.% cereal co-product mixed with a UK coal. The exposures were carried out using a deposit containing Na2SO4, K2SO4, and Fe2O3 to produce alkali-iron tri-sulfates, which had been identified as the principal cause of fireside corrosion on superheaters/reheaters in pulverized coal-fired power plants. The exposed samples were examined in an ESEM with EDX analysis to characterize the damage. Pre- and post-exposure dimensional metrologies were used to quantify the metal damage in terms of metal loss distributions. The thermally sprayed coatings suffered significant corrosion attack from a combination of aggressive combustion gases and deposit mixtures. In this study, all the four plasma-sprayed coatings studied performed better than the HVOF-sprayed coatings because of a lower level of porosity. NiCr was found to be the best performing coating material with a median metal loss of ~87 μm (HVOF sprayed) and ~13 μm (plasma sprayed). In general, the median metal damage for coatings had the following ranking (in the descending order: most to the least damage): NiCrAlY > alloy 625 > FeCrAl > NiCr.

  15. Plasma Spray-CVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Produce Thin Films from Liquid or Gaseous Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindrat, M.; Höhle, H.-M.; von Niessen, K.; Guittienne, Ph.; Grange, D.; Hollenstein, Ch.

    2011-06-01

    New dedicated coating processes which are based on the well-known LPPS™ technology but operating at lower work pressure (100 Pa) are being actively developed. These hybrid technologies contribute to improve the efficiencies in the turbine industry such as aero-engines and land-based gas turbines. They also have a great potential in the domain of new energy concepts in applications like Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, membranes, and photovoltaic with the adoption of new ways of producing coatings by thermal spray. Such processes include Plasma Spray-Thin Film (PS-TF) which gives the possibility to coat thin and dense layers from splats through a classical thermal spray approach but at high velocities (400-800 m/s) and enthalpy (8000-15000 kJ/kg). Plasma Spray-PVD (PS-PVD) which allows producing thick columnar-structured Thermal Barrier Coatings (100-300 μm) from the vapor phase with the employment of the high enthalpy gun and specific powder feedstock material. On the other hand, the Plasma Spray-CVD (PS-CVD) process uses modified conventional thermal spray components operated below 100 Pa which allows producing CVD-like coatings (<1-10 μm) at higher deposition rates using liquid or gaseous precursors as feedstock material. The advantages of such thermal spray-enhanced CVD processes are the high ionization degree and high throughput for the deposition of thin layers. In this article, we present an overview of the possibilities and limitations encountered while producing thin film coatings using liquid and gaseous precursors with this new type of low pressure plasma spray equipment and point out the challenges faced to obtain efficient injection and mixing of the precursors in the plasma jet. In particular, SiO x thin films from Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO or C6H18OSi2) can be deposited on wafers at deposition rates of up to 35 nm/s at an efficiency of about 50%. The process was also used for producing metal oxide coatings (Al2O3, ZnO, and SnO2) by evaporating different

  16. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 1170 K (1650 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma spray of Nichrome matrix composite contains dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication. Coatings can be applied to bearing journals and bearing bores. Coating was easily machinable and had excellent bond strength on substrate metal.

  17. Life modeling of atmospheric and low pressure plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Argarwal, P.; Duderstadt, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The cycles-to-failure vs cycle duration data for three different thermal barrier coating systems, which consist of atmospheric pressure plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 over similarly deposited or low pressure plasma sprayed Ni-base alloys, are presently analyzed by means of the Miller (1980) oxidation-based life model. Specimens were tested at 1100 C for heating cycle lengths of 1, 6, and 20 h, yielding results supporting the model's value.

  18. Electrocatalytically Active Nickel-Based Electrode Coatings Formed by Atmospheric and Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasibeig, M.; Mousavi, M.; Ben Ettouill, F.; Moreau, C.; Wuthrich, R.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ni-based electrode coatings with enhanced surface areas, for hydrogen production, were developed using atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and suspension plasma spray (SPS) processes. The results revealed a larger electrochemical active surface area for the coatings produced by SPS compared to those produced by APS process. SEM micrographs showed that the surface microstructure of the sample with the largest surface area was composed of a large number of small cauliflower-like aggregates with an average diameter of 10 μm.

  19. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  20. Predicting radiative transport properties of plasma sprayed porous ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. X.; Zhao, C. Y.

    2016-03-01

    The typical yttria-stabilized zirconia material for making the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is intrinsically semitransparent to thermal radiation, and the unique disordered microstructures in TBCs make them surprisingly highly scattering. To quantitatively understand the influence of disordered microstructures, this paper presents a quantitative prediction on the radiative properties, especially the transport scattering coefficient of plasma sprayed TBC based on microstructure analysis and rigorous electromagnetic theory. The impact of the porosity, shape, size, and orientation of different types of voids on transport scattering coefficient is comprehensively investigated under the discrete dipole approximation. An inverse model integrating these factors together is then proposed to quantitatively connect transport scattering coefficient with microstructural information, which is also validated by available experimental data. Afterwards, an optimization procedure is carried out based on this model to obtain the optimal size and orientation distribution of the microscale voids to achieve the maximal radiation insulation performance at different operating temperatures, providing guidelines for practical coating design and fabrication. This work suggests that the current model is effective and also efficient for connecting scattering properties to microstructures and can be implemented as a quantitative tool for further studies like non-destructive infrared imaging as well as micro/nanoscale thermal design of TBCs.

  1. Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings: Influence of Spraying Power on Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, S. M.; Abd, M. Z.; Abd, A. N.

    2010-03-11

    The plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are used on metallic implants to enhance the bonding between the implant and bone in human body. The coating process was implemented at different spraying power for each spraying condition. The coatings formed from a rapid solidification of molten and partly molten particles that impact on the surface of substrate at high velocity and high temperature. The study was concentrated on different spraying power that is between 23 to 31 kW. The effect of different power on the coatings microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase composition was evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coatings surface morphology showed distribution of molten, partially melted particles and some micro-cracks. The produced coatings were found to be porous as observed from the cross-sectional morphology. The coatings XRD results indicated the presence of crystalline phase of HA and each of the patterns was similar to the initial powder. Regardless of different spraying power, all the coatings were having similar XRD patterns.

  2. Optimal Design of Nozzle for Supersonic Atmosphere Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pei; Wei, Zhengying; Zhao, Guangxi; Bai, Y.; Tan, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Through numerical simulation, key issues concerning the plasma jet features as well as the sizes of nozzle for supersonic atmosphere plasma spraying (SAPS) were analyzed in this paper. Numerical results were compared with the experimental measurements and a good agreement has been achieved. Due to the effect of mechanical compression, the increasing sizes of r1, r2, r3 and r4 (r1, r2, r3 and r4 are the sizes of nozzle) lead to a decrease in temperature and velocity of plasma jet. But large size of r5 can increase the external temperature and velocity of plasma jet, which benefit particles accelerating at the far downstream region. A new nozzle was designed based on the simulation results. Compared to the temperature and velocity of plasma jet in the original nozzle, the maximum temperature and velocity of plasma jet in new structure are increased by about 9.8% and 44.5%, which is a benefit to the particles to reach a higher speed and surface temperature.

  3. Optimization of Plasma Spray Process Using Statistical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Huang, X.; Liu, R.; Yang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure features of coatings produced by a plasma spray process are affected significantly by the process parameters such as powder size, spray gun nozzle size, total plasma gas flow, ratio of H2 + N2 over total gas flow, and so on. This article presents a study of the effects of these parameters on the microstructure (porosity, formation of crack, unmelted particle and oxide phase) of NiCrAlY coatings deposited by the Mettech Axial III™ System. A Taguchi array is used to design the spraying process parameters. The results of the microstructure evaluation are used to generate regression equations for the prediction of coating microstructure based on process parameters. The results predicted from the regression equations are in good agreement with the experimental results according to a confidence level of 0.95. Among the parameters examined, the powder size and the ratio of H2 + N2 over total gas flow rate are the most significant parameters affecting the occurrence of crack, porosity, unmelted particle and oxide. Within the range of the designed process parameters, lower powder size and higher ratio of H2 + N2 over total gas flow rate lead to less cracks, pores, unmelted particles but more oxides. Nozzle size has marginal influence on oxides which increase with nozzle size. Gas flow rate has no direct influence on any coating feature evaluated with the range of variation.

  4. Young's Moduli of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pawlik, R.; Loewenthal, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic metallic copper alloy and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold spray (CS) or the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) deposition processes. Dynamic elastic modulus property measurements were conducted on these monolithic coating specimens between 300 K and 1273 K using the impulse excitation technique. The Young's moduli decreased almost linearly with increasing temperature at all temperatures except in the case of the CS Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and VPS NiCrAlY, where deviations from linearity were observed above a critical temperature. It was observed that the Young's moduli for VPS Cu-8%Cr were larger than literature data compiled for Cu. The addition of 1%Al to Cu- 8%Cr significantly increased its Young's modulus by 12 to 17% presumably due to a solid solution effect. Comparisons of the Young s moduli data between two different measurements on the same CS Cu- 23%Cr-5%Al specimen revealed that the values measured in the first run were about 10% higher than those in the second run. It is suggested that this observation is due to annealing of the initial cold work microstructure resulting form the cold spray deposition process.

  5. Recent developments in plasma spray processes for applications in energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Jarligo, M. O.; Marcano, D.; Rezanka, S.; Zhou, D.; Vaßen, R.

    2017-03-01

    This work focuses on recent developments of plasma spray processes with respect to specific demands in energy technology. High Velocity Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (HV-APS) is a novel variant of plasma spraying devoted to materials which are prone to oxidation or decomposition. It is shown how this process can be used for metallic bondcoats in thermal barrier coating systems. Furthermore, Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS) is a new method to process submicron-sized feedstock powders which are not sufficiently flowable to feed them in dry state. SPS is presently promoted by the development of novel torch concepts with axial feedstock injection. An example for a columnar structured double layer thermal barrier coating is given. Finally, Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) is a novel technology operating in controlled atmosphere at low pressure and high plasma power. At such condition, vaporization even of high-melting oxide ceramics is possible enabling the formation of columnar structured, strain tolerant coatings with low thermal conductivity. Applying different conditions, the deposition is still dominated by liquid splats. Such process is termed Low Pressure Plasma Spraying-Thin Film (LPPS-TF). Two examples of applications are gas-tight and highly ionic and electronic conductive electrolyte and membrane layers which were deposited on porous metallic substrates.

  6. Method of forming a plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Spengler, C.J.; Folser, G.R.; Vora, S.D.; Kuo, L.; Richards, V.L.

    1995-06-20

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles doped with an element selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by plasma spraying doped LaCrO{sub 3} powder, preferably compensated with chromium as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and/or dopant element, preferably by plasma arc spraying; and, (C) heating the doped and compensated LaCrO{sub 3} layer to about 1100 C to 1300 C to provide a dense, substantially gas-tight, substantially hydration-free, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell. 6 figs.

  7. Plasma Sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) Coatings for Corrosion Protection and Adhesion Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Groff, G. B.; Rooney, M.; Cooke, A. V.; Boothe, R.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) coatings are being developed under the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program's (SPIP) Bondlines Package. These coatings are designed as a steel case preparation treatment prior to insulation lay-up. Other uses include the exterior of steel cases and bonding surfaces of nozzle components. They provide excellent bondability - rubber insulation and epoxy bonds fail cohesively within the polymer - for both fresh surfaces and surfaces having undergone natural and accelerated environmental aging. They have passed the MSFC requirements for protection of inland and sea coast environment. Because BOSS coatings are inherently corrosion resistant, they do not require preservation by greases or oils. The reduction/elimination of greases and oils, known bondline degraders, can increase SRM reliability, decrease costs by reducing the number of process steps, and decrease environmental pollution by reducing the amount of methyl chloroform used for degreasing and thus reduce release of the ozone-depleting chemical in accordance with the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol. The coatings can potential extend the life of RSRM case segments and nozzle components by eliminating erosion due to multiple grit blasting during each use cycle and corrosion damage during marine recovery. Concurrent work for the Air Force show that other BOSS coatings give excellent bondline strength and durability for high-performance structures of aluminum and titanium.

  8. Method of forming a plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Spengler, Charles J.; Folser, George R.; Vora, Shailesh D.; Kuo, Lewis; Richards, Von L.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by plasma spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 powder, preferably compensated with chromium as Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 and/or dopant element, preferably by plasma arc spraying; and, (C) heating the doped and compensated LaCrO.sub.3 layer to about 1100.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. to provide a dense, substantially gas-tight, substantially hydration-free, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell.

  9. Atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) coatings of Al2O3-TiO2 system for photocatalytic application.

    PubMed

    Stengl, V; Ageorges, H; Ctibor, P; Murafa, N

    2009-05-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the photocatalytic ability of coatings produced by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The plasma gun used is a common gas-stabilized plasma gun (GSP) working with a d.c. current and a mixture of argon and hydrogen as plasma-forming gas. The TiO(2) powders are particles of about 100 nm which were agglomerated to a mean size of about 55 mum, suitable for spraying. Composition of the commercial powder is 13 wt% of TiO(2) in Al(2)O(3), whereas also in-house prepared powder with the same nominal composition but with agglomerated TiO(2) and conventional fused and crushed Al(2)O(3) was sprayed. The feedstock materials used for this purpose are alpha-alumina and anatase titanium dioxide. The coatings are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion probe (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Photocatalytic degradation of acetone is quantified for various coatings. All plasma sprayed coatings show a lamellar structure on cross section, as typical for this process. Anatase titania from feedstock powder is converted into rutile titania and alpha-alumina partly to gamma-alumina. Coatings are proven to catalyse the acetone decomposition when irradiated by UV rays.

  10. Do conventional monitoring practices indicate in situ air sparging performance?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.C.; Johnson, R.L.; Neaville, C.; Hansen, E.E.; Stearns, S.M.; Dortch, I.J.

    1995-12-31

    Short-term pilot tests play a key role in the selection and design of in situ air sparging systems. Most pilot tests are less than 24 h in duration and consist of monitoring changes in dissolved oxygen, water levels in wells, soil gas pressures, and soil gas contaminant concentrations while air is injected into the aquifer. These parameters are assumed to be indicators of air sparging feasibility and performance, and are also used in the design of full-scale systems. In this work the authors assess the validity of this critical assumption. Data are presented from a study site where a typical pilot-scale short-term test was conducted, followed by continued operation of a full-scale system for 110 days. Conventional sampling practices were augmented with more discrete and detailed assessment methods. In addition, a tracer gas was used to better understand air distributions, vapor flow paths, and vapor recovery efficiency. The data illustrate that conclusions regarding the performance and applicability of air sparging at the study site vary significantly depending on the monitoring approach used. There was no clear correlation between short-term pilot-test data and extended system performance when using data collected only from conventional groundwater monitoring wells. Attention is focused on petroleum hydrocarbons.

  11. Splat Morphology and Influence of Feeding Rate During Reactive Plasma Spray of Aluminum Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-12-01

    Fabrication of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings using conventional plasma spraying processes directly has been deemed impossible. It is attributed to the thermal decomposition of the AlN feedstock particles during spraying without a stable melting phase. Using the reactivity of the plasma (reactive plasma spraying: RPS) showed a promising consideration for in situ formation of AlN thermally sprayed coatings. Several AlN-based coatings were fabricated through the RPS of aluminum powders in the N2/H2 plasma. The focus of this study is in discussing the morphology of splat deposition during the nitriding of Al particles. Furthermore, the influence of the feeding rate during the RPS and nitriding of Al powders will be investigated. The nitride content, as well as the unreacted molten Al phase, strongly influences splat deposition and morphology during the RPS of Al. The collected splats can be divided into reacted, partially reacted, and unreacted splats. The reacted splats tend to show a disk or egg-shell shape. The partially reacted mainly had outside nitride shells and an unreacted molten Al part in the center. The unreacted splats tended to show a splash shape. The main controlling factor is the time of the droplet impact on the substrate during the reaction sequence. The particle size and spray distance showed significant effects on the splat formation due to their effect on the nitriding conversion and the melting behavior of the particles during RPS nitriding. The powder feeding rate was investigated through increasing the injection rate and by using a low carrier gas flow rate. Increasing the powder feeding rate significantly improved the coating thickness. However, it suppressed the nitriding conversion of the large Al particles. Thus, with increasing the amount of the powder in the plasma, the Al molten particles are easily aggregated and agglomerate together upon colliding on the substrate with an AlN shell on the surface. This prevents the N2 from having

  12. Assessment of plasma sprayed coatings to modify surface friction for railroad applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Heidi Lynn

    For the past hundred years, railroads have been an important means of transportation for passengers and freight. Over the years train traffic, speeds, and loads have increased steadily leading to a more severe wheel/rail environment that exceeds the design limits of the steels thus causing increased wear, decreased rail life, and higher maintenance costs. The cost of controlling friction and the resulting damage is an area of ever-increasing concern. One potential method of modifying friction is by changing the surface properties of the rail. The work reported herein was carried out as part of a larger effort to modify surface friction of rails. The original focus of this research was to use high velocity air plasma spraying to develop friction enhancing coatings for the rail surface. Using the methodology developed at the Oregon Graduate Institute, the plasma spray parameters were optimized and the coatings were tested on the Amsler machine under rolling/sliding wear conditions to determine viability prior to full scale testing. Stainless steel and composite 1080 steel were investigated as potential materials for increasing friction. Poor results with these coatings shifted the research focus to understanding the durability of the coatings and to failure analysis of initial 1080 steel full scale samples tested by the Facility for Accelerated Service Testing that had failed prematurely. After re-optimization of parameters and preparation methodologies further full scale samples (1080 steel/nylon) were tested and failure analysis was performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of coatings from the tested samples. The laboratory scale Amsler test did not appear to be a good indicator of the performance of the coating in full scale tests, because variations in microstructure were caused by differences in sample size, geometry and spraying methods when scaling up from a small Amsler roller to a large rail sample. The

  13. High Temperature Multilayer Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited Via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan James; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Si-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments to avoid rapid material loss. Candidate EBC materials have use temperatures only marginally above current technology, but the addition of a columnar oxide topcoat can substantially increase the durability. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) allows application of these multilayer EBCs in a single process. The PS-PVD technique is a unique method that combines conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, allowing for tailoring of thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures by varying deposition conditions. Multilayer coatings were deposited on CMC specimens and assessed for durability under high heat flux and load. Coated samples with surface temperatures ranging from 2400-2700F and 10 ksi loads using the high heat flux laser rigs at NASA Glenn. Coating morphology was characterized in the as-sprayed condition and after thermomechanical loading using electron microscopy and the phase structure was tracked using X-ray diffraction.

  14. Characterization of gas tunnel type plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-nanostructure titania composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugeswaran, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Ucisik, A. Hikmet; Subramanian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) can be coated onto metal implants as a ceramic biocompatible coating to bridge the growth between implants and human tissue. Meanwhile many efforts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of the HA coatings without affecting its bioactivity. In the present study, nanostructure titania (TiO2) was mixed with HA powder and HA-nanostructure TiO2 composite coatings were produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying torch under optimized spraying conditions. For this purpose, composition of 10 wt% TiO2 + 90 wt% HA, 20 wt% TiO2 + 80 wt% HA and 30 wt% TiO2 + 70 wt% HA were selected as the feedstock materials. The phase, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings were characterized. The obtained results validated that the increase in weight percentage of nanostructure TiO2 in HA coating significantly increased the microhardness, adhesive strength and wear resistance of the coatings. Analysis of the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were done using conventional simulated body fluid (c-SBF) solution and cultured green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow stromal cells (MSCs) respectively. The bioactivity results revealed that the composite coating has bio-active surface with good cytocompatibility.

  15. Plasma sprayed rutile titania-nanosilver antibacterial coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinjin; Zhao, Chengjian; Zhou, Jingfang; Li, Chunxia; Shao, Yiran; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Yingchun

    2015-11-01

    Rutile titania (TiO2) coatings have superior mechanical properties and excellent stability that make them preferential candidates for various applications. In order to prevent infection arising from bacteria, significant efforts have been focused on antibacterial TiO2 coatings. In the study, titania-nanosilver (TiO2/Ag) coatings with five different kinds of weight percentages of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by plasma spray. The feedstock powders, which had a composition of rutile TiO2 powders containing 1-10,000 ppm AgNPs, were double sintered and deposited on stainless steel substrates with optimized spraying parameters. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to analysize the phase composition and surface morphology of TiO2/Ag powders and coatings. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were employed to examine the antibacterial activity of the as-prepared coatings by bacterial counting method. The results showed that silver existed homogeneously in the TiO2/Ag coatings and no crystalline changed happened in the TiO2 structure. The reduction ratios on the TiO2/Ag coatings with 10 ppm AgNPs were as high as 94.8% and 95.6% for E. coli and S. aureus, respectively, and the TiO2/Ag coatings with 100-1000 ppm AgNPs exhibited 100% bactericidal activity against E. coli and S. aureus, which indicated the TiO2/Ag coatings with more than 10 ppm AgNPs had strong antibacterial activity. Moreover, the main factors influencing the antibacterial properties of TiO2/Ag coatings were discussed with grain size and the content of silver as well as the microstructure of the coatings.

  16. Sintering and Creep Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia and Hafnia Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The sintering and creep of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings under high temperature conditions are complex phenomena. Changes in thermomechanical and thermophysical properties and in the stress response of these coating systems as a result of the sintering and creep processes are detrimental to coating thermal fatigue resistance and performance. In this paper, the sintering characteristics of ZrO2-8wt%y2O3, ZrO2-25wt%CeO2-2.5wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6w%NiO- 9wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6wt%Sc2O3-2wt%y2O3 and HfO2-27wt%y2O3 coating materials were investigated using dilatometry. It was found that the HfO2-Y2O3 and baseline ZrO2-Y2O3 exhibited the best sintering resistance, while the NiO-doped ZrO2-Y2O3 showed the highest shrinkage strain rates during the tests. Higher shrinkage strain rates of the coating materials were also observed when the specimens were tested in Ar+5%H2 as compared to in air. This phenomenon was attributed to an enhanced metal cation interstitial diffusion mechanism under the reducing conditions. It is proposed that increased chemical stability of coating materials will improve the material sintering resistance.

  17. Effect of Sintering on Mechanical and Physical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of sintering on mechanical and physical properties of free-standing plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined by annealing them at 1316 C in air. Mechanical and physical properties of the TBCs, including strength, modes I and II fracture toughness, elastic modulus, Poisson s response, density, microhardness, fractography, and phase stability, were determined at ambient temperature as a function of annealing time ranging from 0 to 500 h. All mechanical and physical properties, except for the amount of monoclinic phase, increased significantly in 5 to 100 h and then reached a plateau above 100 h. Annealing resulted in healing of microcracks and pores and in grain growth, accompanying densification of the TBC s body due to the sintering effect. However, an inevitable adverse effect also occurred such that the desired lower thermal conductivity and good expansivity, which makes the TBCs unique in thermal barrier applications, were degraded upon annealing. A model was proposed to assess and quantify all the property variables in response to annealing in a normalized scheme. Directionality of as-sprayed TBCs appeared to have an insignificant effect on their properties, as determined via fracture toughness, microhardness, and elastic modulus measurements.

  18. Process maps for plasma spray: Part 1: Plasma-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    GILMORE,DELWYN L.; NEISER JR.,RICHARD A.; WAN,YUEPENG; SAMPATH,SANJAY

    2000-01-26

    This is the first paper of a two part series based on an integrated study carried out at Sandia National Laboratories and the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The aim of the study is to develop a more fundamental understanding of plasma-particle interactions, droplet-substrate interactions, deposit formation dynamics and microstructural development as well as final deposit properties. The purpose is to create models that can be used to link processing to performance. Process maps have been developed for air plasma spray of molybdenum. Experimental work was done to investigate the importance of such spray parameters as gun current, auxiliary gas flow, and powder carrier gas flow. In-flight particle diameters, temperatures, and velocities were measured in various areas of the spray plume. Samples were produced for analysis of microstructures and properties. An empirical model was developed, relating the input parameters to the in-flight particle characteristics. Multi-dimensional numerical simulations of the plasma gas flow field and in-flight particles under different operating conditions were also performed. In addition to the parameters which were experimentally investigated, the effect of particle injection velocity was also considered. The simulation results were found to be in good general agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Development and the Implementation of High-Temperature Reliable Heaters in Plasma Spray Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudenziati, Maria

    2008-06-01

    Many problems have been encountered during development of reliable high-temperature heaters by means of atmospheric plasma spray and procedures commonly adopted in thermal spray technology, especially due to poor steel substrate corrosion resistance, notably affected by grit-blasting operations, but also deriving from contamination of insulating layers, dielectric arcs, and failures due to hot spots in the heating elements. While seeking the origin of these problems, a close scrutiny of every single step of the preparation process and analyses of the coatings were carried out using laser confocal scanning microscopy, optical and electronic microscopy, fluorescence analysis, X-ray diffraction, and ancillary techniques. The electrical properties of both alumina layers and metal strips prepared with Ni, NiCr, NiAl commercial powders for the heating elements were studied and cross-related to the failures in the heaters. The article reports the main results of these investigations, delineates the innovations introduced to overcome or circumvent the problems, and underlines the distinct characteristics of new heaters, whose reliability has been proven up to now with temperatures of up to 600 °C in air.

  20. Suspensions Plasma Spraying of Ceramics with Hybrid Water-Stabilized Plasma Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musalek, Radek; Medricky, Jan; Tesar, Tomas; Kotlan, Jiri; Pala, Zdenek; Lukac, Frantisek; Chraska, Tomas; Curry, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Technology of water-stabilized plasma torch was recently substantially updated through introduction of a so-called hybrid concept that combines benefits of water stabilization and gas stabilization principles. The high-enthalpy plasma provided by the WSP-H ("hybrid") torch may be used for thermal spraying of powders as well as liquid feedstocks with high feed rates. In this study, results from three selected experiments with suspension plasma spraying with WSP-H technology are presented. Possibility of deposition of coatings with controlled microstructures was demonstrated for three different ceramics (YSZ—yttria-stabilized zirconia, YAG—yttrium aluminum garnet and Al2O3) introduced into ethanol-based suspensions. Shadowgraphy was used for optimization of suspension injection and visualization of the liquid fragmentation in the plasma jet. Coatings were deposited onto substrates attached to the rotating carousel with integrated temperature monitoring and air cooling, which provided an excellent reproducibility of the deposition process. Deposition of columnar-like YSZ and dense YAG and Al2O3 coatings was successfully achieved. Deposition efficiency reached more than 50%, as evaluated according to EN ISO 17 836 standard.

  1. Plasma sprayed manganese-cobalt spinel coatings: Process sensitivity on phase, electrical and protective performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su Jung; Pala, Zdenek; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel (Mn1.5Co1.5O4, MCO) coatings are prepared by the air plasma spray (APS) process to examine their efficacy in serving as protective coatings from Cr-poisoning of the cathode side in intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). These complex oxides are susceptible to process induced stoichiometric and phase changes which affect their functional performance. To critically examine these effects, MCO coatings are produced with deliberate modifications to the spray process parameters to explore relationship among process conditions, microstructure and functional properties. The resultant interplay among particle thermal and kinetic energies are captured through process maps, which serve to characterize the parametric effects on properties. The results show significant changes to the chemistry and phase composition of the deposited material resulting from preferential evaporation of oxygen. Post deposition annealing recovers oxygen in the coatings and allows partial recovery of the spinel phase, which is confirmed through thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA)/differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements. In addition, coatings with high density after sintering show excellent electrical conductivity of 40 S cm-1 at 800 °C while simultaneously providing requisite protection characteristics against Cr-poisoning. This study provides a framework for optimal evaluation of MCO coatings in intermediate temperature SOFCs.

  2. High-temperature frictional wear behavior of MCrAlY-based coatings deposited by atmosphere plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chong; Wang, Lei; Song, Xiu

    2017-02-01

    Al2O3-Cr2O3/NiCoCrAlYTa coatings were prepared via atmosphere plasma spraying (APS). The microstructure and phase composition of the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser confocal scanning microscopy (LSCM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The dry frictional wear behavior of the coatings at 500°C in static air was investigated and compared with that of 0Cr25Ni20 steel. The results show that the coatings comprise the slatted layers of oxide phases, unmelted particles, and pores. The hot abrasive resistance of the coatings is enhanced compared to that of 0Cr25Ni20, and their mass loss is approximately one-fifteenth that of 0Cr25Ni20 steel. The main wear failure mechanisms of the coatings are abrasive wear, fatigue wear, and adhesive wear.

  3. A sputtered zirconia primer for improved thermal shock resistance of plasma-sprayed ceramic turbine seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Sovey, J.; Allen, G. P.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the application of sputtered Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) primer in plasma-sprayed YSZ ceramic-coated turbine blades results in an improvement, by a factor of 5-6, in the thermal shock life of specimens with a sprayed, porous, Ni-Cr-Al-Y intermediate layer. Species with and without the primer were found to be able to survive 1000 cycles when the intermediate layer was used, but reduced laminar cracking was observed in the specimen with the primer. It is suggested that the sputtered YZS primer-induced properties are due to (1) more effective wetting and adherence of the plasma-sprayed YZS particles to the primer, and (2) the primer's retardation of impinging, molten plasma sprayed particles solidification rates, which result in a less detrimental residual stress distribution.

  4. Morphological Evaluation of Plasma Sprayed Ceramic Coatings using Cavitation Erosion Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Susumu; Tani, Kazumi; Sugasawa, Shinobu; Kawanami, Yasutaka; Namba, Yoshio; Takabatake, Tsuyoshi; Yoshioka, Masaru; Ishihara, Yasuaki

    The microstructure of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings is characterized by the existence of splats along with other morphological features such as interlamellar and globular pores, intrasplat microcracks and splat boundaries. These various process-dependant micro- defects extremely influence physical and mechanical properties such as thermal conductivity and elastic modulus and then influence coating behavior. In this approach, the process involved in the cavitation erosion of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings have been studied using the ultrasonic vibratory technique. The weight loss occurring during fifteen minute intervals of exposure to cavitational erosion was determined, the surface of specimens and the wear debris were examined by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results suggest that the improvement in coating performance could be achieved by controlling the effective contact between lamellae of which the coating is made up using the plasma spray conditions, such as sufficient preheat, short standoff distance and slow gun traversing movement.

  5. Characterisation of the TiO2 coatings deposited by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, M. L.; Benea, L. P.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma spraying of materials such as ceramics and non-metals, which have high melting points, has become a well-established commercial process. Such coatings are increasingly used in aerospace, automobile, textile, medical, printing and electrical industries to impart proprieties such as corrosion resistance, thermal resistance, wear resistance, etc. One of the most important characteristics of thermal barrier coatings is the ability to undergo fast temperature changes without failing, the so called thermal shock resistance. The formation of residual stresses in plasma sprayed ceramic and metallic coatings is a very complex process. Several factors, such as substrate material, substrate thickness, physical properties of both the substrate and the coating material, deposition rate, relative velocity of the plasma torch, etc. determine the final residual stress state of the coating at room temperature. Our objective is to characterize the titanium oxide and aluminium oxide coatings deposited by plasma spraying in structural terms, the resistance to thermal shock and residual stresses.

  6. Efficiency of surface cleaning by a glow discharge for plasma spraying coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Kashapov, N. F.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Fadeev, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of the quality of cleaning steel surfaces by a glow discharge for plasma spraying. Shows the results of measurements of the angle of surface wetting and bond strength of the plasma coating to the surface treated. The dependence of the influence of the glow discharge power, chamber pressure, distance between the electrodes and the processing time of the surface on cleaning efficiency. Optimal fields of factors is found. It is shown increase joint strength coating and base by 30-80% as a result of cleaning the substrate surface by a glow discharge plasma spraying.

  7. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  8. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-09-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  9. Direct morphological comparison of vacuum plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates were produced using two thermal spray techniques vacuum plasma spraying and detonation gun spraying. X-ray diffraction was used to compare crystallinity and residual stresses in the coatings. Porosity was measured using optical microscopy in conjunction with an image analysis system. Scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness measurements were used to characterise the surface morphologies of the coatings. The vacuum plasma sprayed coatings were found to have a lower residual stress, a higher crystallinity and a higher level of porosity than the detonation gun coatings. It is concluded that consideration needs to be given to the significance of such variations within the clinical context.

  10. Vacuum Plasma Spray of CuCrNb Alloy for Advanced Liquid - Fuel Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The copper-8 atomic percent chromium-4 atomic percent niobium (CuCrNb) alloy was developed by Glenn Research Center (formally Lewis Research Center) as an improved alloy for combustion chamber liners. In comparison to NARloy-Z, the baseline (as in Space Shuttle Main Engine) alloy for such liners, CuCrNb demonstrates mechanical and thermophysical properties equivalent to NARloy-Z, but at temperatures 100 C to 150 C (180 F to 270 F) higher. Anticipated materials related benefits include decreasing the thrust cell liner weight 5% to 20%, increasing the service life at least two fold over current combustion chamber design, and increasing the safety margins available to designers. By adding an oxidation and thermal barrier coating to the liner, the combustion chamber can operate at even higher temperatures. For all these benefits, however, this alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods because of the levels of chromium and niobium, which exceed their solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintains the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics is powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form structural articles including small combustion chambers from the CuCrNb alloy. In addition, an oxidation and thermal barrier layer can be formed integrally on the hot wall of the liner that improve performance and extend service life. This paper discusses the metallurgy and thermomechanical properties of VPS formed CuCrNb versus the baseline powder metallurgy process, and the manufacturing of small combustion chamber liners at Marshall Space Flight Center using the VPS process. The benefits to advanced propulsion initiatives of using VPS to fabricate combustion chamber liners

  11. Effects of arc current on the life in burner rig thermal cycling of plasma sprayed ZrOsub2-Ysub2Osub3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; McDonald, G.

    1982-02-01

    An analysis of thermal cycle life data for four sets of eight thermal barrier coated specimens representing arc currents (plasma gun power) of 525, 600, 800, or 950 amps is presented. The ZrO2-8Y2O3/NiCrAlY plasma spray coated Rene 41 rods were thermal cycled to 1040 C in a Mach 0.3-Jet A/air burner flame. The experimental results indicate the existance of a minimum or threshold power level which coating life expectancy is less than 500 cycles. Above the threshold power level, coating life expectancy more than doubles and increases with arc current.

  12. A sputtered zirconia primer for improved thermal shock resistance of plasma sprayed ceramic turbine seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Sovey, J.; Allen, G. P.

    1981-01-01

    The development of plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic turbine blade tip seal components is discussed. The YSZ layers are quite thick (0.040 to 0.090 in.). The service potential of seal components with such thick ceramic layers is cyclic thermal shock limited. The most usual failure mode is ceramic layer delamination at or very near the interface between the plasma sprayed YSZ layer and the NiCrAlY bondcoat. Deposition of a thin RF sputtered YSZ primer to the bondcoat prior to deposition of the thick plasma sprayed YSZ layer was found to reduce laminar cracking in cyclic thermal shock testing. The cyclic thermal shock life of one ceramic seal design was increased by a factor of 5 to 6 when the sputtered YSZ primer was incorporated. A model based on thermal response of plasma sprayed YSZ particles impinging on the bondcoat surface with and without the sputtered YSZ primer provides a basis for understanding the function of the primer.

  13. T55-L-712 turbine engine compressor housing refurbishment-plasma spray project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissler, George W.; Yuhas, John S.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of reclaiming T55-L-712 turbine engine compressor housings with an 88 wt percent aluminum to 12 wt percent silicon alloy applied by a plasma spray process. Tensile strength testing was conducted on as-sprayed and thermally cycled test specimens which were plasma sprayed with 0.020 to 0.100 in. coating thicknesses. Satisfactory tensile strength values were observed in the as-sprayed tensile specimens. There was essentially no decrease in tensile strength after thermally cycling the tensile specimens. Furthermore, compressor housings were plasma sprayed and thermally cycled in a 150-hr engine test and a 200-hr actual flight test during which the turbine engine was operated at a variety of loads, speeds and torques. The plasma sprayed coating system showed no evidence of degradation or delamination from the compressor housings. As a result of these tests, a procedure was designed and developed for the application of an aluminum-silicon alloy in order to reclaim T55-L-712 turbine engine compressor housings.

  14. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  15. Analysis of processes in DC arc plasma torches for spraying that use air as plasma forming gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V.; Ivanov, D.; Toropchin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Developed in Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University technological processes of air-plasma spraying of wear-resistant, regenerating, hardening and decorative coatings used in number of industrial areas are described. The article contains examples of applications of air plasma spraying of coatings as well as results of mathematical modelling of processes in air plasma torches for spraying.

  16. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  17. Relationship Between the Microstructure and Thermal Conductivity of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongzhe; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Xuebin; Zeng, Yi; Ding, Minju; Zhang, Chenggong

    2011-12-01

    Plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings have a complex microstructure consisting of a variety of pores and cracks. These microstructure features which are determined by the spray process are known to influence the thermal conductivity of coatings. In this article, the microstructure features such as total porosity, large pores, and small pores were quantified by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis, and for each spray process, the particle velocity and particle temperature were measured prior to impact onto the substrate using the online monitoring system (Spray Watch 2i). Multiple linear regression was used to find the relationship between the particle state and the spray gun parameters. The linear regression models were also investigated between the particle state and the microstructure features, in addition, between the microstructure features and the thermal conductivity. The comprehensive correlation of spray process-microstructure-thermal conductivity was established for plasma-sprayed ZrO2 coatings.

  18. Improvement of Plasma Spray Torch Stability by Controlling Pressure and Voltage Dynamic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    The development of coating formation processes involving electric arcs depends on process stability and the capacity to ensure a constant reproducibility of coating properties. This is particularly important when considering suspension plasma spraying or solution precursor plasma spraying. Submicron particles closely follow plasma instabilities and have nonhomogeneous plasma treatment. Recently, it has been shown that arc voltage fluctuations in direct-current (dc) plasma torches, showing dominant fluctuation frequencies between 4 and 6 kHz, are linked to pressure oscillations in the cathode cavity of the plasma torch. In this study, first, a method to isolate the different oscillation modes in arc voltage and pressure signals using signal processing methods is presented. Second, correlations between the different modes of oscillations are analyzed following the plasma torch operating parameters. Lastly, it is shown that the use of an acoustic stub, mounted on the torch body, decreases the amplitude of arc voltage fluctuations and slightly increases the mean voltage.

  19. Crack-free surface sealing of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings using an excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia coatings are typically used in the aerospace industry as high-temperature thermal barriers. These coatings are normally applied by plasma thermal spray, which has an inherent problem of producing coatings containing a substantial amount of open or closed porosity. Surface sealing of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings with CO 2 and Nd:YAG lasers is always associated with the problem of cracking on melted layers. Although some attempts such as pre-heating have been used to overcome the problem, formation of cracking is still not prevented, especially in zirconia-based ceramic coatings. The present work investigates an alternative method of surface sealing of plasma sprayed 8 wt.% Y 2O 3-ZrO 2 coatings using an excimer laser. The results show that smooth, crack-free and crater-free sealing can be obtained. Effects of laser operating parameters on the sealing quality and involved mechanism are also discussed.

  20. Effect of laser melting on plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Samant, Anoop; Balani, Kantesh; Dahotre, Narendra B.; Agarwal, Arvind

    2009-03-01

    The effect of laser melting on the microstructure and mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide composite coating reinforced with 4 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reported. Laser-melted layer consists of dense, coarse columnar microstructure which is significantly different from plasma-sprayed coating that consists of splats and porosity. CNTs retained their original cylindrical graphitic structure after undergoing laser irradiation. Three dimensional heat flow model has been developed to estimate temperature variation in the laser-melted composite layer. Laser-melted layers show an increase in the microhardness at the expanse of degradation of fracture toughness. Nanoindentation study indicates an increase in the elastic modulus and yield strength of the laser-melted layer which is attributed to dense microstructure with absence of weak-bonding splats and porosity.

  1. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation is reported of improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for the vane platforms in the JT9d turbofan engine. The program aims for reduced fuel consumption of commercial aircraft engines; the use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application are being evaluated. The initial burner rig tests at temperatures up to 1010 C indicated that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coatings were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 1000-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  2. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to reduce fuel consumption of current commercial aircraft engines, methods were investigated for improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for use on vane platforms in the JT9D turbofan engine. Increased durability concepts under evaluation include use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application. Initial burner rig tests conducted at temperatures of 1010 C (1850 F) indicate that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coating systems were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 100-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  3. Nano-composite Si particle formation by plasma spraying for negative electrode of Li ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambara, M.; Kitayama, A.; Homma, K.; Hideshima, T.; Kaga, M.; Sheem, K.-Y.; Ishida, S.; Yoshida, T.

    2014-04-01

    Nano-composite silicon powders have been produced at a maximum process throughput of 6 g/min by plasma spraying with metallurgical grade silicon powder as raw material. The obtained powders are found to be fundamentally composed of crystalline silicon particles of 20-40 nm in diameter, and are coated with an ˜5-nm-thick amorphous carbonous layer when methane gas is additionally introduced during plasma spraying. The performance of half-cell batteries containing the powders as negative electrodes has shown that the capacity decay observed for the raw Si coarse particles is significantly improved by plasma treatment. The carbonous coating potentially contributes to an improvement in capacity retention, although coexisting SiC particles that inevitably form during high-temperature processing reduce the overall capacity.

  4. Monitoring Delamination of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings by Reflectance-Enhanced Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Highly scattering plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) present a challenge for optical diagnostic methods to monitor TBC delamination because scattering attenuates light transmitted through the TBC and usually degrades contrast between attached and delaminated regions of the TBC. This paper presents a new approach where reflectance-enhanced luminescence from a luminescent sublayer incorporated along the bottom of the TBC is used to identify regions of TBC delamination. Because of the higher survival rate of luminescence reflecting off the back surface of a delaminated TBC, the strong scattering exhibited by plasma-sprayed TBCs actually accentuates contrast between attached and delaminated regions by making it more likely that multiple reflections of luminescence off the back surface occur before exiting the top surface of the TBC. A freestanding coating containing sections designed to model an attached or delaminated TBC was prepared by depositing a luminescent Eu-doped or Er-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent layer below a plasma-sprayed undoped YSZ layer and utilizing a NiCr backing layer to represent an attached substrate. For specimens with a Eu-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer, luminescence intensity maps showed excellent contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections even at a plasma-sprayed overlayer thickness of 300 m. Discernable contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections was not observed for specimens with a Er-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer because luminescence from Er impurities in the undoped YSZ layer overwhelmed luminescence originating form the Er-doped YSZ sublayer.

  5. Performance of Plasma Sprayed Al2O3 Coating in Bio-Simulated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, F.; Yetim, A. F.; Alsaran, A.; Çelik, A.

    2014-01-01

    Alumina coatings deposited on the surface of stainless steel 316L by the method of plasma spraying are studied. Tests for wear and corrosion are preformed in Ringer's solution simulating a human body environment. The structure, microhardness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance of the steel are determined with and without a coating. Deposition of a coating onto the stainless steel is shown to be an effective means for protecting implants from corrosion and wear.

  6. The Effect of Cesium Vapour on the Bulk Conductivity of Plasma - Sprayed Spinel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1995 P. Agnew TOPAZ International Program 901 University Blvd. Albuquerque, NM 87106 USA. 1999021 9 0 4 7 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for Public...these experiments. References ə> P. Agnew and J.L. Ing, "Surface electrical conductivity of single crystal spinel in cesium vapour", TOPAZ ...International Program report, April 1995. ɚ> P. Agnew and J.L. Ing, "The effect of cesium vapour on the bulk conductivity of plasma- sprayed alumina", TOPAZ

  7. Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of free standing, plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings, including strength, fracture toughness, fatigue, constitutive relation, elastic modulus, and directionality, has been determined under various loading-specimen configurations. This report presents and describes a summary of mechanical properties of the plasma-sprayed coating material to provide them as a design database.

  8. dc-plasma-sprayed electronic-tube device

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.

    1982-01-29

    An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by dc plasma arc spraying techniques is described. The process is carried out in a single step automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

  9. Nano Crystalline Ceramic and Ceramic Coatings Made by Conventional and Solution Plasma Spray

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    paper a third method of making TBC’s is presented where the motivation for developing another processing method is to provide an improved combination...of properties compared to current practice. The novel method is based on the injection of liquid chemical precursors into a plasma jet forming a...UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED some cases after reaching the surface. This spray method is identical to APS deposition with the substitution of a solution

  10. Tailored plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings for aircraft gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennisi, F. J.; Gupta, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Eighteen plasma sprayed coating systems, nine based on the NiCoCrAly chemistry and nine based on the CoCrAly composition, were evaluated to identify coating systems which provide equivalent or superior life to that shown by the electron beam physical vapor deposited NiCoCrAly and CoCrAly coatings respectively. NiCoCrAly type coatings were examined on a single crystal alloy and the CoCrAly based coatings were optimized on the B1900+ Hf alloy. Cyclic burner rig oxidation and hot corrosion and tensile ductility tests used to evaluate the various coating candidates. For the single crystal alloy, a low pressure chamber plasma sprayed NiCoCrAly + Si coating exhibited a 2x oxidation life improvement at 1394 K (2050 F) over the vapor deposited NiCoCrAly material while showing equivalent tensile ductility. A silicon modified low pressure chamber plasma sprayed CoCrAly coating was found to be more durable than the baseline vapor deposited CoCrAly coating on the B1900+ Hf alloy.

  11. Influence of Glass Content on Damping Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Mixtures of Zirconia and Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvik, P. J.; Henderson, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    The addition by vacuum infiltration of small quantities of a polymer has been found to increase significantly the ability of a plasma-sprayed coating to dissipate vibratory energy at temperatures in the glassy-rubbery transition range of the polymer. As vitreous enamels and glasses undergo a glassy transition, but at much higher temperatures, the addition of a small amount of glass to a ceramic has the potential of providing high damping at such temperatures. Mixtures of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and a glass frit were plasma sprayed on specimens with bond coats. Measures of system response (resonant frequencies and loss factors) were extracted from frequency responses to excitations of cantilever beam specimens over a range of excitation amplitudes. Comparisons of values determined before and after coating were used to determine the damping properties of the coatings alone as functions of strain, at temperatures of special interest. Emphasis was given to identifying the lowest level of glass giving significantly more damping than that of the plasma-sprayed ceramic alone. Coatings with weight fractions of 5, 2, 1, ½, and 0% glass were tested. The inclusion of glass at all weight fractions considered was found to yield significant increases in both the stiffness and dissipation of the coatings.

  12. Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of High Melting Temperature Complex Perovskites for TBC Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarligo, M. O.; Mack, D. E.; Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.; Stöver, D.

    2010-01-01

    High melting materials have always been very attractive candidates for materials development in thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. Among these materials, complex perovskites with Ba(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3 and La(Al1/4Mg1/2T1/4)O3 compositions have been developed and deposited in TBC systems by atmospheric plasma spraying. Spray parameters were optimized and in-flight particle temperatures were recorded using Accuraspray-g3 and DPV 2000. Plasma sprayed coatings were found to undergo non-stoichiometric decomposition of components which could have contributed to early failure of the coatings. Particle temperature diagnostics suggest that gun power of ~15 kW or lower where majority of the particles have already solidified upon impact to the substrate could probably prevent the decomposition of phases. Additionally, it has been found that the morphology of the powder feedstock plays a critical role during atmospheric plasma spraying of complex perovskites.

  13. The durability of adhesively bonded titanium: Performance of plasma-sprayed polymeric coating pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.; Dillard, J.; Dillard, D.

    1996-12-31

    The role of a surface treatment of an adherend is to promote highly stable adhesive-adherend interactions; high stability is accomplished by making the chemistry of the adherend and adhesive compatible. The common surface preparations used to enhance durability include grit blasting, chromic acid or sodium hydroxide anodization, and other chemical treatments for titanium. As interest has grown in the development of environmentally benign surface treatments, other methods have been explored. In this study, plasma-sprayed polymeric materials have been evaluated as a surface coating pretreatment for adhesively bonding titanium alloy. Polyimide and polyether powders were plasm-sprayed onto grit-blasted titanium-6Al-4V. The alloy was adhesively bonded using a high performance polyimide adhesive. The coating was characterized using surface sensitive analytical measurements. The durability performance of the plasma-sprayed adherends was compared to the performance for chromic acid anodized titanium. Among the plasma-sprayed coatings, a LaRC-TPI polyimide-based coating exhibited performance comparable to that for chromic acid anodized specimens.

  14. Concept for a beryllium divertor with in-situ plasma spray surface regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. F.; Watson, R. D.; McGrath, R. T.; Croessmann, C. D.; Whitley, J. B.; Causey, R. A.

    1990-04-01

    Two serious problems with the use of graphite tiles on the ITER divertor are the limited lifetime due to erosion and the difficulty of replacing broken tiles inside the machine. Beryllium is proposed as an alternative low-Z armor material because the plasma spray process can be used to make in-situ repairs of eroded or damaged surfaces. Recent advances in plasma spray technology have produced beryllium coatings of 98% density with a 95% deposition efficiency and strong adhesion to the substrate. With existing technology, the entire active region of the ITER divertor surface could be coated with 2 mm of beryllium in less than 15 h using four small plasma spray guns. Beryllium also has other potential advantages over graphite, e.g., efficient gettering of oxygen, ten times less tritium inventory, reduced problems of transient fueling from D/T exchange and release, no runaway erosion cascades from self-sputtering, better adhesion of redeposited material, as well as higher strength, ductility, and fracture toughness than graphite. A 2-D finite element stress analysis was performed on a 3 mm thick Be tile brazed to an OFHC soft-copper saddle block, which was brazed to a high-strength copper tube. Peak stresses remained 50% below the ultimate strength for both brazing and in-service thermal stresses.

  15. XPS and bioactivity study of the bisphosphonate pamidronate adsorbed onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Kate; Kumar, Sunil; Smart, Roger St. C.; Dutta, Naba; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Anderson, Gail I.; Sekel, Ron

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate bisphosphonate (BP) adsorption onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings commonly used for orthopaedic implants. BPs exhibit high binding affinity for the calcium present in HA and hence can be adsorbed onto HA-coated implants to exploit their beneficial properties for improved bone growth at the implant interface. A rigorous XPS analysis of pamidronate, a commonly used nitrogenous BP, adsorbed onto plasma sprayed HA-coated cobalt-chromium substrates has been carried out, aimed at: (a) confirming the adsorption of this BP onto HA; (b) studying the BP diffusion profile in the HA coating by employing the technique of XPS depth profiling; (c) confirming the bioactivity of the adsorbed BP. XPS spectra of plasma sprayed HA-coated discs exposed to a 10 mM aqueous BP solution (pamidronate) for periods of 1, 2 and 24 h showed nitrogen and phosphorous photoelectron signals corresponding to the BP, confirming its adsorption onto the HA substrate. XPS depth profiling of the 2 h BP-exposed HA discs showed penetration of the BP into the HA matrix to depths of at least 260 nm. The bioactivity of the adsorbed BP was confirmed by the observed inhibition of osteoclast (bone resorbing) cell activity. In comparison to the HA sample, the HA sample with adsorbed BP exhibited a 25-fold decrease in primary osteoclast cells.

  16. Recent Trends in Newly Developed Plasma-Sprayed and Sintered Coatings for Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bsat, Suzan; Speirs, Andrew; Huang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    The current paper aims to review recent trends (2011 to 2015) in newly developed plasma-sprayed and sintered coatings for implant applications. Recent developments in plasma-sprayed and sintered coatings have focused on improving biological performance, bacterial growth resistance, and mechanical properties, predominantly of HA and glass ceramics. The majority of these improvements are attributed to the addition of dopants. To improve biological performance, trace elements, such as Zn and Mg, both of which are found in bone, were added to replicate the functions they provide for the skeletal system. Though bacterial growth resistance is traditionally improved by Ag dopant, the addition of new dopants such as CeO2 and Zn were explored as well. Great effort has also been made to improve coating adherence and reduce stresses by minimizing coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the coating and substrate through the addition of elements such as Zn and Mg or the inclusion of a buffer layer. For sintering process in particular, there was an emphasis on reducing sintering temperature through modification of 45S5 Bioglass. New plasma spray and sintering technologies aimed at reducing high-temperature exposure are briefly introduced as well. These include microplasma spray and spark plasma sintering.

  17. Broadband Plasma-Sprayed Anti-reflection Coating for Millimeter-Wave Astrophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, O.; Lee, A.; Raum, C.; Suzuki, A.

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a plasma-sprayed anti-reflection (AR) coating technology for millimeter-wave astrophysics experiments with cryogenic optics which achieves minimal dissipative loss and broad bandwidth and is easily and accurately applied. Plasma spraying is a coating process through which melted or heated materials are sprayed onto a substrate. The dielectric constants of the plasma-sprayed coatings were tuned between 2.7 and 7.9 by mixing hollow ceramic microspheres with alumina powder as the base material and varying the plasma energy of the spray. By spraying low loss ceramic materials with a tunable dielectric constant, we can apply multiple layers of AR coating for broadband millimeter-wave detection. At 300 K, we achieved a fractional bandwidth of 106 over 90% transmission using a three-layer AR coating. Applying ceramic coatings on ceramic lenses offers an additional benefit of preventing cryogenic delamination of the coatings. We report on methodology of coating application and measurement of uniformity, repeatability, transmission property, and cryogenic adhesion performance.

  18. Comparison of Physical-chemical and Mechanical Properties of Chlorapatite and Hydroxyapatite Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Demnati, Imane; Grossin, David; Marsan, Olivier; Bertrand, Ghislaine; Collonges, Gérard; Combes, Christèle; Parco, Maria; Braceras, Inigo; Alexis, Joel; Balcaen, Yannick; Rey, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Chlorapatite can be considered a potential biomaterial for orthopaedic applications. Its use as plasma-sprayed coating could be of interest considering its thermal properties and particularly its ability to melt without decomposition unlike hydroxyapatite. Chlorapatite (ClA) was synthesized by a high-temperature ion exchange reaction starting from commercial stoichiometric hydroxyapatites (HA). The ClA powder showed similar characteristics as the original industrial HA powder, and was obtained in the monoclinic form. The HA and ClA powders were plasma-sprayed using a low-energy plasma spraying system with identical processing parameters. The coatings were characterized by physical-chemical methods, i.e. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, including distribution mapping of the main phases detected such as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), oxyapatite (OA), and HA or ClA. The unexpected formation of oxyapatite in ClA coatings was assigned to a side reaction with contaminating oxygenated species (O2, H2O). ClA coatings exhibited characteristics different from HA, showing a lower content of oxyapatite and amorphous phase. Although their adhesion strength was found to be lower than that of HA coatings, their application could be an interesting alternative, offering, in particular, a larger range of spraying conditions without formation of massive impurities. PMID:25893015

  19. Impact of new technology weapons on SAC (Strategic Air Command) conventional air operations. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenheimer, C.E.

    1983-06-01

    Chapter I introduces the issue of conventional-response capability. The point stressed first is that the strategic bomber's primary mission is in support of the single integrated operations plan (SIOP) as a nuclear weapons delivery vehicle. However, as cited by Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger, we must have a rapid deployment conventional capability to areas where there are small if any U.S. forces present. The SAC strategic projection force (SPF) is available but with gravity weapons of World War II vintage. New technology can provide answers to the problem by providing highly accurate long-range conventional standoff weapons. Chapter II gives a basic historical perspective on the use of the strategic bomber in past wars. It discusses the development of strategy, weapons, and targets in World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam War. Chapter III presents a very brief look at current US policy, strategy, and guidance. Chapter IV covers the aircraft attrition issue in today's highly lethal defensive environment. Chapter V describes the development of air-to-ground weapons. Chapter VI addresses the potential for the future in the shifting balance of Soviet and US technology. The final chapter makes the point that a decision must be made on weapons-acquisition programs and bomber force structure. New technology-standoff conventional weapons could make AAA and SAM defenses a modern Maginot Line.

  20. Influence of dopant on the behavior under thermal cycling of two plasma- sprayed zirconia coatings Part 2: residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacha, R.; Fauchais, P.; Nardou, F.

    1997-06-01

    The evolution of coating morphology and surface residual stresses was followed for three different pow-ders: zirconia stabilized with 8 wt% yttria (YSZ), 9.9 wt% dysprosia (DSZ), and 9.8 wt% ytterbia (YbSZ). The YSZ reference powder was fused and crushed (-45 +22 μm), and the other two were agglom-erated and sintered (-90 +10 μm). According to the size distributions and manufacturing process, the plasma-sprayed YSZ particles were fully molten, resulting in dense coatings with good contact between the splats; the DSZ and, especially, the YbSZ particles were partially molten. In general, the surface residual stresses were slightly compressive before thermal cycling. The YSZ and DSZ coatings were insensitive to aging (600 h in air at room temperature), as shown by the surface stress evolution, which was not the case for YbSZ coatings. Six hundred furnace thermal cycles from 1100 °C to room temperature indicated excellent behavior of YSZ and DSZ coatings, with almost no variation of sur-face residual stresses, compared to a high dispersion for YbSZ coatings with the development of macrocracks parallel and perpendicular to the substrate within the coating.

  1. Thermal-Cycling Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Partially Stabilized Zirconia Coatings on High-Density Graphite Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sure, Jagadeesh; Thyagarajan, K.; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-08-01

    The thermal cycling behavior of partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ)-coated by plasma-spray process on NiCrAlY bond-coated high-density (HD) graphite substrate was investigated. Thermal cycling was carried out at 600 and 750 °C under vacuum, up to 200 cycles. Each cycle comprised a 10-min heating followed by forced air cooling for 10 min down to room temperature. Characterization of the microstructure and the phase analysis of thermal-cycled PSZ coatings by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy revealed the correlation between the microstructural/crystallographic phases and the mechanical integrity of the coating up to 200 cycles. Segmented and vertical cracks generated on the coating during thermal cycling were observed to propagate with increase in the number of cycles. Macrocracks and variations in elemental compositions were not observed until 200 cycles at 600 and 750 °C. XRD and Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed the presence of nontransformable tetragonal phase only in all the thermal-cycled PSZ coatings, irrespective of temperature up to 200 cycles.

  2. Thermal barrier coating life and isothermal oxidation of low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J.; Miller, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper investigates the isothermal oxidation kinetics of Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y, Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y, and Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys and examines the effect of these alloys on the thermal barrier coating (TBC) cyclic life. TBC life was examined by cycling substrates coated with the different bond coats and a ZrO2-7 wt pct Y2O3 TBC in an air-rich burner rig flame between 1150 C and room temperature. The oxidation kinetics of the three bond coat alloys was examined by isothermal oxidation of monolithic NJiCrAlY coupons at 1083 C. The Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y alloy exhibits comparatively high isothermal oxidation weight gains and provides the longest TBC life, whereas the Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y alloy had the lowest weight gains and provided the shortest TBC life. The results show that, although bond coat oxidation is known to have a strong detrimental effect on TBC life, it is not the only bond coat factor that determines TBC life.

  3. Mathematical analysis of thermoelastic characteristics in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings.

    PubMed

    Go, Jaegwi; Jungo, Yeon-Gil; Kim, Seokchan; Ali, Md Afsar; Paik, Ungyu

    2012-02-01

    The thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been analyzed using mathematical modeling. Two types of TBC model, cylinder and circular disk which are commercial plasma-sprayed TBCs, subjecting to symmetric temperature distribution to the radial and longitudinal directions, respectively, were taken into consideration. Based on the thermoelastic theories, a second order ordinary differential equation was derived for the cylinder model and a pair of partial differential equations were set up for the circular disk model. The analytic solution was obtained from the ordinary differential equation, while a finite volume method was developed for numerical solutions to the pair of partial differential equations due to the complexity of governing equations. The thermoelastic characteristics of TBC models, such as temperature distributions, displacements, and stresses, were displayed according to the obtained solutions. The rate of heat conduction in the section of the top coat is relatively slow in comparison with the substrate, and no profound difference appears in the temperature distribution between two TBC models. The highest longitudinal tensile stress is expressed at the bond coat of both models, and the substrate is under the compressive stresses to the circumferential direction. While the cylinder expands to the positive longitudinal direction only, the expansion in the circular disk occurs to both the positive and negative longitudinal directions. Relatively large displacement and stresses exhibit in the cylinder as compared with the circular disk. In the circular disk, the stresses to the radial direction undulate at each section, and the displacement profile displays that the width of the circular disk is slightly narrowed. The results demonstrate that the mechanical and thermal properties of the top and bond coats are the crucial factors to be considered in controlling the thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed

  4. Phase stability and biological property evaluation of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopedic and dental applications.

    PubMed

    Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2015-04-01

    In this work we have investigated the effects of strontium (Sr) dopant on in vitro protein release kinetics and in vivo osteogenic properties of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings, along with their dissolution behavior. Plasma sprayed HA coatings are widely used in load-bearing implants. Apart from osseointegration, the new generation of HA coating is expected to deliver biomolecules and/or drugs that can induce osteoinduction. This paper reports the preparation of crystalline and amorphous HA coatings on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma spray, and their stability at different solution pH. Coatings prepared at 110 mm working distance from the nozzle showed an average Ca ion release of 18 and 90 ppm in neutral and acidic environments, respectively. Decreasing the working distance to 90 mm resulted in the formation of a coating with less crystalline HA and phases with higher solubility products, and consequently higher dissolution over 32 days. A 92% release of a model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) in phosphate buffer with pH of 7.4 was measured for Sr-doped HA (Sr-HA) coating, while only a 72% release could be measured for pure HA coating. Distortion of BSA during adsorption on coatings revealed a strong interaction between the protein and the coating, with an increase in α-helix content. Osteoid formation was found on Sr-HA implants as early as 7 weeks post implantation compared to HA coated and uncoated Ti implants. After 12 weeks post implantation, osteoid new bone was formed on HA implants; whereas, bone mineralization started on Sr-HA samples. While no osteoid was formed on bare Ti surfaces, bone was completely mineralized on HA and Sr-HA coatings after 16 weeks post implantation. Our results show that both phase stability and chemistry can have a significant influence toward in vitro and in vivo response of HA coatings on Ti implants.

  5. Plasma-sprayed zirconia gas path seal technology: A state-of-the-art review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The benefits derived from application of ceramic materials to high pressure turbine gas path seal components are described and the developmental backgrounds of various approaches are reviewed. The most fully developed approaches are those employing plasma sprayed zirconium oxide as the ceramic material. Prevention of cracking and spalling of the zirconium oxide under cyclic thermal shock conditions imposed by the engine operating cycle is the most immediate problem to be solved before implementation is undertaken. Three promising approaches to improving cyclic thermal shock resistance are described and comparative rig performance of each are reviewed. Advanced concepts showing potential for performance improvements are described.

  6. Structure and Properties of Modified Plasma-Sprayed Composite Coatings on a Titanium Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'tseva, S. V.; Mel'nikova, I. P.; Lyasnikova, A. V.; Zaharevich, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The structure and properties of hydroxyapatite (HA) plasma-sprayed coatings modified by Al2O3 and AlOOH nanoparticles have been investigated using different methods. It is found that the impregnation of HA particles before forming the coating ensures their most uniform distribution in the coating and increases its adhesion to 17.6 MPa. Agglomeration and milling of the powder mixture before spraying contribute to the formation of a uniform porous structure of the coating and a developed surface morphology with an increased adhesion from 10.4 to 17.8 MPa.

  7. Preparation of YBa2Cu3O7 High Tc Superconducting Coatings by Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danroc, J.; Lacombe, J.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * THE COMPOUND YBa2Cu3O7-δ * Structure * Critical temperature * Critical current density * Phase equilibria in the YBaCuO system * PREPARATION OF YBa2Cu3O7 COATINGS * General organisation of the preparation process * The powder * Hot plasma spraying of YBa2Cu3O7 * The post-spraying thermal treatment * CHARACTERISTICS OF THE YBa2Cu3O7-δ COATINGS * Chemical composition * Crystalline structure * Morphology of the coatings * Electrical and magnetic characteristics * Conclusion * REFERENCES

  8. Deposition of Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (LSCF) Using Suspension Plasma Spraying for Oxygen Transport Membrane Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, E. S. C.; Kesler, O.

    2015-08-01

    Suspension plasma spray deposition was utilized to fabricate dense lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite oxygen separation membranes (OSMs) on porous metal substrates for mechanical support. The as-sprayed membranes had negligible and/or reversible material decomposition. At the longer stand-off distance (80 mm), smooth and dense membranes could be manufactured using a plasma with power below approximately 81 kW. Moreover, a membrane of 55 μm was observed to have very low gas leakage rates desirable for OSM applications. This thickness could potentially be decreased further to improve oxygen diffusion by using metal substrates with finer surface pores.

  9. Physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepeshev, A. A.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Karpov, I. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Fedorov, L. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    The physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of quasicrystalline coatings based on the Al65Cu23Fe12 alloy prepared by plasma spraying have been investigated. The specific features of the phase formation due to the competitive interactions of the icosahedral ψ and cubic β phases have been elucidated. A correlation between the microhardness and the content of the icosahedral phase in the coating has been determined. The decisive role of the quasicrystalline phase in the formation of high tribological characteristics of the coatings has been revealed and tested.

  10. Process, properties, and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  11. Process, properties and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  12. The use of a macroscopic formulation describing the effects of dynamic compaction and porosity on plasma sprayed copper

    SciTech Connect

    Arrigoni, M.; Boustie, M.; Bolis, C.; Berthe, L.; Barradas, S.; Jeandin, M.

    2008-04-15

    Coatings processed by thermal deposition techniques involve porosity. The Laser adhesion test developed for testing bond strength of a coating on its substrate requires a good knowledge of shock wave propagation in such media. Experiments carried out on plasma sprayed copper samples, about 14% porous, with velocity interferometer system for any reflector measurements display the discrepancy of previously used models. Hence, a one-dimensional formulation of the compaction process, based on a simple P-{alpha} model, is proposed to improve the correlation between experimental and computed data signals obtained on a plasma sprayed copper under dynamic loading. Besides, this improvement allows the estimation of the bond strength of a plasma sprayed copper on aluminum substrate.

  13. Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxylapatite-Based Coatings: Chemical, Mechanical, Microstructural, and Biomedical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Robert B.

    2016-06-01

    This contribution discusses salient properties and functions of hydroxylapatite (HA)-based plasma-sprayed coatings, including the effect on biomedical efficacy of coating thickness, phase composition and distribution, amorphicity and crystallinity, porosity and surface roughness, cohesion and adhesion, micro- and nano-structured surface morphology, and residual coating stresses. In addition, it will provide details of the thermal alteration that HA particles undergo in the extremely hot plasma jet that leads to dehydroxylated phases such as oxyhydroxylapatite (OHA) and oxyapatite (OA) as well as thermal decomposition products such as tri-(TCP) and tetracalcium phosphates (TTCP), and quenched phases such as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). The contribution will further explain the role of ACP during the in vitro interaction of the as-deposited coatings with simulated body fluid resembling the composition of extracellular fluid (ECF) as well as the in vivo responses of coatings to the ECF and the host tissue, respectively. Finally, it will briefly describe performance profiles required to fulfill biological functions of osteoconductive bioceramic coatings designed to improve osseointegration of hip endoprostheses and dental root implants. In large parts, the content of this contribution is a targeted review of work done by the author and his students and coworkers over the last two decades. In addition, it is considered a stepping stone toward a standard operation procedure aimed at depositing plasma-sprayed bioceramic implant coatings with optimum properties.

  14. Neutron and X-ray diffraction of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Herman, H.; Singhal, S. P.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    ZrO2-7.8mol. pct. YO1.5, a fused powder, and ZrO2-8.7mol. pct. YO1.5, a prereacted powder, were plasma-sprayed onto steel substrates. Neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction of the as-received powder, the powder plasma sprayed into water, as-sprayed coatings, and coatings heat-treated for 10 and 100 h were carried out to study phase transformations and ordering of the oxygen ions on the oxygen sublattice. The as-received fused powder has a much lower monoclinic percentage than does the pre-reacted powder, this resulting in a much lower monoclinic percentage in the coating. Heat treatment increases the percentages of the cubic and monoclinic phases, while decreasing the tetragonal content. An ordered tetragonal phase is detected by the presence of extra neutron diffraction peaks. These phase transformations and ordering will result in volume changes. The implications of these transformations on the performance of partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings is discussed.

  15. Characteristics of a Plasma Torch Designed for Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Yang, De Ming; Gao, Jianyi

    2012-06-01

    Unlike atmosphere plasma spraying (APS), very low pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) can only weakly heat the feed materials at the plasma-free region exit of the nozzle. Most current VLPPS methods have adopted a high power plasma gun, which operates at high arc currents up to 2500 A to remedy the lower heating ability, causing a series of problems for both the plasma torch and the associated facility. According to the Kundsen number and pressures distribution inside of the nozzle in a low-pressure environment, a plasma torch was designed with a separated anode and nozzle, and with the powder feed to the plasma jets inside the nozzle intake. In this study, the pressures in the plasma gas intake, in the nozzle intake and outside the plasma torch were measured using an enthalpy probe. For practice, SUS 316 stainless steel coatings were prepared at the plasma currents of 500-600 A, an arc voltage of 50 V and a chamber pressure of 1000 Pa; the results indicated that coatings with an equiaxed microstructure could be deposited in proper conditions.

  16. Plasma Spray Synthesis Of Nanostructured V2O5 Films For Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Jagjit

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time, the synthesis of nanostructured vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) films and coatings using plasma spray technique. V2O5 has been used in several applications such as catalysts, super-capacitors and also as an electrode material in lithium ion batteries. In the present studies, V2O5 films were synthesized using liquid precursors (vanadium oxychloride and ammonium metavanadate) and powder suspension. In our approach, the precursors were atomized and injected radially into the plasma gun for deposition on the substrates. During the flight towards the substrate, the high temperature of the plasma plume pyrolyzes the precursor particles resulting into the desired film coatings. These coatings were then characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Among the precursors, vanadium oxychloride gave the best results in terms of nanocrystalline and monophasic films. Spraying of commercial powder suspension yielded multi-phasic mixture in the films. Our approach enables deposition of large area coatings of high quality nanocrystalline films of V2O5 with controllable particle morphology. This has been optimized by means of control over precursor composition and plasma spray conditions. Initial electrochemical studies of V2O5 film electrodes show potential for energy storage studies.

  17. Effect of aluminum phosphate additions on composition of three-component plasma-sprayed solid lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, T. P.; Young, S. G.

    1982-01-01

    Image analysis (IA) and electron microprobe X-ray analysis (EMXA) were used to characterize a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating coating, NASA LUBE PS106, specified by weight percent as 35NiCr-35Ag-30CaF2. To minimize segregation of the powder mixture during the plasma-spraying procedure, monoaluminum phosphate was added to form agglomerate particles. Three concentrations of AlPO4 were added to the mixtures: 1.25, 2.5, and 6.25 percent by weight. Analysis showed that 1.25 wt% AlPO4 yielded a CaF2 deficiency, 2.5 wt% kept the coating closest to specification, and 6.25 wt% yielded excess CaF2 as well as more impurities and voids and a deficiency in silver. Photomicrographs and X-ray maps are presented. The methods of IA and EMXA complement each other, and the reasonable agreement in the results increases the confidence in determining the coating composition.

  18. Effect of Solid Shield on Coating Properties in Atmospheric Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Zheng, Lili; Zhang, Hui

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the impact of shrouded shield structure on plasma spray processes and the selection of optimal shield structure. Response of plasma flame characteristics to solid shield structures is studied first, and experimental investigations are then performed for both atmospheric (APS) and shrouded (SPS) plasma spray processes. It is found that the usage of conical shield (divergence angle 5.5°) with 90 mm in length is effective to form a low-oxygen (<2%) and high-temperature (>3000 K) region in the plasma flame and this region can cover the majority area for particles passing by. The average particle temperature is higher in SPS than in APS with the given conditions, and such behavior is intensified as solid shield length increases. Using the SPS process, more disk-shaped splats are obtained, and the oxygen concentration in coating is significantly reduced. The degree of the oxidation in the coatings is further reduced as the length of the solid shield increases from 50 to 90 mm. Applying solid shield will lead to high flame temperature and low oxidation; however, the substrate overheating and velocity reduction may occur. For the cases studied, the optimal shield length is around 90 mm.

  19. Spinel Oxides Growing on Fe—Cr Alloy Particles During Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweiss, O.; Dubský, J.; Voleník, K.; Had, J.; Leitner, J.; Seberíni, M.

    2001-07-01

    Oxidation reactions during plasma spraying of metallic powders give rise to oxide crusts on powder particle surfaces. The first oxidation stage occurs in flight of molten particles. It is usually followed by the second stage after hitting a substrate. To investigate the oxidation products immediately after the first stage, abrupt stopping of in-flight oxidation is possible by trapping and quenching the flying particles in liquid nitrogen. In oxide crusts on plasma sprayed and liquid nitrogen quenched particles of a Fe-12%Cr alloy, two spinel oxides were indicated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Both are solid solutions of the type Fe3O4 - Cr3O4 (i.e., Fe3- x Cr x O4, 0 ≤ x ≤ 3). One of the oxides, tetragonally distorted spinel, is characterized by the mean value of x ≈ 2.3. It is only stable at very high temperatures. The other spinel oxide is cubic with x slightly lower than 2, i.e. almost stoichiometric chromite FeCr2O4. From thermodynamic considerations it follows that in the Fe3O4 - Cr3O4 system there is no miscibility gap at high temperatures. The simultaneous existence of both oxides is probably due to non-equilibrium conditions during liquid nitrogen quenching of trapped particles.

  20. Evaluation of hot corrosion of 8YSZ coatings elaborated by suspension plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Hernández, A. G.; Ageorges, H.; López-Gómez, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the evaluation microscopic of hot corrosion of 8mol% Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (8YSZ) coatings was studied in the presence of V2O5 and Na2SO4 as corrosive molten salt, for 40h at 1050°C. First, the substrates of Inconel 718 super-alloy were sprayed with a NiCrCoAl-Y2O3 bond coat by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). Then this bond coat was polished for elaborated the 8YSZ layer by suspension plasma spraying (SPS). The microstructure of the cross-section and surface of the coating was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After the hot corrosion test, the delamination of 8YSZ coatings was occurred in the ceramic layer due to the creation of stress resulting from the chemical reaction between the molten salts and the yttria (Y2O3) of 8YSZ coating at high temperature. According to EDS-SEM analysis, the evaluation of fractured sections of 8YSZ coating showed mainly the formation of crystals composed by Y, V, O and the surface was mainly composed by Zr and O. Those crystals can be related with the tetragonal phase of YVO4, which they were commonly found by other researchers in studies of hot corrosion of YSZ-based TBCs when its surface reacts with the corrosive salts.

  1. Tailoring the heat transfer on the injection moulding cavity by plasma sprayed ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Hopmann, Ch; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.; Alkhasli, I.; Dornebusch, H.; Schmitz, M.

    2017-03-01

    Inhomogeneous material shrinkage in injection moulding can cause warpage in thermoplastic components. To minimise the deformations of the injection moulding parts, the heat transfer during the cooling phase can be adjusted according to the local cooling demand on the surface of the mould cavity by means of plasma sprayed coatings with locally variable thermal resistance over the surface of the mould. Thermal resistance is a function of thermal conductivity and thickness of the coatings, where thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings can be adjusted by altering the chemical composition and the microstructure, which is depending on the thickness. This work evaluates the application of plasma sprayed coatings with variable thickness as thermal barrier coatings in the mould cavity. The thermal resistance of the coating and thereby the heat transfer from the melt into the mould will be influenced locally by varying the coating thickness over the cavity area according to the local cooling demand. Using the laser flash method, the thermal conduction of coatings with different thicknesses will be determined. On the basis of the experimentally determined thermal conduction, the effect of the coatings on the temperature field of the mould cavity will be numerically calculated and the required thickness distribution of the coating for an optimal temperature gradient will be determined.

  2. Nano Structured Plasma Spray Coating for Wear and High Temperature Corrosion Resistance Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Shukla, A. K.; Roy, H.

    2014-04-01

    The nano structured coating is a major challenge today to improve the different mechanical properties, wear and high temperature corrosion resistance behaviour of different industrial alloys. This paper is a review on synthesis of nano powder, plasma spraying methods, techniques of nano structured coating by plasma spray method, mechanical properties, tribological properties and high temperature corrosion behaviour of nano structured coating. Nano structured coatings of ceramic powders/composites are being developed for wide variety of applications like boiler, turbine and aerospace industries, which requires the resistance against wear, corrosion, erosion etc. The nano sized powders are subjected to agglomeration by spray drying, after which nano structured coating can be successfully applied over the substrate. Nano structured coating shows improved mechanical wear resistance and high temperature corrosion resistance. The significant improvement of wear and corrosion resistance is mainly attributed to formation of semi molten nano zones in case of nano structured coatings. The future scope of application of nano structured coating has also been highlighted in this paper.

  3. Flow characteristic of in-flight particles in supersonic plasma spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pei; Wei, Zhengying; Zhao, Guangxi; Du, Jun; Bai, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a computational model based on supersonic plasma spraying (SAPS) is developed to describe the plasma jet coupled with the injection of carrier gas and particles for SAPS. Based on a high-efficiency supersonic spraying gun, the 3D computational model of spraying gun was built to study the features of plasma jet and its interactions with the sprayed particles. Further the velocity and temperature of in-flight particles were measured by Spray Watch 2i, the shape of in-flight particles was observed by scanning electron microscope. Numerical results were compared with the experimental measurements and a good agreement has been achieved. The flight process of particles in plasma jet consists of three stages: accelerated stage, constant speed stage and decelerated stage. Numerical and experimental indicates that the H2 volume fraction in mixture gas of Ar + H2 should keep in the range of 23-26 %, and the distance of 100 mm is the optimal spraying distance in Supersonic atmosphere plasma spraying. Particles were melted and broken into small child particles by plasma jet and the diameters of most child particles were less than 30 μm. In general, increasing the particles impacting velocity and surface temperature can decrease the coating porosity.

  4. Sintering and Interface Strain Tolerance of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Leissler, George W.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot section SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. A coating system consisting of a zirconia-based oxide topcoat (thermal barrier) and a mullite/BSAS silicate inner coat (environmental barrier) is often considered a model system for the CMC applications. However, the coating sintering, and thermal expansion mismatch between the zirconia oxide layer and the silicate environmental barrier/CMC substrate will be of major concern at high temperature and under thermal cycling conditions. In this study, the sintering behavior of plasma-sprayed freestanding zirconia-yttria-based thermal barrier coatings and mullite (and/or barium-strontium-aluminosilicate, i.e., BSAS) environmental barrier coatings was determined using a dilatometer in the temperature range of 1200-1500 C. The effects of test temperature on the coating sintering kinetics were systematically investigated. The plasma-sprayed zirconia-8wt.%yttria and mullite (BSAS) two-layer composite coating systems were also prepared to quantitatively evaluate the interface strain tolerance of the coating system under thermal cycling conditions based on the dilatomentry. The cyclic response of the coating strain tolerance behavior and interface degradation as a function of cycle number will also be discussed.

  5. Tribological Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed CoNiCrAlY-BN Abradable Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irissou, E.; Dadouche, A.; Lima, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    The processing conditions, microstructural and tribological characterizations of plasma-sprayed CoNiCrAlY-BN high temperature abradable coatings are reported in this manuscript. Plasma spray torch parameters were varied to produce a set of abradable coatings exhibiting a broad range of porosity levels (34-62%) and superficial Rockwell hardness values (0-78 HR15Y). Abradability tests have been performed using an abradable-seal test rig, capable of simulating operational wear at different rotor speeds and seal incursion rates (SIRs). These tests allowed determining the rubbing forces and quantifying the blade and seal wear characteristics for slow and fast SIRs. Erosion wear performance and ASTM C633 coating adhesion strength test results are also reported. For optimal abradability performance, it is shown that coating hardness needs to be lower than 70 and 50 HR15Y for slow and fast blade incursion rate conditions, respectively. It is shown that the erosion wear performance, as well as, the coating cohesive strength is a function of the coating hardness. The current results allow defining the coating specifications in terms of hardness and porosity for targeted applications.

  6. Effect of Powder Injection on the Interfacial Fracture Toughness of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okajima, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay

    2013-03-01

    Adhesive strength of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating is one of the most important parameters which influence their durability and reliability during service. While many methods exist to measure the adhesive strength, in general, they require cumbersome and time-consuming specimen preparation. Furthermore, considerations of the adhesion strength from the point-of-view of fracture toughness or for that matter, their systematic correlation to both processing variances are limited. Consequently, there is an opportunity to both simplify the measurement procedure and establish correlations among methods and linkages between processing parameters and interfacial fracture toughness. In this paper, we report results on adhesion strength of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating on aluminum substrates based on both interfacial indentation test (to measure interfacial fracture toughness) and the modified tensile adhesive test. Carrier gas flow for powder injection into the plasma torch was systematically varied to introduce variances in particle melting with concomitant impact on the measured adhesive strength. The results indicate the correlation between the particle melting index and the measured interfacial fracture toughness.

  7. Fabrication and Wear Behavior of Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed 6061Al-SiCp Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailor, Satish; Mohanty, R. M.; Sharma, V. K.; Soni, P. R.

    2014-10-01

    6061Al powder with 15 wt.% SiC particulate (SiCp) reinforcement was mechanically alloyed (MA) in a high-energy attrition mill. The MA powder was then plasma sprayed onto weathering steel (Cor-Ten A242) substrate using an atmospheric plasma spray process. Results of particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy show that the addition of SiC particles as the reinforcement influences on the matrix grain size and morphology. XRD studies revealed embedment of SiCp in the MA-processed composite powder, and nanocrystals in the MA powder and the coating. Microstructural studies showed a uniform distribution of reinforced SiC particles in the coating. The porosity level in the coating was as low as 2% while the coating hardness was increased to 232VHN. The adhesion strength of the coatings was high and this was attributed to higher degree of diffusion at the interface. The wear rate in the coatings was evaluated using a pin-on-disk type tribometer and found to decrease by 50% compared to the 6061Al matrix coating. The wear mechanism in the coating was delamination and oxidative type.

  8. Electrochemical Impedance Studies on Tribocorrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Al2O3 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe; Chu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueguang; Dong, Yanchun; Yang, Yong; Li, Yingzhen; Yan, Dianran

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the tribocorrosion of plasma-sprayed Al2O3 coatings in simulated seawater was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique, complemented by scanning electron microscopy to observe the morphology of the tribocorrosion attack. Base on EIS of plasma-sprayed Al2O3 coatings undergoing long-time immersion in simulated seawater, the corrosion process of Al2O3 coatings can be divided into the earlier stage of immersion (up to 20 h) and the later stage (beyond 20 h). Then, the wear tests were carried out on the surface of Al2O3 coating undergoing different times of immersion to investigate the influence of wear on corrosion at different stages. The coexistence of wear and corrosion condition had been created by a boron nitride grinding head rotating on the surface of coatings corroded in simulated seawater. The measured EIS and the values of the fitting circuit elements showed that wear accelerated corrosion at the later stage, meanwhile, corrosion accelerated wear with the immersion time increasing.

  9. Characterization of Microstructure and Thermal Properties of YSZ Coatings Obtained by Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying (ASPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per

    2015-10-01

    The paper aims at demonstrating various microstructures which can be obtained using the suspension spraying technique and their respective significance in enhancing the thermal insulation property of a thermal barrier coating. Three different types of coating microstructures are discussed which were produced by the Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying. Detailed characterization of coatings was then performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were utilized for microstructure evaluations; x-ray diffraction for phase analysis; water impregnation, image analysis, and mercury intrusion porosimetry for porosity analysis, and laser flash analysis for thermal diffusivity measurements were used. The results showed that Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying can generate vertically cracked, porous, and feathery columnar-type microstructures. Pore size distribution was found in micron, submicron, and nanometer range. Higher overall porosity, the lower density of vertical cracks or inter-column spacing, and higher inter-pass porosity favored thermal insulation property of the coating. Significant increase in thermal diffusivity and conductivity was found at higher temperature, which is believed to be due to the pore rearrangement (sintering and pore coarsening). Thermal conductivity values for these coatings were also compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) thermal barrier coatings from the literature and found to be much lower.

  10. Development of a plasma sprayed ceramic gas path seal for high pressure turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.

    1977-01-01

    The plasma sprayed graded layered yittria stabilized zirconia (ZrO2)/metal(CoCrAlY) seal system for gas turbine blade tip applications up to 1589 K (2400 F) seal temperatures was studied. Abradability, erosion, and thermal fatigue characteristics of the graded layered system were evaluated by rig tests. Satisfactory abradability and erosion resistance was demonstrated. Encouraging thermal fatigue tolerance was shown. Initial properties for the plasma sprayed materials in the graded, layered seal system was obtained, and thermal stress analyses were performed. Sprayed residual stresses were determined. Thermal stability of the sprayed layer materials was evaluated at estimated maximum operating temperatures in each layer. Anisotropic behavior in the layer thickness direction was demonstrated by all layers. Residual stresses and thermal stability effects were not included in the analyses. Analytical results correlated reasonably well with results of the thermal fatigue tests. Analytical application of the seal system to a typical gas turbine engine application predicted performance similar to rig specimen thermal fatigue performance. A model for predicting crack propagation in the sprayed ZrO2/CoCrAlY seal system was proposed, and recommendations for improving thermal fatigue resistance were made. Seal system layer thicknesses were analytically optimized to minimize thermal stresses in the abradability specimen during thermal fatigue testing. Rig tests on the optimized seal configuration demonstrated some improvement in thermal fatigue characteristics.

  11. Development of a plasma sprayed ceramic gas path seal for high pressure turbine application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the plasma sprayed graded, layered ZRO2/CoCrAlY seal system for gas turbine engine blade tip seal applications up to 1589 K (2400 F) surface temperature was continued. The effect of changing ZRO2/CoCrAlY ratios in the intermediate layers on thermal stresses was evaluated analytically with the goal of identifying the materials combinations which would minimize thermal stresses in the seal system. Three methods of inducing compressive residual stresses in the sprayed seal materials to offset tensile thermal stresses were analyzed. The most promising method, thermal prestraining, was selected based upon potential, feasibility and complexity considerations. The plasma spray equipment was modified to heat, control and monitor the substrate temperature during spraying. Specimens were fabricated and experimentally evaluated to: (1) substantiate the capability of the thermal prestrain method to develop compressive residual stresses in the sprayed structure and (2) define the effect of spraying on a heated substate on abradability, erosion and thermal shock characteristics of the seal system. Thermal stress analysis, including residual stresses and material properties variations, was performed and correlated with thermal shock test results. Seal system performance was assessed and recommendations for further development were made.

  12. Columnar-Structured Mg-Al-Spinel Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, N.; Ebert, S.; Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2015-01-01

    The suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process has been developed to permit the feeding of sub-micrometer-sized powder into the plasma plume. In contrast to electron beam-physical vapor deposition and plasma spray-physical vapor deposition, SPS enables the cost-efficient deposition of columnar-structured coatings. Due to their strain tolerance, these coatings play an important role in the field of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In addition to the cost-efficient process, attention was turned to the TBC material. Nowadays, yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is used as standard TBC material. However, its long-term application at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is problematic. At these high temperatures, phase transitions and sintering effects lead to the degradation of the TBC system. To overcome those deficits of YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel was chosen as TBC material. Even though it has a lower melting point (~2135 °C) and a higher thermal conductivity (~2.5 W/m/K) than YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel provides phase stability at high temperatures in contrast to YSZ. The Mg-Al-spinel deposition by SPS resulted in columnar-structured coatings, which have been tested for their thermal cycling lifetime. Furthermore, the influence of substrate cooling during the spraying process on thermal cycling behavior, phase composition, and stoichiometry of the Mg-Al-spinel has been investigated.

  13. Method of forming a leak proof plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Vora, Shailesh D.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by: (A) providing an electrode structure; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, an interconnection layer having the general formula La.sub.1-x M.sub.x Cr.sub.1-y N.sub.y O.sub.3, where M is a dopant selected from the group of Ca, Sr, Ba, and mixtures thereof, and where N is a dopant selected from the group of Mg, Co, Ni, Al, and mixtures thereof, and where x and y are each independently about 0.075-0.25, by thermally spraying, preferably plasma arc spraying, a flux added interconnection spray powder, preferably agglomerated, the flux added powder comprising flux particles, preferably including dopant, preferably (CaO).sub.12. (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3).sub.7 flux particles including Ca and Al dopant, and LaCrO.sub.3 interconnection particles, preferably undoped LaCrO.sub.3, to form a dense and substantially gas-tight interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure by a single plasma spraying step; and, (C) heat treating the interconnection layer at from about 1200.degree. to 1350.degree. C. to further densify and heal the micro-cracks and macro-cracks of the thermally sprayed interconnection layer. The result is a substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure. The electrode structure can be an air electrode, and a solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and further a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell for generation of electrical power.

  14. Method of forming a leak proof plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Vora, S.D.

    1995-02-21

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by: (A) providing an electrode structure; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, an interconnection layer having the general formula La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Cr{sub 1{minus}y}N{sub y}O{sub 3}, where M is a dopant selected from the group of Ca, Sr, Ba, and mixtures thereof, and where N is a dopant selected from the group of Mg, Co, Ni, Al, and mixtures thereof, and where x and y are each independently about 0.075--0.25, by thermally spraying, preferably plasma arc spraying, a flux added interconnection spray powder, preferably agglomerated, the flux added powder comprising flux particles, preferably including dopant, preferably (CaO){sub 12}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 7} flux particles including Ca and Al dopant, and LaCrO{sub 3} interconnection particles, preferably undoped LaCrO{sub 3}, to form a dense and substantially gas-tight interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure by a single plasma spraying step; and (C) heat treating the interconnection layer at from about 1,200 to 1,350 C to further densify and heal the micro-cracks and macro-cracks of the thermally sprayed interconnection layer. The result is a substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure. The electrode structure can be an air electrode, and a solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and further a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell for generation of electrical power. 4 figs.

  15. Evaluation of air toxic emissions from advanced and conventional coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.; Epstein, M.; Gould, L.; Botros, P.

    1995-12-31

    This paper evaluates the air toxics measurements at three advanced power systems and a base case conventional fossil fuel power plant. The four plants tested include a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, integrated gasification combined cycle, circulating fluidized bed combustor, and a conventional coal-fired plant.

  16. Reactive Plasma-Sprayed Aluminum Nitride-Based Coating Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Egota, Kazumi; Okamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Recently, thick aluminum nitride/alumina (AlN/Al2O3) composite coatings were successfully fabricated through the reactive plasma spraying of fine Al2O3/AlN mixture in the N2/H2 atmospheric plasma. The coatings consist of AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and α-Al2O3 phases. This study will evaluate the thermal conductivity of these complicated plasma-sprayed coatings and optimize the controlling aspects. Furthermore, the influence of the process parameters on the coatings thermal conductivity will be investigated. The fabricated coatings showed very low thermal conductivity (2.43 W/m K) compared to the AlN sintered compacts. It is attributed to the phase composition of the fabricated coatings, oxide content, and porosity. The presence of Al2O3, Al5O6N and the high coating porosity decreased its thermal conductivity. The presence of oxygen in the AlN lattice creates Al vacancies which lead to phonon scattering and therefore suppressed the thermal conductivity. The formation of γ-Al2O3 phase in the coating leads to further decrease in its conductivity, due to its lower density compared to the α-phase. Moreover, the high porosity of the coating strongly suppressed the conductivity. This is due to the complicated microstructure of plasma spray coatings (splats, porosity, and interfaces, particularly in case of reactive spray process), which obviously lowered the conductivity. Furthermore, the measured coating density was lower than the AlN value and suppressed the coating conductivity. In addition, the spraying parameter showed a varied effect on the coating phase composition, porosity, density, and therefore on its conductivity. Although the N2 gas flow improved the nitride content, it suppressed the thermal conductivity gradually. It is attributed to the further increase in the porosity and further decrease in the density of the coatings with the N2 gas. Furthermore, increasing the arc did not show a significant change on the coating thermal conductivity. On the other hand

  17. Chemical Phase and Valence Studies of Plasma Sprayed Coatings: EDXRD and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Versatile XAS micro-(NSLS)/nano(NSLS-II)- probe: local mapping of structure chemistry Rare Earth (RE) 4f -localized atomic, core states** Ce Problem and Ce-L3...powder • Ce3+ n-PS coating Ce4+O2 Ce 3+ !!!!!! PS Plasma Spray Chemical reduction of Ce Average Ce-O distance estimate Rare Earth continuum...local ligand coordination - structure EDXRD: plasma sprayed alumina-titania coatings (on Ti-6-4) • nATCZ → nano composite alumina-titania coating

  18. Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed MCrAlY-Cr2O3 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Huang, Chuanbing; Lan, Hao; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2016-08-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion behavior of two atmospheric plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY-Cr2O3 and CoNiCrAlY-Cr2O3 coatings, which are primarily designed for wear applications at high temperature, were investigated in this study. The two coatings were exposed to air and molten salt (75%Na2SO4-25%NaCl) environment at 800 °C under cyclic conditions. Oxidation and hot corrosion kinetic curves were obtained by thermogravimetric technique. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry were employed to characterize the coatings' microstructure, surface oxides, and composition. The results showed that both coatings provided the necessary oxidation resistance with oxidation rates of about 1.03 × 10-2 and 1.36 × 10-2 mg/cm2 h, respectively. The excellent oxidation behavior of these two coatings is attributed to formation of protective (Ni,Co)Cr2O4 spinel on the surface, while as-deposited Cr2O3 in the coatings also acted as a barrier to diffusion of oxidative and corrosive substances. The greater presence of Co in the CoNiCrAlY-Cr2O3 coating restrained internal diffusion of sulfur and slowed down the coating's degradation. Thus, the CoNiCrAlY-Cr2O3 coating was found to be more protective than the NiCoCrAlY-Cr2O3 coating under hot corrosion condition.

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes produced via very low pressure suspension plasma spray and electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleetwood, James D.

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a promising element of comprehensive energy policies due to their direct mechanism for converting the oxidization of fuel, such as hydrogen, into electrical energy. Both very low pressure plasma spray and electrophoretic deposition allow working with high melting temperature SOFC suspension based feedstock on complex surfaces, such as in non-planar SOFC designs. Dense, thin electrolytes of ideal composition for SOFCs can be fabricated with each of these processes, while compositional control is achieved with dissolved dopant compounds that are incorporated into the coating during deposition. In the work reported, sub-micron 8 mole % Y2O3-ZrO2 (YSZ) and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC), powders, including those in suspension with scandium-nitrate dopants, were deposited on NiO-YSZ anodes, via very low pressure suspension plasma spray (VLPSPS) at Sandia National Laboratories' Thermal Spray Research Laboratory and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) at Purdue University. Plasma spray was carried out in a chamber held at 320 - 1300 Pa, with the plasma composed of argon, hydrogen, and helium. EPD was characterized utilizing constant current deposition at 10 mm electrode separation, with deposits sintered from 1300 -- 1500 °C for 2 hours. The role of suspension constituents in EPD was analyzed based on a parametric study of powder loading, powder specific surface area, polyvinyl butyral (PVB) content, polyethyleneimine (PEI) content, and acetic acid content. Increasing PVB content and reduction of particle specific surface area were found to eliminate the formation of cracks when drying. PEI and acetic acid content were used to control suspension stability and the adhesion of deposits. Additionally, EPD was used to fabricate YSZ/GDC bilayer electrolyte systems. The resultant YSZ electrolytes were 2-27 microns thick and up to 97% dense. Electrolyte performance as part of a SOFC system with screen printed LSCF cathodes was evaluated with peak

  20. Effect of spark plasma sintering on the microstructure and in vitro behavior of plasma sprayed HA coatings.

    PubMed

    Yu, L-G; Khor, K A; Li, H; Cheang, P

    2003-07-01

    The crystalline phases and degree of crystallinity in plasma sprayed calcium phosphate coatings on Ti substrates are crucial factors that influence the biological interactions of the materials in vivo. In this study, plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings underwent post-spray treatment by the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique at 500 degrees C, 600 degrees C, and 700 degrees C for duration of 5 and 30 min. The activity of the HA coatings before and after SPS are evaluated in vitro in a simulated body fluid. The surface microstructure, crystallinity, and phase composition of each coating is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry before, and after in vitro incubation. Results show that the plasma sprayed coatings treated for 5 min in SPS demonstrated increased proportion of beta-TCP phase with a preferred-orientation in the (214) plane, and the content of beta-TCP phase corresponded to SPS temperature, up to 700 degrees C. SPS treatment at 700 degrees C for 30 min enhanced the HA content in the plasma spray coating as well. The HA coatings treated in SPS for 5 min revealed rapid surface morphological changes during in vitro incubation (up to 12 days), indicating that the surface activity is enhanced by the SPS treatment. The thickest apatite layer was found in the coating treated by SPS at 700 degrees C for 5 min.

  1. Anisotropic Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at High Temperature Determined by Ultrasonic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qin; Zhu, Jianguo; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are of great scientific and technological significance for the design and fabrication of TBC systems. The ultrasonic method combined with a sing-around method for mechanical properties measurement of TBC is deduced and the elastic modulus can be determined in the spray, or longitudinal, direction, and the transverse direction. Tested specimens of plasma-sprayed TBC are detached from the substrate and treated with thermal exposure at 1400 °C. The elastic moduli along the longitudinal and transverse directions of the TBCs are measured by different types of ultrasonic waves combined with a sing-around method, while the Poisson's ratio is also obtained simultaneously. The experimental results indicate that the magnitude of longitudinal elastic modulus is larger than that of the transverse one, and thus the plasma-sprayed TBC has an anisotropic mechanical property. Moreover, the elastic moduli along both longitudinal and transverse directions change with high-temperature exposure time, which consists of a rapid increasing stage followed by a slow decreasing stage. In addition, the magnitude of Poisson's ratio increases slightly from 0.05 to 0.2 with the high-temperature exposure time. Generally, the microstructures in the plasma-sprayed coatings and their evolution in a high-temperature environment are the main causes of the varying anisotropic mechanical properties.

  2. Investigations of Local Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed FeCr Nanocomposite Coating by SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi; Shu, Mingyong; Zhong, Qingdong; Zhang, Junliang; Zhou, Qiongyu; Bui, Quoc Binh

    2016-02-01

    FeCr alloy coating can be sprayed on low-carbon steel to improve the corrosion resistance because of FeCr alloy's high anti-corrosion capacity. In this paper, Fe microparticles/Cr nanoparticles coating (NFC) and FeCr microparticles coating (MFC) were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying and NFC was heat-treated under hydrogen atmosphere at 800 °C (HNFC). EDS mapping showed no penetration of Ni in MFC and NFC while penetration of Ni occurred in HNFC. X-ray diffraction results indicated the form of the NiCrFe (bcc) solid solution in HNFC. SECM testing in 3.5 (wt.%) NaCl revealed that the anti-corrosion capacity of NFC improved compared with MFC, while HNFC improved further.

  3. Influence of plasma spraying deposition process on optical properties of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belka, Radosław; Kowalski, Szymon; Żórawski, Wojciech; Suchańska, Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is a well-known bioceramic, nonorganic material of the bones of the vertebrate responsible for their mechanical durability. In human bones it occupies 60-80 % of the volume depending on a number of factors. Synthetic HAp is valued in bone endoprosthetic to its high biocompatibility. It is widely used to fill cavities of bone and as the coating of bone implants to increase their biocompatibility and adhesion to bone surface. In this paper a diffuse reflectance spectra of plasma-spraying deposited hydroxyapatite were presented and compared with pure powder samples. Optical band gap were estimated basing on Kubelka-Munk functions and Tauc plot extrapolation. We found that deposition process affects the value of band gap.

  4. Nanocomposite Lanthanum Zirconate Thermal Barrier Coating Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaohui; Wang, You; Wang, Liang; Hao, Guangzhao; Sun, Xiaoguang; Shan, Fan; Zou, Zhiwei

    2014-10-01

    This work seeks to develop an innovative nanocomposite thermal barrier coating (TBC) exhibiting low thermal conductivity and high durability compared with that of current TBCs. To achieve this objective, nanosized lanthanum zirconate particles were selected for the topcoat of the TBC system, and a new process—suspension plasma spray—was employed to produce desirable microstructural features: the nanocomposite lanthanum zirconate TBC contains ultrafine splats and high volume porosity, for lower thermal conductivity, and better durability. The parameters of plasma spray experiment included two main variables: (i) spray distance varying from 40 to 80 mm and (ii) the concentration of suspension 20, 25, and 30 wt.%, respectively. The microstructure of obtained coatings was characterized with scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction. The porosity of coatings is in the range of 6-10%, and the single phase in the as-sprayed coatings was pyrochlore lanthanum zirconate.

  5. Coanda-Assisted Spray Manipulation Collar for a Commercial Plasma Spray Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabey, K.; Smith, B. L.; Whichard, G.; McKechnie, T.

    2011-06-01

    A Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) collar was retrofitted to a Praxair SG-100 plasma spray gun. The CSM device makes it possible to change the direction of (vector) the plasma jet and powder without moving the gun. The two-piece retrofit device replaces the standard faceplate. Two separate collars were tested: one designed for small vector angles and one for larger vector angles. It was demonstrated that the small-angle device could modify the trajectory of zirconia powder up to several degrees. Doing so could realign the plasma with the powder resulting in increased powder temperature and velocity. The large-angle device was capable of vectoring the plasma jet up to 45°. However, the powder did not vector as much. Under large-angle vectoring, the powder velocity and temperature decreased steadily with vector angle. Both devices were tested using a supersonic configuration to demonstrate that CSM is capable of vectoring supersonic plasmas.

  6. Pressure-Based Liquid Feed System for Suspension Plasma Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotler, Elliot M.; Chen, Dianying; Molz, Ronald J.

    2011-06-01

    Thermal spraying with liquid-based feedstocks demonstrated a potential to produce coatings with new and enhanced characteristics. A liquid delivery system prototype was developed and tested in this study. The feeder is based on the 5MPE platform and uses a pressure setup to optimally inject and atomize liquid feedstock into a plasma plume. A novel self-cleaning apparatus is incorporated into the system to greatly reduce problems associated with clogging and agglomeration of liquid suspensions. This approach also allows the liquid feedstock line to the gun to remain charged for quick on-off operation. Experiments on aqueous and ethanol-based suspensions of titania, alumina, and YSZ were performed through this liquid delivery system using a 9MB plasma gun. Coatings with ultrafine splat microstructures were obtained by plasma spraying of those suspensions. Phase composition and microstructure of the as-sprayed coatings were investigated.

  7. Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Forming of Solar Thermal Propulsion Components Using Refractory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank R.; Hissam, David A.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Davis, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Spray Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a fabrication technique using Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) to form structural components from a tungsten/rhenium alloy. The components were assembled into an absorber cavity for a fully-functioning, ground test unit of a solar then-nal propulsion engine. The VPS process deposits refractory metal onto a graphite mandrel of the desired shape. The mandrel acts as a male mold, forming the required contour and dimensions of the inside surface of the deposit. Tungsten and tungsten/25% rhenium were used in the development and production of several absorber cavity components. These materials were selected for their high temperature (greater than 25000 C [greater than 4530 F]) strength. Each absorber cavity comprises 3 coaxial shells with two, double-helical flow passages through which the propellant gas flows. This paper describes the processing techniques, design considerations, and process development associated with forming these engine components.

  8. Effect of Porosity on Photocatalytic Activity of Plasma-Sprayed TiO2 Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Chaudhary, Ujwal; Das, Santanu; Godavarty, Anuradha; Agarwal, Arvind

    2013-10-01

    The effect of porosity on photocatalytic activity of plasma-sprayed TiO2 coating on steel substrate is studied by varying processing parameters viz. plasma power and powder feed rate. The relationship between porosity content and methylene blue (MB) dye decomposition rate was established to correlate coating microstructure and its photocatalytic activity. The coating with the highest porosity content exhibited best photocatalytic efficiency. The same processing parameters were used to deposit TiO2 coating on FTO glass. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 coating on FTO was 2.5 times better than TiO2 coating on the steel substrate. TiO2 coating on FTO glass contains bimodal porosity distribution (micropores and submicron pores) which accelerated MB decomposition by accelerated diffusion of ionic species.

  9. The effect of processing parameters on plasma sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.A.; Cowgill, D.F.; Snead, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    Plasma spraying is being investigated as a potential coating technique for applying thin (0.1--5mm) layers of beryllium on plasma facing surfaces of blanket modules in ITER and also as an in-situ repair technique for repairing eroded beryllium surfaces in high heat flux divertor regions. High density spray deposits (>98% of theoretical density) of beryllium will be required in order to maximize the thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. A preliminary investigation was done to determine the effect of various processing parameters (particle size, particle morphology, secondary gas additions and reduced chamber pressure) on the as-deposited density of beryllium. The deposits were made using spherical beryllium feedstock powder which was produced by centrifugal atomization at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Improvements in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the beryllium spray deposits will be discussed along with the corresponding thermal conductivity and outgassing behavior of these deposits.

  10. Numerical and experimental investigations of splat geometric characteristics during oblique impact of plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chang-Wei; Tan, Jiak Kwang; Pan, Lunsheng; Low, Cheng Yee; Jaffar, Ahmed

    2011-10-01

    Splats are obtained on the substrates inclined at different angles (0°, 20°, 40° and 60°) by plasma spraying process and characterized by SEM and WYKO ® optical surface profiler. Numerical model is developed using CFD software FLOW-3D ® to simulate the process of droplet impact, spreading and solidification onto the substrates. Splat characteristics such as spread factor, aspect ratio and fractional factor are defined and compared between simulation and experiment. Fair agreements are obtained. In addition, the impacting behavior including spreading and solidification are analyzed in details from the simulation results. The rates of reduction in droplet kinetic energy during impact, spreading and solidification are also compared between different inclination angles.

  11. Creep of plasma-sprayed-ZrO2 thermal-barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Logan, W. R.; Adams, J. W.; Bill, R. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of plasma-sprayed-zirconia thermal-barrier coatings with three different porosities and different initial particle sizes were deformed in compression at initial loads of 6900, 13,800, and 24,100 kPa (1000, 2000, and 3500 psi) and temperatures of 1100, 1250, and 1400 C. The coatings were stabilized with lime, MgO, and two different concentrations of Y2O3. Creep began as soon as the load was applied and continued at a constantly decreasing rate until the load was removed. Temperature and stabilization had a pronounced effect on creep rate while the stress, particle size, and porosity had a lesser effect. Creep deformation was due to cracking and particle sliding.

  12. Post-treatment of Plasma-Sprayed Amorphous Ceramic Coatings by Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chraska, T.; Pala, Z.; Mušálek, R.; Medřický, J.; Vilémová, M.

    2015-04-01

    Alumina-zirconia ceramic material has been plasma sprayed using a water-stabilized plasma torch to produce free standing coatings. The as-sprayed coatings have very low porosity and are mostly amorphous. The amorphous material crystallizes at temperatures above 900 °C. A spark plasma sintering apparatus has been used to heat the as-sprayed samples to temperatures above 900 °C to induce crystallization, while at the same time, a uniaxial pressure of 80 MPa has been applied to their surface. After such post-treatment, the ceramic samples are crystalline and have very low open porosity. The post-treated material exhibits high hardness and significantly increased flexural strength. The post-treated samples have a microstructure that is best described as nanocomposite with the very small crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix.

  13. Net Shaped Component Fabrication of Refractory Metal Alloys using Vacuum Plasma Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; ODell, S.; Gorti, S.; Litchford, R.

    2006-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) technique was employed to produce dense and net shaped components of a new tungsten-rhenium (W-Re) refractory metal alloy. The fine grain size obtained using this technique enhanced the mechanical properties of the alloy at elevated temperatures. The alloy development also included incorporation of thermodynamically stable dispersion phases to pin down grain boundaries at elevated temperatures and thereby circumventing the inherent problem of recrystallization of refractory alloys at elevated temperatures. Requirements for such alloys as related to high temperature space propulsion components will be discussed. Grain size distribution as a function of cooling rate and dispersion phase loading will be presented. Mechanical testing and grain growth results as a function of temperature will also be discussed.

  14. Influence of Laser Glazing on the Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Jiangwei; Liao, Hanlin; Darut, Geoffrey; Stella, Jorge; Poirier, Thierry; Planche, Marie-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    In this study, 8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia powder was deposited on the substrates by atmospheric plasma spray. The coatings were post-treated by laser glazing under different parameters in order to densify them. The characterization of the laser molten pools under different laser treatment conditions was studied. Preheating processes were also employed. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the surface and cross section of as-sprayed and laser-glazed coatings were carried out to investigate the influence of laser glazing on the microstructure on laser-glazed coatings. The results show that preheating processes improve the coating in terms of deepening the laser-glazed layer, reducing the number of vertical cracks and surface density of cracks and widening the molten pool. Finally, the influences of linear energy density on the characterization of the glazed layer are discussed.

  15. Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings onto Carbon/carbon Composites in Simulated Body Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Jin-Ling; Bo, Wu; Hai, Zhou; Cao, Ning; Li, Mu-Sen

    Two types of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings onto carbon/carbon composite (C/C composites) substrates, deposited by plasma spraying technique, were immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) in order to determine their behavior in conditions similar to the human blood plasma. Calcium ion concentration, pH value, microstructure, and phase compositions were analyzed. Results demonstrated that both the crystal Ca-P phases or the amorphous HA do dissolve slightly, and the dissolution of CaO phases in SBF was evident after 1 day of soaking. The calcium-ion concentration was decreased and the pH value of SBF was increased with the increasing of the immersing time. The precipitation was mainly composed of HA, which was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron-probe microanalyzer.

  16. Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Forming of Solar Thermal Propulsion Components Using Refractory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank; Gerish, Harold; Davis, William; Hissam, D. Andy

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal Spray Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a fabrication technique using Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) to form structural components from a tungsten/rhenium alloy. The components were assembled into an absorption cavity for a fully-functioning, ground test unit of a solar thermal propulsion engine. The VPS process deposits refractory metal onto a graphite mandrel of the desired shape. The mandrel acts as a male mold, forming the required contour and dimensions of the inside surface of the deposit. Tungsten and tungsten/25% rhenium were used in the development and production of several absorber cavity components. These materials were selected for their high temperature (less than 2500 C) strength. Each absorber cavity comprises 3 coaxial shells with two, double-helical flow passages through which the propellant gas flows. This paper describes the processing techniques, design considerations, and process development associated with forming these engine components.

  17. Development of a plasma sprayed ceramic gas path seal for high pressure turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.; Hyland, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Development of the plasma sprayed graded, layered ZrO2/CoCrAlY seal system for gas turbine engine blade tip seal application up to 1589 K (2400 F) surface temperature was continued. Methods of improvement of the cyclic thermal shock resistance of the sprayed zirconia seal system were investigated. The most promising method, reduction of the ceramic thickness and metallic substrate stiffness were selected based upon potential and feasibility. Specimens were fabricated and experimentally evaluated to: (1) substantiate the capacity of the geometry changes to reduce operating stresses in the sprayed structure; and (2) define the abradability, erosion, thermal shock and physical property characteristic for the sprayed ceramic seal system. Thermal stress analysis was performed and correlated with thermal shock test results.

  18. Plasma sprayed coatings for containment of Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material

    DOE PAGES

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Andraka, Charles E.; ...

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), Y2O3, and Al2O3 plasma sprayed coatings are investigated for their ability to prevent attack of Haynes 230 by a near-eutectic Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material (PCM) in a closed environment at 820 °C. Areas where coatings failed were identified with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while chemical interactions were clarified through elemental mapping using electron microprobe analysis. Despite its susceptibility to reduction by Mg, the Al2O3 coating performed well while the YSZ and Y2O3 coating showed clear areas of attack. These results are attributed to the evolution of gaseous Mg atmore » 820 °C leading to the formation of MgO and MgAl2O4.« less

  19. A design of experiment study of plasma sprayed alumina-titania coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, T.J.; Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Wilson, G.C.; Riggs, W.L. II; Rotolico, A.J.; Nerz, J.E.

    1992-08-01

    An experimental study of the plasma spraying of alumina-titania powder is presented in this paper. This powder system is being used to fabricate heater tubes that emulate nuclear fuel tubes for use in thermal-hydraulic testing. Coating experiments were conducted using a Taguchi fractional-factorial design parametric study. Operating parameters were varied around the typical spray parameters in a systematic design of experiments in order to display the range of plasma processing conditions and their effect on the resultant coating. The coatings were characterized by hardness and electrical tests, image analysis, and optical metallography. Coating qualities are discussed with respect to dielectric strength, hardness, porosity, surface roughness, deposition efficiency, and microstructure. The attributes of the coatings are correlated with the changes in operating parameters.

  20. Microwave absorption property of plasma spray W-type hexagonal ferrite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shicheng; Liu, Yi; Tian, Haoliang; Tong, Hui; Liu, Yuxin; Xu, Binshi

    2015-03-01

    In order to enhance the adhesion strength of microwave absorbing materials, W-type hexagonal ferrite coating is fabricated by plasma spray. The feedstock of ferrite powders is synthesized by solid-state reaction and spray dried process. Microstructures of the coating are analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectra (EDS). Hexagonal ferrite coating is successfully deposited on the substrate with adhesion strength of 28 MPa. The magnetic property of ferrite samples is measured using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is lower than ferrite powder. Reflection loss of the hexagonal ferrite coating is measured in frequency of 2-18 GHz. The result shows that the coating is suitable for electromagnetic wave absorbers in Ku-band.

  1. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings were successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They were evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore, wide temperature spectrum, self-lubricating compositions.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and physical properties of Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Sordelet

    1995-11-09

    Our lab has been working with plasma spraying of both high pressure gas atomized (HPGA) and cast and crushed quasicrystal powders. A major component of this research includes comparative studies of PAS coatings formed with starting powders prepared by both techniques. In addition, a thorough investigation of the effects of starting powder particle size on coating microstructure is included. During the course of the overall research, an interest developed in forming Al-Cu-Fe materials with finer grain sizes. Therefore, a brief study was performed to characterize the effect of adding boron to Al-Cu-Fe materials prepared by different techniques. In addition to characterizing the microstructural features of the above materials, oxidation and wear behavior was also examined.

  3. Characterization of the adherence of plasma-sprayed ZrO/sub 2/ coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Rice, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of the microstructure and adherence of ZrO/sub 2/ coatings revealed that the adherence decreased with increasing coating thickness and could be increased by incorporating MgO as a second phase as well as by including noncubic ZrO/sub 2/ in the cubic ZrO/sub 2/ coating. Residual stresses from the plasma spraying process limit adherence (hence the coating thickness dependence) but these can be relieved by plastic flow in the MgO phase during post-spray cooling. Some degree of strength/toughening is also derived by the presence of microcracks and/or from transformation associated with the presence of tetragonal ZrO/sub 2/.

  4. Repulsive Interaction of Sulfide Layers on Compressor Impeller Blades Remanufactured Through Plasma Spray Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.; Zhou, D.; Wang, Y. L.; Huang, H. H.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the repulsive interaction of sulfide layers on compressor impeller blades remanufactured through plasma spray welding (PSW). Sulfide layers on the blades made of FV(520)B steel were prepared through multifarious corrosion experiments, and PSW was utilized to remanufacture blade specimens. The specimens were evaluated through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, 3D surface topography, x-ray diffraction, ImageJ software analysis, Vicker's micro-hardness test and tensile tests. Results showed a large number of sulfide inclusions in the fusion zone generated by sulfide layers embodied into the molten pool during PSW. These sulfide inclusions seriously degraded the mechanical performance of the blades remanufactured through PSW.

  5. Deposition of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite-based biocompatible composite by reactive plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Dragoş, Uţu

    2012-02-01

    Titanium nitride is a bioceramic material successfully used for covering medical implants due to the high hardness meaning good wear resistance. Hydroxyapatite is a bioactive ceramic that contributes to the restoration of bone tissue, which together with titanium nitride may contribute to obtaining a superior composite in terms of mechanical and bone tissue interaction matters. The paper presents the experimental results in obtaining composite layers of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite by reactive plasma spraying in ambient atmosphere. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that in both cases of powders mixtures used (10% HA + 90% Ti; 25% HA + 75% Ti), hydroxyapatite decomposition occurred; in variant 1 the decomposition is higher compared with the second variant. Microstructure of the deposited layers was investigated using scanning electron microscope, the surfaces presenting a lamellar morphology without defects such as cracks or microcracks. Surface roughness values obtained vary as function of the spraying distance, presenting higher values at lower thermal spraying distances.

  6. Microstructure and Pitting Corrosion of Plasma-Sprayed Ni-Al Nanocomposite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Zhong, Q. D.

    2016-06-01

    Ni-Al nanoparticles coating (NAN) was manufactured via atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and thermal treated under hydrogen atmosphere at 1300∘C (TNAN) remained 1 h, and NiAl microparticles coating (NAM) was manufactured as a reference. Nanoscale particles were observed in NAN by TEM, and these nanoscale particles disappeared in TNAN. Many pores and cracks were observed in NAM. Few pores and cracks were observed in NAN, and no pores and cracks were found in TNAN with SEM. A scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) testing in 3.5% (wt.) NaCl solution for 3 h revealed that NAM underwent several pitting corrosion, NAN pitting corrosion was relatively minor, and TNAN had no pitting corrosion.

  7. The Main Issues to Address in Modeling Plasma Spray Torch Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazelas, C.; Trelles, J. P.; Vardelle, A.

    2017-01-01

    The modeling of plasma torch operation has advanced greatly in the last 15 years due to a better understanding of the underlying physics, development of commercial, open-source computational fluid dynamics softwares, and access to high performance and cloud computing. However, the operation mode of the electric arc in plasma torches is controlled by dynamic, thermal, electromagnetic, acoustic and chemical phenomena that take place at different scales and whose interactions are not completely understood yet. Even though no single model of plasma torch operation fully addresses these phenomena, most of these models are useful tools for parametric studies, if their use is reinforced by knowledge of torch operation and the model predictions are validated against experimental data. To increase the level of predictability of the current models, several further steps are needed. This study examines the issues remaining to be addressed in the modeling of plasma spray torch operation and the current critical aspects of these.

  8. Plasma Sprayed Pour Tubes and Other Melt Handling Components for Use in Gas Atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, David; Rieken, Joel; Heidloff, Andy; Besser, Matthew; Anderson, Iver

    2011-04-01

    Ames Laboratory has successfully used plasma sprayed ceramic components made from yttria stabilized zirconia as melt pouring tubes for gas atomization for many years. These tubes have proven to be strong, thermal shock resistant and versatile. Various configurations are possible both internally and externally. Accurate dimensions are achieved internally with a machined fugitive graphite mandrel and externally by diamond grinding. The previous study of the effect of spray parameters on density was extended to determine the effect of the resulting density on the thermal shock characteristics on down-quenching and up-quenching. Encouraging results also prompted investigation of the use of plasma spraying as a method to construct a melt pour exit stopper that is mechanically robust, thermal shock resistant, and not susceptible to attack by reactive melt additions. The Ames Laboratory operates two close-coupled high pressure gas atomizers. These two atomizers are designed to produce fine and coarse spherical metal powders (5{mu} to 500{mu} diameter) of many different metals and alloys. The systems vary in size, but generally the smaller atomizer can produce up to 5 kg of powder whereas the larger can produce up to 25 kg depending on the charge form and density. In order to make powders of such varying compositions, it is necessary to have melt systems capable of heating and containing the liquid charge to the desired superheat temperature prior to pouring through the atomization nozzle. For some metals and alloys this is not a problem; however for some more reactive and/or high melting materials this can pose unique challenges. Figure 1 is a schematic that illustrates the atomization system and its components.

  9. Induction plasma sprayed Sr and Mg doped nano hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti for bone implant.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we report fabrication of strontium (Sr) and magnesium (Mg) doped hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) substrates using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma spray. HA powder was doped with 1 wt % Sr (Sr-HA) and 1 wt % Mg (Mg-HA), heat treated at 800°C for 6 h and then used for plasma spray coating. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis indicated that the coatings were primarily composed of phase pure crystalline HA. When compared to undoped HA coating, physical properties such as microstructure, grain size, and adhesive bond strength of the doped HA coatings did not change significantly. Microstructure of the coatings showed coherency in the structure with an average grain size of 200-280 μm HA particles, where each of the HA grains consisted of 20-30 nm sized particles. An average adhesive bond strength of 17 MPa ensured sufficient mechanical strength of the coatings. A chemistry dependent improvement in bone cell-coating interaction was noticed for doped coatings although it had minimal effect on physical properties of the coatings. In vitro cell-materials interactions using human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB) showed better cell attachment and proliferation on Sr-HA coatings compared to HA or Mg-HA coatings. Presence of Sr in the coating also stimulated hFOB cell differentiation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression. Improvement in bioactivity of Sr doped HA coatings on Ti without compromising its mechanical properties makes it an excellent material of choice for coated implant.

  10. Comparison of Thermal Properties of Thermal Barrier Coating Deposited on IN738 Using Standard Air Plasma Spray with 100HE Plasma Spray System

    SciTech Connect

    Uppu, Nalini; Mensah, Patrick F.; Ofori, Daniel

    2006-07-31

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have low thermal conductivity values and have a primary benefit of providing an insulating layer that reduces the coated substrate temperature and mitigates the effects of hot streaking or uneven temperature distributions. Thermal conductivity, k, is a thermo-physical property that can be derived from the thermal diffusivity, α, of the specimen. It can be obtained from the formula k = α cp ρ, where cp is specific heat and ρ is the density of the material. Thermal conductivity, k, describes the quantity of heat that passes through a unit area of sample in unit time with a temperature gradient present. This thermal property of TBCs can be measured by flash method in which a nearly instantaneous pulse of energy (usually laser or other discharge source) is input to the frontal surface of a material sample and the temperature changes are measured on back side of sample with and INSb infrared detector as shown in Fig.1. A laser flash test has the advantage of being fast while providing values with excellent accuracy and reproducibility. In this study, an instantaneous triangular heat pulse from a laser heat flash system (FL5000) made by Anter corporation, Pittsburgh, PA was used. The technique satisfies the ASTM E 1461. The test method can measure thermal diffusivity values ranging from 10-7 to 10-3 m2/s from temperatures 75 to 2800 K.

  11. Predictive Validity of Conventional and Adaptive Tests in an Air Force Training Environment. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sympson, James B.; And Others

    Conventional Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery-7 (ASVAB) Arithmetic Reasoning and Word Knowledge tests, were compared with computer-administered adaptive tests as predictors of performance in an Air Force Jet Engine Mechanic training course (n=495). Results supported earlier research in showing somewhat longer examinee response times for…

  12. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  13. PLASMA SPRAYED Ni-Al COATINGS FOR SAFE ENDING HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.; OTTERSON,D.; BERNDT,C.C.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AIB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand. It was determined that the Ni-Al coatings could be applied to a depth of two inches on the tube ends. When sprayed on flat coupons the coatings exhibited relatively high adhesion strength and microhardness. Polarization curves showed that the coating performance was variable. Measured corrosion potentials indicated that the Ni-Al coatings are active towards steel coated with thermally conductive polymers, thereby suggesting preferential corrosion. Corrosion also occurred on the coated coupons tested in the volcanic pool. This may have been exacerbated by the difficulty in applying a uniform coating to the coupon edges. The Ni-Al coatings applied to the tubes had significant porosity and did not provide adequate corrosion protection. This is associated with

  14. Simulation on change of generic satellite radar cross section via artificially created plasma sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shen Shou Max; Chuang, Yu-Chou

    2016-06-01

    Recent advancements in antisatellite missile technologies have proven the effectiveness of such attacks, and the vulnerability of satellites in such exercises inspires a new paradigm in RF Stealth techniques suitable for satellites. In this paper we examine the possibility of using artificially created plasma sprays on the surface of the satellite’s main body to alter its radar cross section (RCS). First, we briefly review past research related to RF Stealth using plasma. Next, we discuss the physics between electromagnetic waves and plasma, and the RCS number game in RF Stealth design. A comparison of RCS in a generic satellite and a more complicated model is made to illustrate the effect of the RCS number game, and its meaning for a simulation model. We also run a comparison between finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) codes, and find the RCS results are very close. We then compare the RCS of the generic satellite and the plasma-covered satellite. The incident radar wave is a differentiated Gaussian monopulse, with 3 dB bandwidth between 1.2 GHz and 4 GHz, and we simulate three kinds of plasma density, with a characteristic plasma frequency ω P  =  0.1, 1, and 10 GHz. The electron-neutral collision frequency ν en is set at 0.01 GHz. We found the RCS of plasma-covered satellite is not necessarily smaller than the originally satellite. When ω P is 0.1 GHz, the plasma spray behaves like a dielectric, and there is minor reduction in the RCS. When ω P is 1 GHz, the X-Y cut RCS increases. When ω P is 10 GHz, the plasma behaves more like a metal to the radar wave, and stronger RCS dependency to frequency appears. Therefore, to use plasma as an RCS adjustment tool requires careful fine-tuning of plasma density and shape, in order to achieve the so-called plasma stealth effect.

  15. High-temperature thermo-mechanical behavior of functionally graded materials produced by plasma sprayed coating: Experimental and modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kang Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Su; Park, Chang Hyun; Kim, Gon-Ho; Baik, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are widely used in aerospace industries to protect exterior surfaces from harsh environments. In this study, functionally graded materials (FGMs) were investigated with the aim to optimize their high temperature resistance and strength characteristics. NiCrAlY bond coats were deposited on Inconel-617 superalloy substrate specimens by the low vacuum plasma spraying technique. Functionally graded Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings with gradually varying amounts of YSZ (20%-100%) were fabricated from composite powders by vacuum plasma spraying. Heat shield performance tests were conducted using a high- temperature plasma torch. The temperature distributions were measured using thermocouples at the interfaces of the FGM layers during the tests. A model for predicting the temperature at the bond coating-substrate interface was established. The temperature distributions simulated using the finite element method agreed well with the experimental results.

  16. Improvements in Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Fe-Based Amorphous Coating by Laser-Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaoping; Chen, Hong; Wang, Gui; Chen, Yongnan; Xing, Yazhe; Zhang, Chunhua; Dargusch, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    Amorphous coating technology is an attractive way of taking advantage of the superior properties of amorphous alloys for structural applications. However, the limited bonds between splats within the plasma-sprayed coatings result in a typically lamellar and porous coating structure. To overcome these limitations, the as-sprayed coating was treated by a laser-remelting process. The microstructure and phase composition of two coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The wear resistance of the plasma-sprayed coating and laser-remelted coating was studied comparatively using a pin-on-disc wear test under dry friction conditions. It was revealed that the laser-remelted coating exhibited better wear resistance because of its defect-free and amorphous-nanocrystalline composited structure.

  17. An Assessment of the Residual Stresses in Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Coatings on an Advanced Copper Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Agarwal, A.; Lachtrupp, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Modeling studies were conducted on low pressure plasma sprayed (LPPS) NiAl top coat applied to an advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy (GRCop-84) substrate using Ni as a bond coat. A thermal analysis suggested that the NiAl and Ni top and bond coats, respectively, would provide adequate thermal protection to the GRCop-84 substrate in a rocket engine operating under high heat flux conditions. Residual stress measurements were conducted at different depths from the free surface on coated and uncoated GRCop-84 specimens by x-ray diffraction. These data are compared with theoretically estimated values assessed by a finite element analysis simulating the development of these stresses as the coated substrate cools down from the plasma spraying temperature to room temperature.

  18. Very low pressure plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating using a low-energy plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, a more economical low-energy plasma source was used to perform a very low pressure plasma-spray (VLPPS) process. The plasma-jet properties were analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Moreover, yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (YSZ) was elaborated by a F100 low-power plasma gun under working pressure of 1 mbar, and the substrate specimens were partially shadowed by a baffle-plate during plasma spraying for obtaining different coating microstructures. Based on the SEM observation, a column-like grain coating was deposited by pure vapor deposition at the shadowed region, whereas, in the unshadowed region, the coating exhibited a binary microstructure which was formed by a mixed deposition of melted particles and evaporated particles. The mechanical properties of the coating were also well under investigation.

  19. Bulge Testing and Interface Fracture Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed and HIP Bonded Zr Coatings on U-Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, K.; Liu, C.; Leckie, R.; Lovato, M.

    2015-01-01

    Bulge testing using a pressurized fluid to fracture the interface between bonded material layers along with three-dimensional digital image correlation to measure the sample distortion caused by pressurized fluid was applied to plasma-sprayed coatings. The initiation fracture toughness associated with the bonded materials was measured during the testing. The bulge testing of the uranium-molybdenum alloy plasma sprayed with zirconium and clad in aluminum is presented. The initiation fracture toughness was observed to increase with the increasing cathodic arc-cleaning current and the use of alternating polarity transferred arc current. This dependence was linked to the interface composition of oxide and mixed metal phases along with the interface temperature during spray deposition.

  20. Microstructure and properties of in-flight rare-earth doped thermal barrier coatings prepared by suspension plasma spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Stephanie

    Thermal barrier coatings with lower thermal conductivity improve the efficiency of gas turbine engines by allowing higher operating temperatures. Recent studies were shown that coatings containing a pair of rare-earth oxides with equal molar ratio have lower thermal conductivity and improved sintering resistance compared to the undoped 4-4.5 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In the present work, rare-earth doped coatings were fabricated via suspension plasma spray by spraying YSZ powder-ethanol suspensions that contained dissolved rare-earth nitrates. The compositions of the coatings determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy verified that 68 +/- 8% of the rare-earth nitrates added into the suspension was incorporated into the coatings. Two coatings containing different concentrations of the same dopant pair (Nd2O3/Yb2O3), and three coatings having similar concentrations of different dopant pairs (Nd 2O3/Yb2O3, Nd2O3/Gd 2O3, and Gd2O3/Yb2O 3) were produced and compared. The effect of dopant concentration and dopant pair type on the microstructure and properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed and heat treated conditions were investigated using XRD, SEM, TEM, STEM-EDX, and the laser flash method. The cross-sectional morphology of all coatings displayed columnar structure. The porosity content of the coating was found to increase with increasing dopant concentration, but did not significantly change with dopant pairs. Similarly, increasing the Nd2O3/Yb2O 3 concentration lowered the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed coatings. Although the effect of changing dopant pair type is not as significant as increasing the dopant concentration, the coating that contained Gd2O 3/Yb2O3 exhibited the lowest conductivity compared to coatings that had other dopant pairs. Thermal conductivity measurement performed on the heat treated coatings indicated a larger conductivity increase for the rare-earth doped coatings. A detailed study on the

  1. The properties and fracture behavior of ion plasma sprayed TiN coating on stainless steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Dina V.; Goncharenko, Igor M.; Danilov, Vladimir I.; Lobach, Maxim I.; Danilova, Lidiya V.; Shlyakhova, Galina V.

    2015-10-01

    The wear resistance and fracture behavior of ion plasma sprayed TiN coating were studied; the results are presented. The coating was applied to the stainless steel substrate using a vacuum arc method. The samples were tested by active loading. With varying coating thickness, its characteristics were found to change. Multiple cracking would occur in the deformed sample, with fragment borders aligned normal to the extension axis.

  2. Nanocrystalline structure of the surface layer of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings obtained upon preliminary induction heat treatment of metal base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, A. A.; Steinhauer, A. B.; Lyasnikov, V. N.; Wenig, S. B.; Zakharevich, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    Biocompatible nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings for intrabone titanium implants have been obtained by plasma spraying. The HA coatings have an average grain size within 10-30 nm and are characterized by improved characteristics of morphological heterogeneity that is acquired due to the induction heat treatment (IHT) of substrates prior to plasma spray deposition. Based on the data of scanning electron microscopy with computer-aided processing of images, it is established that the average grain size depends on the IHT temperature.

  3. Rethinking the Air Operations Center, Air Force Command and Control in Conventional War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    ADm-A285 444 DTIC ELECT ,IAll Rethinking the Air Operations Center Air Force C)mmand and Control in Conv6ntal War. J. TAYOR SIMK, Lt Col, USAF School...at the theater level as the best way to achieve these dual aims.3 Indeed, this advocacy is tightly intertwined with the history of the USAF in its...Conversely, fully effective strikes on poorly selected targets will, at best , merely waste effort, and are quite likely to be counterproductive. Thus

  4. Thermal control of a lidar laser system using a non-conventional ram air heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Brian D.; Alexander, William, Jr.; Swofford, Doyle P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and performance testing of a uniquely designed external heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is attached externally to an aircraft and is used to cool a laser system within the fuselage. Estimates showed insufficient cooling capacity with a conventional staggered tube array in the limited space available. Thus, a non-conventional design wes developed with larger tube and fin area exposed to the ram air to increase the heat transfer performance. The basic design consists of 28 circular finned aluminum tubes arranged in two parallel banks. Wind tunnel tests were performed to simulate air and liquid flight conditions for the non-conventional parallel bank arrangement and the conventional staggered tube arrangement. Performance comparisons of each of the two designs are presented. Test results are used in a computer model of the heat exchanger to predict the operating performance for the entire flight profile. These analyses predict significantly improved performance over the conventional design and show adequate thermal control margins.

  5. Studies on the Sliding Wear Performance of Plasma Spray Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Balraj; Singh, Bhupinder

    2010-01-01

    Two metallic powders namely Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al were coated on AISI 309 SS steel by shrouded plasma spray process. The wear behavior of the bare, Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al-coated AISI 309 SS steel was investigated according to ASTM Standard G99-03 on a Pin-on-Disc Wear Test Rig. The wear tests were carried out at normal loads of 30 and 50 N with a sliding velocity of 1 m/s. Cumulative wear rate and coefficient of friction (μ) were calculated for all the cases. The worn-out surfaces were then examined by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Both the as-sprayed coatings exhibited typical splat morphology. The XRD analysis indicated the formation of Ni phase for the Ni-20Cr coating and Ni3Al phase for the Ni3Al coating. It has been concluded that the plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al coatings can be useful to reduce the wear rate of AISI 309 SS steel. The coatings were found to be adherent to the substrate steel during the wear tests. The plasma-sprayed Ni3Al coating has been recommended as a better choice to reduce the wear of AISI 309 SS steel, in comparison with the Ni-20Cr coating.

  6. Characterization of Nanostructured NbSi2 Intermetallic Coatings Obtained by Plasma Spraying of Mechanically Alloyed Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Zohreh; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Abbasi, Mohammad-Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured NbSi2 powders plasma sprayed on to Ti-6Al-4V substrates were characterized in this research. After preparation of the nanostructured NbSi2 powders by mechanical alloying of an Nb-Si powder mixture, agglomeration was performed to obtain a particle size suitable for spraying. The agglomerated powders were then sprayed by atmospheric plasma spraying. Structural transformation of the powders and morphological and mechanical changes of the coatings were examined by use of x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and microhardness testing. During milling, NbSi2 intermetallic with a grain size of approximately 15 nm was gradually formed. After plasma spraying, a coating of hardness 550 ± 8 HV with a uniform nanocrystalline structure, low oxide content, low porosity, and a good adhesion to the substrate was obtained. No phase change occurred after spraying and the NbSi2 compound remained nanostructured with a grain size of approximately 82 nm.

  7. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    DOEpatents

    Schilke, Peter W.; Muth, Myron C.; Schilling, William F.; Rairden, III, John R.

    1983-01-01

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  8. Preparation of SrZrO3 Thermal Barrier Coating by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinhui; Ma, Wen; Wen, Jing; Bai, Yu; Sun, Li; Chen, Baodong; Dong, Hongying; Shuang, Yingchai

    2017-02-01

    The solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process is capable of depositing highly durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In this study, an aqueous chemical precursor feedstock was injected into the plasma jet to deposit SrZrO3 thermal barrier coating on metal substrate. Taguchi design of experiments was employed to optimize the SPPS process. The thermal characteristics and phase evolution of the SrZrO3 precursor, as well as the influence of various spray parameters on the coating deposition rate, microhardness, microstructure, and phase stability, were investigated. The experimental results showed that, at given spray distance, feedstock flow rate, and atomization pressure, the optimized spray parameters were arc current of 600 A, argon flow rate of 40 L/min, and hydrogen flow rate of 10 L/min. The SrZrO3 coating prepared using the optimized spray parameters had single-pass thickness of 6.0 μm, porosity of 18%, and microhardness of 6.8 ± 0.1 GPa. Phase stability studies indicated that the as-sprayed SrZrO3 coating had good phase stability in the temperature range from room temperature to 1400 °C, gradually exhibiting a phase transition from t'-ZrO2 to m-ZrO2 in the SrZrO3 coating at 1450 °C with increasing time, while the SrZrO3 phase did not change.

  9. Vapors and Droplets Mixture Deposition of Metallic Coatings by Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautherin, B.; Planche, M.-P.; Bolot, R.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.; Montavon, G.

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, the very low pressure plasma-spraying (VLPPS) process has been intensely developed and implemented to manufacture thin, dense and finely structured ceramic coatings for various applications, such as Y2O3 for diffusion barriers, among other examples. This paper aims at presenting developments carried out on metallic coatings. Aluminum was chosen as a demonstrative material due to its "moderate" vaporization enthalpy (i.e., 38.23 KJ cm-3) compared to the one of copper (i.e., 55.33 KJ cm-3), cobalt (i.e., 75.03 KJ cm-3), or even tantalum (i.e., 87.18 KJ cm-3). The objective of this work is primarily to better understand the behavior of a solid precursor injected into the plasma jet leading to the formation of vapors and to better control the factors affecting the coating structure. Nearly dense aluminum coatings were successfully deposited by VLPPS at 100 Pa with an intermediate power plasma torch (i.e., Sulzer Metco F4 type gun with maximum power of 45 kW). Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was implemented to study and analyze the vapor behavior into the plasma jet. Simplified CFD modeling allowed better understanding of some of the thermo-physical mechanisms. The effect of powder-size distribution, substrate temperature and spray distance were studied. The phase composition and microstructural features of the coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. Moreover, Vickers microhardness measurements were implemented.

  10. Plasma-Spray Ionization (PLASI): A Multimodal Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source for Liquid Stream Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaylor, Adam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Pittman, Jennifer J.; Monge, María Eugenia; Cheng, Guilong; Li, Shelly; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2014-10-01

    A new ion generation method, named plasma-spray ionization (PLASI) for direct analysis of liquid streams, such as in continuous infusion experiments or liquid chromatography (LC), is reported. PLASI addresses many of the analytical limitations of electrospray ionization (ESI) and has potential for real time process stream analysis and reaction monitoring under atmospheric conditions in non-ESI friendly scenarios. In PLASI-mass spectrometry (MS), the liquid stream is pneumatically nebulized and partially charged at low voltages; the resultant aerosol is thus entrained with a gaseous plasma plume from a distal glow discharge prior to MS detection. PLASI-MS not only overcomes ESI-MS limitations but also generates simpler mass spectra with minimal adduct and cluster formation. PLASI utilizes the atomization capabilities of an ESI sprayer operated below the ESI threshold to generate gas-phase aerosols that are then ionized by the plasma stream. When operated at or above the ESI threshold, ionization by traditional ESI mechanisms is achieved. The multimodal nature of the technique enables readily switching between plasma and ESI operation. It is expected that PLASI will enable analyzing a wide range of analytes in complex matrices and less-restricted solvent systems, providing more flexibility than that achievable by ESI alone.

  11. Material fundamentals and clinical performance of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings: a review.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Berndt, C C; Gross, K A; Kucuk, A

    2001-01-01

    The clinical use of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on metal implants has aroused as many controversies as interests over the last decade. Although faster and stronger fixation and more bone growth have been revealed, the performance of HA-coated implants has been doubted. This article will initially address the fundamentals of the material selection, design, and processing of the HA coating and show how the coating microstructure and properties can be a good predictor of the expected behavior in the body. Further discussion will clarify the major concerns with the clinical use of HA coatings and introduce a comprehensive review concerning the outcomes experienced with respect to clinical practice over the past 5 years. A reflection on the results indicates that HA coatings can promote earlier and stronger fixation but exhibit a durability that can be related to the coating quality. Specific relationships between coating quality and clinical performance are being established as characterization methods disclose more information about the coating.

  12. On characterisation of wire-arc-plasma-sprayed Ni on alumina substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Laik, A.; Chakravarthy, D.P.; Kale, G.B. . E-mail: gbkale@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2005-08-15

    A study was carried out on metal-ceramic bonding produced by the technique of wire-arc-plasma spraying of Ni on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The Ni layer and the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface were characterised using optical and electro-optic techniques. The plasma-deposited Ni layer shows a uniform lamellar microstructure throughout the cross-section. The metal-ceramic interface was found to be well bonded with no pores, flaws or cracks in the as-sprayed condition. The optical metallography and concentration profiles established with the help of an electron probe microanalyser confirmed the absence of any intermediate phase at the interface. An annealing treatment at 1273 K for 24 h on the plasma-coated samples did not result in formation of any intermetallic compound or spinel at the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. This indicates that the oxygen picked up by Ni during the spraying operation is less than the threshold value required to form the spinel NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  13. Improvement of Coating Properties in Three-Cathode Atmospheric Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Kopp, N.; Warda, T.; Petković, I.; Zimmermann, S.; Hartz-Behrend, K.; Landes, K.; Forster, G.; Kirner, S.; Marqués, J.-L.; Schein, J.; Prehm, J.; Möhwald, K.; Bach, Fr.-W.

    2013-04-01

    The main aim of this study is to improve the coating properties of three-cathode atmospheric plasma-sprayed coatings with respect to porosity and residual stresses. This was done by means of numerical simulation coupled with advanced diagnostic methods. A numerical model for the triple injection of alumina feedstock, as well as acceleration and heating of the powder particles in the characteristic threefold symmetrical plasma jet cross section produced by a three-cathode-plasma torch, was developed. The modeling results for the standard injector's position "0" were calculated and experimentally verified by laser Doppler anemometry. Based on the criteria defined for the concentrated feedstock transport and homogeneous thermal treatment of powder particles in the plasma jet, the optimal injection position was found. In the next step, a previously developed, coupled CFD-FEM-simulation model was used for simulations of the coating build-up, describing flattening, solidification, and deformation due to shrinkage for alumina particles on a rough substrate surface.

  14. Preparation of Nanocomposite GDC/LSCF Cathode Material for IT-SOFC by Induction Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Almeida, Veronica Alexandra B.; Gitzhofer, François

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneous mixtures of Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 (GDC) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF) nanopowders were successfully synthesized using induction plasma by axial injection of a solution. The resulting nanocomposite powders consisted of two kinds of nanopowders with different mass ratio of GDC/LSCF, such as 3/7 and 6/4. The morphological features, crystallinity, and the phases of the synthesized powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), local energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The nanopowders are almost globular in shape with a diameter smaller than 100 nm and their BET specific areas are around 20 m2 g-1. The GDC and LSCF phases are well distributed in the nanopowders. In addition, suspensions, made with the as-synthesized composite nanopowders and ethanol, were used to deposit cathode coatings using suspension plasma spray (SPS). Micro-nanostructures of the coatings are discussed. The coatings are homogeneous and porous (51% porosity) with cauliflower structures.

  15. Fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier ceramics: Influence of processing, microstructure, and thermal aging

    DOE PAGES

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay; ...

    2014-06-09

    Fracture toughness has become one of the dominant design parameters that dictates the selection of materials and their microstructure to obtain durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Much progress has been made in characterizing the fracture toughness of relevant TBC compositions in bulk form, and it has become apparent that this property is significantly affected by process-induced microstructural defects. In this investigation, a systematic study of the influence of coating microstructure on the fracture toughness of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs has been carried out. Yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were fabricated under different spray process conditions inducing different levelsmore » of porosity and interfacial defects. Fracture toughness was measured on free standing coatings in as-processed and thermally aged conditions using the double torsion technique. Results indicate significant variance in fracture toughness among coatings with different microstructures including changes induced by thermal aging. Comparative studies were also conducted on an alternative TBC composition, Gd2Zr2O7 (GDZ), which as anticipated shows significantly lower fracture toughness compared to YSZ. Furthermore, the results from these studies not only point towards a need for process and microstructure optimization for enhanced TBC performance but also a framework for establishing performance metrics for promising new TBC compositions.« less

  16. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  17. Low-Energy Plasma Spray (LEPS) Deposition of Hydroxyapatite/Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Biocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alonso, Diana; Parco, Maria; Stokes, Joseph; Looney, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal spraying is widely employed to deposit hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-based biocomposites on hip and dental implants. For thick HA coatings (>150 μm), problems are generally associated with the build-up of residual stresses and lack of control of coating crystallinity. HA/polymer composite coatings are especially interesting to improve the pure HA coatings' mechanical properties. For instance, the polymer may help in releasing the residual stresses in the thick HA coatings. In addition, the selection of a bioresorbable polymer may enhance the coatings' biological behavior. However, there are major challenges associated with spraying ceramic and polymeric materials together because of their very different thermal properties. In this study, pure HA and HA/poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) thick coatings were deposited without significant thermal degradation by low-energy plasma spraying (LEPS). PCL has never been processed by thermal spraying, and its processing is a major achievement of this study. The influence of selected process parameters on microstructure, composition, and mechanical properties of HA and HA/PCL coatings was studied using statistical design of experiments (DOE). The HA deposition rate was significantly increased by the addition of PCL. The average porosity of biocomposite coatings was slightly increased, while retaining or even improving in some cases their fracture toughness and microhardness. Surface roughness of biocomposites was enhanced compared with HA pure coatings. Cell culture experiments showed that murine osteoblast-like cells attach and proliferate well on HA/PCL biocomposite deposits.

  18. Adhesive and cohesive properties by indentation method of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Z.; Ziaei-Moayyed, A. A.; Mesgar, A. Sheikh-Mehdi

    2007-03-01

    Adhesive and cohesive properties of the plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings, deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrates by varying the plasma power level and spray distance (SD), were evaluated by an indentation method. The crystallinity and the porosity decreased with increasing both of these two parameters. The microhardness value, Young's modulus ( E) and coating fracture toughness ( KC) were found to increase with a combinational increase in spray power and SD. The Knoop and Vickers indentation methods were used to estimate E and KC, respectively. The critical point at which no crack appears at the interface was determined by the interface indentation test. This was used to define the apparent interfacial toughness ( KCa) which is representative of the crack initiation resistance of the interface. It was found that KCa reaches to a maximum at a medium increase in both spray power and SD, while other mechanical properties of the coatings reaches to the highest value with further increase in these two plasma parameters. The tensile adhesion strength of the coatings, measure by the standard adhesion test, ISO 13779-4, was shown to alter in the same manner with KCa results. It was deduced that a combinational increase in spray power and SD which leads to a higher mechanical properties in the coatings, does not necessarily tends to a better mechanical properties at the interface.

  19. Effect of substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on residual stress in plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dapei

    2015-07-01

    A thermal-mechanical coupling model was developed based on thermal-elastic- plastic theory according the special process of plasma spraying Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating upon Ti-6Al-4V substrate. On the one hand, the classical Fourier transient heat conduction equation was modified by introducing the effect item of deformation on temperature, on the other hand, the Johnson-Cook model, suitable for high temperature and high strain rate conditions, was used as constitutive equation after considering temperature softening effect, strain hardening effect and strain rate reinforcement effect. Based on the above coupling model, the residual stress field within the HA coating was simulated by using finite element method (FEM). Meanwhile, the substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on the influence of residual stress components were calculated, respectively. The failure modes of coating were also preliminary analyzed. In addition, in order to verify the reliability of calculation, the material removal measurement technique was applied to determine the residual stress of HA coating near the interface. Some important conclusions are obtained.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Yttria- and Ceria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Obtained by Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łatka, Leszek; Cattini, Andrea; Chicot, Didier; Pawłowski, Lech; Kozerski, Stefan; Petit, Fabrice; Denoirjean, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Plasma generated by the SG-100 torch was applied to spray suspension formulated with the use of ZrO2 + 8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ) and ZrO2 + 24 wt.% CeO2 + 2.5 wt.% Y2O3 (24CeYSZ) as solid phases. The suspensions were formulated with the use of 20 wt.% solid phase, 40 wt.% water, and 40 wt.% ethanol. The plasma spray parameters were optimized by keeping constant: (a) the electric power of 40 kW and (b) the working gas compositions of 45 slpm for Ar and 5 slpm for H2. On the other hand, the spray distance was varied from 40 to 60 mm and the torch linear speed was varied from 300 to 500 mm/s. The coatings were sprayed onto stainless steel substrates, and their thicknesses were in the range from 70 to 110 μm. The coating microstructures were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. Mechanical properties were tested with the different methods including the indentation and scratch tests. The indentation test, carried out with various loads ranging from 100 to 10,000 mN, enabled to determine elastic modulus and Martens microhardness. Young's modulus of the coatings was in the range of 71-107 GPa for 8YSZ and 68-130 GPa for 24CeYSZ coatings. The scratch test enabled the authors to find the scratch macrohardness.

  1. Highly Segmented Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray: Effects of Spray Process on Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Honda, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Araki, Hiroshi; Murakami, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Sakka, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Effects of the ceramic powder size used for suspension as well as several processing parameters in suspension plasma spraying of YSZ were investigated experimentally, aiming to fabricate highly segmented microstructures for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to observe the atomization process and the velocity distribution of atomized droplets and ceramic particles travelling toward the substrates. The tested parameters included the secondary plasma gas (He versus H2), suspension injection flow rate, and substrate surface roughness. Results indicated that a plasma jet with a relatively higher content of He or H2 as the secondary plasma gas was critical to produce highly segmented YSZ TBCs with a crack density up to 12 cracks/mm. The optimized suspension flow rate played an important role to realize coatings with a reduced porosity level and improved adhesion. An increased powder size and higher operation power level were beneficial for the formation of highly segmented coatings onto substrates with a wider range of surface roughness.

  2. Plasma sprayed coatings for containment of Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Andraka, Charles E.; Gibbs, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), Y2O3, and Al2O3 plasma sprayed coatings are investigated for their ability to prevent attack of Haynes 230 by a near-eutectic Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material (PCM) in a closed environment at 820 °C. Areas where coatings failed were identified with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while chemical interactions were clarified through elemental mapping using electron microprobe analysis. Despite its susceptibility to reduction by Mg, the Al2O3 coating performed well while the YSZ and Y2O3 coating showed clear areas of attack. These results are attributed to the evolution of gaseous Mg at 820 °C leading to the formation of MgO and MgAl2O4.

  3. A TEM Study of the Microstructure of Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Near Inter-splat Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Er-Juan; Luo, Xiao-Tao; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu.

    2015-08-01

    The splat interface bonding state which changes heat transfer conditions and thus the cooling rate during splat cooling may influence the interface microstructure. In this paper, YSZ coating was deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying with substrate cooling during deposition. Subsequent characterization was implemented using high resolution transmission electron microscopy to examine the local microstructures near the interfaces at the bonded and unbonded zones. Selected area diffraction analyses of the splats across both the bonded interface and unbonded interface revealed that all bulk splats present a metastable tetragonal structure. Results showed that the size of columnar grains within a splat was significantly influenced by the interface bonding. At the unbonded region in the splat, large columnar grains form which can be attributed to poor thermal contact of melt to the underlying splat surface before its solidification. At the bonded zones, the splat presents a much fine columnar grain structure, which is attributed to good thermal contact of the melt to the underlying splat before solidification. Moreover, it is evident that the bonded interface region presents a distinct microstructure feature from the fine columnar grains suggesting the crystal defect of high density of dislocations at the interface.

  4. Numerical simulation of zirconia splat formation and cooling during plasma spray deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, YeMeng; Zheng, YunZhai; Zheng, ZhengHuan; Li, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    The adhesion/cohesion of plasma-sprayed coatings depends strongly on the flattening and solidification of individual splat, taking place in a few microseconds. Such a short time makes it difficult to thoroughly study the splat formation. A three-dimensional numerical model incorporating the substrate melting and solidification was developed using CFD method to simulate the flattening and cooling of zirconia splat involving the influence of interface thermal contact resistance. On smooth substrate where the thermal contact resistance is zero, the splat has a cooling rate of 1.7 × 108 K/s, resulting in substrate melting, and a disk-like splat is formed with a spread factor of approximately 3.5. While on substrate with thermal contact resistance of 10-7 m2 K/W, corresponding cooling rate is 3.17 × 108 K/s and a central splat surrounded by satellite droplets is formed due to the rapid solidification of the splat edges.

  5. Surface characterization and cytotoxicity analysis of plasma sprayed coatings on titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Zia Ur; Shabib, Ishraq; Haider, Waseem

    2016-10-01

    In the realm of biomaterials, metallic materials are widely used for load bearing joints due to their superior mechanical properties. Despite the necessity for long term metallic implants, there are limitations to their prolonged use. Naturally, oxides of titanium have low solubilities and form passive oxide film spontaneously. However, some inclusion and discontinuity spots in oxide film make implant to adopt the decisive nature. These defects heighten the dissolution of metal ions from the implant surface, which results in diminishing bio-integration of titanium implant. To increase the long-term metallic implant stability, surface modifications of titanium alloys are being carried out. In the present study, biomimetic coatings of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite and titanium were applied to the surface of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V. Surface morphology and surface chemistry were studied using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were carried out in order to study their electrochemical behavior. Moreover, cytotoxicity analysis was conducted for osteoblast cells by performing MTS assay. It is concluded that both hydroxyapatite and titanium coatings enhance corrosion resistance and improve cytocompatibility.

  6. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings have been successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They have been evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self-lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore 'wide temperature spectrum,' self-lubricating compositions.

  7. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-08-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of plasma-sprayed HA/SiO(2) coatings for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Morks, M F

    2008-01-01

    Fused silica powder has been mixed with hydroxyapatite (HA) powder and plasma sprayed by using gas tunnel-type plasma jet. The influence of silica content (10 wt% and 20 wt%) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of HA-silica coatings was investigated. For investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of HA-silica coatings, SUS 304 stainless steel was used as substrate material. The spraying was carried out on roughened substrate in an atmospheric chamber. Scanning electron microscope micrographs of cross-sectioned HA/SiO(2) coatings showed that the sprayed HA coatings with 10 and 20 wt% SiO(2) have dense structure with low porosity compared to the pure HA coatings. On the other hand, as the amount of silica was increased the coatings became denser, harder and exhibited high abrasive wear resistance. The presence of silica significantly improved the adhesive strength of HA/SiO(2) coatings mainly due to the increase in bonding strength of the coating at the interface.

  9. Processing of AlCoCrFeNiTi high entropy alloy by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löbel, M.; Lindner, T.; Kohrt, C.; Lampke, T.

    2017-03-01

    High Entropy Alloys (HEA) are gaining increasing interest due to their unique combination of properties. Especially the combination of high mechanical strength and hardness with distinct ductility makes them attractive for numerous applications. One interesting alloy system that exhibits excellent properties in bulk state is AlCoCrFeNiTi. A high strength, wear resistance and high-temperature resistance are the necessary requirements for the application in surface engineering. The suitability of blended, mechanically ball milled and inert gas atomized feedstock powders for the development of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) coatings is investigated in this study. The ball milled and inert gas atomized powders were characterized regarding their particle morphology, phase composition, chemical composition and powder size distribution. The microstructure and phase composition of the thermal spray coatings produced with different feedstock materials was investigated and compared with the feedstock material. Furthermore, the Vickers hardness (HV) was measured and the wear behavior under different tribological conditions was tested in ball-on-disk, oscillating wear and scratch tests. The results show that all produced feedstock materials and coatings exhibit a multiphase composition. The coatings produced with inert gas atomized feedstock material provide the best wear resistance and the highest degree of homogeneity.

  10. The abrasive wear of plasma sprayed nanoscale tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewksbury, Graham Alfred

    Thermal spray coatings composed of a variety of carbide sizes and cobalt contents were sprayed with a high energy plasma spray system. The size of the carbides used fell into three rough groupings, micrometer scale carbides (1--2 mum), submicrometer (700--300 nm), and nanoscale (≈100 nm). The feedstock powder was evaluated in terms of their size distribution, external morphology, internal morphology, and initial carbide size. Two different fixtures were used in spraying to evaluate the effect of cooling rate on the wear resistance of the coatings. The microstructures of the sprayed coatings were examined using optical metallography, SEM, FESEM, TEM, XRD and chemical analysis. The coatings were evaluated in low stress abrasive wear by the ASTM G-65 Dry Sand Rubber Wheel test. Furthermore, the porosity and hardness of the coatings were evaluated. The cobalt content was found to be the predominant influence on the wear rate of the coatings. The decrease in the carbide size was not found to effect the wear rate of the coatings. Coatings sprayed on the 'hot' fixture were found to have slightly improved wear resistance as compared to coatings sprayed on the 'cold' fixture. The wear rates of the coatings were found to be a function of the WC/Co volume ratio.

  11. Microstructure of a plasma-sprayed Mo-Si-B alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. J.; Okumus, S. C.; Besser, M. F.; Ünal, Ö.; Akinc, M.

    2000-03-01

    Powders of Mo52Si38B10 were plasma sprayed under inert conditions onto stainless steel substrates to determine if high density free standing forms could be synthesized by this process. Thermal spray conditions were varied to minimize porosity and oxygen impurities while minimizing evaporative metal losses. The assprayed and sintered microstructures were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and quantitative x-ray diffraction (XRD). The as-sprayed microstructure consisted of elongated splats tens of microns in length and only one to three microns in thickness. The splats contained submicrometer grains of primarily MoB and Mo5Si3B x (T1) and minor amounts of MoSi2 and a glassy grain boundary phase. The interior of the splats typically consisted of a fine eutectic of MoB and T1. Small pieces were cut out of the cross section of the sample and pressureless sintered for 2, 6, and 10 h at 1800 °C in flowing Ar. After sintering for 2 h at 1800 °C, the samples exhibited a coarser but equiaxed microstructure (1 to 5 µm grain size) containing 78 vol.% T1, 16 vol.% MoB, and 6 vol.% MoSi2 as determined by XRD. Approximately 8 at.% of the Si formed silica. The high-temperature anneal removed all vestiges of the layered structure observed in the as-sprayed samples.

  12. Microstructure and Thermal Properties of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Yb2Si2O7 Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Niu, Yaran; Huang, Liping; Li, Hong; Zheng, Xuebin; Ding, Chuanxian; Sun, Jinliang

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, Yb2Si2O7 powder was synthesized by solid-state reaction using Yb2O3 and SiO2 powders as starting materials. Atmospheric plasma spray technique was applied to fabricate Yb2Si2O7 coating. The phase composition and microstructure of the coating were characterized. The density, open porosity and Vickers hardness of the coating were investigated. Its thermal stability was evaluated by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the coating were measured. The results showed that the as-sprayed coating was mainly composed of crystalline Yb2Si2O7 with amorphous phase. The coating had a dense structure containing defects, such as pores, interfaces and microcracks. The TG-DTA results showed that there was almost no mass change from room temperature to 1200 °C, while a sharp exothermic peak appeared at around 1038 °C in DTA curve, which indicated that the amorphous phase crystallized. The thermal conductivity of the coating decreased with rise in temperature up to 600 °C and then followed by an increase at higher temperatures. The minimum value of the thermal conductivity of the Yb2Si2O7 coating was about 0.68 W/(m K).

  13. Fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier ceramics: Influence of processing, microstructure, and thermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-06-09

    Fracture toughness has become one of the dominant design parameters that dictates the selection of materials and their microstructure to obtain durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Much progress has been made in characterizing the fracture toughness of relevant TBC compositions in bulk form, and it has become apparent that this property is significantly affected by process-induced microstructural defects. In this investigation, a systematic study of the influence of coating microstructure on the fracture toughness of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs has been carried out. Yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were fabricated under different spray process conditions inducing different levels of porosity and interfacial defects. Fracture toughness was measured on free standing coatings in as-processed and thermally aged conditions using the double torsion technique. Results indicate significant variance in fracture toughness among coatings with different microstructures including changes induced by thermal aging. Comparative studies were also conducted on an alternative TBC composition, Gd2Zr2O7 (GDZ), which as anticipated shows significantly lower fracture toughness compared to YSZ. Furthermore, the results from these studies not only point towards a need for process and microstructure optimization for enhanced TBC performance but also a framework for establishing performance metrics for promising new TBC compositions.

  14. Suspension Plasma Spray Fabrication of Nanocrystalline Titania Hollow Microspheres for Photocatalytic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kun; Liu, Yi; He, Xiaoyan; Li, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Hollow inorganic microspheres with controlled internal pores in close-cell configuration are usually constructed by submicron-sized particles. Fast and efficient large-scale production of the microspheres with tunable sizes yet remains challenging. Here, we report a suspension plasma spray route for making hollow microspheres from nano titania particles. The processing permits most nano particles to retain their physiochemical properties in the as-sprayed microspheres. The microspheres have controllable interior cavities and mesoporous shell of 1-3 μm in thickness. Spray parameters and organic content in the starting suspension play the key role in regulating the efficiency of accomplishing the hollow sphere structure. For the ease of collecting the spheres for recycling use, ferriferous oxide particles were used as additives to make Fe3O4-TiO2 hollow magnetic microspheres. The spheres can be easily recycled through external magnetic field collection after each time use. Photocatalytic anti-bacterial activities of the hollow spheres were assessed by examining their capability of degrading methylene blue and sterilizing Escherichia coli bacteria. Excellent photocatalytic performances were revealed for the hollow spheres, giving insight into their potential versatile applications.

  15. The low cycle fatigue behavior of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C, but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  16. Quasistatic vs. Dynamic Modulus Measurements Of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Morscher, G. N.; Choi, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been demonstrated to exhibit nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior by quasistatic cyclic compression and cylindrical punch indentation measurements. In particular, the instantaneous (tangential) elastic modulus increases with applied stress and exhibits significant hysteresis during cycling. Sound velocity (dynamic) measurements also show an increase in TBC modulus with applied compressive stress, but in contrast show no significant hysteresis for the modulus during cycling. The nonlinear elastic behavior of the TBCs evidenced by these tests is attributed to coating compaction and internal sliding. The differences between the quasistatic and dynamic measurements are explained by the relative absence of the effect of internal sliding in the dynamic modulus measurements. By incorporating short load reversals into the larger loading cycle and measuring the instantaneous modulus at the start of each load reversal, the effects of internal sliding can be substantially reduced in the quasistatic measurements, and the resulting modulus values show good agreement with the modulus values determined by dynamic sound velocity measurements.

  17. Plasma Sprayed Ni-Al Coatings for Safe Ending Heat Exchanger Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Berndt, C.C.; Otterson, D.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AlB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand.

  18. Interaction Studies of Ceramic Vacuum Plasma Spraying for the Melting Crucible Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jong Hwan Kim; Hyung Tae Kim; Yoon Myung Woo; Ki Hwan Kim; Chan Bock Lee; R. S. Fielding

    2013-10-01

    Candidate coating materials for re-usable metallic nuclear fuel crucibles, TaC, TiC, ZrC, ZrO2, and Y2O3, were plasmasprayed onto a niobium substrate. The microstructure of the plasma-sprayed coatings and thermal cycling behavior were characterized, and U-Zr melt interaction studies were carried out. The TaC and Y2O3 coating layers had a uniform thickness, and high density with only a few small closed pores showing good consolidation, while the ZrC, TiC, and ZrO2 coatings were not well consolidated with a considerable amount of porosity. Thermal cycling tests showed that the adhesion of the TiC, ZrC, and ZrO2 coating layers with niobium was relatively weak compared to the TaC and Y2O3 coatings. The TaC and Y2O3 coatings had better cycling characteristics with no interconnected cracks. In the interaction studies, ZrC and ZrO2 coated rods showed significant degradations after exposure to U-10 wt.% Zr melt at 1600 degrees C for 15 min., but TaC, TiC, and Y2O3 coatings showed good compatibility with U-Zr melt.

  19. Ablation Resistance of C/C Composites with Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed W Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhe; Wang, Yuan; Gong, Jieming; Ge, Yicheng; Peng, Ke; Ran, Liping; Yi, Maozhong

    2016-12-01

    To improve the ablation resistance of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites, tungsten (W) coating with thickness of 1.2 mm was applied by atmospheric plasma spraying. The antiablation property of the coated composites was evaluated by oxyacetylene flame ablation experiments. The phase composition of the coating was investigated by a combination of x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis. The ablation resistance of the coated C/C substrates was compared with that of uncoated C/C composites and C/C-CuZr composites after ablation for 30 s. The properties of the coated C/C composites after ablation time of 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 s were further studied. The results indicated that the mass and linear ablation rates of the W-coated C/C composites were lower than those of uncoated C/C or C/C-CuZr composites after ablation for 30 s. The coating exhibited heat stability after 120 s of ablation, with mass loss and linear ablation rates of 7.39 × 10-3 g/s and 3.50 × 10-3 mm/s, respectively. However, the W coating became ineffective and failed after ablation for 180 s. Three ablation regions could be identified, in which the ablation mechanism of the coating changed from thermochemical to thermophysical erosion to mechanical scouring with increasing ablation time.

  20. Investigations on the Nature of Ceramic Deposits in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, W.; Mauer, G.; Gindrat, M.; Wäger, R.; Vaßen, R.

    2017-01-01

    In Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) process, major fractions of the feedstock powder can be evaporated so that coatings are deposited mainly from the vapor phase. In this work, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results indicate that such evaporation occurs significantly in the plasma torch nozzle and even nucleation and condensation of zirconia is highly possible there. Experimental work has been performed to investigate the nature of the deposits in the PS-PVD process, in particular coatings from condensate vapor and nano-sized clusters produced at two spraying distances of 1000 mm and 400 mm. At long spraying distance, columns in the coatings have pyramidal tops and very sharp faceted microstructures. When the spraying distance is reduced to 400 mm, the tops of columns become relatively flat and a faceted structure is not recognizable. XRD patterns show obvious preferred orientations of (110) and (002) in the coatings sprayed at 400 mm but only limited texture in the coatings sprayed at 1000 mm. Meanwhile, a non-line of sight coating was also investigated, which gives an example for pure vapor deposition. Based on these analyses, a vapor and cluster depositions are suggested to further explain the formation mechanisms of high-quality columnar-structured PS-PVD thermal barrier coatings which have already shown excellent performance in cyclic lifetime test.

  1. Deposition of titanium nitride layers by electric arc - Reactive plasma spraying method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Pascu, Doru Romulus

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a ceramic material which possesses high mechanical properties, being often used in order to cover cutting tools, thus increasing their lifetime, and also for covering components which are working in corrosive environments. The paper presents the experimental results on deposition of titanium nitride coatings by a new combined method (reactive plasma spraying and electric arc thermal spraying). In this way the advantages of each method in part are combined, obtaining improved quality coatings in the same time achieving high productivity. Commercially pure titanium wire and C45 steel as substrate were used for experiments. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the deposited coatings are composed of titanium nitride (TiN, Ti2N) and small amounts of Ti3O. The microstructure of the deposited layers, investigated both by optical and scanning electron microscopy, shows that the coatings are dense, compact, without cracks and with low porosity. Vickers microhardness of the coatings presents maximum values of 912 HV0.1. The corrosion tests in 3%NaCl solution show that the deposited layers have a high corrosion resistance compared to unalloyed steel substrate.

  2. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-02-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  3. Microstructural design of functionally graded coatings composed of suspension plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Cattini, Andrea; Bellucci, Devis; Sola, Antonella; Pawłowski, Lech; Cannillo, Valeria

    2014-04-01

    Various bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite (HA) functional coatings were designed by the suspension plasma spraying (SPS) technique. Their microstructure, scratch resistance, and apatite-forming ability in a simulated body fluid (SBF) were compared. The functional coatings design included: (i) composite coating, that is, randomly distributed constituent phases; (ii) duplex coating with glass top layer onto HA layer; and (iii) graded coating with a gradual changing composition starting from pure HA at the interface with the metal substrate up to pure glass on the surface. The SPS was a suitable coating technique to produce all the coating designs. The SBF tests revealed that the presence of a pure glass layer on the working surface significantly improved the reactivity of the duplex and graded coatings, but the duplex coating suffered a relatively low scratch resistance because of residual stresses. The graded coating therefore provided the best compromise between mechanical reliability and apatite-forming ability in SBF. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 551-560, 2014.

  4. Impact of New Technology Weapons on SAC (Strategic Air Command) Conventional Air Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    material for analysis in depth and later recommendations in regard to U.S. policies and institutions. 16 The intent of this study is to achieve the...objectives outlined by Colonel Dupuy. All material here is unclassified. A large amount of research material has been condensed in this study, but the...insure no misunderstanding on your part, a few definitions are necessary. Conventional weapon. This is any weapon that does not use nuclear materials as

  5. Indoor air quality in green vs conventional multifamily low-income housing.

    PubMed

    Colton, Meryl D; MacNaughton, Piers; Vallarino, Jose; Kane, John; Bennett-Fripp, Mae; Spengler, John D; Adamkiewicz, Gary

    2014-07-15

    Indoor air quality is an important predictor of health, especially in low-income populations. It is unclear how recent trends in "green" building affect the indoor exposure profile. In two successive years, we conducted environmental sampling, home inspections, and health questionnaires with families in green and conventional (control) apartments in two public housing developments. A subset of participants was followed as they moved from conventional to green or conventional to conventional housing. We measured particulate matter less than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5), formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nicotine, carbon dioxide (CO2), and air exchange rate (AER) over a seven-day sampling period coincident with survey administration. In multivariate models, we observed 57%, 65%, and 93% lower concentrations of PM2.5, NO2, and nicotine (respectively) in green vs control homes (p=0.032, p<0.001, p=0.003, respectively), as well as fewer reports of mold, pests, inadequate ventilation, and stuffiness. Differences in formaldehyde and CO2 were not statistically significant. AER was marginally lower in green buildings (p=0.109). Participants in green homes experienced 47% fewer sick building syndrome symptoms (p<0.010). We observed significant decreases in multiple indoor exposures and improved health outcomes among participants who moved into green housing, suggesting multilevel housing interventions have the potential to improve long-term resident health.

  6. Furnace Cyclic Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia-Yttria and Multi-Component Rare Earth Oxide Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Nesbitt, James A.; McCue, Terry R.; Barrett, Charles A.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to enable further increases in engine temperatures. However, the coating performance and durability become a major concern under the increasingly harsh thermal cycling conditions. Advanced zirconia- and hafnia-based cluster oxide thermal barrier coatings with lower thermal conductivity and improved thermal stability are being developed using a high-heat-flux laser-rig based test approach. Although the new composition coatings were not yet optimized for cyclic durability, an initial durability screening of numerous candidate coating materials was carried out using conventional furnace cyclic tests. In this paper, furnace thermal cyclic behavior of the advanced plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria-based thermal barrier coatings that were co-doped with multi-component rare earth oxides was investigated at 1163 C using 45 min hot cycles. The ceramic coating failure mechanisms were studied by using scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray diffraction phase analysis after the furnace tests. The coating cyclic lifetime will be discussed in relation to coating phase structures, total dopant concentrations, and other properties.

  7. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  8. Effects of Atomization Injection on Nanoparticle Processing in Suspension Plasma Spray

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hong-bing; Zhang, Cheng-yu; Zhang, Kai; Shao, Xue-ming

    2016-01-01

    Liquid atomization is applied in nanostructure dense coating technology to inject suspended nano-size powder materials into a suspension plasma spray (SPS) torch. This paper presents the effects of the atomization parameters on the nanoparticle processing. A numerical model was developed to simulate the dynamic behaviors of the suspension droplets, the solid nanoparticles or agglomerates, as well as the interactions between them and the plasma gas. The plasma gas was calculated as compressible, multi-component, turbulent jet flow in Eulerian scheme. The droplets and the solid particles were calculated as discrete Lagrangian entities, being tracked through the spray process. The motion and thermal histories of the particles were given in this paper and their release and melting status were observed. The key parameters of atomization, including droplet size, injection angle and velocity were also analyzed. The study revealed that the nanoparticle processing in SPS preferred small droplets with better atomization and less aggregation from suspension preparation. The injection angle and velocity influenced the nanoparticle release percentage. Small angle and low initial velocity might have more nanoparticles released. Besides, the melting percentage of nanoparticles and agglomerates were studied, and the critical droplet diameter to ensure solid melting was drawn. Results showed that most released nanoparticles were well melted, but the agglomerates might be totally melted, partially melted, or even not melted at all, mainly depending on the agglomerate size. For better coating quality, the suspension droplet size should be limited to a critical droplet diameter, which was inversely proportional to the cubic root of weight content, for given critical agglomerate diameter of being totally melted. PMID:28335222

  9. Deposition of nanostructured photocatalytic zinc ferrite films using solution precursor plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Dom, Rekha; Sivakumar, G.; Hebalkar, Neha Y.; Joshi, Shrikant V.; Borse, Pramod H.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly economic solution precursor route capable of producing films/coating even for mass scale production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pure spinel phase ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} porous, immobilized films deposited in single step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parameter optimization yields access to nanostructuring in SPPS method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ecofriendly immobilized ferrite films were active under solar radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such magnetic system display advantage w.r.t. recyclability after photocatalyst extraction. -- Abstract: Deposition of pure spinel phase, photocatalytic zinc ferrite films on SS-304 substrates by solution precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) has been demonstrated for the first time. Deposition parameters such as precursor solution pH, concentration, film thickness, plasma power and gun-substrate distance were found to control physico-chemical properties of the film, with respect to their crystallinity, phase purity, and morphology. Alkaline precursor conditions (7 < pH {<=} 10) were found to favor oxide film formation. The nanostructured films produced under optimized conditions, with 500 mM solution at pH {approx} 8.0, yielded pure cubic phase ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} film. Very high/low precursor concentrations yielded mixed phase, less adherent, and highly inhomogeneous thin films. Desired spinel phase was achieved in as-deposited condition under appropriately controlled spray conditions and exhibited a band gap of {approx}1.9 eV. The highly porous nature of the films favored its photocatalytic performance as indicated by methylene blue de-coloration under solar radiation. These immobilized films display good potential for visible light photocatalytic applications.

  10. Early apatite deposition and osteoblast growth on plasma-sprayed dicalcium silicate coating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuanyong; Xie, Youtao; Ding, Chuanxian; Chu, Paul K

    2005-09-01

    Dicalcium silicate coating was deposited onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate using plasma-spraying technology. The coating was immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h to investigate early apatite formation on the coating. Osteoblasts were also seeded onto the surface of the dicalcium silicate coating to evaluate its biocompatibility. Cold field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were used to evaluate the morphologies and determine the chemical composition of the coatings. The surface structural changes caused by immersion in SBF were analyzed using thin-film X-ray diffraction. After the dicalcium silicate coating was soaked in SBF solution 1-6 h, two types of particles containing calcium and phosphorus were formed on the surface. One type consisted of relatively larger particles (P1) precipitated on the surface of the coating from the precursor cluster formed in the SBF solution. The second type was composed of particles (P2) nucleated on the surface of the coating. With increasing immersion time, the particles coalesced to form a surface Ca-P layer. The Ca-P layer was composed of amorphous calcium phosphate that was not transformed to crystalline apatite until the immersion time in SBF exceeded 24 h. The formation mechanism of the Ca-P layer and apatite on the surface of the coating is believed to be involved in the formation of the Si 3-ring active surface site with negative charge. The cell-seeding test revealed that osteoblasts grew and proliferated very well on the surface of the dicalcium silicate coating.

  11. Erosion Performance of Gadolinium Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Processed by Suspension Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahade, Satyapal; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    7-8 wt.% Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the standard thermal barrier coating (TBC) material used by the gas turbines industry due to its excellent thermal and thermo-mechanical properties up to 1200 °C. The need for improvement in gas turbine efficiency has led to an increase in the turbine inlet gas temperature. However, above 1200 °C, YSZ has issues such as poor sintering resistance, poor phase stability and susceptibility to calcium magnesium alumino silicates (CMAS) degradation. Gadolinium zirconate (GZ) is considered as one of the promising top coat candidates for TBC applications at high temperatures (>1200 °C) due to its low thermal conductivity, good sintering resistance and CMAS attack resistance. Single-layer 8YSZ, double-layer GZ/YSZ and triple-layer GZdense/GZ/YSZ TBCs were deposited by suspension plasma spray (SPS) process. Microstructural analysis was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A columnar microstructure was observed in the single-, double- and triple-layer TBCs. Phase analysis of the as-sprayed TBCs was carried out using XRD (x-ray diffraction) where a tetragonal prime phase of zirconia in the single-layer YSZ TBC and a cubic defect fluorite phase of GZ in the double and triple-layer TBCs was observed. Porosity measurements of the as-sprayed TBCs were made by water intrusion method and image analysis method. The as-sprayed GZ-based multi-layered TBCs were subjected to erosion test at room temperature, and their erosion resistance was compared with single-layer 8YSZ. It was shown that the erosion resistance of 8YSZ single-layer TBC was higher than GZ-based multi-layered TBCs. Among the multi-layered TBCs, triple-layer TBC was slightly better than double layer in terms of erosion resistance. The eroded TBCs were cold-mounted and analyzed by SEM.

  12. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  13. Sintering and Fracture Behavior of Plasma-sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. There is a need to characterize the fundamental sintering and fracture behavior of the current ZrO2-(7 to 8)wt%Y2O3 coating, in order to fully take advantage of the coating capability. In addition, a thorough evaluation of the coating behavior and temperature limits will be useful for more accurately assessing the benefit gained from future advanced coating systems. In this study, the sintering behavior of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 coatings was systematically investigated as a function of temperature and time using a dilatometer in the temperature range of 1200-1500 C. The coating sintering kinetics obtained by dilatometry were compared with the coating thermal conductivity increase kinetics, determined by a steady-state laser heat-flux testing approach, under high temperature and thermal gradient sintering conditions. The mode I, mode II, and mixed mode I-mode II fracture behavior of as-processed and sintering-annealed coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at ambient and elevated temperatures in order to evaluate the coating sintering effects on the fracture envelope of K(sub I) versus K(sub II). The coating thermal conductivity cyclic response associated with the interface delamination of the coating systems under simulated engine heat-flux conditions will be discussed in conjunction with the sintering and fracture testing results.

  14. Advanced Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) for a Robust, Longlife and Safe Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Elam, Sandra K.; McKechnie, Timothy N.; Power, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    In 1984, the Vacuum Plasma Spray Lab was built at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center for applying durable, protective coatings to turbine blades for the space shuttle main engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbopump. Existing turbine blades were cracking and breaking off after five hot fire tests while VPS coated turbine blades showed no wear or cracking after 40 hot fire tests. Following that, a major manufacturing problem of copper coatings peeling off the SSME Titanium Main Fuel Valve Housing was corrected with a tenacious VPS copper coating. A patented VPS process utilizing Functional Gradient Material (FGM) application was developed to build ceramic lined metallic cartridges for space furnace experiments, safely containing gallium arsenide at 1260 degrees centigrade. The VPS/FGM process was then translated to build robust, long life, liquid rocket combustion chambers for the space shuttle main engine. A 5K (5,000 Lb. thrust) thruster with the VPS/FGM protective coating experienced 220 hot firing tests in pristine condition with no wear compared to the SSME which showed blanching (surface pulverization) and cooling channel cracks in less than 30 of the same hot firing tests. After 35 of the hot firing tests, the injector face plates disintegrated. The VPS/FGM process was then applied to spraying protective thermal barrier coatings on the face plates which showed 50% cooler operating temperature, with no wear after 50 hot fire tests. Cooling channels were closed out in two weeks, compared to one year for the SSME. Working up the TRL (Technology Readiness Level) to establish the VPS/FGM process as viable technology, a 40K thruster was built and is currently being tested. Proposed is to build a J-2X size liquid rocket engine as the final step in establishing the VPS/FGM process TRL for space flight.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Cu-8Cr-4Nb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Ellis, David; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert

    1997-01-01

    This paper compares the tensile properties of Cu-8Cr-4Nb material produced by VPS to material previously produced by extrusion. The microstructure of the VPS material is also presented. The combustion chamber liner of rocket motors represents an extreme materials application. The liner hot wall is exposed to a 2760 C (5000 F) flame while the cold side is exposed to cryogenic hydrogen liquid. Materials for use in the combustion chamber liner require a combination of high temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue resistance along with high thermal conductivity. The hot side is also subject to localized cycles between reducing and oxidizing environments that degrade the liner by a process called blanching. A new Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at% Nb (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) alloy has been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center as a replacement for the currently used alloy, NARloy-z (Cu-3 wt.% Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr). The alloy is strengthened by a fine dispersion of Cr2Nb particles. The alloy has better mechanical properties than NARloy-Z while retaining most of the thermal conductivity of pure copper. The alloy has been successfully consolidated by extrusion and hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). However, vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) offers several advantages over prior consolidation methods. VPS can produce a near net shape piece with the profile of the liner. In addition, oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings can be incorporated as an integral part of the liner hot wall during the VPS deposition. The low oxygen VPS Cu-8Cr-4Nb exhibits a higher strength than Cu-8Cr-4Nb produced by extrusion at elevated temperatures and a comparable strength at room temperature. Moduli and ductility were not significantly different. However, the ability to produce parts to near-net shape and maintain the good elevated temperature tensile properties of the extruded Cu-8Cr-4Nb makes VPS an attractive processing method for fabricating rocket engine combustion liners.

  16. Acoustic emission and fatigue damage induced in plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating layers.

    PubMed

    Laonapakul, Teerawat; Otsuka, Yuichi; Nimkerdphol, Achariya Rakngarm; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the adhesive strength of hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings, grit blasting with Al(2)O(3) powder and then wet blasting with HAp/Ti mixed powders was carried out on a commercially pure Ti (cp-Ti) substrate. Subsequently, an HAp/Ti bond coat layer and HAp top coat layer were deposited by plasma spraying. Fatigue tests of the HAp-coated specimens were carried out under four-point bending. Acoustic emission (AE) signals during the entire fatigue test were monitored to investigate the fatigue cracking behavior of the HAp-coated specimens. The HAp-coated specimens could survive up to 10(7) cycles without spallation of the HAp coating layers at the stress amplitude of 120 MPa. The HAp-coated specimens without HAp/Ti bond coat layer showed shorter fatigue life and easy crack nucleation compared to the HAp-coated specimens with HAp/Ti bond coat layer. The delamination and spallation of the HAp top coat with HAp/Ti bond coat on cp-Ti was not observed until the crack propagated into the cp-Ti during the final fracture stage of the fatigue cycle. Therefore, the HAp/Ti bond coat layer was found to greatly improve the fatigue damage resistance of the HAp coating layer. Three stages of the fatigue failure behavior of the HAp top coat with HAp/Ti bond coat on a cp-Ti substrate can be clearly estimated by the AE monitoring technique. These stages are cracks nucleating and propagating in the coating layer, cracks propagating in the substrate, and cracks propagating unstably to final fracture.

  17. Post-heat treatment pressure effect on performances of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chun-Huang; Hwang, Chang-sing; Chang, Chun-Liang; Yu, Jen-Feng; Nien, Sheng-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The nickel metal-supported cells fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying are post-heat treated in air at 960 °C for 2 h with different pressures. The current-voltage-power and AC impedance measurements show the prepared cell with an applied pressure of 450 g cm-2 in the post-heat treatment has a better electrochemical performance at test temperatures ≥ 650 °C. For test temperatures < 650 °C, the maximum power densities at 450 g cm-2 pressure are about the same as the maximum power densities at 1250 g cm-2 pressure. The SEM micrograph indicates that the cathode including the cathode interlayer and the cathode collector is the most porous region in the cell. AC impedance results show this cathode is the most sensitive part to the applied pressure in the post-heat treatment and the cell with 450 g cm-2 pressure has the smallest low frequency intercept R2 and the polarization resistance Rp at temperatures from 600 to 800 °C. The performance durability test of the cell post-heat treated at 450 g cm-2 pressure shows a degradation rate of 0.0087 mV h-1 or 0.0026 mW h-1 at 300 mA cm-2 constant current density and 750 °C test temperature.

  18. Monolithic mass sensor fabricated using a conventional technology with attogram resolution in air conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verd, J.; Uranga, A.; Abadal, G.; Teva, J.; Torres, F.; Pérez-Murano, F.; Fraxedas, J.; Esteve, J.; Barniol, N.

    2007-07-01

    Monolithic mass sensors for ultrasensitive mass detection in air conditions have been fabricated using a conventional 0.35μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. The mass sensors are based on electrostatically excited submicrometer scale cantilevers integrated with CMOS electronics. The devices have been calibrated obtaining an experimental sensitivity of 6×10-11g/cm2Hz equivalent to 0.9ag/Hz for locally deposited mass. Results from time-resolved mass measurements are also presented. An evaluation of the mass resolution have been performed obtaining a value of 2.4×10-17g in air conditions, resulting in an improvement of these devices from previous works in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and fabrication process complexity.

  19. In vitro biological response of plasma electrolytically oxidized and plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Wing Kiu; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Matthews, Allan; Yerokhin, Aleksey

    2013-08-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a relatively new surface modification process that may be used as an alternative to plasma spraying methods to confer bioactivity to Ti alloy implants. The aim of this study was to compare physical, chemical and biological surface characteristics of two coatings applied by PEO processes, containing different calcium phosphate (CaP) and titanium dioxide phases, with a plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. Coating characteristics were examined by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry, and wettability tests. The biological properties were determined using the human osteoblastic cell line MG-63 to assess cell viability, calcium and collagen synthesis. The tests showed that PEO coatings are significantly more hydrophilic (6%) and have 78% lower surface roughness (Ra) than the plasma-sprayed coatings. Cell behavior was demonstrated to be strongly dependent on the phase composition and surface distribution of elements in the PEO coating. MG-63 viability for the TiO2 -based PEO coating containing amorphous CaPs was significantly lower than that for the PEO coating containing crystalline HA and the plasma-sprayed coating. However, collagen synthesis on both the CaP and the TiO2 PEO coatings was significantly higher (92% and 71%, respectively) than on the plasma-sprayed coating after 14 days. PEO has been demonstrated to be a promising method for coating of orthopedic implant surfaces.

  20. High-speed thermal imaging of yttria-stabilized zirconia droplet impinging on substrate in plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Shinoda, Kentaro; Murakami, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Seiji; Oki, Sachio; Takehara, Kohsei; Etoh, Takeharu Goji

    2007-05-07

    The authors have developed an in situ monitoring system that captures the impacting phenomena of plasma-sprayed particles at 1x10{sup 6} frames/s. The system clearly captured deformation and cooling processes of an yttria-stabilized zirconia droplet of 50 {mu}m in diameter impinging at 170 m/s on a smooth quartz glass substrate kept at room temperature. The images show that the liquid sheet jetting out sideways from the droplet detached from the substrate and kept on spreading without disintegration until its maximum extent. While the sheet was spreading, the center region of the flattened droplet cooled down much more rapidly.

  1. Some adhesion/cohesion characteristics of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 under tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, Robert L.; Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Mcdonald, Glen

    1987-01-01

    A set of 12.7 mm diameter stainless steel tubes were coated with ceramic and expanded. The bond cast was 0.08 to 0.13 mm NiCrAlY with 0.38 mm of ZrO2-8Y2O3 ceramic. Upon pressurization, the tube substrate yielded and overstressed the coatings in tension. The coatings cracked (i.e., they failed) but did not come off the tube. These results demonstrate that tensile failure of plasma-sprayed coatings is not catastrophic as is compressive failure, which leads to spallation.

  2. Effect of Samarium Oxide on the Electrical Conductivity of Plasma-Sprayed SOFC Anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, S. N.; Samadi, H.; Nemati, A.

    2016-10-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are rapidly becoming recognized as a new alternative to traditional energy conversion systems because of their high energy efficiency. From an ecological perspective, this environmentally friendly technology, which produces clean energy, is likely to be implemented more frequently in the future. However, the current SOFC technology still cannot meet the demands of commercial applications due to temperature constraints and high cost. To develop a marketable SOFC, suppliers have tended to reduce the operating temperatures by a few hundred degrees. The overall trend for SOFC materials is to reduce their service temperature of electrolyte. Meanwhile, it is important that the other components perform at the same temperature. Currently, the anodes of SOFCs are being studied in depth. Research has indicated that anodes based on a perovskite structure are a more promising candidate in SOFCs than the traditional system because they possess more favorable electrical properties. Among the perovskite-type oxides, SrTiO3 is one of the most promising compositions, with studies demonstrating that SrTiO3 exhibits particularly favorable electrical properties in contrast with other perovskite-type oxides. The main purpose of this article is to describe our study of the effect of rare-earth dopants with a perovskite structure on the electrical behavior of anodes in SOFCs. Sm2O3-doped SrTiO3 synthesized by a solid-state reaction was coated on substrate by atmospheric plasma spray. To compare the effect of the dopant on the electrical conductivity of strontium titanate, different concentrations of Sm2O3 were used. The samples were then investigated by x-ray diffraction, four-point probe at various temperatures (to determine the electrical conductivity), and a scanning electron microscope. The study showed that at room temperature, nondoped samples have a higher electrical resistance than doped samples. As the temperature was increased, the electrical

  3. Influence of Cold-Sprayed, Warm-Sprayed, and Plasma-Sprayed Layers Deposition on Fatigue Properties of Steel Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizek, J.; Matejkova, M.; Dlouhy, I.; Siska, F.; Kay, C. M.; Karthikeyan, J.; Kuroda, S.; Kovarik, O.; Siegl, J.; Loke, K.; Khor, Khiam Aik

    2015-06-01

    Titanium powder was deposited onto steel specimens using four thermal spray technologies: plasma spray, low-pressure cold spray, portable cold spray, and warm spray. The specimens were then subjected to strain-controlled cyclic bending test in a dedicated in-house built device. The crack propagation was monitored by observing the changes in the resonance frequency of the samples. For each series, the number of cycles corresponding to a pre-defined specimen cross-section damage was used as a performance indicator. It was found that the grit-blasting procedure did not alter the fatigue properties of the steel specimens (1% increase as compared to as-received set), while the deposition of coatings via all four thermal spray technologies significantly increased the measured fatigue lives. The three high-velocity technologies led to an increase of relative lives to 234% (low-pressure cold spray), 210% (portable cold spray), and 355% (warm spray) and the deposition using plasma spray led to an increase of relative lives to 303%. The observed increase of high-velocity technologies (cold and warm spray) could be attributed to a combination of homogeneous fatigue-resistant coatings and induction of peening stresses into the substrates via the impingement of the high-kinetic energy particles. Given the intrinsic character of the plasma jet (low-velocity impact of semi/molten particles) and the mostly ceramic character of the coating (oxides, nitrides), a hypothesis based on non-linear coatings behavior is provided in the paper.

  4. Investigations on the Initial Stress Evolution During Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of YSZ by In Situ Curvature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutter, Markus; Mauer, Georg; Mücke, Robert; Vaßen, Robert; Back, Hyoung Chul; Gibmeier, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The residual stresses within plasma-sprayed coatings are an important factor that can influence the lifetime as well as the performance in operation. The investigation of stresses evolving during deposition and post-deposition cooling for atmospheric plasma spraying of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings using in situ measurement of the samples curvature is a powerful tool for identifying the factors that contribute to stress generation. Under various spray conditions, the first deposition pass leads to a significantly larger increase in samples curvature than the subsequent passes. It is shown in this work that the amount of curvature change at the onset of spraying is significantly influenced by the spray conditions, as well as by the substrate material. More information on the origin of this steep curvature increase at the onset of spraying was obtained by single splat experiments, which yielded information on the splat bonding behavior under various conditions. A comparison of the compressive yield strength for different substrate materials indicated the influence of substrate residual stress relaxation. Residual stress measurements using the incremental hole-drilling method and x-ray diffraction confirmed that the coating deposition affects the substrate residual stress level. The yield strength data were combined with the substrate near-surface temperature during deposition, obtained by finite element simulations, and with the measured residual stress-profile. This revealed that residual stress relaxation is the key factor for the initial curvature increase.

  5. Production of composite Si nanoparticles by plasma spraying PVD and CH4 annealing for negative electrodes of lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Ryoshi; Ohta, Yutaro; Tashiro, Toru; Kambara, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Si is a promising candidate as anode of next generation high density Li ion batteries. This material, however, needs to be nanostructured, nanoparticles and C coating of active material, to cope with huge volume change and associated rapid capacity decay. Si nanoparticles with 20-40 nm have been successfully produced by plasma spraying PVD and also Si-C core-shell composite particles by adding CH4 during processing. The battery performance has been improved with these nanopowders as anode, especially with the C coated Si particles. However, SiC that is inactive in battery reaction forms inevitably at high temperature during plasma spraying PVD and reduces the capacity density. In this work, therefore, post CH4 annealing was attempted to form Si-C nanocomposite particles while suppressing formation of SiC. The primary Si nanoparticles were unchanged in size after annealing and were coated with the finer carbonous particles that formed after CH4 infiltration through pores between nanoparticles. The batteries using annealed powders with C/Si molar ratio of 0.3 have shown two-fold capacity retention increase after 50 cycles with no capacity reduction associated with SiC formation as compared to the powders without C. This work was partly supported by the Funding Program for Next Generation World-Leading Researchers (NEXT Program) of Japan.

  6. One-Step Synthesis of Pt/Graphene Composites from Pt Acid Dissolved Ethanol via Microwave Plasma Spray Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun Hee; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Sun Kyung; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Park, Su-Ryeon; Lee, Chong Min; Jang, Hee Dong

    2016-01-01

    Pt nanoparticles-laden graphene (Pt/GR) composites were synthesized in the gas phase from a mixture of ethanol and Pt precursor by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. The morphology of Pt/GR composites has the shape of wrinkled sheets of paper, while Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) that are less than 2.6 nm in the mean diameter are uniformly well deposited on the surface of GR sheets stacked in only three layers. The Pt/GR composite prepared with 20 wt% of Pt had the highest specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of up to 402 m2 g−1 and 77 m2 g−1 (Pt), respectively. In addition, the composite showed superior electrocatalytic activity compared with commercial Pt-carbon black. The excellent electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the high specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of the Pt/GR composite directly produced by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. Thus, it is clearly expected that the Pt/GR composite is a promising material for DMFC catalysts. PMID:27622908

  7. Effect of Particle Size on the Micro-cracking of Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Coatings During Thermal Cycle Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jibo; Wang, Weize; Yu, Jingye; Wu, Liangmin; Feng, Zhengqu

    2017-03-01

    The failure of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during service or thermal cycle testing usually results from internal cracking in the top coat, erosion and CMAS (calcium-magnesium-alumina-silicate)-induced damage, etc. The microstructure of ceramic coatings affects their durability and other properties of TBCs. In the present study, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) using feedstocks with different particle sizes. In addition, the effect of particle size on damage evolution in the top coat was investigated. It is found that the coatings deposited using coarse particles show the higher thermal cycle life. Crack length grew with increasing numbers of thermal cycles. The faster crack growth rate can be found for the coatings deposited from fine particles. The porosity of the coating made from the coarse powder is larger than the porosity of the coating made from fine powder both in the as-sprayed condition and after thermal cycling. The changes in crack growth rate and the porosity are related to the effect of sintering and stress evolution in coatings during the thermal cyclic tests.

  8. Effect of Sulfur Acid Corrosion on the Luminescent Intensity of Plasma-Sprayed YAG:Ce Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weize; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Hehui; Yu, Jingye; Wu, Liangmin

    2017-01-01

    In order to monitor the corrosion condition of components, plasma-sprayed YAG:Ce coating was prepared for the detection, which could develop the application of plasma spraying. The effect of sulfuric acid corrosion on the microstructure, phase composition and luminescence intensity of coatings was studied. The powder was synthesized by the high-temperature solid-state method. Microstructure and phases were characterized through using SEM and XRD, respectively. Effect of immersion time in the acid was studied on the luminescence intensity. It was found that the phase composition of the powder was dominated by YAG (Y3Al5O12). More pores could be observed in coatings with the increase in immersion time. Sprayed coatings mainly included phases of YAG and YAP (YAlO3). The position of the XRD peaks of coatings was changing during the immersion. The luminescence intensity showed the fluctuation tendency with the immersion time, which related to the coating porosity, phase composition and the migration of the diffract peak.

  9. Plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on carbon/carbon composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering and related tests in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ning; Dong, Jianwen; Wang, Qiangxiu; Ma, Quansheng; Wang, Feng; Chen, Huaying; Xue, Chengqian; Li, Musen

    2010-03-01

    The bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings were successfully prepared on carbon/carbon composites (C/C) by means of sand-blasting pretreatment and plasma-spraying technology. X-ray diffraction was employed to analyze the phase constitute of the coatings. Meanwhile, the bond strength between the HA coatings and C/C substrates was determined via shear test. Experimental results show that the coatings constitute HA, CaO, and other amorphous phosphates. The post heat treatment could effectively increase crystallization and purity of the coatings. Through observation and analysis by electron microprobe and scanning electron microscopy, it is concluded that the bond strength of the plasma-sprayed HA coatings on C/C is mainly determined by the interface structure and can be further improved by the post heat treatment. Meanwhile, the implantation in vivo was carried out in hybrid goats. The histological observation revealed that the osteoplaque gradually grew on the surface of the HA coatings and the pure C/C surface was covered by the fibrous tissues. No inflammation symptoms were found in the bone tissue around the implants.

  10. A plasma spray process for the manufacture of long-fiber reinforced Ti-6Al-4V composite monotapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, T.; Bartuli, C.

    1994-03-01

    A fabrication method for titanium matrix composite monotapes reinforced by long SiC fibers is described. The plasma spray technique, carried out in an inert atmosphere, was used to deposit the metal matrix onto previously arranged continuous fibers. Major benefits are due to a controlled operating environment (the entire process is performed in a neutral gas atmosphere) and to the high solidification rate of the melted material. The formation of deleterious brittle reaction products between the fiber and matrix is therefore limited. Plasma spraying, normally used as a coating technique, was modified to produce a long composite monotape. This required a suitable arrangement of the fiber, placed onto a cylindrical substrate, and the identification of suitable operating conditions, as described in the present work. The results of characterization tests performed on the tape, with special reference to the quality of the fiber/matrix interface, are summarized. Results of preliminary diffusion bonding experiments carried out by means of a hot pressing system are also reported.

  11. One-Step Synthesis of Pt/Graphene Composites from Pt Acid Dissolved Ethanol via Microwave Plasma Spray Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eun Hee; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Sun Kyung; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Park, Su-Ryeon; Lee, Chong Min; Jang, Hee Dong

    2016-09-13

    Pt nanoparticles-laden graphene (Pt/GR) composites were synthesized in the gas phase from a mixture of ethanol and Pt precursor by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. The morphology of Pt/GR composites has the shape of wrinkled sheets of paper, while Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) that are less than 2.6 nm in the mean diameter are uniformly well deposited on the surface of GR sheets stacked in only three layers. The Pt/GR composite prepared with 20 wt% of Pt had the highest specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of up to 402 m(2) g(-1) and 77 m(2) g(-1) (Pt), respectively. In addition, the composite showed superior electrocatalytic activity compared with commercial Pt-carbon black. The excellent electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the high specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of the Pt/GR composite directly produced by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. Thus, it is clearly expected that the Pt/GR composite is a promising material for DMFC catalysts.

  12. One-Step Synthesis of Pt/Graphene Composites from Pt Acid Dissolved Ethanol via Microwave Plasma Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Eun Hee; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Sun Kyung; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Park, Su-Ryeon; Lee, Chong Min; Jang, Hee Dong

    2016-09-01

    Pt nanoparticles-laden graphene (Pt/GR) composites were synthesized in the gas phase from a mixture of ethanol and Pt precursor by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. The morphology of Pt/GR composites has the shape of wrinkled sheets of paper, while Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) that are less than 2.6 nm in the mean diameter are uniformly well deposited on the surface of GR sheets stacked in only three layers. The Pt/GR composite prepared with 20 wt% of Pt had the highest specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of up to 402 m2 g‑1 and 77 m2 g‑1 (Pt), respectively. In addition, the composite showed superior electrocatalytic activity compared with commercial Pt-carbon black. The excellent electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the high specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of the Pt/GR composite directly produced by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. Thus, it is clearly expected that the Pt/GR composite is a promising material for DMFC catalysts.

  13. Chemical Stability and Biological Properties of Plasma-Sprayed CaO-SiO2-ZrO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Xie, Youtao; Ji, Heng; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2010-12-01

    In this work, calcia-stabilized zirconia powders were coated by silica derived from tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) hydrolysis. After calcining at 1400 °C, decalcification of calcia-stabilized zirconia by silica occurred and powders composed of Ca2SiO4, ZrO2, and CaZrO3 were prepared. We produced three kinds of powders with different Ca2SiO4 contents [20 wt.% (denoted as CZS2), 40 wt.% (denoted as CZS4), and 60 wt.% (denoted as CZS6)]. The obtained powders were sprayed onto Ti-6Al-4V substrates using atmospheric plasma spraying. The microstructure of the powders and coatings were analyzed. The dissolution rates of the coatings were assessed by monitoring the ions release and mass losses after immersion in Tris-HCl buffer solution. Results showed that the chemical stability of the coatings were significantly improved compared with pure calcium silicate coatings, and increased with the increase of Zr contents. The CZS4 coating showed not only good apatite-formation ability in simulated body fluid, but also well attachment and proliferation capability for the canine bone marrow stem cells. Results presented here indicate that plasma-sprayed CZS4 coating has medium dissolution rate and good biological properties, suggesting its potential use as bone implants.

  14. Characteristics of yttrium fluoride and yttrium oxide coatings for plasma process equipment prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Ken; Wuu, Dong-Sing; Huang, Shih-Yung; Wang, Wei-Kai

    2016-12-01

    In this study, yttrium fluoride (YF3) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) coatings were prepared by an atmospheric plasma spraying technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). YF3 powders were sprayed at various plasma spraying powers of 9, 15, and 21 kW. The XRD result indicates that the YF3 coating shows preferred orientations and was well crystallized. The XPS results revealed a strong Y-F bond on the YF3 coating surface. A porosity value analysis showed that the porosity of the YF3 coating was lower than that of the Y2O3 coating. Moreover, the dielectric strength of the YF3 coating (22.65 kV/mm) was higher than that of the Y2O3 coating (14.42 kV/mm). This confirms that the YF3 coating exhibits a breakdown voltage of 4.97 kV, which is more than 1.5 times higher than that observed for the Y2O3 coating (3.29 kV). These results indicate that the YF3 coating has better mechanical and dielectric properties than the Y2O3 coating, indicating that the YF3 coating is a very attractive novel antiplasma and corrosion-resistant material.

  15. Cluster model of amorphized particles formation by plasma spraying of metallic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakhtin, Boris K.; Nesterova, E. V.

    1999-05-01

    Multifunctional coatings from materials with amorphized microcrystalline or nano-phase structure cause a considerable scientific and practical interest. With their help it is to manufacture heat resistant neutralizers of harmful ejections, to produce ecologically clean sources of electric current, to design electromagnetic protective shields and to fabricate a lot of other technical products. The variety of application and a unique complex of operating characteristics (ductility, strength, magnetic and chemical properties) are governed by the basic peculiarity of material in amorphized state - its thermodynamic instability. In comparison with traditional thermodynamically equilibrium metallic alloys, the kinetics of structure changes in amorphous materials is quite different. Thus, it is suggested, that they have peculiar defects (phasonics) which are not typical of materials in crystalline state, they have no translational symmetry and elementary cells. In the process of coatings forming with non-equilibrium structure states can be realized in them, which are characterized by a fluctuation type of origin, entropy export, appearance of space or temporary symmetry uncertainty of the transition direction 'order $ARLR disorder' in bifurcation points. The aforesaid explains a great scientific (not only practical) interest in the structure study of disordered medium. Functional coatings with amorphized, nano- and microcrystalline structure components formed on copper substrate by plasma spraying of dispersed (to 50 mcm) Ni-Al powder. According to the constitutional diagram it was expected to obtain a mixture from equilibrium intermetallide phases NiAl3 + Ni2Al3. The experimental results and investigations performed by X-ray structure, X-ray spectrum and electron microscopy techniques have shown it is possible to obtain phases of variable composition (Ni)m(Al)n with Ni content from 25 to 75 vol.%, including NiAl. It turned out that in the process of spraying the

  16. Air gasification of rice husk in bubbling fluidized bed reactor with bed heating by conventional charcoal.

    PubMed

    Makwana, J P; Joshi, Asim Kumar; Athawale, Gaurav; Singh, Dharminder; Mohanty, Pravakar

    2015-02-01

    An experimental study of air gasification of rice husk was conducted in a bench-scale fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) having 210 mm diameter and 1600 mm height. Heating of sand bed material was performed using conventional charcoal fuel. Different operating conditions like bed temperature, feeding rate and equivalence ratio (ER) varied in the range of 750-850 °C, 25-31.3 kg/h, and 0.3-0.38, respectively. Flow rate of air was kept constant (37 m(3)/h) during FBG experiments. The carbon conversion efficiencies (CCE), cold gas efficiency, and thermal efficiency were evaluated, where maximum CCE was found as 91%. By increasing ER, the carbon conversion efficiency was decreased. Drastic reduction in electric consumption for initial heating of gasifier bed with charcoal compared to ceramic heater was ∼45%. Hence rice husk is found as a potential candidate to use directly (without any processing) in FBG as an alternative renewable energy source from agricultural field.

  17. Dynamics of Air Temperature, Velocity and Ammonia Emissions in Enclosed and Conventional Pig Housing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Song, J. I.; Park, K.-H.; Jeon, J. H.; Choi, H. L.; Barroga, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the dynamics of air temperature and velocity under two different ventilation and housing systems during summer and winter in Korea. The NH3 concentration of both housing systems was also investigated in relation to the pig’s growth. The ventilation systems used were; negative pressure type for the enclosed pig house (EPH) and natural airflow for the conventional pig house (CPH). Against a highly fluctuating outdoor temperature, the EPH was able to maintain a stable temperature at 24.8 to 29.1°C during summer and 17.9 to 23.1°C during winter whilst the CPH had a wider temperature variance during summer at 24.7 to 32.3°C. However, the temperature fluctuation of the CPH during winter was almost the same with that of EPH at 14.5 to 18.2°C. The NH3 levels in the CPH ranged from 9.31 to 16.9 mg/L during summer and 5.1 to 19.7 mg/L during winter whilst that of the EPH pig house was 7.9 to 16.1 mg/L and 3.7 to 9.6 mg/L during summer and winter, respectively. These values were less than the critical ammonia level for pigs with the EPH maintaining a lower level than the CPH in both winter and summer. The air velocity at pig nose level in the EPH during summer was 0.23 m/s, enough to provide comfort because of the unique design of the inlet feature. However, no air movement was observed in almost all the lower portions of the CPH during winter because of the absence of an inlet feature. There was a significant improvement in weight gain and feed intake of pigs reared in the EPH compared to the CPH (p<0.05). These findings proved that despite the difference in the housing systems, a stable indoor temperature was necessary to minimize the impact of an avoidable and highly fluctuating outdoor temperature. The EPH consistently maintained an effective indoor airspeed irrespective of season; however the CPH had defective and stagnant air at pig nose level during winter. Characteristics of airflow direction and pattern were consistent relative to

  18. The air quality impacts of road closures associated with the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Jonathan I; Baxter, Lisa K; Clougherty, Jane E

    2006-01-01

    Background The Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Boston, Massachusetts in 2004 provided an opportunity to evaluate the impacts of a localized and short-term but potentially significant change in traffic patterns on air quality, and to determine the optimal monitoring approach to address events of this nature. It was anticipated that the road closures associated with the DNC would both influence the overall air pollution level and the distribution of concentrations across the city, through shifts in traffic patterns. Methods To capture these effects, we placed passive nitrogen dioxide badges at 40 sites around metropolitan Boston before, during, and after the DNC, with the goal of capturing the array of hypothesized impacts. In addition, we continuously measured elemental carbon at three sites, and gathered continuous air pollution data from US EPA fixed-site monitors and traffic count data from the Massachusetts Highway Department. Results There were significant reductions in traffic volume on the highway with closures north of Boston, with relatively little change along other highways, indicating a more isolated traffic reduction rather than an across-the-board decrease. For our nitrogen dioxide samples, while there was a relatively small change in mean concentrations, there was significant heterogeneity across sites, which corresponded with our a priori classifications of road segments. The median ratio of nitrogen dioxide concentrations during the DNC relative to non-DNC sampling periods was 0.58 at sites with hypothesized traffic reductions, versus 0.88 for sites with no changes hypothesized and 1.15 for sites with hypothesized traffic increases. Continuous monitors measured slightly lower concentrations of elemental carbon and nitrogen dioxide during road closure periods at monitors proximate to closed highway segments, but not for PM2.5 or further from major highways. Conclusion We conclude that there was a small but measurable influence of DNC

  19. Mode I, Mode II, and Mixed-Mode Fracture of Plasma-sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in air at 25 and 1316 C in asymmetric four-point flexure with single edge v-notched beam (SEVNB) test specimens. The mode I fracture toughness was found to be K(sub Ic) = 1.15 plus or minus 0.07 and 0.98 plus or minus 0.13 MPa the square root of m, respectively, at 25 and 1316 C. The respective mode II fracture toughness values were K(sub IIc) = 0.73 plus or minus 0.10 and 0.65 plus or minus 0.04 MPa the square root of m. Hence, there was an insignificant difference in either K(sub Ic or K(sub IIc) between 25 and 1316 C for the coating material, whereas there was a noticeable distinction between K(sub Ic) and K(sub IIc), resulting in K(sub IIc) per K(sub Ic) = 0.65 at both temperatures. The empirical mixed-mode fracture criterion best described the coatings' mixed-mode fracture behavior among the four mixed-mode fracture theories considered. The angle of crack propagation was in reasonable agreement with the minimum strain energy density criterion. The effect of the directionality of the coating material in on K(sub Ic) was observed to be insignificant, while its sintering effect at 1316 C on K(sub Ic) was significant.

  20. Significance of in-situ dry-ice blasting on the microstructure, crystallinity and bonding strength of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shujuan; Zeng, Jinyan; Li, Lifen; Sun, Junbin; Yang, Xiong; Liao, Hanlin

    2017-03-07

    To obtain hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings with high crystallinity which have long-term stability in clinical applications, coarse powders were usually injected to less energetic plasma. However, the HA coatings accumulated by partly melted particles usually have high porosity and poor mechanical properties, especially poor bonding strength. In this work, by profiting its quenching and mechanical impact, dry-ice blasting was in-situ employed during plasma spray process to improve the microstructure characterization and bonding strength of HA coatings. In addition, the influence of in-situ dry-ice blasting on the phase composition and crystallinity of plasma-sprayed HA coatings was investigated. The results show that a significant reduction of porosity and an apparent increase in bonding strength are revealed in plasma-sprayed HA coatings due to the cleaning effect of dry-ice blasting on the convex unmelted particles and splashing fragments. HA coatings prepared by the combination process of plasma spraying and dry-ice blasting have a compromise structure with minimum globular pores but with pronounced microcracks. The disappearance of CaO phase and the increase in crystallinity also derive from the application of dry-ice blasting.

  1. High Temperature Thermal Properties of Columnar Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coating Performed by Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, B.; Schick, V.; Remy, B.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.

    2016-09-01

    Performance enhancement of gas turbines is a main issue for the aircraft industry. Over many years, a large part of the effort has been focused on the development of more insulating Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs). In this study, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) columnar structures are processed by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS). These structures have already demonstrated abilities to get improved thermal lifetime, similarly to standard YSZ TBCs performed by EB-PVD. Thermal diffusivity measurements coupled with differential scanning calorimetry analysis are performed from room temperature up to 1100 °C, first, on HastelloyX substrates and then, on bilayers including a SPS YSZ coating. Results show an effective thermal conductivity for YSZ performed by SPS lower than 1 W.m-1K-1 whereas EB- PVD YSZ coatings exhibit a value of 1.5 W.m-1K-1.

  2. High-temperature erosion of plasma-sprayed, yttria-stabilized zirconia in a simulated turbine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanschuh, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    A series of rig calibration and high temperature tests simulating gas path seal erosion in turbine engines were performed at three impingement angles and at three downstream locations. Plasma sprayed, yttria stablized zirconia specimens were tested. Steady state erosion curves presented for 19 test specimens indicate a brittle type of material erosion despite scanning electron microscopy evidence of plastic deformation. Steady state erosion results were not sensitive to downstream location but were sensitive to impingement angle. At difference downstream locations specimen surface temperature varied from 1250 to 1600 C (2280 to 2900 F) and particle velocity varied from 260 to 320 m/s (850 to 1050 ft/s). The mass ratio of combustion products to erosive grit material was typically 240.

  3. High-temperature erosion of plasma-sprayed, yttria-stabilized zirconia in a simulated turbine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A series of rig calibration and high temperature tests simulating gas path seal erosion in turbine engines were performed at three impingement angles and at three downstream locations. Plasma sprayed, yttria stabilized zirconia specimens were tested. Steady state erosion curves presented for 19 test specimens indicate a brittle type of material erosion despite scanning electron microscopy evidence of plastic deformation. Steady state erosion results were not sensitive to downstream location but were sensitive to impingement angle. At different downstream locations specimen surface temperature varied from 1250 to 1600 C (2280 to 2900 F) and particle velocity varied from 260 to 320 m/s (850 to 1050 ft/s). The mass ratio of combustion products to erosive grit material was typically 240.

  4. Deposition and properties of high-velocity-oxygen-fuel and plasma-sprayed Mo-Mo2C composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prchlik, L.; Gutleber, J.; Sampath, S.

    2001-12-01

    Molybdenum thermal-spray coatings, dispersion strengthened by molybdenum oxides and molybdenum carbides, play an important role in industrial tribological applications. Traditionally, they have been prepared by plasma and wire flame spraying. High porosity and lower cohesion strength limit their application in situations where both galling and abrasion wear is involved. In this study, high-velocity-oxygen-fuel (HVOF) deposition of molybdenum and molybdenum carbide coatings was attempted. Deposition was achieved for all powders used. Composition, microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of the HVOF synthesized coatings were evaluated and compared with plasma-sprayed counterparts. The HVOF coatings possessed a very good abrasion resistance, whereas plasma deposits performed better in dry sliding tests. Measurements showed a close relationship between the coating surface hardness and its abrasion resistance. Results also suggested correlation between molybdenum carbide distribution in the molybdenum matrix and the sliding friction response of Mo-Mo2C coatings.

  5. Parametric Appraisal of Process Parameters for Adhesion of Plasma Sprayed Nanostructured YSZ Coatings Using Taguchi Experimental Design

    PubMed Central

    Mantry, Sisir; Mishra, Barada K.; Chakraborty, Madhusudan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the Taguchi experimental design in developing nanostructured yittria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings by plasma spraying process. This paper depicts dependence of adhesion strength of as-sprayed nanostructured YSZ coatings on various process parameters, and effect of those process parameters on performance output has been studied using Taguchi's L16 orthogonal array design. Particle velocities prior to impacting the substrate, stand-off-distance, and particle temperature are found to be the most significant parameter affecting the bond strength. To achieve retention of nanostructure, molten state of nanoagglomerates (temperature and velocity) has been monitored using particle diagnostics tool. Maximum adhesion strength of 40.56 MPa has been experimentally found out by selecting optimum levels of selected factors. The enhanced bond strength of nano-YSZ coating may be attributed to higher interfacial toughness due to cracks being interrupted by adherent nanozones. PMID:24288490

  6. Suspension Plasma-Sprayed ZnFe2O4 Nanostructured Coatings for ppm-Level Acetone Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jiajun; Chen, Xia; Zheng, Bingbing; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) sensitive coatings have been deposited by suspension plasma spraying. The phase constitution of the coatings was characterized by x-ray diffraction while the top surface and cross-sectional morphology of the coatings were inspected by scanning electron microscopy. The response to acetone was tested with the concentration in the range of 25-500 ppm at the working temperature from 175 to 275 °C. The sensors that were deposited at an arc current of 400 A showed better performance than those at 600 A owing to small grain size and high porosity. The sensor response increased with acetone concentration. The optimized sensors showed excellent response/recovery time and selectivity to acetone at 200 °C.

  7. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2- 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of K(sub I)/K(sub II) were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  8. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2 - 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma- sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  9. La2Zr2O7 (LZ) Coatings by Liquid Feedstock Plasma Spraying: The Role of Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, William; Rossignol, Sylvie; Vardelle, Michel

    2014-12-01

    Solution precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) is an innovative process for obtaining finely structured coatings from metallic salt solutions. Lanthanum and zirconium precursors were studied to understand their influence on lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) synthesis by SPPS. Thermal analysis revealed that the nature of the precursor and the solvent affected mixture decomposition by changing the decomposition temperature. The surface tensions of precursor solutions in various media were investigated and revealed the influence of the nature of the counter-cation. Different solutions of precursor mixtures were used to obtain La2Zr2O7 splats on metallic substrates. A decrease in solution surface tension led to an increase in splat size. Coating mechanisms by SPPS are governed by the nature of the precursors and solvents.

  10. Evaluation of tungsten shaped-charge liners spray-formed using the low-pressure plasma spray process

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, E.R.; Sickinger, A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper documents the results of a DARPA Phase 1 SBIR program which was awarded following a solicitation to develop new technologies for the forming of refractory metal shaped-charge liners. Holtgren had proposed to manufacture liners by spraying refractory metal powder onto a rapidly-rotating mandrel inside the chamber of a low-pressure plasma spray system. A total of nine tungsten shaped-charge liners were sprayed during the course of the program. Metallographic evaluation of the liners revealed that the as-sprayed microstructure was dense, averaging 98.5% density. The grain structure is equiaxed and fine, averaging five microns in diameter. The sprayed shapes were then processed to the final liner configuration by cylindrical grinding. The liners were ductile enough to withstand the strains of grinding and normal handling.

  11. Evaluation of the behavior of shrouded plasma spray coatings in the platen superheater of coal-fired boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Buta Singh; Prakash, S.

    2006-06-01

    Nickel- and cobalt-based coatings were formulated by a shrouded plasma spray process on boiler tube steels, namely, ASTM-SA210-grade A1 (GrA1), ASTM-SA213-T-11 (T11), and ASTM-SA213-T-22 (T22). The Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y alloy powder was sprayed as a bond in each case before the final coating. The degradation behavior of the bared and coated steels was studied in the platen superheater of the coal-fired boiler. The samples were inserted through the soot blower dummy points with the help of stainless steel wires. The coatings were found to be effective in increasing resistance to degradation in the given boiler environment. The maximum protection was observed in the case of Stellite-6 (St-6) coating.

  12. Induction of osteoconductivity by BMP-2 gene modification of mesenchymal stem cells combined with plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang; Guo, Ying-qiang; Yin, Guang-fu; Chen, Huai-qing; Kang, Yunqing

    2008-11-01

    Success in bone implant depends greatly on the composition and surface features of the implant. The surface-modification measures not only favor the implant's osteoconductivity, but also promote both bone anchoring and biomechanical stability. This paper reports an approach to combine a hydroxyapatite (HA) coated substrate with a cellular vehicle for the delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) synergistically enhancing the osteoconductivity of implant surfaces. We examined the attachment, growth and osteoinductive activity of transfected BMP-producing bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on a plasma-sprayed HA coated substrate. It was found that the HA coated substrate could allow the attachment and growth of BMP-2 gene modified BMSCs, and this combined application synergistically enhanced osteconductivity of the substrate surface. This synergistic method may be of osseointegration value in orthopedic and dental implant surgery.

  13. Effect of Liquid Feed-Stock Composition on the Morphology of Titanium Dioxide Films Deposited by Thermal Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Adán, C; Marugán, J; van Grieken, R; Chien, K; Pershin, L; Coyle, T; Mostaghimi, J

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited on the surface of titanium foils by Thermal Plasma Spray (TPS) process. Three different TiO2 coatings were prepared using the commercial TiO2-P25 nanopowder and titanium isopropoxide precursor solution as feed-stocks. Structure and morphology of the TiO2-P25 powder and the plasma sprayed coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, UV-visible spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRD and Raman results indicate that the TiO2 coatings were composed of an anatase/rutile mixture that is conditioned by the suspension composition used to be sprayed. Coatings prepared from TiO2-P25 nanoparticles in water suspension (NW-P25) and titanium isopropoxide solution suspension (NSP-P25) are incorporated into the coatings without phase transformation and their anatase/rutile ratio percentage remains very similar to the starting TiO2-P25 powder. On the contrary, when titanium isopropoxide solution is used for spraying (SP), the amount of rutile increases in the final TiO2 coating. SEM analysis also reveals different microstructure morphology, coating thickness, density and porosity of the three TiO2 films that depend significantly on the type of feed-stock employed. Interestingly, we have observed the role of titanium isopropoxide in the formation of more porous and cohesive layers of TiO2. The NSP-P25 coating, prepared with a mix of titanium isopropoxide solution based on TiO2 nanoparticles, presents higher deposition efficiencies and higher coating thickness than the film prepared with nanoparticles suspended in water (NW-P25) or with titanium isopropoxide solutions (SP). This is due to the precursor solution is acting as the cement between TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the cohesive strength of the coating. In sum, NSP-P25 and NW-P25 coatings display a good photocatalytic potential, based on their light absorption properties and mechanical stability. Band gap of

  14. Microscopic, crystallographic and adherence properties of plasma-sprayed calcium phosphate coatings on Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufekci, Eser

    Recently, plasma-spayed titanium implants have become very popular in the dentistry because of their biocompatibility and ability of providing osseointegration with the surrounding bone. Although there are numerous published studies on these materials, information and standards are still lacking. This study investigated the miscrostructural, crystallographic and adherence properties of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V substrates. The microstructures of the coatings and the elemental interdiffusion near the coating/substrate interface were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with x-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray diffraction analyses performed on Ti-6Al-4V coupons prepared with different percent crystallinities have provided structural information such as degree of crystallinity, phases present, average crystallite size, as well as the residual stresses within the coating. For evaluation of the adherence of the coatings to the substrates, experimental rods were subjected to torsion. The fracture surfaces were analyzed using SEM/EDS to develop a new methodology to determine the percent adherence of the coatings. SEM studies indicated that the surface microstructures of commercial dental implants were consistent with the plasma-spraying. In cross-section, coatings exhibited minimal porosity and limited interdiffusion of titanium and calcium at the coating/substrate interface. X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that the highest crystallinity coatings consisted of almost entirely HA and an amorphous calcium phosphate phase. As the coating crystallinity decreased, increasing amounts of alpha- and beta-tricalcium phosphate and tetracalcium phosphate were detected. The mean percent crystallinity for the three sets of coatings ranged from 50-60%. The mean HA crystallite size for the three sets of coatings ranged from about 0.02-0.04 mum. Differences in mean interplanar spacings for three selected

  15. Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Henry C.; Han, Taewon; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Tschudi, William F.

    2011-07-17

    There is a concern that environmental-contamination caused corrosion may negatively affect Information Technology (IT) equipment reliability. Nineteen data centers in the United States and two in India were evaluated using Corrosion Classification Coupons (CCC) to assess environmental air quality as it may relate IT equipment reliability. The data centers were of two basic types: closed and outside-air cooled. A closed data center provides cool air to the IT equipment using air conditioning in which only a small percent age of the recirculation air is make-up air continuously supplied from outside to meet human health requirements. An outside-air cooled data center uses outside air directly as the primary source for IT equipment cooling. Corrosion measuring coupons containing copper and silver metal strips were placed in both closed and outside-air cooled data centers. The coupons were placed at each data center (closed and outside-air cooled types) with the location categorized into three groups: (1) Outside - coupons sheltered, located near or at the supply air inlet, but located before any filtering, (2) Supply - starting just after initial air filtering continuing inside the plenums and ducts feeding the data center rooms, and (3) Inside located inside the data center rooms near the IT equipment. Each coupon was exposed for thirty days and then sent to a laboratory for a corrosion rate measurement analysis. The goal of this research was to investigate whether gaseous contamination is a concern for U.S. data center operators as it relates to the reliability of IT equipment. More specifically, should there be an increased concern if outside air for IT equipment cooling is used To begin to answer this question limited exploratory measurements of corrosion rates in operating data centers in various locations were undertaken. This study sought to answer the following questions: (1) What is the precision of the measurements (2) What are the approximate statistical

  16. Effect of Sealing Treatment on Corrosion Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed NiCrAl/Cr2O3-8 wt.%TiO2 Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Zehua; Lin, Pinghua; Lu, Wenhuan; Zhou, Zehua; Jiang, Shaoqun

    2011-03-01

    Plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings inherently contain pores and micro-cracks which is deleterious when performed in aggressive environment. Various methods were applied to the as-sprayed coatings in order to improve the corrosion resistance. In the investigation of this study, plasma-sprayed NiCrAl/Cr2O3-8 wt.%TiO2 coatings were sealed by epoxy resin and silicone resin, respectively. Coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), optical microscopy (OM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The possible corrosion mechanism was discussed. The results of salt spray test and electrochemical measurements indicated that after the sealing treatment, the porosity of coatings decreased obviously and a compact layer was formed to protect the coating from corrosion. The silicone resin proved to be more effective than epoxy resin in enhancing the corrosion resistance of the coatings used in this research.

  17. The Role of Spraying Parameters and Inert Gas Shrouding in Hybrid Water-Argon Plasma Spraying of Tungsten and Copper for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matějíček, J.; Kavka, T.; Bertolissi, G.; Ctibor, P.; Vilémová, M.; Mušálek, R.; Nevrlá, B.

    2013-06-01

    Tungsten-based coatings have potential application in the plasma-facing components in future nuclear fusion reactors. By the combination of refractory tungsten with highly thermal conducting copper, or steel as a construction material, functionally graded coatings can be easily obtained by plasma spraying, and may result in the development of a material with favorable properties. During plasma spraying of these materials in the open atmosphere, oxidation is an important issue, which could have adverse effects on their properties. Among the means to control it is the application of inert gas shrouding, which forms the subject of this study and represents a lower-cost alternative to vacuum or low-pressure plasma spraying, potentially applicable also for spraying of large surfaces or spacious components. It is a continuation of recent studies focused on the effects of various parameters of the hybrid water-argon torch on the in-flight behavior of copper and tungsten powders and the resultant coatings. In the current study, argon shrouding with various configurations of the shroud was applied. The effects of torch parameters, such as power and argon flow rate, and powder morphology were also investigated. Their influence on the particle in-flight behavior as well as the structure, composition and properties of the coatings were quantified. With the help of auxiliary calculations, the mass changes of the powder particles, associated with oxidation and evaporation, were assessed.

  18. Structure and magnetotransport properties in plasma-sprayed La 0.78Sr 0.22MnO 3 thick film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, M. T. D.; Cunha, A. G.; Freitas, J. C. C.; Orlando, C. G. P.; Bud'ko, S.; Giordanengo, B.; Sato, I. M.; Martinez, L. G.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E. M.

    2002-04-01

    Thick films of La 0.78Sr 0.22MnO 3 were produced by the plasma-spray technique onto stainless-steel substrate at 930°C. These films were obtained without the use of bond-layer, buffer-layer and annealing after deposition. The compound was deposited by a plasma-spray torch using nitrogen as the working gas. The films with thickness varying from 20 to 60 μm have good adherence and are composed of large splats with high degree of interconnection and small number of defects, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffractometry analysis of the as-deposited film revealed that it had the same crystal structure as the original bulk. Measurements of electrical resistivity versus temperature for the film revealed a magnetic transition temperature near 340 K, with a ferromagnetic/metallic behavior below this temperature. The magnetoresistance of La 0.78Sr 0.22MnO 3 films exhibited similar magnetic field dependence as compared to the bulk sample, which indicates that the plasma-spray technique can be successfully employed for the deposition of thick films of manganites on large-area substrates while maintaining the main bulk properties.

  19. AI-Li/SiCp composites and Ti-AI alloy powders and coatings prepared by a plasma spray atomization (PSA) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Boey, F. Y. C.; Murakoshi, Y.; Sano, T.

    1994-06-01

    There has been increasing use of Al-Li alloys in the aerospace industry, due mainly to the low density and high elastic modulus of this material. However, the problem of low ductility and fracture toughness of this material has limited its present application to only weight- and stiffness-critical components. Development of Al-Li/ceramic composites is currently being investigated to enhance the service capabilities of this material. The Ti-Al alloy is also of interest to aerospace-type applications, engine components in particular, due to its attractive high-temperature properties. Preparation of fine powders by plasma melting of composite feedstock and coatings formed by plasma spraying was carried out to examine the effect of spray parameters on the microstructure and properties of these materials. Characterization of the powders and coatings was performed using the scanning electron microscope and image analyzer. Examination of the plasma-sprayed powders and coatings has shown that in the Al-Li/SiC composite there is melting of both materials to form a single composite particle. The SiC reinforcement was in the submicron range and contributed to additional strengthening of the composite body, which was formed by a cold isostatic press and consolidated by hot extrusion or hot forging processes. The plasma-sprayed Ti-Al powder showed four categories of microstructures: featureless, dendritic, cellular, and martensite-like.

  20. Analysis of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings With Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Bond Coats Under Spatially Uniform Cyclic Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a numerical investigation into the spallation mechanism in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings observed under spatially-uniform cyclic thermal loading. The analysis focuses on the evolution of local stress and inelastic strain fields in the vicinity of the rough top/bond coat interface during thermal cycling, and how these fields are influenced by the presence of an oxide film and spatially uniform and graded distributions of alumina particles in the metallic bond coat aimed at reducing the top/bond coat thermal expansion mismatch. The impact of these factors on the potential growth of a local horizontal delamination at the rough interface's crest is included. The analysis is conducted using the Higher-Order Theory for Functionally Graded Materials with creep/relaxation constituent modeling capabilities. For two-phase bond coat microstructures, both the actual and homogenized properties are employed in the analysis. The results reveal the important contributions of both the normal and shear stress components to the delamination growth potential in the presence of an oxide film, and suggest mixed-mode crack propagation. The use of bond coats with uniform or graded microstructures is shown to increase the potential for delamination growth by increasing the magnitude of the crack-tip shear stress component.

  1. Effect of Oxidation on the Bonding Formation of Plasma-Sprayed Stainless Steel Splats onto Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Stainless steel splats were deposited on 304 stainless substrates with different thicknesses of oxide layer to examine the effect of substrate oxidation on splat morphology and splat-substrate interface bonding by inert low-pressure plasma spraying. The cross sections of splats showing the splat-substrate interface were prepared by focus ion beam (FIB). The splat morphology and splat-substrate interface bonding state were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The interface bonding was also examined by an electrolytic etching process. Results showed that with increasing oxide layer thickness and surface roughness, the morphology of splat changed from disk shape to splashed finger-like shape. The examination into the interface bonding by using FIB-prepared cross-sectional samples revealed that the splat interface bonding depended on the oxide roughness and composition. The interface bonding with a ratio of 44% was formed at the inner part of a splat on the pre-oxidized substrate when iron oxide presented on the surface, and the roughness of oxide scale was <5 nm. When the pre-oxidizing temperature exceeded 800 °C, the surface roughness increased to 14 nm and chromium oxide covered the pre-oxidized surface, resulting in no effective bonding forming at the whole interface. Thus, surface roughness and oxide composition have a significant influence on the splat interface bonding formation.

  2. Computational study and experimental comparison of the in-flight particle behavior for an external injection plasma spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remesh, K.; Yu, S. C. M.; Ng, H. W.; Berndt, C. C.

    2003-12-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis using Fluent V5.4 was conducted on the in-flight particle behavior during the plasma spraying process with external injection. The spray process was modeled as a steady jet issuing from the torch nozzle via the heating of the are gas by an electric are within the nozzle. The stochastic discrete model was used for the particle distribution. The particle temperature, velocity, and size inside the plasma plume at a specified standoff distance have been investigated. The results show that carrier gas flow rate variation from 2 standard liters per minute (slm) to 4.0 slm can increase the centerline particle mean temperature and mean velocity by 10% and 16%, respectively, at the specified standoff distance. A further increase of the carrier gas flow rate to 6 slm did not change the particle temperature, but the particle velocity was decreased by 20%. It was also found that an increase in the total arc gas flow rate from 52 slm to 61 slm, with all other process parameters unchanged, resulted in a 17% higher particle velocity, but 6% lower particle temperature. Some of these computational findings were experimentally confirmed by Kucuk et al. For a given process parameter setting, the kinetic and thermal energy extracted by the particles reached a maximum for carrier gas flow rate of about 3.5 4.0 slm.

  3. Porous tantalum coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying enhance bmscs osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ze; Xie, Youtao; Yang, Fei; Huang, Yan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Double-Layer and Graded Composite Coatings of YSZ Obtained by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpio, Pablo; Rayón, Emilio; Salvador, María Dolores; Lusvarghi, Luca; Sánchez, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Double-layer and graded composite coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia were sprayed on metallic substrates by atmospheric plasma spray. The coating architecture was built up by combining two different feedstocks: one micro- and one nanostructured. Microstructural features and mechanical properties (hardness and elastic modulus) of the coatings were determined by FE-SEM microscopy and nanoindentation technique, respectively. Additional adherence and scratch tests were carried out in order to assess the failure mechanisms occurring between the layers comprising the composites. Microstructural inspection of the coatings confirms the two-zone microstructure. This bimodal microstructure which is exclusive of the layer obtained from the nanostructured feedstock negatively affects the mechanical properties of the whole composite. Nanoindentation tests suitably reproduce the evolution of mechanical properties through coatings thickness on the basis of the position and/or amount of nanostructured feedstock used in the depositing layer. Adhesion and scratch tests show the negative effect on the coating adhesion of layer obtained from the nanostructured feedstock when this layer is deposited on the bond coat. Thus, the poor integrity of this layer results in lower normal stresses required to delaminate the coating in the adhesion test as well as minor critical load registered by using the scratch test.

  5. Application of atmospheric solution precursor plasma spray to photocatalytic devices for small and medium industries in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindole, Dickson; Ando, Yasutaka

    2017-01-01

    For development of a functional film deposition process with high deposition rate, as a basic study, TiO2 films were deposited by atmospheric solution precursor plasma spray (ASPPS) process. Ethanol-diluted titanium tetraisobutoxide [TTIB: Ti(OC4H9)4] was used as a feedstock. To achieve a high plasma thermal energy at a low discharge power, N2-dominant Ar/N2 as the plasma working gas was used, for film deposition at various deposition distances. Consequently, photocatalytic TiO2 with a rutile/anatase mixture film structure was deposited evenly in this case. By conducting methylene blue decomposition and wettability tests, photocatalytic properties of the film were confirmed. When a TiO2 film was applied to photocatalytic dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), the cells generated an electromotive force of 0.143V oc, which is close to those of commercial DSSCs. From these results, the ASPPS process was found to have high potential for high rate functional film deposition and was cost effective, making it suitable for developing countries.

  6. In-Flight Temperature and Velocity of Powder Particles of Plasma-Sprayed TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizek, Jan; Khor, Khiam Aik; Dlouhy, Ivo

    2013-12-01

    This paper relates to the in-flight temperature and velocity of TiO2 particles, an integral part of the systematic research on atmospheric plasma spraying of the material. Initial powder feedstock (32-45 μm, 100% rutile phase) was introduced into the plasma jet. Six parameters were selected to represent the versatility of the plasma system and their respective influences were determined according to basic one-at-a-time and advanced Taguchi design of experiments combined with the analysis of variance analytical tool. It was found that the measured temperatures varied from 2121 to 2830 K (33% variation), while the velocities of the particles were altered from 127 to 243 m/s (91% variation). Gun net power was detected as the most influential factor with respect to the velocity of the TiO2 particles (an increase of 8.4 m/s per 1-kW increase in net power). Spray distance was determined to have a major impact on the in-flight temperature (a decrease of 10 mm in spray distance corresponds to a drop of 36 K). A significant decrease in both characteristics was detected for an increasing amount of powder entering the plasma jet: A drop of 7.1 K and 1.4 m/s was recorded per every +1 g/min of TiO2 powder.

  7. Oxidation and particle deposition modeling in plasma spraying of Ti-6Al-4V/SiC fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochelin, E.; Borit, F.; Frot, G.; Jeandin, M.; Decker, L.; Jeulin, D.; Taweel, B. Al; Michaud, V.; Noël, P.

    1999-03-01

    Plasma spraying is known to be a promising process for the manufacturing of Ti/SiC long-fiber composites. However, some improvements remain for this process to be applied in an industrial route. These include: oxygen contamination of the sprayed material through that of titanium particles before and during spraying, damage to fibers due to a high level of thermal stresses induced at the spraying stage, adequate deposition of titanium-base powder to achieve a low-porosity matrix and good impregnation of the fiber array. This article deals with work that resulted in a threefold study of the process. Oxidation was studied using electron microprobe analysis of elementary particles quenched and trapped into a closed box at various given flight distances. Oxygen diffusion phenomena within the particles are discussed from a preliminary theoretical approach coupled with experimental data. Isothermal and thermomechanical calculations were made using the ABAQUS code to determine stresses arising from contact of a liquid Ti-6Al-4V particle onto a SiC fiber. On the scale of the sprayed powder flow, a two-dimensional new type of model simulating the deposition of droplets onto a substrate was developed. This new type of model is based on a lattice-gas automaton that reproduces the hydrodynamical behavior of fluids.

  8. Degradation behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al plasma-sprayed boiler tube steels in an energy generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, B.S.; Prakash, S.

    2005-06-01

    Boiler steels, namely, low-C steel, ASTM-SA210-Grade A1 (GrA1), 1Cr-0.5Mo steel, ASTM-SA213-T-11 (T11) and 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, ASTM-SA213-T-22 (T22) were plasma sprayed with Ni3Al. The alloy powder was prepared by mixing Ni and Al in the stoichiometric ratio of 3 to 1. The Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y alloy powder was used as a bond coat, with a 150{mu} m thick layer sprayed onto the surface before applying the 200{mu}m coating of Ni{sub 3}Al. Exposure studies have been performed in the platen superheater zone of a coal-fired boiler at around 755{sup o}C for 10 cycles, each of 100 h duration. The protection to the base steel was minimal for the three steels. Scale spallation and the formation of a porous and nonadherent NiO scale were probably the main reasons for the lack of protection. In the case of T22-coated steel, cracks in the coatings have been observed after the first 100 h exposure cycle.

  9. Microstructural Healing with Interfacial Reaction Layers on the Adhesive Strength Enhancement of Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chung-Wei; Lui, Truan-Sheng

    The effect of hydrothermal crystallization and adding reinforced intermediate layers on improving the tensile adhesion of plasma-sprayed HA coatings (HAC) was investigated. The experimental results show that the index of crystallinity (IOC) and phase purity of hydrothermally-treated HAC (HT-HAC) are increased by the low-temperature hydrothermal treatment. The microstructural healing effect with nano-size HA crystallites is significant to diminish the defects and prevent mechanical strength degradation for the HT-HAC. XPS analysis demonstrates that hydrothermal crystallization helps to promote the interfacial Ti-OH chemical reaction. HA composite coatings with CP-Ti and ZrO2 intermediate layers provide another strengthening effect compared with the hydrothermal-heating method. The inter-diffusion of Ca results in a chemical bonding at the HA/ZrO2 interface, which results in the increase of the adhesive strength of composite coatings. The fracture behavior is different between the crystallization-induced HAC and the composite coatings. The HT-HAC remains on the substrate with an evident cohesive failure. The adhesive failure occurred at HA/intermediate layers for composite coatings. Failures with less percentage area of interfacial fracture are indicative of a higher strength of a coating.

  10. Cyclic delamination behavior of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrates in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Hayato; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effect of a simulated body fluid (SBF) on the cyclic delamination behavior of a plasma-sprayed hydroxapatite (HAp) coating. A HAp coating is deposited on the surfaces of surgical metallic materials in order to enhance the bond between human bone and such surfaces. However, the HAp coating is susceptible to delamination by cyclic loading from the patient's gait. Although hip joints are subjected to both positive and negative moments, only the effects of tensile bending stresses on vertical crack propagation behavior have been investigated. Thus, the cyclic delamination behavior of a HAp coating was observed at the stress ratio R=-1 in order to determine the effects of tensile/compressive loading on the delamination behavior. The delamination growth rate increased with SBF immersion, which decreased the delamination life. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the selective phase dissolution in the HAp coating was promoted at interfaces. Finite element analysis revealed that the energy release rate Gmax showed a positive value even in cases with compressive loading, which is a driving force for the delamination of a HAp coating. A prediction model for the delamination growth life was developed that combines a fracture mechanics parameter with the assumed stress-dependent dissolution rate. The predicted delamination life matched the experimental data well in cases of lower stress amplitudes with SBF.

  11. Effect of Processing Parameters on Plasma Jet and In-flight Particles Characters in Supersonic Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pei; Wei, Zhengying; Zhao, Guangxi; Bai, Y.; Tan, Chao

    2016-09-01

    In supersonic plasma spraying system (SAPS), heat transfer from arc plasma is characterized by several distinct features, such as transport of dissociation and ionization energy and of electrical charges in addition to mass transport. The thermodynamic and transport properties of plasma jet were influenced by several main parameters such as primary gas flow rate, the H2 vol.% and current intensity A. This paper first analyzes the effect of these parameters on the temperature and velocity of plasma jet theoretically. Further, the loading particles were melted and accelerated by plasma jet. Effects of several main parameters such as carrier gas flow rate, the H2 vol.%, the current intensity, the voltage and the spraying distance on temperature and velocity of in-flight particle were studied experimentally. The average maximum temperature and velocity of in-flight particle at any given parameters were systematically quantified. Optimal SAPS process parameters were given in this paper. In general, increasing the particles impacting velocity and surface temperature can improve the maximum spreading factor and decrease the coating porosity.

  12. PLASMA SPRAYED FUNCTIONALLY GRADED AND LAYERED MoSi2-A1203 COMPOSITES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SENSOR SHEATH APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. VAIDYA; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    Protective sensor sheaths are required in the glass industry for sensors that are used to measure various properties of the melt. Molten glass presents an extremely corrosive elevated temperature environment, in which only a few types of materials can survive. Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) has been shown to possess excellent corrosion resistance in molten glass, and is thus a candidate material for advanced sensor sheath applications. Plasma spray-forming techniques were developed to fabricate molybdenum dilicide-alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) laminate and functionally graded composite tubes with mechanical properties suitable for sensor sheath applications. These functionally graded materials (FGMs) were achieved by manipulating the powder hoppers and plasma torch translation via in-house created computer software. Molybdenum disilicide and alumina are thermodynamically stable elevated temperature materials with closely matching thermal expansion coefficients. Proper tailoring of the microstructure of these MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites can result in improved strength, toughness, and thermal shock resistance. This study focuses on the mechanical performance of these composite microstructures.

  13. Effect of Carbon Black on Dielectric and Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Cordierite Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jinbu; Zhou, Wancheng; Liu, Yi; Qing, Yuchang; Luo, Fa; Zhu, Dongmei

    2015-06-01

    Carbon black (CB)/cordierite composite coatings with different CB contents were fabricated by a multi-function micro-plasma spraying system developed by the Second Artillery Engineering College. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the microstructure of the spray-dried powders and as-sprayed coatings. The complex permittivities of the coatings and powders with different CB contents were investigated at the frequency of 8.2-12.4 GHz. The results show that both real and imaginary part of the permittivity increase with increasing CB content, which can be ascribed to the increase of the number of micro-capacitors and the polarization centers. Reflection loss of the as-sprayed coatings with different CB contents and thicknesses was calculated according to the transmission line theory. The coating with 4.54% CB content and 3.0 mm thickness shows optical microwave absorption with a minimum reflection loss of -23.90 dB at 10.13 GHz and reflection loss less than -9 dB over the whole investigated frequency.

  14. Antibacterial mechanism of plasma sprayed Ca2ZnSi2O7 coating against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Xie, Youtao; Huang, Liping; Ji, Heng; Zheng, Xuebin

    2013-01-01

    In our previous work, antibacterial activity of plasma sprayed Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) coating has been demonstrated. However, antibacterial mechanism of Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) coating still remains undefined. In this study, Escherichia coli (E. coli), a kind of Gram-negative bacteria, was chosen to investigate the interactions between the bacterium and Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) coating. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy micrographs exhibited that the morphologies of E. coli on the coating changed with treatment time, from initial slight disturbance to the disruption of cell wall and drastic distortion of bacterial interior where a remarkable material-light region was formed in the center and condensed deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules were found. Disturbances of cytoplasmic membrane were observed by two-photon confocal microscopy and confirmed by leakage of intracellular potassium ion (K(+)). Results suggest that the destruction of cell wall and the loss of replication ability of DNA molecules are two major reasons causing death of E. coli.

  15. Electrochemical behavior of different preparations of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti6Al4V substrate.

    PubMed

    Souto, Ricardo M; Lemus, M Mercedes; Reis, Rui L

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of four different preparations of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on Ti6Al4V substrates in static Hank's balanced salt solution was investigated using dc potentiodynamic and ac impedance techniques. Two different nominal thicknesses, 50 microm and 200 microm, and two different spraying conditions, were considered. The electrochemical impedance experiments proved this technique to be very suitable for the investigation of the electrochemical behavior of surgical implant alloys when they are coated with HA, which is characterized by the dissolution and passivation characteristics of the underlying metal substrate. Because the coatings are porous, ionic paths between the electrolytic medium and the base material can eventually be produced, resulting in the corrosion of the coated metal. Differences in the corrosion resistance of the coated materials were detected, and a relevant model for the description of the coating degradation in the biosimulating solution was proposed. The model consisted of the description of the coated system in terms of a two-layer model of the surface film. Significant differences in electrochemical behavior for similar nominal thicknesses of HA coatings obtained under different spraying conditions were found.

  16. Effect of Graphite Addition on Structure and Properties of Ti(CN) Coatings Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Pengbo; He, Jining; Zhao, Hongjian; Ni, Zenglei; Ye, Fuxing

    2016-12-01

    Ti(CN) coatings with graphite addition ranging from 0 to 50 wt.% were prepared using reactive plasma spraying technology and their microstructure, mechanical, and tribological properties were investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Vickers microhardness testing, and block-on-ring wear testing. The results showed that graphite addition resulted in crystallite size refinement and an increase in the amount of amorphous phase. The Ti(CN) coatings consisted of a mixture of Ti(CN), graphite, CN x , and amorphous phases. The hardness first increased then decreased as the graphite content was increased, with a maximum of 1450 HV0.2 for 30 wt.% graphite addition. The fracture toughness decreased from 4.38 MPa m1/2 to 2.76 MPa m1/2 with increasing graphite content. The friction coefficient decreased due to unreacted graphite embedded in the matrix. Also, the wear rate first decreased then increased, with a minimum value of 2.65 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1 for 30 wt.% graphite addition. The wear mechanisms of the Ti(CN) coatings included abrasive, adhesive, and oxidation wear.

  17. Porous Tantalum Coatings Prepared by Vacuum Plasma Spraying Enhance BMSCs Osteogenic Differentiation and Bone Regeneration In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ze; Xie, Youtao; Yang, Fei; Huang, Yan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration. PMID:23776648

  18. Thermal Shock and Ablation Behavior of Tungsten Nozzle Produced by Plasma Spray Forming and Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Xiong, X.; Zhao, Z. W.; Xie, L.; Min, X. B.; Yan, J. H.; Xia, G. M.; Zheng, F.

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten nozzle was produced by plasma spray forming (PSF, relative density of 86 ± 2%) followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing, 97 ± 2%) at 2000 °C and 180 MPa for 180 min. Scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffractometer, Archimedes method, Vickers hardness, and tensile tests have been employed to study microstructure, phase composition, density, micro-hardness, and mechanical properties of the parts. Resistance of thermal shock and ablation behavior of W nozzle were investigated by hot-firing test on solid rocket motor (SRM). Comparing with PSF nozzle, less damage was observed for HIPed sample after SRM test. Linear ablation rate of nozzle made by PSF was (0.120 ± 0.048) mm/s, while that after HIPing reduced to (0.0075 ± 0.0025) mm/s. Three types of ablation mechanisms including mechanical erosion, thermophysical erosion, and thermochemical ablation took place during hot-firing test. The order of degree of ablation was nozzle throat > convergence > dilation inside W nozzle.

  19. Effect of Spray Distance on Microstructure and Tribological Performance of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite-Titania Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Xu, Haifeng; Geng, Xin; Wang, Jingjing; Xiao, Jinkun; Zhu, Peizhi

    2016-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-titania (TiO2) composite coatings prepared on Ti6Al4V alloy surface can combine the excellent mechanical property of the alloy substrate and the good biocompatibility of the coating material. In this paper, HA-TiO2 composite coatings were deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates using suspension plasma spray (SPS). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier infrared absorption spectrometry and friction tests were used to analyze the microstructure and tribological properties of the obtained coatings. The results showed that the spray distance had an important influence on coating microstructure and tribological performance. The amount of decomposition phases decreased as the spray distance increased. The increase in spray distance from 80 to 110 mm improved the crystalline HA content and decreased the wear performance of the SPS coatings. In addition, the spray distance had a big effect on the coating morphology due to different substrate temperature resulting from different spray distance. Furthermore, a significant presence of OH- and CO3 2- was observed, which was favorable for the biomedical applications.

  20. Ten years after entry into force of the Stockholm Convention: What do air monitoring data tell about its effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Wöhrnschimmel, Henry; Scheringer, Martin; Bogdal, Christian; Hung, Hayley; Salamova, Amina; Venier, Marta; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Hites, Ronald A; Hungerbuhler, Konrad; Fiedler, Heidelore

    2016-10-01

    More than a decade ago, the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), one of the multilateral environmental agreements administered by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), entered into force. The objective of this Convention is to protect human health and the environment by controlling the releases of POPs. According to its Article 16, the effectiveness of the Stockholm Convention shall be evaluated using comparable monitoring data on the presence of POPs as well as their regional and global environmental transport. Here, we present a time series analysis on atmospheric POP concentrations from 15 monitoring stations in North America and Europe that provide long-term data and have started operations between 1990 and 2003. We systematically searched for temporal trends and significant structural changes in temporal trends that might result from the provisions of the Stockholm Convention. We find that such structural changes do occur, but they are related mostly to effects of national regulations enforced prior to the implementation of the Stockholm Convention, rather than to the enforcement of the provisions laid out in the Convention. One example is that concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, many of which started to decrease rapidly during the 1990s. Also effects of chemical transport and fate, for instance the re-volatilization of POPs from secondary sources, are thought to be a cause of some of the observed structural changes. We conclude that a decade of air monitoring data has not been sufficient for detecting general and statistically significant effects of the Stockholm Convention. Based on these lessons, we present recommendations for the future operation of existing monitoring programs and advocate for a stricter enforcement of the provisions of the Stockholm Convention, in the current absence of proof for its effectiveness.

  1. Friction and Wear Characteristics of a Modified Composite Solid Lubricant Plasma Spray Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, M. K.; DellaCorte, C.

    2004-01-01

    LCR304 is a solid lubricant coating composed of Ni-10Cr, Cr2O3, BaF2-CaF2 and Ag and developed for dimensional stability in high temperature air. This coating is a modification of PS304, which differs in that the Ni-Cr constituent contains 20wt% Cr. The tribological characteristics of LCR304 were evaluated by pin-on-disk and foil air bearing rig testing from 25 to 650 C and compared to previous test results with PS304. For both tests, the friction coefficient decreased as temperature increased from 25 to 650 C. Wear generally decreased with increasing temperature for all pin-on-disk tests. LCR304 coated components produced the least wear of Inconel X-750 counterface materials at 427 and 650 C. These results indicate that the LCR304 coating has potential as a replacement for PS304 in, for example, low cycle (minimum wear) applications where dimensional stability is imperative.

  2. Class III Restoration of Anterior Primary Teeth: In Vitro Retention Comparison of Conventional, Modified and Air-abrasion Treated Preparations.

    PubMed

    Asl Aminabadi, Naser; Najafpour, Ebrahim; Erfanparast, Leila; Samiei, Mohammad; Haghifar, Monireh; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza; Jamali, Zahra; Pournaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Shokravi, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Anterior esthetic restoration is challenging in pediatric dentistry, due to limited durability and poor retention of the restoration.This study assessed the effect of air abrasion on tensile failure load of composite class III restorations using different preparation techniques. Materials and methods. 100 extracted human anterior primary teeth were divided, based on the preparation methods, into four groups each consisting of 25 subjects : conventional (A), labial surface bevel (B), conventional + air abrasion (C), and labial surface bevel + air abrasion (D). After restoring cavities, tensile failure load of samples was measured in Newton by Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm per minute. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests using SPSS software. Results. There were statistically significant differences between groups A and C (P = 0.003), groups A and B (P & 0.001), groups A and D (P & 0.001), groups B and C (P = 0.028), groups B and D (P = 0.027), and also groups C and D (P& 0.001). Group D demonstrated the highest mean tensile failure load. Conclusion. Labial surface bevel treated by air abrasion showed significantly more retention of composite restoration.

  3. Cost characteristics of tilt-rotor, conventional air and high speed rail short-haul intercity passenger service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoendorfer, David L.; Morlok, Edward K.

    1985-01-01

    The cost analysis done to support an assessment of the potential for a small tilt-rotor aircraft to operate in short-haul intercity passenger service is described in detail. Anticipated costs of tilt-rotor air service were compared to the costs of two alternatives: conventional air and high speed rail (HSR). Costs were developed for corridor service, varying key market characteristics including distance, passenger volumes, and minimum frequency standards. The resulting cost vs output information can then be used to compare modal costs for essentially identical service quality and passenger volume or for different service levels and volumes for each mode, as appropriate. Extensive sensitivity analyses are performed. The cost-output features of these technologies are compared. Tilt-rotor is very attractive compared to HSR in terms of costs over the entire range of volume. It also has costs not dramatically different from conventional air, but tilt-rotor costs are generally higher. Thus some of its other advantages, such as the VTOL capability, must offset the cost disadvantage for it to be a preferred or competitive mode in any given market. These issues are addressed in the companion report which considers strategies for tilt-rotor development in commercial air service.

  4. Preliminary analysis on the MD-4® plasma-sprayed titanium acetabular component☆

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Loures, Elmano; Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Loures, Daniel Naya; Loures, Clarice Naya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the short-term performance of a type of implant manufactured in Brazil. Methods This study analyzed a cohort of 60 patients who underwent implantation of MD-4® acetabular components during primary hip arthroplasty procedures performed between January 1, 2010, and August 1, 2012. The patients were studied retrospectively with regard to clinical behavior, stability and radiological osseointegration. The patients were followed up for a minimum of 12 months and a maximum of 42 months (mean: 27) and were evaluated by means of the Harris Hip Score, SF-36 questionnaire and serial conventional radiographs. Results All the components were radiologically stable, without evidence of migration or progressive radiolucency lines. On average, the Harris Hip Score evolved from 36.1 to 92.1 (p < 0.001) and the SF-36 showed significant increases in all its domains (p < 0.001). No differences were observed among patients with osteoarthrosis, osteonecrosis, hip dysplasia or other conditions. Conclusions The short-term results showed clinical and radiological signs of stability and osseointegration of the implants, which may represent a predictive factor regarding medium-term survival of this acetabular component. PMID:26229918

  5. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  6. Thermoelectric properties of in-situ plasma spray synthesized sub-stoichiometry TiO2-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwasoo; Han, Su Jung; Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The thermoelectric properties of sub-stoichiometric TiO2-x deposits produced by cascaded-plasma spray process are investigated from room-temperature to 750 K. Sub-stoichiometric TiO2-x deposits are formed through in-situ reaction of the TiO1.9 within the high temperature plasma flame and manipulated through introduction of varying amounts of hydrogen in the plasma. Although the TiO2-x particles experience reduction within plasma, it can also re-oxidize through interaction with the surrounding ambient atmosphere, resulting in a complex interplay between process conditions and stoichiometry. The deposits predominantly contain rutile phase with presence of Magneli phases especially under significantly reducing plasma conditions. The resultant deposits show sensitivity to thermoelectric properties and under certain optimal conditions repeatedly show Seebeck coefficients reaching values of -230 μV K-1 at temperatures of 750 K while providing an electrical conductivity of 5.48 × 103 S m-1, relatively low thermal conductivity in the range of 1.5 to 2 W m-1 K-1 resulting in power factor of 2.9 μW cm-1 K-2. The resultant maximum thermoelectric figure of merit value reached 0.132 under these optimal conditions. The results point to a potential pathway for a large-scale fabrication of low-cost oxide based thermoelectric with potential applicability at moderate to high temperatures.

  7. Thermoelectric properties of in-situ plasma spray synthesized sub-stoichiometry TiO2−x

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwasoo; Han, Su Jung; Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties of sub-stoichiometric TiO2−x deposits produced by cascaded-plasma spray process are investigated from room-temperature to 750 K. Sub-stoichiometric TiO2−x deposits are formed through in-situ reaction of the TiO1.9 within the high temperature plasma flame and manipulated through introduction of varying amounts of hydrogen in the plasma. Although the TiO2−x particles experience reduction within plasma, it can also re-oxidize through interaction with the surrounding ambient atmosphere, resulting in a complex interplay between process conditions and stoichiometry. The deposits predominantly contain rutile phase with presence of Magneli phases especially under significantly reducing plasma conditions. The resultant deposits show sensitivity to thermoelectric properties and under certain optimal conditions repeatedly show Seebeck coefficients reaching values of −230 μV K−1 at temperatures of 750 K while providing an electrical conductivity of 5.48 × 103 S m−1, relatively low thermal conductivity in the range of 1.5 to 2 W m−1 K−1 resulting in power factor of 2.9 μW cm−1 K−2. The resultant maximum thermoelectric figure of merit value reached 0.132 under these optimal conditions. The results point to a potential pathway for a large-scale fabrication of low-cost oxide based thermoelectric with potential applicability at moderate to high temperatures. PMID:27811954

  8. Capturing Non-Linear Battlefield Operations: Conventional Air Forces’ Interdependence with Special Operations Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    COMBAT HOURS. MAJOR CIHAK IS MARRIED TO PATRICIA ( PATTI ) AND THEY CURRENTLY RESIDE IN MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA WITH THEIR FIVE CHILDREN; HEATHER (16...MY OWN CAREER. BORN AND RAISED ON THE GROUND , I GREW WINGS, BUT NEVER FORGOT WHERE MY ROOTS DEVELOPED. AS I RESEARCHED AND BEGAN TO BETTER...UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES AND FORGING TIGHT LINKS BETWEEN SATELLITES, PILOTS IN THE AIR, SPECIAL FORCES ON THE GROUND , AND LAND FORCE COMMANDERS TO RAPIDLY

  9. Photoresponse and Donor Concentration of Plasma-Sprayed TiO2 and TiO2-ZnO Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, F.-X.; Ohmori, A.; Li, C.-J.

    2005-12-01

    The photoelectrochemical characteristics of plasma-sprayed porous TiO2, TiO2-5%ZnO, and TiO2-10%ZnO electrodes in 0.1 N NaOH solution were studied through a three-electrode cell system. The microstructure, morphology, and composition of the electrodes were analyzed using an electron probe surface roughness analyzer (ERA-8800FE), scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The results indicate that the sprayed electrodes have a porous microstructure, which is affected by the plasma spray parameters and composition of the powders. The TiO2-ZnO electrodes consist of anatase TiO2, rutile TiO2, and Zn2Ti3O8 phase. The photoresponse characteristics of the plasma-sprayed electrodes are comparable to those of single-crystal TiO2, but the breakdown voltage is close to 0.5 V (versus that of a saturated calomel electrode). The short-circuit photocurrent density ( J SC) increases with a decrease of donor concentration, which was calculated according to the Gartner-Butler model. For the lowest donor concentration of a TiO2-5%ZnO electrode sprayed under an arc current of 600 A, the short-circuit J SC is approximately 0.4 mA/cm2 higher than that of the TiO2 electrodes under 30 mW/cm2 xenon light irradiation. The J SC increases linearly with light intensity.

  10. Thermal residual stresses near the interface between plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating and titanium substrate: finite element analysis and synchrotron radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Cofino, B; Fogarassy, P; Millet, P; Lodini, A

    2004-07-01

    Plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on titanium alloy are often used in prosthetic implants. The metallic substrate gives the implant good mechanical strength which is combined with good biocompatibility and osteointegration of the ceramic coating. However, the interface between the HA coating and titanium alloy substrate is an area of critical weakness when compared with the interlamellar cohesive strength of the HA coating structure. Knowledge of the stresses in materials near the interface seems to be an important step in understanding why failure occurs. Synchrotron radiation, using Beamline BM16 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France), has been used to determine local stresses near the interface, down to 10 microm in resolution, between a plasma-sprayed HA coating and a titanium alloy substrate. This experimental determination of residual stresses is compared with the results found by a finite element analysis modeling the thermal effects of the plasma-spraying process. Residual stresses have been found in deposited ceramic near the interface due to a thermal properties mismatch of the materials. If the plane stress state is assumed, meaning the perpendicular component of residual stress is ignored (sigma(z) = 0), then the synchrotron residual stress measurements should be interpreted as mainly compressive in the ceramic coating. This is in contradiction with the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch; therefore, the simplified plane stresses assumption seems to be inappropriate for the deposited morphology characterized by pores and a network of microcracks. The detailed finite element analysis model, taking into account the real morphology of the coating and the real three-dimensional stress field distribution, allowed the estimation of sigma(z), leading to a more accurate interpretation of synchrotron measurements, which is validated by the experimental results.

  11. Experience of high-nitrogenous steel powder application in repairs and surface hardening of responsible parts for power equipment by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, A. S.; Kardonina, N. I.

    2016-02-01

    The questions of the application of novel diffusion-alloying high-nitrogenous steel powders for repair and surface hardening of responsible parts of power equipment by plasma spraying are considered. The appropriateness of the method for operative repair of equipment and increasing its service life is justified. General data on the structure, properties, and manufacture of nitrogen-, aluminum-, and chromium-containing steel powders that are economically alloyed using diffusion are described. It is noted that the nitrogen release during the decomposition of iron nitrides, when heating, protects the powder particles from oxidation in the plasma jet. It is shown that the coating retains 50% of nitrogen that is contained in the powder. Plasma spraying modes for diffusion-alloying high-nitrogenous steel powders are given. The service properties of plasma coatings based on these powders are analyzed. It is shown that the high-nitrogenous steel powders to a nitrogen content of 8.9 wt % provide the necessary wear resistance and hardness of the coating and the strength of its adhesion to the substrate and corrosion resistance to typical aggressive media. It is noted that increasing the coating porosity promotes stress relaxation and increases its thickness being limited with respect to delamination conditions in comparison with dense coatings on retention of the low defectiveness of the interface and high adhesion to the substrate. The examples of the application of high-nitrogenous steel powders in power engineering during equipment repairs by service companies and overhaul subdivisions of heat power plants are given. It is noted that the plasma spraying of diffusion-alloyed high-nitrogenous steel powders is a unique opportunity to restore nitrided steel products.

  12. Processing-structure-property relationships of thermal barrier coatings deposited using the solution precursor plasma spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liangde

    This research is intended to develop a novel process, solution-precursor plasma-spray (SPPS), for the deposition of highly durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In the SPPS process a solution precursor feedstock, that results in ZrO2-7 wt% Y2O3 ceramic, is injected into the plasma jet and the coating is deposited on a metal substrate. The formed coating has the following novel microstructural features: (i) ultra-fine splats, (ii) through-thickness cracks, (iii) micrometer and nanometer porosity, and (iv) interpass boundaries. The deposition mechanisms of the solution precursor droplets injected into the different regions of the plasma jet were found to be different due to large temperature variation across the plasma jet. The solution precursor droplets injected into the core of the plasma jet are deposited on the substrate as ultra-fine splats that account for around 65 volume% of the coating. The other 35 volume% of the coating includes porosity and deposits formed from the solution precursor droplets injected into other regions of the plasma jet. The optimum processing condition for highly durable TBCs was determined using Taguchi design of experiments. Meanwhile, the relationship of the microstructural features and processing parameters was revealed. During thermal cycling, the unmelted particles in the coating were observed to pyloyze and/or sinter, while no sign of sintering was observed for the ultra-fine splats. The spacing of through-thickness cracks remains in the range of 160 to 190 mum throughout the thermal cycling test. Three stages of oxidation of the bond coat were observed. Failure of the SPPS TBC starts with the crack nucleation along the unmelted particles in the top coat and the Ni, Cr, Co-rich oxides of large thickness. These cracks propagate and coalesce with thermal cycling. The extensive cracking of the rapidly formed Ni, Cr, Co-rich oxides resulting from the depletion of aluminum in the bond coat leads to the development of large

  13. Comparative evaluation of the hygienic efficacy of an ultra-rapid hand dryer vs conventional warm air hand dryers

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, AM; Saville, T; Stevens, D; Beggs, CB

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To compare an ultra-rapid hand dryer against warm air dryers, with regard to: (A) bacterial transfer after drying and (B) the impact on bacterial numbers of rubbing hands during dryer use. Methods and Results: The Airblade™ dryer (Dyson Ltd) uses two air ‘knives’ to strip water from still hands, whereas conventional dryers use warm air to evaporate moisture whilst hands are rubbed together. These approaches were compared using 14 volunteers; the Airblade™ and two types of warm air dryer. In study (A), hands were contaminated by handling meat and then washed in a standardized manner. After dryer use, fingers were pressed onto foil and transfer of residual bacteria enumerated. Transfers of 0–107 CFU per five fingers were observed. For a drying time of 10 s, the Airblade™ led to significantly less bacterial transfer than the other dryers (P<0·05; range 0·0003–0·0015). When the latter were used for 30–35 s, the trend was for the Airblade to still perform better, but differences were not significant (P>0·05, range 0·1317–0·4099). In study (B), drying was performed ± hand rubbing. Contact plates enumerated bacteria transferred from palms, fingers and fingertips before and after drying. When keeping hands still, there was no statistical difference between dryers, and reduction in the numbers released was almost as high as with paper towels. Rubbing when using the warm air dryers inhibited an overall reduction in bacterial numbers on the skin (P < 0·05). Conclusions: Effective hand drying is important for reducing transfer of commensals or remaining contaminants to surfaces. Rubbing hands during warm air drying can counteract the reduction in bacterial numbers accrued during handwashing. Significance and Impact of the Study: The Airblade™ was superior to the warm air dryers for reducing bacterial transfer. Its short, 10 s drying time should encourage greater compliance with hand drying and thus help reduce the spread of infectious agents

  14. Failure Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Three-Point Bending Test via Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Ni, J. X.; Shao, F.; Yang, J. S.; Zhong, X. H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Liu, C. G.; Tao, S. Y.; Wang, Y.; Li, D. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the failure behavior of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS-TBCs) under three-point bending (3PB) test has been characterized via acoustic emission (AE) technique. Linear positioning method has been adopted to monitor dynamic failure process of the APS-TBCs under 3PB test. The investigation results indicate that the variation of AE parameters (AE event counts, amplitudes and AE energy) corresponds well with the change of stress-strain curve of the loading processes. The failure mechanism was analyzed based on the characteristics of AE parameters. The distribution of frequency of crack propagation has been obtained. The AE signals came from two aspects: i.e., plastic deformation of substrates, initiation and propagation of the cracks in the coatings. The AE analysis combined with cross-sectional observation has indicated that many critical cracks initiate at the surface of the top-coat. And some main cracks tend to propagate toward the substrate/bond-coat interface. The actual failure mechanism of the APS-TBCs under 3PB test is attributed to the debonding of metallic coating from the substrates and the propagation of the horizontal crack along the substrate/bond-coat interface under the action of flexural moment.

  15. Characterisations Of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-13% Wt TiO{sub 2} Deposition On Mild Steel Via Plasma Spray Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yusoff, N. H.; Isa, M. C.; Daud, A. R.

    2011-01-17

    To date, plasma sprayed alumina titania have been widely used as wear resistance coatings in textile, machinery and printing industries. Previous studies showed that the coating microstructures and properties were strongly depended on various parameters such as ceramic composition, grain size powders and spray parameters, thus, influencing the melting degree of the alumina titania during the deposition process. The aim of this study focuses on the evolution of the micron sizes of alumina-13%wt titania at different plasma spray power, ranging from 20kW to 40kW. It was noted that the coating porosity of alumina-13%wt titania were decreased from 6.2% to 4% by increasing the plasma power from 20 to 40 kW. At lower power value, partially melted powders were deposited, generating over 6% porosity within the microstructures. Percentage of porosity about 5.6% gave the best ratio of bi-modal structures, providing the highest microhardness value. Furthermore, the effect of microstructure and porosity formation on wear resistance was also discussed. Coatings with less porosity exhibited better resistance to wear, in which the wear resistance of coated mild steel possessed only {approx}5 x 10{sup -4} cm{sup 3}/Nm with 4% of porosity.

  16. Investigation into the diffusion and oxidation behavior of the interface between a plasma-sprayed anode and a porous steel support for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu; Liu, Meilin; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Porous metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have attracted much attention because their potential to dramatically reduce the cost while enhancing the robustness and manufacturability. In particular, 430 ferritic steel (430L) is one of the popular choice for SOFC support because of its superior performance and low cost. In this study, we investigate the oxidation and diffusion behavior of the interface between a Ni-based anode and porous 430L support exposed to a humidified (3% H2O) hydrogen atmosphere at 700 °C. The Ni-GDC (Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ) cermet anodes are deposited on the porous 430L support by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The effect of exposure time on the microstructure and phase structure of the anode and the supports is studied and the element diffusion across the support/anode interface is characterized. Results indicate that the main oxidation product of the 430L support is Cr2O3, and that Cr and Fe will diffuse to the anode and the diffusion thickness increases with the exposure time. The diffusion thickness of Cr and Fe reach about 5 and 2 μm, respectively, after 1000 h exposure. However, the element diffusion and oxidation has little influence on the area-specific resistance, indicating that the porous 430L steel and plasma sprayed Ni-GDC anode are promising for durable SOFCs.

  17. The Influence of Temperature on Frictional Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed NiAl-Cr2O3 Based Self-Adaptive Nanocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazani, M.; Ashrafizadeh, F.; Mozaffarinia, R.

    2013-10-01

    Frictional behavior of nano and hybrid-structured NiAl-Cr2O3-Ag-CNT-WS2 adaptive self-lubricant coatings was evaluated at a range of temperatures, from room temperature to 700 °C. For this purpose, hybrid structured (HS) and nanostructured (NS) composite powders with the same nominal compositions were prepared by spray drying and heat treatment techniques. A series of HS and NS coating samples were deposited on steel substrate by an atmospheric plasma spraying process. The tribological behavior of both coatings was studied from room temperature to 700 °C at 100° intervals using a custom designed high temperature wear test machine. Scanning electron microscopy was employed for the evaluation of the composite coatings and worn surfaces. Experimental results indicated that the hybrid coating had inferior tribological properties when compared to the nanostructured coating, showing the attractive frictional behavior on the basis of low friction and high wear resistance; the NS coating possessed a more stable friction coefficient in the temperature range of 25-700 °C against alumina counterface. Microstructural examinations revealed more uniformity in NS plasma-sprayed coatings.

  18. Chemical compatibility and properties of suspension plasma-sprayed SrTiO3-based anodes for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2014-10-01

    La-doped strontium titanate (LST) is a promising, redox-stable perovskite material for direct hydrocarbon oxidation anodes in intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). In this study, nano-sized LST and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) powders are produced by the sol-gel and glycine-nitrate processes, respectively. The chemical compatibility between LST and electrolyte materials is studied. A LST-SDC composite anode is prepared by suspension plasma spraying (SPS). The effects of annealing conditions on the phase structure, microstructure, and chemical stability of the LST-SDC composite anode are investigated. The results indicate that the suspension plasma-sprayed LST-SDC anode has the same phase structure as the original powders. LST exhibits a good chemical compatibility with SDC and Mg/Sr-doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM). The anode has a porosity of ∼40% with a finely porous structure that provides high gas permeability and a long three-phase boundary for the anode reaction. Single cells assembled with the LST-SDC anode, La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3 electrolyte, and La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-SDC cathode show a good performance at 650-800 °C. The annealing reduces the impedances due to the enhancement in the bonding between the particles in the anode and interface of anode and LSGM electrolyte, thus improving the output performance of the cell.

  19. Particulate emissions from combustion of biomass in conventional combustion (air) and oxy-combustion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruscio, Amanda Deanne

    Oxy-fuel combustion is a viable technology for new and existing coal-fired power plants, as it facilitates carbon capture and thereby, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The use of biomass as an energy source is another popular strategy to reduce carbon dioxide emissions as they are considered nearly carbon dioxide neutral. If the use of biomass is combined with oxy-fuel combustion, negative net emissions of carbon dioxide are possible. This work examined the particulate emissions from combustion of pulverized biomass residues burning in either conventional or oxy-fuel environments. Combustion of three biomasses (olive residue, corn residue, and torrefied pine sawdust) occurred in a laboratory-scale laminar-flow drop tube furnace (DTF) heated to 1400 K. The O2 mole fraction was increased from 20% to 60% in N2 environments while a range of 30% to 60% O2 mole fractions were used in CO2 environments to represent plausible dry oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Submicron particulate matter (PM1) emission yields of all three fuels were typically lower in O2/CO2 environments than in O2/N2 environments. When the oxygen mole fraction was increased, the PM1 yields typically increased. The mass fractions of submicron particulate matter (PM1/PM18) collected from biomass combustion were higher than those of coal combustion. PM 1 constituted approximately 50 wt% of the collected ash particles in PM18 in each environment, whereas the corresponding submicron emissions from coal constituted approximately 20 wt%. Changing the background gas had little effect on the chemical composition of the PM1 particles. Unlike the submicron particles collected from coal which contained high amounts of silicon and aluminum, high amounts of alkalis (potassium, calcium, and sodium) and chlorine were the major elements observed in PM1 from the biomasses. In addition, phosphorous and sulfur also existed in high amounts in PM1 of corn residue. Super-micron particles (PM1-18) yields exhibited no clear

  20. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tessum, Christopher W; Hill, Jason D; Marshall, Julian D

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration-response, and economic health impact modeling for ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or "grid average" electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles.

  1. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-01-01

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles. PMID:25512510

  2. Development and Oxidation Resistance of Plasma Sprayed Mo(Si,Al)2 Coating on Nbss/Nb5Si3 in Situ Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Dendzun; Wei, Haixia; Zhou, Chungen

    A Mo(Si,Al)2 coating is developed to protect Nbss/Nb5Si3 in situ composite by plasma spraying. The binary layers of this coating consist of an inner interdiffusion layer surrounded by Mo(Si,Al)2 layer with C40 crystal structure. After oxidation at 1250°C for 100h, Mo(Si,Al)2 coating exhibited an excellent protection against oxidation and good adherence to substrate. The oxidation curve followed parabolic law and even after oxidation at high temperature for 100h, the weight gain per unit area of Mo(Si,Al)2 coating is 8.24mg/cm2. No evident spalling of coating to substrate was observed but a continuous and compact layer of Al2O3 was formed on coating surface to prevent oxidation below coating and substrate.

  3. Plasma-Sprayed High Entropy Alloys: Microstructure and Properties of AlCoCrFeNi and MnCoCrFeNi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Andrew Siao Ming; Berndt, Christopher C.; Sesso, Mitchell L.; Anupam, Ameey; S, Praveen; Kottada, Ravi Sankar; Murty, B. S.

    2015-02-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) represent a new class of materials that present novel phase structures and properties. Apart from bulk material consolidation methods such as casting and sintering, HEAs can also be deposited as a surface coating. In this work, thermal sprayed HEA coatings are investigated that may be used as an alternative bond coat material for a thermal barrier coating system. Nanostructured HEAs that were based on AlCoCrFeNi and MnCoCrFeNi were prepared by ball milling and then plasma sprayed. Splat studies were assessed to optimise the appropriate thermal spray parameters and spray deposits were prepared. After mechanical alloying, aluminum-based and manganese-based HEA powders revealed contrary prominences of BCC and FCC phases in their X-ray diffraction patterns. However, FCC phase was observed as the major phase present in both of the plasma-sprayed AlCoCrFeNi and MnCoCrFeNi coatings. There were also minor oxide peaks detected, which can be attributed to the high temperature processing. The measured porosity levels for AlCoCrFeNi and MnCoCrFeNi coatings were 9.5 ± 2.3 and 7.4 ± 1.3 pct, respectively. Three distinct phase contrasts, dark gray, light gray and white, were observed in the SEM images, with the white regions corresponding to retained multicomponent HEAs. The Vickers hardness (HV0.3kgf) was 4.13 ± 0.43 and 4.42 ± 0.60 GPa for AlCoCrFeNi and MnCoCrFeNi, respectively. Both type of HEAs coatings exhibited anisotropic mechanical behavior due to their lamellar, composite-type microstructure.

  4. Effect of Critical Plasma Spray Parameters on Microstructure and Microwave Absorption Property of Ti3SiC2/Cordierite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jinbu; Zhou, Wancheng; Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Yi; Qing, Yuchang; Luo, Fa; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhou, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Ti3SiC2/cordierite coatings with different critical plasma spray parameters (CPSP) were fabricated via atmospheric plasma spraying method. The microstructure and phase constitution of the as-sprayed Ti3SiC2/cordierite coatings were characterized. The effects of CPSP conditions on the electromagnetic shielding, and dielectric and microwave absorption properties of coatings in the frequency of 8.2-12.4 GHz were also measured and investigated. The results showed that both real and imaginary part of the complex permittivity decrease with increasing CPSP values, which can be ascribed to the decomposition of some Ti3SiC2 into TiC. The calculated reflection loss of the as-sprayed Ti3SiC2/cordierite coatings with different CPSP conditions and thicknesses indicates that coatings with CPSP 0.3, 0.35, and 0.425 exhibit excellent microwave absorption property in the thickness of 1.5 mm. In order to broaden the bandwidth of the coatings, a double-layer coating system was designed. The calculated reflection loss results show that when the thickness of matching layer is 0.3 mm and the thickness of absorbing layer is 1.5 mm, the double-layer coating system shows a proper microwave absorption property with a minimum absorption value of -17.37 dB at 9.67 GHz and a absorption bandwidth (RL less than -5 dB) of 4.16 GHz in the investigated frequency.

  5. Markers of respiratory inflammation in horses in relation to seasonal changes in air quality in a conventional racing stable.

    PubMed

    Riihimäki, Miia; Raine, Amanda; Elfman, Lena; Pringle, John

    2008-10-01

    Airborne factors in a conventionally managed racing stable and markers of pulmonary inflammation in the stabled horses were investigated on 3 occasions at 6-month intervals, including 2 winter periods and the intervening summer period. The stable measurements included inside and outside ambient temperature and relative humidity, levels of total and respirable dust, endotoxin, and 1,3-beta-glucan. Horses (n = 12) were examined in detail clinically as well as by endoscopy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of BAL-cells for IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA. Indoor measurements showed low dust levels irrespective of season. Inhalable dust, as well as 1,3-beta-glucan, were higher during the winter stabling period, whereas endotoxin levels were higher during summer. Complete data from all sampling occasions to be used for further evaluation was obtained for only 8 of the horses. There was a trend for elevation of BAL neutrophils in the horses during winter stabling that coincided with a 3.7-fold increased expression of IL-6 mRNA in BAL cells (P = 0.014). Compared to summer sampling, IL-10 mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in only 1 of the winter sampling occasions, implicating influence on immune regulation by factor/s apart from seasonal differences. Our findings suggest up-regulation of innate immunity in the airways of stabled horses; in particular involving IL-6 in association with mild elevations in respirable dust, 1,3-beta-glucan, and/or cold ambient air. However, given that this study was observational, other unmeasured environmental factors associated with winter stabling need to be considered.

  6. Dual-Layer Oxidation-Protective Plasma-Sprayed SiC-ZrB2/Al2O3-Carbon Nanotube Coating on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariharan, S.; Sengupta, Pradyut; Nisar, Ambreen; Agnihotri, Ankur; Balaji, N.; Aruna, S. T.; Balani, Kantesh

    2016-12-01

    Graphite is used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors because of its outstanding irradiation performance and corrosion resistance. To restrict its high-temperature (>873 K) oxidation, atmospheric-plasma-sprayed SiC-ZrB2-Al2O3-carbon nanotube (CNT) dual-layer coating was deposited on graphite substrate in this work. The effect of each layer was isolated by processing each component of the coating via spark plasma sintering followed by isothermal kinetic studies. Based on isothermal analysis and the presence of high residual thermal stress in the oxide scale, degradation appeared to be more severe in composites reinforced with CNTs. To avoid the complexity of analysis of composites, the high-temperature activation energy for oxidation was calculated for the single-phase materials only, yielding values of 11.8, 20.5, 43.5, and 4.5 kJ/mol for graphite, SiC, ZrB2, and CNT, respectively, with increased thermal stability for ZrB2 and SiC. These results were then used to evaluate the oxidation rate for the composites analytically. This study has broad implications for wider use of dual-layer (SiC-ZrB2/Al2O3) coatings for protecting graphite crucibles even at temperatures above 1073 K.

  7. Detection of segmentation cracks in top coat of thermal barrier coatings during plasma spraying by non-contact acoustic emission method.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kaita; Kuriki, Hitoshi; Araki, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Enoki, Manabu

    2014-06-01

    Numerous cracks can be observed in the top coat of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) method. These cracks can be classified into vertical and horizontal ones and they have opposite impact on the properties of TBCs. Vertical cracks reduce the residual stress in the top coat and provide strain tolerance. On the contrary, horizontal cracks trigger delamination of the top coat. However, monitoring methods of cracks generation during APS are rare even though they are strongly desired. Therefore, an in situ, non-contact and non-destructive evaluation method for this objective was developed in this study with the laser acoustic emission (AE) technique by using laser interferometers as a sensor. More AE events could be detected by introducing an improved noise reduction filter and AE event detection procedures with multiple thresholds. Generation of vertical cracks was successfully separated from horizontal cracks by a newly introduced scanning pattern of a plasma torch. Thus, generation of vertical cracks was detected with certainty by this monitoring method because AE events were detected only during spraying and a positive correlation was observed between the development degree of vertical cracks and the total AE energy in one experiment.

  8. Processing Parameter Effects and Thermal Properties of Y2Si2O7 Nanostructured Environmental Barrier Coatings Synthesized by Solution Precursor Induction Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darthout, Émilien; Laduye, Guillaume; Gitzhofer, François

    2016-10-01

    The solution precursor plasma spray process, in which a solution of metal salts is axially injected into an induction thermal plasma, is suitable for deposition of nanostructured environmental barrier coatings. The effects of main processing parameters, namely the solution precursor concentration, spraying distance, reactor pressure, and atomization gas flow rate, have been analyzed using D-optimal design of experiments regarding the deposition rate and coating porosity responses. Among these four parameters, the solution precursor concentration had the greatest influent on the coating structure, followed by the spraying distance and reactor pressure, and finally the atomization gas flow rate with a small contribution. It is pointed out that the species that impact on the substrate are agglomerates of nanoparticles. The equivalent thermal conductivity of selected coatings was computed from experimental temperature evolution curves obtained by laser flash thermal diffusivity analysis, using two methods: a multilayer finite-element model with optimization, and a multilayer thermal diffusion model. The results of the two models agree, with coatings exhibiting low thermal conductivity between 0.7 and 1 W/(m K) at 800 °C.

  9. Correlation of Microstructures and Tribological Properties of Ferrous Coatings Deposited by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying on Al-Si Cast Alloy Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencl, Aleksandar; Mrdak, Mihailo; Banjac, Miloš

    2009-02-01

    The microstructure and tribological properties of ferrous coatings applicable to cylinder bores were investigated in this study. Two kinds of ferrous powders were sprayed on Al-Si cast alloy (EN AlSi10Mg) substrate by atmospheric plasma spraying. Microstructural analysis showed that various Fe oxides were formed in the coatings. The presence of pores, unmelted particles, and Fe precipitates was also noticed. The pin-on-ring tribometer was used to carry out tribological tests under lubricated sliding conditions: sliding speed of 0.5 m/s, sliding distance of 5000 m, and normal load of 450 N. High porosity and the presence of larger and irregularly shaped pores as well as the amount of oxides were the controlling factors for the crack initiations and, consequently, the wear rate. Tribological properties of the coatings were compared with gray cast iron as a standard material for cylinder blocks and showed that, for the investigated conditions, both coatings could be an adequate substitution.

  10. High throughput production of nanocomposite SiO x powders by plasma spray physical vapor deposition for negative electrode of lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Keiichiro; Kambara, Makoto; Yoshida, Toyonobu

    2014-04-01

    Nanocomposite Si/SiO x powders were produced by plasma spray physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) at a material throughput of 480 g h-1. The powders are fundamentally an aggregate of primary ˜20 nm particles, which are composed of a crystalline Si core and SiO x shell structure. This is made possible by complete evaporation of raw SiO powders and subsequent rapid condensation of high temperature SiO x vapors, followed by disproportionation reaction of nucleated SiO x nanoparticles. When CH4 was additionally introduced to the PS-PVD, the volume of the core Si increases while reducing potentially the SiO x shell thickness as a result of the enhanced SiO reduction, although an unfavorable SiC phase emerges when the C/Si molar ratio is greater than 1. As a result of the increased amount of Si active material and reduced source for irreversible capacity, half-cell batteries made of PS-PVD powders with C/Si = 0.25 have exhibited improved initial efficiency and maintenance of capacity as high as 1000 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at the same time.

  11. Effect of chemical composition on hydrophobicity and zeta potential of plasma sprayed HA/CaO-P2O5 glass coatings.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, M P; Monteiro, F J; Serro, A P; Saramago, B; Gibson, I R; Santos, J D

    2001-12-01

    Multilayered plasma sprayed coatings on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V alloys have been prepared, which were composed of an underlayer of HA and a surface layer of a CaO-P2O5 glass-HA composite, with 2 or 4wt% of glass. Contact angle and surface tension variation with time, for both water and a protein solution, were determined by the sessile and pendent drop methods respectively using the ADSA-P software. Wettability studies showed that hydrophobicity of the coatings increase with the glass addition. The work of adhesion of albumin was also altered in a controlled manner by the addition of the CaO-P2O5 glass, being lower on the composite coatings than on HA. Zeta potential (ZP) results showed that composite coatings presented a higher net negative charge than HA coatings and that ZP values were also influenced by the content of the glass. This study demonstrated that the surface properties of those coatings may be modified by the addition of CaO-P2O5 glass.

  12. Dual-Layer Oxidation-Protective Plasma-Sprayed SiC-ZrB2/Al2O3-Carbon Nanotube Coating on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariharan, S.; Sengupta, Pradyut; Nisar, Ambreen; Agnihotri, Ankur; Balaji, N.; Aruna, S. T.; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-02-01

    Graphite is used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors because of its outstanding irradiation performance and corrosion resistance. To restrict its high-temperature (>873 K) oxidation, atmospheric-plasma-sprayed SiC-ZrB2-Al2O3-carbon nanotube (CNT) dual-layer coating was deposited on graphite substrate in this work. The effect of each layer was isolated by processing each component of the coating via spark plasma sintering followed by isothermal kinetic studies. Based on isothermal analysis and the presence of high residual thermal stress in the oxide scale, degradation appeared to be more severe in composites reinforced with CNTs. To avoid the complexity of analysis of composites, the high-temperature activation energy for oxidation was calculated for the single-phase materials only, yielding values of 11.8, 20.5, 43.5, and 4.5 kJ/mol for graphite, SiC, ZrB2, and CNT, respectively, with increased thermal stability for ZrB2 and SiC. These results were then used to evaluate the oxidation rate for the composites analytically. This study has broad implications for wider use of dual-layer (SiC-ZrB2/Al2O3) coatings for protecting graphite crucibles even at temperatures above 1073 K.

  13. Suspension Plasma Sprayed Sr2Fe1.4Mo0.6O6-δ Electrodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Zhang, Ai-Ping; Li, Cheng-Xin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, suspension plasma spraying (SPS) was applied to deposit double perovskite Sr2Fe1.4Mo0.6O6-δ (SFM) which can be used as both cathode and anode for solid oxide fuel cells. The effects of SFM concentration on the electrode phase composition, microstructure, and catalytic performance were investigated. The electrodes showed a dense structure when it was deposited at a concentration of 0.05 mol/L. The cathode performance was limited by the limited three-phase boundaries and poor gas diffusion. At 750 °C, cathode polarization (R pc) was 0.19 Ω cm2. When the SFM concentration increased to 0.075 mol/L, the deposits revealed a porous microstructure with well-bonded fine particles. As a result, the Rpc decreased significantly to 0.078 Ω cm2 at 750 °C. However, when the SFM concentration was further increased to 0.1 mol/L, the R pc increased owing to the limited interface bonding between the non-molten particles. As a result, it was found that the SFM suspension concentration should be optimized to achieve a highly active SFM by SPS process. Moreover, when the optimized deposit was employed as an anode and tested in a hydrogen atmosphere, it showed anode polarization resistance (Rpa) of 1.5 Ω cm2 at 750 °C.

  14. Effects of silver and group II fluoride solid lubricant additions to plasma-sprayed chromium carbide coatings for foil gas bearings to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.; Sliney, Harold E.

    1986-01-01

    A new self-lubricating coating composition of nickel aluminide-bonded chromium carbide formulated with silver and Group II fluorides was developed in a research program on high temperature solid lubricants. One of the proposed applications for this new coating composition is as a wide temperature spectrum solid lubricant for complaint foil gas bearings. Friction and wear properties were obtained using a foil gas bearing start-stop apparatus at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The journals were Inconel 748. Some were coated with the plasma sprayed experimental coating, others with unmodified nickel aluminide/chromium carbide as a baseline for comparison. The additional components were provided to assist in achieving low friction over the temperature range of interest. Uncoated, preoxidized Inconel X-750 foil bearings were operated against these surfaces. The foils were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14-kPa (2-Psi) bearing unit loading. Sliding contact occurred during lift-off and coastdown at surface velocities less than 6 m/s (3000 rPm). Testing continued until 9000 start/stop cycles were accumulated or until a rise in starting torque indicated the journal/bearing had failed. Comparison in coating performance as well as discussions of their properties and methods of application are given.

  15. Effects of silver and group 2 fluorides addition to plasma sprayed chromium carbide high temperature solid lubricant for foil gas bearing to 650 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    A new self-lubricating coating composition of nickel aluminide-bonded chromium carbide formulated with silver and Group II fluorides was developed in a research program on high temperature solid lubricants. One of the proposed applications for this new coating composition is as a wide temperature spectrum solid lubricant for complaint foil gas bearings. Friction and wear properties were obtained using a foil gas bearing start/stop apparatus at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The journals were Inconel 718. Some were coated with the plasma sprayed experimental coating, others with unmodified nickel aluminide/chromium carbide as a baseline for comparison. The addtitional components were provided to assist in achieving low friction over the temperature range of interest. Uncoated, preoxidized Inconel X-750 foil bearings were operated against these surfaces. The foils were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14-kPa (2-psi) bearing unit loading. Sliding contact occurred during lift-off and coastdown at surface velocities less than 6 m/s (3000 rpm). Testing continued until 9000 start/stop cycles were accumulated or until a rise in starting torque indicated the journal/bearing had failed. Comparison in coating performance as well as discussions of their properties and methods of application are given.

  16. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed AlCoCrFeNiTi High-Entropy Alloy Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Li-Hui; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Chuan; Lu, Sheng; Fu, Ming

    2016-12-01

    Due to the advantages such as high strength, high hardness and good wear resistance, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) attracted more and more attentions in recent decades. However, most reports on HEAs were limited to bulk materials. Although a few of studies on atmospheric plasma-sprayed (APS) HEA coatings were carried out, the wear behavior, especially the high-temperature wear behavior of those coatings has not been investigated till now. Therefore, in this study, APS was employed to deposit AlCoCrFeNiTi high-entropy alloy coating using mechanically alloyed AlCoCrFeNiTi powder as the feedstock. The phase structure of the initial powder, the feedstock powder and the as-sprayed coating was examined by an x-ray diffractometer. The surface morphology of the feedstock powder and the microstructure of the as-sprayed coating were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The bonding strength and the microhardness of the as-sprayed coating were tested. The wear behavior of the coating at 25, 500, 700 and 900 °C was investigated by analysis of the wear surface morphology and measurements of the volume wear rate and the coefficient of friction.

  17. Dose-Dependent Effects of CeO2 on Microstructure and Antibacterial Property of Plasma-Sprayed TiO2 Coatings for Orthopedic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Liu, Gaopeng; Zheng, Hai; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Xuanyong

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been used extensively for orthopedic and dental implants. Although these devices have achieved high rates of success, two major complications may be encountered: the lack of osseointegration and the biomaterial-related infection. Accordingly, cerium oxide (CeO2)-doped titanium oxide (TiO2) materials were coated on titanium by an atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) technique. The phase structures, morphologies, and surface chemical states of the obtained coatings were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The in vitro antibacterial and cytocompatibility of the materials were studied with Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus, ATCC25923) and osteoblast precursor cell line MC3T3-E1. The results indicated that the addition of CeO2 shifts slightly the diffraction peaks of TiO2 matrix to low angles but does not change its rutile phase structure. In addition, the CeO2/TiO2 composite coatings possess dose-dependent corrosion resistance and antimicrobial properties. And doping of 10 wt.% CeO2 exhibits the highest activity against S. aureus, improved corrosion resistance, and competitive cytocompatibility, which argues a promising option for balancing the osteogenetic and antibacterial properties of titanium implants.

  18. Detection of segmentation cracks in top coat of thermal barrier coatings during plasma spraying by non-contact acoustic emission method

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kaita; Kuriki, Hitoshi; Araki, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Enoki, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cracks can be observed in the top coat of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) method. These cracks can be classified into vertical and horizontal ones and they have opposite impact on the properties of TBCs. Vertical cracks reduce the residual stress in the top coat and provide strain tolerance. On the contrary, horizontal cracks trigger delamination of the top coat. However, monitoring methods of cracks generation during APS are rare even though they are strongly desired. Therefore, an in situ, non-contact and non-destructive evaluation method for this objective was developed in this study with the laser acoustic emission (AE) technique by using laser interferometers as a sensor. More AE events could be detected by introducing an improved noise reduction filter and AE event detection procedures with multiple thresholds. Generation of vertical cracks was successfully separated from horizontal cracks by a newly introduced scanning pattern of a plasma torch. Thus, generation of vertical cracks was detected with certainty by this monitoring method because AE events were detected only during spraying and a positive correlation was observed between the development degree of vertical cracks and the total AE energy in one experiment. PMID:27877683

  19. Suspension Plasma Sprayed Sr2Fe1.4Mo0.6O6- δ Electrodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Zhang, Ai-Ping; Li, Cheng-Xin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-02-01

    In this study, suspension plasma spraying (SPS) was applied to deposit double perovskite Sr2Fe1.4Mo0.6O6- δ (SFM) which can be used as both cathode and anode for solid oxide fuel cells. The effects of SFM concentration on the electrode phase composition, microstructure, and catalytic performance were investigated. The electrodes showed a dense structure when it was deposited at a concentration of 0.05 mol/L. The cathode performance was limited by the limited three-phase boundaries and poor gas diffusion. At 750 °C, cathode polarization ( R pc) was 0.19 Ω cm2. When the SFM concentration increased to 0.075 mol/L, the deposits revealed a porous microstructure with well-bonded fine particles. As a result, the Rpc decreased significantly to 0.078 Ω cm2 at 750 °C. However, when the SFM concentration was further increased to 0.1 mol/L, the R pc increased owing to the limited interface bonding between the non-molten particles. As a result, it was found that the SFM suspension concentration should be optimized to achieve a highly active SFM by SPS process. Moreover, when the optimized deposit was employed as an anode and tested in a hydrogen atmosphere, it showed anode polarization resistance (Rpa) of 1.5 Ω cm2 at 750 °C.

  20. Instantaneous formation of SiOx nanocomposite for high capacity lithium ion batteries by enhanced disproportionation reaction during plasma spray physical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Tohru; Dougakiuchi, Masashi; Kambara, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nanocomposite SiOx particles have been produced by a single step plasma spray physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) through rapid condensation of SiO vapors and the subsequent disproportionation reaction. Core-shell nanoparticles, in which 15 nm crystalline Si is embedded within the amorphous SiOx matrix, form under typical PS-PVD conditions, while 10 nm amorphous particles are formed when processed with an increased degree of non-equilibrium effect. Addition of CH4 promotes reduction in the oxygen content x of SiOx, and thereby increases the Si volume in a nanocomposite particle. As a result, core-shell nanoparticles with x = 0.46 as anode exhibit increased initial efficiency and the capacity of lithium ion batteries while maintaining cyclability. Furthermore, it is revealed that the disproportionation reaction of SiO is promoted in nanosized particles attaining increased Si diffusivity by two orders of magnitude compared to that in bulk, which facilitates instantaneous composite nanoparticle formation during PS-PVD. PMID:27933114

  1. Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of VC and Columnar Structured Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yang, Qi; Huang, Xiao; Tang, Zhaolin

    2015-08-01

    The effects of different thermal barrier coating (TBC) top coat structures and substrate alloys on the isothermal oxidation behaviors of TBC systems were investigated at 1080 °C in lab air. The tested TBC systems consisted of two nickel-based superalloy substrates (CMSX-4 and IN738LC), a platinum aluminide bond coat and two 8YSZ top coats (vertical cracked and columnar structured). Samples with IN738LC substrate demonstrated longer isothermal oxidation lives than the counterparts with CMSX-4 substrate. Outward refractory elemental diffusion in coating systems with CMSX-4 substrate and void formation at the interface between thermally grown oxide and bond coat was found to be responsible for the early failure of TBCs. Columnar structured YSZ top coat seemed to provide better protection of the bond coating and substrate, marginally delaying the failure of the both coating systems with IN738LC and CMSX-4.

  2. Study of metallic powder behavior in very low pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) — Application to the manufacturing of titanium–aluminum coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Vautherin, B.; Planche, M.-P.; Montavon, G.; Lapostolle, F.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.

    2015-08-28

    In this study, metallic materials made of aluminum and titanium were manufactured implementing very low pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS). Aluminum was selected at first as a demonstrative material due to its rather low vaporization enthalpy (i.e., 381.9 kJ·mol⁻¹). Developments were then carried out with titanium which exhibits a higher vaporization enthalpy (i.e., 563.6 kJ·mol⁻¹). Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was implemented to analyze the behavior of each solid precursor (metallic powders) when it is injected into the plasma jet under very low pressure (i.e., in the 150 Pa range). Besides, aluminum, titanium and titanium–aluminum coatings were deposited in the same conditions implementing a stick-cathode plasma torch operated at 50 kW, maximum power. Coating phase compositions were identified by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Coating elementary compositions were quantified by Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyses. The coating structures were observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The coating void content was determined by Ultra-Small Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS). The coatings exhibit a two-scale structure corresponding to condensed vapors (smaller scale) and solidified areas (larger scale). Titanium–aluminum sprayed coatings, with various Ti/Al atomic ratios, are constituted of three phases: metastable α-Ti, Al and metastable α₂-Ti₃Al. This latter is formed at elevated temperature in the plasma flow, before being condensed. Its rather small fraction, impeded by the rather small amount of vaporized Ti, does not allow modifying however the coating hardness.

  3. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  4. Comparison of shear bond strength and surface structure between conventional acid etching and air-abrasion of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Bishara, S E; Damon, P; Jakobsen, J R

    1997-11-01

    Recently, air-abrasion technology has been examined for potential applications within dentistry, including the field of orthodontics. The purpose of this study was to compare the traditional acid-etch technique with an air-abrasion surface preparation technique, with two different sizes of abrading particles. The following parameters were evaluated: (a) shear bond strength, (b) bond failure location, and (c) enamel surface preparation, as viewed through a scanning electron microscope. Sixty extracted human third molars were pumiced and divided into three groups of 20. The first group was etched with a 37% phosphoric acid gel for 30 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and dried for 20 seconds. The second and third groups were air-abraded with (a) a 50 microm particle and (b) a 90 microm particle of aluminum oxide, with the Micro-etcher microabrasion machine (Danville Engineering Inc.). All three groups had molar stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to the buccal surface of each tooth with Transbond XT bonding system (3M Unitek). A Zwick Universal Testing Machine (Calitek Corp.) was used to determine shear bond strengths. The analysis of variance was used to compare the three groups. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was used to evaluate the residual adhesive on the enamel after bracket removal. The chi square test was used to evaluate differences in the ARI scores among the groups. The significance for all tests was predetermined at p < or = 0.05. The results indicated that there was a significant difference in shear bond strength among the three groups (p = 0.0001). The Duncan Multiple Range test showed a significant decrease in shear bond strength in the air-abraded groups. The chi square test revealed significant differences among the ARI scores of the acid-etched group and the air-abraded groups (chi(2) = 0.0001), indicating no adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding when air-abrasion was used. In conclusion, the current findings indicate that

  5. Comparison of conventional filtration and a denuder-based methodology for sampling of particulate-phase mercury in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Lu, J Y; Schroeder, W H

    1999-06-01

    This paper compares the results of total atmospheric particulate-phase mercury determinations using samples collected by two methods. The conventional filtration method (FM) collects airborne particulate matter first, whereas the denuder-based method (DM) removes gaseous-phase mercury prior to particulate matter collection. In each case, particulate-phase mercury (PM) is collected on a quartz fiber disc held in a miniaturized device and is analyzed using a pyrolysis/gold amalgamation/thermal desorption/cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS) technique. The results show that the concentrations of PM determined using the samples collected by DM are higher than those determined using the samples collected by FM. Evidence presented shows that the higher results are due to mercury-bearing gold particles flaking off from the gold-coated denuder surfaces in the denuder-based sampling system.

  6. Arthrodesis Rate and Patient Reported Outcomes After Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Utilizing a Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Coated PEEK Interbody Implant: A Retrospective, Observational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Sophea R.; Staples, Miranda; Liang, Kevin; Raiszadeh, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Background Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is utilized in symptomatic spinal disc destabilization due to degenerative lumbar disc disease, isthmic and degenerative spondylolisthesis, internal disc disruption, or pseudarthrosis after non-operative treatments fail. The addition of a plasma-sprayed titanium coating (PTC) to polyether ether ketone spacers (PEEK) may reduce the rate of implant subsidence or non-union secondary to poor osseous-integration of non-coated PEEK or metal interbody systems. Methods A retrospective, non-randomized, single-center chart review, evaluated the post-surgical follow-up data of patients receiving a PTC PEEK implant during single or multi-level ALIF procedures to determine the clinical efficacy and rate of arthrodesis after utilization of a coated spacer. Standard roentgenographs or computed tomography were used to identify successful arthrodesis following the ALIF procedure and longitudinal clinical improvements were determined by scores on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for low back and leg pain. Results Forty-four subjects (48% male, mean=53 years) were included in this chart review. Follow-up radiology demonstrated radiographic union with bridging bone formation across the interbody space for 42/44 (96%) individuals with solid arthrodesis occurring at an average of 7.3 ± 2.3 months. Subjects demonstrated significant improvement in VAS low back pain (4.5 ± 2.4 point improvement, p=0.0001) and VAS leg pain (4.1 ± 3.3 point improvement, p=0.0001). While there was a significant reduction in the improvement of VAS low back pain of Worker's Compensation claimants as compared to other patients (3.9 ± 2.4 vs. 5.3 ± 2.1), there was no difference in VAS low back pain or leg pain when the data was stratified by gender, age, tobacco use, comorbidities, prior surgery, fusion construct length, use of supplemental posterior instrumentation, BMI, or diagnosis. Conclusions This study provides support that the addition of a PTC coating

  7. Failure behavior of plasma-sprayed HAp coating on commercially pure titanium substrate in simulated body fluid (SBF) under bending load.

    PubMed

    Laonapakul, Teerawat; Rakngarm Nimkerdphol, Achariya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2012-11-01

    Four point bending tests with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring were conducted for evaluating failure behavior of the plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coat on commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) plate with and without mixed HAp/Ti bond coat. Effect of immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on failure behavior of the coated specimen was also investigated by immersing the specimen in SBF. The AE patterns obtained from the bending test of the HAp coating specimens after a week immersion in SBF clearly showed the earlier stage of delamination and spallation of the coating layer compared to those without immersion in SBF. It was also found that the bond coating improved failure resistance of the HAp coating specimen compared to that without the bond coat. Four point bend fatigue tests under ambient and SBF environments were also conducted with AE monitoring during the entire fatigue test for investigating the influence of SBF environment on fatigue failure behavior of the HAp coating specimen with the mixed HAp/Ti bond coat. The specimens tested at a stress amplitude of 120 MPa under both ambient and SBF environments could survive up to 10⁷ cycles without spallation of HAp coating layer. The specimens tested under SBF environment and those tested under ambient environment after immersion in SBF showed shorter fatigue life compared to those tested under ambient environment without SBF immersion. Micro-cracks nucleated in the coating layer in the early stage of fatigue life and then propagated into the cp-Ti substrate in the intermediate stage, which unstably propagated to failure in the final stage. It was found from the XRD analysis that the dissolution of the co-existing phases and the precipitation of the HAp phase were taken place during immersion in SBF. During this process, the co-existing phases disappeared from the coating layer and the HAp phase fully occupied the coating layer. The degradation of bending strength and fatigue life of the HAp coating

  8. Characterization and durability testing of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria and hafnia-yttria thermal barrier coatings. Part 2: Effect of spray parameters on the performance of several hafnia-yttria and zirconia-yttria coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Leissler, George W.

    1993-01-01

    This is the second of two reports which discuss initial experiments on thermal barrier coatings prepared and tested in newly upgraded plasma spray and burner rig test facilities at LeRC. The first report, part 1, describes experiments designed to establish the spray parameters for the baseline zirconia-yttria coating. Coating quality was judged primarily by the response to burner rig exposure, together with a variety of other characterization approaches including thermal diffusivity measurements. That portion of the study showed that the performance of the baseline NASA coating was not strongly sensitive to processing parameters. In this second part of the study, new hafnia-yttria coatings were evaluated with respect to both baseline and alternate zirconia-yttria coatings. The hafnia-yttria and the alternate zirconia-yttria coatings were very sensitive to plasma-spray parameters in that high-quality coatings were obtained only when specific parameters were used. The reasons for this important observation are not understood.

  9. Wear studies on plasma-sprayed Al2O3 and 8mole% of Yttrium-stabilized ZrO2 composite coating on biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy for orthopedic joint application.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Perumal; Manivasagam, Geetha; Rajamanickam, Asokamani; Natarajan, Alagumurthi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the wear characteristics of the composite ceramic coating made with Al2O3-40wt%8YSZ on the biomedical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy (grade 5) used for total joint prosthetic components, with the aim of improving their tribological behavior. The coatings were deposited using a plasma spraying technique, and optimization of plasma parameters was performed using response surface methodology to obtain dense coating. The tribological behaviors of the coated and uncoated substrates were evaluated using a ball-on-plate sliding wear tester at 37°C in simulated body-fluid conditions. The microstructure of both the titanium alloy and coated specimen were examined using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The hardness of the plasma-sprayed alumina-zirconia composite coatings was 2.5 times higher than that of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, while the wear rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was 253 times higher than that of the composite-coated Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The superior wear resistance of the alumina-zirconia coated alloy is attributed to its enhanced hardness and intersplat bonding strength. Wear-track examination showed that the predominant wear mechanism of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was abrasive and adhesive wear, whereas, in the case of alumina-zirconia composite coated alloy, the wear was dominated by microchipping and microcracking.

  10. Wear studies on plasma-sprayed Al2O3 and 8mole% of Yttrium-stabilized ZrO2 composite coating on biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy for orthopedic joint application

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Perumal; Manivasagam, Geetha; Rajamanickam, Asokamani; Natarajan, Alagumurthi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the wear characteristics of the composite ceramic coating made with Al2O3-40wt%8YSZ on the biomedical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy (grade 5) used for total joint prosthetic components, with the aim of improving their tribological behavior. The coatings were deposited using a plasma spraying technique, and optimization of plasma parameters was performed using response surface methodology to obtain dense coating. The tribological behaviors of the coated and uncoated substrates were evaluated using a ball-on-plate sliding wear tester at 37°C in simulated body-fluid conditions. The microstructure of both the titanium alloy and coated specimen were examined using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The hardness of the plasma-sprayed alumina–zirconia composite coatings was 2.5 times higher than that of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, while the wear rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was 253 times higher than that of the composite-coated Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The superior wear resistance of the alumina–zirconia coated alloy is attributed to its enhanced hardness and intersplat bonding strength. Wear-track examination showed that the predominant wear mechanism of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was abrasive and adhesive wear, whereas, in the case of alumina–zirconia composite coated alloy, the wear was dominated by microchipping and microcracking. PMID:26491323

  11. Molecular characterisation of organic material in air fine particles (PM10) using conventional and reactive pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Daniele; Prati, Silvia; Vassura, Ivano

    2002-04-01

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) was applied to study the composition of organic constituents in air particulate matter (PM10) collected inside an industrial area. A few milligrams of sampling filters containing air particles were pyrolysed at 700 degrees C directly (conventional) or after the addition of a derivatising reagent (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, TMAH, for pyrolysis-methylation; hexamethyldisilazane, HMDS, for pyrolysis-silylation). Py-GC-MS was also applied to synthetic polymers (poly(styrene-co-isoprene), polylimonene and polypinene) and vegetation samples (coniferous pollen, bark and resin) to identify markers indicative of possible precursors. Pyrolysates of PM10 showed the same suite of compounds in all the four seasons, dominated by hydrocarbons like styrene, limonene and clusters of isomeric alkenes with 14, 15 and 16 carbon atoms. Pyrolysis products of natural origin, including furaldehyde, benzeneacetonitrile, dehydroabietin and other diterpenoids were found, while no specific markers of synthetic rubbers were detected. The principal products released from reactive pyrolysis of PM10 were methyl or trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives of 1,6-anhydroglucose (levoglucosan), fatty acids, dehydroabietic acid and other resin acids along with hydroxy (di)carboxylic acids. Possible sources of the detected products (e.g. pine forest, biomass combustion) are discussed.

  12. Development of Fine-Grained, Low-Carbon Bainitic Steels with High Strength and Toughness Produced Through the Conventional Hot-Rolling and Air-Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhua, Sanjay Kumar; Sarkar, Partha Pratim; Saxena, Atul; Jha, Bimal Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Low-carbon bainitic steels have created enormous interest among scientists across the world in the past few decades because of their high strength, toughness, and weldability replacing the conventional quenched and tempered medium-carbon steels. Three experimental steels with varying alloy additions were made in a 100-kg laboratory induction furnace and cast into 100-mm-diameter cylindrical ingots. These ingots were hot-rolled and air-cooled to 6-mm plates in an experimental rolling mill with selected thermomechanical parameters. Steels processed through this process provided an ultrafine low-carbon bainitic microstructure with maximum yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) 575 and 705 MPa, respectively. The Charpy impact toughness of the experimental steels was excellent, and at 253 K (-20 °C), it varied from 114 to 170 Joules. Cu-B-added steel was found to give an optimum combination of strength, YS-575 MPa, and toughness, 114 J at 253 K (-20 °C). Thus, fine-grained, low-carbon bainitic steels could be developed with a proper combination of alloying elements and thermomechanical parameters even by air-cooling.

  13. Conceptual and feasibility study on lab-scale series power generation by carbon-air and conventional solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Nan-Qi; Cao, Yong; Chi, Bo; Pu, Jian; Li, Jian

    2016-10-01

    To take the advantage chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process for CO2 sequestration, carbon-air fuel cell (CAFC) and conventional solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are prepared for high-efficiency series power generation. The tubular CAFC (Cell-I) consisting of Sb anode, (Y2O3)0.08(ZrO2)0.92 (YSZ) electrolyte and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ-Gd0.1Ce0.9O3-δ (LSCF-GDC) cathode has achieved peak power densities of 117, 186 and 295 mW cm-2 at 700, 750 and 800 °C, respectively. Fueled by repeatedly added 3 g of coconut-derived activated charcoal, Cell-I has operated stably at 800 °C for 21 h under the condition of 0.4 A cm-2 and 0.502 V, with an electrical efficiency of 30.8%. The tubular conventional SOFC (Cell-II) is designed with Ni-YSZ as anode, YSZ electrolyte as electrolyte and (La0.8Sr0.2)0.95MnO3-δ-YSZ (LSM-YSZ) as cathode. The anode exhaust gas of Cell-I, which is operated at temperatures from 750 to 850 °C, contains CO and CO2. Using this exhaust gas as fuel, Cell-II has demonstrated peak power densities between 87 and 133 mW cm-2 at 750 °C, and performed stably for 6 h at 0.1 A cm-2 and 0.720 V during which 69.6% of CO in the exhaust gas is consumed. Cell-II has achieved an extra electrical efficiency of 11.0%, giving a total electrical efficiency of 41.8% for the series power generation.

  14. High-temperature tribological properties of NiCoCrAlY-WSe2-BaF2·CaF2 solid lubricant coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. H.; Yuan, X. J.; Xia, J.; Yu, Z. H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, NiCoCrAlY-WSe2-BaF2·CaF2 solid lubricant coatings were produced on a substrate by plasma spray and investigated at the high temperature, such as 500 °C and 800 °C. The structure of the coatings was characterized using XRD pattern and scanning electron microscopy. The TC1 (83wt% NiCoCrAlY) coating has a low friction coefficient at 500C, where the WSe2 is a good solid lubricant. The TC2 (65wt% NiCoCrAlY) coating has the low friction coefficient (0.279) at 800°C, due to the formation of BaCrO4 on the surfaces. As a result, the TC2 coating has the optimal tribological property in the wide temperature.

  15. The Role of Oxygen Partial Pressure in Controlling the Phase Composition of La1- x Sr x Co y Fe1- y O3- δ Oxygen Transport Membranes Manufactured by Means of Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcano, D.; Mauer, G.; Sohn, Y. J.; Vaßen, R.; Garcia-Fayos, J.; Serra, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    La0.58Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 - δ (LSCF) deposited on a metallic porous support by plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a promising candidate for oxygen-permeation membranes. Ionic transport properties are regarded to depend on the fraction of perovskite phase present in the membrane. However, during processing, the LSCF powder decomposes into perovskite and secondary phases. In order to improve the ionic transport properties of the membranes, spraying was carried out at different oxygen partial pressures p(O2). It was found that coatings deposited at lower and higher oxygen partial pressures consist of 70% cubic/26% rhombohedral and 61% cubic/35% rhombohedral perovskite phases, respectively. During annealing, the formation of non-perovskite phases is driven by oxygen non-stoichiometry. The amount of oxygen added during spraying can be used to increase the perovskite phase fraction and suppress the formation of non-perovskite phases.

  16. Instantaneous Conventions

    PubMed Central

    Misyak, Jennifer; Noguchi, Takao; Chater, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Humans can communicate even with few existing conventions in common (e.g., when they lack a shared language). We explored what makes this phenomenon possible with a nonlinguistic experimental task requiring participants to coordinate toward a common goal. We observed participants creating new communicative conventions using the most minimal possible signals. These conventions, furthermore, changed on a trial-by-trial basis in response to shared environmental and task constraints. Strikingly, as a result, signals of the same form successfully conveyed contradictory messages from trial to trial. Such behavior is evidence for the involvement of what we term joint inference, in which social interactants spontaneously infer the most sensible communicative convention in light of the common ground between them. Joint inference may help to elucidate how communicative conventions emerge instantaneously and how they are modified and reshaped into the elaborate systems of conventions involved in human communication, including natural languages. PMID:27793986

  17. Characterization and durability testing of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria and hafnia-yttria thermal barrier coatings. Part 1: Effect of spray parameters on the performance of several lots of partially stabilized zirconia-yttria powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Leissler, George W.; Jobe, J. Marcus

    1993-01-01

    Initial experiments conducted on thermal barrier coatings prepared in the newly upgraded research plasma spray facility and the burner rig test facilities are discussed. Part 1 discusses experiments which establish the spray parameters for three baseline zirconia-yttria coatings. The quality of five similar coating lots was judged primarily by their response to burner rig exposure supplemented by data from other sources such as specimen characterizations and thermal diffusivity measurements. After allowing for burner rig variability, although there appears to be an optimum density (i.e., optimum microstructure) for maximum burner rig life, the distribution tends to be rather broad about the maximum. In Part 2, new hafnia-yttria-based coatings were evaluated against both baseline and alternate zirconia-yttria coatings. The hafnia-yttria coatings and the zirconia-yttria coatings that were prepared by an alternate powder vendor were very sensitive to plasma spray parameters, in that high-quality coatings were only obtained when certain parameters were employed. The reasons for this important observation are not understood. Also not understood is that the first of two replicate specimens sprayed for Part 1 consistently performed better than the second specimen. Subsequent experiments did not display this spray order affect, possibly because a chiller was installed in the torch cooling water circuit. Also, large changes in coating density were observed after switching to a new lot of electrodes. Analyses of these findings were made possible, in part, because of the development of a sensitive density measurement technique described herein in detail. The measured thermal diffusivities did not display the expected strong relationship with porosity. This surprising result was believed to have been caused by increased microcracking of the denser coatings on the stainless steel substrates.

  18. Design Optimization and the Limits of Steady-State Heating Efficiency for Conventional Single-Speed Air-Source Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.K.

    2001-06-06

    The ORNL Heat Pump Model and an optimizing program were used to explore the limits of steady-state heating efficiency for conventional air-source heat pumps. The method used allows for the simultaneous optimization of ten selected design variables, taking proper account of their interactions, while constraining other parameters to chosen limits or fixed values. Designs were optimized for a fixed heating capacity, but the results may be scaled to other capacities. Substantial performance improvement is predicted compared to today's state of the art heat pump. With increased component efficiencies that are expected in the near future and with modest increases in heat exchanger area, a 28% increase in heating efficiency is predicted; for long-term improvements with considerably larger heat exchangers, a 56% increase is possible. The improved efficiencies are accompanied by substantial reductions in the requirements for compressor and motor size. The predicted performance improvements are attributed not only to improved components and larger heat exchangers but also to the use of an optimizing design procedure. Deviations from the optimized design may be necessary to make use of available component sizes and to maintain good cooling-mode performance while improving the heating efficiency. Sensitivity plots (i.e., COP as a function of one or more design parameters) were developed to explore design flexibilities and to evaluate their consequences. The performance of the optimized designs was compared to that of modified ideal cycles to assess the factors that limit further improvement. It is hoped that the design methods developed will be useful to designers in the heat pump industry.

  19. Relationship Between Designed Three-Dimensional YSZ Electrolyte Surface Area and Performance of Solution-Precursor Plasma-Sprayed La0.8Sr0.2MnO3- δ Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Huang, Jiang-Yuan; Li, Cheng-Xin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-12-01

    Active three-phase boundaries (TPBs) significantly influence cathode performance in solid oxide fuel cells, but obtaining long TPBs and understanding the mechanism underlying the improved cathode performance when the electrolyte is prepared with a smooth surface by a high-temperature sintering process remain essential challenges. In this work, we used flame spraying to deposit single-layer semimolten particles on a smooth electrolyte to build a three-dimensional surface with enlarged active surface area and thus increased TPBs. Meanwhile, La0.8Sr0.2MnO3- δ (LSM) cathodes with fine microstructure were deposited by solution-precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) on the designed electrolyte to establish a three-dimensional cathode-electrolyte interface. The deposition behavior of the semimolten particles on the smooth electrolyte and LSM cathodes on the three-dimensional electrolyte surface was studied. The effects of the area enlargement factor ( α area) on the polarization resistance of the SPPS LSM cathodes were investigated, using three-dimensional electrolytes with α area from 1.29 to 2.48. The results indicated that convex particles with different molten states bonded well with the electrolytes. SPPS LSM cathodes also showed good interfacial bonding with convex particles. Finally, the cathode polarization ( R p) decreased linearly with increase of α area. At 800 °C, R p decreased from 0.98 to 0.32 Ω cm2 when α area was increased from 1.29 to 2.48.

  20. Hot Corrosion Performance of AlO-CrO/NiCoCrAlYTa and AlO/NiCoCrAlYTa Coatings Deposited by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Nailiang; Hu, Hengfa; Liu, Yang; Song, Xiu

    2016-04-01

    AlO-CrO/NiCoCrAlYTa and AlO/NiCoCrAlYTa coatings were deposited on 316L stainless steel substrate using atmospheric plasma spraying, respectively, in order to improve the oxidation and corrosion resistance. The hot corrosion performance of the coatings at 700 and 900 °C were studied, and the detailed microstructures and phase composition of the coatings were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer, and transmission electron microscope. The results show that both coatings are structurally featured by slatted layers, consisting of amorphous phase, Cr2O3, Ni3Al, and Al2O3. The hot corrosion resistance of AlO-CrO/NiCoCrAlYTa coating is better than that of AlO/NiCoCrAlYTa coating. This improvement is attributed to lower porosity and more compact Cr2O3 in AlO-CrO/NiCoCrAlYTa coating which performs better than Al2O3 in blocking further inward progress of corrosion and oxidization.

  1. Deformation and Tensile Cyclic Fatigue of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2-8wt% Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Deformation (constitutive relations) of free-standing, thick thermal barrier coatings of sprayed ZrO2-8Wt% Y2O3 was determined at ambient temperature in both pure tension and pure compression using cylindrical bar test specimens. The material exhibited both significant nonlinearity and hysteresis in its load-strain curves, The load-strain relations in four-point uniaxial flexure were determined from tension and compression sides and were compared with individual pure tension and compression constitutive data. Effect of sintering on deformation behavior was significant, resulting in a dramatic change in constitutive relation. Cyclic fatigue testing of the coating material in tension-tension at room temperature showed an insignificant susceptibility to fatigue, similar to the slow crack growth behavior of the material in flexure in 800 C air.

  2. Influence of the Surface State on the Adherence of the Coating: Case of an Alumina Coating Plasma Sprayed on SiC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costil, S.; Lukat, S.; Verdy, C.; Coddet, C.

    2011-01-01

    In thermal spraying, adherence between the coating and the substrate appears as the fundamental point. To favor a good interaction between both, it is often necessary to clean and prepare the substrate surface. Conventionally, solvents and sand blasting are applied to remove the contaminants and increase the surface roughness for a mechanical anchorage. However, according to the substrate nature (ceramic) or the substrate morphology, it can be prejudicial to apply a mechanical treatment because of peeling of the surface or a decrease in the global properties. Then, to obtain an appropriate preparation, several techniques can be investigated, such as water jet, ice blasting, and heat treatment; as well, laser ablation can be an interesting technology to prepare the substrate surface. The aim of this work was to study the modifications induced by 10 ns single or cumulative pulses of a Q-switched Nd:YAG near-infrared laser and its influence on the interface adhesion. The case of an alumina coating sprayed on a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) was studied. In these conditions, the laser treatment seems favorable from the adherence viewpoint according to the mechanical effect (induced by a conelike structure) and the chemical effect.

  3. Hot Corrosion Mechanism in Multi-Layer Suspension Plasma Sprayed Gd2Zr2O7 /YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings in the Presence of V2O5 + Na2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonnalagadda, Krishna Praveen; Mahade, Satyapal; Curry, Nicholas; Li, Xin-Hai; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Björklund, Stefan; Peng, Ru Lin

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the corrosion resistance of two-layer Gd2Zr2O7/YSZ, three-layer dense Gd2Zr2O7/ Gd2Zr2O7/YSZ, and a reference single-layer YSZ coating with a similar overall top coat thickness of 300-320 µm. All the coatings were manufactured by suspension plasma spraying resulting in a columnar structure except for the dense layer. Corrosion tests were conducted at 900 °C for 8 h using V2O5 and Na2SO4 as corrosive salts at a concentration of approximately 4 mg/cm2. SEM investigations after the corrosion tests show that Gd2Zr2O7-based coatings exhibited lower reactivity with the corrosive salts and the formation of gadolinium vanadate (GdVO4), accompanied by the phase transformation of zirconia was observed. It is believed that the GdVO4 formation between the columns reduced the strain tolerance of the coating and also due to the fact that Gd2Zr2O7 has a lower fracture toughness value made it more susceptible to corrosion-induced damage. Furthermore, the presence of a relatively dense layer of Gd2Zr2O7 on the top did not improve in reducing the corrosion-induced damage. For the reference YSZ coating, the observed corrosion-induced damage was lower probably due to combination of more limited salt penetration, the SPS microstructure and superior fracture toughness of YSZ.

  4. Multi-kilowatt, all-fiber integrated chirped-pulse amplification system yielding 40x pulse compression using air-core fiber and conventional erbium-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    de Matos, C; Taylor, J

    2004-02-09

    We present a totally fiber integrated chirped-pulse amplification system using air-core photonic bandgap fiber and a conventional erbium-doped fiber amplifier. ~40-ps input pulses, generated in a Mach-Zehnder modulator, were stretched and spectrally broadened in a dispersion-shifted fiber before being amplified and subsequently compressed in 10 m of anomalously-dispersive photonic bandgap fiber to yield ~960 fs pulses. The system gives multi-kilowatt peak powers while the amplifier nonlinearity threshold is as low as ~150 W. Higher peak powers could be obtained by the use of an amplifier with higher nonlinearity threshold.

  5. Conventional Strategic Deterrence

    SciTech Connect

    Latter, A.L.; Martinelli, E.A.; Speed, R.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Bush Administration argues that the US, as the world's only remaining superpower, must be prepared to intervene militarily in regional conflicts. However, the traditional American way of fighting-relying on ground forces with heavy equipment, supported by naval and air forces--could prove too expensive, both monetarily and in terms of expected American casualties, to garner the support of the American public or Congress. This paper argues that the revolution in conventional weaponry demonstrated in the Persian Gulf War opens up the possibility of a new strategy--called Conventional Strategic Deterrence--that could reduce both financial costs and casualties (if it were necessary to implement the strategy) while still being a strong and credible deterrent to regional conflict.

  6. Accumulation and Translocation of Essential and Nonessential Elements by Tomato Plants (Solanum lycopersicum) Cultivated in Open-Air Plots under Organic or Conventional Farming Techniques.

    PubMed

    Liñero, Olaia; Cidad, Maite; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Nguyen, Christophe; de Diego, Alberto

    2015-11-04

    A 5-month experiment was performed to study the accumulation of several inorganic elements in tomato plants cultivated using organic or synthetic fertilizer. Plants were harvested in triplicate at six sampling dates during their life cycle. Statistical and chemometric analysis of data indicated the sequestration of toxic elements and of Na, Zn, Fe, and Co in roots, while the rest of the elements, including Cd, were mainly translocated to aboveground organs. A general decreasing trend in element concentrations with time was observed for most of them. A negative correlation between some element concentrations and ripening stage of fruits was identified. Conventionally grown plants seemed to accumulate more Cd and Tl in their tissues, while organic ones were richer in some nutrients. However, there was no clear effect of the fertilizer used (organic vs synthetic) on the elemental composition of fruits.

  7. Delivery performance of conventional aircraft by terminal-area, time-based air traffic control: A real-time simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, Leonard; Houck, Jacob A.; Capron, William R.; Lohr, Gary W.

    1990-01-01

    A description and results are presented of a study to measure the performance and reaction of airline flight crews, in a full workload DC-9 cockpit, flying in a real-time simulation of an air traffic control (ATC) concept called Traffic Intelligence for the Management of Efficient Runway-scheduling (TIMER). Experimental objectives were to verify earlier fast-time TIMER time-delivery precision results and obtain data for the validation or refinement of existing computer models of pilot/airborne performance. Experimental data indicated a runway threshold, interarrival-time-error standard deviation in the range of 10.4 to 14.1 seconds. Other real-time system performance parameters measured include approach speeds, response time to controller turn instructions, bank angles employed, and ATC controller message delivery-time errors.

  8. Effect of Initial Powder Morphology and Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Stand-Alone Plasma-Sprayed 7 wt%Y2O3-ZrO2 Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ercan, Batur; Bowman, Keith; Trice, Rodney; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D

    2006-01-01

    The effects of starting powder morphology on the thermal and mechanical properties of stand-alone plasma-sprayed 7 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}(YSZ) coatings were studied. Two powder morphologies were investigated: an agglomerated and sintered powder (referred to presently as 'AS') and a powder manufactured using plasma spheroidization to create hollow spheres (referred to presently as 'HS'). Coatings made from AS powders contained 0.21 wt.% SiO{sub 2} impurity, twice as much as observed in coatings made from HS powders. Properties of coatings made from each powder type were compared in the as-sprayed state and after 50 h heat treatments at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1400 C. SEM microstructural investigations revealed significant differences in the porosity and distribution of pores in the coatings. In coatings made with AS powders the majority of the high aspect ratio pores were located between lamella (interlamellar porosity). In addition to interlamellar pores, coatings made with HS powders demonstrated 1.5 times more spherical-shaped globular pores by number located within lamella. Globular pores were shown to still exist in coatings made with HS powders after 50 h heat treatments at 1400 C. Archimedes porosity measurements showed that coatings made with AS powders typically contained 4-5% less total porosity than coatings made with HS powders. Thermal conductivity experiments using laser flash showed that there was no difference in the thermal conductivity of coatings made from either powder type in the as-sprayed state despite higher porosity in the coatings made from HS powders. After a 50 h heat treatment at 1000 and 1200 C, coatings made from both powder types still demonstrated statistically similar thermal conductivities. However, after a 50 h heat treatment at 1400 C the thermal conductivity of coatings made from AS powders was found to be 0.3 W/m/K higher than coatings made from HS powders. Microstructural differences in the coatings made

  9. Schilling Titan 7 plasma spray system

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.C.; Pollard, R.E.; Walker, E.W.; Mooney, L.R.; Thompson, W.F.; Younkin, J.R.

    1994-02-01

    Non-metallic oxide inclusions are known to influence the microstructure and properties of low alloy steel weld metal. Therefore, it is desirable to estimate the inclusion characteristics such as size distribution, number density, volume fraction, and composition as a function of welding process and weld composition. Previous work considered a sequential formation of various oxides and compounds to estimate the inclusion characteristics, however, the effect of weld metal composition and weld cooling conditions were not considered. Hence, a model based on ladle metallurgy principles and transformation kinetics involving nucleation and growth has been developed. The inclusion kinetic calculations are coupled with weld pool thermal history to estimate the inclusion characteristics for a given welding process and composition. The calculations based on this model show a complex sequential oxidation of dissolved deoxidizing elements such as Al, Ti, Si and Mn. The calculated inclusion characteristics show a good correlation with the published results.

  10. Plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, H. H.; Logan, W. R.; Harada, Y.

    1982-01-01

    One of the most important criterion for acceptable commercial application of a multiple phase composition is uniformity and reproducibility. This means that the performance characteristics of the coat - e.g., its lubricating properties, bond strength to the substrate, and thermal properties - can be readily predicted to give a desired performance. The improvement of uniformity and reproducibility of the coats, the oxidation behavior at three temperature ranges, the effect of bond coat and the effect of preheat treatment as measured by adhesive strength tests, coating examination procedures, and physical property measurements were studied. The following modifications improved the uniformity and reproducibility: (1) changes and closer control in the particle size range of the raw materials used, (2) increasing the binder content from 3.2% to 4.1% (dried weight), and (3) analytical processing procedures using step by step checking to assure consistency.

  11. A plasma-sprayed valve coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, A.; Olmore, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Need to reduce wear on nickel alloy seats and poppets for Space Shuttle main engine led to fused cobalt/tungsten carbide coating. Coating, which is dense, wear-resistant, and nonporous, can be applied in controlled amounts to various substrate configurations. Ease of application to parts with intricate shapes and contours should make coating useful in automotive and aircraft manufacturing.

  12. XTOD to Conventional Facilities Interface Control Document

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, D

    2005-09-29

    This document describes the interface between the LCLS X-ray Transport and Diagnostics (XTOD) (WBS 1.5) and the LCLS Conventional Facilities (CF) (WBS 1.1). The interface locations ranging from the beam dump to the far experimental hall are identified. Conventional Facilities provides x-ray, beamline and equipment enclosures, mounting surfaces, conventional utilities, compressed (clean, dry) air, process and purge gases, exhaust systems, power, and environmental conditions for the XTOD components and controls.

  13. Decomposing Composing Conventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Terry

    Recent research has invited critiques of the authoritative descriptions of composing found in many rhetoric textbooks. The concept of "convention" may be especially useful in rethinking the teleological basis of these textbook descriptions. Conventions found in composition textbooks need to be unmasked as arbitrary concepts which serve…

  14. Air Pollution: Current and Future Challenges

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Despite the dramatic progress to date, air pollution continues to threaten Americans’ health and welfare. The main obstacles are climate change, conventional air pollution, and ozone layer depletion.

  15. A Quiet Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Welch

    2003-01-01

    Describes how discussion of governance and academic standards dominated the proceedings at the first NCAA convention of Myles Brand's presidency. The new president also offered a qualified endorsement of Title IX. (EV)

  16. Minamata Convention on Mercury

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On November 6, 2013 the United States signed the Minamata Convention on Mercury, a new multilateral environmental agreement that addresses specific human activities which are contributing to widespread mercury pollution

  17. Liquid plasma sprayed nano-network La0.4Sr0.6Co0.2Fe0.8O3/Ce0.8Gd0.2O2 composite as a high-performance cathode for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Chang-Jiu; Li, Cheng-Xin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Huang, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

    2016-09-01

    Here, we investigate the feasibility of using a liquid plasma spray process as a novel method for the cost-effective fabrication of a nanonetwork of La0.4Sr0.6Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) and Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ (GDC) composite as a high-performance cathode for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells. A suspension containing well-dispersed nanosized GDC particles in an LSCF precursor solution is designed as the feedstock. The effects of GDC concentration in the suspension on the phase composition, microstructure, and electrochemical performance of the resulting cathode are studied. When the GDC concentration increases to 15 g L-1, the nanosized GDC particles distribute uniformly and continuously on the LSCF backbone to form a porous network structure. The electrochemical studies further indicate that the cathode polarization decreased with the increase in GDC concentration from 0 g L-1 to 15 g L-1, whereas a further increase in the GDC concentration increases the cathode polarization instead. At 600 and 750 °C, the cathode prepared using 15 g L-1 GDC concentration exhibits an impressive area-specific polarization resistance (Rp) of 0.1 Ω cm2 and 0.009 Ω cm2, respectively. Finally, the Rp of the optimal cathode almost does not change after the isothermal dwelling at 650 °C for 350 h.

  18. Convention Problems - 1787.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Deroy L.

    Designed to motivate eighth-grade civics students in the study of the United States Constitution, this game is intended to simulate the basic problems faced by the delegates to the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. The four parts of the game introduce the governmental concepts of the bicameral legislature, the executive branch, the judicial branch,…

  19. JT9D ceramic outer air seal system refinement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, W. O.

    1982-01-01

    The abradability and durability characteristics of the plasma sprayed system were improved by refinement and optimization of the plasma spray process and the metal substrate design. The acceptability of the final seal system for engine testing was demonstrated by an extensive rig test program which included thermal shock tolerance, thermal gradient, thermal cycle, erosion, and abradability tests. An interim seal system design was also subjected to 2500 endurance test cycles in a JT9D-7 engine.

  20. Laparoscopic versus conventional appendectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Vallina, V L; Velasco, J M; McCulloch, C S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to prospectively define the impact of laparoscopy on the management of patients with a presumed diagnosis of appendicitis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: While the role of laparoscopy in the management of cholelithiasis is well established, its impact on the management of acute appendicitis needs to be objectively defined and compared to that of conventional management. Several authors have predicted that laparoscopic appendectomy will become the preferred treatment for appendicitis. METHODS: Two groups of consecutive patients with similar clinical characteristics of acute appendicitis were compared. Data on the laparoscopic group were compiled prospectively on standardized forms; data on the conventional group were collected retrospectively. Operative time, hospital stay, analgesia, cost, and return to normal activities were noted. RESULTS: Seventeen consecutive patients who underwent appendectomy were compared to 18 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopy (16 of these 18 had laparoscopic appendectomy). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of clinical characteristics and appendiceal histopathology. The mean operative times were 61 +/- 4.1 minutes and 46 +/- 2.9 minutes for the laparoscopy and conventional groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic appendectomy group, with 81% of patients being discharged on their first postoperative day (p < 0.001). The laparoscopic appendectomy patients required significantly less narcotic analgesia (p < 0.02). Return to normal activity was not significantly different between the two groups. The average total cost of laparoscopic appendectomy was 30% greater than that of conventional appendectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy is a useful adjunct to the management of patients with a presumed clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:8239785

  1. IERS Conventions (2003)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    3), are the respective resonance frequencies associated with the Chandler wobble (CW), the retrograde free core nutation (FCN), and the pro- grade...Soc., 64, pp. 747–765. Zschau, J., 1983, “Rheology of the Earth’s mantle at tidal and Chandler Wobble periods,” Proc. Ninth Int. Symp. Earth Tides, New...Reference Frame CTRS Conventional Terrestrial Reference System CW Chandler Wobble DOMES Directory Of MERIT Sites DORIS Doppler Orbit determination

  2. Convention, Confirmation, and Credibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    4 It was Pierre Duhem , a physicist, who made the strongest claim regarding the conventionality of what most people think of as empirical theory near...Mach, op. cit. p. 306. 5. Pierre Duhem , The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1954. In French, it appeared as...examine in detail the ideas of Mach, Poincare, and Duhem . That they had the idea that it could be philosophically respectable to regard scientific

  3. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  4. The Validity of Conventional Assumptions Concerning Flexible Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    3AIR_ FWLE OOLEY RESEARCH REPORT c~J THE VALIDITY OF CONVENTIONAL ASSUMPTIONS ___ CONCERNING FLEXIBLE RESPONSE LT COL MARIE 3. GUTIERREZ DTIC...Validity of Conventional Assumptions Concerning Flexible Response AUTHOR: Marie J. Gutierrez, Lieutenant Colonel, USAF Thc North Atlantic Treaty...Europe since 1945. In 1967, NATO adopted the strategy of flexible response , a Etrategy dependent upon conventional, tactical nuclear, and stra- tegic

  5. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led to the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.

  6. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led tomore » the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.« less

  7. Biodiesel from conventional feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Liu, De-Hua

    2012-01-01

    At present, traditional fossil fuels are used predominantly in China, presenting the country with challenges that include sustainable energy supply, energy efficiency improvement, and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. In 2007, China issued The Strategic Plan of the Mid-and-Long Term Development of Renewable Energy, which aims to increase the share of clean energy in the country's energy consumption to 15% by 2020 from only 7.5% in 2005. Biodiesel, an important renewable fuel with significant advantages over fossil diesel, has attracted great attention in the USA and European countries. However, biodiesel is still in its infancy in China, although its future is promising. This chapter reviews biodiesel production from conventional feedstocks in the country, including feedstock supply and state of the art technologies for the transesterification reaction through which biodiesel is made, particularly the enzymatic catalytic process developed by Chinese scientists. Finally, the constraints and perspectives for China's biodiesel development are highlighted.

  8. Conventional mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    The provision of mechanical ventilation for the support of infants and children with respiratory failure or insufficiency is one of the most common techniques that are performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Despite its widespread application in the PICUs of the 21st century, before the 1930s, respiratory failure was uniformly fatal due to the lack of equipment and techniques for airway management and ventilatory support. The operating rooms of the 1950s and 1960s provided the arena for the development of the manual skills and the refinement of the equipment needed for airway management, which subsequently led to the more widespread use of endotracheal intubation thereby ushering in the era of positive pressure ventilation. Although there seems to be an ever increasing complexity in the techniques of mechanical ventilation, its successful use in the PICU should be guided by the basic principles of gas exchange and the physiology of respiratory function. With an understanding of these key concepts and the use of basic concepts of mechanical ventilation, this technique can be successfully applied in both the PICU and the operating room. This article reviews the basic physiology of gas exchange, principles of pulmonary physiology, and the concepts of mechanical ventilation to provide an overview of the knowledge required for the provision of conventional mechanical ventilation in various clinical arenas. PMID:20927268

  9. Comparison of air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction technique and conventional dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction for determination of triazole pesticides in aqueous samples by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Mogaddam, Mohammad Reza Afshar; Aghdam, Abdollah Abdollahi

    2013-07-26

    Two micro-extraction methods, air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), have been compared with each other by applying them for the analysis of five triazole pesticides (penconazole, hexaconazole, diniconazole, tebuconazole and triticonazole) in aqueous samples by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). In the AALLME method, which excludes any disperser solvent, much less volume of organic solvent is used. In order to form fine and dispersed organic droplets in the aqueous phase, the mixture of aqueous sample solution and extraction solvent is repeatedly aspirated and dispensed with a syringe. In the DLLME method, an appropriate mixture of extraction solvent and disperser solvent is rapidly injected by a syringe into the aqueous sample. Effect of the pertinent experimental factors on DLLME (i.e. identity and volume of the extraction and disperser solvents and ionic strength) and on AALLME (identity and volume of the extraction solvent, number of agitations, and ionic strength) were investigated. Under optimal conditions, limits of detection for the five target pesticides obtained by AALLME-GC-FID and DLLME-GC-FID ranged from 0.20 to 1.1ngmL(-1) and 1.9 to 5.9ngmL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) were in the range of 1-4% and 3-5% with the enrichment factors of 449-504 and 79-143 for AALLME-GC-FID and DLLME-GC-FID, respectively. Both of the compared methods are simple, fast, efficient, inexpensive and can be applied to the analysis of the five pesticides in different aqueous samples in which penconazole and hexaconazole were found. For spiked samples, the recoveries were in the ranges of 92-105%, and 92-104% for AALLME and DLLME, respectively.

  10. ESD and the Rio Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarabhai, Kartikeya V.; Ravindranath, Shailaja; Schwarz, Rixa; Vyas, Purvi

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 36 of Agenda 21, a key document of the 1992 Earth Summit, emphasised reorienting education towards sustainable development. While two of the Rio conventions, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developed communication, education and public awareness (CEPA)…

  11. Plasma spray gun having gas vortex producing nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, R.T.; Zatorski, R.A.

    1985-03-19

    A plasma flame spray gun suitable for being constructed physically smaller than comparable power prior art plasma flame spray guns. The gun includes a nozzle having a tapering portion on the inlet side thereof. A cathode with a flat tip is positioned to at least partially extend into the tapering portion of the nozzle. A gas distribution ring is located around the cathode for creating a vortex around the cathode tip. This causes the arc formed between the tip and the nozzle to have a root which spins around the perimeter of the nozzle tip resulting in less wear and, therefore, extended part life.

  12. Underwater plasma spraying for components located in greater water depths

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Rass, J.

    1994-12-31

    Current activities in offshore oil and gas production, freshwater and naval applications on the one hand and energy technologies on the other hand requires specific technologies for production, repair and maintenance underwater. Concerning the deep water atmosphere the development of viable practical systems of fabricating and processing materials centers around welding and cutting technologies. But new applications e.g. coatings on as sealings for corrosion attacked surfaces require new kinds of high energy techniques in hyperbaric atmospheres.

  13. Remaining Fatigue Life Assessment of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Philippe; Gitzhofer, François; Fauchais, Pierre; Boulos, Maher

    2010-09-01

    Ceramic functional coatings are frequently applied to structural materials, covering a wide range of thermomechanical and electrochemical applications. The main limiting feature is their reliability when subjected to cyclic transient thermal stresses. The study described in this article is a continuation of earlier research study focused on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the thermomechanical aging effects in ceramic coatings. Here, emphasis is placed on the usefulness of combining AE short-term monitoring with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict the performance of such coatings when subjected to cyclic thermal loads. The FEM study presented in this article is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent approach, of the stress fields that developed within the coatings during the post-deposition cooling step and the thermal cycling. Experiments were conducted using yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Alumina (Al2O3) ceramic coatings combined with a NiCr-based intermetallic bond coat.

  14. A Systems Approach to the Solid Lubrication of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Zaldana, Antonio R.; Radil, Kevin C.

    2002-01-01

    Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings which rely upon solid lubricants to reduce friction and minimize wear during sliding which occurs at start-up and shut-down when surface speeds are too low to allow the formation of a hydrodynamic air film. This solid lubrication is typically accomplished by coating the non-moving foil surface with a thin, soft polymeric film. The following paper introduces a systems approach in which the solid lubrication is provided by a combination of self lubricating shaft coatings coupled with various wear resistant and lubricating foil coatings. The use of multiple materials, each providing different functions is modeled after oil-lubricated hydrodynamic sleeve bearing technology which utilizes various coatings and surface treatments in conjunction with oil lubricants to achieve optimum performance. In this study, room temperature load capacity tests are performed on journal foil air bearings operating at 14,000 rpm. Different shaft and foil coating technologies such as plasma sprayed composites, ceramic, polymer and inorganic lubricant coatings are evaluated as foil bearing lubricants. The results indicate that bearing performance is improved through the individual use of the lubricants and treatments tested. Further, combining several solid lubricants together yielded synergistically better results than any material alone.

  15. Life Cycle Assessment of Residential Heating and Cooling Systems in Minnesota A comprehensive analysis on life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and cost-effectiveness of ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems compared to the conventional gas furnace and air conditioner system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mo

    Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) technologies for residential heating and cooling are often suggested as an effective means to curb energy consumption, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and lower homeowners' heating and cooling costs. As such, numerous federal, state and utility-based incentives, most often in the forms of financial incentives, installation rebates, and loan programs, have been made available for these technologies. While GSHP technology for space heating and cooling is well understood, with widespread implementation across the U.S., research specific to the environmental and economic performance of these systems in cold climates, such as Minnesota, is limited. In this study, a comparative environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) is conducted of typical residential HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) systems in Minnesota to investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for delivering 20 years of residential heating and cooling—maintaining indoor temperatures of 68°F (20°C) and 75°F (24°C) in Minnesota-specific heating and cooling seasons, respectively. Eight residential GSHP design scenarios (i.e. horizontal loop field, vertical loop field, high coefficient of performance, low coefficient of performance, hybrid natural gas heat back-up) and one conventional natural gas furnace and air conditioner system are assessed for GHG and life cycle economic costs. Life cycle GHG emissions were found to range between 1.09 × 105 kg CO2 eq. and 1.86 × 10 5 kg CO2 eq. Six of the eight GSHP technology scenarios had fewer carbon impacts than the conventional system. Only in cases of horizontal low-efficiency GSHP and hybrid, do results suggest increased GHGs. Life cycle costs and present value analyses suggest GSHP technologies can be cost competitive over their 20-year life, but that policy incentives may be required to reduce the high up-front capital costs of GSHPs and relatively long payback periods of more than 20 years. In addition

  16. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  17. The Emergence of Conventional Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Maria

    Children in the emergent writing stage write in pre-conventional or emergent forms (scribbling, drawing, non-phonetic letterings, and phonetic spelling) before they write conventionally. A special education teacher in a kindergarten inclusion setting in the Bronx, New York, noticing that her students did not particularly like to write, decided and…

  18. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  19. VapeCons: E-cigarette user conventions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction E-cigarette ‘vaping conventions’ provide a venue for user social networking, parties, and ‘try before you buy’ access to a wide range of e-cigarette products. This study identifies and describes vaping conventions, raising awareness of this potentially problematic practice. Methods Conventions were identified via Google searches in April and May 2014 and August 2015. Details captured included location, sponsors, admission cost, event features, and promotions. Results 41 distinct organizations have planned 90 vaping conventions in 37 different locations since 2010. Conventions promoted access to a wide range of product vendors, seminars, social interactions with other users, parties, gifts, vaping contests, and other events. E-cigarette use at conventions was encouraged. Conclusions Vaping conventions promote e-cigarette use and social norms without public health having a voice to educate attendees about negative consequences of use. Future research should focus on the effects of attending these conventions on attendees and on indoor air quality in vapor-filled convention rooms. PMID:26424201

  20. NULL convention floating point multiplier.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anitha Juliette; Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation.

  1. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  2. Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearing for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

    1999-01-01

    The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304, is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

  3. Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

    2000-01-01

    The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304 is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

  4. Biological air filter for air-quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ras, Niels; Krooneman, Janneke; Ogink, Nico; Willers, Hans; D'Amico, Arnaldo; di Natale, Corrado; Godia, F.; Albiol, J.; Perez, J.; Martinez, N.; Dixon, Mike; Llewellyn, David; Eckhard, Fir; Zona, G.; Fachecci, L.; Kraakman, Bart; Demey, Dries; Michel, Noelle; Darlington, Alan

    2005-10-01

    Biological air filtration is a promising technique for air-quality control in closed environments in space and on Earth, and it offers several advantages over existing techniques. However, to apply it in these environments, specific criteria have to be met. A concept for biological air filtration in closed environments was developed and tested by an international team of specialists. Several model systems for closed environments in space and on Earth were used as a source of contaminated air. Conventional and new analytical techniques were used to determine odour composition and removal efficiency of the filter, including an "electronic nose". The results show that the developed biological air filter is suitable for treating contaminated air in closed environments. The developed electronic nose was shown to be a promising method for air-quality monitoring.

  5. Computational Design of a Krueger Flap Targeting Conventional Slat Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akaydin, H. Dogus; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin C.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Hutcheson, Florence V.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the design of a Krueger flap as a substitute for a conventional slat in a high-lift system. This notional design, with the objective of matching equivalent-mission performance on aircraft approach, was required for a comparative aeroacoustic study with computational and experimental components. We generated a family of high-lift systems with Krueger flaps based on a set of design parameters. Then, we evaluated the high-lift systems using steady 2D RANS simulations to find a good match for the conventional slat, based on total lift coefficients in free-air. Finally, we evaluated the mean aerodynamics of the high-lift systems with Krueger flap and conventional slat as they were installed in an open-jet wind tunnel flow. The surface pressures predicted with the simulations agreed well with experimental results.

  6. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for... and microwave ovens; and (2) For each basic model of conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  7. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for... and microwave ovens; and (2) For each basic model of conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  8. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for... and microwave ovens; and (2) For each basic model of conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  9. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  10. Conventional and Non-Conventional Drosophila Toll Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Scott A.; Wasserman, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Toll in Drosophila and of the remarkable conservation in pathway composition and organization catalyzed a transformation in our understanding of innate immune recognition and response. At the center of that picture is a cascade of interactions in which specific microbial cues activate Toll receptors, which then transmit signals driving transcription factor nuclear localization and activity. Experiments gave substance to the vision of pattern recognition receptors, linked phenomena in development, gene regulation, and immunity into a coherent whole, and revealed a rich set of variations for identifying non-self and responding effectively. More recently, research in Drosophila has illuminated the positive and negative regulation of Toll activation, the organization of signaling events at and beneath membranes, the sorting of information flow, and the existence of non-conventional signaling via Toll-related receptors. Here, we provide an overview of the Toll pathway of flies and highlight these ongoing realms of research. PMID:23632253

  11. Implementing the chemical weapons convention

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E. A.

    1999-12-07

    In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty

  12. Air channel distribution during air sparging: A field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Leeson, A.; Hinchee, R.E.; Headington, G.L.; Vogel, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Air sparging may have the potential to improve upon conventional groundwater treatment technologies. However, judging from studies published to date and theoretical analyses, it is possible that air sparging may have a limited effect on aquifer contamination. The basic mechanisms controlling air sparging are not well understood, and current monitoring practice does not appear adequate to quantitatively evaluate the process. During this study, the effective zone of influence, defined as the areas in which air channels form, was studied as a function of flowrate and depth of injection points. This was accomplished by conducting the air sparging test in an area with shallow standing water. Air sparging points were installed at various depths, and the zone of influence was determined visually.

  13. Science and the climate convention

    SciTech Connect

    Goldemberg, J. )

    1994-08-01

    The scientific facts concerning the changes in the composition of the atmosphere that are leading to global warming are briefly presented. This greenhouse effect could be slowed or stopped if action is taken to curb emissions of greenhouse gases or enhance the [open quotes]sinks[close quotes] of these gases. The paper also addresses the response of the international community to this problem. Concern over global warming led to a landmark international agreement to work towards preventing global warming. This agreement is the Framework Convention on Climate Change; it was negotiated at the United Nations Conferences on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. Government policies that could prevent climate change are discussed.

  14. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2017-02-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen – Cooper – Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature Tc. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at Tc = 200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high Tc superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing Tc to room temperature are also discussed.

  15. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen - Cooper - Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature T_c. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at T_c=200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high T_c superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing T_c to room temperature are also discussed.

  16. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  17. Non-conventional Fishbone Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.V. Lutsenko; V.S. Marchenko; R.B. White

    2004-11-10

    New instabilities of fishbone type are predicted. First, a trapped-particle-induced m = n = 1 instability with the mode structure having nothing to do with the conventional rigid kink displacement. This instability takes place when the magnetic field is weak, so that the precession frequency of the energetic ions is not small as compared to the frequency of the corresponding Alfven continuum at r = 0 and the magnetic shear is small inside the q = 1 radius [the case relevant to spherical tori]. Second, an Energetic Particle Mode fishbone instability driven by circulating particles. Third, a double-kink-mode instability driven by the circulating energetic ions. In particular, the latter can have two frequencies simultaneously: we refer to it as ''doublet'' fishbones. This instability can occur when the radial profile of the energetic ions has an off-axis maximum inside the region of the mode localization.

  18. Fireman's Air Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Together with NASA's Johnson Space Center, A-T-O Inc.'s Scott Aviation has developed light-weight firefighter's air tanks. New backpack system weighs only 20 pounds for 30 minute air supply, 13 pounds less than conventional firefighting tanks. They are pressurized at 4,500 psi, (twice current tanks). Made of aluminum liner wrapped by resin-impregnated glass fibers, eliminating corrosion as well as lightening the load. Redesigned face mask permits better vision. Warning device to tell fireman he is running out of air is personalized so it can't be heard by others reducing confusion in an already hectic environment. Structural Composites Inc., The Boeing Co., and Martin- Marietta Corp. have developed uses for this technology.

  19. Conventional treatments for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Dougados, M; Dijkmans, B; Khan, M; Maksymowych, W; van der Linden, S.; Brandt, J

    2002-01-01

    Management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is challenged by the progressive nature of the disease. To date, no intervention is available that alters the underlying mechanism of inflammation in AS. Currently available conventional treatments are palliative at best, and often fail to control symptoms in the long term. Current drug treatment may perhaps induce a spurious state of "disease remission," which is merely a low level of disease activity. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are first line treatment, but over time, the disease often becomes refractory to these agents. Disease modifying antirheumatic drugs are second line treatment and may offer some clinical benefit. However, conclusive evidence of the efficacy of these drugs from large placebo controlled trials is lacking. Additionally, these drugs can cause treatment-limiting adverse effects. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection guided by arthrography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging is an effective means of reducing inflammatory back pain, but controlled studies are lacking. A controlled study has confirmed moderate but significant efficacy of intravenous bisphosphonate (pamidronate) treatment in patients with AS; further evaluation of bisphosphonate treatment is warranted. Physical therapy and exercise are necessary adjuncts to pharmacotherapy; however, the paucity of controlled data makes it difficult to identify the best way to administer these interventions. Surgical intervention may be required to support severe structural damage. Thus, for patients with AS, the future of successful treatment lies in the development of pharmacological agents capable of both altering the disease course through intervention at sites of disease pathogenesis, and controlling symptoms. PMID:12381510

  20. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…