Science.gov

Sample records for air pockets trapped

  1. Fuel tank air pocket removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.N. II.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes a device for the removal of air pockets from filled underground fuel storage tanks. It comprises: a hollow rigid guide column of sufficient length to extend through a fuel inlet opening of the storage tank to the bottom thereof; a rotatable assembly affixed to the lower end of the column and containing guide means for facilitating the passage of a hose from the guide column to the most distant point of the walls of the storage tank; a hose slidably mounted within and extendable from and retractable into the guide column and having means for maintaining the air hose in a plane essentially parallel to the bottom of the storage tank; a first end of a tubular means connected to a first end of the hose, the tubular means comprising flotation means, the flotation means causing a second end of the tubular means to contact the air pocket; and means on a second end of the hose for extending and retracting the hose through the guide column so as to reach any point within the storage tank.

  2. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  3. Breakdown of air pockets in downwardly inclined sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F H L R

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to centralised WWTPs by an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the last decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. One of the many causes that account for the reduction of the flow capacity is the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. During dry weather periods with low flow velocities, gas may accumulate at high points in the system. Once the velocity increases during storm weather flow, the air pockets may be broken down and transported to the end of the system. A research study is started focussing on the description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation of gas. An experimental facility is constructed for the study of multi-phase flow. This paper describes the preliminary results of experiments on breakdown rates of gas pockets as a function of inclination angle and water flow rate. The results show an increasing breakdown rate with increasing inclination angle.

  4. A cell-permeable inhibitor to trap Gαq proteins in the empty pocket conformation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

    2014-07-17

    In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences Gαq signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps Gαq in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule Gα inhibitor to date. Our data show that Gα proteins may be "frozen" pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence Gα subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors.

  5. A Cell-Permeable Inhibitor to Trap Gαq Proteins in the Empty Pocket Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M.; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H. Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T. Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences Gαq signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps Gαq in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule Gα inhibitor to date. Our data show that Gα proteins may be “frozen” pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence Gα subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors. PMID:25036778

  6. Air permeability and trapped-air content in two soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, D.A.; Rubin, J.

    1989-01-01

    To improve understanding of hysteretic air permeability relations, a need exists for data on the water content dependence of air permeability, matric pressure, and air trapping (especially for wetting-drying cycles). To obtain these data, a special instrument was designed. The instrument is a combination of a gas permeameter (for air permeability determination), a suction plate apparatus (for retentivity curve determination), and an air pycnometer (for trapped-air-volume determination). This design allowed values of air permeability, matric pressure, and air trapping to be codetermined, i.e., determined at the same values of water content using the same sample and the same inflow-outflow boundaries. Such data were obtained for two nonswelling soils. -from Authors

  7. An experimental study of geyser-like flows induced by a pressurized air pocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elayeb, I. S.; Leon, A.; Choi, Y.; Alnahit, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies argues that the entrapment of pressurized air pockets within combined sewer systems can produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows. To verify that pressurized air pockets can effectively produce geysers, laboratory experiments were conducted. However, past experiments were conducted in relatively small-scale apparatus (i.e. maximum φ2" vertical shaft). This study conducted a set of experiments in a larger apparatus. The experimental setup consists of an upstream head tank, a downstream head tank, a horizontal pipe (46.5ft long, φ6") and a vertical pipe (10ft long, φ6"). The initial condition for the experiments is constant flow discharge through the horizontal pipe. The experiments are initiated by injecting an air pocket with pre-determined volume and pressure at the upstream end of the horizontal pipe. The air pocket propagates through the horizontal pipe until it arrives to the vertical shaft, where it is released producing a geyser-like flow. Three flow rates in the horizontal pipe and three injected air pressures were tested. The variables measured were pressure at two locations in the horizontal pipe and two locations in the vertical pipe. High resolution videos at two regions in the vertical shaft were also recorded. To gain further insights in the physics of air-water interaction, the laboratory experiments were complemented with numerical simulations conducted using a commercial 3D CFD model, previously validated with experiments.

  8. Rigid-plug elastic-water model for transient pipe flow with entrapped air pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; OU, CHANGQI

    2011-01-01

    Pressure transients in a rapidly filling pipe with an entrapped air pocket are investigated analytically. A rigid-plug elastic water model is developed by applying elastic water hammer to the majority of the water column while applying rigid water analysis to a small portion near the air-water interface, which avoids effectively the interpolation error of previous approaches. Moreover, another two simplified models are introduced respectively based on constant water length and by neglecting water elasticity. Verification of the three models is confirmed by experimental results. Calculations show that the simplification of constant water length is feasible for small air pockets. The complete rigid water model is appropriate for cases with large initial air volume. The rigid-plug elastic model can predict all the essential features for the entire range of initial air fraction considered in this study, and it is the effective model for analysis of pressure transients of entrapped air.

  9. Air and gas pockets in sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F

    2005-01-01

    In The Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to large centralised WWTPs by means of an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the past decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. For that reason, in practice their state of functioning is often not known. Failure of operation is only noticed when the capacity of the system proves to be insufficient to fulfil the minimum design capacity demand. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. Many causes may account for the reduction of the system's nominal capacity like an increased wall roughness, scaling or occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. The occurrence of free gas may be caused by degassing of dissolved (bio) gas or by air entrained at the pumps' inlet or at air valves. A research study is started that will focus on three main issues: The description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation and dynamic hydraulic behaviour, A method to diagnose gas problems, and To overcome future problems by either applying remedial measures or improving the design of wastewater pressure systems. For this study, two experimental facilities are constructed, a small circuit for the study of multi-phase flow and a second, larger one for the research into diagnostic methods. This paper describes the preliminary results of the experiments in the multi-phase circuit.

  10. Influence of entrapped air pockets on hydraulic transients in water pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen

    2011-01-01

    The pressure variations associated with a filling undulating pipeline containing an entrapped air pocket are investigated both experimentally and numerically. The influence of entrapped air on abnormal transient pressures is often ambiguous since the compressibility of the air pocket permits the liquid flow to accelerate but also partly cushions the system, with the balance of these tendencies being associated with the initial void fraction of the air pocket. Earlier experimental research involved systems with an initial void fraction greater than 5.8%; this paper focuses on initial void fractions ranging from 0% to 10%, in order to more completely characterize the transient response. Experimental results show that the maximum pressure increases and then decreases as the initial void fraction decreases. A simplified model is developed by neglecting the liquid inertia and energy loss of a short water column near the air-water interface. Comparisons of the calculated and observed results show the model is able to accurately predict peak pressures as a function of void fraction and filling conditions. Rigid water column models, however, perform poorly with small void fractions.

  11. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions. PMID:17476384

  12. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions.

  13. Underwater superoleophilicity to superoleophobicity: role of trapped air.

    PubMed

    Jin, Meihua; Li, Shasha; Wang, Jing; Xue, Zhongxin; Liao, Mingyi; Wang, Shutao

    2012-12-14

    The interesting oil-wetting behavior to a superamphiphobic surface in water has been investigated. We demonstrated that the trapped air can tune the underwater wettability of the surface, changing from superoleophilic to superoleophobic. The trapped air in the grooves of the superamphiphobic surface can cause the significant change of the three-phase contact line (TCL).

  14. Calibration of polydimethylsiloxane and XAD-Pocket passive air samplers (PAS) for measuring gas- and particle-phase SVOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeme, Joseph O.; Saini, Amandeep; Yang, Congqiao; Zhu, Jiping; Smedes, Foppe; Klánová, Jana; Diamond, Miriam L.

    2016-10-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has seen wide use as the stationary phase of gas chromatographic columns, a passive sampler in water, and recently as a personal exposure sampler, while styrene divinyl-benzene copolymer (XAD) has been used extensively as a passive air sampler outdoors and indoors. We have introduced PDMS and XAD-Pocket as new indoor passive air samplers (PASs). The XAD-Pocket was designed to maximize the surface area-to-volume ratio of XAD and to minimize obstruction of air flow by the sampler housing. Methods were developed to expedite the use of these PASs for measuring phthalates, novel brominated flame-retardants (NFRs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) indoors. Sampling rates, Rs, (m3 day-1), were measured during a 7-week calibration study. Variability within and between analyte groups was not statistically significant. As a result, generic values of 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.5 ± 0.3 m3 day-1 dm-2 are recommended for PDMS and XAD-Pocket for a 50-day deployment time, respectively. PDMS has a higher uptake rate and is easier to use than XAD-Pocket.

  15. The mechanism of two-dimensional pocket formation in lean premixed methane-air flames with implications to turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Echekki, T.; Kollmann, W.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of unburnt pocket formation in an unsteady two-dimensional premixed lean methane-air flame is investigated using direct numerical simulations. Theoretical results for nonlinear diffusion equations combined with analytical examples are used to interpret some of the results. Flame structure and propagation show three distinct stages of pocket formation: (1) flame channel closing involving head-on quenching of flames, (2) cusp recovery, and (3) pocket burnout. The flame channel closing and subsequent pocket burnout are mutual annihilation events that feature curvature, diffusion normal to the flame front, unsteady strain rate effects, and singularities in flame propagation and stretch rate. The results show that during channel closing and pocket burnout thermo-diffusive and chemical interactions result in the acceleration of the flames prior to annihilation; the time scales associated with the final stage of mutual annihilation and the initial stage of cusp recovery are significantly smaller than diffusive and convective time scales. Peak radical concentrations resulting from flame channel closing and pocket burnout exceed peak laminar values by as much as 25%. After the merging of the fuel consumption layers, radical production and flame structure shifts more towards an H{sub 2}/CO/O{sub 2} system at the expense of hydrocarbon reactions. Species thermodiffusive interaction times are shorter than the unstrained one-dimensional counterpart due to unsteady strain and convection. Curvature effects on the flame propagation are prominent during pocket burnout and cusp recovery. The recovery stage shows strong dependence on diffusion of radicals left from the channel closing stage. This diffusion is amplified by the strong curvature of the flame cusp.

  16. Dosimetric effects of air pocket sizes in MammoSite treatment as accelerated partial breast irradiation for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y Jessica; Blough, Melissa

    2009-12-23

    MammoSite Brachytherapy System had been used as one of the Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) techniques since 2002. The clinical results from several clinical institutions had shown comparable treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity, to other APBI techniques. During MammoSite treatment, air cavities had been one of the primary issues causing treatment cancellation or delay. With the tolerance of the air volume less than 10% of the total Planning Target Volume (PTV) been set, there is still no data available to show the actual dose delivered to the breast tissue with the existence of the air pocket. In this paper, Monte Carlo N-Particle version 5 (MCNP5) was used to model a hypothesis MammoSite phantom with different sizes of air pockets, and compared to the calculation results from the treatment planning system (TPS) without heterogeneous corrections. It was found that without heterogeneous corrections, the difference between the TPS and MCNP5 calculations in the air cavity surface doses and PTV point doses can be up to 2.02% and 3.61%, respectively, with the balloon and air pocket size combinations calculated in this paper. Based on the distance from the point of interest to the balloon surface, an approximate dose can be calculated using the linear relationship found in this study. These equations provide a quick and simple way to predict the actual dose delivered to the breast soft tissue located within the PTV. With the equation applied to the dose from the TPS, the dose error caused by the air pocket during MammoSite treatment can be reduced to the minimum.

  17. A one-dimensional numerical model for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pressurized air pockets in combined sewer systems is argued to produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows through vertical shafts. A 1D numerical model is developed for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft which in turn attempts to simulate geyser like flows. The vertical shaft is closed at the bottom and open to ambient pressure at the top. Initially, the lower section of the vertical shaft is filled with compressed air and the upper section with water. The interaction between the pressurized air pocket and the water column in the vertical shaft exhibits an oscillatory motion of the water column that decays over time. The model accounts for steady and unsteady friction to estimate the energy dissipation. The model also includes the falling flow of water around the external perimeter of the pressurized air pocket by assuming that any expansion in the pressurized air pocket would result in the falling volume of water. The acceleration of air-water interface is predicted through a force balance between the pressurized air pocket and the water column combined with the Method of Characteristics that resolves pressure and velocity within the water column. The expansion and compression of the pressurized air pocket is assumed to follow either isothermal process or adiabatic process. Results for both assumptions; isothermal and adiabatic processes, are presented. The performance of the developed 1D numerical model is compared with that of a commercial 3D CFD model. Overall, a good agreement between both models is obtained for pressure and velocity oscillations. The paper will also present a sensitivity analysis of the 3D CFD model.

  18. Lead isotope ratios in tree bark pockets: an indicator of past air pollution in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Conkova, M; Kubiznakova, J

    2008-10-15

    Tree bark pockets were collected at four sites in the Czech Republic with differing levels of lead (Pb) pollution. The samples, spanning 1923-2005, were separated from beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies). Elevated Pb content (0.1-42.4 microg g(-1)) reflected air pollution in the city of Prague. The lowest Pb content (0.3-2.6 microg g(-1)) was found at the Kosetice EMEP "background pollution" site. Changes in (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb isotope ratios were in agreement with operation times of the Czech main anthropogenic Pb sources. Shortly after the Second World War, the (206)Pb/(207)Pb isotope ratio in bark pockets decreased from 1.17 to 1.14 and the (208)Pb/(206)Pb isotope ratio increased from 2.12 to 2.16. Two dominant emission sources responsible for these changes, lignite and leaded petrol combustion, contributed to the shifts in Pb isotope ratios. Low-radiogenic petrol Pb ((206)Pb/(207)Pb of 1.11) lead to lower (206)Pb/(207)Pb in bark pockets over time. High-radiogenic lignite-derived Pb ((206)Pb/(207)Pb of 1.18 to 1.19) was detected in areas affected by coal combustion rather than by traffic.

  19. Optical trapping and binding in air: Imaging and spectroscopic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Guillon, Marc; Stout, Brian

    2008-02-15

    We report on an experimental study of direct and spectroscopic imaging of optically trapped Mie droplets in air. The scattering of the trapping beams gives glare points at the droplets' azimuths. Spectroscopic measurements involving polarized light are performed to precisely determine both the droplet sizes and refraction index using Mie scattering theory. Experimental pictures are compared to rigorous numerical simulations. We also include some results on imaging of whispering gallery resonances and conclude with a brief discussion on the possibility of efficiently exciting whispering gallery resonances via radiative coupling.

  20. Quantification of Pathologic Air Trapping in Lung Transplant Patients Using CT Density Mapping: Comparison with Other CT Air Trapping Measures.

    PubMed

    Solyanik, Olga; Hollmann, Patrick; Dettmer, Sabine; Kaireit, Till; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Wacker, Frank; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Shin, Hoen-oh

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether density mapping (DM) is more accurate for detection and quantification of pathologic air trapping (pAT) in patients after lung transplantation compared to other CT air trapping measures. One-hundred forty-seven lung and heart-lung transplant recipients underwent CT-examinations at functional residual capacity (FRC) and total lung capacity (TLC) and PFT six months after lung transplantation. Quantification of air trapping was performed with the threshold-based method in expiration (EXP), density mapping (DM) and the expiratory to inspiratory ratio of the mean lung density (E/I-ratio MLD). A non-rigid registration of inspiration-expiration CT-data with a following voxel-to-voxel mapping was carried out for DM. Systematic variation of attenuation ranges was performed for EXP and DM and correlated with the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC) by Spearman rank correlation test. AT was considered pathologic if RV/TLC was above the 95th percentile of the predicted upper limit of normal values. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. The optimal attenuation range for the EXP method was from -790 HU to -950 HU (EXP(-790 to -950HU)) (r = 0.524, p<0.001) to detect air trapping. Within the segmented lung parenchyma, AT was best defined as voxel difference less than 80 HU between expiration and registered inspiration using the DM method. DM correlated best with RV/TLC (r = 0.663, p<0.001). DM and E/I-ratio MLD showed a larger AUC (0.78; 95% CI 0.69-0.86; 0.76, 95% CI 0.67-0.85) than EXP(-790 HU to -950 HU) (0.71, 95% CI 0.63-0.78). DM and E/I-ratio MLD showed better correlation with RV/TLC and are more suited quantitative CT-methods to detect pAT in lung transplant patients than the EXP(-790HU to -950HU).

  1. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  2. Work of Breathing into Snow in the Presence versus Absence of an Artificial Air Pocket Affects Hypoxia and Hypercapnia of a Victim Covered with Avalanche Snow: A Randomized Double Blind Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Presence of an air pocket and its size play an important role in survival of victims buried in the avalanche snow. Even small air pockets facilitate breathing. We hypothesize that the size of the air pocket significantly affects the airflow resistance and work of breathing. The aims of the study are (1) to investigate the effect of the presence of an air pocket on gas exchange and work of breathing in subjects breathing into the simulated avalanche snow and (2) to test whether it is possible to breathe with no air pocket. The prospective interventional double-blinded study involved 12 male volunteers, from which 10 completed the whole protocol. Each volunteer underwent two phases of the experiment in a random order: phase “AP”—breathing into the snow with a one-liter air pocket, and phase “NP”—breathing into the snow with no air pocket. Physiological parameters, fractions of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the airways and work of breathing expressed as pressure-time product were recorded continuously. The main finding of the study is that it is possible to breath in the avalanche snow even with no air pocket (0 L volume), but breathing under this condition is associated with significantly increased work of breathing. The significant differences were initially observed for end-tidal values of the respiratory gases (EtO2 and EtCO2) and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) between AP and NP phases, whereas significant differences in inspiratory fractions occurred much later (for FIO2) or never (for FICO2). The limiting factor in no air pocket conditions is excessive increase in work of breathing that induces increase in metabolism accompanied by higher oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. The presence of even a small air pocket reduces significantly the work of breathing. PMID:26666523

  3. Work of Breathing into Snow in the Presence versus Absence of an Artificial Air Pocket Affects Hypoxia and Hypercapnia of a Victim Covered with Avalanche Snow: A Randomized Double Blind Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Roubík, Karel; Sieger, Ladislav; Sykora, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Presence of an air pocket and its size play an important role in survival of victims buried in the avalanche snow. Even small air pockets facilitate breathing. We hypothesize that the size of the air pocket significantly affects the airflow resistance and work of breathing. The aims of the study are (1) to investigate the effect of the presence of an air pocket on gas exchange and work of breathing in subjects breathing into the simulated avalanche snow and (2) to test whether it is possible to breathe with no air pocket. The prospective interventional double-blinded study involved 12 male volunteers, from which 10 completed the whole protocol. Each volunteer underwent two phases of the experiment in a random order: phase "AP"--breathing into the snow with a one-liter air pocket, and phase "NP"--breathing into the snow with no air pocket. Physiological parameters, fractions of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the airways and work of breathing expressed as pressure-time product were recorded continuously. The main finding of the study is that it is possible to breath in the avalanche snow even with no air pocket (0 L volume), but breathing under this condition is associated with significantly increased work of breathing. The significant differences were initially observed for end-tidal values of the respiratory gases (EtO2 and EtCO2) and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) between AP and NP phases, whereas significant differences in inspiratory fractions occurred much later (for FIO2) or never (for FICO2). The limiting factor in no air pocket conditions is excessive increase in work of breathing that induces increase in metabolism accompanied by higher oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. The presence of even a small air pocket reduces significantly the work of breathing.

  4. Work of Breathing into Snow in the Presence versus Absence of an Artificial Air Pocket Affects Hypoxia and Hypercapnia of a Victim Covered with Avalanche Snow: A Randomized Double Blind Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Roubík, Karel; Sieger, Ladislav; Sykora, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Presence of an air pocket and its size play an important role in survival of victims buried in the avalanche snow. Even small air pockets facilitate breathing. We hypothesize that the size of the air pocket significantly affects the airflow resistance and work of breathing. The aims of the study are (1) to investigate the effect of the presence of an air pocket on gas exchange and work of breathing in subjects breathing into the simulated avalanche snow and (2) to test whether it is possible to breathe with no air pocket. The prospective interventional double-blinded study involved 12 male volunteers, from which 10 completed the whole protocol. Each volunteer underwent two phases of the experiment in a random order: phase "AP"--breathing into the snow with a one-liter air pocket, and phase "NP"--breathing into the snow with no air pocket. Physiological parameters, fractions of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the airways and work of breathing expressed as pressure-time product were recorded continuously. The main finding of the study is that it is possible to breath in the avalanche snow even with no air pocket (0 L volume), but breathing under this condition is associated with significantly increased work of breathing. The significant differences were initially observed for end-tidal values of the respiratory gases (EtO2 and EtCO2) and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) between AP and NP phases, whereas significant differences in inspiratory fractions occurred much later (for FIO2) or never (for FICO2). The limiting factor in no air pocket conditions is excessive increase in work of breathing that induces increase in metabolism accompanied by higher oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. The presence of even a small air pocket reduces significantly the work of breathing. PMID:26666523

  5. Photophoretic trapping-Raman spectroscopy for single pollens and fungal spores trapped in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Redding, Brandon

    2015-03-01

    Photophoretic trapping-Raman spectroscopy (PTRS) is a new technique for measuring Raman spectra of particles that are held in air using photophoretic forces. It was initially demonstrated with Raman spectra of strongly-absorbing carbon nanoparticles (Pan et al. [44] (Opt Express 2012)). In the present paper we report the first demonstration of the use of PTRS to measure Raman spectra of absorbing and weakly-absorbing bioaerosol particles (pollens and spores). Raman spectra of three pollens and one smut spore in a size range of 6.2-41.8 μm illuminated at 488 nm are shown. Quality spectra were obtained in the Raman shift range of 1600-3400 cm-1 in this exploratory study. Distinguishable Raman scattering signals with one or a few clear Raman peaks for all four aerosol particles were observed within the wavenumber region 2940-3030 cm-1. Peaks in this region are consistent with previous reports of Raman peaks in the 1600-3400 cm-1 range for pollens and spores excited at 514 nm measured by a conventional Raman spectrometer. Noise in the spectra, the fluorescence background, and the weak Raman signals in most of the 1600-3400 cm-1 region make some of the spectral features barely discernable or not discernable for these bioaerosols except the strong signal within 2940-3030 cm-1. Up to five bands are identified in the three pollens and only two bands appear in the fungal spore, but this may be because the fungal spore is so much smaller than any of the pollens. The fungal spore signal relative to the air-nitrogen Raman band is approximately 10 times smaller than that ratio for the pollens. The five bands are tentatively assigned to the CH2 symmetric stretch at 2948 cm-1, CH2 Fermi resonance stretch at 2970 cm-1, CH3 symmetric stretch at 2990 cm-1, CH3 out-of-plane end asymmetric stretch at 3010 cm-1, and unsaturated =CH stretch at 3028 cm-1. The two dominant bands of the up-to-five Raman bands in the 2940-3030 cm-1 region have a consistent band spacing of 25 cm-1 in all

  6. Optical configurations for photophoretic trap of single particles in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhiyong; Pan, Yong-Le; Wang, Chuji

    2016-10-01

    Since Ashkin's pioneering work in the 1970's, optical trapping (OT) and manipulation have become an indispensable tool in diverse research fields. Today, there are multiple optical trapping schemes in use. In this article, we explore six different optical trapping schemes based on the photophoretic force (PPF). Within these schemes we explore 21 variants differing in such details as laser source, power, beam shape, and focusing optics. We evaluate and rate the trapping quality and performance of the six trapping schemes in terms of four key aspects: simplicity, robustness, flexibility, and efficiency. One of the schemes is novel: we introduce a simple, high quality scheme using a confocal design in which one trapping beam is effectively converted to two counter-propagating beams. The versatility of this new trapping scheme is demonstrated via application of the scheme to cavity ringdown spectroscopy. We hope this exploration of the diversity of PPF trapping schemes will extend applications of OT by providing researchers with information to assist in the selection of specific optical trapping schemes from the first-of-its-kind list of 21 configurations presented herein.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of mass and rotation of trapped absorbing particles in air.

    PubMed

    Bera, Sudipta K; Kumar, Avinash; Sil, Souvik; Saha, Tushar Kanti; Saha, Tanumoy; Banerjee, Ayan

    2016-09-15

    We trap absorbing micro-particles in air by photophoretic forces generated using a single loosely focused Gaussian trapping beam. We measure a component of the radial Brownian motion of a trapped particle cluster and determine the power spectral density, mean squared displacement, and normalized position and velocity autocorrelation functions to characterize the photophoretic body force in a quantitative fashion for the first time. The trapped particles also undergo spontaneous rotation due to the action of this force. This is evident from the spectral density that displays clear peaks at the rotation and the particles' inertial resonance frequencies. We fit the spectral density to the well-known analytical function derived from the Langevin equation, measure the resonance and rotation frequencies, and determine the values for particle mass that we verify at different trapping laser powers with reasonable accuracy. PMID:27628396

  8. Generation and annihilation of traps in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices after negative air corona charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ila; Srivastava, R. S.

    1993-07-01

    Surface and bulk traps along with positive oxide charge accumulation have been found to be generated in metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors, when subjected to negative air corona discharge at slightly reduced pressure (≂10-1 Torr). The effects are neutralized and device quality improved when annealed at 200 °C in air. The bulk traps and a fraction of oxide charges were annealable when kept at room temperature for several months. The results have been analyzed by Nicollian-Goetzberger's conductance technique and a plausible explanation is given.

  9. Liquid-Infused Surfaces with Trapped Air (LISTA) for Drag Force Reduction.

    PubMed

    Hemeda, A A; Tafreshi, H Vahedi

    2016-03-29

    Superhydrophobic (SHP) surfaces are known for their drag-reducing attributes thanks to their ability to trap air in their surface pores and thereby reduce the contact between water and the frictional solid area. SHP surfaces are prone to failure under elevated pressures or because of air-layer dissolution into the surrounding water. Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) or liquid-infused surfaces (LIS) in which the trapped air is replaced with a lubricant have been proposed in the literature as a way of eliminating the air dissolution problem as well as improving the surface stability under pressure. While an LIS surface has been shown to reduce drag for flow of water-glycerol mixture (ref 18), no significant drag reduction has yet been reported for the flow of water (a lower viscosity fluid) over LIS. In this concern, we have designed a new surface in which a layer of air is trapped underneath the infused lubricant to reduce the frictional forces preventing the LIS to provide drag reduction for water or any fluid with a viscosity less than that of the lubricant. Drag reduction performance of such surfaces, referred to here as liquid-infused surfaces with trapped air (LISTA), is predicted by solving the biharmonic equation for the water-oil-air three-phase system in transverse grooves with enhanced meniscus stability thanks to double-reentry designs. For the arbitrary dimensions considered in our proof-of-concept study, LISTA designs showed 20-37% advantage over their LIS counterparts.

  10. Physical conditions for trapping air by a microtrichia-covered insect cuticle during temporary submersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Dietrich; Woermann, Dietrich

    2009-08-01

    The intertidal midge Clunio, which reproduces on exposed rocky seashores, becomes enclosed in an irregularly shaped air bubble during short submersion by incoming waves. This water-repellent property of Clunio’s cuticle is caused by a complete cover of hydrophobic microtrichia offering an effective surf tolerance. These microtrichia not only trap a thin air layer above the cuticle but also maintain a larger air bubble between the insect’s ventral side and legs. The effectiveness of the water repellence was quantitatively characterised on the basis of a known model (Crisp and Thorpe, Discuss Faraday Soc 3:210-220, 1948). The parameters of the model are the contact angle θ (>90°) at the contact line of air/water/microtrichia and the distance between individual microtrichia and their radius. When the microtrichia are 1.1 μm apart and have a radius of 0.1 μm and an estimated contact angle θ of 140°, the air layer is stable against hydrostatic pressures of up to 3 m water column. As shown by a modified version of the model, considerably larger air bubbles can be trapped by the microtrichia cover of the legs up to distances of 0.5 mm from the body. The widely spaced (about 8 μm apart) and longer setae of Clunio are not involved in the formation of air layers and air bubble.

  11. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  12. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  13. NMR study comparing capillary trapping in Berea sandstone of air, carbon dioxide, and supercritical carbon dioxide after imbibition of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Cody A.; Bray, Joshua M.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques were used to study the capillary trapping mechanisms relevant to carbon sequestration. Capillary trapping is an important mechanism in the initial trapping of supercritical CO2 in the pore structures of deep underground rock formations during the sequestration process. Capillary trapping is considered the most promising trapping option for carbon sequestration. NMR techniques noninvasively monitor the drainage and imbibition of air, CO2, and supercritical CO2 with DI H2O at low capillary numbers in a Berea sandstone rock core under conditions representative of a deep underground saline aquifer. Supercritical CO2 was found to have a lower residual nonwetting (NW) phase saturation than that of air and CO2. Supercritical CO2 behaves differently than gas phase air or CO2 and leads to a reduction in capillary trapping. NMR relaxometry data suggest that the NW phase, i.e., air, CO2, or supercritical CO2, is preferentially trapped in larger pores. This is consistent with snap-off conditions being more favorable in macroscale pores, as NW fluids minimize their contact area with the solid and hence prefer larger pores.

  14. Near-infrared Laser-induced Temperature Elevation in Optically-trapped Aqueous Droplets in Air.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Shoji; Ma, Jiang; Fujiwara, Terufumi; Yamauchi, Kunihiro; Kitamura, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared laser-induced temperature elevation in single aqueous ammonium sulfate droplets levitated in air were evaluated by means of laser trapping and Raman spectroscopy. Since the vapor pressure in an aqueous solution droplet should be thermodynamically in equilibrium with that of water in air, the equilibrium size of the droplet varies sensitively through evaporation/condensation of water in accordance with the temperature change of the droplet. In this study, we demonstrated that the changes in the size of an optically levitated aqueous ammonium sulfate droplet were induced by irradiation of a 1064-nm laser beam as a heat source under an optical microscope. Temperature elevation in the droplet was evaluated successfully by means of Raman spectroscopy, and the values determined were shown to be in good agreement with those by the theoretical calculations based on the absorption coefficient of water at 1064-nm and the thermal conductivity of air. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration showing that the absorption coefficient evaluated from changes in the size of optically-trapped aqueous droplets is consistent with that of pure water. PMID:27063715

  15. Water flow and retention in coarse soil pockets in the shallow subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Limsuwat, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    Soil moisture processes in the near-land-surface subsurface, referred to here as the shallow subsurface, plays a crucial role in the hydrologic cycle and global water budget. In addition, this critical zone is associated with emerging problems in hydrology, climate, the environment and relates to multiple direct and tangential short- and long-term national security interests. Some of the problems associated with the shallow subsurface such as detection of buried landmines and evaporation from disturbed soils require the understanding of spatial distribution of soil moisture at much higher spatial resolutions than what is needed in traditional soil physics applications. In landmine detection in naturally heterogeneous shallow subsurface, where soil properties change at smaller scales, soil moisture as measured by remote sensing techniques may provide anomalies that result in falsely interpreted sensing signals to conclude that a mine is present. To improve our fundamental understanding of how variation of soil properties at small scales affect soil moisture distribution, the water flow and retention behaviors in a heterogeneous system with two pockets of different sands that are coarser than the background sand were investigated. Drainage was slowly induced in a two-dimensional test sand tank, followed by wetting, secondary drainage, and precipitation cycles. Throughout the experiments, water and air pressures and water content were continuously monitored at 25 locations on the tank. To monitor air pressure in highly wet soils, we used newly-developed hydrophobic tensiometers. In the primary drainage cycle, the pockets of coarse sands drained rapidly when air reached the coarse-fine interface. During the rapid drainage, air pressure in the pockets suddenly became negative as the water was released. In the wetting cycle, water bypassed through fine sand and air was trapped in the pockets. At the top portion of the coarse pocket, significant amount of air was trapped

  16. Tetraglyme Trap for the Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Urban Air: Projects for Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Wilbert W.; Johnson, Clyde; Johnson, Leon P.

    2004-01-01

    The differences in the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in the ambient air from the two urban locations, were studied by the undergraduate analytical chemistry students. Tetraglyme is very widely used due to its simplicity and its potential for use to investigate VOCs in ambient and indoor air employing a purge-and-trap concentrator…

  17. Reconfigurable optothermal microparticle trap in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, O A; Garbos, M K; Euser, T G; Russell, P St J

    2012-07-13

    We report a novel optothermal trapping mechanism that occurs in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. In the confined environment of the core, the motion of a laser-guided particle is strongly influenced by the thermal-gradient-driven flow of air along the core surface. Known as "thermal creep flow," this can be induced either statically by local heating, or dynamically by the absorption (at a black mark placed on the fiber surface) of light scattered by the moving particle. The optothermal force on the particle, which can be accurately measured in hollow-core fiber by balancing it against the radiation forces, turns out to exceed the conventional thermophoretic force by 2 orders of magnitude. The system makes it possible to measure pN-scale forces accurately and to explore thermally driven flow in micron-scale structures. PMID:23030165

  18. Trapped Air in Glacial Ice from the base of Penny, Agassiz, and Devon Ice Caps, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, A. M.; Fisher, D.

    2013-12-01

    Basal ice from the Canadian Arctic ice caps, Penny, Agassiz, and Devon, has long been suggested to date back into the last interglacial, or Stage 5e. Cores from all three ice caps contain long Holocene sections with heavy δ18Oice values, overlaying condensed glacial sections with light δ18Oice values, which are underlain by ~1-7 m of ice with δ18Oice values similar to that of the Holocene, suggesting accumulation during the last interglacial. However, the origin of the ice, whether the ice is regelation/segregated or pristine glacial ice has been debated, with important implications as to whether or not ice caps in the Canadian arctic persisted through the last interglacial. Here we present analyses of the trapped air from the bottom portions of Penny, Agassiz, and Devon ice caps to provide context about the nature of the basal ice. Geochemical analyses of N2/Ar, O2/Ar, O2/N2, δ15N2, δ18OATM, and total air content (TAC) indicate a spectrum of ice conditions in basal ice. Low N2/Ar ratios and low TAC indicate partial melting in some of the samples from all three ice caps. High δ15N2, high TAC, and N2/Ar ratios close to air indicate that clean glacial ice is also present in the basal section of each ice cap. Low O2/Ar and high δ18OATM indicates microbial respiration in most samples. The lowest δ18OATM values, near 0‰, indicate trapped air ages >80 ka for the Devon and Agassiz ice caps.

  19. Microcontact printing trapping air: A versatile tool for protein microarray fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipponi, Luisa; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2006-01-01

    The present work introduces a new method for the fabrication of protein micro-patterns, microcontact printing trapping air. The method is based on microcontact printing, a well-established soft-lithographic technique for printing bioactive protein patterns. Usually, the stamp used is made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) obtained by replicating a lithographically microfabricated silicon master. In microcontact printing, the dimensions of the features in the stamp are critical, since the high compressibility of poly(dimethylsiloxane) causes high aspect ratio features to collapse, leading to the printing of undesired areas. In most cases, this is an unwanted effect, which interferes with the printing quality. In this work we used a poly(dimethylsiloxane)stamp bearing an array of micro-posts which, when placed over a flat surface, collapses with consequent formation of an air gap around the entire array. This effect is linked to the distance between the posts that form the array and can be exploited for the fabrication of protein microarrays having a remarkably low background noise for fluorescence detection.

  20. Decreased lung compliance and air trapping in heterozygous SP-B-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, J C; Weaver, T E; Iwamoto, H S; Ikegami, M; Jobe, A H; Hull, W M; Whitsett, J A

    1997-01-01

    Genetic ablation of the murine SP-B gene in transgenic mice caused lethal perinatal respiratory distress in homozygous offspring, whereas heterozygous SP-B (+/-) mice survived postnatally. In adult SP-B(+/-) mice, surfactant protein B mRNA and the alveolar lavage SP-B protein were reduced by 50% compared with wild-type littermates, consistent with the inactivation of a single SP-B allele. Expression of SP-A, SP-C, and SP-D proteins was not affected in SP-B(+/-) mice. Heterozygous SP-B(+/-) mice reached maturity in numbers expected by Mendelian inheritance of a recessive gene. Lung morphology and both intracellular and extracellular phospholipid pool size and composition were unaltered in the SP-B(+/-) mice. Despite normal survival, pulmonary function studies demonstrated a consistent decrease in lung compliance in SP-B(+/-) mice. Abnormalities of inflation/deflation curves demonstrated airway collapse at low deflation pressures. Residual volumes were increased in the SP-B(+/-) mice. In summary, SP-B mRNA and SP-B protein were reduced by 50% in SP-B(+/-) mice, resulting in abnormalities of lung compliance and air trapping, suggesting a potential susceptibility to pulmonary dysfunction associated with SP-B deficiency.

  1. Multistage open-tube trap for enrichment of part-per-trillion trace components of low-pressure (below 27-kPa) air samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, D.; Vo, T.; Vedder, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A multistage open-tube trap for cryogenic collection of trace components in low-pressure air samples is described. The open-tube design allows higher volumetric flow rates than densely packed glass-bead traps commonly reported and is suitable for air samples at pressures below 27 kPa with liquid nitrogen as the cryogen. Gas blends containing 200 to 2500 parts per trillion by volume each of ethane and ethene were sampled and hydrocarbons were enriched with 100 + or - 4 percent trap efficiency. The multistage design is more efficient than equal-length open-tube traps under the conditions of the measurements.

  2. Orbital tuning of deep ice cores using O2/N2 of trapped air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    The chronology of the first Dome Fuji deep ice core (80,000-340,000 yr BP) was established by orbital tuning of measured O2/N2 ratios in trapped air to the past local summer insolation at the drill site (Kawamura et al., 2007). The O2/N2 ratios found in ice cores are generally lower than atmospheric ratio because of size-dependent molecular fractionation during bubble close-off. The magnitude of this gas fractionation appears to be influenced by snow metamorphism when the layer was originally at the surface, which in turn is controlled by local summer insolation (Fujita et al., 2009). The O2/N2 record has little 100,000-yr periodicity (strongest in climatic records), suggesting insignificant climatic influence in the orbital tuning. Agreement of the O2/N2 chronology with U-Th radiometric chronology of speleothems (within ~2000 yr) suggests that O2/N2 and summer insolation are indeed in phase. However, it may not be common to all ice cores that O2/N2 signal only records local summer insolation. For example, the GISP2 ice core (Greenland) has clear imprint of abrupt climate changes in the O2/N2 record, indicating climatic (non-insolation) signal in the record and the possibility of phase variability of O2/N2 relative to the past insolation (Suwa and Bender, 2008). Here we present new O2/N2 record from the second Dome Fuji ice core with significant improvements in ice core storage practice and mass spectrometry. In particular, the ice core had been stored at about -50 ˚C until the air extraction except during transportations, which prevent fractionation due to gas loss during the core storage. The precision of the new O2/N2 data set is improved by a factor of 3 over the previous data, and we do not observe outliers (there were 15% outliers in the previous data). Clear imprint of local insolation is recognizable in the new O2/N2, which would enable us to generate a chronology with accuracy of ~2000 yr towards older periods. Samples from the first core after long

  3. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  4. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Gordon F. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low-noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free-ranging subject. The electrode comprises a pocket-shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  5. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, G. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A low noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free ranging subject is described. The electrode comprises a pocket shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member, remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  6. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  7. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This booklet of pocket statistics includes the 1996 NASA Major Launch Record, NASA Procurement, Financial, and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Luanch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  8. Activation of water soluble amines by halogens for trapping methyl radioactive iodine from air streams

    DOEpatents

    Deitz, Victor R.; Blachly, Charles H.

    1977-01-01

    Gas adsorbent charcoals impregnated with an aqueous solution of the reaction product of a tertiary amine and elemental iodine or bromine are better than 99 per cent efficient in trapping methyl iodine.sup.131. The chemical addition of iodine or bromine to the tertiary amine molecule increases the efficiency of the impregnated charcoal as a trapping agent, and in conjunction with the high flash point of the tertiary amine raises the ignition temperature of the impregnated charcoal.

  9. Pocket-based drug design: exploring pocket space.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiliang; Gan, Linfeng; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    The identification and application of druggable pockets of targets play a key role in in silico drug design, which is a fundamental step in structure-based drug design. Herein, some recent progresses and developments of the computational analysis of pockets have been covered. Also, the pockets at the protein-protein interfaces (PPI) have been considered to further explore the pocket space for drug discovery. We have presented two case studies targeting the kinetic pockets generated by normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics method, respectively, in which we focus upon incorporating the pocket flexibility into the two-dimensional virtual screening with both affinity and specificity. We applied the specificity and affinity (SPA) score to quantitatively estimate affinity and evaluate specificity using the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR) as a quantitative criterion. In one of two cases, we also included some applications of pockets located at the dimer interfaces to emphasize the role of PPI in drug discovery. This review will attempt to summarize the current status of this pocket issue and will present some prospective avenues of further inquiry.

  10. Side pocket mandrel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.W.; Crawford, M.S.; Crawford, W.B.

    1987-12-29

    A side pocket mandrel is described comprising: a tubular body section having a hollow interior that defines a main bore to one side thereof and another bore to the other side thereof; and a short-length seating section welded to one end of the body section. The seating section has a main bore formed to one side thereof aligned with the main bore in the body section, and a valve seating bore formed on the other side thereof generally aligned with the other bore. The seating bore has a polish section adjacent its outer end. The outer end opening through an exterior end surface of the mandrel. The seating bore has a recessed section adjacent the polish section. That provides an inwardly facing stop shoulder at one end thereof and a latch shoulder at the other end thereof facing the stop shoulder; and a tubular member welded to the seating section in axial alignment with the main bores. The axis of the polish section of the seating bore is inclined toward the axes of the main bores at a small angle.

  11. Measurement and accumulation of electric charge on a single dielectric particle trapped in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Haesung; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2016-03-01

    Normally occurring charges on small particles provide a means to control the motion of the particles. Using a piezoelectric transducer to launch microparticles into a trap, we can vary particle-surface interactions to transfer charge to the particle via contact electrification. This allows more detailed studies of contact electrification itself as well generation of higher charge states for precision measurements of force or nonlinear dynamics using electric field modulation. In practice, particles may be repeatedly landed on the substrate and relaunched during loading. This leads to charge transfer so that the net charge on the polystyrene (PS) particle becomes sufficient to allow electrostatic forcing to drive ballistic motion over a range of displacement two orders of magnitude greater than thermal fluctuations. An increase in charge from 1000 to 3000 electrons is demonstrated and the induced motion of the trapped particle is accurately described using simple classical mechanics in phase space.

  12. Investigation on the gas pockets in a rotodynamic multiphase pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Li, Y. J.; Cai, S. J.; Zhu, H. W.; Zhang, Y. X.

    2016-05-01

    The appearance of gas pockets has an obvious impact on the performance of the rotodynamic multiphase pump. In order to study the formation of gas pockets in the pump and its effects on pump's performance, the unsteady numerical simulation and the visualization experiments were done to investigate gas pockets in a three-stage rotodynamic multiphase pump developed by authors. Meanwhile, the mixture of water and air was selected as the medium. According to the distributions of pressure, gas volume fraction and velocity vector in three compression cells in unsteady flow process, the process of the formation of gas pockets in the pump were analysed generally. The visualization experiments were used to verify the validity of the numerical simulation. The results will be benefit for the hydraulic design of the compression cell of rotodynamic multiphase pump.

  13. Trapping the Pasture Odorscape Using Open-Air Solid-Phase Micro Extraction, a Tool to Assess Grassland Value.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Agnès; Farruggia, Anne; Leppik, Ene; Pinier, Centina; Fournier, Florence; Genoud, David; Frérot, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Besides supporting cattle feeding, grasslands are home to a diversity of plants and insects that interact with each other by emitting volatile compounds. The aim of this work was to develop a method to determine permanent grassland odorscape and relate it to flower-visiting insects. Two grasslands were chosen for their contrasting levels of botanical diversity, resulting from differing grazing managements. Measurements were made over two periods of three consecutive days at the beginning of grazing, and just after the cows had left the plots. Volatile compounds were trapped using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers exposed eight hours a day in three exclosures per plot, and then analyzed by gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Insects were trapped using pan traps and a net, sorted and counted. The open air SPME method yielded volatile compound profiles that were richer than maize field profiles, comprising the common green leaf volatiles (GLV) and more specific ones. Differences between the odorscapes of the two grasslands were found, but they were not as marked as expected from their botanical composition. By contrast, there were sharp differences between the two periods, resulting from the combined effects of changes in weather conditions, plant phenological stage and grazing progress. Several correlations between insect counts and volatile compounds were found. Although their correlation coefficients were low, some of them were confirmed when tested by Spearman rank correlation, and could be logically explained. This method of grassland odorscape deserves to be developed because it can provide information on many aspects of grassland function and on the stresses that grassland plants undergo.

  14. Trapping the Pasture Odorscape Using Open-Air Solid-Phase Micro Extraction, a Tool to Assess Grassland Value

    PubMed Central

    Cornu, Agnès; Farruggia, Anne; Leppik, Ene; Pinier, Centina; Fournier, Florence; Genoud, David; Frérot, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Besides supporting cattle feeding, grasslands are home to a diversity of plants and insects that interact with each other by emitting volatile compounds. The aim of this work was to develop a method to determine permanent grassland odorscape and relate it to flower-visiting insects. Two grasslands were chosen for their contrasting levels of botanical diversity, resulting from differing grazing managements. Measurements were made over two periods of three consecutive days at the beginning of grazing, and just after the cows had left the plots. Volatile compounds were trapped using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers exposed eight hours a day in three exclosures per plot, and then analyzed by gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Insects were trapped using pan traps and a net, sorted and counted. The open air SPME method yielded volatile compound profiles that were richer than maize field profiles, comprising the common green leaf volatiles (GLV) and more specific ones. Differences between the odorscapes of the two grasslands were found, but they were not as marked as expected from their botanical composition. By contrast, there were sharp differences between the two periods, resulting from the combined effects of changes in weather conditions, plant phenological stage and grazing progress. Several correlations between insect counts and volatile compounds were found. Although their correlation coefficients were low, some of them were confirmed when tested by Spearman rank correlation, and could be logically explained. This method of grassland odorscape deserves to be developed because it can provide information on many aspects of grassland function and on the stresses that grassland plants undergo. PMID:26536369

  15. Abrupt climate change at the end of the last glacial period inferred from trapped air in polar Ice

    PubMed

    Severinghaus; Brook

    1999-10-29

    The last glacial period was terminated by an abrupt warming event in the North Atlantic approximately 15,000 years before the present, and warming events of similar age have been reported from low latitudes. Understanding the mechanism of this termination requires that the precise relative timing of abrupt climate warming in the tropics versus the North Atlantic be known. Nitrogen and argon isotopes in trapped air in Greenland ice show that the Greenland Summit warmed 9 +/- 3 degrees C over a period of several decades, beginning 14,672 years ago. Atmospheric methane concentrations rose abruptly over a approximately 50-year period and began their increase 20 to 30 years after the onset of the abrupt Greenland warming. These data suggest that tropical climate became warmer or wetter (or both) approximately 20 to 80 years after the onset of Greenland warming, supporting a North Atlantic rather than a tropical trigger for the climate event.

  16. A centrifugal ice microtome for measurements of atmospheric CO2 on air trapped in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, B.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2012-10-01

    For atmospheric CO2 reconstructions using ice cores, the technique to release the trapped air from the ice samples is crucial for the precision and accuracy of the measurements. We present here a new dry extraction technique in combination with a new gas analytical system that together show significant improvements with respect to current systems. Ice samples (3-15 g) are pulverized using a novel Centrifugal Ice Microtome (CIM) by shaving the ice in a cooled vacuum chamber (-27 °C) in which no friction occurs due to the use of magnetic bearings. Both, the shaving principle of the CIM and the use of magnetic bearings have not been applied so far in this field. Shaving the ice samples produces finer ice powder and releases a minimum of 90% of the trapped air compared to 50%-70% when needle crushing is employed. In addition, the friction-free motion with an optimized design to reduce contaminations of the inner surfaces of the device result in a reduced system offset of about 2.0 ppmv compared to 4.9ppmv. The gas analytical part shows a factor two higher precision than our corresponding part of the previous system and all processes except the loading and cleaning of the CIM now run automatically. Compared to our previous system the new system shows a 3 times better measurement reproducibility of about 1.1 ppmv (1σ) which is similar to the best reproducibility of other systems applied in this field. With this high reproducibility, replicate measurements are not required anymore for most prospective measurement campaigns resulting in a possible output of 12-20 measurements per day compared to a maximum of 6 with other systems.

  17. A centrifugal ice microtome for measurements of atmospheric CO2 on air trapped in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, B.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2013-02-01

    For atmospheric CO2 reconstructions using ice cores, the technique to release the trapped air from the ice samples is essential for the precision and accuracy of the measurements. We present here a new dry extraction technique in combination with a new gas analytical system that together show significant improvements with respect to current systems. Ice samples (3-15 g) are pulverised using a novel centrifugal ice microtome (CIM) by shaving the ice in a cooled vacuum chamber (-27 °C) in which no friction occurs due to the use of magnetic bearings. Both, the shaving principle of the CIM and the use of magnetic bearings have not been applied so far in this field. Shaving the ice samples produces finer ice powder and releases a minimum of 90% of the trapped air compared to 50%-70% when needle crushing is employed. In addition, the friction-free motion with an optimized design to reduce contaminations of the inner surfaces of the device result in a reduced system offset of about 2.0 ppmv compared to 4.9 ppmv. The gas analytical part shows a higher precision than the corresponding part of our previous system by a factor of two, and all processes except the loading and cleaning of the CIM now run automatically. Compared to our previous system, the complete system shows a 3 times better measurement reproducibility of about 1.1 ppmv (1 σ) which is similar to the best reproducibility of other systems applied in this field. With this high reproducibility, no replicate measurements are required anymore for most future measurement campaigns resulting in a possible output of 12-20 measurements per day compared to a maximum of 6 with other systems.

  18. Visualization of removal of trapped air from the apical region in simulated root canals by laser-activated irrigation using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Harry Huiz; De Moor, Roeland J G; Suharto, Djoko

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this visualization study was to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism by which trapped air is removed from the apical region of simulated root canals by activation of an irrigant using an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser during endodontic procedures. A high-speed imaging system with high temporal and spatial resolution was used to visualize laser-induced shock waves in a resin block model with a curved root canal (inner diameter at the apex 0.08 mm, taper 4 %, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm) and a glass cylinder model with a straight root canal (inner diameter 1 mm, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm). The study utilized MZ3 and RFT3 tips in each model, without water or air spray, and with an average power of 1 W at 35 Hz. Laser-activated irrigation overcame the airlock effect by releasing air trapped in the air column. The mechanism underlying the removal of trapped air from the apical region using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a dry root canal is via the disruption of the surface tension at the solution-air interface. This disruption, caused by bubble implosion (cavitation), displaces air in the form of bubbles from the apical region toward the solution, which allows the solution to travel apically.

  19. Sorbent trapping solid-phase microextraction of fragrance allergens in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Lamas, J Pablo; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Lores, Marta; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2010-08-13

    Exposure to fragrance substances is exponentially increasing in our daily life due to the enhanced use of scented products. Some fragrances are known to be important sensitizers, inhalation being an important exposure pathway in indoor environments. A simple and sensitive method based on solid-phase enrichment and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed for the analysis of 24 volatile fragrance allergens in indoor air. Suspected allergens present in the air (0.2 m(3)) were adsorbed onto a very small quantity of florisil (25 mg) and then transferred to a SPME fiber in the headspace mode (HS). To the best of our knowledge, this paper describes the first application of SPME for the determination of these compounds in air samples. The experimental parameters affecting the microextraction process have been optimized using a multifactor experimental design strategy. Accuracy, linearity, precision and detection limits (LODs) were evaluated to assess the performance of the proposed method. External calibration, using spiked sorbent standards, and not requiring the complete sampling process (only the SPME step), demonstrated to be suitable for the quantification of all suspected allergens. Recovery studies were performed at three concentration levels (0.04, 1.00 and 50 microg m(-3)), obtaining quantitative recoveries (> or = 85%) in most cases. LOD values at the low ng m(-3) level were achieved for all the target compounds. The application of the method to daily home air samples demonstrated the ubiquity of this kind of fragrance ingredients in quotidian indoor environments, finding 18 of the 24 considered compounds in concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 56 microg m(-3). Benzyl alcohol, linalool, citronellol, ionone and lilial were found in most analyzed samples.

  20. Experimental investigation of infiltration in soil with occurrence of preferential flow and air trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, Michal; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Sacha, Jan; Cislerova, Milena

    2015-04-01

    Recently, a number of infiltration experiments have not proved the validity of standard Richards' theory of the flow in soils with wide pore size distribution. Water flow in such soils under near-saturated conditions often exhibits preferential flow and temporal instability of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. An intact sample of coarse sandy loam from Cambisol series containing naturally developed vertically connected macropore was investigated during recurrent ponding infiltration (RPI) experiments conducted during period of 30 hours. RPI experiment consisted of two ponded infiltration runs, each followed by free gravitational draining of the sample. Three-dimensional neutron tomography (NT) image of the dry sample was acquired before the infiltration begun. The dynamics of the wetting front advancement was investigated by a sequence of neutron radiography (NR) images. Analysis of NR showed that water front moved preferentially through the macropore at the approximate speed of 2 mm/sec, which was significantly faster pace than the 0.3 mm/sec wetting advancement in the surrounding soil matrix. After the water started to flow out of the sample, changes in the local water content distribution were evaluated quantitatively by subtracting the NT image of the dry sample from subsequent tomography images. As a next stage, the experiment was repeated on a composed sample packed of ceramic and coarse sand. Series of infiltration runs was conducted in the sample with different initial water contents. The neutron tomography data quantitatively showed that both in natural soil sample containing the macropore and in the composed sample air was gradually transported from the region of fine soil matrix to the macropores or to the coarser material. The accumulation of the air bubbles in the large pores affected the hydraulic conductivity of the sample reducing it up to 50% of the initial value. This supports the hypothesis on strong influence of entrapped air amount and

  1. Contribution of CT quantified emphysema, air trapping and airway wall thickness on pulmonary function in male smokers with and without COPD.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus A A; de Jong, Pim A; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Mali, Willem P Th M; Mets, Onno M; Schmidt, Michael; de Koning, Harry J; Aalst, Carlijn van der; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Ginneken, Bram van; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Zanen, Pieter

    2014-09-01

    Emphysema, airway wall thickening and air trapping are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). All three can be quantified by computed tomography (CT) of the chest. The goal of the current study is to determine the relative contribution of CT derived parameters on spirometry, lung volume and lung diffusion testing. Emphysema, airway wall thickening and air trapping were quantified automatically on CT in 1,138 male smokers with and without COPD. Emphysema was quantified by the percentage of voxels below -950 Hounsfield Units (HU), airway wall thickness by the square root of wall area for a theoretical airway with 10 mm lumen perimeter (Pi10) and air trapping by the ratio of mean lung density at expiration and inspiration (E/I-ratio). Spirometry, residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC) and diffusion capacity (Kco) were obtained. Standardized regression coefficients (β) were used to analyze the relative contribution of CT changes to pulmonary function measures. The independent contribution of the three CT measures differed per lung function parameter. For the FEV1 airway wall thickness was the most contributing structural lung change (β = -0.46), while for the FEV1/FVC this was emphysema (β = -0.55). For the residual volume (RV) air trapping was most contributing (β = -0.35). Lung diffusion capacity was most influenced by emphysema (β = -0.42). In a cohort of smokers with and without COPD the effect of different CT changes varies per lung function measure and therefore emphysema, airway wall thickness and air trapping need to be taken in account.

  2. Trapping of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate at the Air-Water Interface of Oscillating Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Corti, Mario; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2015-06-16

    We report that at very low initial bulk concentrations, a couple of hundred times below the critical micellar concentration (CMC), anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) adsorbed at the air-water interface of a gas bubble cannot be removed, on the time scale of the experiment (hours), when the surrounding solution is gently replaced by pure water. Extremely sensitive interferometric measurements of the resonance frequency of the bubble-forced oscillations give precise access to the concentration of the surfactant monolayer. The bulk-interface dynamic exchange of SDS molecules is shown to be inhibited below a concentration which we believe refers to a kind of gas-liquid phase transition of the surface monolayer. Above this threshold we recover the expected concentration-dependent desorption. The experimental observations are interpreted within simple energetic considerations supported by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. PMID:26039913

  3. Ambient formic acid in southern California air: A comparison of two methods, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and alkaline trap-liquid chromatography with UV detection

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. ); Tuazon, E.C. ); Fujita, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Formic acid is an ubiquitous component of urban smog. Sources of formic acid in urban air include direct emissions from vehicles and in situ reaction of ozone with olefins. Ambient levels of formic acid in southern California air were first measured some 15 years ago by Hanst et al. using long-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All subsequent studies of formic acid in the Los Angeles area have involved the use of two methods, either FTIR or collection on alkaline traps followed by gas chromatography, ion chromatography, or liquid chromatography analysis with UV detection, ATLC-UV. The Carbon Species Methods Comparison Study (CSMCS), a multilaboratory air quality study carried out in August 1986 at a southern California smog receptor site, provided an opportunity for direct field comparison of the FTIR and alkaline trap methods. The results of the comparison are presented in this brief report.

  4. NASA Pocket Statistics: 1997 Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    POCKET STATISTICS is published by the NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA). Included in each edition is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, Aeronautics and Space Transportation and NASA Procurement, Financial and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. All Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  5. Accurate age scale of the Dome Fuji ice core, Antarctica from O2/N2 ratio of trapped air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.; Suzuki, K.; Parrenin, F.

    2012-04-01

    Chronology of the first Dome Fuji deep ice core (core length: 2,500 m, ice thickness: 3,035 m) for the age range from 80 kyr to 340 kyr ago was established by orbital tuning of measured O2/N2 ratios in trapped air to local summer insolation, with precision better than about 2,000 years (Kawamura et al., 2007). The O2/N2 ratios found in polar ice cores are slightly lower than the atmospheric ratio because of size-dependent molecular fractionation during bubble close-off. The magnitude of this gas fractionation is believed to be governed by the magnitude of snow metamorphism when the layer was originally at the surface, which in turn is controlled by local summer insolation (Fujita et al., 2009). A strong advantage of the O2/N2 chronology is that there is no need to assume a lag between climatic records in the ice core and orbital forcings, becacuse O2/N2 ratios record local insolation through physical processes. Accuracy of the chronology was validated by comparing the O2/N2 chronology with U-Th radiometric chronology of speleothem records (Cheng et al., 2009) for the ends of Terminations II, III and IV, as well as several large climatic events, for which both ice-core CH4 and speleothem δ18O (a proxy for precipitation) show abrupt shifts as seen in the last glacial period. All ages from O2/N2 and U-Th chronology agreed with each other within ~2,000 yr. The O2/N2 chronology permits comparisons between Antarctic climate, greenhouse gases, astronomically calculated orbital parameters, and radiometrically-dated sea level and monsoon records. Here, we completed the measurements of O2/N2 ratios of the second Dome Fuji ice core, which reached bedrock, for the range from 2,400 to 3,028 m (320 - 700 kyr ago) at approximately 2,000-year time resolution. We made significant improvements in ice core storage practices and mass spectrometry. In particular, the ice core samples were stored at about -50 ° C until the air extraction, except during short periods of transportation

  6. Pocket Hematoma: A Call for Definition.

    PubMed

    DE Sensi, Francesco; Miracapillo, Gennaro; Cresti, Alberto; Severi, Silva; Airaksinen, Kari Eino Juhani

    2015-08-01

    Pocket hematoma is a common complication of cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and a potential risk factor for device infections, especially in patients on oral anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment. There is a wide variability in the incidence of pocket hematoma and bleeding complications in the literature and the major cause for this seems to be the variability of the used definitions for hematomas. The lack of generally accepted definition for pocket hematoma renders the comparisons across the studies difficult. In this article, we briefly review the current literature on this issue and propose a uniform definition for pocket hematoma and criteria for grading the severity of hematoma in clinical practice and research.

  7. A purge-and-trap capillary column gas chromatographic method for the measurement of halocarbons in water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Happell, J.D.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wills, K.D.; Wilke, R.J.; Neill, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes an automated, accurate, precise and sensitive capillary column purge- and -trap method capable of quantifying CFC-12, CFC-11, CFC-113, CH{sub 3}CCL{sub 3}, and CCL{sub 4} during a single chromatographic analysis in either water or gas phase samples.

  8. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  9. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  10. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  11. A novel needle trap device with single wall carbon nanotubes sol-gel sorbent packed for sampling and analysis of volatile organohalogen compounds in air.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Abdolrahman; Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Shahna, Farshid Ghorbani; Soltanian, Ali Reza

    2012-11-15

    This paper describes a new approach that combines needle trap devices (NTDs) with a newly synthesized silanated nano material as sorbent for sampling and analysis of HVOCs in air. The sol-gel technique was used for preparation of the single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/silica composite as sorbent, packed inside a 21-gauge NTD. Application of this method as an exhaustive sampler device was investigated under different laboratory conditions in this study. Predetermined concentrations of each analyte were prepared in a home-made standard chamber, and the effects of experimental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, sampling air flow rate, breakthrough volume and storage time on NTD, and the sorbent performance were investigated. The proposed NTD was used in two different modes and two different injection methods, and an NTD with a side hole, a narrow neck glass liner and syringe pump assisted injection of carrier gas were applied. The NTD packed with SWCNTs/silica composite was compared to the NTD packed with PDMS and also SPME with CAR/PDMS. For four compounds, LOD was 0.001-0.01 ng mL(-1), LOQ was 0.007-0.03 ng mL(-1), and the relative standard division for repeatability of method was 2.5-6.7%. The results show that the incorporation of NTD and SWCNTs/silica composite is a reliable and effective approach for the sampling and analysis of HVOCs in air. Coupling this system to GC-MS make it more sensitive and powerful technique. PMID:23158328

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: PAINT OVERSPRAY ARRESTOR, COLUMBUS INDUSTRIES, INC., SL-90B 8 POCKET BAG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of March 23-24, 1999, tests of Columbus Industries Inc's SL-90B 8 Pocket Bag paint overspray arrestor (POA) as part of an evaluation of POAs by EPA's Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The basic pe...

  13. Pocket-size microwave radiation hazard detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight unit is easily carried in coat pocket or attached to belt, detector sounds alarm in presence of dangerous microwave radiation levels. Unit consists of antenna, detector, level sensor, keyed oscillator, and speaker. Antenna may be single equiangular spiral or set of orthogonal slot dipoles. Signal detector is simple diode in small package.

  14. Pocket Guide to Minority Health Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Minority Health (PHS/DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This pocket-size directory lists federal, state, and private agencies; clearinghouses; and organizations that address the general and specific health needs of minority groups. The guide has seven sections. Part 1 describes the Office of Minority Health (OMH), its activities, and the OMH Resource Center. Parts 2 and 3 list Public Health Service…

  15. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOEpatents

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  16. High variability of Greenland surface temperature over the past 4000 years estimated from trapped air in an ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Takuro; Kawamura, Kenji; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Barnola, Jean-Marc; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Vinther, Bo M.; Johnsen, Sigfús J.; Box, Jason E.

    2011-11-01

    Greenland recently incurred record high temperatures and ice loss by melting, adding to concerns that anthropogenic warming is impacting the Greenland ice sheet and in turn accelerating global sea-level rise. Yet, it remains imprecisely known for Greenland how much warming is caused by increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases versus natural variability. To address this need, we reconstruct Greenland surface snow temperature variability over the past 4000 years at the GISP2 site (near the Summit of the Greenland ice sheet; hereafter referred to as Greenland temperature) with a new method that utilises argon and nitrogen isotopic ratios from occluded air bubbles. The estimated average Greenland snow temperature over the past 4000 years was -30.7°C with a standard deviation of 1.0°C and exhibited a long-term decrease of roughly 1.5°C, which is consistent with earlier studies. The current decadal average surface temperature (2001-2010) at the GISP2 site is -29.9°C. The record indicates that warmer temperatures were the norm in the earlier part of the past 4000 years, including century-long intervals nearly 1°C warmer than the present decade (2001-2010). Therefore, we conclude that the current decadal mean temperature in Greenland has not exceeded the envelope of natural variability over the past 4000 years, a period that seems to include part of the Holocene Thermal Maximum. Notwithstanding this conclusion, climate models project that if anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions continue, the Greenland temperature would exceed the natural variability of the past 4000 years sometime before the year 2100.

  17. Low-pressure gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry for the fast determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air samples.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Khaiwal; Godoi, Ana F L; Bencs, László; Van Grieken, René

    2006-05-12

    A low-pressure gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (LPGC-ITMS) method was investigated to shorten the analysis time for 18 US Environmental Protection Agency priority listed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Their elution was optimised with a short, wide-bore column coupled to a deactivated capillary at the inlet end and with a long, conventional column to compare their analytical performance. The analytical figures of merit under optimal LPGC-ITMS conditions were determined with respect to chromatographic separation, S/N ratio, limit of detection and precision. The peak width at half height of 1.5s matched the ITMS duty cycle. Up to 16 PAHs in the molecular weight (MW) range of 128-278 Da could be separated in a very short time, i.e. less than 13 min using LPGC-ITMS, whereas with conventional GC-MS, it took approximately 40 min. However, LPGC-ITMS has a limited loss of separation power compared to that of conventional GC-MS due to the occurrence of three critical pairs for high-MW PAHs. For a practical evaluation, the LPGC-ITMS approach was applied to the determination of PAHs in gas and aerosol phase samples collected in the ambient air of Hasselt, Belgium.

  18. Relationship between lung function and quantitative computed tomographic parameters of airway remodeling, air trapping, and emphysema in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Ruth A.; Barker, Bethan L.; Newby, Chris; Pakkal, Mini; Baldi, Simonetta; Kajekar, Radhika; Kay, Richard; Laurencin, Marie; Marshall, Richard P.; Sousa, Ana R.; Parmar, Harsukh; Siddiqui, Salman; Gupta, Sumit; Brightling, Chris E.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of studies comparing asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) based on thoracic quantitative computed tomographic (QCT) parameters. Objectives We sought to compare QCT parameters of airway remodeling, air trapping, and emphysema between asthmatic patients and patients with COPD and explore their relationship with airflow limitation. Methods Asthmatic patients (n = 171), patients with COPD (n = 81), and healthy subjects (n = 49) recruited from a single center underwent QCT and clinical characterization. Results Proximal airway percentage wall area (%WA) was significantly increased in asthmatic patients (62.5% [SD, 2.2]) and patients with COPD (62.7% [SD, 2.3]) compared with that in healthy control subjects (60.3% [SD, 2.2], P < .001). Air trapping measured based on mean lung density expiratory/inspiratory ratio was significantly increased in patients with COPD (mean, 0.922 [SD, 0.037]) and asthmatic patients (mean, 0.852 [SD, 0.061]) compared with that in healthy subjects (mean, 0.816 [SD, 0.066], P < .001). Emphysema assessed based on lung density measured by using Hounsfield units below which 15% of the voxels lie (Perc15) was a feature of COPD only (patients with COPD: mean, −964 [SD, 19.62] vs asthmatic patients: mean, −937 [SD, 22.7] and healthy subjects: mean, −937 [SD, 17.1], P < .001). Multiple regression analyses showed that the strongest predictor of lung function impairment in asthmatic patients was %WA, whereas in the COPD and asthma subgrouped with postbronchodilator FEV1 percent predicted value of less than 80%, it was air trapping. Factor analysis of QCT parameters in asthmatic patients and patients with COPD combined determined 3 components, with %WA, air trapping, and Perc15 values being the highest loading factors. Cluster analysis identified 3 clusters with mild, moderate, or severe lung function impairment with corresponding decreased lung density (Perc15 values) and increased air

  19. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  20. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  1. Epock: rapid analysis of protein pocket dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Benoist; Chavent, Matthieu; Cragnolini, Tristan; Dahl, Anna Caroline E.; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Baaden, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The volume of an internal protein pocket is fundamental to ligand accessibility. Few programs that compute such volumes manage dynamic data from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Limited performance often prohibits analysis of large datasets. We present Epock, an efficient command-line tool that calculates pocket volumes from MD trajectories. A plugin for the VMD program provides a graphical user interface to facilitate input creation, run Epock and analyse the results. Availability and implementation: Epock C++ source code, Python analysis scripts, VMD Tcl plugin, documentation and installation instructions are freely available at http://epock.bitbucket.org. Contact: benoist.laurent@gmail.com or baaden@smplinux.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25505095

  2. Evaluation of the turbine pocket spirometer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, K A; Houston, K; Smith, A P

    1987-01-01

    A compact electronic spirometer, the turbine pocket spirometer, which measures the FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in a single expiration, was compared with the Vitalograph and the Wright peak flow meter in 99 subjects (FEV1 range 0.40-5.50 litres; FVC 0.58-6.48 l; PEF 40-650 l min-1). The mean differences between the machines were small--0.05 l for FEV1, 0.05 l for FVC, and 11.6 l min-1 for PEF, with the limits of agreement at +/- 0.25 l, +/- 0.48 l, and +/- 52.2 l min-1 respectively. The wide limits of agreement for the PEF comparison were probably because of the difference in the technique of blowing: a fast, long blow was used for the pocket spirometer and a short, sharp one for the Wright peak flow meter. The FEV1 and FVC showed a proportional bias of around 4-5% in favour of the Vitalograph. The repeatability coefficient for the pocket spirometer FEV1 was 0.18 l, for FVC 0.22 l, and for PEF 31 l min-1. These compared well with the repeatability coefficients of the Vitalograph and the Wright peak flow meter, which gave values of 0.18 l, 0.28 l, and 27 l min-1 respectively. At flow rates of over 600 l min-1 the resistance of the pocket spirometer marginally exceeded the American Thoracic Society recommendations. The machine is easy to operate and portable, and less expensive than the Vitalograph and Wright peak flow meter combined. It can be recommended for general use. Images PMID:3686460

  3. Pocketing mechanics of SRM nozzle liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systems approach was adopted to study the pocketing phenomena on a solid rocket nozzle liner. The classical thermoelastic analysis was used to identify marginally strained regions on the composite liner erosion surface and at a depth coincident with the peak value of the across ply coefficient of thermal expansion. A failure criterion was introduced which included a thermal term and permitted failure assessment over the charred liner. The method was verified by satisfactory application to a reported related experiment. Liner pocketing mechanism was attributed to very localized material degradation caused during manufacturing process either by reduction of fiber strength and/or by concentration of resin volume fraction. Pocketing scenario over the degraged material was constructed with supporting formulation to predict size of fissures with respect to degraded material size and location in the liner and with burn time. Sensitivities of liner material parameters were determined to influence test programs designed to update mechanical data base of carbon cloth phenolic over the char temperature range.

  4. HIV-1 Protease Dimerization Dynamics Reveals a Transient Druggable Binding Pocket at the Interface

    PubMed Central

    Pietrucci, Fabio; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Kranjc, Agata

    2015-01-01

    The binding mechanism of HIV-1 protease monomers leading to the catalytically competent dimeric enzyme has been investigated by means of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. The emerging picture allows a deeper understanding of experimental observations and reveals that water molecules trapped at the interface have an important role in slowing down the kinetics of the association process. Unexpectedly, a cryptic binding pocket is identified at the interface of the complex, corresponding to a partially bound dimer that lacks enzymatic function. The pocket has a transient nature with a lifetime longer than 1 μs, and it displays very favorable druggability features. Docking as well as MM-GBSA free-energy calculations further support the possibility to target the new binding site by means of inhibitors able to prevent the complete dimerization by capturing the inactive conformation. This discovery could open the way to the rational design of a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26692118

  5. HIV-1 Protease Dimerization Dynamics Reveals a Transient Druggable Binding Pocket at the Interface.

    PubMed

    Pietrucci, Fabio; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Kranjc, Agata

    2015-01-01

    The binding mechanism of HIV-1 protease monomers leading to the catalytically competent dimeric enzyme has been investigated by means of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. The emerging picture allows a deeper understanding of experimental observations and reveals that water molecules trapped at the interface have an important role in slowing down the kinetics of the association process. Unexpectedly, a cryptic binding pocket is identified at the interface of the complex, corresponding to a partially bound dimer that lacks enzymatic function. The pocket has a transient nature with a lifetime longer than 1 μs, and it displays very favorable druggability features. Docking as well as MM-GBSA free-energy calculations further support the possibility to target the new binding site by means of inhibitors able to prevent the complete dimerization by capturing the inactive conformation. This discovery could open the way to the rational design of a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26692118

  6. Graphene packed needle trap device as a novel field sampler for determination of perchloroethylene in the air of dry cleaning establishments.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Abdolrahman; Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Emam, Maryam Rafiei; Shahna, Farshid Ghorbani; Soltanian, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the application of a needle trap microextraction device packed with graphene nanoplatelets for the sampling and analysis of perchloroethylene in dry cleaning. The study was carried out in two phases. First the parameters for the sampling and analysis of perchloroethylene by NTD were evaluated and optimized in the laboratory. Then the sampler was used to determine the levels of perchloroethylene in a dry-cleaning shop. In the laboratory phase of the study the performance of the NTD packed with the proposed sorbent was examined in a variety of sampling conditions to evaluate the technique. The technique was also compared with NTDs packed with PDMS as well as SPME with Carboxen/PDMS-coated fibers. Both the NTDs and SPME performed better at lower sampling temperatures and relative humidity levels. The post-sampling storage times for a 95% recovery of the analyte were 5, 5 and 3 days for NTD-graphene, NTD-PDMS and SPME-CAR/PDMS respectively. The optimum desorption time was 3 min for NTDs packed with either graphene or PDMS and 1 min for SPME-CAR/PDMS. The limits of detection for the GC/MS detection system were 0.023 and 0.25 ng mL(-1) for NTDs packed with graphene and PDMS and 0.014 ng mL(-1) for SPME coated with CAR/PDMS. In the second stage of the study the evaluated technique was applied to the sampling and analysis of perchloroethylene in dry cleaning. In this environment the performance of the NTD-graphene as a field sampler for PCE was similar to that of the SPME-CA/PDMS, and better than the NIOSH 1003 method which had greater measurement variations. The results show that a NTD packed with carbonic graphene nanoplatelets and used as an active exhaustive sampling technique is effective for determination of VOC and HVOC occupational/environmental pollutants in air.

  7. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  8. [A new pocket-type flicker apparatus].

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, T; Makizuka, T; Nakai, K; Saito, K

    1989-09-01

    A small, light and inexpensive pocket flicker (P.F.) apparatus for measuring fatigue was designed, fabricated and tested. The apparatus, being composed of a light emitting diode and a variable resistor with a scale, is so compact that it can be carried in a shirt pocket. Thus, critical fusion frequency (CFF) values can be easily determined at a working place and the load involved is small when compared to other physical fatigue measurements and earlier CFF apparatuses. Moreover, the apparatus is so inexpensive that it can be widely used. To compare the performance of the P.F. apparatus with earlier apparatuses, the following experiments were performed. CFF values were measured at the same time with the pocket type apparatus, blinking type apparatus and sector type apparatus and the results were compared. The subjects were 13 males and 5 females with their age ranging from 21 to 52 years. The total number of measurements was 132. The CFF values measured with these three apparatuses showed a significant correlation. The correlation coefficient between the CFF values measured with the sector type apparatus and blinking type apparatus was high, but the slope of the regression line was not one. Hence, in comparing the values measured with another apparatus, we should be aware of the differences between these data. The correlation coefficients between the CFF values measured with P.F. apparatus and with sector type apparatus or blinking type apparatus were not higher than those between the CFF values measured with sector type apparatus and blinking type apparatus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2585810

  9. Pocket radiation dosimeter: dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, F.W.

    1982-03-17

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  10. Pocket radiation dosimeter--dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Frank W.

    1984-01-01

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  11. Antihydrogen Trapped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowe[1], Paul

    2011-05-01

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time. Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome. The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained. These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating. The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures,, where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried. The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time.

  12. Modulated Degradation of Transient Electronic Devices through Multilayer Silk Fibroin Pockets.

    PubMed

    Brenckle, Mark A; Cheng, Huanyu; Hwang, Sukwon; Tao, Hu; Paquette, Mark; Kaplan, David L; Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2015-09-16

    The recent introduction of transient, bioresorbable electronics into the field of electronic device design offers promise for the areas of medical implants and environmental monitors, where programmed loss of function and environmental resorption are advantageous characteristics. Materials challenges remain, however, in protecting the labile device components from degradation at faster than desirable rates. Here we introduce an indirect passivation strategy for transient electronic devices that consists of encapsulation in multiple air pockets fabricated from silk fibroin. This approach is investigated through the properties of silk as a diffusional barrier to water penetration, coupled with the degradation of magnesium-based devices in humid air. Finally, silk pockets are demonstrated to be useful for controlled modulation of device lifetime. This approach may provide additional future opportunities for silk utility due to the low immunogenicity of the material and its ability to stabilize labile biotherapeutic dopants.

  13. Online volatile organic compound measurements using a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry instrument during New England Air Quality Study--Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2004: performance, intercomparison, and compound identification.

    PubMed

    Warneke, Carsten; Kato, Shuji; De Gouw, Joost A; Goldan, Paul D; Kuster, William C; Shao, Min; Lovejoy, Edward R; Fall, Ray; Fehsenfeld, Fred C

    2005-07-15

    We have used a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS) instrument for online trace gas analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the 2004 New England Air Quality Study-Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation study. The PIT-MS instrument uses proton-transfer reactions with H3O+ ions to ionize VOCs, similarto a PTR-MS (proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry) instrument but uses an ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the product ions. The advantages of an ion trap are the improved identification of VOCs and a near 100% duty cycle. During the experiment, the PIT-MS instrument had a detection limit between 0.05 and 0.3 pbbv (S/N = 3 (signal-to-noise ratio)) for 2-min integration time for most tested VOCs. PIT-MS was used for ambient air measurements onboard a research ship and agreed well with a gas chromatography mass spectrometer). The comparison included oxygenated VOCs, aromatic compounds, and others such as isoprene, monoterpenes, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfide. Automated collision-induced dissociation measurements were used to determine the contributions of acetone and propanal to the measured signal at 59 amu; both species are detected at this mass and are thus indistinguishable in conventional PTR-MS.

  14. Form and deformity: the trouble with Victorian pockets.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Christopher Todd

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores the Victorian debate about the place of pockets in men's and women's clothing. By studying the representation of men as naturally pocketed creatures and the general denial of useful pockets to middle-class women, the essay demonstrates the tenacious cultural logic by which men's and women's pockets were imagined to correspond to sexual differences and to index access, or lack thereof, to public mobility and financial agency. Interconnected readings of visual art, essays, and novels show how the common sense about gendered pockets was utilized and promulgated in Victorian narratives. The question of who gets pockets is thus positioned as part of the history of gendered bodies in public space.

  15. fpocket: online tools for protein ensemble pocket detection and tracking.

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, Peter; Le Guilloux, Vincent; Maupetit, Julien; Tufféry, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    Computational small-molecule binding site detection has several important applications in the biomedical field. Notable interests are the identification of cavities for structure-based drug discovery or functional annotation of structures. fpocket is a small-molecule pocket detection program, relying on the geometric alpha-sphere theory. The fpocket web server allows: (i) candidate pocket detection--fpocket; (ii) pocket tracking during molecular dynamics, in order to provide insights into pocket dynamics--mdpocket; and (iii) a transposition of mdpocket to the combined analysis of homologous structures--hpocket. These complementary online tools allow to tackle various questions related to the identification and annotation of functional and allosteric sites, transient pockets and pocket preservation within evolution of structural families. The server and documentation are freely available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/fpocket.

  16. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  17. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-11-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  18. Modifications of traps to reduce bycatch of freshwater turtles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bury, R. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Mortality of freshwater turtles varies among types and deployments of traps. There are few or no losses in hoop or fyke traps set where turtles may reach air, including placement in shallows, addition of floats on traps, and tying traps securely to a stake or to shore. Turtle mortality occurs when traps are set deep, traps are checked at intervals >1 day, and when turtles are captured as bycatch. Devices are available that exclude turtles from traps set for crab or game fish harvest. Slotted gates in front of the trap mouth reduce turtle entry, but small individuals still may be trapped. Incidental take of turtles is preventable by integrating several designs into aquatic traps, such as adding floats to the top of traps so turtles may reach air or an extension tube (chimney, ramp) that creates an escape route.

  19. The Potential for Pocket Parks to Increase Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.; Marsh, Terry; Williamson, Stephanie; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Golinelli, Daniella; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the use of new pocket parks in low-income neighborhoods. Setting Los Angeles Subjects Parks users and residents living within ½ mile of 3 pocket parks and 15 neighborhood parks Intervention The creation of pocket parks Design Quasi-experimental post-only comparison Measures We used the System of Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to measure park use and park-based physical activity and surveyed park users and residents about their park use. Analysis We surveyed 392 and 432 household members within one-half mile of the 3 pocket parks before and after park construction, respectively, as well as 71 pocket park users and compared them to 992 neighborhood park users and 342 residents living within ½ mile of other neighborhood parks. We compared pocket park use to playground area use in the larger neighborhood parks. We used descriptive statistics and Generalized Estimating Equations for the analysis. Results Overall, pocket park use compared favorably in promoting moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with that of existing playground space in nearby parks and they were cost-effective at $0.73/MET hour gained. Pocket park visitors walked an average of 0.25 miles to get there. Conclusions Pocket parks, when perceived as attractive and safe destinations, may increase physical activity by encouraging families with children to walk there. Additional strategies and programs may be needed to encourage more residents to use the parks. PMID:24380461

  20. Detection of multiscale pockets on protein surfaces using mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Detection of pockets on protein surfaces is an important step toward finding the binding sites of small molecules. In a previous study, we defined a pocket as a space into which a small spherical probe can enter, but a large probe cannot. The radius of the large probes corresponds to the shallowness of pockets. We showed that each type of binding molecule has a characteristic shallowness distribution. In this study, we introduced fundamental changes to our previous algorithm by using a 3D grid representation of proteins and probes, and the theory of mathematical morphology. We invented an efficient algorithm for calculating deep and shallow pockets (multiscale pockets) simultaneously, using several different sizes of spherical probes (multiscale probes). We implemented our algorithm as a new program, ghecom (grid-based HECOMi finder). The statistics of calculated pockets for the structural dataset showed that our program had a higher performance of detecting binding pockets, than four other popular pocket-finding programs proposed previously. The ghecom also calculates the shallowness of binding ligands, R(inaccess) (minimum radius of inaccessible spherical probes) that can be obtained from the multiscale molecular volume. We showed that each part of the binding molecule had a bias toward a specific range of shallowness. These findings will be useful for predicting the types of molecules that will be most likely to bind putative binding pockets, as well as the configurations of binding molecules. The program ghecom is available through the Web server (http://biunit.naist.jp/ghecom).

  1. Dewetting-Controlled Binding of Ligands to Hydrophobic Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Setny, P.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, L.-T.; Li, B.; McCammon, J. A.; Dzubiella, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a combined atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and implicit solvent analysis of a generic hydrophobic pocket-ligand (host-guest) system. The approaching ligand induces complex wetting-dewetting transitions in the weakly solvated pocket. The transitions lead to bimodal solvent fluctuations which govern magnitude and range of the pocket-ligand attraction. A recently developed implicit water model, based on the minimization of a geometric functional, captures the sensitive aqueous interface response to the concave-convex pocket-ligand configuration semiquantitatively. PMID:19905832

  2. Trapped Antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2012-03-01

    Atoms made of a particle and an antiparticle are unstable, usually surviving less than a microsecond. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, is made entirely of antiparticles and is believed to be stable. It is this longevity that holds the promise of precision studies of matter-antimatter symmetry. Low energy (Kelvin scale) antihydrogen has been produced at CERN since 2002. I will describe the experiment which has recently succeeded in trapping antihydrogen in a cryogenic Penning trap for times up to approximately 15 minutes.

  3. 30 CFR 57.19103 - Dumping facilities and loading pockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dumping facilities and loading pockets. 57.19103 Section 57.19103 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... MINES Personnel Hoisting Shafts § 57.19103 Dumping facilities and loading pockets. Dumping...

  4. 30 CFR 56.19103 - Dumping facilities and loading pockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dumping facilities and loading pockets. 56.19103 Section 56.19103 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Personnel Hoisting Shafts § 56.19103 Dumping facilities and loading pockets. Dumping facilities and...

  5. Depth of penetration in periodontal pockets with oral irrigation.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Ford, C; Boyd, R L

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the Water Pik oral irrigator as a vehicle for delivering an aqueous solution into periodontal pockets. Plaque-disclosing dye diluted with sterile saline solution was applied with the irrigator toward the gingival margins of teeth at 90 degrees and at 45 degrees prior to their extraction. The mean % penetration measured between a reference notch at the gingival crest and the periodontal ligament at the bottom of the pocket showed no statistical difference between the two angles of application. Penetration ranged from 44% to 71%, the lowest being into pockets 4-7 mm; higher mean penetration was noted in both subgroups 0-3 and greater than 7 mm. No statistical difference was found between proximal and facial or lingual surfaces, maxilla and mandible, existence of tooth contact, and proximal tissue contour or consistency. The mean % penetration was independent of pocket depth (chi 2 analysis). Correlation between pocket depth and mean penetration was low for all but one subgroup (90 degrees application and pockets greater than 7 mm). The results suggest that the oral irrigator will deliver an aqueous solution into periodontal pockets and will penetrate on average to approximately half the depth of the pockets. PMID:3003166

  6. Delta N-15 of N[sub 2] in air trapped in polar ice - a tracer of gas transport in the firn and a possible constraint on ice age-gas age differences

    SciTech Connect

    Sowers, T.; Bender, M.; Raynaud, D.; Korotkevich, IU.S. CNRS, Lab. de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l'Environnement, St.-Martin-d'Heres Arctic and Antarctic Research Inst., St. Petersburg )

    1992-10-01

    Factors which influence the distribution of air in present-day firn are examined on the basis of the analysis of delta N-15 of trapped N[sub 2] in 12 ice-core samples taken from Greenland and Antarctica, and this information is used to determine how air may have been mixed in glacial firn. The upper and the lower limits of ice-age/gas-age differences (Delta age) are then calculated for the ice core at the Vostok, the Dome C, and the Byrd locations, and the results are compared with previous estimates. Finally, the surface-temperature and CO[sub 2] records from Byrd and Vostok over the last 30,000 years are compared to provide independent means of establishing the best estimates of the Delta age difference for Vostok, and of the nature of gas transport in firn during the last glacial termination. 39 refs.

  7. Results of ear examination. [in Apollo 17 BIOCORE pocket mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Leon, H. A.; Barrows, W. F.; Suri, K.; Kraft, L. M.; Turnbill, C. E.; Webster, D. B.; Ashley, W. W.; Look, B. C.; Simmonds, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    In the five pocket mice flown on Apollo XVII, no evidence was found that the inner ear had been damaged, though poor fixation precluded detailed study. On the other hand, the middle ear cavity was involved in all the mice, hemorrhage having occurred in response to excursions in pressure within the canister that housed the mice during their flight. The same occurred in flight control mice which had been subjected to pressure excursions of much the same magnitude. A greater degree of exudation into air cells and greater leukotaxis were noted in the flight animals than in the control animals. There was no increase in leukocyte population along the paths of the 23 cosmic-ray particles registered in the subscalp dosimeters that traversed the middle ear cavities of the flight mice. The increased exudation and the greater response by leukocytes in the flight mice may have been causally related to the lesions found in their olfactory mucosa but there were no data in support of this possibility.

  8. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes. PMID:27004988

  9. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes.

  10. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes. PMID:27004988

  11. Trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; el Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with high-energy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 10(14) for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. However, so far experiments have produced antihydrogen that is not confined, precluding detailed study of its structure. Here we demonstrate trapping of antihydrogen atoms. From the interaction of about 10(7) antiprotons and 7 × 10(8) positrons, we observed 38 annihilation events consistent with the controlled release of trapped antihydrogen from our magnetic trap; the measured background is 1.4 ± 1.4 events. This result opens the door to precision measurements on anti-atoms, which can soon be subjected to the same techniques as developed for hydrogen. PMID:21085118

  12. Trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; el Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with high-energy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 10(14) for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. However, so far experiments have produced antihydrogen that is not confined, precluding detailed study of its structure. Here we demonstrate trapping of antihydrogen atoms. From the interaction of about 10(7) antiprotons and 7 × 10(8) positrons, we observed 38 annihilation events consistent with the controlled release of trapped antihydrogen from our magnetic trap; the measured background is 1.4 ± 1.4 events. This result opens the door to precision measurements on anti-atoms, which can soon be subjected to the same techniques as developed for hydrogen.

  13. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  14. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  15. Architectural repertoire of ligand-binding pockets on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Martin; Kriegl, Jan M; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of ligand binding sites in proteins provides valuable information for computer-assisted drug design. We present a method for the automated extraction and classification of ligand binding site topologies, in which protein surface cavities are represented as branched frameworks. The procedure employs a growing neural gas approach for pocket topology assignment and pocket framework generation. We assessed the structural diversity of 623 known ligand binding site topologies based on framework cluster analysis. At a resolution of 5 A only 23 structurally distinct topology groups were formed; this suggests an overall limited structural diversity of ligand-accommodating protein cavities. Higher resolution allowed for identification of protein-family specific pocket features. Pocket frameworks highlight potentially preferred modes of ligand-receptor interactions and will help facilitate the identification of druggable subpockets suitable for ligand affinity and selectivity optimization. PMID:20069621

  16. 15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, LATCH CRADLE, SPLIT COLLAR, ETC. - Niantic River Swing Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  17. Behind the Scenes: Astronauts Pockets Deep in Mystery

    NASA Video Gallery

    Host Mike Massimino returns to the pre-launch suit up room at the Kennedy Space Center to reexamine the question: what's inside all those pockets of the astronauts' big orange suits? Find out on "N...

  18. Monitoring Air Pollution In and Around the Premises of Industrial Parks Using Two Types of Electronic Nose and Gas Chromatography-Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jen Yu; Ling, Yong Chien, Sr.

    2004-03-31

    Two types of electronic nose and GC-MS were used to monitor air pollution in the premises of seven industrial parks. Real-time analysis of air at the sites was performed using portable electronic noses. Air samples were analyzed from the up and down stream direction along the wind flow to investigate the effect or distribution of the pollutants on the surrounding environment. The advantage of multisensors in spatially resolved sensing for direct multicomponent analysis was explored to minimize tedious sample preparation procedure. Electronic nose could give characteristic odor fingerprints, which were correlated with the pollutants analyzed using GC-MS providing detailed diagnostic information such as the presence of hydrocarbons, halocarbons, phenols, nitrogenous benzenes, sulfur compounds, lipid-derived compounds, polysiloxanes, etc. Subsequent principal component analysis helped in identifying the source of pollutants. The applicability of the electronic nose was demonstrated confirming it to be a simple and rapid screening method for identifying the pollutant source.

  19. Gates and binding pockets for nitric oxide with cytochrome c', according to molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Random-acceleration molecular-dynamics (RAMD) simulations with models of homodimeric 6-ligated distal-NO and 5-ligated proximal-NO cytochrome c' complexes, in TIP3 H2 O, showed two distinct, non-intercommunicating worlds. In the framework of a long cavity formed by four protein helices with heme at one extremity, NO was observed to follow different pathways with the two complexes to reach the solvent. With the 6-ligated complex, NO was observed to progress by exploiting protein internal channels created by thermal fluctuations, and be temporarily trapped into binding pockets before reaching the preferred gate at the heme end of the cavity. In contrast, with the 5-ligated complex, NO was observed to surface the solvent-exposed helix 7, up to a gate at the other extremity of the protein, only occasionally finding an earlier, direct way out toward the solvent. That only bulk NO gets involved in forming the 5-ligated proximal-NO complex is in agreement with previous experimental observations, while the occurrence of binding pockets suggests that also reservoir NO might play a role with the distal-NO complex.

  20. Sequestration of carbon dioxide by the hydrophobic pocket of the carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Domsic, John F; McKenna, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The interaction between carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and the alpha-class carbonic anhydrase, human CA 2 (HCA2) exists for only a short period due to the rapid catalytic turnover by this enzyme. The fleeting nature of this interaction has led to difficulties in its direct analysis, with previous studies placing the CO(2) in the hydrophobic pocket of HCA2's active site. A more precise location was determined via the crystal structure of CO(2) trapped in both wild-type (holo) and zinc-free (apo) HCA2. This provided a detailed description of the means by which CO(2) is held and orientated for optimal catalysis. This information can be extended to the beta and gamma class enzymes to help elucidate the binding mode of CO(2) in these enzymes. PMID:19679198

  1. Development of a method based on sorbent trapping followed by solid-phase microextraction for the determination of synthetic musks in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Jorge; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria; Lamas, J Pablo; Cela, Rafael

    2009-04-01

    Synthetic musks are extensively used as fragrance components in a wide range of consumer and personal care products such as detergents, shampoos, perfumes and other cosmetic products. Amongst them, galaxolide and tonalide have become ubiquitous pollutants due to their continuous releasing into the environment. Because of their nature as artificial fragrances, inhalation should be considered as an important exposure pathway, especially in indoor environments. However, up to now very few studies have been carried out to determine these emergent pollutants indoors. In this work, a simple and highly sensitive methodology for the analysis of synthetic musk fragrances in indoor air samples is presented. The proposed methodology combines solid-phase extraction (SPE) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first method based on SPME for the analysis of musks in air. By active sampling, musks present in air were adsorbed onto 25mg Tenax and then transferred to a SPME fiber in the headspace mode (HS). An experimental design strategy was used to optimize main factors potentially affecting the microextraction process such as fiber coating, temperature and the addition of a microvolume of organic solvent to the solid sorbent prior to SPME. Breakthrough of the SPE sorbent was studied from 1 to 10m(3) without significant losses. Recovery studies were performed at two concentration levels (2 and 20ngm(-3)), obtaining quantitative recoveries (>/=85%) by external calibration. A comprehensive study was performed in order to estimate the limits of detection taking into account the contamination risks and laboratory blanks. Values at the sub ngm(-3) level were achieved for all the target compounds sampling 5m(3) air. External calibration, not requiring the complete sampling process, demonstrated to be suitable for the quantification of all musk compounds. Finally, several indoor

  2. Water properties inside nanoscopic hydrophobic pocket studied by computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setny, Piotr; Geller, Maciej

    2006-10-01

    The structure and dynamics of water in the vicinity of the hemispherical hydrophobic pocket of 8Å radius were examined via molecular dynamics simulations in NVT ensemble. Density, hydrogen bonding properties, and residence times of water molecules were projected on two-dimensional planes providing a spatial description of water behavior. We found that the average water density is significantly depleted relative to bulk value. A detailed analysis of pocket occupancy revealed fluctuations between states of completely empty pocket and a pocket filled with a bulklike fluid, which seem to result from collective behavior of water molecules. Free energy differences accompanying these fluctuations are rather small, suggesting that the given pocket radius is close to the critical one for transition between gas and liquid phases in the considered system. We show that the situation is different in the case of a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. These results indicate that changing the surface curvature from flat to concave may lead to qualitative difference in water behavior in its vicinity. We think that our studies may also put some light on binding site desolvation process which is necessary to understand to make correct predictions of binding energies.

  3. A needle trap device packed with a sol-gel derived, multi-walled carbon nanotubes/silica composite for sampling and analysis of volatile organohalogen compounds in air.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Abdolrahman; Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Shahna, Farshid Ghorbani; Soltanian, Ali Reza

    2013-06-27

    A needle trap device (NTD) packed with silica composite of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared based on sol-gel technique was utilized for sampling and analysis of volatile organohalogen compounds (HVOCs) in air. The performance of the NTD packed with MWCNTs/silica composite as sorbent was examined in a variety of sampling conditions and was compared with NTDs packed with PDMS as well as SPME with Carboxen/PDMS-coated fibers. The limit of detection of NTDs for the GC/MS detection system was 0.01-0.05 ng mL(-1) and the limit of quantitation was 0.04-0.18 ng mL(-1). The RSD were 1.1-7.8% for intra-NTD comparison intended for repeatability of technique. The NTD-MWCNTs/silica composite showed better analytical performances compared to the NTD-PDMS composite and had the same analytical performances when compared to the SPME-Carboxen/PDMS fibers. The results show that NTD-MWCNTs-GC/MS is a powerful technique for active sampling of occupational/environmental pollutants in air.

  4. Ethics pocket cards: an educational tool for busy clinicians.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Rebecca L; Levi, Benjamin H; Blackhall, George F; Green, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The adage "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" is widely used in healthcare settings and can be applied to the work of institutional clinical ethics committees. The model of clinical ethics consultation, however, is inherently reactive: a crisis or question emerges, and ethics experts are called to help. In an effort to employ a proactive component to the model of clinical ethics consultation (as well as to standardize our educational interventions), we developed ethics pocket cards. The purpose of this article is to: (1) describe the rationale for using ethics pocket cards, (2) provide examples of our cards, and (3) begin a dialogue about the potential uses of ethics pocket cards. In doing so, we hope to explore how such portable, economical devices can advance the goals of ethics consultation as well as the educational aims of ethics committees.

  5. Optimization of pocket milling operation of rectangular shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Andijani, A.

    1994-12-31

    An optimization model to setup machine parameters (feed, speed, width, and depth of cut) for pocket milling on a vertical mill is developed. We propose an approach to determine the optimal set of operating conditions that minimize the total milling cost. The part to be milled has a square or a rectangular shape. The pocket milling mathematical model in this paper is an explicit, multi-variable, nonlinear objective function, and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. We provide a study of some optimization algorithms that are suitable for the optimization of the pocket milling operation. We describe the general and the relative features for each algorithm. However, the final choice of the best algorithm depends upon individual preference, experience, and the case being investigated. An illustrative example is presented.

  6. Pan trapping soybean aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) using attractants.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Nicholas S; Zhu, Junwei; Coats, Joel R

    2012-06-01

    Since its introduction into the United States in the past 10 yr, soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), has been a damaging pest to soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill. During 2008 and 2009, fields in central and north central Iowa experienced pockets of high soybean aphid populations. Electroantennograms have shown that soybean aphid alatae are capable of detecting host plant volatiles and sex pheromones. Here, we evaluated baited pan traps as a potential soybean aphid attractant. Yellow pan traps were placed in soybean fields after planting along with lures that contained plant volatiles and sex pheromones in 2008 or sex pheromones only in 2009. Pan trap contents were collected weekly, and plant counts also were conducted. Aphids were identified, and soybean aphids were counted to determine whether one chemical lure was more attractive to spring migrants than other lures. In both years, soybean aphids collected in pan traps with lures were not significantly different from the other products tested. PMID:22812127

  7. A pocket model for aluminum agglomeration in composite propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the purpose of estimating the fraction of aluminum powder that will form agglomerates at the surface of deflagrating composite propellants. The basic idea is that the fraction agglomerated depends upon the amount of aluminum that melts within effective binder pocket volumes framed by oxidizer particles. The effective pocket depends upon the ability of ammonium perchlorate modals to encapsulate the aluminum and provide a local temperature sufficient to ignite the aluminum. Model results are discussed in the light of data showing effects of propellant formulation variables and pressure.

  8. NOTE: Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Raman, Natarajan V.; Enke, Charles A.

    2005-05-01

    Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag.

  9. A pocket aide-memoire on drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Stockley, I H

    1975-04-01

    A pocket size "slide-rule" type device designed to be used by physicians, pharmacists and nurses as a memory aid on potential drug-drug interactions is described. Color-coded symbols on the device indicate both the type and clinical significance of the potential interactions involving 56 drugs or groups of drugs.

  10. Portable Anthrax Testing with Lab-in-a-Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, Melissa; Koskelo, Markku; Edwards, Thayne; Kadner, Steve; Beckes-Talcot, Judy; Harper, Jason; Shawwa, Luay

    2014-10-24

    BaDx (Bacillus anthracis Diagnostics) is a lab-in-a-pocket device to sample, sense, and diagnose bacteria that cause anthrax. It accomplishes these tasks in environments with no power, refrigerated storage, or laboratory equipment. BaDx was designed to be used with minimal or no training, and to keep handlers safe.

  11. Advanced Geometric Optics on a Programmable Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Allen

    1979-01-01

    Presents a ray-tracing procedure based on some ideas of Herzberger and the matrix approach to geometrical optics. This method, which can be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator, applies to any conic surface, including paraboloids, spheres, and planes. (Author/GA)

  12. 6. Julia Steele House, interior view of pocket doors at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Julia Steele House, interior view of pocket doors at front left (south) parlor, looking north. Center hall is behind doors and oak mantle is to left of photograph. - Julia Steele House, 5875 Paris Road (US Highway 27/68); 1 1/5 miles north of Bourbon County line, Paris, Bourbon County, KY

  13. Simulation of Quantum-Mechanical Measurements with Programmable Pocket Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, G.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a method for the illustration of the statistical nature of measurements in quantum physics by means of simulation with pocket calculators. The application to examples like the double-slit experiment, Mott scattering, and the demonstration of the uncertainty relation is discussed. (Author/HM)

  14. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics Pocket Guide, Issued 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This handy, pocket-sized booklet summarises information from the National Centre for Vocational Education Research's (NCVER's) current statistical publications. It presents statistics about: Australia's public vocational education and training (VET) system (which includes activity undertaken at technical and further education [TAFE] institutes,…

  15. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics Pocket Guide, Issued 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This pocket guide presents statistics about: (1) the public vocational education and training (VET) system, which includes activity undertaken at technical and further education (TAFE) institutes, other government providers, community education providers and publicly funded delivery by private providers; (2) apprentices and trainees, who are…

  16. Evaluation of Cation Hydrolysis Schemes with a Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, Brian W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is the use of two models of pocket calculators. The Hewlett-Packard HP67 and the Texas Instruments TI59, to solve problems arising in connection with ionic equilibria in solution. A three-parameter regression program is described and listed as a specific example, the hydrolysis of hexavalent uranium, is provided. (BT)

  17. The pocket epithelium: a light- and electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Müller-Glauser, W; Schroeder, H E

    1982-03-01

    The POCKET epithelium is important for the pathogenesis of gingivitis and periodontitis. However, this epithelial variant has never been adequately described. The bioptic material with supraalveolar pockets originated from previous studies in which cotton floss ligatures were placed around the crowns of premolars in eight dogs. After periods of 4 to 21 days or up to 5 months, block biopsies comprising dental and gingival tissues were taken on the buccal side. The tissues were processed for light- and electron microscopic examination. The observations revealed that the pocket epithelium (1) does not attach to the tooth, (2) forms irregular ridges and, over connective tissue papillae, thin coverings which occasionally ulcerate, (3) consists of cells only some of which show a tendency to differentiate, (4) presents a basal lamina complex with discontinuities and multiplications, and (5) is infiltrated mainly by lymphocytes, T- and B-blasts and plasma cells, and is transmigrated by neutrophilic granulocytes. It is concluded that the mosaic-like structure of the pocket epithelium reflects the heterogeneity of the adjacent plaque, that this structure together with the absence of membrane coating granules is the basis for an extremely high permeability, and that epithelial ridges may conduct and collect foreign substances which thereby become more easily recognizable for leukocytes.

  18. Elimination of Elyzol 25% Dentalgel matrix from periodontal pockets.

    PubMed

    Stoltze, K

    1995-03-01

    Elyzo 25% Dentalgel (EDG) which is developed for use in the treatment of periodontitis is a suspension of metronidazole benzoate (40%) in a mixture of glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) and triglyceride (sesame oil). Metronidazole can be detected in the periodontal pockets 24-36 h after application. The aim of the present study was to estimate the period of time that the gel matrix persists on periodontal pockets after 1 application of EDG. 12 patients were included in the study. From each patient, 1 sample was taken before and immediately after, and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 12 and 24 h after application. Subgingival scaling followed by absorption of gingival crevicular fluid with filter paper was used for sampling. The sampling unit was 1 tooth. Each sample was assayed for the amount of GMO and oleic acid (a degradation product of GMO) by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. To allow determination of the GMO dose applied into the pockets and to estimate the recovery rate of the sampling method, 1 tooth in each patient was selected for sampling as soon as the gel had set, i.e., about 10 min after application. Only in 1 patient was a detectable amount of GMO within the pocket revealed 24 h after application. This amount was approximately 0.5% of the mean GMO dose applied around 1 tooth. GMO was found no longer than 12 h in the remaining patients.

  19. Trapping polar molecules in an ac trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-12-15

    Polar molecules in high-field seeking states cannot be trapped in static traps as Maxwell's equations do not allow a maximum of the electric field in free space. It is possible to generate an electric field that has a saddle point by superposing an inhomogeneous electric field to an homogeneous electric field. In such a field, molecules are focused along one direction, while being defocused along the other. By reversing the direction of the inhomogeneous electric field the focusing and defocusing directions are reversed. When the fields are being switched back and forth at the appropriate rate, this leads to a net focusing force in all directions. We describe possible electrode geometries for creating the desired fields and discuss their merits. Trapping of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} ammonia molecules in a cylindrically symmetric ac trap is demonstrated. We present measurements of the spatial distribution of the trapped cloud as a function of the settings of the trap and compare these to both a simple model assuming a linear force and to full three-dimensional simulations of the experiment. With the optimal settings, molecules within a phase-space volume of 270 mm{sup 3} (m/s){sup 3} remain trapped. This corresponds to a trap depth of about 5 mK and a trap volume of about 20 mm{sup 3}.

  20. AmeriFlux US-Cop Corral Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Cop Corral Pocket. Site Description - The Corral Pocket site is located in a semi-arid grassland in southeastern Utah, just east of Canyonlands National park. For the greater part of the year, 38-80% of the ground is essentially bare. Vegetation is primarily native perennial C3/C4 grasses with annual ground converge ranging from 8-35%. Leaving the remaining 0-15% coverage to interspersed annual grasses, the remaining 0-15% coverage is occupied by annual grasses. 6-8 weeks during the late fall or winter, Livestock grazing is responsible for the majority of aboveground vegetation loss and subsequent high variability of ground coverage.

  1. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  2. Financial Survival between Jobs. Pocket Job Series No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Amy

    This book is the sixth in a series of six pocket-sized books written for career changers and laid-off workers. Each book is written at a 7th- to 10th-grade reading level and contains examples, hands-on self-discovery exercises, and step-by-step advice for a successful job search. This book provides information on financial survival between…

  3. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  4. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  5. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  6. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  7. Paired electron pockets in the hole-doped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitski, Victor; Sachdev, Subir

    2009-04-01

    We propose a theory for the underdoped hole-doped cuprates, focusing on the “nodal-antinodal dichotomy” observed in recent experiments. Our theory begins with an ordered antiferromagnetic Fermi liquid with electron and hole pockets. We argue that it is useful to consider a quantum transition at which the loss of antiferromagnetic order leads to a hypothetical metallic “algebraic charge liquid” (ACL) with pockets of charge -e and +e fermions, and an emergent U(1) gauge field; the instabilities of the ACL lead to the low-temperature phases of the underdoped cuprates. The pairing instability leads to a superconductor with the strongest pairing within the -e Fermi pockets, a d -wave pairing signature for electrons, and very weak nodal-point pairing of the +e fermions near the Brillouin-zone diagonals. The influence of an applied magnetic field is discussed using a proposed phase diagram as a function of field strength and doping. We describe the influence of gauge field and pairing fluctuations on the quantum Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the normal states induced by the field. For the finite-temperature pseudogap region, our theory has some similarities to the phenomenological two-fluid model of -2e bosons and +e fermions proposed by Geshkenbein [Phys. Rev. B 55, 3173 (1997)], which describes anomalous aspects of transverse transport in a magnetic field.

  8. Biphenyl/diphenyl ether renin inhibitors: filling the S1 pocket of renin via the S3 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Simpson, Robert D; Zhao, Wei; Tice, Colin M; Xu, Zhenrong; Cacatian, Salvacion; Jia, Lanqi; Flaherty, Patrick T; Guo, Joan; Ishchenko, Alexey; Wu, Zhongren; McKeever, Brian M; Scott, Boyd B; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Berbaum, Jennifer; Panemangalore, Reshma; Bentley, Ross; Doe, Christopher P; Harrison, Richard K; McGeehan, Gerard M; Singh, Suresh B; Dillard, Lawrence W; Baldwin, John J; Claremon, David A

    2011-08-15

    Structure-based design led to the discovery of a novel class of renin inhibitors in which an unprecedented phenyl ring filling the S1 site is attached to the phenyl ring filling the S3 pocket. Optimization for several parameters including potency in the presence of human plasma, selectivity against CYP3A4 inhibition and improved rat oral bioavailability led to the identification of 8d which demonstrated antihypertensive efficacy in a transgenic rat model of human hypertension.

  9. Coherent population trapping magnetometer by differential detecting magneto-optic rotation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Gu, Si-Hong

    2016-09-01

    A pocket coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic magnetometer scheme that uses a vertical cavity surface emitting laser as a light source is proposed and experimentally investigated. Using the differential detecting magneto-optic rotation effect, a CPT spectrum with the background canceled and a high signal-to-noise ratio is obtained. The experimental results reveal that the sensitivity of the proposed scheme can be improved by half an order, and the ability to detect weak magnetic fields is extended one-fold. Therefore, the proposed scheme is suited to realize a pocket-size CPT magnetometer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304362 and 61434005).

  10. Origin of melt pockets in mantle xenoliths from southern Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliani, Paola; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Bjerg, Ernesto

    2009-12-01

    Peridotite mantle xenoliths collected north of Gobernador Gregores, Patagonia, affected by cryptic and modal metasomatism bear melt pockets of unusually large size. Melt pockets consist of second generation olivine (ol2), clinopyroxene (cpx2) and spinel (sp2) ± relict amphibole (amph) immersed in a yellowish vesicular glass matrix. Amphibole breakdown was responsible for melt pocket generation as suggested by textural evidence and proved by consistent mass-balance calculations: amph → cpx2 + ol2 + sp2 + melt. Composition of calculated amphibole in amphibole-free melt pockets is very similar to that measured in amphibole-bearing melt pockets from the same xenolith, i.e. amphibole was consumed in the melt pocket generation process. In melt pockets devoid of relict amphibole, mass-balance calculations show remarkable differences between the calculated amphibole and the measured amphibole compositions in melt pockets from the same xenolith. The participation of minor proportions of a consumed reactant phase could be a reasonable explanation. In some samples the calculated phase proportion of glass is in excess compared to modal estimations based on backscattered electron images, probably because a portion of the generated melt was able to migrate out of the melt pockets. Compositional inhomogeneity of cpx2 and variable Ti Kd in cpx2 vs. glass in the same melt pocket reflect fast nucleation and growth and disequilibrium crystallisation, respectively. This and the difference between forsterite content in calculated equilibrium olivine and second generation olivine, suggest that mineral equilibrium was inhibited by rapid quenching of melt pockets.

  11. Comparative kinematical analyses of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) snap traps

    PubMed Central

    Kampowski, Tim; Metzger, Amélie; Speck, Olga; Speck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) can be considered as one of the most extensively investigated carnivorous plants, knowledge is still scarce about diversity of the snap-trap motion, the functionality of snap traps under varying environmental conditions, and their opening motion. By conducting simple snap-trap closure experiments in air and under water, we present striking evidence that adult Dionaea snaps similarly fast in aerial and submersed states and, hence, is potentially able to gain nutrients from fast aquatic prey during seasonal inundation. We reveal three snapping modes of adult traps, all incorporating snap buckling, and show that millimeter-sized, much slower seedling traps do not yet incorporate such elastic instabilities. Moreover, opening kinematics of young and adult Dionaea snap traps reveal that reverse snap buckling is not performed, corroborating the assumption that growth takes place on certain trap lobe regions. Our findings are discussed in an evolutionary, biomechanical, functional–morphological and biomimetic context. PMID:27335756

  12. Comparative kinematical analyses of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) snap traps.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Kampowski, Tim; Metzger, Amélie; Speck, Olga; Speck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Although the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) can be considered as one of the most extensively investigated carnivorous plants, knowledge is still scarce about diversity of the snap-trap motion, the functionality of snap traps under varying environmental conditions, and their opening motion. By conducting simple snap-trap closure experiments in air and under water, we present striking evidence that adult Dionaea snaps similarly fast in aerial and submersed states and, hence, is potentially able to gain nutrients from fast aquatic prey during seasonal inundation. We reveal three snapping modes of adult traps, all incorporating snap buckling, and show that millimeter-sized, much slower seedling traps do not yet incorporate such elastic instabilities. Moreover, opening kinematics of young and adult Dionaea snap traps reveal that reverse snap buckling is not performed, corroborating the assumption that growth takes place on certain trap lobe regions. Our findings are discussed in an evolutionary, biomechanical, functional-morphological and biomimetic context. PMID:27335756

  13. Comparative kinematical analyses of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) snap traps.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Kampowski, Tim; Metzger, Amélie; Speck, Olga; Speck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Although the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) can be considered as one of the most extensively investigated carnivorous plants, knowledge is still scarce about diversity of the snap-trap motion, the functionality of snap traps under varying environmental conditions, and their opening motion. By conducting simple snap-trap closure experiments in air and under water, we present striking evidence that adult Dionaea snaps similarly fast in aerial and submersed states and, hence, is potentially able to gain nutrients from fast aquatic prey during seasonal inundation. We reveal three snapping modes of adult traps, all incorporating snap buckling, and show that millimeter-sized, much slower seedling traps do not yet incorporate such elastic instabilities. Moreover, opening kinematics of young and adult Dionaea snap traps reveal that reverse snap buckling is not performed, corroborating the assumption that growth takes place on certain trap lobe regions. Our findings are discussed in an evolutionary, biomechanical, functional-morphological and biomimetic context.

  14. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  15. Practical Pocket PC Application w/Biometric Security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Julian

    2004-01-01

    I work in the Flight Software Engineering Branch, where we provide design and development of embedded real-time software applications for flight and supporting ground systems to support the NASA Aeronautics and Space Programs. In addition, this branch evaluates, develops and implements new technologies for embedded real-time systems, and maintains a laboratory for applications of embedded technology. The majority of microchips that are used in modern society have been programmed using embedded technology. These small chips can be found in microwaves, calculators, home security systems, cell phones and more. My assignment this summer entails working with an iPAQ HP 5500 Pocket PC. This top-of-the-line hand-held device is one of the first mobile PC's to introduce biometric security capabilities. Biometric security, in this case a fingerprint authentication system, is on the edge of technology as far as securing information. The benefits of fingerprint authentication are enormous. The most significant of them are that it is extremely difficult to reproduce someone else's fingerprint, and it is equally difficult to lose or forget your own fingerprint as opposed to a password or pin number. One of my goals for this summer is to integrate this technology with another Pocket PC application. The second task for the summer is to develop a simple application that provides an Astronaut EVA (Extravehicular Activity) Log Book capability. The Astronaut EVA Log Book is what an astronaut would use to report the status of field missions, crew physical health, successes, future plans, etc. My goal is to develop a user interface into which these data fields can be entered and stored. The applications that I am developing are created using eMbedded Visual C++ 4.0 with the Pocket PC 2003 Software Development Kit provided by Microsoft.

  16. Ecological and evolutionary traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Runge, M.C.; Sherman, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Organisms often rely on environmental cues to make behavioral and life-history decisions. However, in environments that have been altered suddenly by humans, formerly reliable cues might no longer be associated with adaptive outcomes. In such cases, organisms can become 'trapped' by their evolutionary responses to the cues and experience reduced survival or reproduction. Ecological traps occur when organisms make poor habitat choices based on cues that correlated formerly with habitat quality. Ecological traps are part of a broader phenomenon, evolutionary traps, involving a dissociation between cues that organisms use to make any behavioral or life-history decision and outcomes normally associated with that decision. A trap can lead to extinction if a population falls below a critical size threshold before adaptation to the novel environment occurs. Conservation and management protocols must be designed in light of, rather than in spite of, the behavioral mechanisms and evolutionary history of populations and species to avoid 'trapping' them.

  17. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  18. Pocket atlas of head and neck MRI anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This pocket atlas depicts the anatomy of the head and neck as seen in magnetic resonance (MR) images. The collection of 140 high-resolution images covers all major areas - neck, larynx, oropharynx, tongue, nasopharynx, skull base, sinuses, and temporal bone - displayed in sagittal, axial, and coronal MR image planes. The images show maximum fat/muscle contrast for better visualization of fascial planes. In certain areas of the anatomy, such as the neck and temporal bone, surface coils were used to achieve significant advantages in image quality over standard head or body coils.

  19. The retraction pocket in the treatment of cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Austin, D F

    1976-12-01

    Residual and especially recurrent disease was observed in 124 consecutive patients who had operations for cholesteatomas, with the finding of continuing problems in at least 23% of these patients. Surgical therapy based on the goals of extirpation of the "pseudoneoplasm" of cholesteatoma, restoration of health and function, and prevention of recurrence is the ideal. Results of "single-barreled" regimens do not yet meet these goals. A compromise surgical management regimen is offered. Etiologic implications of the retraction pocket phenomenon are explored and a testable hypothesis offered.

  20. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  1. Response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeter to beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munish; Gupta, Anil; Pradhan, S M; Bakshi, A K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimate of the response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters (DRDs) to various beta sources was performed. It has been established that the ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters do not respond to beta particles having energy (Emax)<1 MeV and same was verified using (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (204)Tl beta sources. However, for beta particles having energy >1 MeV, the DRDs exhibit measureable response and the values are ~8%, ~14% and ~27% per mSv for natural uranium, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh beta sources respectively. As the energy of the beta particles increases, the response also increases. The response of DRDs to beta particles having energy>1 MeV arises due to the fact that the thickness of the chamber walls is less than the maximum range of beta particles. This may also be one of the reasons for disparity between doses measured with passive/legal dosimeters (TLDs) and DRDs in those situations in which radiation workers are exposed to mixed field of gamma photons and beta particles especially at uranium processing plants, nuclear (power and research) reactors, waste management facilities and fuel reprocessing plants etc. The paper provides the reason (technical) for disparity between the doses recorded by TLDs and DRDs in mixed field of photons and beta particles.

  2. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly – if not exclusively – belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis. PMID:24983705

  3. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly - if not exclusively - belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis.

  4. Anatomy of protein pockets and cavities: measurement of binding site geometry and implications for ligand design.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J.; Edelsbrunner, H.; Woodward, C.

    1998-01-01

    Identification and size characterization of surface pockets and occluded cavities are initial steps in protein structure-based ligand design. A new program, CAST, for automatically locating and measuring protein pockets and cavities, is based on precise computational geometry methods, including alpha shape and discrete flow theory. CAST identifies and measures pockets and pocket mouth openings, as well as cavities. The program specifies the atoms lining pockets, pocket openings, and buried cavities; the volume and area of pockets and cavities; and the area and circumference of mouth openings. CAST analysis of over 100 proteins has been carried out; proteins examined include a set of 51 monomeric enzyme-ligand structures, several elastase-inhibitor complexes, the FK506 binding protein, 30 HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complexes, and a number of small and large protein inhibitors. Medium-sized globular proteins typically have 10-20 pockets/cavities. Most often, binding sites are pockets with 1-2 mouth openings; much less frequently they are cavities. Ligand binding pockets vary widely in size, most within the range 10(2)-10(3)A3. Statistical analysis reveals that the number of pockets and cavities is correlated with protein size, but there is no correlation between the size of the protein and the size of binding sites. Most frequently, the largest pocket/cavity is the active site, but there are a number of instructive exceptions. Ligand volume and binding site volume are somewhat correlated when binding site volume is < or =700 A3, but the ligand seldom occupies the entire site. Auxiliary pockets near the active site have been suggested as additional binding surface for designed ligands (Mattos C et al., 1994, Nat Struct Biol 1:55-58). Analysis of elastase-inhibitor complexes suggests that CAST can identify ancillary pockets suitable for recruitment in ligand design strategies. Analysis of the FK506 binding protein, and of compounds developed in SAR by NMR (Shuker SB et

  5. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  6. Optical Trapping of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Jarrah; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Ghaffari, Saeedeh; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Optical trapping is a technique for immobilizing and manipulating small objects in a gentle way using light, and it has been widely applied in trapping and manipulating small biological particles. Ashkin and co-workers first demonstrated optical tweezers using a single focused beam1. The single beam trap can be described accurately using the perturbative gradient force formulation in the case of small Rayleigh regime particles1. In the perturbative regime, the optical power required for trapping a particle scales as the inverse fourth power of the particle size. High optical powers can damage dielectric particles and cause heating. For instance, trapped latex spheres of 109 nm in diameter were destroyed by a 15 mW beam in 25 sec1, which has serious implications for biological matter2,3. A self-induced back-action (SIBA) optical trapping was proposed to trap 50 nm polystyrene spheres in the non-perturbative regime4. In a non-perturbative regime, even a small particle with little permittivity contrast to the background can influence significantly the ambient electromagnetic field and induce a large optical force. As a particle enters an illuminated aperture, light transmission increases dramatically because of dielectric loading. If the particle attempts to leave the aperture, decreased transmission causes a change in momentum outwards from the hole and, by Newton's Third Law, results in a force on the particle inwards into the hole, trapping the particle. The light transmission can be monitored; hence, the trap can become a sensor. The SIBA trapping technique can be further improved by using a double-nanohole structure. The double-nanohole structure has been shown to give a strong local field enhancement5,6. Between the two sharp tips of the double-nanohole, a small particle can cause a large change in optical transmission, thereby inducing a large optical force. As a result, smaller nanoparticles can be trapped, such as 12 nm silicate spheres7 and 3.4 nm

  7. Modelling and experimental validation of Textile Pockets based active inflatable device.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, A; Basset, M; Orjuela, R; Dupuis, R; Drean, J Y

    2014-11-01

    This paper aims with the mathematical modelling of an active inflatable device. This device is composed of a compressor, an Electro-pneumatic Pressure Converter (EPC) and an Inflatable Textile fabric Pocket (ITP). The later has interesting mechanical properties and is fabricated using Jacquard knitting technique which allows automatic production of unlimited varieties of pattern weaving without any mould. Thanks to these features, these ITPs have provided a better alternative to the classical airbags made by stretchable polymer material. The proposed mathematical model is obtained by combining sub-models of two main parts of the whole system. In this way, a generalised and flexible model is obtained which can easily take into consideration the ITPs of different shapes. The pressure dynamics inside the ITP are considered by taking into account the air flow rate, variation of the volume of ITP and the length of pneumatic lines joining ITP with compressed air source. The parameters of the whole mathematical model are obtained via identification techniques. The effectiveness of the model is assessed through several experimental tests with the help of a servo hydraulic fatigue testing machine. PMID:25200116

  8. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  9. Trapping radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-12-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  10. Optically programmable excitonic traps

    PubMed Central

    Alloing, Mathieu; Lemaître, Aristide; Galopin, Elisabeth; Dubin, François

    2013-01-01

    With atomic systems, optically programmed trapping potentials have led to remarkable progress in quantum optics and quantum information science. Programmable trapping potentials could have a similar impact on studies of semiconductor quasi-particles, particularly excitons. However, engineering such potentials inside a semiconductor heterostructure remains an outstanding challenge and optical techniques have not yet achieved a high degree of control. Here, we synthesize optically programmable trapping potentials for indirect excitons of bilayer heterostructures. Our approach relies on the injection and spatial patterning of charges trapped in a field-effect device. We thereby imprint in-situ and on-demand electrostatic traps into which we optically inject cold and dense ensembles of excitons. This technique creates new opportunities to improve state-of-the-art technologies for the study of collective quantum behavior of excitons and also for the functionalisation of emerging exciton-based opto-electronic circuits. PMID:23546532

  11. "Pocket" Deformable Mirror for an Integrated On-Mirror Adaptive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, L.; Voronstov, M.; Wangsness, P.

    Existing HEL beam control architectures are extremely complicated because they require installation and alignment of a large number of optical elements, resulting in substantial increase of the entire HEL system size, weight and cost. There is a strong interest in designing new robust beam control capabilities integrated directly to a beam director system. The discussed technical effort is focused on development and demonstration of a new adaptive beam director (ABD) consisting of a beam forming telescope with wavefront compensation integrated solely on its ultra-lightweight primary mirror. This on-mirror AO system will be controlled using a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) controller specifically designed for target-in-the-loop (TIL) operation. The key component of the on-mirror AO system is its primary mirror. This mirror contains an array of pockets machined on its backside, called a pocket-mirror. A special dielectric layer deposited on the front surface of the pocket-mirror is highly reflective for the HEL wavelength ???HEL, and semi-transparent for the laser illuminator wavelength ?ILL. Thus the wave ?ILL scattered by the target surface enters inside the mirror pockets, while the outgoing HEL beam with wavelength ?HEL is totally reflected. The pockets of the ABD pocket-mirror include opto-electronic components that can provide local (inside pocket-window) wavefront correction and sensing. Wavefront correction at each pocket aperture is performed using electrically sectioned piezo-ceramic annular rings made from thin (~0.3 mm) bimorph discs glued to the pocket bottoms. Control voltages applied to these electrodes result in mechanical deformation of the pocket-window front surface thus providing compensation of low-order aberrations at each pocket-window. Packaging the pockets with a high fill factor allows high resolution control of the beam director primary mirror shape. Preliminary analysis has shown that surface stroke near 3 microns with

  12. Recrystallization of atomically balanced amorphous pockets in Si: A source of point defects

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria

    2007-10-15

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulation techniques to study the regrowth behavior of amorphous pockets in Si. We demonstrate that crystallization depends on the morphology of the pocket-crystal interface. Although our simulated amorphous pockets had not any excess nor deficit of atoms with respect to perfect crystal, after regrowth we found residual defects. Most of them are single Si interstitials and vacancies, but also larger defects have been encountered. We have determined their atomic structures and calculated their formation energies. These complexes are more stable than amorphous pockets, and may trigger the formation of extended defects or favor damage accumulation.

  13. Exploitation of pocket gophers and their food caches by grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    I investigated the exploitation of pocket gophers (Thomomys talpoides) by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in the Yellowstone region of the United States with the use of data collected during a study of radiomarked bears in 1977-1992. My analysis focused on the importance of pocket gophers as a source of energy and nutrients, effects of weather and site features, and importance of pocket gophers to grizzly bears in the western contiguous United States prior to historical extirpations. Pocket gophers and their food caches were infrequent in grizzly bear feces, although foraging for pocket gophers accounted for about 20-25% of all grizzly bear feeding activity during April and May. Compared with roots individually excavated by bears, pocket gopher food caches were less digestible but more easily dug out. Exploitation of gopher food caches by grizzly bears was highly sensitive to site and weather conditions and peaked during and shortly after snowmelt. This peak coincided with maximum success by bears in finding pocket gopher food caches. Exploitation was most frequent and extensive on gently sloping nonforested sites with abundant spring beauty (Claytonia lanceolata) and yampah (Perdieridia gairdneri). Pocket gophers are rare in forests, and spring beauty and yampah roots are known to be important foods of both grizzly bears and burrowing rodents. Although grizzly bears commonly exploit pocket gophers only in the Yellowstone region, this behavior was probably widespread in mountainous areas of the western contiguous United States prior to extirpations of grizzly bears within the last 150 years.

  14. Psychologist in a pocket: towards depression screening on mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Jó Ágila; Ramos, Roann; Ix, Tim; Ferrer-Cheng, Paula Glenda; Wehrle, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Depression is the most prevalent clinical disorder and one of the main causes of disability. This makes early detection of depressive symptoms critical in its prevention and management. This paper presents and discusses the development of Psychologist in a Pocket (PiaP), a mental mHealth application for Android which screens and monitors for these symptoms, and-given the explicit permission of the user-alerts a trusted contact such as the mental health professional or a close friend, if it detects symptoms. All text inputted electronically-such as short message services, emails, social network posts-is analyzed based on keywords related to depression based on DSM-5 and ICD criteria as well as Beck's Cognitive Theory of Depression and the Self-Focus Model. Data evaluation and collection happen in the background, on-device, without requiring any user involvement. Currently, the application is in an early prototype phase entering initial clinical validation. PMID:25980862

  15. Oriented valve and latch for side pocket mandrel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.W.; Crawford, W.B.; Crawford, M.S.

    1991-10-22

    This patent describes a gas lift valve apparatus for use with a side pocket mandrel having a main bore, a seating bore laterally offset from said main bore, and a longitudinal slot formed in a wall of said mandrel between said man and seating bores. It comprises: a body section having guide means thereon adapted to enter said slot and maintain rotational orientation of said body section in a predetermined position, said body section having gas flow passage; and outlet prot means in said body section communicating with said passage and opening through an outer wall of said guide means, whereby lift gas emanating from said port means is directed only toward main bore of the mandrel.

  16. Airplane stability calculations with a card programmable pocket calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Programs are presented for calculating airplane stability characteristics with a card programmable pocket calculator. These calculations include eigenvalues of the characteristic equations of lateral and longitudinal motion as well as stability parameters such as the time to damp to one-half amplitude or the damping ratio. The effects of wind shear are included. Background information and the equations programmed are given. The programs are written for the International System of Units, the dimensional form of the stability derivatives, and stability axes. In addition to programs for stability calculations, an unusual and short program is included for the Euler transformation of coordinates used in airplane motions. The programs have been written for a Hewlett Packard HP-67 calculator. However, the use of this calculator does not constitute an endorsement of the product by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Stratigraphic traps 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains studies of fields with traps that are mainly stratigraphic in nature. Structure plays a role in the traps of several fields, but overall, it is clear that the main trapping features with the group of fields in this volume are stratigraphic. The first six fields in this volume, Alabama Ferry, Rospo Mare, Walker Creek, Bindley, Lexington, and Newburg/South Westhope, have carbonate reservoirs. The latter two of these, Lexington and Newburg/South Westhope, also have sandstone reservoirs. The remaining fields, East Texas, East Clinton, Stockholm Southwest, Sorrento, Port Acres, and Lagoa Parda, have only sandstone reservoirs.

  18. The nature of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Unzai, Satoru; Akashi, Satoko; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2009-02-17

    Tryptophan biosynthesis is subject to exquisite control in species of Bacillus and has become one of the best-studied model systems in gene regulation. The protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) predominantly forms a ring-shaped 11-mer, which binds cognate RNA in the presence of tryptophan to suppress expression of the trp operon. TRAP is itself regulated by the protein Anti-TRAP, which binds to TRAP and prevents RNA binding. To date, the nature of this interaction has proved elusive. Here, we describe mass spectrometry and analytical centrifugation studies of the complex, and 2 crystal structures of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex. These crystal structures, both refined to 3.2-A resolution, show that Anti-TRAP binds to TRAP as a trimer, sterically blocking RNA binding. Mass spectrometry shows that 11-mer TRAP may bind up to 5 AT trimers, and an artificial 12-mer TRAP may bind 6. Both forms of TRAP make the same interactions with Anti-TRAP. Crystallization of wild-type TRAP with Anti-TRAP selectively pulls the 12-mer TRAP form out of solution, so the crystal structure of wild-type TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex reflects a minor species from a mixed population. PMID:19164760

  19. PockDrug-Server: a new web server for predicting pocket druggability on holo and apo proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Hiba Abi; Borrel, Alexandre; Geneix, Colette; Petitjean, Michel; Regad, Leslie; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Predicting protein pocket's ability to bind drug-like molecules with high affinity, i.e. druggability, is of major interest in the target identification phase of drug discovery. Therefore, pocket druggability investigations represent a key step of compound clinical progression projects. Currently computational druggability prediction models are attached to one unique pocket estimation method despite pocket estimation uncertainties. In this paper, we propose ‘PockDrug-Server’ to predict pocket druggability, efficient on both (i) estimated pockets guided by the ligand proximity (extracted by proximity to a ligand from a holo protein structure) and (ii) estimated pockets based solely on protein structure information (based on amino atoms that form the surface of potential binding cavities). PockDrug-Server provides consistent druggability results using different pocket estimation methods. It is robust with respect to pocket boundary and estimation uncertainties, thus efficient using apo pockets that are challenging to estimate. It clearly distinguishes druggable from less druggable pockets using different estimation methods and outperformed recent druggability models for apo pockets. It can be carried out from one or a set of apo/holo proteins using different pocket estimation methods proposed by our web server or from any pocket previously estimated by the user. PockDrug-Server is publicly available at: http://pockdrug.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr. PMID:25956651

  20. PockDrug-Server: a new web server for predicting pocket druggability on holo and apo proteins.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Hiba Abi; Borrel, Alexandre; Geneix, Colette; Petitjean, Michel; Regad, Leslie; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2015-07-01

    Predicting protein pocket's ability to bind drug-like molecules with high affinity, i.e. druggability, is of major interest in the target identification phase of drug discovery. Therefore, pocket druggability investigations represent a key step of compound clinical progression projects. Currently computational druggability prediction models are attached to one unique pocket estimation method despite pocket estimation uncertainties. In this paper, we propose 'PockDrug-Server' to predict pocket druggability, efficient on both (i) estimated pockets guided by the ligand proximity (extracted by proximity to a ligand from a holo protein structure) and (ii) estimated pockets based solely on protein structure information (based on amino atoms that form the surface of potential binding cavities). PockDrug-Server provides consistent druggability results using different pocket estimation methods. It is robust with respect to pocket boundary and estimation uncertainties, thus efficient using apo pockets that are challenging to estimate. It clearly distinguishes druggable from less druggable pockets using different estimation methods and outperformed recent druggability models for apo pockets. It can be carried out from one or a set of apo/holo proteins using different pocket estimation methods proposed by our web server or from any pocket previously estimated by the user. PockDrug-Server is publicly available at: http://pockdrug.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr.

  1. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  2. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  3. Versatile electrostatic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to create either a double-well or a donut-shaped trapping field. The profile of the {sup 15}ND{sub 3} packet in each of these four trapping potentials is measured, and the dependence of the well-separation and barrier height of the double-well and donut potential on the hexapole and dipole term are discussed.

  4. Air Entraining Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2001-11-01

    Air entraining flows are frequently encountered in Nature (e.g. breaking waves, waterfalls, rain over water bodies) and in technological applications (gas-liquid chemical reactors, water treatment, aquaculture, and others). Superficially, one may distinguish between transient events, such as a breaking wave, and steady situations, e.g. a falling jet. However, when viscosity is not important, the process of air entrainment turns out to be the consequence of local transient events even in steady flows. For example, surface disturbances convected by a nominally steady jet impact the receiving liquid, create a deep depression, which collapses entraining an air pocket. (In practice this basic mechanism is complicated by the presence of waves, vortical flows, and other factors.) This talk will describe several examples of air-entraining flows illustrating the fluid mechanic principles involved with high-speed movies and numerical computations.

  5. Structural traps 5

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains studies of oil and gas fields that are mainly structural in nature. Stratigraphy controls the extend of the reservoir in the traps of several fields, but overall, the main trapping features within the group of fields in this volume are structural. Fields covered in this volume include: Endicott Field, Point Arguello Field, West Puerto Chiquito Field, Dukhan Field, Sendji Field, Ruston Field, Raudhatain Field, Hassi Messaoud Field, Snapper Field, Tirrawarra Field, and Sacha Field.

  6. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  7. Planview Geometry and morphological characteristics of pocket beaches on the Catalan coast (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D.; Guillén, J.; López, L.; Pellegrino, V.

    2009-07-01

    Coastal planform studies are a relevant initial stage before launching detailed dynamic field experiments. The aim of this study is to define the planform characteristics of 72 Catalan pocket beaches, natural and man-made, and to determine their sheltering effect, embaymentization and their status of equilibrium. Planform measurements were performed on SIGPAC, 1:5000 orthophoto sets and wave climate was provided by Puertos del Estado (Wana model). Planform parameters were applied and coastal planview indexes were determined. The study shows that the Catalan pocket beaches display a wide range of indentation, suggesting that no single structural, tectonic or morphological control dominates their planform. The man-made pocket beaches typically display indentations which are smaller than those shown by natural pocket beaches. Headland spacing and beach area are positively correlated. The more indented bays are, the shorter their beaches become. Low-indented pocket beaches are the widest and the longest ones. Deep indentation contributes towards beach protection and energy dissipation which counteracts rip efficiency and inhibits the formation of mega-rips. Pocket beaches often show gradual and moderate alongshore changes in texture and beach morphology. One third of the Catalan pocket beaches are "sediment starved", i.e., 60% and more of their embayed shorelines are deprived of beach sediments. Examination of the status of equilibrium demonstrates that most of the Catalan pocket beaches are in an unstable mode, with indentation ratios that are unrelated to the wave obliquity.

  8. A phosphate-binding pocket within the platform-PAZ-connector helix cassette of human Dicer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Simanshu, Dhirendra K; Ma, Jin-Biao; Park, Jong-Eun; Heo, Inha; Kim, V Narry; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2014-02-20

    We have solved two families of crystal structures of the human Dicer "platform-PAZ-connector helix" cassette in complex with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The structures possess two adjacently positioned pockets: a 2 nt 3'-overhang-binding pocket within the PAZ domain (3' pocket) and a phosphate-binding pocket within the platform domain (phosphate pocket). One family of complexes contains a knob-like α-helical protrusion, designated "hDicer-specific helix," that separates the two pockets and orients the bound siRNA away from the surface of Dicer, which could be indicative of a product release/transfer state. In the second complex, the helical protrusion is melted/disordered and the bound siRNA is aligned toward the surface of Dicer, suggestive of a cleavage-competent state. These structures allow us to propose that the transition from the cleavage-competent to the postulated product release/transfer state may involve release of the 5'-phosphate from the phosphate pocket while retaining the 3' overhang in the 3' pocket.

  9. The Role of Electronic Pocket Dictionaries as an English Learning Tool among Chinese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jian, Hua-Li; Sandnes, Frode Eika; Law, Kris M. Y.; Huang, Yo-Ping; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study addressed the role of electronic pocket dictionaries as a language learning tool among university students in Hong Kong and Taiwan. The target groups included engineering and humanities students at both undergraduate and graduate level. Speed of reference was found to be the main motivator for using an electronic pocket dictionary.…

  10. Do Out-of-Pocket Health Expenditures Rise with Age Among Older Americans?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Susan T.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Relationships are examined between age and out-of-pocket costs for different health goods and services among the older population. Design and Methods: Age patterns in health service use and out-of-pocket costs are examined by use of the 1990 Elderly Health Supplement to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (N = 1,031, age 66+). Multivariate…

  11. Characteristics and tolerances of the pocket mouse and incidence of disease. [CNS lesions during space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, R. G.; Kraft, L. M.; Simmonds, R. C.; Bailey, O. T.; Dunlap, W. A.; Haymaker, W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies carried out on the pocket mouse colony on Apollo XVII are reported. They revealed no serological evidence of viral disease, no pathogenic enterobacteria or respiratory Mycoplasma on culture, a 25% incidence of sarcosporidiosis, and a 2% incidence of chronic meningitis or meningoencephalitis. It is concluded that the pocket mouse is a highly adaptive animal and very well-suited to space flight.

  12. Switching Oxide Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.

    2003-01-01

    We consider radiation-induced charge trapping in SiO2 dielectric layers, primarily from the point of view of CMOS devices. However, SiO2 insulators are used in many other ways, and the same defects occur in other contexts. The key studies, which determined the nature of the oxide charge traps, were done primarily on gate oxides in CMOS devices, because that was the main radiation problem in CMOS at one time. There are two major reviews of radiation-induced oxide charge trapping already in the literature, which discuss the subject in far greater detail than is possible here. The first of these was by McLean et al. in 1989, and the second, ten years later, was intended as an update, because of additional, new work that had been reported. Basically, the picture that has emerged is that ionizing radiation creates electron-hole pairs in the oxide, and the electrons have much higher mobility than the holes. Therefore, the electrons are swept out of the oxide very rapidly by any field that is present, leaving behind any holes that escape the initial recombination process. These holes then undergo a polaron hopping transport toward the Si/SiO2 interface (under positive bias). Near the interface, some fraction of them fall into deep, relatively stable, long-lived hole traps. The nature and annealing behavior of these hole traps is the main focus of this paper.

  13. Inertial Pocket Navigation System: Unaided 3D Positioning.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Estefania Munoz

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation systems use dead-reckoning to estimate the pedestrian's position. There are two types of pedestrian dead-reckoning, the strapdown algorithm and the step-and-heading approach. Unlike the strapdown algorithm, which consists of the double integration of the three orthogonal accelerometer readings, the step-and-heading approach lacks the vertical displacement estimation. We propose the first step-and-heading approach based on unaided inertial data solving 3D positioning. We present a step detector for steps up and down and a novel vertical displacement estimator. Our navigation system uses the sensor introduced in the front pocket of the trousers, a likely location of a smartphone. The proposed algorithms are based on the opening angle of the leg or pitch angle. We analyzed our step detector and compared it with the state-of-the-art, as well as our already proposed step length estimator. Lastly, we assessed our vertical displacement estimator in a real-world scenario. We found that our algorithms outperform the literature step and heading algorithms and solve 3D positioning using unaided inertial data. Additionally, we found that with the pitch angle, five activities are distinguishable: standing, sitting, walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs. This information complements the pedestrian location and is of interest for applications, such as elderly care. PMID:25897501

  14. Inertial Pocket Navigation System: Unaided 3D Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Munoz Diaz, Estefania

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation systems use dead-reckoning to estimate the pedestrian's position. There are two types of pedestrian dead-reckoning, the strapdown algorithm and the step-and-heading approach. Unlike the strapdown algorithm, which consists of the double integration of the three orthogonal accelerometer readings, the step-and-heading approach lacks the vertical displacement estimation. We propose the first step-and-heading approach based on unaided inertial data solving 3D positioning. We present a step detector for steps up and down and a novel vertical displacement estimator. Our navigation system uses the sensor introduced in the front pocket of the trousers, a likely location of a smartphone. The proposed algorithms are based on the opening angle of the leg or pitch angle. We analyzed our step detector and compared it with the state-of-the-art, as well as our already proposed step length estimator. Lastly, we assessed our vertical displacement estimator in a real-world scenario. We found that our algorithms outperform the literature step and heading algorithms and solve 3D positioning using unaided inertial data. Additionally, we found that with the pitch angle, five activities are distinguishable: standing, sitting, walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs. This information complements the pedestrian location and is of interest for applications, such as elderly care. PMID:25897501

  15. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) For Fuel Assembly Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Michael Reichenberger; Phillip Ugorowski

    2013-09-01

    Neutron sensors capable of real-time measurement of thermal flux, fast flux, and temperature in a single miniaturized probe are needed in irradiation tests required to demonstrate the performance of candidate new fuels, and cladding materials. In-core ceramic-based miniature neutron detectors or “Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors” (MPFDs) have been studied at Kansas State University (KSU). The first MPFD prototypes were tested in various neutron fields at the KSU TRIGA research reactor with successful results. Currently, a United States Department of Energy-sponsored joint KSU/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) effort is underway to develop a high-temperature, high-pressure version of the MPFD using radiation-resistant, high temperature materials, which would be capable of withstanding irradiation test conditions in high performance material and test reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, this more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, existing and advanced reactor designs, high performance MTRs, and transient test reactors has the potential to lead to higher accuracy and resolution data from irradiation testing, more detailed core flux measurements and enhanced fuel assembly processing. Prior evaluations by KSU indicate that these sensors could also be used to monitor burn-up of nuclear fuel. If integrated into nuclear fuel assemblies, MPFDs offer several advantages to current spent fuel management systems.

  16. Modeling liquid distribution in soil after pocket injection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin; Chen, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Information on liquid distribution after injection of liquid manure is important to the evaluation of injection methods and the design of injection tools. A two-dimensional numerical model was developed to predict liquid distribution in the soil around a soil pocket. Model outputs are the lateral spread (L), vertical thickness (T), and cross-sectional area (A) of the liquid infiltration zone. Values of L do not vary with injection depth, whereas T and A increase with the injection depth. These model outputs are sensitive to effective saturated soil content (the difference between saturated and initial water contents). At greater effective saturated water content, values of L, T, and A are lower. Values of L vary from 0.13 to 0.23 m, values ofT vary from 0.09 to 0.19 m for injection depths from 0.05 to 0.15 m, and values of A vary from 0.009 to 0.030 m2. The model results were compared with field measurements taken from six forage fields with sandy loam and clay soils. The model better predicts L than T and A. The relative average error between the predictions and field measurements vary from 10.3 to 101.9%.

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark J.; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-01-01

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field. PMID:26247952

  18. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  19. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  20. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  1. Assessing progressivity of out-of-pocket payment: with illustration to Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chai Ping; Whynes, David K; Sach, Tracey H

    2006-01-01

    Throughout the world, policy makers are considering or implementing financing strategies that are likely to have a substantial impact on the equity of health financing. The assessment of the equity implication is clearly important, given the potential impact that alternative finance sources have on households. Households incur out-of-pocket payment directly from their budget, apart from their public or private insurance. Out-of-pocket payment is the primary concern, given their undesirable impact on households. Progressivity measures departures from proportionality in the relationship between out-of-pocket payment and ability to pay. It is the most frequently used yardstick to assess the equity of out-of-pocket payments in empirical studies. This paper provides an evaluation of such progressivity measures, undertaken using four approaches (proportion approach, tabulation approach, concentration curve and Kakwani's index), in order to reveal their usefulness and underlying notion. It is illustrated empirically with data on out-of-pocket payment for health care in Malaysia for 1998/ 1999, based on the nationally representative Household Expenditure Survey. Results indicate that out-of-pocket payments are mildly progressive, whilst the four approaches have their benefits and limitations in assessing equity implications. This analysis is of interest from a policy perspective, given Malaysia's heavy reliance on out-of-pocket payments to finance health care. PMID:17044546

  2. Efficacy of a physicians' pocket guide about prenatal substance use: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Midmer, Deana; Kahan, Meldon; Kim, Theresa; Ordean, Alice; Graves, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    A pocket guide on management of substance use during pregnancy was developed by a group of Canadian care providers. One hundred and fifteen family medicine residents in 6 Canadian teaching sites were randomized to receive either the pocket guide or a paper summary on similar clinical topics, based on UpToDate, a comprehensive Web-based resource. At baseline, both groups completed a survey containing questions on beliefs, attitudes, experience, and training on pregnancy and substance use. Participants then answered 28 multiple choice questions about substance use in pregnancy, using either the pocket guide or UpToDate. Finally participants were asked to rate ease of use for the 2 resources. The results showed that the pocket guide group had higher knowledge scores than the UpToDate group overall and at each study site (61.27% vs. 42.86%, P < .001). The residents found the pocket guide easier to use than UpToDate (mean = 2.73 vs. 4.36, P < .001), and were more likely to want to use it again (96% for pocket card, 78% for UpToDate, P = .005). It is concluded that the pocket guide is a practical source of clinical information at point of care, particularly for "orphan" subjects such as substance use in pregnancy.

  3. Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Cis-β-Methylstyrene:Distal Pocket Flexibility Tunes Catalytic Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexander N.; Chatfield, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase, the most versatile heme protein, has a hybrid active site pocket that shares structural features with peroxidases and cytochrome P450s. The simulation studies presented here show that the enzyme possesses a remarkable ability to efficiently utilize its hybrid structure, assuming structurally different peroxidase-like and P450-like distal pocket faces and thereby enhancing the inherent catalytic capability of the active center. We find that during epoxidation of cis-β-methylstyrene (CBMS), the native peroxidase-like aspect of the distal pocket is diminished as the polar Glu183 side chain is displaced away from the active center and the distal pocket takes on a more hydrophobic, P450-like, aspect. The P450-like distal pocket provides a significant enthalpic stabilization of ~4 kcal/mol of the 14 kcal/mol reaction barrier for gas-phase epoxidation of CMBS by an oxyferryl heme-thiolate species. This stabilization comes from breathing of the distal pocket. As until recently the active site of chloroperoxidase was postulated to be inflexible, these results suggest a new conceptual understanding of the enzyme’s versatility: catalytic reactivity is tuned by flexibility of the distal pocket. PMID:23020548

  4. Assessing progressivity of out-of-pocket payment: with illustration to Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chai Ping; Whynes, David K; Sach, Tracey H

    2006-01-01

    Throughout the world, policy makers are considering or implementing financing strategies that are likely to have a substantial impact on the equity of health financing. The assessment of the equity implication is clearly important, given the potential impact that alternative finance sources have on households. Households incur out-of-pocket payment directly from their budget, apart from their public or private insurance. Out-of-pocket payment is the primary concern, given their undesirable impact on households. Progressivity measures departures from proportionality in the relationship between out-of-pocket payment and ability to pay. It is the most frequently used yardstick to assess the equity of out-of-pocket payments in empirical studies. This paper provides an evaluation of such progressivity measures, undertaken using four approaches (proportion approach, tabulation approach, concentration curve and Kakwani's index), in order to reveal their usefulness and underlying notion. It is illustrated empirically with data on out-of-pocket payment for health care in Malaysia for 1998/ 1999, based on the nationally representative Household Expenditure Survey. Results indicate that out-of-pocket payments are mildly progressive, whilst the four approaches have their benefits and limitations in assessing equity implications. This analysis is of interest from a policy perspective, given Malaysia's heavy reliance on out-of-pocket payments to finance health care.

  5. SplitPocket: identification of protein functional surfaces and characterization of their spatial patterns.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Dupree, Craig; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2009-07-01

    SplitPocket (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/) is a web server to identify functional surfaces of protein from structure coordinates. Using the Alpha Shape Theory, we previously developed an analytical approach to identify protein functional surfaces by the geometric concept of a split pocket, which is a pocket split by a binding ligand. Our geometric approach extracts site-specific spatial information from coordinates of structures. To reduce the search space, probe radii are designed according to the physicochemical textures of molecules. The method uses the weighted Delaunay triangulation and the discrete flow algorithm to obtain geometric measurements and spatial patterns for each predicted pocket. It can also measure the hydrophobicity on a surface patch. Furthermore, we quantify the evolutionary conservation of surface patches by an index derived from the entropy scores in HSSP (homology-derived secondary structure of proteins). We have used the method to examine approximately 1.16 million potential pockets and identified the split pockets in >26,000 structures in the Protein Data Bank. This integrated web server of functional surfaces provides a source of spatial patterns to serve as templates for predicting the functional surfaces of unbound structures involved in binding activities. These spatial patterns should also be useful for protein functional inference, structural evolution and drug design.

  6. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  7. Measurement of Trap Length for an Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2009-01-01

    The trap length along the beam axis for an optical trap formed with an upright, oil-immersion microscope was measured. The goals for this effort were twofold. It was deemed useful to understand the depth to which an optical trap can reach for purposes of developing a tool to assist in the fabrication of miniature devices. Additionally, it was desired to know whether the measured trap length favored one or the other of two competing theories to model an optical trap. The approach was to trap a microsphere of known size and mass and raise it from its initial trap position. The microsphere was then dropped by blocking the laser beam for a pre-determined amount of time. Dropping the microsphere in a free-fall mode from various heights relative to the coverslip provides an estimate of how the trapping length changes with depth in water in a sample chamber on a microscope slide. While it was not possible to measure the trap length with sufficient precision to support any particular theory of optical trap formation, it was possible to find regions where the presence of physical boundaries influenced optical traps, and determine that the trap length, for the apparatus studied, is between 6 and 7 m. These results allow more precise control using optical micromanipulation to assemble miniature devices by providing information about the distance over which an optical trap is effective.

  8. Deconnable self-reading pocket dosimeter containment with self-contained light

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Robyn L.; Arnold, Greg N.; McBride, Ryan G.

    1996-01-01

    A container for a self-reading pocket dosimeter includes a transparent tube for receiving the self-reading pocket dosimeter, a light source mounted at one end of the transparent tube, and an eyepiece mounted on an opposite end of the transparent tube for viewing a read-out of the self-reading pocket dosimeter. The container may further include an activation device for selectively supplying power to the light source. The container both protects the dosimeter from being contaminated and provides a light source for viewing the dosimeter.

  9. Deconnable self-reading pocket dosimeter containment with self-contained light

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.L.; Arnold, G.N.; McBride, R.G.

    1995-12-31

    A container for a self-reading pocket dosimeter includes a transparent tube for receiving the self-reading pocket dosimeter, a light source mounted at one end of the transparent tube, and an eyepiece mounted on an opposite end of the transparent tube for viewing a read-out of the self-reading pocket dosimeter. The container may further include an activation device for selectively supplying power to the light source. The container both protects the dosimeter from being contaminated and provides a light source for viewing the dosimeter.

  10. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: II. Characteristics and tolerances of the pocket mouse and incidence of disease.

    PubMed

    Linberg, R G; Kraft, L M; Simmonds, R C; Bailey, O T; Dunlap, W A; Haymaker, W

    1975-04-01

    Pocket mice are facultative homoiotherms with the ability to drop their metabolic rate dramatically while at rest or in response to environmental stresses. Under these conditions, they characteristically enter a state of prolonged torpor. These animals require no drinking water and they can live in darkness for many months without apparent ill effect. They tolerate a wide range of ambient temperature, ralative humidity, and oxygen pressure and have survied without food for a mean of 14 d at an ambient temperature of 20 degrees C (68 degrees F). Studies carried out on the pocket mouse colony used for the Apollo XVII flight revealed, in the animals tested, no serological evidence of viral disease, no pathogenic enterobacteria or respiratory Mycoplasma on culture, a 25% incidence of sarcosporidiosis, and a 2% incidence of chronic meningitis or meningoencephalitis. The conclusion reached is that the pocket mouse is a highly adaptive animal and very well suited for space flight.

  11. Trapped particle optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmqvist, Lars; Hertz, Hans M.

    1992-11-01

    A scanned probe optical microscope allowing nondestructive studies of a wide range of objects and surface is described. The microscope utilizes a noninvasive optical trap to position a microscopic probe light source in immediate proximity to the studied object. We demonstrate the method experimentally and show theoretically its potential for optical imaging with subdiffraction limited resolution of, e.g., biological objects.

  12. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  13. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  14. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  15. The Universal Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Paul

    The compulsory system of education is criticized on the grounds that it has become a regimented "universal trap" antithetical to democracy. In contrast to the Jeffersonian concept of education in the service of citizen initiative for the preservation of freedom, current compulsory education is a tool of industrialism and of a rigidly stratified…

  16. Traps and trapping techniques for adult mosquito control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview is presented of the recent advancements in research activities conducted to evaluate mosquito traps, insecticide-impregnated targets baited with combinations of attractants, and strategies for using mass trapping techniques for adult mosquito population management. Technologies that use...

  17. Optical trapping assembling of clusters and nanoparticles in solution by CW and femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuhara, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Teruki; Yuyama, Ken-ichi; Usman, Anwar

    2015-02-01

    Laser trapping of molecular systems in solution is classified into three cases: JUST TRAPPING, EXTENDED TRAPPING, and NUCLEATION and GROWTH. The nucleation in amino acid solutions depends on where the 1064-nm CW trapping laser is focused, and crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation are induced by laser trapping at the solution/air surface and the solution/glass interface, respectively. Laser trapping crystallization is achieved even in unsaturated solution, on which unique controls of crystallization are made possible. Crystal size is arbitrarily controlled by tuning laser power for a plate-like anhydrous crystal of l-phenylalanine. The α- or γ-crystal polymorph of glycine is selectively prepared by changing laser power and polarization. Further efficient trapping of nanoparticles and their following ejection induced by femtosecond laser pulses are introduced as unique trapping phenomena and finally future perspective is presented.

  18. Surgical management of retraction pockets of the pars tensa with cartilage and perichondrial grafts.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, P; Mills, R

    2006-09-01

    Stable, self-cleansing retraction pockets of the pars tensa are common incidental findings and require no treatment. In other cases, recurrent discharge occurs and there may also be associated conductive hearing loss. In a minority of cases, cholesteatoma may develop. This paper presents the results of surgery using a graft composed of cartilage and perichondrium for retraction pockets involving the posterior half of the tympanic membrane, as well as early results using a larger graft designed to manage retraction of the entire tympanic membrane. Data on 51 patients with posterior retraction pockets are presented. Forty-two (82 per cent) patients had no aural discharge one year following surgery and the tympanic membrane was not retracted in 43 (84 per cent). The larger 'Mercedes-Benz' graft was used in four patients and the results obtained suggested that it may prove a successful technique for extensive retraction pockets.

  19. Nucleotide pocket thermodynamics measured by EPR reveal how energy partitioning relates myosin speed to efficiency.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Thomas J; Naber, Nariman; Franks-Skiba, Kathy; Dunn, Alexander R; Eldred, Catherine C; Berger, Christopher L; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Spudich, James A; Swank, Douglas M; Pate, Edward; Cooke, Roger

    2011-03-18

    We have used spin-labeled ADP to investigate the dynamics of the nucleotide-binding pocket in a series of myosins, which have a range of velocities. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that the pocket is in equilibrium between open and closed conformations. In the absence of actin, the closed conformation is favored. When myosin binds actin, the open conformation becomes more favored, facilitating nucleotide release. We found that faster myosins favor a more closed pocket in the actomyosin•ADP state, with smaller values of ΔH(0) and ΔS(0), even though these myosins release ADP at a faster rate. A model involving a partitioning of free energy between work-generating steps prior to rate-limiting ADP release explains both the unexpected correlation between velocity and opening of the pocket and the observation that fast myosins are less efficient than slow myosins.

  20. Yeasts associated with the infrabuccal pocket and colonies of the carpenter ant Camponotus vicinus.

    PubMed

    Mankowski, M E; Morrell, J J

    2004-01-01

    After scanning electron microscopy indicated that the infrabuccal pockets of carpenter ants (Camponotus vicinus) contained numerous yeast-like cells, yeast associations were examined in six colonies of carpenter ants from two locations in Benton County in western Oregon. Samples from the infrabuccal-pocket contents and worker ant exoskeletons, interior galleries of each colony, and detritus and soil around the colonies were plated on yeast-extract/ malt-extract agar augmented with 1 M hydrochloric acid and incubated at 25 C. Yeasts were identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and physiological attributes with the BIOLOG(®) microbial identification system. Yeast populations from carpenter ant nest material and material surrounding the nest differed from those obtained from the infrabuccal pocket. Debaryomyces polymorphus was isolated more often from the infrabuccal pocket than from other material. This species has also been isolated from other ant species, but its role in colony nutrition is unknown.

  1. Complex home care: Part 2- family annual income, insurance premium, and out-of-pocket expenses.

    PubMed

    Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Ross, Vicki M; Smith, Carol E; Clements, Faye; Williams, Arthur R

    2010-01-01

    Annual costs paid by families for intravenous infusion of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) health insurance premiums, deductibles, co-payments for health services, and the wide range of out-of-pocket home health care expenses are significant. The costs of managing complex chronic care at home cannot be completely understood until all out-of-pocket costs have been defined, described, and tabulated. Non-reimbursed and out-of-pocket costs paid by families over years for complex chronic care negatively impact the financial stability of families. National health care reform must take into account the long-term financial burdens of families caring for those with complex home care. Any changes that may increase the out-of-pocket costs or health insurance costs to these families can also have a negative long-term impact on society when greater numbers of patients declare bankruptcy or qualify for medical disability.

  2. Yeasts associated with the infrabuccal pocket and colonies of the carpenter ant Camponotus vicinus.

    PubMed

    Mankowski, M E; Morrell, J J

    2004-01-01

    After scanning electron microscopy indicated that the infrabuccal pockets of carpenter ants (Camponotus vicinus) contained numerous yeast-like cells, yeast associations were examined in six colonies of carpenter ants from two locations in Benton County in western Oregon. Samples from the infrabuccal-pocket contents and worker ant exoskeletons, interior galleries of each colony, and detritus and soil around the colonies were plated on yeast-extract/ malt-extract agar augmented with 1 M hydrochloric acid and incubated at 25 C. Yeasts were identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and physiological attributes with the BIOLOG(®) microbial identification system. Yeast populations from carpenter ant nest material and material surrounding the nest differed from those obtained from the infrabuccal pocket. Debaryomyces polymorphus was isolated more often from the infrabuccal pocket than from other material. This species has also been isolated from other ant species, but its role in colony nutrition is unknown. PMID:21148849

  3. Surgical management of retraction pockets of the pars tensa with cartilage and perichondrial grafts.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, P; Mills, R

    2006-09-01

    Stable, self-cleansing retraction pockets of the pars tensa are common incidental findings and require no treatment. In other cases, recurrent discharge occurs and there may also be associated conductive hearing loss. In a minority of cases, cholesteatoma may develop. This paper presents the results of surgery using a graft composed of cartilage and perichondrium for retraction pockets involving the posterior half of the tympanic membrane, as well as early results using a larger graft designed to manage retraction of the entire tympanic membrane. Data on 51 patients with posterior retraction pockets are presented. Forty-two (82 per cent) patients had no aural discharge one year following surgery and the tympanic membrane was not retracted in 43 (84 per cent). The larger 'Mercedes-Benz' graft was used in four patients and the results obtained suggested that it may prove a successful technique for extensive retraction pockets. PMID:16740207

  4. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector. Final Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, T.; Rempe, Joy; McGregor, Douglas; Ugorowski, Philip; Reichenberger, Michael; Ito, Takashi; Villard, J.-F.

    2014-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to accurately

  5. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector -- FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger

    2012-09-01

    A research program has been initiated by the NEET program for developing and testing compact miniature fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When implemented, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Materials Test Reactors (MTRs).Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, high performance reactors and commercial nuclear power plants. Deployment of Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) in US DOE-NE program irradiation tests will address several challenges: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe, MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different then current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions in typical high performance MTR irradiation tests. New high-fidelity reactor physics codes will need a small, accurate, multipurpose in-core sensor to validate the codes without perturbing the validation experiment; MPFDs fill this requirement. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs; allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be simultaneously deployed; obtaining data required to visualize the reactor flux and temperature profiles. This report summarizes the research progress for year 1 of this 3 year project. An updated design of the MPFD has been developed, materials and tools to support the new design have been procured, construction methods to support the new design have been initiated at INL’s HTTL and KSU’s SMART Laboratory, plating methods are being updated at KSU, new

  6. [The early diagnostics of retraction pockets of the tympanic membrane in children].

    PubMed

    Karneeva, O V; Poliakov, D P; Zelikovich, E I

    2012-01-01

    The most important literature data concerning retraction pockets (RP) of the tympanic membrane and their currently accepted classification are presented. The objective of the present work was to develop criteria for the objective estimation of the dynamic state of the tympanic retraction pockets in children presenting with non-perforating forms of otitis media. A total of 138 children suffering from exudative otitis media were available for observation; retraction pockets were found in the majority of these patients. Otomicroscopic characteristics of various RP species are described. A diagnostic approach to the observation of the dynamic state of the tympanic retraction pockets is proposed. The presence of the retraction pockets of the tympanic membrane is considered to be a risk factor of the development of cholesteatoma and chronic purulent pathology of the middle ear in the children. Deep retraction pockets without a controllable bottom and attic cholesteatomas were identified in 16 (11.6%) and 6 (4.3%) of the examined children respectively. They were treated by means of sparing otosurgery. PMID:22678634

  7. Periodontal pocket as a potential reservoir of high risk human papilloma virus: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dayakar, Manjunath Mundoor; Shipilova, Anna; Gupta, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are small DNA viruses that have been identified in periodontal pocket as well as gingival sulcus. High risk HPVs are also associated with a subset of head and neck carcinomas. HPV detection in periodontium has previously involved DNA detection. This study attempts to: (a) Detect the presence or absence of high risk HPV in marginal periodontiun by identifying E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells from samples obtained by periodontal pocket scraping. (b) Detect the percentage of HPV E6/E7 mRNA in cells of pocket scrapings, which is responsible for producing oncoproteins E6 and E7. Materials and Methods: Pocket scrapings from the periodontal pockets of eight subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis were taken the detection of presence or absence of E6, E7 mRNA was performed using in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. Results: HPV E6/E7 mRNA was detected in four of the eight samples. Conclusion: Presence of high risk human papillomaviruses in periodontal pockets patients of diagnosed with chronic periodontitis, not suffering from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the present day could link periodontitis to HPV related squamous cell carcinoma. Prevalence studies are needed detecting the presence of HPV in marginal periodontium as well as prospective studies of HPV positive periodontitis patients are required to explore this possible link. PMID:27143823

  8. Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins using residue preference methods.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhijun; Wang, Xicheng

    2009-01-01

    Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins is pivotal to protein function definition and drug discovery. In this study, we focus on determining the binding pockets in proteins for potential ligands without any a priori knowledge. Three methods based upon residue preference concept are proposed to predict ligand-binding pockets, where we deal with three types of residue preference (residue based, atom based and atom-contact-pair based preference), respectively. Two test sets were chosen to examine the proposed methods. Two different identification rules (named Top1 and Top2) are used to detect ligand-binding pockets. The results show that the atom-contact-pair method has good accuracy and high efficiency, better than the other two methods. By means of preference analysis for amino acids and atom-contact-pairs, we find that Gly and atom-contact-pairs on aromatic residues appear at ligand-binding pockets more frequently. The former favors pocket flexibility, and the latter shows that aggregate hydrophobic surface may play an important role in complex formation.

  9. Predicting peptide binding to MHC pockets via molecular modeling, implicit solvation, and global optimization.

    PubMed

    Schafroth, Heather D; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2004-02-15

    Development of a computational prediction method based on molecular modeling, global optimization, and implicit solvation has produced accurate structure and relative binding affinity predictions for peptide amino acids binding to five pockets of the MHC molecule HLA-DRB1*0101. Because peptide binding to MHC molecules is essential to many immune responses, development of such a method for understanding and predicting the forces that drive binding is crucial for pharmaceutical design and disease treatment. Underlying the development of this prediction method are two hypotheses. The first is that pockets formed by the peptide binding groove of MHC molecules are independent, separating the prediction of peptide amino acids that bind within individual pockets from those that bind between pockets. The second hypothesis is that the native state of a system composed of an amino acid bound to a protein pocket corresponds to the system's lowest free energy. The prediction method developed from these hypotheses uses atomistic-level modeling, deterministic global optimization, and three methods of implicit solvation: solvent-accessible area, solvent-accessible volume, and Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics. The method predicts relative binding affinities of peptide amino acids for pockets of HLA-DRB1*0101 by determining computationally an amino acid's global minimum energy conformation. Prediction results from the method are in agreement with X-ray crystallography data and experimental binding assays.

  10. Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins using residue preference methods.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhijun; Wang, Xicheng

    2009-01-01

    Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins is pivotal to protein function definition and drug discovery. In this study, we focus on determining the binding pockets in proteins for potential ligands without any a priori knowledge. Three methods based upon residue preference concept are proposed to predict ligand-binding pockets, where we deal with three types of residue preference (residue based, atom based and atom-contact-pair based preference), respectively. Two test sets were chosen to examine the proposed methods. Two different identification rules (named Top1 and Top2) are used to detect ligand-binding pockets. The results show that the atom-contact-pair method has good accuracy and high efficiency, better than the other two methods. By means of preference analysis for amino acids and atom-contact-pairs, we find that Gly and atom-contact-pairs on aromatic residues appear at ligand-binding pockets more frequently. The former favors pocket flexibility, and the latter shows that aggregate hydrophobic surface may play an important role in complex formation. PMID:19689426

  11. Phosphorous trapped within buckminsterfullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, J. A.; Greer, J. C.; Harneit, W.; Weidinger, A.

    2002-05-01

    Under normal circumstances, when covalent molecules form, electrons are exchanged between atoms to form bonds. However, experiment and theoretical computations reveal exactly the opposite effect for the formation of group V elements nitrogen and phosphorous encapsulated within a buckminsterfullerene molecule. The C60 carbon cage remains intact upon encapsulation of the atom, whereas the electronic charge cloud of the N or P atom contracts. We have studied the chemical, spin, and thermodynamic properties of endohedral phosphorous (P@C60) and have compared our results with earlier findings for N@C60. From a combined experimental and theoretical vantage, we are able to elucidate a model for the interaction between the trapped group V atom and the fullerene cage. A picture emerges for the electronic structure of these complexes, whereby an atom is trapped within a fullerene, and interacts weakly with the molecular orbitals of the C60 cage.

  12. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  13. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  14. Filter vapor trap

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  15. Synthesis of a "super bulky" guanidinate possessing an expandable coordination pocket.

    PubMed

    Maity, Arnab K; Fortier, Skye; Griego, Leonel; Metta-Magaña, Alejandro J

    2014-08-01

    Friedel-Crafts alkylation of 4-tert-butylaniline with 2 equiv of benzhydrol affords bulky 2,6-bis(diphenylmethyl)-4-tert-butylaniline (Ar*NH2) in good yield, which can be readily synthesized on a tens of grams scale. The reaction of 6 equiv of Ar*NH2 with triphosgene generates the symmetric urea (Ar*NH)2CO, which, upon dehydration with a P2O5/Al2O3 slurry in pyridine, produces the sterically encumbered carbodiimide (Ar*N)2C as an air-stable white solid. The treatment of (Ar*N)2C with LiN═C(t)Bu2 in tetrahydrofuran cleanly gives the monomeric lithium guanidinate Li[(Ar)*ketguan], free of coordinating solvent, in 85% yield. Protonation of Li[(Ar)*ketguan] with lutidinium chloride produces the guanidine (Ar)*ketguanH (MW = 1112.60 g/mol), which is easily derivatized to give the monomeric alkali metal complexes M[(Ar)*ketguan] (M = K, Cs) in 94% and 51% yield, respectively. The solid-state molecular structures of M[(Ar)*ketguan] (M = Li, K, Cs) show formally two-coordinate alkali metal cations encapsulated within a hydrophobic coordination pocket formed by the peripheral diphenylmethyl substituents of the guanidinate. Remarkably, percent buried volume analyses (% V(Bur)) of M[(Ar)*ketguan] [M = Li (94.8% V(Bur)), K (92.1% V(Bur)), Cs (81.7% V(Bur))] reveal a coordination cavity that adjusts to individually accommodate the variously sized metal ions despite the highly encumbering nature of the ligand. This demonstrates a flexible ligand framework that is able to stabilize low-coordinate metal centers within a "super bulky" coordination environment. PMID:25029088

  16. Magnetic trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Sokolov, A V; Chebakov, K A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevskii, N N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2011-08-31

    For the first time ultra-cold thulium atoms were trapped in a magnetic quadrupole trap with a small field gradient (20 Gs cm{sup -1}). The atoms were loaded from a cloud containing 4x10{sup 5} atoms that were preliminarily cooled in a magneto-optical trap to the sub-Doppler temperature of 80 {mu}K. As many as 4x10{sup 4} atoms were trapped in the magnetic trap at the temperature of 40 {mu}K. By the character of trap population decay the lifetime of atoms was determined (0.5 s) and an upper estimate was obtained for the rate constant of inelastic binary collisions for spin-polarised thulium atoms in the ground state (g{sub in} < 10{sup -11}cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). (magnetic traps)

  17. Experiments with trapped hydrogen atoms and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    1995-01-01

    The earliest trapped atom coherent resonance experiments were with material traps or bottles. In the atomic hydrogen maser the atoms are trapped inside a teflon-coated quartz bulb for about a second. Neutrons have been trapped for hundreds of seconds in suitably coated bottles or in superconducting magnetic traps. Results from experiments with trapped atoms and neutrons are given.

  18. Experiments with trapped hydrogen atoms and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-03-01

    The earliest trapped atom coherent resonance experiments were with material traps or bottles. In the atomic hydrogen maser, the atoms are trapped inside a teflon-coated quartz bulb for about a second. Neutrons have been trapped for hundreds of seconds in suitably coated bottles or in superconducting magnetic traps. Results from experiments with trapped atoms and neutrons are reported.

  19. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    SciTech Connect

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  20. Coherent population trapping magnetometer by differential detecting magneto–optic rotation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Gu, Si-Hong

    2016-09-01

    A pocket coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic magnetometer scheme that uses a vertical cavity surface emitting laser as a light source is proposed and experimentally investigated. Using the differential detecting magneto–optic rotation effect, a CPT spectrum with the background canceled and a high signal-to-noise ratio is obtained. The experimental results reveal that the sensitivity of the proposed scheme can be improved by half an order, and the ability to detect weak magnetic fields is extended one-fold. Therefore, the proposed scheme is suited to realize a pocket-size CPT magnetometer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304362 and 61434005).

  1. Atom trap trace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  2. Out-of-pocket expenses for maternity care in rural Bangladesh: a public-private comparison.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Moshiur; Rob, Ubaidur; Noor, Forhana Rahman; Bellows, Benjamin

    Out-of-pocket expenses incurred by women for availing maternal healthcare services at public and private health facilities in Bangladesh were examined using a baseline household survey evaluating the impact of demand side financing vouchers on utilization and service delivery for maternal healthcare. The survey was conducted in 2010 among 3,300 women who gave birth in the previous 12 months from the start of data collection. Information on costs incurred to receive antenatal, delivery, and postnatal care services was collected. Findings reveal that the majority of women reported paying out-of-pocket expenses for availing maternal healthcare services both at public and private health facilities. Out-of-pocket expenses include registration, consultation, laboratory examination, medicine, transportation, and other associated costs incurred for receiving maternal healthcare services. On average, women paid US$3.60 out-of-pocket expenses for receiving antenatal care at public health facilities and US$12.40 at private health facilities. Similarly, women paid one and half times more for normal (US$42.30) and cesarean deliveries (US$136.20) at private health facilities compared to public health facilities. On the other hand, costs for postnatal care services did not vary significantly between public and private health facilities. Utilization of maternal healthcare services can be improved if out-of-pocket expenses can be minimized. At the same time, effective demand generation strategies are necessary to encourage women to utilize health facilities.

  3. The ciliary pocket: an endocytic membrane domain at the base of primary and motile cilia.

    PubMed

    Molla-Herman, Anahi; Ghossoub, Rania; Blisnick, Thierry; Meunier, Alice; Serres, Catherine; Silbermann, Flora; Emmerson, Chris; Romeo, Kelly; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Schmitt, Alain; Saunier, Sophie; Spassky, Nathalie; Bastin, Philippe; Benmerah, Alexandre

    2010-05-15

    Cilia and flagella are eukaryotic organelles involved in multiple cellular functions. The primary cilium is generally non motile and found in numerous vertebrate cell types where it controls key signalling pathways. Despite a common architecture, ultrastructural data suggest some differences in their organisation. Here, we report the first detailed characterisation of the ciliary pocket, a depression of the plasma membrane in which the primary cilium is rooted. This structure is found at low frequency in kidney epithelial cells (IMCD3) but is associated with virtually all primary cilia in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE1). Transmission and scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence analysis and videomicroscopy revealed that the ciliary pocket establishes closed links with the actin-based cytoskeleton and that it is enriched in active and dynamic clathrin-coated pits. The existence of the ciliary pocket was confirmed in mouse tissues bearing primary cilia (cumulus), as well as motile cilia and flagella (ependymal cells and spermatids). The ciliary pocket shares striking morphological and functional similarities with the flagellar pocket of Trypanosomatids, a trafficking-specialised membrane domain at the base of the flagellum. Our data therefore highlight the conserved role of membrane trafficking in the vicinity of cilia. PMID:20427320

  4. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Richard J; Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-02-15

    Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins--proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution.

  5. Medicare Advantage Members' Expected Out-Of-Pocket Spending For Inpatient And Skilled Nursing Facility Services.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Laura M; Grebla, Regina C; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N

    2015-06-01

    Inpatient and skilled nursing facility (SNF) cost sharing in Medicare Advantage (MA) plans may reduce unnecessary use of these services. However, large out-of-pocket expenses potentially limit access to care and encourage beneficiaries at high risk of needing inpatient and postacute care to avoid or leave MA plans. In 2011 new federal regulations restricted inpatient and skilled nursing facility cost sharing and mandated limits on out-of-pocket spending in MA plans. After these regulations, MA members in plans with low premiums averaged $1,758 in expected out-of-pocket spending for an episode of seven hospital days and twenty skilled nursing facility days. Among members with the same low-premium plan in 2010 and 2011, 36 percent of members belonged to plans that added an out-of-pocket spending limit in 2011. However, these members also had a $293 increase in average cost sharing for an inpatient and skilled nursing facility episode, possibly to offset plans' expenses in financing out-of-pocket limits. Some MA beneficiaries may still have difficulty affording acute and postacute care despite greater regulation of cost sharing.

  6. Medicare Advantage Members’ Expected Out-Of-Pocket Spending For Inpatient And Skilled Nursing Facility Services

    PubMed Central

    Keohane, Laura M.; Grebla, Regina C.; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N.

    2015-01-01

    Inpatient and skilled nursing facility (SNF) cost sharing in Medicare Advantage (MA) plans may reduce unnecessary use of these services. However, large out-of-pocket expenses potentially limit access to care and encourage beneficiaries at high risk of needing inpatient and postacute care to avoid or leave MA plans. In 2011 new federal regulations restricted inpatient and skilled nursing facility cost sharing and mandated limits on out-of-pocket spending in MA plans. After these regulations, MA members in plans with low premiums averaged $1,758 in expected out-of-pocket spending for an episode of seven hospital days and twenty skilled nursing facility days. Among members with the same low-premium plan in 2010 and 2011, 36 percent of members belonged to plans that added an out-of-pocket spending limit in 2011. However, these members also had a $293 increase in average cost sharing for an inpatient and skilled nursing facility episode, possibly to offset plans’ expenses in financing out-of-pocket limits. Some MA beneficiaries may still have difficulty affording acute and postacute care despite greater regulation of cost sharing. PMID:26056208

  7. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Richard J; Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-02-15

    Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins--proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution. PMID:26746239

  8. Functional importance of a peripheral pocket in mammalian cytochrome P450 2B enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Hee; Liu, Jingbao; Lee, Ga-Young; Halpert, James R; Wilderman, P Ross

    2015-10-15

    The functional importance of a peripheral pocket found in previously published X-ray crystal structures of CYP2B4 and CYP2B6 was probed using a biophysical approach. Introduction of tryptophan within the pocket of CYP2B4 at F202 or I241 leads to marked impairment of 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC) or 7-benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylation efficiency; a similar substitution at F195, near the surface access to the pocket, does not affect these activities. The analogous CYP2B6 F202W mutant is inactive in the 7-EFC O-dealkylation assay. The stoichiometry of 7-EFC deethylation suggested that the decreased activity of F202W and I241W in CYP2B4 and lack of activity of F202W in CYP2B6 coincided with a sharp increase in the flux of reducing equivalents through the oxidase shunt to produce excess water. The results indicate that the chemical identity of residues within this peripheral pocket, but not at the mouth of the pocket, is important in substrate turnover and redox coupling, likely through effects on active site topology.

  9. A MORN Repeat Protein Facilitates Protein Entry into the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma brucei lives in the bloodstream of infected mammalian hosts, fully exposed to the adaptive immune system. It relies on a very high rate of endocytosis to clear bound antibodies from its cell surface. All endo- and exocytosis occurs at a single site on its plasma membrane, an intracellular invagination termed the flagellar pocket. Coiled around the neck of the flagellar pocket is a multiprotein complex containing the repeat motif protein T. brucei MORN1 (TbMORN1). In this study, the phenotypic effects of TbMORN1 depletion in the mammalian-infective form of T. brucei were analyzed. Depletion of TbMORN1 resulted in a rapid enlargement of the flagellar pocket. Dextran, a polysaccharide marker for fluid phase endocytosis, accumulated inside the enlarged flagellar pocket. Unexpectedly, however, the proteins concanavalin A and bovine serum albumin did not do so, and concanavalin A was instead found to concentrate outside it. This suggests that TbMORN1 may have a role in facilitating the entry of proteins into the flagellar pocket. PMID:26318396

  10. Chiral Weyl Pockets and Fermi Surface Topology of the Weyl Semimetal TaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, F.; Naumann, M.; Wu, S.-C.; Sun, Y.; Schmidt, M.; Borrmann, H.; Felser, C.; Yan, B.; Hassinger, E.

    2016-09-01

    Tantalum arsenide is a member of the noncentrosymmetric monopnictides, which are putative Weyl semimetals. In these materials, three-dimensional chiral massless quasiparticles, the so-called Weyl fermions, are predicted to induce novel quantum mechanical phenomena, such as the chiral anomaly and topological surface states. However, their chirality is only well defined if the Fermi level is close enough to the Weyl points that separate Fermi surface pockets of opposite chirality exist. In this Letter, we present the bulk Fermi surface topology of high quality single crystals of TaAs, as determined by angle-dependent Shubnikov-de Haas and de Haas-van Alphen measurements combined with ab initio band-structure calculations. Quantum oscillations originating from three different types of Fermi surface pockets were found in magnetization, magnetic torque, and magnetoresistance measurements performed in magnetic fields up to 14 T and temperatures down to 1.8 K. Of these Fermi pockets, two are pairs of topologically nontrivial electron pockets around the Weyl points and one is a trivial hole pocket. Unlike the other members of the noncentrosymmetric monopnictides, TaAs is the first Weyl semimetal candidate with the Fermi energy sufficiently close to both types of Weyl points to generate chiral quasiparticles at the Fermi surface.

  11. ALiBERO: Evolving a team of complementary pocket conformations rather than a single leader

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Manuel; Totrov, Max; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Docking and virtual screening (VS) reach maximum potential when the receptor displays the structural changes needed for accurate ligand binding. Unfortunately, these conformational changes are often poorly represented in experimental structures or homology models, debilitating their docking performance. Recently, we have shown that receptors optimized with our LiBERO method (Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization) were able to better discriminate active ligands from inactives in flexible-ligand VS docking experiments. The LiBERO method relies on the use of ligand information for selecting the best performing individual pockets from ensembles derived from normal mode analysis or Monte Carlo. Here we present ALiBERO, a new computational tool that has expanded the pocket selection from single to multiple, allowing for automatic iteration of the sampling-selection procedure. The selection of pockets is performed by a dual method that uses exhaustive combinatorial search plus individual addition of pockets, selecting only those that maximize the discrimination of known actives compounds from decoys. The resulting optimized pockets showed increased VS performance when later used in much larger unrelated test sets consisting of biologically active and inactive ligands. In this paper we will describe the design and implementation of the algorithm, using as a reference the human estrogen receptor alpha. PMID:22947092

  12. Spectroscopy of trapped francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Joshua Matus

    Atomic francium, which has no stable isotopes, is an attractive candidate for measurements of parity non-conservation. A heavy ion fusion reaction produces Fr at the Stony Brook superconducting LINAC, and we confine about 10,000 atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We made precise measurements (300 ppm) of the hyperfine splitting of the 7P1/2 state. Combining these measurements with previous measurements of the ground state hyperfine splitting, enabled us to extract the hyperfine anomaly in these states, and thus probe the nuclear magnetization. We located the previously unobserved 7D states and measured their energies and hyperfine splittings. Using time-correlated single-photon counting, we measured radiative lifetimes of 73.6 +/- 0.3 ns for the 7D3/2 level and 67.7 +/- 2.9 ns for the 7D5/2 level. We have constructed a new apparatus for efficient trapping of Fr in preparation for a measurement of the nuclear anapole moment.

  13. ATRAP - Progress Towards Trapped Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Grzonka, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E.A.; Storry, C.H.; Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Lesage, D.; Levitt, B.; Speck, A.; Haensch, T.W.

    2005-10-26

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom.Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen.For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trapping tests of charged particles within a combined magnetic/Penning trap have started at ATRAP.

  14. The effects of cosmic Particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: V. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. Part I. physiological studies.

    PubMed

    Leon, H A; Suri, K; McTigue, M; Smith, J; Cooper, W; Miquel, J; Ashley, W W; Behnke, A R; Saunders, J F

    1975-04-01

    Tests were carried out on pocket mice to ascertain their tolerance to elevated oxygen pressures alone and to a combination of hyperoxta and heat in excess of that expected during the flight of the mice on Apollo XVII. the mice withstood oxygen partial pressures up to 12 pst at normal room temperature (24 degrees C, 75 degrees F) over a period of 7 days. A few mice previously exposed to increased PO2 died in the course of exposure to an oxygen pressure of 10 pst or 12 psi (517 mm or 620 mm Hg) for 13 d in ambient heat of 32 degrees C (90 degrees F). Supplemental vitamin E and physiological saline loading given prior to exposure had no apparent protective effect. The overall conclusion was that the pocket mice which were to go on Apollo XVII could readily survive the ambient atmosphere to which they would be exposed.

  15. Halo ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel E; Wang, Miao; Tolley, Samuel E; Maas, Jeffrey D; Hawkins, Aaron R; Rockwood, Alan L; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Edgar D; Lee, Milton L

    2007-04-01

    We describe a novel radio frequency ion trap mass analyzer based on toroidal trapping geometry and microfabrication technology. The device, called the halo ion trap, consists of two parallel ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are imprinted with sets of concentric ring electrodes. Radii of the imprinted rings range from 5 to 12 mm, and the spacing between the plates is 4 mm. Unlike conventional ion traps, in which hyperbolic metal electrodes establish equipotential boundary conditions, electric fields in the halo ion trap are established by applying different radio frequency potentials to each ring. The potential on each ring can be independently optimized to provide the best trapping field. The halo ion trap features an open structure, allowing easy access for in situ ionization. The toroidal geometry provides a large trapping and analyzing volume, increasing the number of ions that can be stored and reducing the effects of space-charge on mass analysis. Preliminary mass spectra show resolution (m/Deltam) of 60-75 when the trap is operated at 1.9 MHz and 500 Vp-p. PMID:17335180

  16. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  17. DNA Separation Using Photoelectrophoretic Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Braiman, Avital; Thundat, Thomas George; Rudakov, Fedor M

    2011-01-01

    In our recent publications we presented a design that allows formation of highly localized and optically controlled electrophoretic traps. 1,2 We demonstrated that electrophoretic traps can be utilized for biomolecule photoconcentration, optically directed transport, and separation by size. 1,2 In the current publication we suggest a hybrid design for biomolecule separation which implements electrophoretic traps in tandem with well-established electrophoretic techniques. We perform Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate that the resolution of well-established electrophoretic techniques can be greatly enhanced by introducing photoelectrophoretic traps.

  18. Trapped-electron runaway effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Fisch, N. J.; Peysson, Y.

    2015-08-01

    In a tokamak, trapped electrons subject to a strong electric field cannot run away immediately, because their parallel velocity does not increase over a bounce period. However, they do pinch toward the tokamak center. As they pinch toward the center, the trapping cone becomes more narrow, so eventually they can be detrapped and run away. When they run away, trapped electrons will have a very different signature from circulating electrons subject to the Dreicer mechanism. The characteristics of what are called trapped-electron runaways are identified and quantified, including their distinguishable perpendicular velocity spectrum and radial extent.

  19. Half-bow sliding knot: modified suture technique for scleral fixation using the corneoscleral pocket.

    PubMed

    Chee, Soon-Phaik

    2011-09-01

    A modified suture technique for precise knot placement in the Hoffman corneoscleral pocket technique of scleral fixation is described. Both loops of the polypropylene suture passing from the intraocular device through the sclera and conjunctiva are retrieved from the pocket. A loop of suture is pulled through 3 suture throws made using the second suture loop, forming a half bow. Centration of the intraocular lens (IOL)-capsular bag is checked. If the suture tension is too tight, the surgeon can easily undo the knot of the half-bow knot by pulling it free and can then retie the sliding knot. When the IOL-capsular bag is centered, the suture loop is cut and the free end removed. The second suture end is retrieved from the pocket, and knot tying is completed without further adjustment to the tension. Posterior pressure on the intraocular device centers it and settles the knot within the sclera at the fixation point.

  20. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    SciTech Connect

    Paumel, K.; Baque, F.; Moysan, J.; Corneloup, G.; Chatain, D.

    2011-08-15

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  1. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Conserved Hydrophobic Pocket of Flavivirus Methyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongping; Liu, Lihui; Zou, Gang; Zhao, Yiwei; Li, Zhong; Lim, Siew Pheng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Li, Hongmin

    2010-01-01

    The flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) sequentially methylates the N7 and 2′-O positions of the viral RNA cap (GpppA-RNA → m7GpppA-RNA → m7GpppAm-RNA), using S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) as a methyl donor. We report here that sinefungin (SIN), an AdoMet analog, inhibits several flaviviruses through suppression of viral MTase. The crystal structure of West Nile virus MTase in complex with SIN inhibitor at 2.0-Å resolution revealed a flavivirus-conserved hydrophobic pocket located next to the AdoMet-binding site. The pocket is functionally critical in the viral replication and cap methylations. In addition, the N7 methylation efficiency was found to correlate with the viral replication ability. Thus, SIN analogs with modifications that interact with the hydrophobic pocket are potential specific inhibitors of flavivirus MTase. PMID:20685660

  2. A Conserved Pocket in the Dengue Virus Polymerase Identified through Fragment-based Screening.

    PubMed

    Noble, Christian G; Lim, Siew Pheng; Arora, Rishi; Yokokawa, Fumiaki; Nilar, Shahul; Seh, Cheah Chen; Wright, S Kirk; Benson, Timothy E; Smith, Paul W; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2016-04-15

    We performed a fragment screen on the dengue virus serotype 3 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase using x-ray crystallography. A screen of 1,400 fragments in pools of eight identified a single hit that bound in a novel pocket in the protein. This pocket is located in the polymerase palm subdomain and conserved across the four serotypes of dengue virus. The compound binds to the polymerase in solution as evidenced by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry analyses. Related compounds where a phenyl is replaced by a thiophene show higher affinity binding, indicating the potential for rational design. Importantly, inhibition of enzyme activity correlated with the binding affinity, showing that the pocket is functionally important for polymerase activity. This fragment is an excellent starting point for optimization through rational structure-based design.

  3. Detection and visualization of surface-pockets to enable phenotyping studies.

    PubMed

    Mosaliganti, Kishore; Janoos, Firdaus; Sharp, Richard; Ridgway, Randall; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Wenzel, Pamela; deBruin, Alain; Leone, Gustavo; Saltz, Joel

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a technique for detecting pockets on a surface-of-interest. A sequence of propagating fronts converging to the target surface is used as the basis for inspection. We compute a correspondence function between the initial and the target surface. This leads to a natural definition of the local feature size measured as the evolution distance between mapped points. Surface pockets are then extracted as salient clusters embedded in the feature space. The level-set initialization also determines the scale-space of the extracted pockets. Results are presented on a case-study in which the focus is to chronicle the phenotyping differences in genetically modified mouse placenta. Our results are validated based on manually verified ground-truth.

  4. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paumel, K.; Moysan, J.; Chatain, D.; Corneloup, G.; Baqué, F.

    2011-08-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  5. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Conserved Hydrophobic Pocket of Flavivirus Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    H Dong; L Liu; G Zou; Y Zhao; Z Li; S Lim; P Shi; H Li

    2011-12-31

    The flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) sequentially methylates the N7 and 2'-O positions of the viral RNA cap (GpppA-RNA {yields} m(7)GpppA-RNA {yields} m(7)GpppAm-RNA), using S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) as a methyl donor. We report here that sinefungin (SIN), an AdoMet analog, inhibits several flaviviruses through suppression of viral MTase. The crystal structure of West Nile virus MTase in complex with SIN inhibitor at 2.0-{angstrom} resolution revealed a flavivirus-conserved hydrophobic pocket located next to the AdoMet-binding site. The pocket is functionally critical in the viral replication and cap methylations. In addition, the N7 methylation efficiency was found to correlate with the viral replication ability. Thus, SIN analogs with modifications that interact with the hydrophobic pocket are potential specific inhibitors of flavivirus MTase.

  6. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. II - Effects on lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, G. A.; Corbett, R. L.; Klein, G.

    1975-01-01

    An electron microscope examination was carried out on the lungs of 11 pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that breathed oxygen at 10 psi or 12 psi partial pressure over a period of 7 d, at the end of which time they were decompressed to sea-level O2 pressure, either suddenly or in 30, 60, or 90 min. Vesiculation was noted in the endothelium of the alveolar-capillary wall in most of the animals and, occasionally, blebbing. Some mitochrondria were swollen in a few of the animals. Alveolar exudate was, in general, sparse. Compared with the lungs of other rodents, the lungs of pocket mice appeared relatively resistant to the toxic effects of oxygen. This conclusion needs, however, to be tempered by the fact that 5% N2 was used in the tests reported here. Nonetheless, the results suggest that the oxygen pressures anticipated on the flight of Apollo XVII should be well tolerated by the pocket mice.

  7. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design. PMID:27399277

  8. Inversion of axial coordination in myoglobin to create a "proximal" ligand binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Uno, Tadayuki; Sakamoto, Rikiharu; Tomisugi, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2003-09-01

    A ligand binding pocket has been created on the proximal side of the heme in porcine myoglobin by site-directed mutagenesis. Our starting point was the H64V/V68H double mutant which has been shown to have bis-histidine (His68 and His93) heme coordination [Dou, Y., Admiraal, S. J., Ikeda-Saito, M., Krzywda, S., Wilkinson, A. J., Li, T., Olson, J. S., Prince, R. C., Pickering, I. J., George, G. N. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 15993-16001]. The replacement of the proximal His93 ligand by noncoordinating Ala (H64V/V68H/H93A) or Gly (H64V/V68H/H93G) residues resulted unexpectedly in a six-coordinate low-spin species in both ferric and ferrous states. To test the hypothesis that the sixth coordinating ligand in the triple mutants was the imidazole of His97, this residue was mutated to Phe, in the quadruple mutants, H64V/V68H/H93A/H97F and H64V/V68H/H93G/H97F. The ferric quadruple mutants show a clear water/hydroxide alkaline transition and high cyanide and CO affinities, characteristics similar to those of wild-type myoglobin. The nu(Fe-CO) and nu(C-O) stretching frequencies in the ferrous-CO state of the quadruple mutants indicate that the "proximal" ligand binding heme pocket is less polar than the distal pocket in the wild-type protein. Thus, we conclude that the proximal heme pocket in the quadruple mutants has a similar affinity for exogenous ligands to the distal pocket of wild-type myoglobin but that the two pockets have different polarities. The quadruple mutants open up new approaches for developing heme chemistry on the myoglobin scaffold.

  9. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design.

  10. Traps and seals II. Stratigraphic/capillary traps

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    This text is a reprint belonging to a series of reprint volumes which in turn are part of the Treatise of Petroleum Geology. This volume contains papers that describe different stratigraphically controlled trap types, the preservation of porosity, and the importance of capillarity in trapping hydrocarbons.

  11. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    DOE PAGES

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; et al

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  12. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Wilson, S. D.; He, Rui -Hua

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  13. Ion-beam amorphization of semiconductors: A physical model based on the amorphous pocket population

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, K.R.C.; Jaraiz, M.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Rubio, J.E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Barbolla, J.; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a model for damage accumulation up to amorphization, based on the ion-implant damage structures commonly known as amorphous pockets. The model is able to reproduce the silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature for C, Si, and Ge ion implants. Its use as an analysis tool reveals an unexpected bimodal distribution of the defect population around a characteristic size, which is larger for heavier ions. The defect population is split in both size and composition, with small, pure interstitial and vacancy clusters below the characteristic size, and amorphous pockets with a balanced mixture of interstitials and vacancies beyond that size.

  14. How the Proximal Pocket May Influence the Enantiospecificities of Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Epoxidations of Olefins

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexander N.; Chatfield, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase-catalyzed enantiospecific epoxidations of olefins are of significant biotechnological interest. Typical enantiomeric excesses are in the range of 66%–97% and translate into free energy differences on the order of 1 kcal/mol. These differences are generally attributed to the effect of the distal pocket. In this paper, we show that the influence of the proximal pocket on the electron transfer mechanism in the rate-limiting event may be just as significant for a quantitatively accurate account of the experimentally-measured enantiospecificities. PMID:27517911

  15. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Area 1 trap limits. The Area 1 trap limit is 800 traps. Federally permitted lobster fishing vessels shall not fish with, deploy in, possess in, or haul back...

  16. Cryogenic ion trapping systems with surface-electrode traps.

    PubMed

    Antohi, P B; Schuster, D; Akselrod, G M; Labaziewicz, J; Ge, Y; Lin, Z; Bakr, W S; Chuang, I L

    2009-01-01

    We present two simple cryogenic rf ion trap systems in which cryogenic temperatures and ultra high vacuum pressures can be reached in as little as 12 h. The ion traps are operated either in a liquid helium bath cryostat or in a low vibration closed cycle cryostat. The fast turn around time and availability of buffer gas cooling made the systems ideal for testing surface-electrode ion traps. The vibration amplitude of the closed cycled cryostat was found to be below 106 nm. We evaluated the systems by loading surface-electrode ion traps with (88)Sr(+) ions using laser ablation, which is compatible with the cryogenic environment. Using Doppler cooling we observed small ion crystals in which optically resolved ions have a trapped lifetime over 2500 min.

  17. Solar energy trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for trapping solar energy for heating a fluid that could be subsequently used in turbines and similar devices. The apparatus includes an elongated vertical light pipe having an open end through which the visible spectrum of electromagnetic radiation from the sun passes to strike a tubular absorber. The light pipe has a coated interior surface of a low absorptivity and a high reflectivity at the visible wavelengths and a high absorptivity/emissivity ratio at infrared wavelengths. The tubular absorber has a coating on the surface for absorbing visible wavelengths to heat the fluid passing through. Infrared wave lengths are radiated from the tubular absorber back into the light pipe for heating fluid passing through a tubular coil wound around it.

  18. Effects of ozone and sulfuric acid aerosol on gas trapping in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Silbaugh, S.A.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Four groups of 20 guinea pigs were sequentially exposed by inhalation to either air followed by sulfuric acid aerosol, ozone followed by sulfuric acid aerosol, ozone followed by air, or air followed by air to determine whether ozone preexposure sensitizes guinea pigs to the airway constrictive effects of sulfuric acid aerosol. All first exposures to ozone or air were 2 h in duration; all second exposures to sulfuric acid or air were for 1 h. All ozone and sulfuric acid exposures were 0.8 ppm and 12 mg/m3, respectively. Animals were observed for respiratory distress during exposure, and excised lungs were quantitated for trapped gas and wet/dry ratios. None of the guinea pigs developed dyspnea, and wet/dry ratios were not altered. Ozone significantly (p less than 0.05) increased trapped gas volumes, which were 44% (ozone-acid) to 68% (ozone-air) greater than in the air-air group. Trapped gas volume was 23% greater in the ozone-acid group than in the air-acid group, but the difference was not statistically significant (p less than 0.20). Thus, ozone increased gas trapping but did not significantly sensitize guinea pigs to the bronchoconstrictive action of sulfuric acid.

  19. The Impact of the US Food and Drug Administration Chlorofluorocarbon Ban on Out-of-pocket Costs and Use of Albuterol Inhalers Among Individuals With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Anupam B.; Ho, Oliver; Goldman, Dana P.; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The US Clean Air Act prohibits use of nonessential ozone-depleting substances. In 2005, the US Food and Drug Administration announced the ban of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) albuterol inhalers by December 31, 2008. The policy resulted in the controversial replacement of generic CFC inhalers by more expensive, branded hydrofluoroalkane inhalers. The policy’s impact on out-of-pocket costs and utilization of albuterol is unknown. OBJECTIVE To study the impact of the US Food and Drug Administration’s CFC ban on out-of-pocket costs and utilization of albuterol inhalers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Using private insurance data from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2010, we investigated the effect of the CFC ban on out-of-pocket costs and utilization of albuterol inhalers among individuals with asthma (109 428 adults; 37 281 children), as well as asthma-related hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and outpatient visits. We estimated multivariable models adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, and mean out-of-pocket costs of albuterol inhalers in an individual’s drug plan. We analyzed whether effects varied between adults vs children and those with persistent vs nonpersistent asthma. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Pharmacy claims for albuterol inhalers, as well as asthma-related hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and outpatient visits. RESULTS The mean out-of-pocket albuterol cost rose from $13.60 (95% CI, $13.40–$13.70) per prescription in 2004 to $25.00 (95% CI, $24.80–$25.20) immediately after the 2008 ban. By the end of 2010, costs had lowered to $21.00 (95% CI, $20.80–$21.20) per prescription. Overall albuterol inhaler use steadily declined from 2004 to 2010. Steep declines in use of generic CFC inhalers occurred after the fourth quarter of 2006 and were almost fully offset by increases in use of hydrofluoroalkane inhalers. In multivariable analyses, a $10 increase in out-of-pocket albuterol prescription costs was estimated to

  20. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  1. Nontoxic Antifreeze for Insect Traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Propylene glycol in water is a safe and effective alternative to ethylene glycol as a capture liquid in insect traps (pitfalls, flight intercepts, pan traps). Propylene glycol formulations are readily available because it is the primary (95%) ingredient in certain automotive antifreeze formulations...

  2. Trapped surfaces in spherical stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bizon, P.; Malec, E.; O'Murchadha, N.

    1988-09-05

    We give necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of trapped surfaces in spherically symmetric spacetimes. These conditions show that the formation of trapped surfaces depends on both the degree of concentration and the average flow of the matter. The result can be considered as a partial validation of the cosmic-censorship hypothesis.

  3. Mass trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass trapping has been found to be highly effective for control of pest fruit flies when populations are low and a highly effective lure is available for the target species. Successful population control through mass trapping is an indicator that attract-and-kill bait stations may be equally succes...

  4. Defect trapping of ion-implanted deuterium in nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Besenbacher, F.; Bottiger, J.; Myers, S.M.

    1982-05-01

    Trapping of ion-implanted deuterium by lattice defects in nickel has been studied by ion-beam-analysis techniques in the temperature range between 30 and 380 K. The deuterium-depth profiles were determined by measuring either the ..cap alpha.. particles or the protons from the /sup 3/He-excited nuclear reaction D(/sup 3/He,..cap alpha..)p, and the deuterium lattice location was obtained by means of ion channeling. Linear-ramp annealing (1 K/min) following a 10-keV D/sup +/ implantation in nickel produced two annealing stages at 275 and 320 K, respectively. The release-vs-temperature data were analyzed by solving the diffusion equation with appropriate trapping terms, yielding 0.24 and 0.43 eV for the trap-binding enthalpies associated with the two stages, referred to as an untrapped solution site. The 0.24-eV trap corresponds to deuterium close to the octahedral interstitial site where it is believed to be trapped at a vacancy, whereas it is suggested that the defect correlated with the 0.43-eV trap is a multiple-vacancy defect. The previously air-exposed and electropolished nickel surface was essentially permeable; the surface-recombination coefficient was determined to be K> or approx. =10/sup -19/ cm/sup 4//s at 350 K.

  5. Nanocarpets for Trapping Microscopic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noca, Flavio; Chen, Fei; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Michael; Hoenk, Michael; Kowalczyk, Robert; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Nanocarpets that is, carpets of carbon nanotubes are undergoing development as means of trapping microscopic particles for scientific analysis. Examples of such particles include inorganic particles, pollen, bacteria, and spores. Nanocarpets can be characterized as scaled-down versions of ordinary macroscopic floor carpets, which trap dust and other particulate matter, albeit not purposefully. Nanocarpets can also be characterized as mimicking both the structure and the particle-trapping behavior of ciliated lung epithelia, the carbon nanotubes being analogous to cilia. Carbon nanotubes can easily be chemically functionalized for selective trapping of specific particles of interest. One could, alternatively, use such other three-dimensionally-structured materials as aerogels and activated carbon for the purposeful trapping of microscopic particles. However, nanocarpets offer important advantages over these alternative materials: (1) Nanocarpets are amenable to nonintrusive probing by optical means; and (2) Nanocarpets offer greater surface-to-volume ratios.

  6. Calibration of optical traps by dual trapping of one bead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutov, Pavel; Schieber, Jay

    2014-03-01

    Optical trapping and tracking is a powerful method for many biological and rheological applications. Recent advances in microrheological techniques, like two-point microrheology, allow probing mechanical properties of viscoelastic networks with mesh size bigger than the size of the microbead itself, but require high signal to noise ratio. Noise level in the system can be reduced by removing active elements, like acousto-optical deflectors or galvo-mirrors from the optical train and making the trap fixed. We introduce a method for optical trap calibration that is suitable for viscoelastic material and allows calibration of a fixed trap. The method is designed for use on experimental setups with two optical tweezers and based on pulling a particle with one trap while simultaneously holding it with the other. No piezo-stage is needed and only one optical trap must be movable with galvo-mirrors, piezo-mirrors or acousto-optical deflectors. The method combines advantages of commonly known PSD-fitting and fast-sweeping methods, allowing calibration of a completely fixed trap in a fluid of unknown viscosity/viscoelasticity. We acknowledge financial support of DARPA grant W911NF-09-1-0378.

  7. Improved Traps for Removing Gases From Coolant Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holladay, John; Ritchie, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Two documents discuss improvements in traps for removing noncondensable gases (e.g., air) from heat-transfer liquids (e.g., water) in spacecraft cooling systems. Noncondensable gases must be removed because they can interfere with operation. A typical trap includes a cylindrical hydrophobic membrane inside a cylindrical hydrophilic membrane, all surrounded by an outer cylindrical impermeable shell. The input mixture of gas bubbles and liquid flows into the annular volume between the membranes. Bubbles pass into the central hollow of the hydrophobic membrane and are vented. The liquid flows outward through the hydrophilic membrane and is recirculated.

  8. Investigations of Abrupt Movements of Optically Trapped Water Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Shawntel; McCann, Lowell I.

    2007-03-01

    We have used a single beam optical trap (optical tweezers) to capture individual water droplets in air. A 3-dimensional viewing system consisting of a two axis microscope allows the trapped droplet to be viewed from the top and the side simultaneously. The position of the droplet is determined with a digital camera at a rate up to 700Hz. We have observed abrupt movements along the beam in two situations: As a pure water droplet evaporates, the movements occur at specific size intervals as the diameter decreases. For non-evaporating saltwater droplets the movements rapidly occur for certain ranges of beam power, and not at all for other ranges of power.

  9. Brine Pockets in the Icy Shell on Europa: Distribution, Chemistry, and Habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Yu; Shock, E. L.; Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    On Earth, sea ice is rich in brine, salt, and gas inclusions that form through capturing of seawater during ice formation. Cooling of the ice over time leads to sequential freezing of captured sea-water, precipitation of salts, exsolution of gases, and formation of brine channels and pockets. Distribution and composition of brines in sea ice depend on the rate of ice formation, vertical temperature gradient, and the age of the ice. With aging, the abundance of brine pockets decreases through downward migration. De- spite low temperatures and elevated salinities, brines in sea ice provide a habitat for photosynthetic and chemosynthetic organisms. On Europa, brine pockets and channels could exist in the icy shell that may be from a few km to a few tens of km thick and is probably underlain by a water ocean. If the icy shell is relatively thick, convection could develop, affecting the temperature pattern in the ice. To predict the distribution and chemistry of brine pockets in the icy shell we have combined numerical models of the temperature distribution within a convecting shell, a model for oceanic chemistry, and a model for freezing of Europan oceanic water. Possible effects of brine and gas inclusions on ice rheology and tectonics are discussed.

  10. Pocket-size manual tape reader device aids computer tape checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odle, F. L.

    1967-01-01

    Pocket-size plastic manual tape reader device aids in reading, interpreting, and correcting binary and octal coded punched tapes. The coded information is more easily read if the color of the back plate contrasts sharply with that of the tape.

  11. Crystal structure of cod liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase: substrate pocket and structurally variable segments.

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, S.; el Ahmad, M.; Danielsson, O.; Jörnvall, H.; Eklund, H.

    1996-01-01

    The structural framework of cod liver alcohol dehydrogenase is similar to that of horse and human alcohol dehydrogenases. In contrast, the substrate pocket differs significantly, and main differences are located in three loops. Nevertheless, the substrate pocket is hydrophobic like that of the mammalian class I enzymes and has a similar topography in spite of many main-chain and side-chain differences. The structural framework of alcohol dehydrogenase is also present in a number of related enzymes like glucose dehydrogenase and quinone oxidoreductase. These enzymes have completely different substrate specificity, but also for these enzymes, the corresponding loops of the substrate pocket have significantly different structures. The domains of the two subunits in the crystals of the cod enzyme further differ by a rotation of the catalytic domains by about 6 degrees. In one subunit, they close around the coenzyme similarly as in coenzyme complexes of the horse enzyme, but form a more open cleft in the other subunit, similar to the situation in coenzyme-free structures of the horse enzyme. The proton relay system differs from the mammalian class I alcohol dehydrogenases. His 51, which has been implicated in mammalian enzymes to be important for proton transfer from the buried active site to the surface is not present in the cod enzyme. A tyrosine in the corresponding position is turned into the substrate pocket and a water molecule occupies the same position in space as the His side chain, forming a shorter proton relay system. PMID:8845755

  12. Equitable financing, out-of-pocket payments and the role of health care reform in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castano, Ramon A; Arbelaez, Jose J; Giedion, Ursula B; Morales, Luis G

    2002-12-01

    For a health care system to be considered equitable in its financing, the financial burden of contributions has to be progressive or at least proportional. Out-of-pocket financing takes a larger proportion of poor than of non-poor households' income. To remedy this regressive burden, among other goals, Colombia launched a health care reform based on social insurance as a means to reduce health care financing through out-of-pocket payments, and to reduce financial barriers to access. This paper analyzes the evolution of regressivity in out-of-pocket financing from 1984 to 1997, in order to detect if the 1993 health care reform had an impact on such regressivity. The Kakwani index of progressivity was estimated using three national household surveys. Kakwani indices showed a constant trend towards more regressivity (-0.126 in 1984, to -0.3498 in 1997) when using income to build the index, but a trend towards progressivity (-0.0092 in 1984, to 0.0026 in 1997) when using expenses. Our findings suggest that there was a progressive impact of the reform on out-of-pocket financing when household expenses are used to build the Kakwani index; however, due to issues of comparability between surveys, the findings are not conclusive. PMID:12477736

  13. Pockets of Hope: How Students and Teachers Change the World. Series in Language and Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de los Reyes, Eileen; Gozemba, Patricia A.

    This book presents case studies of six "pockets of hope," democratic educational projects in which empowered students and their teachers actively engage with relevant academic and social problems. Although seemingly very different, the projects share a core commitment to democratic pedagogy and demonstrate practices consistent with Freirean or…

  14. Out-of-Pocket Net Price for College. Data Point. NCES 2014-902

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Laura; Paslov, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This Data Point uses data from four administrations of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000, NPSAS:04, NPSAS:08, and NPSAS:12) to briefly present trends in out-of-pocket net price for college, the amount that students and their families must pay to attend college after subtracting grants, loans, work-study, and all other…

  15. Access to Rural Mental Health Services: Service Use and Out-of-Pocket Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziller, Erika C.; Anderson, Nathaniel J.; Coburn, Andrew F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine rural-urban differences in the use of mental health services (mental health and substance abuse office visits, and mental health prescriptions) and in the out-of-pocket costs paid for these services. Methods: The pooled 2003 and 2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys were used to assess differences in mental health service use…

  16. Rural KIDS COUNT Pocket Guide. Measures of Child Well-Being in the Nation's Rural Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This "Pocket Guide" is derived from the "2004 KIDS COUNT Special Report: City & Rural KIDSCOUNT Data Book." It is designed to give state-level policymakers a better understanding of conditions faced by families in their rural communities and how they compare to those in the rural parts of other states, as well as the country as a whole. This…

  17. Pocket proteins pRb and p107 are required for cortical lamination independent of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, D S; Paquin, A; Park, D S; Slack, R S

    2013-12-01

    Pocket proteins (pRb, p107 and p130) are well studied in their role of regulating cell cycle progression. Increasing evidence suggests that these proteins also control early differentiation and even later stages of cell maturation, such as migration. However, pocket proteins also regulate apoptosis, and many of the developmental defects in knock out models have been attributed to increased cell death. Here, we eliminate ectopic apoptosis in the developing brain through the deletion of Bax, and show that pocket proteins are required for radial migration independent of their role in cell death regulation. Following loss of pRb and p107, a population of cortical neurons fails to pass through the intermediate zone into the cortical plate. Importantly, these neurons are born at the appropriate time and this migration defect cannot be rescued by eliminating ectopic cell death. In addition, we show that pRb and p107 regulate radial migration through a cell autonomous mechanism since pRb/p107 deficient neurons fail to migrate to the correct cortical layer within a wild type brain. These results define a novel role of pocket proteins in regulating cortical lamination through a cell autonomous mechanism independent of their role in apoptosis.

  18. Do Nurse-Led Skill Training Interventions Affect Informal Caregivers' Out-of-Pocket Expenditures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Thorpe, Joshua M.; Chestnutt, Deborah; Molloy, Margory; Boling, John C.; Davis, Linda Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This paper is a report of a study of the Assistance, Support, and Self-health Initiated through Skill Training (ASSIST) randomized control trial. The aim of this paper is to understand whether participating in ASSIST significantly changed the out-of-pocket (OOP) costs for family caregivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) or…

  19. Biochemical and serological characterization of Bacteroides intermedius strains isolated from the deep periodontal pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlén, G; Wikström, M; Renvert, S; Gmür, R; Guggenheim, B

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one fluorescence-positive black-pigmented Bacteroides strains obtained from 51 patients with deep periodontal pockets (greater than 6 mm) were identified and characterized. Fifty of these strains were presumptively identified as Bacteroides intermedius according to the indole reaction. This was confirmed by further biochemical characterization. The 50 strains from diseased sites were then compared with 16 B. intermedius strains isolated from periodontally healthy individuals with no signs of destructive periodontal disease. Tests for antimicrobial susceptibility showed similar patterns for all 50 pocket-derived strains, except for one beta-lactamase-positive strain that was resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin. Forty-seven strains were tested for binding of three monoclonal antibodies defining three distinct serogroups of B. intermedius. Thirty-one strains belonged to serogroup I, three to serogroup II and thirteen to serogroup III. In comparison to the strains from the shallow periodontal pockets, serogroup I was significantly overrepresented in the patient group with periodontal disease. We conclude that saccharolytic black-pigmented Bacteroides species from deep periodontal pockets constituted, with very rare exceptions, a biochemically homogeneous but antigenically heterogeneous group of B. intermedius and that serogroup I is predominantly found in deep periodontal lesions. PMID:2229351

  20. Out-of-pocket Prices of Opioid Analgesics in the United States, 1999-2004

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Benjamin M.; Strassels, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the out-of-pocket prices of common opioid analgesics by medication, drug coverage, region, and year. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study using 1999-2004 data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) and the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS). SETTING United States civilian non-institutionalized population. PATIENTS Adults who filled prescriptions for opioid analgesics between 1999 and 2004 and who were not enrolled in Medicaid. OUTCOME MEASURES Prices of prescribed analgesics were collected from receipts, medication containers, patient recall, and administrative records (N = 20,026 and 31,500, respectively). RESULTS Average out-of-pocket price of an opioid analgesic prescription was around $10, but the estimate is misleading: a typical adult patient without drug coverage paid $12.86 to $61.60 to fill their analgesic prescription, depending on medication. The extended-release formulations cost more than double the “immediate release” prices. For the analgesics studied, drug coverage lowered out-of-pocket prices by 50% to 85%, but market prices increased at a rate of 5.7% to 9% per year with little regional variation. Data did not include prices for medications not prescribed or prescribed, but not acquired. CONCLUSIONS Independent of the diagnosis, patients’ out-of-pocket price for prescribed analgesics fluctuated freely in the United States across time, region, and coverage status. These fluctuations potentially distort the delivery of effective pain management and further burden an already afflicted population. PMID:20002589

  1. Pockets of Excellence: Study Explores How Policy Affects Professional Learning in 4 High-Performing States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaquith, Ann; Mindich, Dan; Wei, Ruth Chung

    2010-01-01

    According to national survey data, access to and participation in professional development varies widely across states, and the quality of professional development across most states is far from meeting research-based definitions of effective professional development, with a few pockets of excellence in some states. In this study, "Teacher…

  2. 77 FR 73769 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Four Subspecies of Mazama Pocket Gopher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Threatened (CNOR) (66 FR 54808, October 30, 2001). All candidate species are assigned listing priority... development and the operation of gravel pits (70 FR 24870; May 11, 2005) on gopher habitat. In our 2007 CNOR (72 FR 69034, December 6, 2007), we added the Brush Prairie pocket gopher to the list of...

  3. Investigation of dielectric pocket induced variations in tunnel field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upasana; Narang, Rakhi; Saxena, Manoj; Gupta, Mridula

    2016-04-01

    The performance of conventional Tunnel FETs struggling from ambipolar issues, insufficient on-current, lower transconductance value, higher delay and lower cut off frequency has been improved by introducing several material and device engineering concepts in past few years. Keeping this in view, another interesting and reliable option i.e. Dielectric Pocket TFET (featuring a dielectric pocket placement near tunneling junction) has been comprehensively and qualitatively demonstrated using ATLAS device simulator. The architecture has been explored in terms of various device electrostatic parameters such as potential, energy band profile, electron and hole concentration, electric field variation and band to band generation rate (GBTB) near the tunneling junction where the Dielectric Pocket (DP) has been introduced. Subsequently, a detailed investigation by changing the position and dielectric constant of pocket at respective junctions has been made where DP induced variations in drain current, transconductance and parasitic capacitance have been examined. The work highlights major improvements over conventional TFET in terms of lower subthreshold swing and threshold voltage, higher drain current and transconductance, improved on-to-off current ratio, suppressed ambipolar conduction and improved dynamic power dissipation issues for low voltage analog and digital applications.

  4. Variables relating to the allocation of pocket money to children: parental reasons and values.

    PubMed

    Feather, N T

    1991-09-01

    This study was concerned with relations among parents' beliefs, values and practices in regard to the allocation of pocket money to their children. Mothers and fathers in 133 Adelaide families provided information about the pocket money allowance they gave to each child in their family and they completed items designed to measure the importance of various possible reasons for their allocations (family concern, independence training, child's needs), as well as items that assessed value dimensions (work ethic, social welfare, compassion). Results showed that social welfare values were associated with family concern reasons, and that individualistic work ethic values were associated with independence training reasons but were antagonistic to reasons concerned with meeting the child's needs. The amount of pocket money provided was positively related to both the age of the child and to the importance of family concern reasons. Parents saw independence training and meeting the child's needs as more important reasons for older children and mothers emphasized children's needs more than fathers. These results were discussed in relation to other research on distributive justice, allocation decisions, pocket money and household tasks. PMID:1933147

  5. 78 FR 54214 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removing Five Subspecies of Mazama Pocket Gopher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Mazama Pocket Gophers On December 11, 2012, we published a proposed rule (77 FR 73770) to list four... refer to the proposed rule (December 11, 2012; 77 FR 73770). Summary of Comments and Recommendations We... the second opened April 3, 2013, and closed May 3, 2013 (78 FR 20074; April 3, 2013). During...

  6. Total and Out-of-Pocket Expenditures for Prescription Drugs among Older Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambamoorthi, Usha; Shea, Dennis; Crystal, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The burden of prescription drug costs on Medicare beneficiaries has become a critical policy issue in improving the Medicare program, yet few studies have provided detailed and current information on that burden. The present study estimates total and out-of-pocket expenditures for prescription drugs and the burden of these costs in…

  7. A Mobile Computing Solution for Collecting Functional Analysis Data on a Pocket PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, James; Dixon, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper provides a task analysis for creating a computerized data system using a Pocket PC and Microsoft Visual Basic. With Visual Basic software and any handheld device running the Windows MOBLE operating system, this task analysis will allow behavior analysts to program and customize their own functional analysis data-collection…

  8. Adaptation of a Pocket PC for Use as a Wearable Voice Dosimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popolo, Peter S.; Svec, Jan G.; Titze, Ingo R.

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the adaptation of a commercially available Pocket PC for use as a voice dosimeter, a wearable device that measures the vocal dose of teachers or other individuals on the job, at home, and elsewhere during the course of an entire day. An engineering approach for designing a voice dosimeter is described, and design data are…

  9. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FACILITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS Urban Development Action Grants § 570.466 Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action... types of new jobs (construction and permanent) that will be provided to the low- and...

  10. City Kids Count Pocket Guide. Measures of Child Well-Being in the Nation's Largest Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    For more than 15 years, the KIDS COUNT initiative, has produced data books filled with statistics reflecting the general well-being of children in each state. This Pocket Guide is designed to give state-level policymakers a better understanding of conditions faced by families in their large cities and how they compare to those in the large cities…

  11. A Survey of Out-of-Pocket Expenditures for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raz, Raanan; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Leon, Odelia; Chodick, Gabriel; Gabis, Lidia V.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a survey of children with ASD aged 4-10 years. The main dependent variables were out-of-pocket expenditures for health services and hours of therapy. Multivariable logistic regression models were used in order to find independent predictors for service utilization. Parents of 178 of the children (87%) agreed to participate. The average…

  12. The trapped human experiment.

    PubMed

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  13. Out-of-pocket health care expenditures due to excess of body weight in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Paula

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence for excessive weight has also been increasing dramatically in Portugal over the last decades. The consequences for families as well as for the publicly funded Portuguese health care system are a matter of policy interest. This paper uses an econometric model to compute the fraction of the national out-of-pocket health care expenditures attributable to overweight and obesity among Portuguese adults. Given that public health care system pays for a substantial share of the national health care expenditures, the estimated the out-of-pocket expenditures is only a share of the total expenditures. Per-capita expenditures and the burden that obesity and overweight impose on families are also estimated. Two waves of the Portuguese National Health Survey (NHS), namely; 1995/1996 and 1998/1999 are considered. The results suggest that out-of-pocket expenditures due to excess weight have increased sharply during these 3 years. The two-part model estimates suggest that the obese and overweight are more likely to incur out-of-pocket health care expenditures but, in the restricted sample of those that incur expenditures, there is weak or no evidence that the obese or overweight spend, on average, more than those of normal weight. Overall, it is estimated that in 1995/1996, more than 1.8% out-of-pocket health care expenditures were attributable to obesity and 2% to overweight (although not statistically significant). The estimated percentages are over 2.9% for obesity and 4% for overweight in 1998/1999. Combined, the estimated attributable percentage of national out-of-pocket expenditures due to excess weight was 3.8% in 1995/1996 and 6.9% in 1998/1999. Per-capita expenditures due to obesity or overweight are small, on average, in absolute terms, but they can be a significant cost for low income families. With respect to public policy concerns, the results suggest that measures which only slightly increase the out-of-pocket health care expenditures of being obese

  14. The migration of fragments of glass from the pockets to the surfaces of clothing.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, S; Geddes, T; Lovelock, T J

    2011-05-20

    During the last decade or so there has been some discussion in the forensic community in the United Kingdom concerning whether it is necessary to search the pockets for glass particles in garments attributed to suspects arrested for glass breaking crimes. The removal of this practice would help expedite the searching and recovery process since examining only the surfaces of clothing would reduce the cost of recovering glass evidence. However, it is believed by many scientists that some glass fragments originally acquired in pockets can migrate to the surfaces of clothing prior to examination by the forensic scientist. As glass fragments have been encountered in the pockets of garments during examinations of casework items in the LGC Laboratories, the implications of this change in practice needs to be assessed. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate this possibility that fragments of glass migrate from a pocket of a garment to its surfaces during police and laboratory handling after a person is suspected of breaking glass during an offence. If this occurs to a significant extent then it could affect the evaluation of the glass evidence when using a Bayesian approach. Sixty fragments of glass were seeded into a pocket of a fleece jacket and a pair of denim jeans. Three experiments were performed; one examined a searching, recovery and blanking procedure, another examined the pre-laboratory 'handling' process of an item in an evidence bag, and the third experiment looked at the removal of an object from a pocket laden with glass and subsequent removal and packaging of the garment. Up to two (3.3%) fragments were recovered from the surfaces of the fleece jacket and the denim jeans via the searching, recovery and blanking procedure. Similar numbers were also recovered from the insides of the evidence bags. Up to four (6.7%) fragments were recovered from the surface of the fleece jacket and up to five (8.3%) fragments were recovered from the surface of the

  15. Out-of-Pocket Payments, Health Care Access and Utilisation in South-Eastern Nigeria: A Gender Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Onah, Michael N.; Govender, Veloshnee

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-pocket (OOP) payments have severe consequences for health care access and utilisation and are especially catastrophic for the poor. Although women comprise the majority of the poor in Nigeria and globally, the implications of OOP payments for health care access from a gender perspective have received little attention. This study seeks to fill this gap by using a combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis to investigate the gendered impact of OOPs on healthcare utilisation in south-eastern Nigeria. 411 households were surveyed and six single-sex Focus Group Discussions conducted. This study confirmed the socioeconomic and demographic vulnerability of female-headed households (FHHs), which contributed to gender-based inter-household differences in healthcare access, cost burden, choices of healthcare providers, methods of funding healthcare and coping strategies. FHHs had higher cost burdens from seeking care and untreated morbidity than male-headed households (MHHs) with affordability as a reason for not seeking care. There is also a high utilisation of patent medicine vendors (PMVs) by both households (PMVs are drug vendors that are unregulated, likely to offer very low-quality treatment and do not have trained personnel). OOP payment was predominantly the means of healthcare payment for both households, and households spoke of the difficulties associated with repaying health-related debt with implications for the medical poverty trap. It is recommended that the removal of user fees, introduction of prepayment schemes, and regulating PMVs be considered to improve access and provide protection against debt for FHHs and MHHs. The vulnerability of widows is of special concern and efforts to improve their healthcare access and broader efforts to empower should be encouraged for them and other poor households. PMID:24728103

  16. An Exploratory Examination of "Pockets of Success" in Creating Urban High Schools of Opportunity for LSES Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine "pockets of success" through the voices of participant stakeholders in low socio-economic status urban high schools and communities to identify opportunities and structures that can improve post-secondary outcomes for students. Examining those pockets of success to rise above the…

  17. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... affecting land, water, vegetation, or wildlife populations. Each person trapping on any wildlife refuge...

  18. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... affecting land, water, vegetation, or wildlife populations. Each person trapping on any wildlife refuge...

  19. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... affecting land, water, vegetation, or wildlife populations. Each person trapping on any wildlife refuge...

  20. Out-of-pocket health expenditures and antimicrobial resistance in low- and middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Alsan, Marcella; Schoemaker, Lena; Eggleston, Karen; Kammili, Nagamani; Kolli, Prasanthi; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Background The decreasing effectiveness of antimicrobial agents is a growing global public health concern. Low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) are vulnerable to the loss of antimicrobial efficacy given their high burden of infectious disease and the cost of treating resistant organisms. Methods We analyzed data from the World Health Organization’s Antibacterial Resistance Global Surveillance Report. We investigated the importance of out-of-pocket spending and copayment requirements for public sector medications on the level of bacterial resistance among LMIC, adjusting for environmental factors purported to be predictors of resistance, such as sanitation, animal husbandry and poverty as well as other structural components of the health sector. Findings Out-of-pocket health expenditures were the only factor demonstrating a statistically significant relationship with antimicrobial resistance. A ten point increase in the percentage of health expenditures that were out-of-pocket was associated with a 3·2 percentage point increase in resistant isolates [95% CI, 1·17 to 5·15, p-value=0·002]. This relationship was driven by countries requiring copayments for medications in the public health sector. Among these countries, moving from the 20th to 80th percentile of out-of-pocket health expenditures was associated with an increase in resistant bacterial isolates from 17·76 [95%CI 12·54 to 22·97] to 36·27 percentage points [95% CI 31·16 to 41·38]. Interpretation Out-of-pocket health expenditures were strongly correlated with antimicrobial resistance among LMIC. This relationship was driven by countries that require copayments on medications in the public sector. Our findings suggest cost-sharing of antimicrobials in the public sector may drive demand to the private sector where supply-side incentives to overprescribe are likely heightened and quality assurance less standardized. PMID:26164481

  1. The O(2) binding pocket of myohemerythrin: role of a conserved leucine.

    PubMed

    Xiong, J; Phillips, R S; Kurtz, D M; Jin, S; Ai, J; Sanders-Loehr, J

    2000-07-25

    A conserved O(2) binding pocket residue in Phascolopsis gouldii myohemerythrin (myoHr), namely, L104, was mutated to several other residues, and the effects on O(2) association and dissociation rates, O(2) affinity, and autoxidation were examined. The L104V, -F, and -Y myoHrs formed stable O(2) adducts whose UV-vis and resonance Raman spectra closely matched those of wild-type oxymyoHr. The L104V mutation produced only minimal effects on either O(2) association or dissociation, whereas the L104F and -Y mutations resulted in 100-300-fold decreases in both O(2) association and dissociation rates. These decreases are attributed to introduction of steric restrictions into the O(2) binding pocket, which are not present in either wild-type or L104V myoHrs. The failure to observe increased O(2) association or dissociation rates for L104V indicates that the side chain of leucine at position 104 does not sterically "gate" O(2) entry into or exit from the binding pocket in the rate-determining step(s). L104V myoHr autoxidized approximately 3 times faster than did wild type, whereas L104T autoxidized >10(6) times faster than did wild type. The latter large increase is attributed to increased side chain polarity, thereby increasing water occupancy in the oxymyoHr binding pocket. These results indicate that L104 contributes a hydrophobic barrier that restricts water entry into the oxymyoHr binding pocket. Thus, a leucine at position 104 in myoHr appears to have the optimal combination of size and hydrophobicity to facilitate O(2) binding while simultaneously inhibiting autoxidation.

  2. Analysis of ASTER data for mapping bauxite rich pockets within high altitude lateritic bauxite, Jharkhand, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Arindam; Singh, Vivek Kr.; Parveen, Reshma; Kumar, K. Vinod; Jeyaseelan, A. T.; Dhanamjaya Rao, E. N.

    2013-04-01

    Bauxite deposits of Jharkhand in India are resulted from the lateritization process and therefore are often associated with the laterites. In the present study, ASTER (Advanced Space borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) image is processed to delineate bauxite rich pockets within the laterites. In this regard, spectral signatures of lateritic bauxite samples are analyzed in the laboratory with reference to the spectral features of gibbsite (main mineral constituent of bauxite) and goethite (main mineral constituent of laterite) in VNIR-SWIR (visible-near infrared and short wave infrared) electromagnetic domain. The analysis of spectral signatures of lateritic bauxite samples helps in understanding the differences in the spectral features of bauxites and laterites. Based on these differences; ASTER data based relative band depth and simple ratio images are derived for spatial mapping of the bauxites developed within the lateritic province. In order to integrate the complementary information of different index image, an index based principal component (IPC) image is derived to incorporate the correlative information of these indices to delineate bauxite rich pockets. The occurrences of bauxite rich pockets derived from density sliced IPC image are further delimited by the topographic controls as it has been observed that the major bauxite occurrences of the area are controlled by slope and altitude. In addition to above, IPC image is draped over the digital elevation model (DEM) to illustrate how bauxite rich pockets are distributed with reference to the topographic variability of the terrain. Bauxite rich pockets delineated in the IPC image are also validated based on the known mine occurrences and existing geological map of the bauxite. It is also conceptually validated based on the spectral similarity of the bauxite pixels delineated in the IPC image with the ASTER convolved laboratory spectra of bauxite samples.

  3. Hepatitis B Virus Capsids Have Diverse Structural Responses to Small-Molecule Ligands Bound to the Heteroaryldihydropyrimidine Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Katen, Sarah P.; Francis, Samson; Chirapu, Srinivas; Finn, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Though the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is an important participant in many aspects of the viral life cycle, its best-characterized activity is self-assembly into 240-monomer capsids. Small molecules that target core protein (core protein allosteric modulators [CpAMs]) represent a promising antiviral strategy. To better understand the structural basis of the CpAM mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the HBV capsid in complex with HAP18. HAP18 accelerates assembly, increases protein-protein association more than 100-fold, and induces assembly of nonicosahedral macrostructures. In a preformed capsid, HAP18 is found at quasiequivalent subunit-subunit interfaces. In a detailed comparison to the two other extant CpAM structures, we find that the HAP18-capsid structure presents a paradox. Whereas the two other structures expanded the capsid diameter by up to 10 Å, HAP18 caused only minor changes in quaternary structure and actually decreased the capsid diameter by ∼3 Å. These results indicate that CpAMs do not have a single allosteric effect on capsid structure. We suggest that HBV capsids present an ensemble of states that can be trapped by CpAMs, indicating a more complex basis for antiviral drug design. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis B virus core protein has multiple roles in the viral life cycle—assembly, compartment for reverse transcription, intracellular trafficking, and nuclear functions—making it an attractive antiviral target. Core protein allosteric modulators (CpAMs) are an experimental class of antivirals that bind core protein. The most recognized CpAM activity is that they accelerate core protein assembly and strengthen interactions between subunits. In this study, we observe that the CpAM-binding pocket has multiple conformations. We compare structures of capsids cocrystallized with different CpAMs and find that they also affect quaternary structure in different ways. These results suggest that the capsid “breathes” and is

  4. Trap-mulching Argentine ants.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jules; Sorenson, Clyde E; Waldvogel, Michael G

    2006-10-01

    Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), management is constrained, in large part, by polydomy where nestmates are distributed extensively across urban landscapes, particularly within mulch. Management with trap-mulching is a novel approach derived from trap-cropping where ants are repelled from a broad domain of nest sites to smaller defined areas, which are subsequently treated with insecticide. This concept was field-tested with mulch surrounding ornamental trees replaced with a narrow band of pine (Pinus spp.) needle mulch (trap) within a much larger patch of repellent aromatic cedar (Juniperus spp.) mulch. After ants reestablished around the trees, the pine needle mulch band was treated with 0.06% fipronil (Termidor). Poor results were obtained when the trap extended from the tree trunk to the edge of the mulched area. When the trap was applied as a circular band around the tree trunk reductions in the number of foraging ants were recorded through 14 d compared with an untreated mulch control, but not for longer periods. Reductions in the number of ant nests within mulch were no different between the trap mulch and any of the other treatments. We conclude that trap-mulching offers limited benefits, and that successful management of Argentine ants will require implementation of complementary or perhaps alternative strategies.

  5. Combined acoustic and optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, G.; Steiger, R.; Meinschad, M.; Hill, M.; Bernet, S.; Ritsch-Marte, M.

    2011-01-01

    Combining several methods for contact free micro-manipulation of small particles such as cells or micro-organisms provides the advantages of each method in a single setup. Optical tweezers, which employ focused laser beams, offer very precise and selective handling of single particles. On the other hand, acoustic trapping with wavelengths of about 1 mm allows the simultaneous trapping of many, comparatively large particles. With conventional approaches it is difficult to fully employ the strengths of each method due to the different experimental requirements. Here we present the combined optical and acoustic trapping of motile micro-organisms in a microfluidic environment, utilizing optical macro-tweezers, which offer a large field of view and working distance of several millimeters and therefore match the typical range of acoustic trapping. We characterize the acoustic trapping forces with the help of optically trapped particles and present several applications of the combined optical and acoustic trapping, such as manipulation of large (75 μm) particles and active particle sorting. PMID:22025990

  6. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  7. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  8. Enhanced performance of GeSn source-pocket tunnel field-effect transistors for low-power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Jing; Xu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Germanium-tin (GeSn) source-pocket tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) are comprehensively investigated by numerical device simulations at low supply voltages. Device configurations with homo- and hetero-tunneling junctions (TJ) are analyzed and compared. It is shown that direct-gap GeSn alloys are favorable for increasing the source-pocket tunneling rate. Increasing the source Sn composition of the device may aid the on-state current increase, but the subthreshold swing (SS) is degraded because of the reduced band gap. At ultrascaled supply voltages, the GeSn hetero-TJ TFET with higher pocket Sn composition exhibits the best performance and SS, and the device performance can be further improved by increasing the Sn composition in the pocket region. These simulation results could be used to understand and optimize the performance of GeSn source-pocket TFETs, which are very promising electronic devices for low-power applications.

  9. Trapping tsetse flies on water

    PubMed Central

    Laveissière, C.; Camara, M.; Rayaisse, J.B.; Salou, E.; Kagbadouno, M.; Solano, P.

    2011-01-01

    Riverine tsetse flies such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are the vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in West Africa. Despite intimate links between tsetse and water, to our knowledge there has never been any attempt to design trapping devices that would catch tsetse on water. In mangrove (Guinea) one challenging issue is the tide, because height above the ground for a trap is a key factor affecting tsetse catches. The trap was mounted on the remains of an old wooden dugout, and attached with rope to nearby branches, thereby allowing it to rise and fall with the tide. Catches showed a very high density of 93.9 flies/”water-trap”/day, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than all the catches from other habitats where the classical trap had been used. In savannah, on the Comoe river of South Burkina Faso, the biconical trap was mounted on a small wooden raft anchored to a stone, and catches were compared with the classical biconical trap put on the shores. G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides densities were not significantly different from those from the classical biconical one. The adaptations described here have allowed to efficiently catch tsetse on the water, which to our knowledge is reported here for the first time. This represents a great progress and opens new opportunities to undertake studies on the vectors of trypanosomoses in mangrove areas of Guinea, which are currently the areas showing the highest prevalences of sleeping sickness in West Africa. It also has huge potential for tsetse control using insecticide impregnated traps in savannah areas where traps become less efficient in rainy season. The Guinean National control programme has already expressed its willingness to use such modified traps in its control campaigns in Guinea, as has the national PATTEC programme in Burkina Faso during rainy season. PMID:21678789

  10. Peristaltic Micro-pump Generated from Heating Trapped Gas in a Superhydrophobic Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hann, Sungyun; Kim, Tae Jin; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Study of micro-pumps has been actively pursued as they may be integrated into portable fluidic systems. Since one major application of developing portable fluidic devices is in medical drug delivery systems, the study of valveless micro-peristaltic pumps has attracted many researchers, particularly due to its low contamination risk of the working fluid. However, conventional peristaltic micro-pumps involve complex fabrication steps, including alignment of multiple device layers. The purpose of this research is to design a low cost, single layer peristaltic pump which utilizes thermal expansion of gas bubbles trapped in the microchannel walls. The microchannel walls are corrugated with a high roughness factor to prevent water from protruding into the gaps, thus rendering the surface superhydrophobic. The gas pockets are heated from the side walls, where the microheaters are fabricated by flowing molten metal into satellite microchannels and then solidifying them. We expect that the expanding gas pockets will act as a series of valves and that the fluid flow can be generated by sequentially heating the gas pockets along the microchannel.

  11. Natural Air Purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA environmental research has led to a plant-based air filtering system. Dr. B.C. Wolverton, a former NASA engineer who developed a biological filtering system for space life support, served as a consultant to Terra Firma Environmental. The company is marketing the BioFilter, a natural air purifier that combines activated carbon and other filter media with living plants and microorganisms. The filter material traps and holds indoor pollutants; plant roots and microorganisms then convert the pollutants into food for the plant. Most non-flowering house plants will work. After pollutants have been removed, the cleansed air is returned to the room through slits in the planter. Terra Firma is currently developing a filter that will also disinfect the air.

  12. Trapping low-energy antiprotons in an ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Xiang.

    1990-01-01

    A fraction of antiprotons from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN are slowed from 5.9 MeV to below 3 keV as they pass through thin foils. Transmitted particle energy distribution and low energy antiproton yield are measured by a time-of-flight technique. The difference in the range of protons and antiprotons (known as the Barkas effect) is observed. While still in flight, up to 1.3 {times} 10{sup 5} antiprotons with energies between 0 eV to 3 keV are stored in an ion trap from a single pulse of 5.9 MeV antiprotons leaving LEAR, thus a trapping efficiency exceeding of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} is established. Trapped antiprotons maintain their initial energy distribution unless allowed to collide with a cloud of trapped electrons, whereupon they slow and cool below 1 meV in 10 s, and fall into a harmonic potential well suited for precision mass measurements. The slowing, trapping and cooling of antiprotons are the main focus of this thesis. The stored antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium at 4.2 K. In this ion trap, the antiproton cyclotron frequency is measured and compared with the proton (or electron) cyclotron frequency. The new measured ratio of the antiproton and proton inertial masses, with its 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} uncertainty, is more than three orders of magnitude more accurate than previous measurements using exotic atoms. This is a most precise test of CPT invariance with baryons. The antiproton lifetime in an ion trap was measured to be more than 103 days by trapping a cloud of antiprotons for 59 days. The indicates the number density of atoms is less than 100/cm{sup 3} which corresponds to the pressure in the vacuum chamber being less than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} Torr at 4.2 K if we apply the ideal gas law.

  13. Characteristics of a trapped-vortex (TV) combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, K.-Y.; Gross, L. P.; Trump, D. D.; Roquemore, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of a Trapped-Vortex (TV) combustor are presented. A vortex is trapped in the cavity established between two disks mounted in tandem. Fuel and air are injected directly into the cavity in such a way as to increase the vortex strength. Some air from the annular flow is also entrained into the recirculation zone of the vortex. Lean blow-out limits of the combustor are determined for a wide range of annular air flow rates. These data indicate that the lean blow-out limits are considerably lower for the TV combustor than for flames stabilized using swirl or bluff-bodies. The pressure loss through the annular duct is also low, being less than 2% for the flow conditions in this study. The instantaneous shape of the recirculation zone of the trapped vortex is measured using a two-color PIV technique. Temperature profiles obtained with CARS indicate a well mixed recirculation zone and demonstrate the impact of primary air injection on the local equivalence ratio.

  14. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: X. Results of ear examination.

    PubMed

    Haymaker, W; Leon, H A; Barrows, W F; Suri, K; Kraft, L M; Turnbill, C E; Webster, D B; Ashley, W W; Look, B C; Simmonds, R C; Cooper, W; Platt, W T; Behnke, A R; Erway, L C; Cruty, M R; Benton, E V; Ellis, J T; Bailey, O T; Vogel, F S; Lloyd, B; Zeman, W; Billingham, J; Samorajski, T

    1975-04-01

    In the five pocket mice flown on Apollo XVII, no evidence was found that the inner ear had been damaged, though poor fixation precluded detailed study. On the other hand, the middle ear cavity was involved in all the mice, hemorrhage having occurrred in response to excursions in pressure within the canister that housed the mice during their flight. The same occurred in flight control mice which had been subjected to pressure excursions of much the same magnitude. A greater degree of exudation into air cells and greater leukotaxis were noted in the flight animals than in the control animals. There was no increase in leukocyte population along the paths of the 23 cosmic ray particles registered in the subscalp dosimeters that traversed the middle ear cavities of the flight mice. The increased exudation and the greater response by leukocytes in the flight mice may have been causally related to the lesions found in their olfactory mucosa but there were no data in support of this possibility.

  15. Trapping behavior of gaseous cesium by fly ash filters.

    PubMed

    Shin, J M; Park, J J; Song, K C; Kim, J H

    2009-01-01

    The high volatility of a gaseous form and its high chemical reactivity make a cesium emission control very difficult work. In this study, fly ash filters were tested for the removal of gaseous cesium from a hot flue gas under air and hydrogen conditions at 700-1000 degrees C. Tests were performed by using a simulated gaseous cesium volatilized from Cs(2)SiO(3) in a two-zone furnace. Fly ash filter was found to be the most promising filter for trapping the gaseous cesium. The results of the trapping tests are presented, along with the effects of the temperature, superficial gas velocity, and carrier gas on the cesium trapping quantity.

  16. Innovation: the classic traps.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  17. The first Latin-American risk stratification system for cardiac surgery: can be used as a graphic pocket-card score.

    PubMed

    Carosella, Victorio C; Navia, Jose L; Al-Ruzzeh, Sharif; Grancelli, Hugo; Rodriguez, Walter; Cardenas, Cesar; Bilbao, Jorge; Nojek, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    This study aims to develop the first Latin-American risk model that can be used as a simple, pocket-card graphic score at bedside. The risk model was developed on 2903 patients who underwent cardiac surgery at the Spanish Hospital of Buenos Aires, Argentina, between June 1994 and December 1999. Internal validation was performed on 708 patients between January 2000 and June 2001 at the same center. External validation was performed on 1087 patients between February 2000 and January 2007 at three other centers in Argentina. In the development dataset the area under receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was 0.73 and the Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) test was P=0.88. In the internal validation ROC curve was 0.77. In the external validation ROC curve was 0.81, but imperfect calibration was detected because the observed in-hospital mortality (3.96%) was significantly lower than the development dataset (8.20%) (P<0.0001). Recalibration was done in 2007, showing excellent level of agreement between the observed and predicted mortality rates on all patients (P=0.92). This is the first risk model for cardiac surgery developed in a population of Latin-America with both internal and external validation. A simple graphic pocket-card score allows an easy bedside application with acceptable statistic precision.

  18. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hägi, Tobias T.; Klemensberger, Sabrina; Bereiter, Riccarda; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cosgarea, Raluca; Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a) to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b) to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Material and Methods Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a) hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR), b) ultrasonication (US), c) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP) and d) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX). The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz), the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness) as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD. Results After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10). The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10). Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm) in comparison with US (14±12 µm), EAP (6±7 µm) and EAP-CHX (11±10) µm). Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts. Conclusion The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air

  19. Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2003-12-09

    Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping carried out by introducing a side stream into the main stream to squeeze the fluid containing particles close to the electrodes producing the dielelectrophoretic forces. The region of most effective or the strongest forces in the manipulating fields of the electrodes producing the dielectrophoretic forces is close to the electrodes, within 100 .mu.m from the electrodes. The particle trapping arrangement uses a series of electrodes with an AC field placed between pairs of electrodes, which causes trapping of particles along the edges of the electrodes. By forcing an incoming flow stream containing cells and DNA, for example, close to the electrodes using another flow stream improves the efficiency of the DNA trapping.

  20. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  1. Acoustic trapping of active matter.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Sho C; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently 'explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  2. Trapping Protoplanets at the Snowlines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillié, K.; Charnoz, S.; Pantin, E.

    2015-12-01

    We follow the viscous evolution of protoplanetary disks by modeling self-consistently their dynamics, thermodynamics, photosphere geometry and composition (Baillié & Charnoz., 2014, ApJ and Baillié et al., 2015, A&A). Our hydrodynamical numerical code allows us to estimate the local gradients in temperature and density that drive the type I migration of planetary embryos. In particular, we identify irregular structures in the disk: shadowed regions that are not directly irradiated by the star, temperature plateaux at the sublimation temperature of the main dust components of the disk. These icelines appear to be related with planetary traps. Though planetary embryos can be trapped temporarily in some early transient traps, the other traps (more permanent) will allow protoplanets to survive and favor their growth by collisions between embryos at some specific orbits.

  3. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  4. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  5. Enceladus' CO2 Frost comes from Near-Surface Gas Pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Davies, Ashley; Lunine, Jonathan; Radebaugh, Jani

    CO2 frost has been detected on the surface of Enceladus [1]. It was noted by Brown et al. [1] that the frost deposits are not likely permanent and that an active replenishment processes for the gas might be necessary. We suggest that the CO2 that forms the frost originates in shallow gas pockets below the surface. These pockets are a consequence of the ocean water circulation hypothesis [2]. They differ from the plume chambers [3] and are a previously unrecognized structure in the near-surface ice. Enceladus’ oceanic circulation is driven by gas bubbles that make seawater buoyant and bring up water, chemicals, and heat from the depths of a warm ocean [2]. The ocean water ascends through the icy crust and, near the surface, it spreads out laterally beneath a relatively thin ice cap, following the pattern of the thermal anomalies identified in Cassini data [4,5]. Topographic recesses on the bottom of the ice cap act as pockets that collect gas. As the ocean water flows horizontally, the gas bubbles in it continue to rise vertically. Rising bubbles reach the pockets and, over time, pop and release gas. The gas pockets can be ruptured by the regular tidally-controlled fissuring of ice in the South Polar Region (Hurford et al. [6]), forming rifts. If a rift reaches a gas pocket, CO2 gas may escape to the surface. The tortuosity and other properties along the escape route will determine if the gas vents as a seep or a jet. If enough gas is vented to form a cloud, some of the gas will freeze on the surface. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. 2006. [2] Matson D. L. et al., Icarus 221, 53-62, 2012. (also see Matson et al. LPS 44 Abstract 1371, 2013). [3] Schmidt J. et al., Nature 451, 685-688, 2008. [4] Spencer J. R. et al., Science 311, 1401-1405, 2006. [5] Howett C. et al., JGR 116, E03003, 2011. [6] Hurford T. A. et al., Nature 447, 292-294, 2007.

  6. Out-of-pocket healthcare payments on chronic conditions impoverish urban poor in Bangalore, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The burden of chronic conditions is on the rise in India, necessitating long-term support from healthcare services. Healthcare, in India, is primarily financed through out-of-pocket payments by households. Considering scarce evidence available from India, our study investigates whether and how out-of-pocket payments for outpatient care affect individuals with chronic conditions. Methods A large census covering 9299 households was conducted in Bangalore, India. Of these, 3202 households that reported presence of chronic condition were further analysed. Data was collected using a structured household-level questionnaire. Out-of-pocket payments, catastrophic healthcare expenditure, and the resultant impoverishment were measured using a standard technique. Results The response rate for the census was 98.5%. Overall, 69.6% (95%CI=68.0-71.2) of households made out-of-pocket payments for outpatient care spending a median of 3.2% (95%CI=3.0-3.4) of their total income. Overall, 16% (95%CI=14.8-17.3) of households suffered financial catastrophe by spending more than 10% of household income on outpatient care. Occurrence and intensity of financial catastrophe were inequitably high among poor. Low household income, use of referral hospitals as place for consultation, and small household size were associated with a greater likelihood of incurring financial catastrophe. The out-of-pocket spending on chronic conditions doubled the number of people living below the poverty line in one month, with further deepening of their poverty. In order to cope, households borrowed money (4.2% instances), and sold or mortgaged their assets (0.4% instances). Conclusions This study provides evidence from India that the out-of-pocket payment for chronic conditions, even for outpatient care, pushes people into poverty. Our findings suggest that improving availability of affordable medications and diagnostics for chronic conditions, as well as strengthening the gate keeping function of

  7. Experimental investigation of planar ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C. E.; Leibrandt, D. R.; Bakr, W. S.; Mallard, W. J.; Brown, K. R.; Chuang, I. L.

    2006-03-15

    Chiaverini et al. [Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005)] recently suggested a linear Paul trap geometry for ion-trap quantum computation that places all of the electrodes in a plane. Such planar ion traps are compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and can be scaled to make compact, many-zone traps. In this paper we present an experimental realization of planar ion traps using electrodes on a printed circuit board to trap linear chains of tens of charged particles of 0.44 {mu}m diameter in a vacuum of 15 Pa (10{sup -1} torr). With these traps we address concerns about the low trap depth of planar ion traps and develop control electrode layouts for moving ions between trap zones without facing some of the technical difficulties involved in an atomic ion-trap experiment. Specifically, we use a trap with 36 zones (77 electrodes) arranged in a cross to demonstrate loading from a traditional four-rod linear Paul trap, linear ion movement, splitting and joining of ion chains, and movement of ions through intersections. We further propose an additional dc-biased electrode above the trap which increases the trap depth dramatically, and a planar ion-trap geometry that generates a two-dimensional lattice of point Paul traps.

  8. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  9. The Impact of Health Insurance Programs on Out-of-Pocket Expenditures in Indonesia: An Increase or a Decrease?

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; De Allegri, Manuela; Souares, Aurelia; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    We used panel data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey to investigate the impact of health insurance programs on reducing out-of-pocket expenditures. We employed three linear panel data models, two of which accounted for endogeneity: pooled ordinary least squares (OLS), pooled two-stage least squares (2SLS) for instrumental variable (IV), and fixed effects (FE). The study revealed that two health insurance programs had a significantly negative impact on out-of-pocket expenditures by using IV estimates. In the IV model, Askeskin decreased out-of-pocket expenditures by 34% and Askes by 55% compared with non-Askeskin and non-Askes, respectively, while Jamsostek was found to bear a nonsignificant effect on out-of-pocket expenditures. In the FE model, only Askeskin had a significant negative effect with an 11% reduction on out-of-pocket expenditures. This study showed that two large existing health insurance programs in Indonesia, Askeskin and Askes, effectively reduced household out-of-pocket expenditures. The ability of programs to offer financial protection by reducing out-of-pocket expenditures is likely to be a direct function of their benefits package and co-payment policies. PMID:23873263

  10. The impact of health insurance programs on out-of-pocket expenditures in Indonesia: an increase or a decrease?

    PubMed

    Aji, Budi; De Allegri, Manuela; Souares, Aurelia; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2013-07-18

    We used panel data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey to investigate the impact of health insurance programs on reducing out-of-pocket expenditures. We employed three linear panel data models, two of which accounted for endogeneity: pooled ordinary least squares (OLS), pooled two-stage least squares (2SLS) for instrumental variable (IV), and fixed effects (FE). The study revealed that two health insurance programs had a significantly negative impact on out-of-pocket expenditures by using IV estimates. In the IV model, Askeskin decreased out-of-pocket expenditures by 34% and Askes by 55% compared with non-Askeskin and non-Askes, respectively, while Jamsostek was found to bear a nonsignificant effect on out-of-pocket expenditures. In the FE model, only Askeskin had a significant negative effect with an 11% reduction on out-of-pocket expenditures. This study showed that two large existing health insurance programs in Indonesia, Askeskin and Askes, effectively reduced household out-of-pocket expenditures. The ability of programs to offer financial protection by reducing out-of-pocket expenditures is likely to be a direct function of their benefits package and co-payment policies.

  11. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of solid particles.

    PubMed

    Rkiouak, L; Tang, M J; Camp, J C J; McGregor, J; Watson, I M; Cox, R A; Kalberer, M; Ward, A D; Pope, F D

    2014-06-21

    The heterogeneous interactions of gas molecules on solid particles are crucial in many areas of science, engineering and technology. Such interactions play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry and in heterogeneous catalysis, a key technology in the energy and chemical industries. Investigating heterogeneous interactions upon single levitated particles can provide significant insight into these important processes. Various methodologies exist for levitating micron sized particles including: optical, electrical and acoustic techniques. Prior to this study, the optical levitation of solid micron scale particles has proved difficult to achieve over timescales relevant to the above applications. In this work, a new vertically configured counter propagating dual beam optical trap was optimized to levitate a range of solid particles in air. Silica (SiO2), α-alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2) and polystyrene were stably trapped with a high trapping efficiency (Q = 0.42). The longest stable trapping experiment was conducted continuously for 24 hours, and there are no obvious constraints on trapping time beyond this period. Therefore, the methodology described in this paper should be of major benefit to various research communities. The strength of the new technique is demonstrated by the simultaneous levitation and spectroscopic interrogation of silica particles by Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the adsorption of water upon silica was investigated under controlled relative humidity environments. Furthermore, the collision and coagulation behaviour of silica particles with microdroplets of sulphuric acid was followed using both optical imaging and Raman spectroscopy. PMID:24803083

  12. Characterization of vertical strain silicon MOSFET incorporating dielectric pocket (SDP-VMOSFET)

    SciTech Connect

    Napiah, Z. A. F. M. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Makhtar, N. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Othman, M. A. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Idris, M. I. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Arith, F. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Yasin, N. Y. M. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Taib, S. N. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com

    2014-02-24

    The vertical Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) leads to a double channel width that can increase the packaging density. The strained silicon MOSFET was introduced to modify the carrier transport properties of silicon in order to enhance transport of both electrons and holes within strained layer. Dielectric pocket was act to control encroachment of the drain doping into the channel and reduce short channel effects (SCE). SDP-VMOSFET which was a combination of those advantages was proposed to overcome the SCE in term of leakage current, threshold voltage roll-off also Drain Induce Barrier Lowering (DIBL). As a result, SDP-VMOSFET produces a better threshold voltage and DIBL compared to related structures. Meanwhile, it gives slightly increased for leakage current compared to Vertical MOSFET Incorporating Dielectric Pocket. The characteristics of the SDP-VMOSFET are analyzed in order to optimize the performance of the device and leading to the next generation of IC technology.

  13. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  14. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. I - Physiological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Suri, K.; Mctigue, M.; Smith, J.; Cooper, W.; Miquel, J.; Ashley, W. W.; Behnke, A. R., Jr.; Saunders, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were carried out on pocket mice to ascertain their tolerance to elevated oxygen pressures alone and to a combination of hyperoxia and heat in excess of that expected during the flight of the mice on Apollo XVII. The mice withstood oxygen partial pressures up to 12 psi at normal room temperature (24 C, 75 F) over a period of 7 days. A few mice previously exposed to increased PO2 died in the course of exposure to an oxygen pressure of 10 psi or 12 psi (517 mm or 620 mm Hg) for 13 d in ambient heat of 32 C (90 F). Supplemental vitamin E and physiological saline loading given prior to exposure had no apparent protective effect. The overall conclusion was that the pocket mice which were to go on Apollo XVII could readily survive the ambient atmosphere to which they would be exposed.

  15. Pars tensa retraction pockets in children: treatment by excision and ventilation tube insertion.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, V; Banhegyi, G; O'Sullivan, G; Sherman, I W

    2000-08-01

    Tympanic membrane retraction pockets involving the pars tensa are not uncommon in clinical practice. Recurrent infections, ossicular erosion and cholesteatoma are the recognized sequelae. The management options include surveillance, medical treatment and surgery. The surgical procedures range from grommet insertion to extensive tympanoplasty procedures. We report our experience with simple excision and grommet insertion, performed in 31 ears in 26 patients as day cases. The follow-up ranged from 8 to 34 months with a mean of 16 months. The procedure was successful in 23 ears (success rate of 74%). Recurrence of retraction occurred in seven ears and in one ear there was a persistent perforation. Age, previous grommet insertion and severity of retraction did not have a statistically significant influence on the final outcome. We conclude that excision and grommet insertion is a simple, safe and efficient procedure for the management of tympanic membrane retraction pockets and can be considered in preference to extensive tympanoplasty. PMID:10971530

  16. Progress at the Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer ``THe-Trap''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoecker, Martin; Eronen, Tommi; Ketter, Jochen; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; van Dyck, Robert S.

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, the ``University of Washington Penning-Trap Mass Spectrometer'' (UW-PTMS), originally designed and built by the Van Dyck group, was moved to the Max-Planck-Insitute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. It was set up in a dedicated laboratory that meets both the radiation-safety requirements, and the environment-stabilization demands for a high-precision measurement of the tritium/helium-3 mass ratio. Our goal is to measure this mass ratio with a relative uncertainty of 10-11, which would be more than an order of magnitude better than the previous best measurement. It would decrease the uncertainty in the tritium beta decay Q-value (an important parameter in the ongoing search for the neutrino mass by experiments such as KATRIN) by the same factor. In order to emphasize the specialization of our experiment with regard to Tritium and ^3Helium, it was renamed to ``THe-Trap''. THe-Trap features a double Penning-trap for rapid ion exchange, an external ion source to minimize trap contamination, a novel Zener-based voltage source, and active as well as passive stabilization of temperature, pressure and the magnetic field of the superconducting magnet. An overview of the project and a report on the recent progress will be given.

  17. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma successfully treated with local thermotherapy using pocket hand warmers.

    PubMed

    Honma, Masaru; Hashimoto, Makoto; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Iinuma, Shin; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Iizuka, Hajime

    2008-11-01

    Apart from for cutaneous deep fungal or mycobacterial infections, thermotherapy has been used for various malignant tumors. We report a case of primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, which responded quite well to topical thermotherapy using chemical pocket hand warmers. The treatment resulted in an immediate tumor regression without recurrence. This method is simple and might be a useful tool against solitary cutaneous lymphoma, especially of elderly patients with poor performance status or with various systemic complications. PMID:19120772

  18. Efficiency of cellular growth when creating small pockets of electric current along the walls of cells.

    PubMed

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Zila, Vojtech; Klimova, Lucie

    2014-04-01

    Pulses up to 11 Tesla magnetic fields may generate pockets of currents along the walls of cellular material and may interfere with the overall ability of cell division. We used prokaryotic cells (Escherichia coli) and eukaryotic cells (murine fibroblasts) and exposed them to magnetic pulses of intensities ranging from 1 millitesla (mT) to 11,000 mT. We found prokaryotic cells to be more sensitive to magnetic field pulses than eukaryotic cells.

  19. Morphological adaptations for digging and climate-impacted soil properties define pocket gopher (Thomomys spp.) distributions.

    PubMed

    Marcy, Ariel E; Fendorf, Scott; Patton, James L; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    Species ranges are mediated by physiology, environmental factors, and competition with other organisms. The allopatric distribution of five species of northern Californian pocket gophers (Thomomys spp.) is hypothesized to result from competitive exclusion. The five species in this environmentally heterogeneous region separate into two subgenera, Thomomys or Megascapheus, which have divergent digging styles. While all pocket gophers dig with their claws, the tooth-digging adaptations of subgenus Megascapheus allow access to harder soils and climate-protected depths. In a Northern Californian locality, replacement of subgenus Thomomys with subgenus Megascapheus occurred gradually during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Concurrent climate change over this transition suggests that environmental factors--in addition to soil--define pocket gopher distributional limits. Here we show 1) that all pocket gophers occupy the subset of less energetically costly soils and 2) that subgenera sort by percent soil clay, bulk density, and shrink-swell capacity (a mineralogical attribute). While clay and bulk density (without major perturbations) stay constant over decades to millennia, low precipitation and high temperatures can cause shrink-swell clays to crack and harden within days. The strong yet underappreciated interaction between soil and moisture on the distribution of vertebrates is rarely considered when projecting species responses to climatic change. Furthermore, increased precipitation alters the weathering processes that create shrink-swell minerals. Two projected outcomes of ongoing climate change--higher temperatures and precipitation--will dramatically impact hardness of soil with shrink-swell minerals. Current climate models do not include factors controlling soil hardness, despite its impact on all organisms that depend on a stable soil structure.

  20. The Lixiscope: a Pocket-size X-ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    A Low Intensity X ray Imaging device with the acronym LIXISCOPE is described. The Lixiscope has a small format and is powered only by a 2.7V battery. The high inherent gain of the Lixiscope permits the use of radioactive sources in lieu of X-ray machines in some fluoroscopic applications. In this mode of operation the complete X ray imaging system is truly portable and pocket-sized.

  1. The pH dependence of heme pocket hydration and ligand rebinding kinetics in photodissociated carbonmonoxymyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Esquerra, Raymond M; Jensen, Russell A; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Pillsbury, Marlisa L; Mendoza, Juan L; Lintner, Benjamin W; Kliger, David S; Goldbeck, Robert A

    2008-05-16

    We monitored the occupancy of a functionally important non-coordinated water molecule in the distal heme pocket of sperm whale myoglobin over the pH range 4.3-9.4. Water occupancy was assessed by using time-resolved spectroscopy to detect the perturbation of the heme visible band absorption spectrum caused by water entry after CO photodissociation ( Goldbeck, R. A., Bhaskaran, S., Ortega, C., Mendoza, J. L., Olson, J. S., Soman, J., Kliger, D. S., and Esquerra, R. M. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 103, 1254-1259 ). We found that the water occupancy observed during the time interval between ligand photolysis and diffusive recombination decreased by nearly 20% as the pH was lowered below 6. This decrease accounted for most of the concomitant increase in the observed CO bimolecular recombination rate constant, as the lower water occupancy presented a smaller kinetic barrier to CO entry into the pocket at lower pH. These results were consistent with a model in which the distal histidine, which stabilizes the water molecule within the distal pocket by accepting a hydrogen bond, tends to swing out of the pocket upon protonation and destabilize the water occupancy at low pH. Extrapolation of this model to lower pH suggests that the additional increase in ligand association rate constant observed previously in stopped-flow studies at pH 3 may also be due in part to reduced distal water occupancy concomitant with further His64 protonation and coupled protein conformational change.

  2. Computational approaches for identification of conserved/unique binding pockets in the A chain of ricin

    SciTech Connect

    Ecale Zhou, C L; Zemla, A T; Roe, D; Young, M; Lam, M; Schoeniger, J; Balhorn, R

    2005-01-29

    Specific and sensitive ligand-based protein detection assays that employ antibodies or small molecules such as peptides, aptamers, or other small molecules require that the corresponding surface region of the protein be accessible and that there be minimal cross-reactivity with non-target proteins. To reduce the time and cost of laboratory screening efforts for diagnostic reagents, we developed new methods for evaluating and selecting protein surface regions for ligand targeting. We devised combined structure- and sequence-based methods for identifying 3D epitopes and binding pockets on the surface of the A chain of ricin that are conserved with respect to a set of ricin A chains and unique with respect to other proteins. We (1) used structure alignment software to detect structural deviations and extracted from this analysis the residue-residue correspondence, (2) devised a method to compare corresponding residues across sets of ricin structures and structures of closely related proteins, (3) devised a sequence-based approach to determine residue infrequency in local sequence context, and (4) modified a pocket-finding algorithm to identify surface crevices in close proximity to residues determined to be conserved/unique based on our structure- and sequence-based methods. In applying this combined informatics approach to ricin A we identified a conserved/unique pocket in close proximity (but not overlapping) the active site that is suitable for bi-dentate ligand development. These methods are generally applicable to identification of surface epitopes and binding pockets for development of diagnostic reagents, therapeutics, and vaccines.

  3. Morphological Adaptations for Digging and Climate-Impacted Soil Properties Define Pocket Gopher (Thomomys spp.) Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Marcy, Ariel E.; Fendorf, Scott; Patton, James L.; Hadly, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Species ranges are mediated by physiology, environmental factors, and competition with other organisms. The allopatric distribution of five species of northern Californian pocket gophers (Thomomys spp.) is hypothesized to result from competitive exclusion. The five species in this environmentally heterogeneous region separate into two subgenera, Thomomys or Megascapheus, which have divergent digging styles. While all pocket gophers dig with their claws, the tooth-digging adaptations of subgenus Megascapheus allow access to harder soils and climate-protected depths. In a Northern Californian locality, replacement of subgenus Thomomys with subgenus Megascapheus occurred gradually during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Concurrent climate change over this transition suggests that environmental factors – in addition to soil – define pocket gopher distributional limits. Here we show 1) that all pocket gophers occupy the subset of less energetically costly soils and 2) that subgenera sort by percent soil clay, bulk density, and shrink-swell capacity (a mineralogical attribute). While clay and bulk density (without major perturbations) stay constant over decades to millennia, low precipitation and high temperatures can cause shrink-swell clays to crack and harden within days. The strong yet underappreciated interaction between soil and moisture on the distribution of vertebrates is rarely considered when projecting species responses to climatic change. Furthermore, increased precipitation alters the weathering processes that create shrink-swell minerals. Two projected outcomes of ongoing climate change—higher temperatures and precipitation—will dramatically impact hardness of soil with shrink-swell minerals. Current climate models do not include factors controlling soil hardness, despite its impact on all organisms that depend on a stable soil structure. PMID:23717675

  4. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  5. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  6. Mutations in the CRE pocket of bacterial RNA polymerase affect multiple steps of transcription.

    PubMed

    Petushkov, Ivan; Pupov, Danil; Bass, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2015-07-13

    During transcription, the catalytic core of RNA polymerase (RNAP) must interact with the DNA template with low-sequence specificity to ensure efficient enzyme translocation and RNA extension. Unexpectedly, recent structural studies of bacterial promoter complexes revealed specific interactions between the nontemplate DNA strand at the downstream edge of the transcription bubble (CRE, core recognition element) and a protein pocket formed by core RNAP (CRE pocket). We investigated the roles of these interactions in transcription by analyzing point amino acid substitutions and deletions in Escherichia coli RNAP. The mutations affected multiple steps of transcription, including promoter recognition, RNA elongation and termination. In particular, we showed that interactions of the CRE pocket with a nontemplate guanine immediately downstream of the active center stimulate RNA-hairpin-dependent transcription pausing but not other types of pausing. Thus, conformational changes of the elongation complex induced by nascent RNA can modulate CRE effects on transcription. The results highlight the roles of specific core RNAP-DNA interactions at different steps of RNA synthesis and suggest their importance for transcription regulation in various organisms.

  7. Fermi pockets and quantum oscillations of the Hall coefficient in high-temperature superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Sudip; Kee, Hae-Young

    2008-01-01

    Recent quantum oscillation measurements in high-temperature superconductors in high magnetic fields and low temperatures have ushered in a new era. These experiments explore the normal state from which superconductivity arises and provide evidence of a reconstructed Fermi surface consisting of electron and hole pockets in a regime in which such a possibility was previously considered to be remote. More specifically, the Hall coefficient has been found to oscillate according to the Onsager quantization condition, involving only fundamental constants and the areas of the pockets, but with a sign that is negative. Here, we explain the observations with the theory that the alleged normal state exhibits a hidden order, the d-density wave, which breaks symmetries signifying time reversal, translation by a lattice spacing, and a rotation by an angle π/2, while the product of any two symmetry operations is preserved. The success of our analysis underscores the importance of spontaneous breaking of symmetries, Fermi surface reconstruction, and conventional quasiparticles. We primarily focus on the version of the order that is commensurate with the underlying crystalline lattice, but we also touch on the consequences if the order were to incommensurate. It is shown that whereas commensurate order results in two independent oscillation frequencies as a function of the inverse of the applied magnetic field, incommensurate order leads to three independent frequencies. The oscillation amplitudes, however, are determined by the mobilities of the charge carriers comprising the Fermi pockets. PMID:18577585

  8. Cytological analysis of the periodontal pocket in patients with aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Cecilia, E. Castro; Myriam, A. Koss; María, E. López

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral exfoliative cytology includes the study and interpretation of the features cells exfoliated from the oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to analyze cytological changes in the periodontal pocket of patients with different clinical stages of aggressive periodontitis (AP) and chronic periodontitis (CP). Materials and Methods: Patients aged 24–54 years, of whom 41 were diagnosed with AP, 40 with CP, sub-classified as mild, moderate and severe periodontitis, and 40 healthy individuals who were the control group. Samples of the epithelium of the periodontal pocket were taken for the cytological study. Results: Superficial and intermediate cell values were significantly greater in patients with AP than in patients with CP or the control group. Histiocyte number was higher in patients with CP than in those with AP, and differed significantly in both types of periodontitis compared to the control group. There were significant differences in polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes when both types of periodontitis were compared to the control group. Microbial flora was statistically higher in patients with CP, and there were differences between patients with periodontitis and the control group. Conclusions: The cytological study demonstrated that patients with AP had greater tissue damage, shown by the increase in intermediate and superficial cells of the epithelium of the periodontal pocket compared to the group of healthy subjects and to a lesser extent, to patients with CP. Only superficial cells made it possible to differentiate the sub-stages of the disease. PMID:25395766

  9. Fairness of utilizing health care facilities and out-of-pocket payment burden: evidence from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Koustuv; Aremu, Olatunde

    2013-05-01

    Catastrophic spending on health care through out-of-pocket payment is a huge problem in most low- and middle-income countries all over the world. The collapse of health systems and poverty have resulted in the proliferation of the private health sector in Cambodia, but very few studies have examined the fairness in ease of utilization of these services based on mode of payment. This study examined the utilization of health services for sickness or injury and identified its relationship with people's ability to pay for treatment seeking at various instances. Based on cross-sectional data from the Cambodian 2007 Demographic and Health Survey, the economic index estimated through principal component analysis and Lorenz curve was used to quantify the degree of fairness and equality in utilization and payment burden among the respondents. A distinct level of fairness was found in health care utilization and out-of-pocket payments. Specifically, use of private health care facilities and over-the-counter remedies dominate, and out-of-pocket payments cut across all socioeconomic strata. As many countries in low- and middle-income regions, and most importantly those in transition such as Cambodia, are repositioning their health systems, efforts should be made towards maintaining equitable access through adoption of finance mechanisms that make utilization of health care services fair and equitable.

  10. Mutations in the CRE pocket of bacterial RNA polymerase affect multiple steps of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Petushkov, Ivan; Pupov, Danil; Bass, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    During transcription, the catalytic core of RNA polymerase (RNAP) must interact with the DNA template with low-sequence specificity to ensure efficient enzyme translocation and RNA extension. Unexpectedly, recent structural studies of bacterial promoter complexes revealed specific interactions between the nontemplate DNA strand at the downstream edge of the transcription bubble (CRE, core recognition element) and a protein pocket formed by core RNAP (CRE pocket). We investigated the roles of these interactions in transcription by analyzing point amino acid substitutions and deletions in Escherichia coli RNAP. The mutations affected multiple steps of transcription, including promoter recognition, RNA elongation and termination. In particular, we showed that interactions of the CRE pocket with a nontemplate guanine immediately downstream of the active center stimulate RNA-hairpin-dependent transcription pausing but not other types of pausing. Thus, conformational changes of the elongation complex induced by nascent RNA can modulate CRE effects on transcription. The results highlight the roles of specific core RNAP–DNA interactions at different steps of RNA synthesis and suggest their importance for transcription regulation in various organisms. PMID:25990734

  11. Identification of a Cholesterol-Binding Pocket in Inward Rectifier K+ (Kir) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Oliver; Nichols, Colin G.; Lamoureux, Guillaume; D’Avanzo, Nazzareno

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is the major sterol component of all mammalian plasma membranes. Recent studies have shown that cholesterol inhibits both bacterial (KirBac1.1 and KirBac3.1) and eukaryotic (Kir2.1) inward rectifier K+ (Kir) channels. Lipid-sterol interactions are not enantioselective, and the enantiomer of cholesterol (ent-cholesterol) does not inhibit Kir channel activity, suggesting that inhibition results from direct enantiospecific binding to the channel, and not indirect effects of changes to the bilayer. Furthermore, conservation of the effect of cholesterol among prokaryotic and eukaryotic Kir channels suggests an evolutionary conserved cholesterol-binding pocket, which we aimed to identify. Computational experiments were performed by docking cholesterol to the atomic structures of Kir2.2 (PDB: 3SPI) and KirBac1.1 (PDB: 2WLL) using Autodock 4.2. Poses were assessed to ensure biologically relevant orientation and then clustered according to location and orientation. The stability of cholesterol in each of these poses was then confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, mutation of key residues (S95H and I171L) in this putative binding pocket found within the transmembrane domain of Kir2.1 channels were shown to lead to a loss of inhibition by cholesterol. Together, these data provide support for this location as a biologically relevant pocket. PMID:25517146

  12. Spatial Decomposition of Translational Water-Water Correlation Entropy in Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Crystal N; Kurtzman, Tom; Gilson, Michael K

    2016-01-12

    A number of computational tools available today compute the thermodynamic properties of water at surfaces and in binding pockets by using inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) to analyze explicit-solvent simulations. Such methods enable qualitative spatial mappings of both energy and entropy around a solute of interest and can also be applied quantitatively. However, the entropy estimates of existing methods have, to date, been almost entirely limited to the first-order terms in the IST's entropy expansion. These first-order terms account for localization and orientation of water molecules in the field of the solute but not for the modification of water-water correlations by the solute. Here, we present an extension of the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory (GIST) approach which accounts for water-water translational correlations. The method involves rewriting the two-point density of water in terms of a conditional density and utilizes the efficient nearest-neighbor entropy estimation approach. Spatial maps of this second order term, for water in and around the synthetic host cucurbit[7]uril and in the binding pocket of the enzyme Factor Xa, reveal mainly negative contributions, indicating solute-induced water-water correlations relative to bulk water; particularly strong signals are obtained for sites at the entrances of cavities or pockets. This second-order term thus enters with the same, negative, sign as the first order translational and orientational terms. Numerical and convergence properties of the methodology are examined.

  13. Acute Deep Hand Burns Covered by a Pocket Flap-Graft

    PubMed Central

    Pradier, Jean-Philippe; Oberlin, Christophe; Bey, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the long-term outcome of the “pocket flap-graft” technique, used to cover acute deep burns of the dorsum of the hand, and analyzed surgical alternatives. Methods: This was a 6-year, retrospective study of 8 patients with extensive burns and 1 patient with a single burn (11 hands in all) treated by defatted abdominal wall pockets. We studied the medical records of the patients, and conducted a follow-up examination. Results: All hands had fourth-degree thermal burns caused by flames, with exposure of tendons, bones, and joints, and poor functional prognosis. One third of patients had multiple injuries. Burns affected an average of 36% of the hand surface, and mean coverage was 92.8 cm2. One patient died. The 8 others were seen at 30-month follow-up: the skin quality of the flap was found to be good in 55% of the cases, the score on the Vancouver Scar Scale was 2.4, the Kapandji score was 4.5, and total active motion was 37% of that of a normal hand. Hand function was limited in only 2 cases, 8 patients were able to drive, and 3 patients had gone back to work. Conclusion: The pocket flap-graft allows preservation of hand function following severe burns, when local or free flaps are impossible to perform. Debulking of the flap at the time of elevation limits the need for secondary procedures. PMID:17268577

  14. Polarization effects stabilize bacteriorhodopsin's chromophore binding pocket: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Babitzki, G; Denschlag, R; Tavan, P

    2009-07-30

    Hybrid methods, which combine a quantum mechanical description of a chromophore by density functional theory (DFT) with a molecular mechanics (MM) model of the surrounding protein binding pocket, can enable highly accurate computations of the chromophore's in situ vibrational spectra. As a prerequisite, one needs a MM model of the chromophore-protein complex, which allows a correct sampling of its room-temperature equilibrium fluctuations by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Here, we show for the case of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) that MM-MD descriptions with standard nonpolarizable force fields entail a collapse of the chromophore binding pocket. As demonstrated by us, this collapse can be avoided by employing a polarized MM force field derived by DFT/MM hybrid computations. The corresponding MD simulations, which are complemented by a novel Hamiltonian replica exchange approach, then reveal a structural heterogeneity within the binding pocket of the retinal chromophore, which mainly pertains to the structure of the lysine chain covalently connecting the retinal chromophore with the protein backbone.

  15. Characterization of a Novel Water Pocket Inside the Human Cx26 Hemichannel Structure

    PubMed Central

    Araya-Secchi, Raul; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Kang, Seung-gu; Huynh, Tien; Bernardin, Alejandro; Escalona, Yerko; Garate, Jose-Antonio; Martínez, Agustin D.; García, Isaac E.; Sáez, Juan C.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-01-01

    Connexins (Cxs) are a family of vertebrate proteins constituents of gap junction channels (GJCs) that connect the cytoplasm of adjacent cells by the end-to-end docking of two Cx hemichannels. The intercellular transfer through GJCs occurs by passive diffusion allowing the exchange of water, ions, and small molecules. Despite the broad interest to understand, at the molecular level, the functional state of Cx-based channels, there are still many unanswered questions regarding structure-function relationships, perm-selectivity, and gating mechanisms. In particular, the ordering, structure, and dynamics of water inside Cx GJCs and hemichannels remains largely unexplored. In this work, we describe the identification and characterization of a believed novel water pocket—termed the IC pocket—located in-between the four transmembrane helices of each human Cx26 (hCx26) monomer at the intracellular (IC) side. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize hCx26 internal water structure and dynamics, six IC pockets were identified per hemichannel. A detailed characterization of the dynamics and ordering of water including conformational variability of residues forming the IC pockets, together with multiple sequence alignments, allowed us to propose a functional role for this cavity. An in vitro assessment of tracer uptake suggests that the IC pocket residue Arg-143 plays an essential role on the modulation of the hCx26 hemichannel permeability. PMID:25099799

  16. Live trapping of hawks and owls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, R.E.; Cope, J.B.; Robbins, C.S.

    1945-01-01

    1. Hawks of six species (80 individuals) and owls of five species (37 individuals) were trapped for banding from November 1, 1943, to. May 26,1944. 2. In general, pole traps proved better than hand-operated traps or automatic traps using live bait. 3. Verbail pole traps proved very efficient, and were much more humane than padded steel traps because they rarely injured a captured bird. 4: Unbaited Verbail traps took a variety of raptors, in rough proportion to their local abundance, although slightly more of beneficial species were caught than of harmful types. 5. Hawks and owls were retrapped more readily in Verbail traps than in other types tried. 6. The number of song birds caught in Verbail traps was negligible. 7. Crows and vultures were not taken in Verbail traps, but possibly could be caught with bait.

  17. Effect of bait in live trapping Peromyscus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1948-01-01

    SUMMARY: Evidence from live trapping tests indicated that Peromyscus leucopus did not leave their home ranges because of the attraction of trap bait in nearby areas. A trap line down the center of a heavily live-trapped area caught as many mice before the area trapping as afterward. Thus, there was reason to believe that the area trapping did not serve to pre-bait the mice. Two unbaited lines of live traps caught an equal number of Peromyscus. When one line was baited with rolled oats and peanut butter the efficiency of the traps was improved to the extent that the baited line captured more than twice as many mice as the unbaited line. It is concluded that for the species and habitat tested it is safe to make population calculations based on the assumption that the animals remain within their home ranges and do not tend to move into the trapped area because of the attraction of the trap bait.

  18. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  19. Comparison of emergence traps of different shape and translucency in the trapping of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; Lühken, R; Kroischke, F; Timmermann, E; Kiel, E

    2016-06-15

    Various types of emergence traps are available for investigations of the breeding habitats of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). In order to assess the potential impact of the trap design on the trapping success, we compared the efficiency of opaque and white (more translucent) emergence traps and two trap shapes (cone-shaped and quadratic), to sample Culicoides emerging from cowpats. Significantly higher numbers of Culicoides chiopterus and Culicoides dewulfi were trapped with opaque traps, while there was no obvious effect of the trap shape. There were no distinct differences in the microclimate among different trap types. PMID:27198792

  20. Neutron Trapping using a Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu

    2014-03-01

    Eighty years after Chadwick discovered the neutron, physicists today still cannot agree on how long the neutron lives. Measurements of the neutron lifetime have achieved the 0.1% level of precision (~ 1 s). However, results from several recent experiments are up to 7 s lower than the (pre-2010) particle data group (PDG) value. Experiments using the trap technique yield lifetime results lower than those using the beam technique. The PDG urges the community to resolve this discrepancy, now 6.5 sigma. Measuring the absolute neutron lifetime is difficult because of several limitations: the low energy of the neutron decay products, the inability to track slow neutrons, and the fact that the neutron lifetime is long (880.1 +/- 1.1 s). Slow neutrons are susceptible to many loss mechanisms other than beta-decay, such as upscattering and absorption on material surfaces. Often, these interactions act on time scales comparable to the neutron beta-decay, making the extraction of the beta-decay lifetime particularly challenging. We will revisit this measurement by trapping ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a hybrid magnetic-gravitational trap. The trap consists of a Halbach array of permanent magnets, which can levitate UCN up to 50 neV. These neutrons are also confined vertically up to 0.5 m by gravity. Such a trap minimizes the chance of neutron interactions with material walls. In addition, the open-top geometry allows room to implement novel schemes to detect neutrons and decay particles in-situ. The UCN τ experiment aims to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron lifetime measurement to below 1 second. In this talk, I will report results of our first attempt to trap UCN in 2013 and discuss plans to quantify systematic effects. The work is supported by NSF grant PHY-1306942.

  1. Design of a mosquito trap support pole for use with CDC miniature light traps.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher L; Wozniak, Arthur; McKenna, Bruce; Vaughan, David R; Dowda, Michael C

    2005-03-01

    A mosquito trap support pole constructed from polyvinyl chloride and aluminum pipes was designed to hang a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention miniature light trap and dry ice container. Miniature light traps normally hang from tree branches. The trap support pole is designed to hang traps and dry ice bait in areas where no suitable trees exist. PMID:15825774

  2. Mountain cold-trapping increases transfer of persistent organic pollutants from atmosphere to cows' milk.

    PubMed

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Wania, Frank; MacLeod, Matthew; Lei, Ying Duan; Quinn, Cristina L; Zhang, Xianming; Scheringer, Martin; Wegmann, Fabio; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Ivemeyer, Silvia; Heil, Fritz; Klocke, Peter; Pacepavicius, Grazina; Alaee, Mehran

    2013-08-20

    Concentrations of long-lived organic contaminants in snow, soil, lake water, and vegetation have been observed to increase with altitude along mountain slopes. Such enrichment, called "mountain cold-trapping", is attributed to a transition from the atmospheric gas phase to particles, rain droplets, snowflakes, and Earth's surface at the lower temperatures prevailing at higher elevations. Milk sampled repeatedly from cows that had grazed at three different altitudes in Switzerland during one summer was analyzed for a range of persistent organic pollutants. Mountain cold-trapping significantly increased air-to-milk transfer factors of most analytes. As a result, the milk of cows grazing at higher altitudes was more contaminated with substances that have regionally uniform air concentrations (hexachlorobenzene, α-hexachlorocyclohexane, endosulfan sulfate). For substances that have sources, and therefore higher air concentrations, at lower altitudes (polychlorinated biphenyls, γ-hexachlorocyclohexane), alpine milk has lower concentrations, but not as low as would be expected without mountain cold-trapping. Differences in the elevational gradients in soil concentrations and air-to-milk transfer factors highlight that cold-trapping of POPs in pastures is mostly due to increased gas-phase deposition as a result of lower temperatures causing higher uptake capacity of plant foliage, whereas cold-trapping in soils more strongly depends on wet and dry particle deposition. Climatic influences on air-to-milk transfer of POPs needs to be accounted for when using contamination of milk lipids to infer contamination of the atmosphere. PMID:23885857

  3. Trapping biases of Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens revealed by comparison of captures in CDC traps, ovitraps, and gravid traps.

    PubMed

    Hesson, Jenny C; Ignell, Rickard; Hill, Sharon R; Östman, Örjan; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate three trapping methods for their effectiveness at capturing Culex pipiens and Culex torrentium, both enzootic vectors of bird-associated viruses in Europe. The comparisons, performed in two regions in Sweden, were among CDC traps baited with carbon dioxide, gravid traps, and ovitraps baited with hay infusion. The proportions of the two Culex species in a catch differed between trap types, with CDC traps catching a lower proportion of Cx. torrentium than both gravid traps and ovitraps. Between gravid traps and ovitraps, there was no difference in the proportions of the two species. The results indicate that Cx. torrentium may go undetected or underestimated compared to Cx. pipiens when using carbon dioxide baited CDC traps. The new insight of trap bias presented here adds an important dimension to consider when investigating these vectors of bird-associated viruses in the field.

  4. Positron trapping at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dupasquier, A. ); Romero, R.; Somoza, A. )

    1993-10-01

    The standard positron trapping model has often been applied, as a simple approximation, to the interpretation of positron lifetime spectra in situations of diffusion-controlled trapping. This paper shows that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate, and presents a model based on the correct solution of the diffusion equation, in the version appropriate for studying positron trapping at grain boundaries. The model is used for the analysis of new experimental data on positron lifetime spectra in a fine-grained Al-Ca-Zn alloy. Previous results on similar systems are also discussed and reinterpreted. The analysis yields effective diffusion coefficients not far from the values known for the base metals of the alloys.

  5. Attraction and trapping of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) with host odors in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    McCall, P J; Harding, G; Roberts, J; Auty, B

    1996-01-01

    Volatile constituents of mouse odor were eluted from an adsorbent after collection within a closed-air system, and offered to host-seeking yellowfever mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti (L.), in the laboratory. Gas chromatographic analysis showed that individual mouse odors varied in blend, both quantitatively and qualitatively. In a 2-choice bioassay, sticky traps baited with individual mouse odors caught more female mosquitoes than controls (69% caught on baited traps) in all cases. When 2 traps baited with volatiles from the empty collection system were used, no preference occurred (46 and 54%), and fewer mosquitoes (22% of total) were caught overall than when a baited trap was present (46% of total). Equal numbers of male mosquitoes were caught on baited and control traps. Results demonstrated that Ae. aegypti can be attracted to entrained and eluted host odor without the addition of other attractants.

  6. Low-temperature Bessel beam trap for single submicrometer aerosol particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jessica W.; Chasovskikh, Egor; Stapfer, David; Isenor, Merrill; Signorell, Ruth

    2014-09-01

    We report on a new instrument for single aerosol particle studies at low temperatures that combines an optical trap consisting of two counter-propagating Bessel beams (CPBBs) and temperature control down to 223 K (−50 °C). The apparatus is capable of capturing and stably trapping individual submicrometer- to micrometer-sized aerosol particles for up to several hours. First results from studies of hexadecane, dodecane, and water aerosols reveal that we can trap and freeze supercooled droplets ranging in size from ∼450 nm to 5500 nm (radius). We have conducted homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing experiments, freezing-melting cycles, and evaporation studies. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of the freezing process for levitated single submicrometer-sized droplets in air using optical trapping techniques. These results show that a temperature-controlled CPBB trap is an attractive new method for studying phase transitions of individual submicrometer aerosol particles.

  7. Salisbury hospital's steam trap success.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    With the Carbon Reduction Commitment now fully in force, and the NHS tasked with achieving tough carbon emission reduction targets in line with both UK and EU mandates, healthcare estates teams across the country are seeking cost-effective ways to reduce energy consumption. Against this backdrop, Salisbury District Hospital has implemented a concerted energy-saving programme, key elements of which include replacing existing bucket steam traps with higher performing, lower maintenance, and more effective GEM venturi steam traps from Thermal Energy International (TEI), installing a new gas CHP engine, and looking into fitting a TEI condensate economiser system. PMID:21485315

  8. Salisbury hospital's steam trap success.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    With the Carbon Reduction Commitment now fully in force, and the NHS tasked with achieving tough carbon emission reduction targets in line with both UK and EU mandates, healthcare estates teams across the country are seeking cost-effective ways to reduce energy consumption. Against this backdrop, Salisbury District Hospital has implemented a concerted energy-saving programme, key elements of which include replacing existing bucket steam traps with higher performing, lower maintenance, and more effective GEM venturi steam traps from Thermal Energy International (TEI), installing a new gas CHP engine, and looking into fitting a TEI condensate economiser system.

  9. Ion trapping in Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-06-28

    Transverse instabilities have been observed in the antiproton beam stored in the Fermilab Recycler Ring, resulting in a sudden increase in the transverse emittances and a small beam loss. The instabilities appear to occur a few hours after a change in the ramping pattern of the Main Injector which shares the same tunnel. The phenomena have been studied by inducing similar instabilities. However, the mechanism is still unknown. A possible explanation is that the ions trapped in the beam reach such an intensity that collective coupled transverse oscillation occurs. However, there is no direct evidence of the trapped ions at this moment.

  10. Dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Seo Ho; Lu Mingwu; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-15

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of highly magnetic lanthanides open the door to explorations of novel phases of strongly correlated matter such as lattice supersolids and quantum liquid crystals. We recently reported the first MOTs of the five high-abundance isotopes of the most magnetic atom, dysprosium. Described here are details of the experimental technique employed for repumper-free Dy MOTs containing up to half a billion atoms. Extensive characterization of the MOTs' properties--population, temperature, loading, metastable decay dynamics, and trap dynamics--is provided.

  11. Growth suppression by an E2F-binding-defective retinoblastoma protein (RB): contribution from the RB C pocket.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, L L; Su, H; Baskaran, R; Knudsen, E S; Wang, J Y

    1998-07-01

    Growth suppression by the retinoblastoma protein (RB) is dependent on its ability to form complexes with transcription regulators. At least three distinct protein-binding activities have been identified in RB: the large A/B pocket binds E2F, the A/B pocket binds the LXCXE peptide motif, and the C pocket binds the nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase. Substitution of Trp for Arg 661 in the B region of RB (mutant 661) inactivates both E2F and LXCXE binding. The tumor suppression function of mutant 661 is not abolished, because this allele predisposes its carriers to retinoblastoma development with a low penetrance. In cell-based assays, 661 is shown to inhibit G1/S progression. This low-penetrance mutant also induces terminal growth arrest with reduced but detectable activity. We have constructed mutations that disrupt C pocket activity. When overproduced, the RB C-terminal fragment did not induce terminal growth arrest but could inhibit G1/S progression, and this activity was abolished by the C-pocket mutations. In full-length RB, the C-pocket mutations reduced but did not abolish RB function. Interestingly, combination of the C-pocket and 661 mutations completely abolished RB's ability to cause an increase in the percentage of cells in G1 and to induce terminal growth arrest. These results suggest that the A/B or C region can induce a prolongation of G1 through mechanisms that are independent of each other. In contrast, long-term growth arrest requires combined activities from both regions of RB. In addition, E2F and LXCXE binding are not the only mechanisms through which RB inhibits cell growth. The C pocket also contributes to RB-mediated growth suppression. PMID:9632788

  12. Medicare Beneficiaries Face Growing Out-Of-Pocket Burden For Specialty Drugs While In Catastrophic Coverage Phase.

    PubMed

    Trish, Erin; Xu, Jianhui; Joyce, Geoffrey

    2016-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes provisions to reduce Medicare beneficiaries' out-of-pocket spending for prescription drugs by gradually closing the coverage gap between the initial coverage limit and the catastrophic coverage threshold (known as the doughnut hole) beginning in 2011. However, Medicare beneficiaries who take specialty pharmaceuticals could still face a large out-of-pocket burden because of uncapped cost sharing in the catastrophic coverage phase. Using 2008-12 pharmacy claims data from a 20 percent sample of Medicare beneficiaries, we analyzed trends in total and out-of-pocket spending among Medicare beneficiaries who take at least one high-cost specialty drug from the top eight specialty drug classes in terms of spending. Annual total drug spending per specialty drug user studied increased considerably during the study period, from $18,335 to $33,301, and the proportion of expenditures incurred while in the catastrophic coverage phase increased from 70 percent to 80 percent. We observed a 26 percent decrease in mean annual out-of-pocket expenditures incurred below the catastrophic coverage threshold, likely attributable to the ACA's doughnut hole cost-sharing reductions, but increases in mean annual out-of-pocket expenditures incurred while in the catastrophic coverage phase offset these reductions almost entirely. Policy makers should consider implementing limits on patients' out-of-pocket burden. PMID:27605634

  13. LAMP using a disposable pocket warmer for anthrax detection, a highly mobile and reliable method for anti-bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Ben; Maki, Takayuki; Obara, Takeyuki; Fukumoto, Hitomi; Hagisawa, Kohsuke; Matsushita, Yoshitaro; Okutani, Akiko; Bazartseren, Boldbaastar; Inoue, Satoshi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-01-01

    A quick, reliable detection system is necessary to deal with bioterrorism. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a DNA amplification method that can amplify specific DNA fragments in isothermal conditions. We developed a new highly mobile and practical LAMP anthrax detection system that uses a disposable pocket warmer without the need for electricity (pocket-warmer LAMP). In our tests, the detection limit of the pocket-warmer LAMP was 1,000 copies of Bacillus anthracis pag and capB gene fragments per tube. The pocket-warmer LAMP also detected B. anthracis genes from DNA extracted from 0.1 volume of a B. anthracis colony. The lower detection limit of the pocket-warmer LAMP was not significantly different from that of a conventional LAMP using a heat block, and was not changed under cold (4 degrees C) or warm (37 degrees C) conditions in a Styrofoam box. The pocket-warmer LAMP could be useful against bioterrorism, and as a sensitive, reliable detection tool in areas with undependable electricity infrastructures. PMID:20093760

  14. A Back-to-Front Fragment-Based Drug Design Search Strategy Targeting the DFG-Out Pocket of Protein Tyrosine Kinases.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hidehisa; Oki, Hideyuki; Okada, Kengo; Takagi, Terufumi; Tawada, Michiko; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Imamura, Shinichi; Hori, Akira; Lawson, J David; Hixon, Mark S; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Miki, Hiroshi

    2012-04-12

    We present a straightforward process for the discovery of novel back pocket-binding fragment molecules against protein tyrosine kinases. The approach begins by screening against the nonphosphorylated target kinase with subsequent counterscreening of hits against the phosphorylated enzyme. Back pocket-binding fragments are inactive against the phosphorylated kinase. Fragment molecules are of insufficient size to span both regions of the ATP binding pocket; thus, the outcome is binary (back pocket-binding or hinge-binding). Next, fragments with the appropriate binding profile are assayed in combination with a known hinge-binding fragment and subsequently with a known back pocket-binding fragment. Confirmation of back pocket-binding by Yonetani-Theorell plot analysis progresses candidate fragments to crystallization trials. The method is exemplified by a fragment screening campaign against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and a novel back pocket-binding fragment is presented. PMID:24900475

  15. A Back-to-Front Fragment-Based Drug Design Search Strategy Targeting the DFG-Out Pocket of Protein Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present a straightforward process for the discovery of novel back pocket-binding fragment molecules against protein tyrosine kinases. The approach begins by screening against the nonphosphorylated target kinase with subsequent counterscreening of hits against the phosphorylated enzyme. Back pocket-binding fragments are inactive against the phosphorylated kinase. Fragment molecules are of insufficient size to span both regions of the ATP binding pocket; thus, the outcome is binary (back pocket-binding or hinge-binding). Next, fragments with the appropriate binding profile are assayed in combination with a known hinge-binding fragment and subsequently with a known back pocket-binding fragment. Confirmation of back pocket-binding by Yonetani–Theorell plot analysis progresses candidate fragments to crystallization trials. The method is exemplified by a fragment screening campaign against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and a novel back pocket-binding fragment is presented. PMID:24900475

  16. Dynamic photophoresis-based optical trapping using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfirev, Aleksey P.; Skidanov, Roman V.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate optical trapping light-absorbing particles in the air employing photophoretic forces with optical tweezers generated by a spatial light modulator (SLM). SLM gives us the opportunity to form optical tweezers for multiple trapping in several planes. We investigate the possibility of using lenses with various focal lengths for trapping light-absorbing microparticles with the SLM. We used lenses with a large focal length and a large depth of focus. The results shown in this paper could be useful in various applications of optics and biology.

  17. The History of Laser Trapping of Atoms and Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkin, Arthur

    2003-03-01

    This subject began in 1970 with the demonstration of relatively large radiation pressure forces on small transparent macroscopic particles. Two components of the force were identified: a scattering force in the direction of the incident laser beam and a gradient component in the direction of the intensity gradient. This led to the discovery of stable optical trapping and manipulation of small neutral particles, using these two components. Such trapping was used to levitate particles in air, and also in vacuum with feedback damping. The use of feedback gives a sensitive force measurement technique with applications to the measurement of optical, electric, magnetic, and viscous forces in the subpiconewton range. Early work on understanding of similar scattering and gradient light forces on atoms led to the first experiment on focusing and defocusing of atoms by light and the invention of the single beam gradient or tweezers trap for atoms. By 1980 the fundamentals of the field had been established [1]. Experiments in the mid-1980s on optical tweezer trapping and cooling of atoms resulted in a revolution in atomic physics experimental techniques. The almost simultaneous demonstration of tweezer trapping of macroscopic dielectric particles and the serendipitous discovery of trapping of living biological particles has opened a new field of applications of tweezers to biological sciences. It is now possible to use optical tweezers to separate living single cells, measure the mechanical properties of cellular cytoplasm, and study single biological molecules in vitro [2]. The growing role of optical forces in recent work on Bose-Einstein condensation will be briefly discussed. [1] A. Ashkin, Science 210, 1081 (1980). [2] A. Ashkin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 4853 (1997).

  18. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  19. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, C. D. J.; Retter, J. A.; Curtis, E. A.; Hall, B. V.; Llorente Garcia, I.; Eriksson, S.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.

    2005-08-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1~μK allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  20. Some Examples of Trapped Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar

    2013-03-01

    We present some simple pen and paper examples of trapped surfaces in order to help in visualising this key concept of the theory of gravitational collapse. We collect these examples from time-symmetric initial data, 2+1 dimensions, collapsing null shells, and the Vaidya solution.

  1. Optical trapping of coated microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bormuth, Volker; Jannasch, Anita; Ander, Marcel; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2008-09-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering and lead to stronger trapping. We found that homogeneous silica and polystyrene microspheres had a sharp maximum trap stiffness at a diameter of around 800 nm--the trapping laser wavelength in water--and that a silica coating on a polystyrene microsphere was a substantial improvement for larger diameters. In addition, we noticed that homogeneous spheres of a correct size demonstrated anti-reflective properties. Our results quantitatively agreed with Mie scattering calculations and serve as a proof of principle. We used a DNA stretching experiment to confirm the large linear range in detection and force of the coated microspheres and performed a high-force motor protein assay. These measurements show that the surfaces of the coated microspheres are compatible with biophysical assays.

  2. VACUUM TRAP AND VALVE COMBINATION

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.; Levenson, L.

    1963-02-19

    This patent relates to a vacuum trap and valve combination suitable for use in large ultra-high vacuum systems. The vacuum trap is a chamber having an inlet and outlet opening which may be made to communicate with a chamber to be evacuated and a diffusion pump, respectively. A valve is designed to hermeticaliy seal with inlet opening and, when opened, block the line-of- sight'' between the inlet and outlet openings, while allowing a large flow path between the opened vaive and the side walls of the trap. The interior of the trap and the side of the valve facing the inlet opening are covered with an impurity absorbent, such as Zeolite or activated aluminum. Besides the advantage of combining two components of a vacuum system into one, the present invention removes the need for a baffle between the pump and the chamber to be evacuated. In one use of a specific embodiment of this invention, the transmission probability was 45 and the partial pressure of the pump fluid vapor in the vacuum chamber was at least 100 times lower than its vapor pressure. (AEC)

  3. Mass Trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT In field tests conducted in south Florida to test grape juice as an alternative inexpensive bait for Anastrepha suspensa Loew, high numbers of Zaprionus indianus Gupta were captured in traps baited with aqueous grape juice. These experiments included comparisons of grape juice with standard...

  4. "Trap Setting" in Didactic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urdal, Pamela

    1984-01-01

    Trap setting is a concept based on a psycholinguistic explanation of the acquisition of second language skills emphasizing cognitive and creative processes over the auditory, visual, and imitative. It proposes that opportunities for repeated attempts at solving new problems through constant testing and retesting of creative hypotheses bring the…

  5. A Death Trap for Microglia.

    PubMed

    Du, Xu-Fei; Du, Jiu-Lin

    2016-07-25

    Microglia, immune cells of the brain, originate from erythromyeloid precursors, far from the central nervous system. Xu et al. (2016) in this issue of Developmental Cell and Casano et al. (2016) recently in Cell Reports show that apoptotic neurons act as bait to "trap" microglia into colonizing the developing brain. PMID:27459061

  6. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Sho C.; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently ‘explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  7. Adding versatility to the reconstruction of intraoral lining: opened pocket method.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Can; Ogur, Simin; Arslan, Hakan; Kilic, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Reconstruction of a full-thickness cheek defect, especially one associated with a large lip and oral commissure defect, remains a challenge. After tumor excision, replacement of the oral mucosa is often necessary. The oral mucosa is a thin, pliable lining. Because the skin of the forearm is ideally suited for replacement of oral lining, being thin, pliable, and predominantly hairless, the radial forearm flap is the most frequently used soft-tissue flap for this purpose. In addition, the vascularity of the area allows substantial variation in the design of the flap, both in relation to its site and size. On the other hand, the radial forearm flap might be unusable in some occasions, such as in the case presented here. Thus, a search for an alternative free flap is required. We used a prefabricated scapular free flap to reconstruct a large concomitant lip and full-thickness cheek defect resulting from perioral cancer ablation. We introduce a new "opened pocket" method for reconstruction of the intra-oral lining without folding the flap. Resection of the tumor resulted in a defect including 45% of the upper lip, 50% of the lower lip, and a large, full-thickness defect of the cheek. The resultant defect was temporarily closed with a split-thickness skin graft. Meanwhile, the left scapular fasciocutaneous flap was prefabricated for permanent closure of the defect. The left scapular flap was outlined horizontally, and the flap orientation for the defect was estimated. Then, the distal portion of the flap was harvested and incised to create lips and oral commissure. Afterward, the raw surface under the neo-lip regions and the base where the flap was raised was grafted with one piece from a thick, split-thickness skin graft. Fourteen days later, the patient was taken back to the operating room for reconstruction of the defect with free transfer of a prefabricated scapular fascia-cutaneous flap. The grafted distal region of the flap was raised with the deep fascia located

  8. Bubbles trapped in a fluidized bed: Trajectories and contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poryles, Raphaël; Vidal, Valérie; Varas, Germán

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the dynamics of bubbles in a confined, immersed granular layer submitted to an ascending gas flow. In the stationary regime, a central fluidized zone of parabolic shape is observed, and the bubbles follow different dynamics: either the bubbles are initially formed outside the fluidized zone and do not exhibit any significant motion over the experimental time or they are located inside the fluidized bed, where they are entrained downwards and are, finally, captured by the central air channel. The dependence of the air volume trapped inside the fluidized zone, the bubble size, and the three-phase contact area on the gas injection flow rate and grain diameter are quantified. We find that the volume fraction of air trapped inside the fluidized region is roughly constant and of the order of 2%-3% when the gas flow rate and the grain size are varied. Contrary to intuition, the gas-liquid-solid contact area, normalized by the air injected into the system, decreases when the flow rate is increased, which may have significant importance in industrial applications.

  9. Ecological genetics of adaptive color polymorphism in pocket mice: geographic variation in selected and neutral genes.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Hopi E; Drumm, Kristen E; Nachman, Michael W

    2004-06-01

    Patterns of geographic variation in phenotype or genotype may provide evidence for natural selection. Here, we compare phenotypic variation in color, allele frequencies of a pigmentation gene (the melanocortin-1 receptor, Mc1r), and patterns of neutral mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in rock pocket mice (Chaetodipus intermedius) across a habitat gradient in southern Arizona. Pocket mice inhabiting volcanic lava have dark coats with unbanded, uniformly melanic hairs, whereas mice from nearby light-colored granitic rocks have light coats with banded hairs. This color polymorphism is a presumed adaptation to avoid predation. Previous work has demonstrated that two Mc1r alleles, D and d, differ by four amino acids, and are responsible for the color polymorphism: DD and Dd genotypes are melanic whereas dd genotypes are light colored. To determine the frequency of the two Mc1r allelic classes across the dark-colored lava and neighboring light-colored granite, we sequenced the Mc1r gene in 175 individuals from a 35-km transect in the Pinacate lava region. We also sequenced two neutral mtDNA genes, COIII and ND3, in the same individuals. We found a strong correlation between Mc1r allele frequency and habitat color and no correlation between mtDNA markers and habitat color. Using estimates of migration from mtDNA haplotypes between dark- and light-colored sampling sites and Mc1r allele frequencies at each site, we estimated selection coefficients against mismatched Mc1r alleles, assuming a simple model of migration-selection balance. Habitat-dependent selection appears strong but asymmetric: selection is stronger against light mice on dark rock than against melanic mice on light rock. Together these results suggest that natural selection acts to match pocket mouse coat color to substrate color, despite high levels of gene flow between light and melanic populations.

  10. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine reactivates gene expression via degradation of pRb pocket proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhixing; Li, Lian; Liu, Xiangyu; Wang, Donglai; Tu, Bo; Wang, Lina; Wang, Haiying; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Not only does 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) induce the reexpression of silenced genes through the demethylation of CpG islands, but it increases the expression of unmethylated genes. However, the mechanism by which 5-aza-CdR activates the expression of genes is not completely understood. Here, we report that the pRb pocket proteins pRb, p107, and p130 were degraded in various cancer cell lines in response to 5-aza-CdR treatment, and this effect was dependent on the proteasome pathway. Mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) played a critical role in this 5-aza-CdR-induced degradation of pRb. Furthermore, PP2A phosphatase-induced MDM2 dephosphorylation at S260 was found to be essential for MDM2 binding to pRb in the presence of 5-aza-CdR. pRb degradation resulted in the significant reexpression of several genes, including methylated CDKN2A, RASFF1A, and unmethylated CDKN2D. Finally, knockdown of pRb pocket proteins by either RNAi or 5-aza-CdR treatment induced a significant decrease in the recruitment of SUV39H1 and an increase in the enrichment of KDM3B and KDM4A to histones around the promoter of RASFF1A and thus reduced H3K9 di- and trimethylation, by which RASFF1A expression is activated. Our data reveal a novel mechanism by which 5-aza-CdR induces the expression of both methylated and unmethylated genes by degrading pRb pocket proteins.

  11. The penetration of lavage solution into the periodontal pocket during ultrasonic instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Nosal, G; Scheidt, M J; O'Neal, R; Van Dyke, T E

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the penetration depth of the water coolant for medicament lavage of an ultrasonic device into the periodontal pocket. Patients having teeth previously planned for extraction, and exhibiting probing depths 3 mm or greater were used in this study. A reference notch was placed on the tooth at the level of the gingival margin and the probing attachment level (PAL) was measured from the base of the notch to the base of the pocket. The ultrasonic device, with an EWPP tip and equipped with a reservoir of erythrocin dye colored coolant, was activated and moved in a vertical direction from the gingival margin to the apical extent of the pocket. The tooth was extracted and the penetration depth (PD) of the dye-colored water spray was measured from the reference notch to the apical limit of the stained subgingival plaque. The tooth was counter stained with methylene blue to determine the coronal extent of the connective tissue attachment. Pearsons' Product Moment Correlation Coefficient for the PAL and PD was calculated. Dye-stained root surface was observed along the full extent of the probe tip's penetration path. The dispersion of the dye-colored stain was localized to the area of the ultrasonic probe with very little lateral dispersion. The ultrasonic instrument may be an effective system to mechanically remove plaque and calculus at the same time as delivering a chemotherapeutic agent. The limited dispersion of the liquid dye would indicate that chemical plaque control with this delivery system is dependent upon thorough debridement with the instrument such that all affected surfaces are instrumented. PMID:1658291

  12. Interactions between Hofmeister anions and the binding pocket of a protein.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jerome M; Kang, Kyungtae; Sherman, Woody; Héroux, Annie; Sastry, G Madhavi; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Lockett, Matthew R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-25

    This paper uses the binding pocket of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII, EC 4.2.1.1) as a tool to examine the properties of Hofmeister anions that determine (i) where, and how strongly, they associate with concavities on the surfaces of proteins and (ii) how, upon binding, they alter the structure of water within those concavities. Results from X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry show that most anions associate with the binding pocket of HCAII by forming inner-sphere ion pairs with the Zn(2+) cofactor. In these ion pairs, the free energy of anion-Zn(2+) association is inversely proportional to the free energetic cost of anion dehydration; this relationship is consistent with the mechanism of ion pair formation suggested by the "law of matching water affinities". Iodide and bromide anions also associate with a hydrophobic declivity in the wall of the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that anions, upon associating with Zn(2+), trigger rearrangements of water that extend up to 8 Å away from their surfaces. These findings expand the range of interactions previously thought to occur between ions and proteins by suggesting that (i) weakly hydrated anions can bind complementarily shaped hydrophobic declivities, and that (ii) ion-induced rearrangements of water within protein concavities can (in contrast with similar rearrangements in bulk water) extend well beyond the first hydration shells of the ions that trigger them. This study paints a picture of Hofmeister anions as a set of structurally varied ligands that differ in size, shape, and affinity for water and, thus, in their ability to bind to—and to alter the charge and hydration structure of—polar, nonpolar, and topographically complex concavities on the surfaces of proteins.

  13. Reversal of negative charges on the surface of Escherichia coli thioredoxin: pockets versus protrusions.

    PubMed

    Mancusso, Romina; Cruz, Eduardo; Cataldi, Marcela; Mendoza, Carla; Fuchs, James; Wang, Hsin; Yang, Xiaomin; Tasayco, María Luisa

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies of proteins with reversed charged residues have demonstrated that electrostatic interactions on the surface can contribute significantly to protein stability. We have used the approach of reversing negatively charged residues using Arg to evaluate the effect of the electrostatics context on the transition temperature (T(m)), the unfolding Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG), and the unfolding enthalpy change (DeltaH). We have reversed negatively charged residues at a pocket (Asp9) and protrusions (Asp10, Asp20, Glu85), all located in interconnecting segments between elements of secondary structure on the surface of Arg73Ala Escherichia coli thioredoxin. DSC measurements indicate that reversal of Asp in a pocket (Asp9Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -7.3 degrees C) produces a larger effect in thermal stability than reversal at protrusions: Asp10Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -3.1 degrees C, Asp20Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = 2.0 degrees C, Glu85Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = 3.9 degrees ). The 3D structure of thioredoxin indicates that Asp20 and Glu85 have no nearby charges within 8 A, while Asp9 does not only have Asp10 as sequential neighbor, but it also forms a 5-A long-range ion pair with the solvent-exposed Lys69. Further DSC measurements indicate that neutralization of the individual charges of the ion pair Asp9-Lys69 with nonpolar residues produces a significant decrease in stability in both cases: Asp9Ala/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -3.7 degrees C, Asp9Met/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -5.5 degrees C, Lys69Leu/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -5.1 degrees C. However, thermodynamic analysis shows that reversal or neutralization of Asp9 produces a 9-15% decrease in DeltaH, while both reversal of Asp at protrusions and neutralization of Lys69 produce negligible changes. These results correlate well with the NMR analysis, which demonstrates that only the substitution of Asp9 produces extensive conformational changes and these changes occur in the surroundings of Lys69. Our results led us to

  14. A Mobile Computing Solution for Collecting Functional Analysis Data on a Pocket PC

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, James; Dixon, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    The present paper provides a task analysis for creating a computerized data system using a Pocket PC and Microsoft Visual Basic. With Visual Basic software and any handheld device running the Windows Moble operating system, this task analysis will allow behavior analysts to program and customize their own functional analysis data-collection system. The program will allow the user to select the type of behavior to be recorded, choose between interval and frequency data collection, and summarize data for graphing and analysis. We also provide suggestions for customizing the data-collection system for idiosyncratic research and clinical needs. PMID:17624078

  15. A mobile computing solution for collecting functional analysis data on a Pocket PC.

    PubMed

    Jackson, James; Dixon, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    The present paper provides a task analysis for creating a computerized data system using a Pocket PC and Microsoft Visual Basic. With Visual Basic software and any handheld device running the Windows Moble operating system, this task analysis will allow behavior analysts to program and customize their own functional analysis data-collection system. The program will allow the user to select the type of behavior to be recorded, choose between interval and frequency data collection, and summarize data for graphing and analysis. We also provide suggestions for customizing the data-collection system for idiosyncratic research and clinical needs. PMID:17624078

  16. Investigation on the sucrose binding pocket of HIV-1 Integrase by molecular dynamics and synergy experiments.

    PubMed

    Tintori, Cristina; Esposito, Francesca; Morreale, Francesca; Martini, Riccardo; Tramontano, Enzo; Botta, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Enzymes whose catalytic activity depends on multimeric assembly are targets for inhibitors that perturb the interactions between the protein subunits such as the HIV-1 Integrase (IN). Sucrose has been recently crystallized in complex with IN revealing an allosteric binding pocket at the monomer-monomer interface. Herein, molecular dynamics were applied to theoretically test the effect of this small ligand on IN. As a result, such a compound increases the mutual free energy of binding between the two interacting monomers. Biological experiments confirmed the computational forecast. PMID:26048795

  17. Funnel traps capture a higher proportion of juvenile Great Tits Parus major than automatic traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senar, J.C.; Domenech, J.; Conroy, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We compared capture rates of Great Tits at funnel traps, where several birds can be captured at once so that some decoy effect may appear, to those obtained at automatic traps, where only one bird can be trapped at a time, at trapping stations in northeastern Spain. Juvenile birds were mainly captured at funnel traps (79% of juvenile captures), whereas adult plumaged birds were captured at both types of traps (51% of captures were at the funnel traps) (test between ages, P<0.001). Juvenile Great Tits had lower body condition as measured by ptilochronology (P<0.01). These birds are more easily trapped in funnel traps, which may be acting as decoy traps, and thus are vulnerable to the same kinds of biases (eg age or body condition) that have been previously documented for decoy traps.

  18. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  19. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  20. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  1. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  2. Persistent free radicals in woodsmoke: An ESR spin trapping study

    SciTech Connect

    Lachocki, T.M.; Church, D.F.; Pryor, W.A. )

    1989-01-01

    Free radicals are detected in the gas-phase smoke resulting from the combustion of wood using the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping method. The materials were pyrolyzed by rapid heating in a quartz tube in a flowing air stream. The filtered smoke was bubbled into a dodecane solution of alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, and the resulting nitroxide radicals were detected by ESR. The radicals spin trapped from woodsmoke are compared to those we have spin trapped from tobacco smoke; the smoke from both yellow pine and oak produce more intense ESR spectra than does tobacco smoke per unit mass burned under the conditions of these experiments. When woodsmoke is bubbled through pure dodecane and the resulting woodsmoke/dodecane solution is held for a delay time before the PBN is added, radicals are detected even after the woodsmoke/dodecane solution is aged for more than 20 min. Similar experiments with tobacco smoke show that radicals no longer are trapped even after much shorter delay times from tobacco smoke/dodecane solutions.

  3. Optical and Magnetic Trapping of Potassium 39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensher, Jason; Cornell, Eric; Cataliotti, Francesco; Fort, Chiara; Marin, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Ricci, Leonardo; Tino, Guglielmo

    1998-05-01

    We present measurments of optical trapping and cooling and magnetic trapping of ^39K in a double-MOT apparatus. (Optics Lett. 21, 290(1996)) We have measured light-assisted collisional loss rates from our second MOT over a range of trap light intensities. At an intensity of 10 mW/cm^2 we find a loss rate parameter β of 2 x 10-11 cc/s. β increases with trap light intensity and is consistent with the values measured by Williamson and Walker (JOSA B 12, 1393 (1995)). We also present studies of the temperature of atoms in a MOT of ^39K. Under certain conditions of repump light intensity and trap light detuning we measure temperatures nearly as low as the Doppler Limit. Finally, we report on prelimiary results of magnetic trapping in which we have trapped several 10^7 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  4. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  5. Effect of cation trapping on thermal stability of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pati, S S; Philip, John

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the effect of sodium trapping on thermal stability of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The pure magnetite nanoparticles incubated in sodium hydroxide solutions and subsequently washed with water to remove the excess sodium. The amount of sodium in magnetite is measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The size distribution obtained from Small angle X-ray scattering measurements show that particles are fairly monodisperse. The FTIR spectra of nanoparticles show transmission bands at 441 and 611 cm(-1) are due to the symmetric stretching vibrations (v) of Fe-O in octahedral and tetrahedral sites respectively. With 500 ppm of sodium ions (Na+) in magnetite, the cubic ferrite structure of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) to hexagonal hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) phase transition is enhanced by -150 degrees C in air. The Rietveld analysis of sodium doped magnetite nanoparticles show that above 99% of metastable gamma-Fe2O3 is converted to a thermodynamically stable alpha-Fe2O3 after air annealing at 700 degrees C. A decrease in enthalpy observed in doped magnetite unambiguously confirms that the activation energy for maghemite to hematite transition is increased due to the presence of trapped sodium ions. These results suggest that the trapped cations in ferrite nanoparticles can stabilize them by increasing the activation energy.

  6. Antiproton Trapping for Advanced Space Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gerald A.

    1998-01-01

    The Summary of Research parallels the Statement of Work (Appendix I) submitted with the proposal, and funded effective Feb. 1, 1997 for one year. A proposal was submitted to CERN in October, 1996 to carry out an experiment on the synthesis and study of fundamental properties of atomic antihydrogen. Since confined atomic antihydrogen is potentially the most powerful and elegant source of propulsion energy known, its confinement and properties are of great interest to the space propulsion community. Appendix II includes an article published in the technical magazine Compressed Air, June 1997, which describes CERN antiproton facilities, and ATHENA. During the period of this grant, Prof. Michael Holzscheiter served as spokesman for ATHENA and, in collaboration with Prof. Gerald Smith, worked on the development of the antiproton confinement trap, which is an important part of the ATHENA experiment. Appendix III includes a progress report submitted to CERN on March 12, 1997 concerning development of the ATHENA detector. Section 4.1 reviews technical responsibilities within the ATHENA collaboration, including the Antiproton System, headed by Prof. Holzscheiter. The collaboration was advised (see Appendix IV) on June 13, 1997 that the CERN Research Board had approved ATHENA for operation at the new Antiproton Decelerator (AD), presently under construction. First antiproton beams are expected to be delivered to experiments in about one year. Progress toward assembly of the ATHENA detector and initial testing expected in 1999 has been excellent. Appendix V includes a copy of the minutes of the most recently documented collaboration meeting held at CERN of October 24, 1997, which provides more information on development of systems, including the antiproton trapping apparatus. On February 10, 1998 Prof. Smith gave a 3 hour lecture on the Physics of Antimatter, as part of the Physics for the Third Millennium Lecture Series held at MSFC. Included in Appendix VI are notes and

  7. Galactic chemical evolution and solar s-process abundances: Dependence on the {sup 13}C-pocket structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bisterzo, S.; Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Wiescher, M.; Käppeler, F. E-mail: sarabisterzo@gmail.com

    2014-05-20

    We study the s-process abundances (A ≳ 90) at the epoch of the solar system formation. Asymptotic giant branch yields are computed with an updated neutron capture network and updated initial solar abundances. We confirm our previous results obtained with a Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model: (1) as suggested by the s-process spread observed in disk stars and in presolar meteoritic SiC grains, a weighted average of s-process strengths is needed to reproduce the solar s distribution of isotopes with A > 130; and (2) an additional contribution (of about 25%) is required in order to represent the solar s-process abundances of isotopes from A = 90 to 130. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of different internal structures of the {sup 13}C pocket, which may affect the efficiency of the {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O reaction, the major neutron source of the s process. First, keeping the same {sup 13}C profile adopted so far, we modify by a factor of two the mass involved in the pocket; second, we assume a flat {sup 13}C profile in the pocket, and we test again the effects of the variation of the mass of the pocket. We find that GCE s predictions at the epoch of the solar system formation marginally depend on the size and shape of the {sup 13}C pocket once a different weighted range of {sup 13}C-pocket strengths is assumed. We obtain that, independently of the internal structure of the {sup 13}C pocket, the missing solar system s-process contribution in the range from A = 90 to 130 remains essentially the same.

  8. Study of Out-of-Pocket Expenditures for Outpatient Imaging Services in Imam-Khomeini Hospital in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Marzban, Sima; Rajaee, Roya; Gholami, Soheyla; Keykale, Meysam Safi; Najafi, Marziye

    2015-01-01

    Background: Direct out-of-pocket (OOP) payment is the most inequitable way to pay for healthcare services, and this trend exposes patients and their families to backbreaking financial risks. The aim of this study was to estimate the out-of-pocket expenditures for outpatient imaging services in Imam-Khomeini Hospital in Tehran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 on 100 users of outpatient imaging services (radiology, ultrasonography, CT-scan, and MRI) in Imam-Khomeini Hospital in Tehran. Structured interviews and the analysis of related documents were used to acquire the pertinent data. The percentage of out-of-pocket expenditures was obtained by dividing the out-of-pocket expenditures by the total expenditures paid to the service provider, i.e., the sum of out-of-pocket expenditures and insurance payments. To analyze the data, we used descriptive-analytic statistics, distribution indices, the t-test, and the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient. Results: Health insurance covered 84% of costs incurred by users of outpatient imaging services. There was no significant relationship between the user’s age and the amount of out-of-pocket expense (p = 0.01). The relationship between the user’s gender and out-of-pocket expense was significant (p = 0.05). The average payment for males was greater than the average payment for females. The highest percentage of the total payment the users incurred was 41% for a CT-scan, and the lowest percentage the users incurred was 30% for radiology services. Conclusion: It is suggested that expensive diagnostic tests, such as CT-scans, be prescribed according to the actual needs of patients to make the financial burden of diagnostic services reasonable for all patients. PMID:26396732

  9. Correlates of out-of-pocket and catastrophic health expenditures in Tanzania: results from a national household survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inequality in health services access and utilization are influenced by out-of-pocket health expenditures in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs). Various antecedents such as social factors, poor health and economic factors are proposed to direct the choice of health care service use and incurring out-of-pocket payments. We investigated the association of these factors with out-of-pocket health expenditures among the adult and older population in the United Republic of Tanzania. We also investigated the prevalence and associated determinants contributing to household catastrophic health expenditures. Methods We accessed the data of a multistage stratified random sample of 7279 adult participants, aged between 18 and 59 years, as well as 1018 participants aged above 60 years, from the first round of the Tanzania National Panel survey. We employed multiple generalized linear and logistic regression models to evaluate the correlates of out-of-pocket as well as catastrophic health expenditures, accounting for the complex sample design effects. Results Increasing age, female gender, obesity and functional disability increased the adults’ out-of-pocket health expenditures significantly, while functional disability and visits to traditional healers increased the out-of-pocket health expenditures in older participants. Adult participants, who lacked formal education or worked as manual laborers earned significantly less (p < 0.001) and spent less on health (p < 0.001), despite having higher levels of disability. Large household size, household head’s occupation as a manual laborer, household member with chronic illness, domestic violence against women and traditional healer’s visits were significantly associated with high catastrophic health expenditures. Conclusion We observed that the prevalence of inequalities in socioeconomic factors played a significant role in determining the nature of both out-of-pocket and catastrophic health

  10. Stokes Trap: Multiplexed particle trapping and manipulation using fluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Anish; Schroeder, Charles

    We report the development of the Stokes Trap, which is a multiplexed microfluidic trap for control over an arbitrary number of small particles in a microfluidic device. Our work involves the design and implementation of ``smart'' flow-based devices by coupling feedback control with microfluidics, thereby enabling new routes for the fluidic-directed assembly of particles. Here, we discuss the development of a new method to achieve multiplexed microfluidic trapping of an arbitrary number of particles using the sole action of fluid flow. In particular, we use a Hele-Shaw microfluidic cell to generate hydrodynamic forces on particles in a viscous-dominated flow defined by the microdevice geometry and imposed peripheral flow rates. This platform allows for a high degree of flow control over individual particles and can be used for manufacturing novel particles for fundamental studies, using fluidic-directed assembly. From a broader perspective, our work provides a solid framework for guiding the design of next-generation, automated on-chip assays.

  11. Geomagnetically trapped energetic helium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Gregory Guzik, T.; Wefel, J.P.; Roger Pyle, K.; Cooper, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    Geomagnetically trapped helium nuclei, at high energy ({approximately}40{endash}100 MeV/nucleon), have been measured by the ONR-604 instrument during the 1990/1991 CRRES mission. The ONR-604 instrument resolved the isotopes of helium with a mass resolution of 0.1 amu. The energetic helium observed at {ital L}{lt}2.3 have a pitch angle distribution peaking perpendicular to the local magnetic field, which is characteristic of a trapped population. Both the trapped {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He show two peaks at {ital L}=1.2 and 1.9. Each isotope{close_quote}s flux, in each peak, can be characterized by a power law energy spectrum. The energy spectrum of the {sup 3}He is different from that of {sup 4}He, indicating that the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is energy dependent. Over the energy range of 51{endash}86 MeV/nucleon, the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is 8.7{plus_minus}3.1 at {ital L}=1.1{endash}1.5 and is 2.4{plus_minus}0.6 at {ital L}=1.5{endash}2.3. The trapped helium counting rates decrease gradually with time during the CRRES mission, when the anomalous component is excluded from the inner heliosphere, indicating that these high energy ions were not injected by flares during this time period. The decrease in intensity is attributed mainly to the events around {ital L}=1.9. The helium around {ital L}=1.2, dominated by {sup 3}He, does not show a significant temporal evolution, which implies a long-term energetic trapped {sup 3}He population. Two possible origins of the geomagnetically trapped helium isotopes are the interactions of energetic protons with the upper atmosphere and/or the inward diffusion and acceleration of helium ions due to electric-field fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Analysis of walker-aided walking by the healthy elderly with a walker pocket of different weights attached at different locations

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eunji; Jeon, Byongjin; Song, Bokyung; Baek, Minho; Roh, Hyolyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to provide information on safe walker-aided walking by analyzing elderly subjects’ walking with a walker pocket of different weights attached at different locations. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty elderly right-handed males participated in the study, and a walking analyzer was used to examine their walking with a pocket attached to the left, center, and right side of the walker. The weight of the pocket was set at three levels relative to the average weight of the subject group: 0% (without pocket), 2.5% (2 kg), and 5.5% (4 kg). [Results] In terms of the pocket location, step width was the narrowest when the pocket was attached to the right side, while the other elements of walking did not change. In terms of the pocket weight, all elements of walking showed changes. A heavier pocket led to a shorter step length and stride, a greater step width, and longer time. [Conclusion] When elderly people use a pocket-attached walker, the pocket is recommended to be attached to the right side of the walker, and its weight should be kept under 5.5% of the user’s weight to ensure safe walking. PMID:26696700

  13. An innovative mosquito trap for testing attractants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe a simple trap modification for testing or using attractants to collect flying mosquitoes. The trap also can test the effectiveness of spatial repellents. The proposed design may facilitate standardized testing of mosquito attractants and repellents. The trap uses a standard Centers f...

  14. 50 CFR 697.27 - Trap transferability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Measures § 697.27 Trap transferability. (a) Federal lobster permit holders may elect to participate in a program that allows them to transfer trap allocation to other participating Federal lobster permit holders... Federal Trap Transfer Program: (i) An individual must possess a valid Federal lobster permit; and (ii)...

  15. The role of a novel auxiliary pocket in bacterial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase druggability.

    PubMed

    Abibi, Ayome; Ferguson, Andrew D; Fleming, Paul R; Gao, Ning; Hajec, Laurel I; Hu, Jun; Laganas, Valerie A; McKinney, David C; McLeod, Sarah M; Prince, D Bryan; Shapiro, Adam B; Buurman, Ed T

    2014-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of phenyl-thiazolylurea-sulfonamides against Staphylococcus aureus PheRS are dependent upon phenylalanine levels in the extracellular fluids. Inhibitor efficacy in animal models of infection is substantially diminished by dietary phenylalanine intake, thereby reducing the perceived clinical utility of this inhibitor class. The search for novel antibacterial compounds against Gram-negative pathogens led to a re-evaluation of this phenomenon, which is shown here to be unique to S. aureus. Inhibition of macromolecular syntheses and characterization of novel resistance mutations in Escherichia coli demonstrate that antimicrobial activity of phenyl-thiazolylurea-sulfonamides is mediated by PheRS inhibition, validating this enzyme as a viable drug discovery target for Gram-negative pathogens. A search for novel inhibitors of PheRS yielded three novel chemical starting points. NMR studies were used to confirm direct target engagement for phenylalanine-competitive hits. The crystallographic structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PheRS defined the binding modes of these hits and revealed an auxiliary hydrophobic pocket that is positioned adjacent to the phenylalanine binding site. Three viable inhibitor-resistant mutants were mapped to this pocket, suggesting that this region is a potential liability for drug discovery. PMID:24936059

  16. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein-TbBILBO1.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R

    2016-03-02

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton.

  17. Involvement of Phenylalanine 297 in the Construction of the Substrate Pocket of Human Aminopeptidase B.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Atsushi; Watanabe, Jobu; Ogawa, Yuko; Goto, Yoshikuni; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2015-10-01

    Aminopeptidase B (APB, EC 3.4.11.6) preferentially hydrolyzes the N-terminal basic amino acids of synthetic and peptide substrates and requires a physiological concentration of NaCl for optimal activity. In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling to search for an amino acid residue that is critical for the enzymatic properties of human APB. Substitution of Phe297 with Tyr caused a significant decrease in hydrolytic activity toward synthetic and peptide substrates as well as chloride anion sensitivity. Molecular modeling suggests that Phe297 contributes to the construction of the substrate pocket of APB, which is wide enough to hold a chloride anion and allow the interaction of Gln169 with the N-terminal Arg residue of the substrate through bridging with the chloride anion. These results indicate that Phe297 is crucial for the optimal enzymatic activity and chloride anion sensitivity of APB via formation of the optimal structure of the catalytic pocket.

  18. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  19. Single reconstructed Fermi surface pocket in an underdoped single-layer cuprate superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, M. K.; Harrison, N.; McDonald, R. D.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Modic, K. A.; Barišić, N.; Greven, M.

    2016-01-01

    The observation of a reconstructed Fermi surface via quantum oscillations in hole-doped cuprates opened a path towards identifying broken symmetry states in the pseudogap regime. However, such an identification has remained inconclusive due to the multi-frequency quantum oscillation spectra and complications accounting for bilayer effects in most studies. We overcome these impediments with high-resolution measurements on the structurally simpler cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg1201), which features one CuO2 plane per primitive unit cell. We find only a single oscillatory component with no signatures of magnetic breakdown tunnelling to additional orbits. Therefore, the Fermi surface comprises a single quasi-two-dimensional pocket. Quantitative modelling of these results indicates that a biaxial charge density wave within each CuO2 plane is responsible for the reconstruction and rules out criss-crossed charge stripes between layers as a viable alternative in Hg1201. Lastly, we determine that the characteristic gap between reconstructed pockets is a significant fraction of the pseudogap energy. PMID:27448102

  20. Single reconstructed Fermi surface pocket in an underdoped single-layer cuprate superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. K.; Harrison, N.; McDonald, R. D.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Modic, K. A.; Barišić, N.; Greven, M.

    2016-07-01

    The observation of a reconstructed Fermi surface via quantum oscillations in hole-doped cuprates opened a path towards identifying broken symmetry states in the pseudogap regime. However, such an identification has remained inconclusive due to the multi-frequency quantum oscillation spectra and complications accounting for bilayer effects in most studies. We overcome these impediments with high-resolution measurements on the structurally simpler cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg1201), which features one CuO2 plane per primitive unit cell. We find only a single oscillatory component with no signatures of magnetic breakdown tunnelling to additional orbits. Therefore, the Fermi surface comprises a single quasi-two-dimensional pocket. Quantitative modelling of these results indicates that a biaxial charge density wave within each CuO2 plane is responsible for the reconstruction and rules out criss-crossed charge stripes between layers as a viable alternative in Hg1201. Lastly, we determine that the characteristic gap between reconstructed pockets is a significant fraction of the pseudogap energy.

  1. The PocketSpacecraft.com Integrated eXploration Environment (PIXE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The PocketSpacecraft.com Integrated eXploration Environment (PIXE) is an integrated generic spacecraft design, simulation, manufacturing, and operations system for the low cost mass exploration of space by amateur and professional Principle Investigators (PIs). PIs use an online tool to design Thin-Film Spacecraft/Lander/Rovers (TF-SLRs) using a library of predefined spacecraft and mission components to specify TF-SLRs in quantities ranging from one to thousands per mission, each with a typical mass <1g, surface area <1m2, and Pocket Spacecraft: Mission to the Moon' has been traditionally and crowd funded and is being prepared for flight with the goal of achieving low lunar orbit in 2016.

  2. Single reconstructed Fermi surface pocket in an underdoped single-layer cuprate superconductor.

    PubMed

    Chan, M K; Harrison, N; McDonald, R D; Ramshaw, B J; Modic, K A; Barišić, N; Greven, M

    2016-01-01

    The observation of a reconstructed Fermi surface via quantum oscillations in hole-doped cuprates opened a path towards identifying broken symmetry states in the pseudogap regime. However, such an identification has remained inconclusive due to the multi-frequency quantum oscillation spectra and complications accounting for bilayer effects in most studies. We overcome these impediments with high-resolution measurements on the structurally simpler cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg1201), which features one CuO2 plane per primitive unit cell. We find only a single oscillatory component with no signatures of magnetic breakdown tunnelling to additional orbits. Therefore, the Fermi surface comprises a single quasi-two-dimensional pocket. Quantitative modelling of these results indicates that a biaxial charge density wave within each CuO2 plane is responsible for the reconstruction and rules out criss-crossed charge stripes between layers as a viable alternative in Hg1201. Lastly, we determine that the characteristic gap between reconstructed pockets is a significant fraction of the pseudogap energy. PMID:27448102

  3. The Role of a Novel Auxiliary Pocket in Bacterial Phenylalanyl-tRNA Synthetase Druggability

    PubMed Central

    Abibi, Ayome; Ferguson, Andrew D.; Fleming, Paul R.; Gao, Ning; Hajec, Laurel I.; Hu, Jun; Laganas, Valerie A.; McKinney, David C.; McLeod, Sarah M.; Prince, D. Bryan; Shapiro, Adam B.; Buurman, Ed T.

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of phenyl-thiazolylurea-sulfonamides against Staphylococcus aureus PheRS are dependent upon phenylalanine levels in the extracellular fluids. Inhibitor efficacy in animal models of infection is substantially diminished by dietary phenylalanine intake, thereby reducing the perceived clinical utility of this inhibitor class. The search for novel antibacterial compounds against Gram-negative pathogens led to a re-evaluation of this phenomenon, which is shown here to be unique to S. aureus. Inhibition of macromolecular syntheses and characterization of novel resistance mutations in Escherichia coli demonstrate that antimicrobial activity of phenyl-thiazolylurea-sulfonamides is mediated by PheRS inhibition, validating this enzyme as a viable drug discovery target for Gram-negative pathogens. A search for novel inhibitors of PheRS yielded three novel chemical starting points. NMR studies were used to confirm direct target engagement for phenylalanine-competitive hits. The crystallographic structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PheRS defined the binding modes of these hits and revealed an auxiliary hydrophobic pocket that is positioned adjacent to the phenylalanine binding site. Three viable inhibitor-resistant mutants were mapped to this pocket, suggesting that this region is a potential liability for drug discovery. PMID:24936059

  4. Identification of a Ligand Binding Pocket in LdtR from Liberibacter asiaticus.

    PubMed

    Pagliai, Fernando A; Gonzalez, Claudio F; Lorca, Graciela L

    2015-01-01

    LdtR is a transcriptional activator involved in the regulation of a putative L,D transpeptidase in Liberibacter asiaticus, an unculturable pathogen and one of the causative agents of Huanglongbing disease. Using small molecule screens we identified benzbromarone as an inhibitor of LdtR activity, which was confirmed using in vivo and in vitro assays. Based on these previous results, the objective of this work was to identify the LdtR ligand binding pocket and characterize its interactions with benzbromarone. A structural model of LdtR was constructed and the molecular interactions with the ligand were predicted using the SwissDock interface. Using site-directed mutagenesis, these residues were changed to alanine. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, thermal denaturation, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, and in vivo assays were used to identify residues T43, L61, and F64 in the Benz1 pocket of LdtR as the amino acids most likely involved in the binding to benzbromarone. These results provide new information on the binding mechanism of LdtR to a modulatory molecule and provide a blue print for the design of therapeutics for other members of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators involved in pathogenicity. PMID:26635775

  5. Color tuning in binding pocket models of the chlamydomonas-type channelrhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Welke, Kai; Frähmcke, Jan S; Watanabe, Hiroshi C; Hegemann, Peter; Elstner, Marcus

    2011-12-22

    We examined the shift of absorption maxima between the chlamydomonas-type channelrhodopsins (ChRs) and bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Starting from the BR X-ray structure, we modeled the color tuning in the binding pockets of the ChRs by mutating up to 28 amino acids in the vicinity of the chromophore. By applying the efficient self-consistent charge density functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB) method in a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) framework, including explicit polarization and calculating excitation energies with the semiempirical OM2/MRCI method and the ab initio SORCI method, we have shown that multiple mutations in the binding pocket of BR causes large hypsochromic shifts that are of the same order as the experimentally observed shifts of the absorption maxima between BR and the ChRs. This study further demonstrates that mutations in the proximity of the Schiff base and complex counterion lead to a stronger but more flexible interaction with the retinal, which could serve as a possible explanation for the spectral patterns found in the ChRs. PMID:22077286

  6. Child Wasting in Emergency Pockets: A Meta-Analysis of Small-Scale Surveys from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Altare, Chiara; Delbiso, Tefera Darge; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-02-01

    Child undernutrition is a major public health concern in Ethiopia (stunting national prevalence: 44%; wasting: 10%), despite the overall improvement in child health status during the last decade. Hundreds of small-scale surveys are conducted in Ethiopia's emergency pockets under ENCU's supervision. We reviewed the evidence from small-scale surveys conducted between 2008 and 2013 with two objectives: to provide a summary estimate of wasting prevalence from emergency pockets and to examine reasons for variation in prevalence estimates. We created a dataset by combining data from the Complex Emergency Database, the Famine Early Warning System Network and the Armed Conflict Location Event Data. We conducted a meta-analysis of small-scale surveys using a random effects model with known within-study heterogeneity. The influence of survey covariates on estimated prevalence was investigated with meta-regression techniques. We included 158 surveys in the analysis. A high degree of heterogeneity among surveys was observed. The overall estimate of wasting prevalence was 10.6% (95% CI 9.8-11.4), with differences among regions and between residents and refugees. Meta-regression results showed that vaccination coverage, child mortality, diarrhea prevalence and food insecurity are significantly associated with wasting prevalence. Child care and displacement status were not. Aggregated analysis of small-scale surveys provides insights into the prevalence of wasting and factors explaining its variation. It can also guide survey planning towards areas with limited data availability. PMID:26828512

  7. Child Wasting in Emergency Pockets: A Meta-Analysis of Small-Scale Surveys from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Altare, Chiara; Delbiso, Tefera Darge; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-02-01

    Child undernutrition is a major public health concern in Ethiopia (stunting national prevalence: 44%; wasting: 10%), despite the overall improvement in child health status during the last decade. Hundreds of small-scale surveys are conducted in Ethiopia's emergency pockets under ENCU's supervision. We reviewed the evidence from small-scale surveys conducted between 2008 and 2013 with two objectives: to provide a summary estimate of wasting prevalence from emergency pockets and to examine reasons for variation in prevalence estimates. We created a dataset by combining data from the Complex Emergency Database, the Famine Early Warning System Network and the Armed Conflict Location Event Data. We conducted a meta-analysis of small-scale surveys using a random effects model with known within-study heterogeneity. The influence of survey covariates on estimated prevalence was investigated with meta-regression techniques. We included 158 surveys in the analysis. A high degree of heterogeneity among surveys was observed. The overall estimate of wasting prevalence was 10.6% (95% CI 9.8-11.4), with differences among regions and between residents and refugees. Meta-regression results showed that vaccination coverage, child mortality, diarrhea prevalence and food insecurity are significantly associated with wasting prevalence. Child care and displacement status were not. Aggregated analysis of small-scale surveys provides insights into the prevalence of wasting and factors explaining its variation. It can also guide survey planning towards areas with limited data availability.

  8. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein—TbBILBO1

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  9. ACA dependent coverage provision reduced high out-of-pocket health care spending for young adults.

    PubMed

    Busch, Susan H; Golberstein, Ezra; Meara, Ellen

    2014-08-01

    Since September 2010 the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has required that insurers allow children to remain as dependents on their parents' private insurance plans until age twenty-six. Studies have shown that this provision increased coverage rates among young adults. In this article we analyze whether the provision also protected young adults from large and uncertain out-of-pocket expenses. We found that the policy was associated with a statistically significant reduction in the share of young adults facing annual out-of-pocket expenditures greater than $1,500 (decreasing from 4.2 percent to 2.9 percent), compared to an increase in the proportion of their slightly older peers facing such expenditures (increasing from 4.4 percent to 5.4 percent), a net difference of -2.4 percentage points, or 57 percent. We conclude that the dependent coverage provision in the ACA provides financial protection for young adults at a time when they often face high debt burden but low wages.

  10. Cophylogeny and disparate rates of evolution in sympatric lineages of chewing lice on pocket gophers.

    PubMed

    Light, Jessica E; Hafner, Mark S

    2007-12-01

    Although molecular-based phylogenetic studies of hosts and parasites are increasingly common in the literature, no study to date has examined two congeneric lineages of parasites that live in sympatry on the same lineage of hosts. This study examines phylogenetic relationships among chewing lice (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae) of the Geomydoecus coronadoi and Geomydoecus mexicanus species complexes and compares these to phylogenetic patterns in their hosts (pocket gophers of the rodent family Geomyidae). Sympatry of congeneric lice provides a natural experiment to test the hypothesis that closely related lineages of parasites will respond similarly to the same host. Sequence data from the mitochondrial COI and the nuclear EF-1alpha genes confirm that the two louse complexes are reciprocally monophyletic and that individual clades within each species complex parasitize a different species of pocket gopher. Phylogenetic comparisons reveal that both louse complexes show a significant pattern of cophylogeny with their hosts. Comparisons of rates of nucleotide substitution at 4-fold degenerate sites in the COI gene indicate that both groups of lice have significantly higher basal mutation rates than their hosts. The two groups of lice have similar basal rates of mutation, but lice of the G. coronadoi complex show significantly elevated rates of nucleotide substitution at all sites. These rate differences are hypothesized to result from population-level phenomena, such as effective population size, founder effects, and drift, that influence rates of nucleotide substitution. PMID:17964189

  11. Military family physicians' perceptions of a pocket point-of-care ultrasound device in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Paul; Bornemann, Gina

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasonography with a pocket ultrasound device, General Electric Medical Systems Vscan (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), has been shown to be effective and easy to learn. However, no studies to date have evaluated its use in the military primary care setting where its portability and value in bedside diagnosis would be especially beneficial. We tested the feasibility of the Vscan in the day-to-day care of patients by family physicians in their clinic, inpatient wards, and its potential for use in the military-deployed setting. Participants were trained and credentialed in the use of the point-of-care ultrasonography. Then, participants were provided with a pocket ultrasound device to use in their normal day-to-day practice. Additionally, participants completed surveys and provided ratings on their perceptions regarding the use of the device. According to the survey analysis, participants found the devices to be easy to use, valuable in discerning a diagnosis, and were not prohibitively time consuming. Moreover, patients were perceived by the participants to have been satisfied with the use of the device. Overall, participants had high satisfaction with the Vscan and perceived that the device would be highly valuable in the military-deployed setting.

  12. Utilizing Wireless PocketPC's in Earth System Science Lectures to Expand Discourse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, P. J.; van der Pluijm, B.

    2004-12-01

    Introductory science teaching, including otherwise engaging topics such as climate change and natural hazards, traditionally relies on static textbooks and/or course packs, and presentation is often delivered as a monologue in front of a passive audience. Add to this the advent of extensive lecture notes on the Internet and the students are left with little incentive to attend class, much less participate. Clearly this model does not provide much opportunity for students to critically think through the arguments being developed. In order to address this issue, we are experimenting with the use of interactive spatial concept challenges utilizing wireless PocketPC computers in Earth Systems classes at the University of Michigan. The tools being developed have the goal of involving students in their own learning during lecture and focusing their attention on underlying concepts. Following Mazur (1997) students respond to spatial questions offered through the PocketPC and formulate their own answers; followed by an in-class discussion in small groups, attempting to reach consensus on the best answer. Successful implementation of this approach in climate change offers new opportunities to engage students in discourse and improved learning through peer and interactive instruction. Eric Mazur, 1997: Peer Instruction: A User's Manual, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.

  13. Poverty, out-of-pocket payments and access to health care: evidence from Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Falkingham, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Most countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have either initiated or are contemplating reform of the health sector. With negative real income growth and falling government revenues, a key concern of many governments is to secure additional finance through non-budgetary sources such as hypothecated payroll taxes, voluntary insurance, and increased private finance through patient cost-sharing. However, before such reforms can be considered, information is needed both on the current levels and distribution of household expenditures on health care, and the extent to which increased charges may affect access to health services, especially amongst the poor. This paper uses the Tajikistan Livings Standard Survey to investigate the level and distribution of out-of-pocket payments for health care in Tajikistan and to examine the extent to which such payments act as barriers to health-care access. The data show that there are significant differences in health-care utilisation rates across socio-economic groups and that these differences are related to ability to pay. Official and informal payments are acting both to deter people from seeking medical assistance and once advice has been sought, from receiving the most appropriate treatment. Despite informal exemptions, out-of-pocket payments for health care are exacting a high toll on household welfare with households being forced to sell assets or go into debt to meet the costs of care. Urgent action is needed to ensure equity in access to health care. PMID:14604611

  14. Screening Analogs of β-OG Pocket Binder as Fusion Inhibitor of Dengue Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman SF; Zahroh, Hilyatuz; Parikesit, Arli A; Idrus, Syarifuddin; Kerami, Djati

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) and transmitted between human hosts by mosquitoes. Recently, Indonesia was listed as a country with the highest cases of dengue by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. The current treatment for dengue disease is supportive therapy; there is no antiviral drug available in the market against dengue. Therefore, a research on antiviral drug against dengue is very important, especially to prevent outbreak explosion. In this research, the development of dengue antiviral is performed through the inhibition of n-octyl-β-D-glucoside (β-OG) binding pocket on envelope protein of DENV by using analogs of β-OG pocket binder. There are 828 compounds used in this study, and all of them were screened based on the analysis of molecular docking, pharmacological character prediction of the compounds, and molecular dynamics simulation. The result of these analyses revealed that the compound that can be used as an antiviral candidate against DENV is 5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-[2-(p-tolyl) benzotriazol-5-yl]furan-2-carboxamide. PMID:26617459

  15. Single reconstructed Fermi surface pocket in an underdoped single-layer cuprate superconductor.

    PubMed

    Chan, M K; Harrison, N; McDonald, R D; Ramshaw, B J; Modic, K A; Barišić, N; Greven, M

    2016-01-01

    The observation of a reconstructed Fermi surface via quantum oscillations in hole-doped cuprates opened a path towards identifying broken symmetry states in the pseudogap regime. However, such an identification has remained inconclusive due to the multi-frequency quantum oscillation spectra and complications accounting for bilayer effects in most studies. We overcome these impediments with high-resolution measurements on the structurally simpler cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg1201), which features one CuO2 plane per primitive unit cell. We find only a single oscillatory component with no signatures of magnetic breakdown tunnelling to additional orbits. Therefore, the Fermi surface comprises a single quasi-two-dimensional pocket. Quantitative modelling of these results indicates that a biaxial charge density wave within each CuO2 plane is responsible for the reconstruction and rules out criss-crossed charge stripes between layers as a viable alternative in Hg1201. Lastly, we determine that the characteristic gap between reconstructed pockets is a significant fraction of the pseudogap energy.

  16. Child Wasting in Emergency Pockets: A Meta-Analysis of Small-Scale Surveys from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Altare, Chiara; Delbiso, Tefera Darge; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-01-01

    Child undernutrition is a major public health concern in Ethiopia (stunting national prevalence: 44%; wasting: 10%), despite the overall improvement in child health status during the last decade. Hundreds of small-scale surveys are conducted in Ethiopia’s emergency pockets under ENCU’s supervision. We reviewed the evidence from small-scale surveys conducted between 2008 and 2013 with two objectives: to provide a summary estimate of wasting prevalence from emergency pockets and to examine reasons for variation in prevalence estimates. We created a dataset by combining data from the Complex Emergency Database, the Famine Early Warning System Network and the Armed Conflict Location Event Data. We conducted a meta-analysis of small-scale surveys using a random effects model with known within-study heterogeneity. The influence of survey covariates on estimated prevalence was investigated with meta-regression techniques. We included 158 surveys in the analysis. A high degree of heterogeneity among surveys was observed. The overall estimate of wasting prevalence was 10.6% (95% CI 9.8–11.4), with differences among regions and between residents and refugees. Meta-regression results showed that vaccination coverage, child mortality, diarrhea prevalence and food insecurity are significantly associated with wasting prevalence. Child care and displacement status were not. Aggregated analysis of small-scale surveys provides insights into the prevalence of wasting and factors explaining its variation. It can also guide survey planning towards areas with limited data availability. PMID:26828512

  17. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  18. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesar, Claudio Lenz

    1997-08-01

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 1012 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 1018. While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen.

  19. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, D. C.; Martin, R. F., Jr.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    Particles leving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E x B drift. This effect which we refer to as 'centrifugal trapping' appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E x B drift speed) plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  20. Trapper readies trap for lizard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    State-licensed animal trapper James Dean sets the open door of an animal trap on KSC. He hopes to catch a large monitor lizard spotted recently near S.R. 3, a route into the Center, by several area residents. The lizard is not a native of the area, and possibly a released pet. Dean is working with the cooperation of KSC and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  1. Trapped noble gases in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.

    1988-01-01

    The trapped noble gases in meteorites come in two main varieties, usually referred to as solar and planetary. The solar noble gases are implanted solar-wind or solar-flare materials, and thus their relative elemental abundances provide a good estimate of those of the sun. The planetary noble gases have relative elemental abundances similar to those in the terrestrial atmosphere, but there are also important distinctions. At least one other elemental pattern (subsolar) and several isotopic patterns have also been identified.

  2. Evaluation of some adhesives for collecting Musca domestica and Chrysomya megacephala adults or mosquito larvae in sticky traps.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, S; Yunus, H; Sohadi, R

    1987-07-01

    1. Seven types of water-insoluble adhesives were evaluated in sticky traps for collecting adults of Musca domestica L. and Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) or mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti (L.) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say). 2. Adhesive viscosity affected the tackiness of the glues and this determined their trapping efficiency in air or water. 3. From the 'Hyvis' range of adhesives tested, 'Hyvis 200' was most effective for trapping adult flies. 4. With 24 h exposure to fourth instar Ae.aegypti larvae in tapwater, submerged plates coated with 'Hyvis 10', 'Hyvis 30' or 'Hyvis 200' formulations trapped the majority of larvae. In polluted water the highest rates of trapping were 17.3% of Ae.aegypti and 18.7% of Cx quinquefasciatus with 'Hyvis 200'. Floating traps were consistently less productive than submerged traps under laboratory conditions. 5. In a heavily polluted natural breeding-site of Cx quinquefasciatus, floating traps were more productive than submerged sticky traps with four of seven adhesives tested, the most efficient being 'Hyvis 200' (4.2 mosquitoes per hour) and Hyvis:polyethylene 90:10 (4.5/h). Despite the relative inefficiency of aquatic traps, emergent adults, pupae and second to fourth instars of larvae were collected quickly from the habitat. PMID:2979541

  3. Evaluation of some adhesives for collecting Musca domestica and Chrysomya megacephala adults or mosquito larvae in sticky traps.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, S; Yunus, H; Sohadi, R

    1987-07-01

    1. Seven types of water-insoluble adhesives were evaluated in sticky traps for collecting adults of Musca domestica L. and Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) or mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti (L.) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say). 2. Adhesive viscosity affected the tackiness of the glues and this determined their trapping efficiency in air or water. 3. From the 'Hyvis' range of adhesives tested, 'Hyvis 200' was most effective for trapping adult flies. 4. With 24 h exposure to fourth instar Ae.aegypti larvae in tapwater, submerged plates coated with 'Hyvis 10', 'Hyvis 30' or 'Hyvis 200' formulations trapped the majority of larvae. In polluted water the highest rates of trapping were 17.3% of Ae.aegypti and 18.7% of Cx quinquefasciatus with 'Hyvis 200'. Floating traps were consistently less productive than submerged traps under laboratory conditions. 5. In a heavily polluted natural breeding-site of Cx quinquefasciatus, floating traps were more productive than submerged sticky traps with four of seven adhesives tested, the most efficient being 'Hyvis 200' (4.2 mosquitoes per hour) and Hyvis:polyethylene 90:10 (4.5/h). Despite the relative inefficiency of aquatic traps, emergent adults, pupae and second to fourth instars of larvae were collected quickly from the habitat.

  4. Optical trapping inside living organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Poul M.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2005-08-01

    We use optical tweezers to investigate processes happening inside ving cells. In a previous study, we trapped naturally occurring lipid granules inside living yeast cells, and used them to probe the viscoelastic properties of the cytoplasm. However, we prefer to use probes which can be specifically attached to various organelles within the living cells in order to optically quantify the forces acting on these organelles. Therefore, we have chosen to use nanometer sized gold beads as probes. These gold beads can be conjugated and attached chemically to the organelles of interest. Only Rayleigh metallic particles can be optically trapped and for these it is the case that the larger the beads, the larger the forces which can be exerted and thus measured using optical tweezers. The gold nanoparticles are injected into the cytoplasm using micropipettes. The very rigid cell wall of the S. pombe yeast cells poses a serious obstacle to this injection. In order to be able to punch a hole in the cell, first, the cells have to be turned into protoplasts, where only a lipid bilayer separates the cytoplasm from the surrounding media. We show how to perform micropipette delivery into the protoplasts and also how the protoplasts can be ablated using the trapping laserlight. Finally, we demonstrate that we can transform the protoplasts back to normal yeast cells.

  5. Evidence for a small hole pocket in the Fermi surface of underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy

    PubMed Central

    Doiron-Leyraud, N.; Badoux, S.; René de Cotret, S.; Lepault, S.; LeBoeuf, D.; Laliberté, F.; Hassinger, E.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, R.; Park, J.-H..; Vignolles, D.; Vignolle, B.; Taillefer, L.; Proust, C.

    2015-01-01

    In underdoped cuprate superconductors, the Fermi surface undergoes a reconstruction that produces a small electron pocket, but whether there is another, as yet, undetected portion to the Fermi surface is unknown. Establishing the complete topology of the Fermi surface is key to identifying the mechanism responsible for its reconstruction. Here we report evidence for a second Fermi pocket in underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy, detected as a small quantum oscillation frequency in the thermoelectric response and in the c-axis resistance. The field-angle dependence of the frequency shows that it is a distinct Fermi surface, and the normal-state thermopower requires it to be a hole pocket. A Fermi surface consisting of one electron pocket and two hole pockets with the measured areas and masses is consistent with a Fermi-surface reconstruction by the charge–density–wave order observed in YBa2Cu3Oy, provided other parts of the reconstructed Fermi surface are removed by a separate mechanism, possibly the pseudogap. PMID:25616011

  6. How the ACA's Health Insurance Expansions Have Affected Out-of-Pocket Cost-Sharing and Spending on Premiums.

    PubMed

    Glied, Sherry; Solís-Román, Claudia; Parikh, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    One important benefit gained by the millions of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is protection from high out-of-pocket health spending. While Medicaid unambiguously reduces out-of-pocket premium and medical costs for low-income people, it is less certain that marketplace coverage and other types of insurance purchased to comply with the law's individual mandate also protect from high health spending. Goal: To compare out-of-pocket spending in 2014 to spending in 2013; assess how this spending changed in states where many people enrolled in the marketplaces relative to states where few people enrolled; and project the decline in the percentage of people paying high amounts out-of-pocket. Methods: Linear regression models were used to estimate whether people under age 65 spent above certain thresholds. Key findings and conclusions: The probability of incurring high out-of-pocket costs and premium expenses declined as marketplace enrollment increased. The percentage reductions were greatest among those with incomes between 250 percent and 399 percent of poverty, those who were eligible for premium subsidies, and those who previously were uninsured or had very limited nongroup coverage. These effects appear largely attributable to marketplace enrollment rather than to other ACA provisions or to economic trends.

  7. Gaining Coverage Through Medicaid Or Private Insurance Increased Prescription Use And Lowered Out-Of-Pocket Spending.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Andrew W; Eibner, Christine; Finegold, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    A growing body of literature describes how the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has expanded health insurance coverage. What is less well known is how these coverage gains have affected populations that are at risk for high health spending. To investigate this issue, we used prescription transaction data for a panel of 6.7 million prescription drug users to compare changes in coverage, prescription fills, plan spending, and out-of-pocket spending before and after the implementation of the ACA's coverage expansion. We found a 30 percent reduction in the proportion of this population that was uninsured in 2014 compared to 2013. Uninsured people who gained private coverage filled, on average, 28 percent more prescriptions and had 29 percent less out-of-pocket spending per prescription in 2014 compared to 2013. Those who gained Medicaid coverage had larger increases in fill rates (79 percent) and reductions in out-of-pocket spending per prescription (58 percent). People who gained coverage who had at least one of the chronic conditions detailed in our study saw larger decreases in out-of-pocket spending compared to those who did not have at least one condition. These results demonstrate that by reducing financial barriers to care, the ACA has increased treatment rates while reducing out-of-pocket spending, particularly for people with chronic conditions. PMID:27534776

  8. How the ACA's Health Insurance Expansions Have Affected Out-of-Pocket Cost-Sharing and Spending on Premiums.

    PubMed

    Glied, Sherry; Solís-Román, Claudia; Parikh, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    One important benefit gained by the millions of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is protection from high out-of-pocket health spending. While Medicaid unambiguously reduces out-of-pocket premium and medical costs for low-income people, it is less certain that marketplace coverage and other types of insurance purchased to comply with the law's individual mandate also protect from high health spending. Goal: To compare out-of-pocket spending in 2014 to spending in 2013; assess how this spending changed in states where many people enrolled in the marketplaces relative to states where few people enrolled; and project the decline in the percentage of people paying high amounts out-of-pocket. Methods: Linear regression models were used to estimate whether people under age 65 spent above certain thresholds. Key findings and conclusions: The probability of incurring high out-of-pocket costs and premium expenses declined as marketplace enrollment increased. The percentage reductions were greatest among those with incomes between 250 percent and 399 percent of poverty, those who were eligible for premium subsidies, and those who previously were uninsured or had very limited nongroup coverage. These effects appear largely attributable to marketplace enrollment rather than to other ACA provisions or to economic trends. PMID:27632806

  9. On the pH dependent behavior of the firefly bioluminescence: protein dynamics and water content in the active pocket.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Rhee, Young Min

    2013-06-20

    Understanding bioluminescence presents fascinating challenges for fundamental sciences and numerous opportunities for practical applications. As a representative example, the firefly bioluminescent system has been intensively studied in both experimental and computational areas. However, there are still remaining questions regarding especially the detailed protein dynamics and the mechanisms of its color modulation. Here, we report on the pH dependent behavior of the firefly bioluminescence primarily based on molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the overall protein structure is generally resilient to pH variations. As the protein does not exhibit any structural distortions that can affect the emission property, we next focus on the dynamics in the active pocket and its effect on color modulation by adopting different protonation states in the pocket. With this, we observe red-shifted emissions at acidic conditions as consistent with previous studies. Most importantly, we find that a water molecule in the active pocket can mediate flexible motions of neighboring groups, which can subsequently modify the emission properties to a substantial degree. Based on the observations, we propose that the active pocket is in a dry condition during the luminescence process. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the role of the dynamics near the active pocket in modulating bioluminescence.

  10. Expression of RB C pocket fragments in HSF induces delayed cell cycle progression and sensitizes to apoptosis upon cellular stresses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Junah; Cho, Jae-We; Baek, Won-Ki; Suh, Seong-Il; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Park, Jong-Wook; Suh, Min-Ho

    2002-08-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (RB) plays an important role in growth suppression through the formation of multiple protein complexes with its target proteins using A/B and C pockets. Even though the A/B and C pockets co-operate for growth suppression, the function of RB in growth arrest is inhibited by the coexpression of RB C fragments with full length RB in the absence of p53, which implies that C pocket fragments are likely to act as a dominant-negative inhibitor of RB function. In contrast, the loss of the RB functions in the presence of p53 triggers a cell cycle arrest or apoptosis by p53-dependent pathways. Thus, it still remains to be elucidated whether the expression of RB C pocket fragments in the presence of p53 induces delayed cell cycle progression and sensitizes cells to apoptosis through p53-dependent pathways. Our results show that the expression of RB C pocket fragments not only induces delayed cell cycle progression, which is mediated by the down-regulation of cyclin A, cyclin E, and E2F-1, but also sensitizes cells to apoptosis through p53-dependent pathways. PMID:12153616

  11. Paramagnetic relaxation assisted docking of a small indole compound in the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic pocket

    PubMed Central

    Gochin, Miriam; Zhou, Guangyan; Phillips, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    The hydrophobic pocket contained within the gp41 coiled coil is an important target for small molecules designed to inhibit HIV-1 fusion. While various screening experiments have identified molecules purported to bind in this pocket, few have confirmed details of the interaction, instead relying on computational docking to predict the binding mode. This is made more challenging by the fact that residues lining the hydrophobic pocket are highly flexible, as is typical for a protein - protein interaction site, limiting the predictive power of computational tools. In this study, we report on an NMR method to define the binding mode of 1-5i, a compound in a series of newly developed indole inhibitors. We show that paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of ligand protons due to an MTSL group positioned close to the binding pocket could be applied quantitatively to distinguish between more than 30 different computational poses, selecting a single pose that agreed with the NMR data. In this pose, important hydrophobic and polar contacts occur with pocket lysine, tryptophan and glutamine residues, including putative hydrogen bonds between the ligand carboxylate and the lysine ε-amino group. A study of the ligand orientation suggests directions for optimization. PMID:21155611

  12. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: V. preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. Part II. effects on lungs.

    PubMed

    Harrison, G A; Corbett, R L; Klein, G

    1975-04-01

    An electron microscope examination was carried out on the lungs of 11 pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that breathed oxygen at 10 psi or 12 psi partial pressure over a period of 7 d, at the end of which time they were decompressed to sea-level O2 pressure, either suddenly or in 30, 60, or 90 min. Vesiculation was noted in the endothelium of the alveolarcapillary wall in most of the animals and, occasionally, blebbing. Some mitochrondria were swollen in a few of the animals. Alveolar exudate was, in general, sparse. Compared with the lungs of other rodents, the lungs of pocket mice appeared relatively resistant to the toxic effects of oxygen. This conclusion needs, however, to be tempered by the fact that 5% N2 was used in the tests reported here. Nonetheless, the results suggest that the oxygen pressures anticipated on the flight of Apollo XVII should be well tolerated by the pocket mice.

  13. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  14. New ion trap for frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel linear ion trap was designed, which permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced.

  15. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potenital and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  16. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-05-15

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  17. A collapsible trap for capturing ruffe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Andrew J.; Czypinski, Gary D.; Selgeby, James H.

    1998-01-01

    A modified version of the Windermere trap was designed, constructed, and tested for its effectiveness in capturing ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus. The inexpensive, lightweight, collapsible trap was easily deployed and retrieved from a small boat. Field tests conducted at the St. Louis River estuary in western Lake Superior in spring 1995 and 1996 indicated that the trap was effective in capturing ruffe. Proportions of the ruffe in trap and bottom trawl catches were similar in 1995 and 1996. This trap could be a useful tool in surveillance, monitoring, or control programs for ruffe or similar species, either to augment existing sampling programs or especially in situations where gillnetting or bottom trawling are not feasible.

  18. Scalable Designs for Planar Ion Trap Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, R. E.

    2007-03-01

    Recent progress in quantum operations with trapped ion qubits has been spectacular for qubit counts up to approximately ten ions. Two qubit quantum gates, quantum error correction, simple quantum algorithms and entanglement of up to 8 qubits have been demonstrated by groups including those at NIST, University of Michigan, University of Innsbruck and Oxford. Interesting problems in quantum information processing including quantum simulations of condensed matter systems and quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communication systems require hundreds or thousands of qubits. Initial designs for an ion trap ``Quantum CCD'' using spatially multiplexed planar ion traps as well as initial experiments using planar ion traps are promising routes to scaling up the number of trapped ions to more interesting levels. We describe designs for planar ion traps fabricated using silicon VLSI techniques. This approach allows the control voltages required for the moving and positioning the ions in the array to be connected vertically through the silicon substrate to underlying CMOS electronics. We have developed techniques that allow the ion trap structures to be fabricated monolithically on top of the CMOS electronics. The planar traps have much weaker trapping depths than the more conventional multi-level traps. However, the trap depths are still adequate for trapping hot ions from many ion sources. The planar traps also involve more complex configurations for laser cooling and micromotion control. Initial solutions to these problems will be presented. Laser access to the ions can be provided by laser beams grazing the trap surface or by using vertical slots through the trap chip. We will also discuss limits imposed by power dissipation and ion transport through trap junctions (e.g. crosses and Ys). We have fabricated these VLSI based traps in a number of configurations. Initial fabrication and packaging challenges will be discussed. D. Kielpinski, C. Monroe, and D.J. Wineland

  19. Deep trap, laser activated image converting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Receiving an optical image on the surface of a photoconducting semiconductor is presented, storing the image in deep traps of the semiconductor, and later scanning the semiconductor with a laser beam to empty the deep traps, thereby producing a video signal. The semiconductor is illuminated with photons of energy greater than the band gap producing electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor which subsequently fill traps in energy from the band edges. When the laser beam of low energy photons excites the trapped electrons and holes out of the traps into the conduction and valence bands, a photoconductivity can be observed.

  20. Subpicosecond oxygen trapping in the heme pocket of the oxygen sensor FixL observed by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kruglik, Sergei G; Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Yamashita, Taku; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2007-05-01

    Dissociation of oxygen from the heme domain of the bacterial oxygen sensor protein FixL constitutes the first step in hypoxia-induced signaling. In the present study, the photodissociation of the heme-O2 bond was used to synchronize this event, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution was implemented to characterize the heme configuration of the primary photoproduct. TR(3) measurements on heme-oxycomplexes are highly challenging and have not yet been reported. Whereas in all other known six-coordinated heme protein complexes with diatomic ligands, including the oxymyoglobin reported here, heme iron out-of-plane motion (doming) occurs faster than 1 ps after iron-ligand bond breaking; surprisingly, no sizeable doming is observed in the oxycomplex of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum FixL sensor domain (FixLH). This assessment is deduced from the absence of the iron-histidine band around 217 cm(-1) as early as 0.5 ps. We suggest that efficient ultrafast oxygen rebinding to the heme occurs on the femtosecond time scale, thus hindering heme doming. Comparing WT oxy-FixLH, mutant proteins FixLH-R220H and FixLH-R220Q, the respective carbonmonoxy-complexes, and oxymyoglobin, we show that a hydrogen bond of the terminal oxygen atom with the residue in position 220 is responsible for the observed behavior; in WT FixL this residue is arginine, crucially implicated in signal transmission. We propose that the rigid O2 configuration imposed by this residue, in combination with the hydrophobic and constrained properties of the distal cavity, keep dissociated oxygen in place. These results uncover the origin of the "oxygen cage" properties of this oxygen sensor protein.

  1. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Effect of trapped charge accumulation on the retention of charge trapping memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Jin; Xiaoyan, Liu; Gang, Du; Jinfeng, Kang; Ruqi, Han

    2010-12-01

    The accumulation process of trapped charges in a TANOS cell during P/E cycling is investigated via numerical simulation. The recombination process between trapped charges is an important issue on the retention of charge trapping memory. Our results show that accumulated trapped holes during P/E cycling can have an influence on retention, and the recombination mechanism between trapped charges should be taken into account when evaluating the retention capability of TANOS.

  2. Characterizing traps causing random telegraph noise during trap-assisted tunneling gate-induced drain leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sung-Won; Shin, Joonha; Seo, Youngsoo; Kim, Hyunsuk; Jeon, Sangbin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Shin, Hyungcheol

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of traps causing random telegraph noise (RTN) in trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) current. RTN was shown for the first time to occur as a result of electron trapping rather than hole trapping. In addition, the proper effective permittivity of two different materials is used to accurately determine the distance between two traps causing RTN in TAT GIDL in an oxide.

  3. Roles of the six peptide-binding pockets of the HLA-A2 molecule in allorecognition by human cytotoxic T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Matsui, M; Hioe, C E; Frelinger, J A

    1993-01-15

    To evaluate the contribution of the major histocompatibility complex class I pockets to the binding of self-peptides recognized by alloreactive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) clones, we have constructed an extensive library of HLA-A2 mutants with different amino acid substitutions in each of the six pockets. When these mutants were tested in cytotoxicity assays with a panel of HLA-A2-specific alloreactive CTL clones, each CTL clone showed a unique pattern of reactivity, implying the different contributions of each pocket to binding individual peptides. We noted that the majority of the mutants in pocket B significantly affect recognition by the CTL clones. Unexpectedly, the mutations influencing allorecognition are found in all other pockets as well. Overall, this study demonstrates that each of the six peptide-binding pockets plays an important and distinct role in binding of self-peptides required for recognition of the HLA-A2 molecule by alloreactive CTLs. PMID:7678462

  4. Evaluation of trapping-web designs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukacs, P.M.; Anderson, D.R.; Burnham, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    The trapping web is a method for estimating the density and abundance of animal populations. A Monte Carlo simulation study is performed to explore performance of the trapping web for estimating animal density under a variety of web designs and animal behaviours. The trapping performs well when animals have home ranges, even if the home ranges are large relative to trap spacing. Webs should contain at least 90 traps. Trapping should continue for 5-7 occasions. Movement rates have little impact on density estimates when animals are confined to home ranges. Estimation is poor when animals do not have home ranges and movement rates are rapid. The trapping web is useful for estimating the density of animals that are hard to detect and occur at potentially low densities. ?? CSIRO 2005.

  5. Perfect lens makes a perfect trap.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaolin; Murakowski, Janusz; Schuetz, Christopher A; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett J; Samluk, Jesse P; Prather, Dennis W

    2006-03-20

    In this work, we present for the first time a new and realistic application of the "perfect lens", namely, electromagnetic traps (or tweezers). We combined two recently developed techniques, 3D negative refraction flat lenses (3DNRFLs) and optical tweezers, and experimentally demonstrated the very unique advantages of using 3DNRFLs for electromagnetic traps. Super-resolution and short focal distance of the flat lens result in a highly focused and strongly convergent beam, which is a key requirement for a stable and accurate electromagnetic trap. The translation symmetry of 3DNRFL provides translation-invariance for imaging, which allows an electromagnetic trap to be translated without moving the lens, and permits a trap array by using multiple sources with a single lens. Electromagnetic trapping was demonstrated using polystyrene particles in suspension, and subsequent to being trapped to a single point, they were then accurately manipulated over a large distance by simple movement of a 3DNRFL-imaged microwave monopole source.

  6. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Steven; Metsaelae, Markus; Zieger, Peter C.; Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Gilijamse, Joop J.; Meijer, Gerard; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de

    2007-12-15

    We report on the Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping of {sup 14}NH (a{sup 1}{delta}) radicals. In the trap, the molecules are excited on the spin-forbidden A{sup 3}{pi}<-a{sup 1}{delta} transition and detected via their subsequent fluorescence to the X{sup 3}{sigma}{sup -} ground state. The 1/e trapping time is 1.4{+-}0.1 s, from which a lower limit of 2.7 s for the radiative lifetime of the a{sup 1}{delta}, v=0, J=2 state is deduced. The spectral profile of the molecules in the trapping field is measured to probe their spatial distribution. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH followed by optical pumping of the trapped molecules to the electronic ground state is an important step toward accumulation of these radicals in a magnetic trap.

  7. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  8. Temperature and trapping characterization of an acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers--towards in-trap temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda; Evander, Mikael; Lilliehorn, Tobias; Almqvist, Monica; Nilsson, Johan; Laurell, Thomas; Johansson, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    An acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers (MITs) for applications in non-contact trapping of cells or particles in a microfluidic channel was characterized by measuring the temperature increase and trapping strength. The fluid temperature was measured by the fluorescent response of Rhodamine B in the microchannel. The trapping strength was measured by the area of a trapped particle cluster counter-balanced by the hydrodynamic force. One of the main objectives was to obtain quantitative values of the temperature in the fluidic channel to ensure safe handling of cells and proteins. Another objective was to evaluate the trapping-to-temperature efficiency for the trap as a function of drive frequency. Thirdly, trapping-to-temperature efficiency data enables identifying frequencies and voltage values to use for in-trap temperature regulation. It is envisioned that operation with only in-trap temperature regulation enables the realization of small, simple and fast temperature-controlled trap systems. The significance of potential gradients at the trap edges due to the finite size of the miniaturized transducers for the operation was emphasized and expressed analytically. The influence of the acoustic near field was evaluated in FEM-simulation and compared with a more ideal 1D standing wave. The working principle of the trap was examined by comparing measurements of impedance, temperature increase and trapping strength with impedance transfer calculations of fluid-reflector resonances and frequencies of high reflectance at the fluid-reflector boundary. The temperature increase was found to be moderate, 7°C for a high trapping strength, at a fluid flow of 0.5mms(-1) for the optimal driving frequency. A fast temperature response with a fall time of 8s and a rise time of 11s was observed. The results emphasize the importance of selecting the proper drive frequency for long term handling of cells, as opposed to the more pragmatic way of selecting the

  9. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  10. Method for establishing a combustion zone in an in situ oil shale retort having a pocket at the top

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1980-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort having a top boundary of unfragmented formation and containing a fragmented permeable mass has a pocket at the top, that is, an open space between a portion of the top of the fragmented mass and the top boundary of unfragmented formation. To establish a combustion zone across the fragmented mass, a combustion zone is established in a portion of the fragmented mass which is proximate to the top boundary. A retort inlet mixture comprising oxygen is introduced to the fragmented mass to propagate the combustion zone across an upper portion of the fragmented mass. Simultaneously, cool fluid is introduced to the pocket to prevent overheating and thermal sloughing of formation from the top boundary into the pocket.

  11. Relationship between the Pathogenic Representatives of Periodontal Pockets Microbiocenosis in Patients with Periodontitis with Varying Degrees of Severity

    PubMed Central

    Zorina, O.A.; Kulakov, A.A.; Boriskina, O.A.; Rebrikov, D.V.

    2011-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common disease that is considered to be a manifestation of the distortion of the ratio between the normal and conditionally pathogenic microflora of periodontal pockets. In this study, the ratio between the six most important periodontal pathogens and the total microflora of the periodontal pocket in healthy individuals and patients with varying severity of periodontitis was ascertained by quantitative real-time PCR. It was ascertained that the relative content ofPorphyromonas gingivalis,Prevotella intermedia, andTannerella forsythensis(Bacteroides forsythus) persistently develops in the total microflora of the periodontal pocket upon progressing periodontitis; this value is higher than that in the control group by more than two orders of magnitude upon a severe degree of chronic generalized periodontitis. PMID:22649688

  12. Residues in the distal heme pocket of neuroglobin. Implications for the multiple ligand binding steps.

    PubMed

    Uno, Tadayuki; Ryu, Daisuke; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Tomisugi, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Sato, Hideaki; Hayashi, Takashi

    2004-02-13

    Amino acid residues in the ligand binding pocket of human neuroglobin have been identified by site-directed mutagenesis and their properties investigated by resonance Raman and flash photolysis methods. Wild-type neuroglobin has been shown to have six-coordinate heme in both ferric and ferrous states. Substitution of His96 by alanine leads to complete loss of heme, indicating that His96 is the proximal ligand. The resonance Raman spectra of M69L and K67T mutants were similar to those of wild-type (WT) neuroglobin in both ferric and ferrous states. By contrast, H64V was six-coordinate high-spin and five-coordinate high-spin in the ferric and ferrous states, respectively, at acidic pH. The spectra were pH-dependent and six-coordinate with the low-spin component dominating at alkaline pH. In a double mutant H64V/K67T, the high-spin component alone was detected in the both ferric and the ferrous states. This implies that His64 is the endogenous ligand and that Lys67 is situated nearby in the distal pocket. In the ferrous H64V and H64V/K67T mutants, the nu(Fe-His) stretching frequency appears at 221 cm(-1), which is similar to that of deoxymyoglobin. In the ferrous CO-bound state, the nu(Fe-CO) stretching frequency was detected at 521 and 494 cm(-1) in WT, M69L, and K67T, while only the 494 cm(-1) component was detected in the H64V and H64V/K67T mutants. Thus, the 521 cm(-1) component is attributed to the presence of polar His64. The CO binding kinetics were biphasic for WT, H64V, and K67T and monophasic for H64V/K67T. Thus, His64 and Lys67 comprise a unique distal heme pocket in neuroglobin. PMID:14645216

  13. GeoPad and GeoPocket: GIS-Enabled Field Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, P. A.; van der Pluijm, B.

    2005-12-01

    Over the past three years we have successfully incorporated and evaluated the use of field-based information technology in introductory through senior-level field courses offered at the University of Michigan's Camp Davis Geology Field Station, near Jackson, WY. The use of GeoPads (field-durable Tablet PCs) and GeoPockets (field-durable Pocket PCs) -- both equipped with GIS, GPS, wireless networking, electronic notebook and other pertinent software -- have significantly enhanced our field exercises and excursions, for both students and instructors. In addition to describing our on-going work, the results of an external, independent review of GeoPad-curriculum integration are presented. For example, using GeoPads to teach field mapping not only supports the traditional approaches and advantages of field instruction, but also offers important benefits in the development of students' spatial reasoning skills. Students are able to record observations and directly create geologic maps in the field, using a combination of an electronic field notebook (Microsoft OneNote) tightly integrated with intuitive, pen-enabled GIS software (ArcGIS-ArcMap). Specifically, this arrangement permits students to analyze and manipulate their data in multiple contexts and representations -- while still in the field -- using both traditional 2-D map views, as well as richer 3-D contexts. Such enhancements provide students with powerful exploratory tools that aid the development of spatial reasoning skills, allowing more intuitive interactions with 2-D representations of our 3-D world. Additionally, field-based GIS mapping enables better error-detection, through immediate interaction with current observations in the context of both supporting data (e.g., topographic maps, aerial photos, magnetic surveys) and students' ongoing observations. GeoPockets provide instructional staff with a more portable, though less feature-rich device, which is highly suitable to the role of "electronic

  14. Design of a Novel Low Cost Point of Care Tampon (POCkeT) Colposcope for Use in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Christopher T.; Krieger, Marlee S.; Gallagher, Jennifer E.; Asma, Betsy; Muasher, Lisa C.; Schmitt, John W.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current guidelines by WHO for cervical cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries involves visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) of the cervix, followed by treatment during the same visit or a subsequent visit with cryotherapy if a suspicious lesion is found. Implementation of these guidelines is hampered by a lack of: trained health workers, reliable technology, and access to screening facilities. A low cost ultra-portable Point of Care Tampon based digital colposcope (POCkeT Colposcope) for use at the community level setting, which has the unique form factor of a tampon, can be inserted into the vagina to capture images of the cervix, which are on par with that of a state of the art colposcope, at a fraction of the cost. A repository of images to be compiled that can be used to empower front line workers to become more effective through virtual dynamic training. By task shifting to the community setting, this technology could potentially provide significantly greater cervical screening access to where the most vulnerable women live. The POCkeT Colposcope’s concentric LED ring provides comparable white and green field illumination at a fraction of the electrical power required in commercial colposcopes. Evaluation with standard optical imaging targets to assess the POCkeT Colposcope against the state of the art digital colposcope and other VIAM technologies. Results Our POCkeT Colposcope has comparable resolving power, color reproduction accuracy, minimal lens distortion, and illumination when compared to commercially available colposcopes. In vitro and pilot in vivo imaging results are promising with our POCkeT Colposcope capturing comparable quality images to commercial systems. Conclusion The POCkeT Colposcope is capable of capturing images suitable for cervical lesion analysis. Our portable low cost system could potentially increase access to cervical cancer screening in limited resource settings through task shifting to community

  15. Household out-of-pocket medical expenditures and national health insurance in Taiwan: income and regional inequality

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tu-Bin; Liu, Tsai-Ching; Chen, Chin-Shyan; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2005-01-01

    Background Unequal geographical distribution of medical care resources and insufficient healthcare coverage have been two long-standing problems with Taiwan's public health system. The implementation of National Health Insurance (NHI) attempted to mitigate the inequality in health care use. This study examines the degree to which Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) has reduced out-of-pocket medical expenditures in households in different regions and varying levels of income. Methods Data used in this study were drawn from the 1994 and 1996 Surveys of Family Income and Expenditure. We pooled the data from 1994 and 1996 and included a year dummy variable (NHI), equal to 1 if the household data came from 1996 in order to assess the impact of NHI on household out-of-pocket medical care expenditures shortly after its implementation in 1995. Results An individual who was older, female, married, unemployed, better educated, richer, head of a larger family household, or living in the central and eastern areas was more likely to have greater household out-of-pocket medical expenditures. NHI was found to have effectively reduced household out-of-pocket medical expenditures by 23.08%, particularly for more affluent households. With the implementation of NHI, lower and middle income quintiles had smaller decreases in out-of-pocket medical expenditure. NHI was also found to have reduced household out-of-pocket medical expenditures more for households in eastern Taiwan. Conclusion Although NHI was established to create free medical care for all, further effort is needed to reduce the medical costs for certain disadvantaged groups, particularly the poor and aborigines, if equality is to be achieved. PMID:16137336

  16. Three-phase measurements of oil and gas trapping in sand packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mansoori, Saleh K.; Iglauer, Stefan; Pentland, Christopher H.; Blunt, Martin J.

    2009-10-01

    We measure the trapped saturations of oil and gas as a function of initial saturation in water-wet sand packs. We start with a water-saturated column and inject octane (oil), while water and oil are produced from the bottom. Once water production has ceased, air (gas) then enters from the top, allowing oil and gas to drain under gravity for different times. Finally water is then injected from the bottom to trap both oil and gas. The columns are sliced and the fluids analyzed using gas chromatography. We find that for high initial gas saturations more gas can be trapped in the presence of oil than in a two-phase (gas/water) system. The residual gas saturation can be over 20% compared to 14% in two-phase flow [Al Mansoori SK, Iglauer S, Pentland CH, Bijeljic B, Blunt MJ. Measurements of non-wetting phase trapping applied to carbon dioxide storage. Energy Procedia 2009;1(1):3173-80]. This is unlike previous measurements on consolidated media, where the trapped gas saturation is either similar or lower to that reached in an equivalent two-phase experiment. For lower initial gas saturation, the amount of trapping follows the initial-residual trend seen in two-phase experiments. The amount of oil trapped is insensitive to initial gas saturation or the amount of gas that is trapped, again in contrast to measurements on consolidated media. More oil is trapped than would be predicted from an equivalent two-phase (oil/water) system, although the trapped saturation is never larger than the maximum reached in two-phase flow (around 11%) [Pentland CH, Al Mansoori SK, Iglauer S, Bijeljic B, Blunt MJ. Measurement of non-wetting phase trapping in sand packs. In: SPE 115697, proceedings of the SPE annual technical conference and exhibition, Denver, Colorado, USA; 21-24 September 2008]. These initially surprising results are explained in the context of oil layer stability and the competition between snap-off and piston-like advance. In two-phase systems, displacement is principally

  17. Ultrasonic trapping of small particles by sharp edges vibrating in a flexural mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Junhui; Yang, Jianbo; Xu, Jun

    2004-12-01

    Ultrasonic trapping of small particles by sharp edges vibrating in a flexural mode is reported. Two rectangular metal plates with a sharp edge are mechanically excited to vibrate in a flexural mode by the piezoelectric rings which are pressed between them by a bolt structure. Small particles such as mint seeds and flying color seeds can be attracted to the sharp edges of the plates. Relationship between input power applied to the piezoelectric rings and the number of trapped particles is experimentally investigated for mint seeds and flying color seeds in water and air. The result shows that for a given type of particle, there exists an input power at which the number of trapped particles is a maximum. Mechanism analysis shows that nodes or antinodes of acoustic pressure of the sound field near the sharp edges are responsible for the trapping.

  18. Structural consequences of two methyl additions in the E. coli trp repressor L-tryptophan binding pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    The flexibility and specificity of the L-tryptophan corepressor binding pocket of E coli trp repressor are being investigated by high-resolution crystallographic examination of aporepressor/corepressor analog complexes. While addition of a methyl group on the corepressor indole (5-methyl-tryptophan) results in a small but measurable shift in the position of that functional group introduction of a methyl group on a nearby residue in the binding pocket (Val 58 {yields} Ile) leaves the indole position of L-tryptophan essentially unchanged. Careful alignment of these structures with aporepressor/L-tryptophan/operator-DNA complexes reveal why 5-methyltryptophan is a better corepressor than L-tryptophan.

  19. Optimization of a Fragment-Based Screening Hit toward Potent DOT1L Inhibitors Interacting in an Induced Binding Pocket.

    PubMed

    Scheufler, Clemens; Möbitz, Henrik; Gaul, Christoph; Ragot, Christian; Be, Céline; Fernández, César; Beyer, Kim S; Tiedt, Ralph; Stauffer, Frédéric

    2016-08-11

    Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangement induces leukemic transformation by ectopic recruitment of disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like protein (DOT1L), a lysine histone methyltransferase, leading to local hypermethylation of H3K79 and misexpression of genes (including HoxA), which drive the leukemic phenotype. A weak fragment-based screening hit identified by SPR was cocrystallized with DOT1L and optimized using structure-based ligand optimization to yield compound 8 (IC50 = 14 nM). This series of inhibitors is structurally not related to cofactor SAM and is not interacting within the SAM binding pocket but induces a pocket adjacent to the SAM binding site.

  20. Status and outlook of CHIP-TRAP: The Central Michigan University high precision Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redshaw, M.; Bryce, R. A.; Hawks, P.; Gamage, N. D.; Hunt, C.; Kandegedara, R. M. E. B.; Ratnayake, I. S.; Sharp, L.

    2016-06-01

    At Central Michigan University we are developing a high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer (CHIP-TRAP) that will focus on measurements with long-lived radioactive isotopes. CHIP-TRAP will consist of a pair of hyperbolic precision-measurement Penning traps, and a cylindrical capture/filter trap in a 12 T magnetic field. Ions will be produced by external ion sources, including a laser ablation source, and transported to the capture trap at low energies enabling ions of a given m / q ratio to be selected via their time-of-flight. In the capture trap, contaminant ions will be removed with a mass-selective rf dipole excitation and the ion of interest will be transported to the measurement traps. A phase-sensitive image charge detection technique will be used for simultaneous cyclotron frequency measurements on single ions in the two precision traps, resulting in a reduction in statistical uncertainty due to magnetic field fluctuations.