Science.gov

Sample records for air pockets trapped

  1. Dynamic water behaviour due to one trapped air pocket in a laboratory pipeline apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergant, A.; Karadžić, U.; Tijsseling, A.

    2016-11-01

    Trapped air pockets may cause severe operational problems in hydropower and water supply systems. A locally isolated air pocket creates distinct amplitude, shape and timing of pressure pulses. This paper investigates dynamic behaviour of a single trapped air pocket. The air pocket is incorporated as a boundary condition into the discrete gas cavity model (DGCM). DGCM allows small gas cavities to form at computational sections in the method of characteristics (MOC). The growth of the pocket and gas cavities is described by the water hammer compatibility equation(s), the continuity equation for the cavity volume, and the equation of state of an ideal gas. Isentropic behaviour is assumed for the trapped gas pocket and an isothermal bath for small gas cavities. Experimental investigations have been performed in a laboratory pipeline apparatus. The apparatus consists of an upstream end high-pressure tank, a horizontal steel pipeline (total length 55.37 m, inner diameter 18 mm), four valve units positioned along the pipeline including the end points, and a downstream end tank. A trapped air pocket is captured between two ball valves at the downstream end of the pipeline. The transient event is initiated by rapid opening of the upstream end valve; the downstream end valve stays closed during the event. Predicted and measured results for a few typical cases are compared and discussed.

  2. Silica nano-particle super-hydrophobic surfaces: the effects of surface morphology and trapped air pockets on hydrodynamic drainage forces.

    PubMed

    Chan, Derek Y C; Uddin, Md Hemayet; Cho, Kwun L; Liaw, Irving I; Lamb, Robert N; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R

    2009-01-01

    We used atomic force microscopy to study dynamic forces between a rigid silica sphere (radius approximately 45 microm) and a silica nano-particle super-hydrophobic surface (SNP-SHS) in aqueous electrolyte, in the presence and absence of surfactant. Characterization of the SNP-SHS surface in air showed a surface roughness of up to two microns. When in contact with an aqueous phase, the SNP-SHS traps large, soft and stable air pockets in the surface interstices. The inherent roughness of the SNP-SHS together with the trapped air pockets are responsible for the superior hydrophobic properties of SNP-SHS such as high equilibrium contact angle (> 140 degrees) of water sessile drops on these surfaces and low hydrodynamic friction as observed in force measurements. We also observed that added surfactants adsorbed at the surface of air pockets magnified hydrodynamic interactions involving the SNP-SHS. The dynamic forces between the same silica sphere and a laterally smooth mica surface showed that the fitted Navier slip lengths using the Reynolds lubrication model were an order of magnitude larger than the length scale of the sphere surface roughness. The surface roughness and the lateral heterogeneity of the SNP-SHS hindered attempts to characterize the dynamic response using the Reynolds lubrication model even when augmented with a Navier slip boundary.

  3. Air pocket stability and the imbibition pathway in droplet wetting.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2015-10-07

    The stability of air pockets formed in grooves on a surface is relevant to contact angle hysteresis of droplet wetting and it is investigated by imbibition experiments and surface evolver (SE) simulations. Liquid drops of different wettabilities are placed atop a conical hole on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) substrate. The stability of the air pocket depends on surface wettability. Four kinds of imbibition behaviors ranging from wetting to nonwetting are observed. The imbibition pathway for the kinetically unstable air pocket is observed by using the olive oil droplet. It involves an inward flow of a thin liquid film along the wall of the hole. The accumulation of liquid at the bottom leads to the rise of the air bubble. The energy-barrier profile associated with the imbibition pathway acquired by SE simulations is able to interpret the outcome of imbibition. The advancing and receding contact angles of various liquids on a PMMA substrate with drilled holes are also determined. Their wetting behaviors can be categorized into three types. Our experimental results for substrates with or without fluorination are in good agreement with the theory based on the stability of air pockets.

  4. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  5. Breakdown of air pockets in downwardly inclined sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F H L R

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to centralised WWTPs by an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the last decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. One of the many causes that account for the reduction of the flow capacity is the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. During dry weather periods with low flow velocities, gas may accumulate at high points in the system. Once the velocity increases during storm weather flow, the air pockets may be broken down and transported to the end of the system. A research study is started focussing on the description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation of gas. An experimental facility is constructed for the study of multi-phase flow. This paper describes the preliminary results of experiments on breakdown rates of gas pockets as a function of inclination angle and water flow rate. The results show an increasing breakdown rate with increasing inclination angle.

  6. A Cell-Permeable Inhibitor to Trap Gαq Proteins in the Empty Pocket Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M.; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H. Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T. Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences Gαq signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps Gαq in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule Gα inhibitor to date. Our data show that Gα proteins may be “frozen” pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence Gα subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors. PMID:25036778

  7. The impact of air pockets around the vaginal cylinder on vaginal vault brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Guler, O C; Dolek, Y

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence, size and predisposing factors for air pockets around the vaginal cylinder and their dosimetric effect on the vaginal mucosa. Methods: We investigated 174 patients with endometrial carcinoma treated with external radiotherapy (RT) and brachytherapy (BRT) (101 patients, 58%) or BRT alone (73 patients, 42%). The quantity, volume and dosimetric impact of the air pockets surrounding the vaginal cylinder were quantified. The proportions of patients with or without air pockets during application were stratified according to menopausal status, treatment modality and interval between surgery and RT. Results: Air pockets around the vaginal cylinder were seen in 75 patients (43%), while 99 patients (57%) had no air pockets. Only 11 patients (6.3%) received less than the prescribed dose (average 93.9% of prescribed dose; range, 79.0–99.2%). Air pockets were significantly fewer in pre-menopausal patients or in patients treated with the combination of external RT and BRT than in post-menopausal patients or patients treated with BRT alone. A significant correlation existed between the mucosal displacement of the air gap and the ratio of the measured dose at the surface of the air gap and prescribed dose (Pearson r = −0.775; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Air pockets were still a frequent problem during vaginal vault BRT, especially in post-menopausal patients or in patients treated with BRT alone, which may potentially cause dose reductions at the vaginal mucosa. Advances in knowledge: Air pockets around the vaginal cylinder remain a significant problem, which may potentially cause dose reduction in the target volume. PMID:25562767

  8. Rigid-plug elastic-water model for transient pipe flow with entrapped air pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; OU, CHANGQI

    2011-01-01

    Pressure transients in a rapidly filling pipe with an entrapped air pocket are investigated analytically. A rigid-plug elastic water model is developed by applying elastic water hammer to the majority of the water column while applying rigid water analysis to a small portion near the air-water interface, which avoids effectively the interpolation error of previous approaches. Moreover, another two simplified models are introduced respectively based on constant water length and by neglecting water elasticity. Verification of the three models is confirmed by experimental results. Calculations show that the simplification of constant water length is feasible for small air pockets. The complete rigid water model is appropriate for cases with large initial air volume. The rigid-plug elastic model can predict all the essential features for the entire range of initial air fraction considered in this study, and it is the effective model for analysis of pressure transients of entrapped air.

  9. An experimental study of geyser-like flows induced by a pressurized air pocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elayeb, I. S.; Leon, A.; Choi, Y.; Alnahit, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies argues that the entrapment of pressurized air pockets within combined sewer systems can produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows. To verify that pressurized air pockets can effectively produce geysers, laboratory experiments were conducted. However, past experiments were conducted in relatively small-scale apparatus (i.e. maximum φ2" vertical shaft). This study conducted a set of experiments in a larger apparatus. The experimental setup consists of an upstream head tank, a downstream head tank, a horizontal pipe (46.5ft long, φ6") and a vertical pipe (10ft long, φ6"). The initial condition for the experiments is constant flow discharge through the horizontal pipe. The experiments are initiated by injecting an air pocket with pre-determined volume and pressure at the upstream end of the horizontal pipe. The air pocket propagates through the horizontal pipe until it arrives to the vertical shaft, where it is released producing a geyser-like flow. Three flow rates in the horizontal pipe and three injected air pressures were tested. The variables measured were pressure at two locations in the horizontal pipe and two locations in the vertical pipe. High resolution videos at two regions in the vertical shaft were also recorded. To gain further insights in the physics of air-water interaction, the laboratory experiments were complemented with numerical simulations conducted using a commercial 3D CFD model, previously validated with experiments.

  10. Air and gas pockets in sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F

    2005-01-01

    In The Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to large centralised WWTPs by means of an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the past decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. For that reason, in practice their state of functioning is often not known. Failure of operation is only noticed when the capacity of the system proves to be insufficient to fulfil the minimum design capacity demand. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. Many causes may account for the reduction of the system's nominal capacity like an increased wall roughness, scaling or occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. The occurrence of free gas may be caused by degassing of dissolved (bio) gas or by air entrained at the pumps' inlet or at air valves. A research study is started that will focus on three main issues: The description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation and dynamic hydraulic behaviour, A method to diagnose gas problems, and To overcome future problems by either applying remedial measures or improving the design of wastewater pressure systems. For this study, two experimental facilities are constructed, a small circuit for the study of multi-phase flow and a second, larger one for the research into diagnostic methods. This paper describes the preliminary results of the experiments in the multi-phase circuit.

  11. Influence of entrapped air pockets on hydraulic transients in water pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen

    2011-01-01

    The pressure variations associated with a filling undulating pipeline containing an entrapped air pocket are investigated both experimentally and numerically. The influence of entrapped air on abnormal transient pressures is often ambiguous since the compressibility of the air pocket permits the liquid flow to accelerate but also partly cushions the system, with the balance of these tendencies being associated with the initial void fraction of the air pocket. Earlier experimental research involved systems with an initial void fraction greater than 5.8%; this paper focuses on initial void fractions ranging from 0% to 10%, in order to more completely characterize the transient response. Experimental results show that the maximum pressure increases and then decreases as the initial void fraction decreases. A simplified model is developed by neglecting the liquid inertia and energy loss of a short water column near the air-water interface. Comparisons of the calculated and observed results show the model is able to accurately predict peak pressures as a function of void fraction and filling conditions. Rigid water column models, however, perform poorly with small void fractions.

  12. Radial-firing optical fiber tip containing conical-shaped air-pocket for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Ho; Ryu, Yong-Tak; Son, Dong Hoon; Jeong, Seongmook; Kim, Youngwoong; Ju, Seongmin; Kim, Bok Hyeon; Han, Won-Taek

    2015-08-10

    We report a novel radial-firing optical fiber tip containing a conical-shaped air-pocket fabricated by deforming a hollow optical fiber using electric arc-discharge process. The hollow optical fiber was fusion spliced with a conventional optical fiber, simultaneously deforming into the intagliated conical-shaped region along the longitudinal fiber-axis of the fiber due to the gradual collapse of the cavity of the hollow optical fiber. Then the distal-end of the hollow optical fiber was sealed by the additional arc-discharge in order to obstruct the inflow of an external bio-substance or liquid to the inner air surface during the surgical operations, resulting in the formation of encased air-pocket in the silica glass fiber. Due to the total internal reflection of the laser beam at the conical-shaped air surface, the laser beam (λ = 632.8 nm) was deflected to the circumferential direction up to 87 degree with respect to the fiber-axis.

  13. Improved quality control of silicon wafers using novel off-line air pocket image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, John F.; Sanna, M. Cristina

    2014-08-01

    Air pockets (APK) occur randomly in Czochralski (Cz) grown silicon (Si) crystals and may become included in wafers after slicing and polishing. Previously the only APK of interest were those that intersected the front surface of the wafer and therefore directly impacted device yield. However mobile and other electronics have placed new demands on wafers to be internally APK-free for reasons of thermal management and packaging yield. We present a novel, recently patented, APK image processing technique and demonstrate the use of that technique, off-line, to improve quality control during wafer manufacturing.

  14. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions.

  15. Calibration of polydimethylsiloxane and XAD-Pocket passive air samplers (PAS) for measuring gas- and particle-phase SVOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeme, Joseph O.; Saini, Amandeep; Yang, Congqiao; Zhu, Jiping; Smedes, Foppe; Klánová, Jana; Diamond, Miriam L.

    2016-10-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has seen wide use as the stationary phase of gas chromatographic columns, a passive sampler in water, and recently as a personal exposure sampler, while styrene divinyl-benzene copolymer (XAD) has been used extensively as a passive air sampler outdoors and indoors. We have introduced PDMS and XAD-Pocket as new indoor passive air samplers (PASs). The XAD-Pocket was designed to maximize the surface area-to-volume ratio of XAD and to minimize obstruction of air flow by the sampler housing. Methods were developed to expedite the use of these PASs for measuring phthalates, novel brominated flame-retardants (NFRs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) indoors. Sampling rates, Rs, (m3 day-1), were measured during a 7-week calibration study. Variability within and between analyte groups was not statistically significant. As a result, generic values of 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.5 ± 0.3 m3 day-1 dm-2 are recommended for PDMS and XAD-Pocket for a 50-day deployment time, respectively. PDMS has a higher uptake rate and is easier to use than XAD-Pocket.

  16. Morphology of Air Nanobubbles Trapped atHydrophobic Nanopatterned Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Checco, A.; Hofmann, T.; DiMasi, E.; Black, C.T.; Ocko, B.M.

    2010-04-01

    The details of air nanobubble trapping at the interface between water and a nanostructured hydrophobic silicon surface are investigated using X-ray scattering and contact angle measurements. Large-area silicon surfaces containing hexagonally packed, 20 nm wide hydrophobic cavities provide ideal model surfaces for studying the morphology of air nanobubbles trapped inside cavities and its dependence on the cavity depth. Transmission small-angle X-ray scattering measurements show stable trapping of air inside the cavities with a partial water penetration of 5-10 nm into the pores, independent of their large depth variation. This behavior is explained by consideration of capillary effects and the cavity geometry. For parabolic cavities, the liquid can reach a thermodynamically stable configuration - a nearly planar nanobubble meniscus - by partially penetrating into the pores. This microscopic information correlates very well with the macroscopic surface wetting behavior.

  17. Air Trapping and Airflow Obstruction in Newborn Cystic Fibrosis Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Bauer, Christian; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Gross, Thomas J.; Awadalla, Maged S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Diwakar, Amit; Ochs, Matthias; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Beichel, Reinhard R.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Air trapping and airflow obstruction are being increasingly identified in infants with cystic fibrosis. These findings are commonly attributed to airway infection, inflammation, and mucus buildup. Objectives: To learn if air trapping and airflow obstruction are present before the onset of airway infection and inflammation in cystic fibrosis. Methods: On the day they are born, piglets with cystic fibrosis lack airway infection and inflammation. Therefore, we used newborn wild-type piglets and piglets with cystic fibrosis to assess air trapping, airway size, and lung volume with inspiratory and expiratory X-ray computed tomography scans. Micro–computed tomography scanning was used to assess more distal airway sizes. Airway resistance was determined with a mechanical ventilator. Mean linear intercept and alveolar surface area were determined using stereologic methods. Measurements and Main Results: On the day they were born, piglets with cystic fibrosis exhibited air trapping more frequently than wild-type piglets (75% vs. 12.5%, respectively). Moreover, newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis had increased airway resistance that was accompanied by luminal size reduction in the trachea, mainstem bronchi, and proximal airways. In contrast, mean linear intercept length, alveolar surface area, and lung volume were similar between both genotypes. Conclusions: The presence of air trapping, airflow obstruction, and airway size reduction in newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis before the onset of airway infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation indicates that cystic fibrosis impacts airway development. Our findings suggest that early airflow obstruction and air trapping in infants with cystic fibrosis might, in part, be caused by congenital airway abnormalities. PMID:24168209

  18. Airpower in your Hip Pocket: Under What Conditions Should an Operational Commander Constitute an Air Reserve?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-16

    Director, Graduate Ph Brookes , Ph.D. Degree Program Accepted this _____. day of 1990 J K L ABSTRACT Airpower in Your Hip Pocket -- Under What...Walter J. Renfro , Jr. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1985. de Seversky, Alexander P. , Maj. , Airpower: Key to Survival. New York: Simon and Schuster

  19. A one-dimensional numerical model for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pressurized air pockets in combined sewer systems is argued to produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows through vertical shafts. A 1D numerical model is developed for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft which in turn attempts to simulate geyser like flows. The vertical shaft is closed at the bottom and open to ambient pressure at the top. Initially, the lower section of the vertical shaft is filled with compressed air and the upper section with water. The interaction between the pressurized air pocket and the water column in the vertical shaft exhibits an oscillatory motion of the water column that decays over time. The model accounts for steady and unsteady friction to estimate the energy dissipation. The model also includes the falling flow of water around the external perimeter of the pressurized air pocket by assuming that any expansion in the pressurized air pocket would result in the falling volume of water. The acceleration of air-water interface is predicted through a force balance between the pressurized air pocket and the water column combined with the Method of Characteristics that resolves pressure and velocity within the water column. The expansion and compression of the pressurized air pocket is assumed to follow either isothermal process or adiabatic process. Results for both assumptions; isothermal and adiabatic processes, are presented. The performance of the developed 1D numerical model is compared with that of a commercial 3D CFD model. Overall, a good agreement between both models is obtained for pressure and velocity oscillations. The paper will also present a sensitivity analysis of the 3D CFD model.

  20. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  1. Differences in regional air trapping in current smokers with normal spirometry.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Reza; Tornling, Göran; Forsslund, Helena; Mikko, Mikael; Wheelock, Åsa M; Nyrén, Sven; Sköld, C Magnus

    2017-01-01

    We investigated regional air trapping on computed tomography in current smokers with normal spirometry. It was hypothesised that presence of regional air trapping may indicate a specific manifestation of smoking-related changes.40 current smokers, 40 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 40 healthy never- smokers underwent computed tomography scans. Regional air trapping was assessed on end-expiratory scans and emphysema, micronodules and bronchial wall thickening on inspiratory scans. The ratio of expiratory and inspiratory mean lung attenuation (E/I) was calculated as a measure of static (fixed) air trapping.Regional air trapping was present in 63% of current smokers, in 45% of never smokers and in 8% of COPD patients (p<0.001). Current smokers with and without regional air trapping had E/I ratio of 0.81 and 0.91, respectively (p<0.001). Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was significantly higher and emphysema less frequent in current smokers with regional air trapping.Current smokers with regional air trapping had higher FEV1 and less emphysema on computed tomography. In contrast, current smokers without regional air trapping resembled COPD. Our results highlight heterogeneity among smokers with normal spirometry and may contribute to early detection of smoking related structural changes in the lungs.

  2. Work of Breathing into Snow in the Presence versus Absence of an Artificial Air Pocket Affects Hypoxia and Hypercapnia of a Victim Covered with Avalanche Snow: A Randomized Double Blind Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Roubík, Karel; Sieger, Ladislav; Sykora, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Presence of an air pocket and its size play an important role in survival of victims buried in the avalanche snow. Even small air pockets facilitate breathing. We hypothesize that the size of the air pocket significantly affects the airflow resistance and work of breathing. The aims of the study are (1) to investigate the effect of the presence of an air pocket on gas exchange and work of breathing in subjects breathing into the simulated avalanche snow and (2) to test whether it is possible to breathe with no air pocket. The prospective interventional double-blinded study involved 12 male volunteers, from which 10 completed the whole protocol. Each volunteer underwent two phases of the experiment in a random order: phase "AP"--breathing into the snow with a one-liter air pocket, and phase "NP"--breathing into the snow with no air pocket. Physiological parameters, fractions of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the airways and work of breathing expressed as pressure-time product were recorded continuously. The main finding of the study is that it is possible to breath in the avalanche snow even with no air pocket (0 L volume), but breathing under this condition is associated with significantly increased work of breathing. The significant differences were initially observed for end-tidal values of the respiratory gases (EtO2 and EtCO2) and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) between AP and NP phases, whereas significant differences in inspiratory fractions occurred much later (for FIO2) or never (for FICO2). The limiting factor in no air pocket conditions is excessive increase in work of breathing that induces increase in metabolism accompanied by higher oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. The presence of even a small air pocket reduces significantly the work of breathing.

  3. Work of Breathing into Snow in the Presence versus Absence of an Artificial Air Pocket Affects Hypoxia and Hypercapnia of a Victim Covered with Avalanche Snow: A Randomized Double Blind Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Presence of an air pocket and its size play an important role in survival of victims buried in the avalanche snow. Even small air pockets facilitate breathing. We hypothesize that the size of the air pocket significantly affects the airflow resistance and work of breathing. The aims of the study are (1) to investigate the effect of the presence of an air pocket on gas exchange and work of breathing in subjects breathing into the simulated avalanche snow and (2) to test whether it is possible to breathe with no air pocket. The prospective interventional double-blinded study involved 12 male volunteers, from which 10 completed the whole protocol. Each volunteer underwent two phases of the experiment in a random order: phase “AP”—breathing into the snow with a one-liter air pocket, and phase “NP”—breathing into the snow with no air pocket. Physiological parameters, fractions of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the airways and work of breathing expressed as pressure-time product were recorded continuously. The main finding of the study is that it is possible to breath in the avalanche snow even with no air pocket (0 L volume), but breathing under this condition is associated with significantly increased work of breathing. The significant differences were initially observed for end-tidal values of the respiratory gases (EtO2 and EtCO2) and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) between AP and NP phases, whereas significant differences in inspiratory fractions occurred much later (for FIO2) or never (for FICO2). The limiting factor in no air pocket conditions is excessive increase in work of breathing that induces increase in metabolism accompanied by higher oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. The presence of even a small air pocket reduces significantly the work of breathing. PMID:26666523

  4. Optical configurations for photophoretic trap of single particles in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhiyong; Pan, Yong-Le; Wang, Chuji

    2016-10-01

    Since Ashkin's pioneering work in the 1970's, optical trapping (OT) and manipulation have become an indispensable tool in diverse research fields. Today, there are multiple optical trapping schemes in use. In this article, we explore six different optical trapping schemes based on the photophoretic force (PPF). Within these schemes we explore 21 variants differing in such details as laser source, power, beam shape, and focusing optics. We evaluate and rate the trapping quality and performance of the six trapping schemes in terms of four key aspects: simplicity, robustness, flexibility, and efficiency. One of the schemes is novel: we introduce a simple, high quality scheme using a confocal design in which one trapping beam is effectively converted to two counter-propagating beams. The versatility of this new trapping scheme is demonstrated via application of the scheme to cavity ringdown spectroscopy. We hope this exploration of the diversity of PPF trapping schemes will extend applications of OT by providing researchers with information to assist in the selection of specific optical trapping schemes from the first-of-its-kind list of 21 configurations presented herein.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Air Trapping in a Porous Medium with Coarse Textured Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Tisler, Witold; Schütz, Cindi; Szymkiewicz, Adam; Neuweiler, Insa; Helmig, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents a 2D upward infiltration experiment performed on a model porous medium consisting of fine sand background with two inclusions made of coarser sands. The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the effects of structural air trapping, which occurs during infiltration as a result of heterogeneous material structure. The experiment shows that a significant amount of air becomes trapped in each of the inclusions. Numerical simulations were carried out using the two-phase water-air flow model and the Richards equation. The experimental results can be reproduced with good accuracy only using a two-phase flow model, which accounts for both structural and pore-scale trapping. On the other hand, the Richards equation was not able to represent the structural trapping caused by material heterogeneity.

  6. Impact of bronchiectasis and trapped air on quality of life and exacerbations in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Leonie A; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Caudri, Daan; Bos, Aukje C; Gonzalez-Graniel, Karla; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; van der Wiel, Els C W; Quittner, Alexandra L; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2013-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is primarily characterised by bronchiectasis and trapped air on chest computed tomography (CT). The revised Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire respiratory symptoms scale (CFQ-R RSS) measures health-related quality of life. To validate bronchiectasis, trapped air and CFQ-R RSS as outcome measures, we investigated correlations and predictive values for pulmonary exacerbations. CF patients (aged 6-20 years) underwent CT, CFQ-R RSS and 1-year follow-up. Bronchiectasis and trapped air were scored using the CF-CT scoring system. Correlation coefficients and backward multivariate modelling were used to identify predictors of pulmonary exacerbations. 40 children and 32 adolescents were included. CF-CT bronchiectasis (r = -0.38, p<0.001) and CF-CT trapped air (r = -0.35, p = 0.003) correlated with CFQ-R RSS. Pulmonary exacerbations were associated with: bronchiectasis (rate ratio 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.19; p = 0.009), trapped air (rate ratio 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05; p = 0.034) and CFQ-R RSS (rate ratio 0.95, 95% CI 0.91-0.98; p = 0.002). The CFQ-R RSS was an independent predictor of pulmonary exacerbations (rate ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.97; p<0.001). Bronchiectasis, trapped air and CFQ-R RSS were associated with pulmonary exacerbations. The CFQ-R RSS was an independent predictor. This study further validated bronchiectasis, trapped air and CFQ-R RSS as outcome measures in CF.

  7. Liquid-Infused Surfaces with Trapped Air (LISTA) for Drag Force Reduction.

    PubMed

    Hemeda, A A; Tafreshi, H Vahedi

    2016-03-29

    Superhydrophobic (SHP) surfaces are known for their drag-reducing attributes thanks to their ability to trap air in their surface pores and thereby reduce the contact between water and the frictional solid area. SHP surfaces are prone to failure under elevated pressures or because of air-layer dissolution into the surrounding water. Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) or liquid-infused surfaces (LIS) in which the trapped air is replaced with a lubricant have been proposed in the literature as a way of eliminating the air dissolution problem as well as improving the surface stability under pressure. While an LIS surface has been shown to reduce drag for flow of water-glycerol mixture (ref 18), no significant drag reduction has yet been reported for the flow of water (a lower viscosity fluid) over LIS. In this concern, we have designed a new surface in which a layer of air is trapped underneath the infused lubricant to reduce the frictional forces preventing the LIS to provide drag reduction for water or any fluid with a viscosity less than that of the lubricant. Drag reduction performance of such surfaces, referred to here as liquid-infused surfaces with trapped air (LISTA), is predicted by solving the biharmonic equation for the water-oil-air three-phase system in transverse grooves with enhanced meniscus stability thanks to double-reentry designs. For the arbitrary dimensions considered in our proof-of-concept study, LISTA designs showed 20-37% advantage over their LIS counterparts.

  8. Physical conditions for trapping air by a microtrichia-covered insect cuticle during temporary submersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Dietrich; Woermann, Dietrich

    2009-08-01

    The intertidal midge Clunio, which reproduces on exposed rocky seashores, becomes enclosed in an irregularly shaped air bubble during short submersion by incoming waves. This water-repellent property of Clunio’s cuticle is caused by a complete cover of hydrophobic microtrichia offering an effective surf tolerance. These microtrichia not only trap a thin air layer above the cuticle but also maintain a larger air bubble between the insect’s ventral side and legs. The effectiveness of the water repellence was quantitatively characterised on the basis of a known model (Crisp and Thorpe, Discuss Faraday Soc 3:210-220, 1948). The parameters of the model are the contact angle θ (>90°) at the contact line of air/water/microtrichia and the distance between individual microtrichia and their radius. When the microtrichia are 1.1 μm apart and have a radius of 0.1 μm and an estimated contact angle θ of 140°, the air layer is stable against hydrostatic pressures of up to 3 m water column. As shown by a modified version of the model, considerably larger air bubbles can be trapped by the microtrichia cover of the legs up to distances of 0.5 mm from the body. The widely spaced (about 8 μm apart) and longer setae of Clunio are not involved in the formation of air layers and air bubble.

  9. A method for determination of methyl chloride concentration in air trapped in ice cores.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takuya; Yokouchi, Yoko; Aoki, Shuji; Nakazawa, Takakiyo; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Okitsugu

    2006-05-01

    A method for measuring the concentration of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) in air trapped in an ice core was developed. The method combines the air extraction by milling the ice core samples under vacuum and the analysis of the extracted air with a cryogenic preconcentration/gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry system. The method was applied to air from Antarctic ice core samples estimated to have been formed in the pre-industrial and/or early industrial periods. The overall precision of the method deduced from duplicate ice core analyses was estimated to be better than +/-20 pptv. The measured CH3Cl concentration of 528+/-26 pptv was similar to the present-day concentration in the remote atmosphere as well as the CH3Cl concentration over the past 300 years obtained from Antarctic firn air and ice core analyses.

  10. Automated CT Scan Scores of Bronchiectasis and Air Trapping in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Swiercz, Waldemar; Heltshe, Sonya L.; Anthony, Margaret M.; Szefler, Paul; Klein, Rebecca; Strain, John; Brody, Alan S.; Sagel, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Computer analysis of high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans may improve the assessment of structural lung injury in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). The goal of this cross-sectional pilot study was to validate automated, observer-independent image analysis software to establish objective, simple criteria for bronchiectasis and air trapping. Methods: HRCT scans of the chest were performed in 35 children with CF and compared with scans from 12 disease control subjects. Automated image analysis software was developed to count visible airways on inspiratory images and to measure a low attenuation density (LAD) index on expiratory images. Among the children with CF, relationships among automated measures, Brody HRCT scanning scores, lung function, and sputum markers of inflammation were assessed. Results: The number of total, central, and peripheral airways on inspiratory images and LAD (%) on expiratory images were significantly higher in children with CF compared with control subjects. Among subjects with CF, peripheral airway counts correlated strongly with Brody bronchiectasis scores by two raters (r = 0.86, P < .0001; r = 0.91, P < .0001), correlated negatively with lung function, and were positively associated with sputum free neutrophil elastase activity. LAD (%) correlated with Brody air trapping scores (r = 0.83, P < .0001; r = 0.69, P < .0001) but did not correlate with lung function or sputum inflammatory markers. Conclusions: Quantitative airway counts and LAD (%) on HRCT scans appear to be useful surrogates for bronchiectasis and air trapping in children with CF. Our automated methodology provides objective quantitative measures of bronchiectasis and air trapping that may serve as end points in CF clinical trials. PMID:24114359

  11. Dipole Moment of a Charged Particle Trapped at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Bohinc, Klemen; Brown, Matthew A; May, Sylvio

    2016-07-07

    The interaction between two charged particles (such as nanoparticles or colloids) trapped at the air-water interface becomes dipolar at large separations. The corresponding dipole moment can be modeled by considering a single point charge located exactly at the interface, but this model fails to correctly predict the dipole moment's dependence on the salt concentration in the aqueous medium. We extend the single point charge model to two point charges that are separated by a fixed distance and are located at the air-water interface, with one charge being immersed in air and the other in the solvent. The two point charges represent the surface charges at the air-exposed and water-exposed regions of an interface-trapped particle. The two point charges also account for the spatial extension of the particle. On the basis of the Debye-Hückel model, we derive mathematical expressions for the interaction between two pairs of charges and discuss the salt concentration dependence of the dipolar moment at large separations. Our results reveal a residual dipole moment in the limit of large salt content that originates from the charge attached to the air-exposed region of the particle. We discuss nonlinear screening effects and compare the predicted dipolar moments with recent experimental results.

  12. Air trapping ability of the Spiral Gold membrane oxygenator: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, X M; Tevaearai, H T; van Ness, K; Horisberger, J; Augstburger, M; Burki, M; von Segesser, L K

    1998-01-01

    Despite an overall improvement in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) technology and materials, air emboli still occur. The latest generation membrane oxygenator from Bentley Laboratories, the SpiralGold, was tested ex vivo for its air handling ability. The study was conducted on four calves. Bolus amounts of air of 10, 15 and 20 cm3 were each injected three times, upstream of the oxygenator and a bubble detector located directly downstream. The amount of bubbles was measured semiquantitatively on a 10 unit scale (U one semiquantitative unit). The animals were killed 10 days after the CPB. When 10 cm3 of air was injected, no bubbles were detected. With 15 and 20 cm3, respectively, 1 +/- 1.5 and 5 +/- 3.3 U of bubbles were detected. Despite a total of 135 cm3 of air injected as large bolus amounts, all the animals survived without any obvious neurological deficit secondary to air bubble manipulation. In conclusion, the SpiralGold oxygenator per se can reliably trap an air bolus of up to 10 cm3. This feature should be taken into account when choosing an oxygenator, as it offers an additional barrier to air bubbles in the CPB circuit.

  13. Tetraglyme Trap for the Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Urban Air: Projects for Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Wilbert W.; Johnson, Clyde; Johnson, Leon P.

    2004-01-01

    The differences in the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in the ambient air from the two urban locations, were studied by the undergraduate analytical chemistry students. Tetraglyme is very widely used due to its simplicity and its potential for use to investigate VOCs in ambient and indoor air employing a purge-and-trap concentrator…

  14. Effetively trapping air or lqiud water for anti-icing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjun

    2014-03-01

    Icing on solid surfaces leads to operational difficulties and high maintenance efforts for power networks, aircrafts, ships, ground transportation vehicles and house-hold refrigerators, to name but a few. In extreme cases, icing on surfaces causes disastrous events such as crash of aircrafts and collapse of power networks, which result in severe economic impact and large loss of life. This talk is focused on the fundamentals of the ice formation and adhesion of ice with solid substrates aiming for fighting against icing on solid surfaces. When the supercooling is low, it would be possible to remove supercooled liquid water from the solid surfaces before freezing occurs. To achieve this, we design and constructed surfaces that can trap the air at the subfreezing temperature thus condensed water microdroplets could be spontaneously removed after the coalescence. When the supercooling is high, icing on surfaces occurs spontaniously. In this case, we constructed coatings on which aqueous lubricating layer could be trapped, thus the ice adhesion on the coating is so low that the ice formed atop could be removed by a wind action or its own gravity.

  15. CysLT2 receptor activation is involved in LTC4-induced lung air-trapping in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Yonetomi, Yasuo; Kamiya, Akihiro; Fujita, Manabu; Nabe, Takeshi; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2017-01-05

    CysLT1 receptors are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. However, the functional roles of CysLT2 receptors in this condition have not been determined. The purpose of this study is to develop an experimental model of CysLT2 receptor-mediated LTC4-induced lung air-trapping in guinea pigs and use this model to clarify the mechanism underlying response to such trapping. Because LTC4 is rapidly converted to LTD4 by γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GTP) under physiological conditions, S-hexyl GSH was used as a γ-GTP inhibitor. In anesthetized artificially ventilated guinea pigs with no S-hexyl GSH treatment, i.v. LTC4-induced bronchoconstriction was almost completely inhibited by montelukast, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist, but not by BayCysLT2RA, a CysLT2 receptor antagonist. The inhibitory effect of montelukast was diminished by treatment with S-hexyl GSH, whereas the effect of BayCysLT2RA was enhanced with increasing dose of S-hexyl GSH. Macroscopic and histological examination of lung tissue isolated from LTC4-/S-hexyl-GSH-treated guinea pigs revealed air-trapping expansion, particularly at the alveolar site. Inhaled LTC4 in conscious guinea pigs treated with S-hexyl GSH increased both airway resistance and airway hyperinflation. On the other hand, LTC4-induced air-trapping was only partially suppressed by treatment with the bronchodilator salmeterol. Although montelukast inhibition of LTC4-induced air-trapping was weak, treatment with BayCysLT2RA resulted in complete suppression of this air-trapping. Furthermore, BayCysLT2RA completely suppressed LTC4-induced airway vascular hyperpermeability. In conclusion, we found in this study that CysLT2 receptors mediate LTC4-induced bronchoconstriction and air-trapping in S-hexyl GSH-treated guinea pigs. It is therefore believed that CysLT2 receptors contribute to asthmatic response involving air-trapping.

  16. Exploiting zone trapping to avoid liberation of air bubbles in flow-based analytical procedures requiring heating.

    PubMed

    Vida, Ana C F; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2014-01-01

    In flow-based analytical procedures requiring heating, liberation of air bubbles is avoided by trapping a sample selected portion into a heated hermetic environment. The flow-through cuvette is maintained into a temperature-controlled aluminium block, thus acting as the trapping element and allowing real-time monitoring. The feasibility of the innovation was demonstrated in the spectrophotometric catalytic determination of vanadium in mineral waters. Air bubbles were not released even for temperatures as high as 95°C. The proposed system handles about 25 samples per hour, requires only 3 mg p-anisidine per determination and yields precise results (r.s.d. = 2.1%), in agreement with ICP-MS. Detection limit was evaluated (3.3 σ criterion) as 0.1 μg L(-1) V.

  17. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Gordon F. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low-noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free-ranging subject. The electrode comprises a pocket-shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  18. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, G. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A low noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free ranging subject is described. The electrode comprises a pocket shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member, remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  19. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  20. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  1. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This booklet of pocket statistics includes the 1996 NASA Major Launch Record, NASA Procurement, Financial, and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Luanch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  2. Phase relationships between orbital forcing and the composition of air trapped in Antarctic ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Lucie; Landais, Amaelle; Capron, Emilie; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Ritz, Catherine; Picard, Ghislain; Jouzel, Jean; Dumont, Marie; Leuenberger, Markus; Prié, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Orbital tuning is central for ice core chronologies beyond annual layer counting, available back to 60 ka (i.e. thousands of years before 1950) for Greenland ice cores. While several complementary orbital tuning tools have recently been developed using δ18Oatm, δO2⁄N2 and air content with different orbital targets, quantifying their uncertainties remains a challenge. Indeed, the exact processes linking variations of these parameters, measured in the air trapped in ice, to their orbital targets are not yet fully understood. Here, we provide new series of δO2/N2 and δ18Oatm data encompassing Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 5 (between 100 and 160 ka) and the oldest part (340-800 ka) of the East Antarctic EPICA Dome C (EDC) ice core. For the first time, the measurements over MIS 5 allow an inter-comparison of δO2/N2 and δ18Oatm records from three East Antarctic ice core sites (EDC, Vostok and Dome F). This comparison highlights some site-specific δO2/N2 variations. Such an observation, the evidence of a 100 ka periodicity in the δO2/N2 signal and the difficulty to identify extrema and mid-slopes in δO2/N2 increase the uncertainty associated with the use of δO2/N2 as an orbital tuning tool, now calculated to be 3-4 ka. When combining records of δ18Oatm and δO2/N2 from Vostok and EDC, we find a loss of orbital signature for these two parameters during periods of minimum eccentricity (˜ 400 ka, ˜ 720-800 ka). Our data set reveals a time-varying offset between δO2/N2 and δ18Oatm records over the last 800 ka that we interpret as variations in the lagged response of δ18Oatm to precession. The largest offsets are identified during Terminations II, MIS 8 and MIS 16, corresponding to periods of destabilization of the Northern polar ice sheets. We therefore suggest that the occurrence of Heinrich-like events influences the response of δ18Oatm to precession.

  3. Orbital tuning of deep ice cores using O2/N2 of trapped air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    The chronology of the first Dome Fuji deep ice core (80,000-340,000 yr BP) was established by orbital tuning of measured O2/N2 ratios in trapped air to the past local summer insolation at the drill site (Kawamura et al., 2007). The O2/N2 ratios found in ice cores are generally lower than atmospheric ratio because of size-dependent molecular fractionation during bubble close-off. The magnitude of this gas fractionation appears to be influenced by snow metamorphism when the layer was originally at the surface, which in turn is controlled by local summer insolation (Fujita et al., 2009). The O2/N2 record has little 100,000-yr periodicity (strongest in climatic records), suggesting insignificant climatic influence in the orbital tuning. Agreement of the O2/N2 chronology with U-Th radiometric chronology of speleothems (within ~2000 yr) suggests that O2/N2 and summer insolation are indeed in phase. However, it may not be common to all ice cores that O2/N2 signal only records local summer insolation. For example, the GISP2 ice core (Greenland) has clear imprint of abrupt climate changes in the O2/N2 record, indicating climatic (non-insolation) signal in the record and the possibility of phase variability of O2/N2 relative to the past insolation (Suwa and Bender, 2008). Here we present new O2/N2 record from the second Dome Fuji ice core with significant improvements in ice core storage practice and mass spectrometry. In particular, the ice core had been stored at about -50 ˚C until the air extraction except during transportations, which prevent fractionation due to gas loss during the core storage. The precision of the new O2/N2 data set is improved by a factor of 3 over the previous data, and we do not observe outliers (there were 15% outliers in the previous data). Clear imprint of local insolation is recognizable in the new O2/N2, which would enable us to generate a chronology with accuracy of ~2000 yr towards older periods. Samples from the first core after long

  4. The corneal pocket assay.

    PubMed

    Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cornea in most species is physiologically avascular, and thus this assay allows the measurement of newly formed vessels. The continuous monitoring of neovascular growth in the same animal allows the evaluation of drugs acting as suppressors or stimulators of angiogenesis. Under anesthesia a micropocket is produced in the cornea thickness and the angiogenesis stimulus (tumor tissue, cell suspension, growth factor) is placed into the pocket in order to induce vascular outgrowth from the limbal capillaries. Neovascular development and progression can be modified by the presence of locally released or applied inhibitory factors or by systemic treatments. In this chapter the experimental details of the avascular cornea assay, the technical challenges, and advantages and disadvantages in different species are discussed. Protocols for local drug treatment and tissue sampling for histology and pharmacokinetic profile are reported.

  5. Pocket neutron REM meter

    SciTech Connect

    Quam, W.; Del Duca, T.; Plake, W.; Graves, G.; DeVore, T.; Warren, J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a pocket-calculator-sized, neutron-sensitive, REM-responding personnel dosimeter that uses three tissue-equivalent cylindrical proportional counters as neutron-sensitive detectors. These are conventionally called Linear Energy Transfer (LET) counters. Miniaturized hybrid circuits are used for the linear pulse handling electronics, followed by a 256-channel ADC. A CMOS microprocessor is used to calculate REM exposure from the basic rads-tissue data supplied by the LET counters and also to provide timing and display functions. The instrument is used to continuously accumulate time in hours since reset, total counts accumulated, rads-tissue, and REM. At any time the user can display any one of these items or a channel number (an aid in calibration). The instrument provides such data with a precision of +- 3% for a total exposure of 1 mREM over 8 hours.

  6. Pocket neutron REM meter

    SciTech Connect

    Quam, W.; Del Duca, T.; Plake, W.; Graves, G.; DeVore, T.; Warren, J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a pocket-calculator-sized, neutron-sensitive, REM-responding personnel dosimeter that uses three tissue-equivalent cylindrical proportional counters as neutron-sensitive detectors. These are conventionally called Linear Energy Transfer (LET) counters. Miniaturized hybrid circuits are used for the linear pulse handling electronics, followed by a 256-channel ADC. A CMOS microprocessor is used to calculate REM exposure from the basic rads-tissue data supplied by the LET counters and also to provide timing and display functions. The instrument is used to continuously accumulate time in hours since reset, total counts accumulated, rads-tissue, and REM. The user can display any one of these items or a channel number (an aid in calibration) at any time. Such data are provided with a precision of +- 3% for a total exposure of 1 mREM over eight hours.

  7. Activation of water soluble amines by halogens for trapping methyl radioactive iodine from air streams

    DOEpatents

    Deitz, Victor R.; Blachly, Charles H.

    1977-01-01

    Gas adsorbent charcoals impregnated with an aqueous solution of the reaction product of a tertiary amine and elemental iodine or bromine are better than 99 per cent efficient in trapping methyl iodine.sup.131. The chemical addition of iodine or bromine to the tertiary amine molecule increases the efficiency of the impregnated charcoal as a trapping agent, and in conjunction with the high flash point of the tertiary amine raises the ignition temperature of the impregnated charcoal.

  8. Determination of volatile organic compounds in ambient air with gas chromatograph-flame ionization and ion trap detection

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Carley, R.J.; Kang, J.; Chen, J.; Stuart, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Two new techniques are utilized to integrate the following three equipments: an Entech 2000 automated air concentrator, a Hewlett Packard gas chromatograph (GC) with flame ionization detector (FID) and an ion trap mass spectrometer detector (ITD). This combined analytical system is used to determine low ppb level volatile organic compounds (VOC) in ambient air. The first technique is to configure the inlet system of the GC, so that the pressure regulated flow control system of the GC injection port is used to control the flow of both the desorb gas of the automated air concentrator and the carrier gas of the GC column. The injection port still can be used to inject gas and liquid samples directly. The second technique is to split the effluent of GC column at a 1:1 ratio to the ITD and the FID. In this way, both FID and ITD data can be obtained for each analysis. For ambient air non-methane hydrocarbons monitoring, the FID detector is widely used. Oxygen containing and halogenated organic compounds cannot be differentiated by FID detector and would be quantified as coeluting hydrocarbons. However, volatile organic compounds other than target hydrocarbons can be identified by ITD. This analytical system is very valuable research tool for non-methane hydrocarbons and urban air toxic monitoring. The performances of this developed system have been presented.

  9. Investigation on the gas pockets in a rotodynamic multiphase pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Li, Y. J.; Cai, S. J.; Zhu, H. W.; Zhang, Y. X.

    2016-05-01

    The appearance of gas pockets has an obvious impact on the performance of the rotodynamic multiphase pump. In order to study the formation of gas pockets in the pump and its effects on pump's performance, the unsteady numerical simulation and the visualization experiments were done to investigate gas pockets in a three-stage rotodynamic multiphase pump developed by authors. Meanwhile, the mixture of water and air was selected as the medium. According to the distributions of pressure, gas volume fraction and velocity vector in three compression cells in unsteady flow process, the process of the formation of gas pockets in the pump were analysed generally. The visualization experiments were used to verify the validity of the numerical simulation. The results will be benefit for the hydraulic design of the compression cell of rotodynamic multiphase pump.

  10. Trapping the Pasture Odorscape Using Open-Air Solid-Phase Micro Extraction, a Tool to Assess Grassland Value

    PubMed Central

    Cornu, Agnès; Farruggia, Anne; Leppik, Ene; Pinier, Centina; Fournier, Florence; Genoud, David; Frérot, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Besides supporting cattle feeding, grasslands are home to a diversity of plants and insects that interact with each other by emitting volatile compounds. The aim of this work was to develop a method to determine permanent grassland odorscape and relate it to flower-visiting insects. Two grasslands were chosen for their contrasting levels of botanical diversity, resulting from differing grazing managements. Measurements were made over two periods of three consecutive days at the beginning of grazing, and just after the cows had left the plots. Volatile compounds were trapped using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers exposed eight hours a day in three exclosures per plot, and then analyzed by gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Insects were trapped using pan traps and a net, sorted and counted. The open air SPME method yielded volatile compound profiles that were richer than maize field profiles, comprising the common green leaf volatiles (GLV) and more specific ones. Differences between the odorscapes of the two grasslands were found, but they were not as marked as expected from their botanical composition. By contrast, there were sharp differences between the two periods, resulting from the combined effects of changes in weather conditions, plant phenological stage and grazing progress. Several correlations between insect counts and volatile compounds were found. Although their correlation coefficients were low, some of them were confirmed when tested by Spearman rank correlation, and could be logically explained. This method of grassland odorscape deserves to be developed because it can provide information on many aspects of grassland function and on the stresses that grassland plants undergo. PMID:26536369

  11. Trapping the Pasture Odorscape Using Open-Air Solid-Phase Micro Extraction, a Tool to Assess Grassland Value.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Agnès; Farruggia, Anne; Leppik, Ene; Pinier, Centina; Fournier, Florence; Genoud, David; Frérot, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Besides supporting cattle feeding, grasslands are home to a diversity of plants and insects that interact with each other by emitting volatile compounds. The aim of this work was to develop a method to determine permanent grassland odorscape and relate it to flower-visiting insects. Two grasslands were chosen for their contrasting levels of botanical diversity, resulting from differing grazing managements. Measurements were made over two periods of three consecutive days at the beginning of grazing, and just after the cows had left the plots. Volatile compounds were trapped using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers exposed eight hours a day in three exclosures per plot, and then analyzed by gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Insects were trapped using pan traps and a net, sorted and counted. The open air SPME method yielded volatile compound profiles that were richer than maize field profiles, comprising the common green leaf volatiles (GLV) and more specific ones. Differences between the odorscapes of the two grasslands were found, but they were not as marked as expected from their botanical composition. By contrast, there were sharp differences between the two periods, resulting from the combined effects of changes in weather conditions, plant phenological stage and grazing progress. Several correlations between insect counts and volatile compounds were found. Although their correlation coefficients were low, some of them were confirmed when tested by Spearman rank correlation, and could be logically explained. This method of grassland odorscape deserves to be developed because it can provide information on many aspects of grassland function and on the stresses that grassland plants undergo.

  12. Visualization of removal of trapped air from the apical region in simulated root canals by laser-activated irrigation using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Harry Huiz; De Moor, Roeland J G; Suharto, Djoko

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this visualization study was to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism by which trapped air is removed from the apical region of simulated root canals by activation of an irrigant using an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser during endodontic procedures. A high-speed imaging system with high temporal and spatial resolution was used to visualize laser-induced shock waves in a resin block model with a curved root canal (inner diameter at the apex 0.08 mm, taper 4 %, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm) and a glass cylinder model with a straight root canal (inner diameter 1 mm, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm). The study utilized MZ3 and RFT3 tips in each model, without water or air spray, and with an average power of 1 W at 35 Hz. Laser-activated irrigation overcame the airlock effect by releasing air trapped in the air column. The mechanism underlying the removal of trapped air from the apical region using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a dry root canal is via the disruption of the surface tension at the solution-air interface. This disruption, caused by bubble implosion (cavitation), displaces air in the form of bubbles from the apical region toward the solution, which allows the solution to travel apically.

  13. A centrifugal ice microtome for measurements of atmospheric CO2 on air trapped in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, B.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2012-10-01

    For atmospheric CO2 reconstructions using ice cores, the technique to release the trapped air from the ice samples is crucial for the precision and accuracy of the measurements. We present here a new dry extraction technique in combination with a new gas analytical system that together show significant improvements with respect to current systems. Ice samples (3-15 g) are pulverized using a novel Centrifugal Ice Microtome (CIM) by shaving the ice in a cooled vacuum chamber (-27 °C) in which no friction occurs due to the use of magnetic bearings. Both, the shaving principle of the CIM and the use of magnetic bearings have not been applied so far in this field. Shaving the ice samples produces finer ice powder and releases a minimum of 90% of the trapped air compared to 50%-70% when needle crushing is employed. In addition, the friction-free motion with an optimized design to reduce contaminations of the inner surfaces of the device result in a reduced system offset of about 2.0 ppmv compared to 4.9ppmv. The gas analytical part shows a factor two higher precision than our corresponding part of the previous system and all processes except the loading and cleaning of the CIM now run automatically. Compared to our previous system the new system shows a 3 times better measurement reproducibility of about 1.1 ppmv (1σ) which is similar to the best reproducibility of other systems applied in this field. With this high reproducibility, replicate measurements are not required anymore for most prospective measurement campaigns resulting in a possible output of 12-20 measurements per day compared to a maximum of 6 with other systems.

  14. A centrifugal ice microtome for measurements of atmospheric CO2 on air trapped in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, B.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2013-02-01

    For atmospheric CO2 reconstructions using ice cores, the technique to release the trapped air from the ice samples is essential for the precision and accuracy of the measurements. We present here a new dry extraction technique in combination with a new gas analytical system that together show significant improvements with respect to current systems. Ice samples (3-15 g) are pulverised using a novel centrifugal ice microtome (CIM) by shaving the ice in a cooled vacuum chamber (-27 °C) in which no friction occurs due to the use of magnetic bearings. Both, the shaving principle of the CIM and the use of magnetic bearings have not been applied so far in this field. Shaving the ice samples produces finer ice powder and releases a minimum of 90% of the trapped air compared to 50%-70% when needle crushing is employed. In addition, the friction-free motion with an optimized design to reduce contaminations of the inner surfaces of the device result in a reduced system offset of about 2.0 ppmv compared to 4.9 ppmv. The gas analytical part shows a higher precision than the corresponding part of our previous system by a factor of two, and all processes except the loading and cleaning of the CIM now run automatically. Compared to our previous system, the complete system shows a 3 times better measurement reproducibility of about 1.1 ppmv (1 σ) which is similar to the best reproducibility of other systems applied in this field. With this high reproducibility, no replicate measurements are required anymore for most future measurement campaigns resulting in a possible output of 12-20 measurements per day compared to a maximum of 6 with other systems.

  15. Measurement of sub-parts-per-billion levels of carbonyl compounds in marine air by a simple cartridge trapping procedure followed by liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xianliang, Zhou; Mopper, K. )

    1990-10-01

    Carbonyl compounds in clean marine air were trapped onto 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine- (DNPH-) coated cartridges, and their hydrazone derivatives were separated by HPLC and detected by UV absorbance. More than 20 carbonyl compounds were isolated from marine air with >92% collection efficiency. The technique employs a highly effective reagent purification procedure, which results in much lower blanks compared to previously reported trapping techniques for carbonyl compounds. Blanks were routinely <0.07 ppb for formaldehyde and acetone and <0.02 ppb for the others. Humidity and reactive gases have no detectable effect on collection efficiencies. Carbonyl-DNPH derivatives eluted from the cartridges are stable in acetonitrile for at least 2 weeks, which facilitates field studies. Several previously undetected unknown carbonyl compounds were found in marine air by this technique. Typical results for open ocean and coastal marine air are shown.

  16. Ambient formic acid in southern California air: A comparison of two methods, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and alkaline trap-liquid chromatography with UV detection

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. ); Tuazon, E.C. ); Fujita, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Formic acid is an ubiquitous component of urban smog. Sources of formic acid in urban air include direct emissions from vehicles and in situ reaction of ozone with olefins. Ambient levels of formic acid in southern California air were first measured some 15 years ago by Hanst et al. using long-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All subsequent studies of formic acid in the Los Angeles area have involved the use of two methods, either FTIR or collection on alkaline traps followed by gas chromatography, ion chromatography, or liquid chromatography analysis with UV detection, ATLC-UV. The Carbon Species Methods Comparison Study (CSMCS), a multilaboratory air quality study carried out in August 1986 at a southern California smog receptor site, provided an opportunity for direct field comparison of the FTIR and alkaline trap methods. The results of the comparison are presented in this brief report.

  17. Approach of UV nanoimprint lithography using template with gas-permeable and gaseous adsorption for reduction of air-trapping issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Satoshi; Sugino, Naoto; Kameda, Takao; Nakajima, Shinya; Hanabata, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we studied a novel approach, UV nanoimprint lithography using glucose-based template with gaspermeable and gaseous adsorption for reduction of air-trapping issue. The air-trapping issue in UV nanoimprint lithography resist is a cause of pattern failure in resist or UV curable materials. The results of 180 nm dense line patterning of UV curable patterning materials containing acetone in UV nanoimprint lithography using glucose-based template with gas-permeable and gaseous adsorption were effected to reduce the pattern failure as compared with that of the poly(dimethylsiloxane) without gas-permeable and gaseous adsorption as the reference. The proposed UV nanoimprint lithography using glucose-based template with gas-permeable and gaseous adsorption is one of the most promising processes ready to be investigated for mass-production of photomask applications.

  18. Quantitative comparison of a flared and a standard heated metal capillary inlet with a voltage-assisted air amplifier on an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Muddiman, David C

    2007-01-01

    The performance characteristics (i.e., ion abundance and electrospray ion current) of a flared and blunt-ended heated metal capillary were evaluated with a voltage-assisted air amplifier on a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ-MS). The results demonstrated that a standard capillary afforded higher ion abundance than a flared capillary, thus further work is necessary to investigate conditions for which significant benefits with the flared capillary will be observed. The compatibility of a voltage-assisted air amplifier is explored for both types of capillaries and in all cases resulted in improved ion abundance and spray current.

  19. NASA Pocket Statistics: 1997 Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    POCKET STATISTICS is published by the NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA). Included in each edition is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, Aeronautics and Space Transportation and NASA Procurement, Financial and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. All Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  20. Accurate age scale of the Dome Fuji ice core, Antarctica from O2/N2 ratio of trapped air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.; Suzuki, K.; Parrenin, F.

    2012-04-01

    Chronology of the first Dome Fuji deep ice core (core length: 2,500 m, ice thickness: 3,035 m) for the age range from 80 kyr to 340 kyr ago was established by orbital tuning of measured O2/N2 ratios in trapped air to local summer insolation, with precision better than about 2,000 years (Kawamura et al., 2007). The O2/N2 ratios found in polar ice cores are slightly lower than the atmospheric ratio because of size-dependent molecular fractionation during bubble close-off. The magnitude of this gas fractionation is believed to be governed by the magnitude of snow metamorphism when the layer was originally at the surface, which in turn is controlled by local summer insolation (Fujita et al., 2009). A strong advantage of the O2/N2 chronology is that there is no need to assume a lag between climatic records in the ice core and orbital forcings, becacuse O2/N2 ratios record local insolation through physical processes. Accuracy of the chronology was validated by comparing the O2/N2 chronology with U-Th radiometric chronology of speleothem records (Cheng et al., 2009) for the ends of Terminations II, III and IV, as well as several large climatic events, for which both ice-core CH4 and speleothem δ18O (a proxy for precipitation) show abrupt shifts as seen in the last glacial period. All ages from O2/N2 and U-Th chronology agreed with each other within ~2,000 yr. The O2/N2 chronology permits comparisons between Antarctic climate, greenhouse gases, astronomically calculated orbital parameters, and radiometrically-dated sea level and monsoon records. Here, we completed the measurements of O2/N2 ratios of the second Dome Fuji ice core, which reached bedrock, for the range from 2,400 to 3,028 m (320 - 700 kyr ago) at approximately 2,000-year time resolution. We made significant improvements in ice core storage practices and mass spectrometry. In particular, the ice core samples were stored at about -50 ° C until the air extraction, except during short periods of transportation

  1. Liquid trap seals thermocouple leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1966-01-01

    Liquid trap seals thermocouple leads coming out of a brazing retort that operates with a controlled atmosphere so that air cannot enter the retort and hydrogen cannot escape. The trap is fastened to a duct welded to the retort. Thermocouple leads are led out through the duct and trap, with the fluid forming a gastight seal between the atmosphere and the retort.

  2. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-06

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  3. Capillary pressure-saturation relations in quartz and carbonate sands: Limitations for correlating capillary and wettability influences on air, oil, and supercritical CO2 trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shibo; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Dong, Wenming; Kim, Yongman

    2016-08-01

    Capillary pressure (Pc)-saturation (Sw) relations are essential for predicting equilibrium and flow of immiscible fluid pairs in soils and deeper geologic formations. In systems that are difficult to measure, behavior is often estimated based on capillary scaling of easily measured Pc-Sw relations (e.g., air-water, and oil-water), yet the reliability of such approximations needs to be examined. In this study, 17 sets of brine drainage and imbibition curves were measured with air-brine, decane-brine, and supercritical (sc) CO2-brine in homogeneous quartz and carbonate sands, using porous plate systems under ambient (0.1 MPa, 23°C) and reservoir (12.0 MPa, 45°C) conditions. Comparisons between these measurements showed significant differences in residual nonwetting phase saturation, Snw_r. Through applying capillary scaling, changes in interfacial properties were indicated, particularly wettability. With respect to the residual trapping of the nonwetting phases, Snw_r, CO2 > Snw_r, decane > Snw_r, air. Decane-brine and scCO2-brine Pc-Sw curves deviated significantly from predictions assuming hydrophilic interactions. Moreover, neither the scaled capillary behavior nor Snw,r for scCO2-brine were well represented by decane-brine, apparently because of differences in wettability and viscosities, indicating limitations for using decane (and other organic liquids) as a surrogate fluid in studies intended to apply to geological carbon sequestration. Thus, challenges remain in applying scaling for predicting capillary trapping and multiphase displacement processes across such diverse fields as vadose zone hydrology, enhanced oil recovery, and geologic carbon sequestration.

  4. Simultaneous sampling and analysis of indoor air infested with Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) by solid phase microextraction, thin film microextraction and needle trap device.

    PubMed

    Eom, In-Yong; Risticevic, Sanja; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-02-24

    Air in a room infested by Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) was sampled simultaneously by three different sampling devices including solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coatings, thin film microextraction (TFME) devices, and needle trap devices (NTDs) and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main focus of this study was to fully characterize indoor air by identifying compounds extracted by three different microextraction formats and, therefore, perform both the device comparison and more complete characterization of C. lectularius pheromone. The NTD technique was capable of extracting both (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal, which were previously identified as alarm pheromones of bedbugs, and superior NTD recoveries for these two components allowed reliable identification based on mass spectral library searching and linear temperature programmed retention index (LTPRI) technique. While the use of DVB/CAR/PDMS SPME fiber coatings provided complementary sample fingerprinting and profiling results, TFME sampling devices provided discriminative extraction coverage toward highly volatile analytes. In addition to two alarm pheromones, relative abundances of all other analytes were recorded for all three devices and aligned across all examined samples, namely, highly infested area, less infested area, and control samples which were characterized by different bedbug populations. The results presented in the current study illustrate comprehensive characterization of infested indoor air samples through the use of three different non-invasive SPME formats and identification of novel components comprising C. lectularius pheromone, therefore, promising future alternatives for use of potential synthetic pheromones for detection of infestations.

  5. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  6. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOEpatents

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  7. A novel needle trap device with single wall carbon nanotubes sol-gel sorbent packed for sampling and analysis of volatile organohalogen compounds in air.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Abdolrahman; Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Shahna, Farshid Ghorbani; Soltanian, Ali Reza

    2012-11-15

    This paper describes a new approach that combines needle trap devices (NTDs) with a newly synthesized silanated nano material as sorbent for sampling and analysis of HVOCs in air. The sol-gel technique was used for preparation of the single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/silica composite as sorbent, packed inside a 21-gauge NTD. Application of this method as an exhaustive sampler device was investigated under different laboratory conditions in this study. Predetermined concentrations of each analyte were prepared in a home-made standard chamber, and the effects of experimental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, sampling air flow rate, breakthrough volume and storage time on NTD, and the sorbent performance were investigated. The proposed NTD was used in two different modes and two different injection methods, and an NTD with a side hole, a narrow neck glass liner and syringe pump assisted injection of carrier gas were applied. The NTD packed with SWCNTs/silica composite was compared to the NTD packed with PDMS and also SPME with CAR/PDMS. For four compounds, LOD was 0.001-0.01 ng mL(-1), LOQ was 0.007-0.03 ng mL(-1), and the relative standard division for repeatability of method was 2.5-6.7%. The results show that the incorporation of NTD and SWCNTs/silica composite is a reliable and effective approach for the sampling and analysis of HVOCs in air. Coupling this system to GC-MS make it more sensitive and powerful technique.

  8. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  9. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  10. Relationship between lung function and quantitative computed tomographic parameters of airway remodeling, air trapping, and emphysema in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Ruth A.; Barker, Bethan L.; Newby, Chris; Pakkal, Mini; Baldi, Simonetta; Kajekar, Radhika; Kay, Richard; Laurencin, Marie; Marshall, Richard P.; Sousa, Ana R.; Parmar, Harsukh; Siddiqui, Salman; Gupta, Sumit; Brightling, Chris E.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of studies comparing asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) based on thoracic quantitative computed tomographic (QCT) parameters. Objectives We sought to compare QCT parameters of airway remodeling, air trapping, and emphysema between asthmatic patients and patients with COPD and explore their relationship with airflow limitation. Methods Asthmatic patients (n = 171), patients with COPD (n = 81), and healthy subjects (n = 49) recruited from a single center underwent QCT and clinical characterization. Results Proximal airway percentage wall area (%WA) was significantly increased in asthmatic patients (62.5% [SD, 2.2]) and patients with COPD (62.7% [SD, 2.3]) compared with that in healthy control subjects (60.3% [SD, 2.2], P < .001). Air trapping measured based on mean lung density expiratory/inspiratory ratio was significantly increased in patients with COPD (mean, 0.922 [SD, 0.037]) and asthmatic patients (mean, 0.852 [SD, 0.061]) compared with that in healthy subjects (mean, 0.816 [SD, 0.066], P < .001). Emphysema assessed based on lung density measured by using Hounsfield units below which 15% of the voxels lie (Perc15) was a feature of COPD only (patients with COPD: mean, −964 [SD, 19.62] vs asthmatic patients: mean, −937 [SD, 22.7] and healthy subjects: mean, −937 [SD, 17.1], P < .001). Multiple regression analyses showed that the strongest predictor of lung function impairment in asthmatic patients was %WA, whereas in the COPD and asthma subgrouped with postbronchodilator FEV1 percent predicted value of less than 80%, it was air trapping. Factor analysis of QCT parameters in asthmatic patients and patients with COPD combined determined 3 components, with %WA, air trapping, and Perc15 values being the highest loading factors. Cluster analysis identified 3 clusters with mild, moderate, or severe lung function impairment with corresponding decreased lung density (Perc15 values) and increased air

  11. Evaluation of the turbine pocket spirometer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, K A; Houston, K; Smith, A P

    1987-01-01

    A compact electronic spirometer, the turbine pocket spirometer, which measures the FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in a single expiration, was compared with the Vitalograph and the Wright peak flow meter in 99 subjects (FEV1 range 0.40-5.50 litres; FVC 0.58-6.48 l; PEF 40-650 l min-1). The mean differences between the machines were small--0.05 l for FEV1, 0.05 l for FVC, and 11.6 l min-1 for PEF, with the limits of agreement at +/- 0.25 l, +/- 0.48 l, and +/- 52.2 l min-1 respectively. The wide limits of agreement for the PEF comparison were probably because of the difference in the technique of blowing: a fast, long blow was used for the pocket spirometer and a short, sharp one for the Wright peak flow meter. The FEV1 and FVC showed a proportional bias of around 4-5% in favour of the Vitalograph. The repeatability coefficient for the pocket spirometer FEV1 was 0.18 l, for FVC 0.22 l, and for PEF 31 l min-1. These compared well with the repeatability coefficients of the Vitalograph and the Wright peak flow meter, which gave values of 0.18 l, 0.28 l, and 27 l min-1 respectively. At flow rates of over 600 l min-1 the resistance of the pocket spirometer marginally exceeded the American Thoracic Society recommendations. The machine is easy to operate and portable, and less expensive than the Vitalograph and Wright peak flow meter combined. It can be recommended for general use. Images PMID:3686460

  12. The Apollo 17 pocket mouse experiment (Biocore)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Look, B. C.; Benton, E. V.; Simmonds, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of the Biocore experiment which attempted to assess the degree to which exposure to cosmic ray particle radiation might present a risk to astronauts. Pocket mice, with plastic dosimeters implanted beneath the scalp were flown in a sealed canister. The objective was to determine whether microscopically visible lesions attributable to particle radiation, could be found in brain, eye, and other tissues in these animals. The need for further study is demonstrated.

  13. Surface-Based Protein Binding Pocket Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Protein similarity comparisons may be made on a local or global basis and may consider sequence information or differing levels of structural information. We present a local 3D method that compares protein binding site surfaces in full atomic detail. The approach is based on the morphological similarity method which has been widely applied for global comparison of small molecules. We apply the method to all-by-all comparisons two sets of human protein kinases, a very diverse set of ATP-bound proteins from multiple species, and three heterogeneous benchmark protein binding site data sets. Cases of disagreement between sequence-based similarity and binding site similarity yield informative examples. Where sequence similarity is very low, high pocket similarity can reliably identify important binding motifs. Where sequence similarity is very high, significant differences in pocket similarity are related to ligand binding specificity and similarity. Local protein binding pocket similarity provides qualitatively complementary information to other approaches, and it can yield quantitative information in support of functional annotation. PMID:21769944

  14. Pocket radiation dosimeter--dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Frank W.

    1984-01-01

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  15. Pocket radiation dosimeter: dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, F.W.

    1982-03-17

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  16. Root Locus Algorithms for Programmable Pocket Calculators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wechsler, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Two algorithms are described which allow the plotting of individual points on a root locus diagram with or without time delay. The development was performed during the design of a continuous phase shifter used in the Baseband Antenna Combiner for the Deep Space Network (DSN). The algorithms, which are expected to be useful in similar DSN efforts, are simple enough to be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator. The coordinates of the open-loop zeros and poles, the gain constant K, and the time delay T are the data inputs.

  17. Trapped antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  18. Trapped antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  19. Modulated Degradation of Transient Electronic Devices through Multilayer Silk Fibroin Pockets.

    PubMed

    Brenckle, Mark A; Cheng, Huanyu; Hwang, Sukwon; Tao, Hu; Paquette, Mark; Kaplan, David L; Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2015-09-16

    The recent introduction of transient, bioresorbable electronics into the field of electronic device design offers promise for the areas of medical implants and environmental monitors, where programmed loss of function and environmental resorption are advantageous characteristics. Materials challenges remain, however, in protecting the labile device components from degradation at faster than desirable rates. Here we introduce an indirect passivation strategy for transient electronic devices that consists of encapsulation in multiple air pockets fabricated from silk fibroin. This approach is investigated through the properties of silk as a diffusional barrier to water penetration, coupled with the degradation of magnesium-based devices in humid air. Finally, silk pockets are demonstrated to be useful for controlled modulation of device lifetime. This approach may provide additional future opportunities for silk utility due to the low immunogenicity of the material and its ability to stabilize labile biotherapeutic dopants.

  20. Modifications of traps to reduce bycatch of freshwater turtles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bury, R. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Mortality of freshwater turtles varies among types and deployments of traps. There are few or no losses in hoop or fyke traps set where turtles may reach air, including placement in shallows, addition of floats on traps, and tying traps securely to a stake or to shore. Turtle mortality occurs when traps are set deep, traps are checked at intervals >1 day, and when turtles are captured as bycatch. Devices are available that exclude turtles from traps set for crab or game fish harvest. Slotted gates in front of the trap mouth reduce turtle entry, but small individuals still may be trapped. Incidental take of turtles is preventable by integrating several designs into aquatic traps, such as adding floats to the top of traps so turtles may reach air or an extension tube (chimney, ramp) that creates an escape route.

  1. Trapping and manipulation of individual nanoparticles in a planar Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alda, I.; Berthelot, J.; Rica, R. A.; Quidant, R.

    2016-10-01

    Visualisation and manipulation of nanoscale matter is one of the main and current challenges in nanosciences. To this aim, different techniques have been recently developed to non-invasively trap and manipulate nano-specimens, like nanoparticles or molecules. However, operating in air or vacuum still remains very challenging since most approaches are limited to a liquid environment. In this letter, we design and characterise a planar Paul trap optimised to trap and manipulate individual charged nanoparticles. This configuration offers competitive capabilities to manipulate nano-specimens in air or vacuum, including in-plane integration, high trap confinement along with dynamical trap reconfiguration, pointing towards applications in the field of levitated optomechanics.

  2. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  3. Online volatile organic compound measurements using a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry instrument during New England Air Quality Study--Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2004: performance, intercomparison, and compound identification.

    PubMed

    Warneke, Carsten; Kato, Shuji; De Gouw, Joost A; Goldan, Paul D; Kuster, William C; Shao, Min; Lovejoy, Edward R; Fall, Ray; Fehsenfeld, Fred C

    2005-07-15

    We have used a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS) instrument for online trace gas analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the 2004 New England Air Quality Study-Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation study. The PIT-MS instrument uses proton-transfer reactions with H3O+ ions to ionize VOCs, similarto a PTR-MS (proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry) instrument but uses an ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the product ions. The advantages of an ion trap are the improved identification of VOCs and a near 100% duty cycle. During the experiment, the PIT-MS instrument had a detection limit between 0.05 and 0.3 pbbv (S/N = 3 (signal-to-noise ratio)) for 2-min integration time for most tested VOCs. PIT-MS was used for ambient air measurements onboard a research ship and agreed well with a gas chromatography mass spectrometer). The comparison included oxygenated VOCs, aromatic compounds, and others such as isoprene, monoterpenes, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfide. Automated collision-induced dissociation measurements were used to determine the contributions of acetone and propanal to the measured signal at 59 amu; both species are detected at this mass and are thus indistinguishable in conventional PTR-MS.

  4. Dewetting-Controlled Binding of Ligands to Hydrophobic Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Setny, P.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, L.-T.; Li, B.; McCammon, J. A.; Dzubiella, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a combined atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and implicit solvent analysis of a generic hydrophobic pocket-ligand (host-guest) system. The approaching ligand induces complex wetting-dewetting transitions in the weakly solvated pocket. The transitions lead to bimodal solvent fluctuations which govern magnitude and range of the pocket-ligand attraction. A recently developed implicit water model, based on the minimization of a geometric functional, captures the sensitive aqueous interface response to the concave-convex pocket-ligand configuration semiquantitatively. PMID:19905832

  5. Detection of multiscale pockets on protein surfaces using mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Detection of pockets on protein surfaces is an important step toward finding the binding sites of small molecules. In a previous study, we defined a pocket as a space into which a small spherical probe can enter, but a large probe cannot. The radius of the large probes corresponds to the shallowness of pockets. We showed that each type of binding molecule has a characteristic shallowness distribution. In this study, we introduced fundamental changes to our previous algorithm by using a 3D grid representation of proteins and probes, and the theory of mathematical morphology. We invented an efficient algorithm for calculating deep and shallow pockets (multiscale pockets) simultaneously, using several different sizes of spherical probes (multiscale probes). We implemented our algorithm as a new program, ghecom (grid-based HECOMi finder). The statistics of calculated pockets for the structural dataset showed that our program had a higher performance of detecting binding pockets, than four other popular pocket-finding programs proposed previously. The ghecom also calculates the shallowness of binding ligands, R(inaccess) (minimum radius of inaccessible spherical probes) that can be obtained from the multiscale molecular volume. We showed that each part of the binding molecule had a bias toward a specific range of shallowness. These findings will be useful for predicting the types of molecules that will be most likely to bind putative binding pockets, as well as the configurations of binding molecules. The program ghecom is available through the Web server (http://biunit.naist.jp/ghecom).

  6. The Potential for Pocket Parks to Increase Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.; Marsh, Terry; Williamson, Stephanie; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Golinelli, Daniella; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the use of new pocket parks in low-income neighborhoods. Setting Los Angeles Subjects Parks users and residents living within ½ mile of 3 pocket parks and 15 neighborhood parks Intervention The creation of pocket parks Design Quasi-experimental post-only comparison Measures We used the System of Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to measure park use and park-based physical activity and surveyed park users and residents about their park use. Analysis We surveyed 392 and 432 household members within one-half mile of the 3 pocket parks before and after park construction, respectively, as well as 71 pocket park users and compared them to 992 neighborhood park users and 342 residents living within ½ mile of other neighborhood parks. We compared pocket park use to playground area use in the larger neighborhood parks. We used descriptive statistics and Generalized Estimating Equations for the analysis. Results Overall, pocket park use compared favorably in promoting moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with that of existing playground space in nearby parks and they were cost-effective at $0.73/MET hour gained. Pocket park visitors walked an average of 0.25 miles to get there. Conclusions Pocket parks, when perceived as attractive and safe destinations, may increase physical activity by encouraging families with children to walk there. Additional strategies and programs may be needed to encourage more residents to use the parks. PMID:24380461

  7. 30 CFR 56.19103 - Dumping facilities and loading pockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dumping facilities and loading pockets. 56.19103 Section 56.19103 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Personnel Hoisting Shafts § 56.19103 Dumping facilities and loading pockets. Dumping facilities and...

  8. 30 CFR 57.19103 - Dumping facilities and loading pockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dumping facilities and loading pockets. 57.19103 Section 57.19103 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... MINES Personnel Hoisting Shafts § 57.19103 Dumping facilities and loading pockets. Dumping...

  9. Results of ear examination. [in Apollo 17 BIOCORE pocket mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Leon, H. A.; Barrows, W. F.; Suri, K.; Kraft, L. M.; Turnbill, C. E.; Webster, D. B.; Ashley, W. W.; Look, B. C.; Simmonds, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    In the five pocket mice flown on Apollo XVII, no evidence was found that the inner ear had been damaged, though poor fixation precluded detailed study. On the other hand, the middle ear cavity was involved in all the mice, hemorrhage having occurred in response to excursions in pressure within the canister that housed the mice during their flight. The same occurred in flight control mice which had been subjected to pressure excursions of much the same magnitude. A greater degree of exudation into air cells and greater leukotaxis were noted in the flight animals than in the control animals. There was no increase in leukocyte population along the paths of the 23 cosmic-ray particles registered in the subscalp dosimeters that traversed the middle ear cavities of the flight mice. The increased exudation and the greater response by leukocytes in the flight mice may have been causally related to the lesions found in their olfactory mucosa but there were no data in support of this possibility.

  10. Characteristics of cellular composition of periodontal pockets

    PubMed Central

    Hasiuk, Petro; Hasiuk, Nataliya; Kindiy, Dmytro; Ivanchyshyn, Victoriya; Kalashnikov, Dmytro; Zubchenko, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The development of inflammatory periodontal disease in young people is an urgent problem of today's periodontology, and requires a development of new methods that would give an opportunity not only to diagnose but also for prognosis of periodontitis course in a given patients contingent. Results Cellular structure of periodontal pockets is presented by hematogenous and epithelial cells. Our results are confirmed by previous studies, and show that the penetration of periodontal pathogens leads to formation in periodontal tissue of a highly active complex compounds—cytokines that are able to modify the activity of neutrophils and reduce their specific antibacterial properties. Cytokines not only adversely affect the periodontal tissues, but also cause further activation of cells that synthesized them, and inhibit tissue repair and process of resynthesis of connective tissue by fibroblasts. Conclusion Neutrophilic granulocytes present in each of the types of smear types, but their functional status and quantitative composition is different. The results of our cytological study confirmed the results of immunohistochemical studies, and show that in generalized periodontitis, an inflammatory cellular elements with disorganized epithelial cells and connective tissue of the gums and periodontium, and bacteria form specific types of infiltration in periodontal tissues. PMID:28180007

  11. Solar trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.S.

    1988-02-09

    A solar trap for collecting solar energy at a concentrated level is described comprising: (a) a compound light funnel including a pair of light reflecting substantially planar members arranged into a trough having a substantially V-shaped cross section; (b) a two dimensional Fresnel lens cover covering the opening of the compound light funnel, the opening being the open diverging end of the substantially V-shaped cross section of the compound light funnel; (c) at least one conduit for carrying a heat transfer fluid disposed substantially adjacent and substantially parallel to the apex line of the compound light funnel.

  12. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  13. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  14. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes. PMID:27004988

  15. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-03-23

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes.

  16. The Role of the Acid Pocket in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David R; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Robertson, Elaine V; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2016-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the commonest chronic conditions in the western world and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The discovery of the acid pocket explained the paradox of acid reflux occurring more frequently in the postprandial period despite intragastric acidity being low due to the buffering effect of the meal. The acid pocket was first described in 2001 when it was detected as an area of low pH immediately distal to the cardia using dual pH electrode pull-through studies 15 minutes after a meal. It was hypothesized that there was a local pocket of acid close to the gastroesophageal junction that escapes the buffering effect of the meal, and that this is the source of postprandial acidic reflux. The presence of the acid pocket has been confirmed in other studies using different techniques including high-resolution pHmetry, Bravo capsule, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphy. This review aims to describe what we know about the acid pocket including its length, volume, fluid constituents, and its relationship to the lower esophageal sphincter and squamocolumnar junction. We will discuss the possible mechanisms that lead to the formation of the acid pocket and examine what differences exist in patients who suffer from acid reflux. Treatments for reflux disease that affect the acid pocket will also be discussed.

  17. APoc: large-scale identification of similar protein pockets

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Most proteins interact with small-molecule ligands such as metabolites or drug compounds. Over the past several decades, many of these interactions have been captured in high-resolution atomic structures. From a geometric point of view, most interaction sites for grasping these small-molecule ligands, as revealed in these structures, form concave shapes, or ‘pockets’, on the protein’s surface. An efficient method for comparing these pockets could greatly assist the classification of ligand-binding sites, prediction of protein molecular function and design of novel drug compounds. Results: We introduce a computational method, APoc (Alignment of Pockets), for the large-scale, sequence order-independent, structural comparison of protein pockets. A scoring function, the Pocket Similarity Score (PS-score), is derived to measure the level of similarity between pockets. Statistical models are used to estimate the significance of the PS-score based on millions of comparisons of randomly related pockets. APoc is a general robust method that may be applied to pockets identified by various approaches, such as ligand-binding sites as observed in experimental complex structures, or predicted pockets identified by a pocket-detection method. Finally, we curate large benchmark datasets to evaluate the performance of APoc and present interesting examples to demonstrate the usefulness of the method. We also demonstrate that APoc has better performance than the geometric hashing-based method SiteEngine. Availability and implementation: The APoc software package including the source code is freely available at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/APoc. Contact: skolnick@gatech.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23335017

  18. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED STOPPING BLOCK AT SHOREWARD END OF TRACK GIRDER - Seddon Island Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Garrison Channel from Tampa to Seddon Island, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  19. 15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, LATCH CRADLE, SPLIT COLLAR, ETC. - Niantic River Swing Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  20. Behind the Scenes: Astronauts Pockets Deep in Mystery

    NASA Video Gallery

    Host Mike Massimino returns to the pre-launch suit up room at the Kennedy Space Center to reexamine the question: what's inside all those pockets of the astronauts' big orange suits? Find out on "N...

  1. Trapping ions in a segmented ring trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakov, B. P.; Sterk, J. D.; Benito, F.; Haltli, R.; Tigges, C. P.; Stick, D.; Blain, M. G.; Moehring, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate robust trapping in an ion trap which has a ring shaped RF node. Ions are back-side loaded through a small 10 μm diameter loading hole and we have demonstrated thousands of complete circuits around the trap. Each circuit passes through 44 trapping zones; the trap has 89 independent DC control electrodes. Measurements of the tangential secular frequency indicate a weak dependence on the RF and the loading hole. The ion trap is fabricated using four metal layers, allowing for the inner islanded electrodes to be electrically routed underneath the trap with negligible effects on the trapped ions. [4pt] This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Micromachined Dust Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromachined traps devised to capture dust particles for analysis without contaminating them. Based on micromachined structures retaining particles, rather than adhesives or greases interfering with scanning-electron-microscope analysis or x-ray imaging. Unlike maze traps and traps enmeshing particles in steel wool or similar materials, micromachined traps do not obscure trapped particles. Internal geometries of traps range from simple cones to U-shapes, all formed by etching silicon.

  3. Free enthalpies of replacing water molecules in protein binding pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riniker, Sereina; Barandun, Luzi J.; Diederich, François; Krämer, Oliver; Steffen, Andreas; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2012-12-01

    Water molecules in the binding pocket of a protein and their role in ligand binding have increasingly raised interest in recent years. Displacement of such water molecules by ligand atoms can be either favourable or unfavourable for ligand binding depending on the change in free enthalpy. In this study, we investigate the displacement of water molecules by an apolar probe in the binding pocket of two proteins, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, using the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to obtain free enthalpy differences. In both cases, a ligand core is placed inside the respective pocket and the remaining water molecules are converted to apolar probes, both individually and in pairs. The free enthalpy difference between a water molecule and a CH3 group at the same location in the pocket in comparison to their presence in bulk solution calculated from EDS molecular dynamics simulations corresponds to the binding free enthalpy of CH3 at this location. From the free enthalpy difference and the enthalpy difference, the entropic contribution of the displacement can be obtained too. The overlay of the resulting occupancy volumes of the water molecules with crystal structures of analogous ligands shows qualitative correlation between experimentally measured inhibition constants and the calculated free enthalpy differences. Thus, such an EDS analysis of the water molecules in the binding pocket may give valuable insight for potency optimization in drug design.

  4. Free enthalpies of replacing water molecules in protein binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Riniker, Sereina; Barandun, Luzi J; Diederich, François; Krämer, Oliver; Steffen, Andreas; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-12-01

    Water molecules in the binding pocket of a protein and their role in ligand binding have increasingly raised interest in recent years. Displacement of such water molecules by ligand atoms can be either favourable or unfavourable for ligand binding depending on the change in free enthalpy. In this study, we investigate the displacement of water molecules by an apolar probe in the binding pocket of two proteins, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, using the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to obtain free enthalpy differences. In both cases, a ligand core is placed inside the respective pocket and the remaining water molecules are converted to apolar probes, both individually and in pairs. The free enthalpy difference between a water molecule and a CH(3) group at the same location in the pocket in comparison to their presence in bulk solution calculated from EDS molecular dynamics simulations corresponds to the binding free enthalpy of CH(3) at this location. From the free enthalpy difference and the enthalpy difference, the entropic contribution of the displacement can be obtained too. The overlay of the resulting occupancy volumes of the water molecules with crystal structures of analogous ligands shows qualitative correlation between experimentally measured inhibition constants and the calculated free enthalpy differences. Thus, such an EDS analysis of the water molecules in the binding pocket may give valuable insight for potency optimization in drug design.

  5. Chronological trends in trace metals recorded by a tree bark pocket in Yakushima Island, Japan.

    PubMed

    Bellis, David J; Satake, Kenichi; Kagawa, Akira

    2005-04-01

    Bark included within the trunk of a 200-year-old Japanese cedar tree harvested in Yakushima Island, Japan, a World Natural Heritage Site located 150 km south of mainland Japan and 800 km east of Shanghai, China, was analysed for trace metals by ICP-MS providing a chronology of atmospheric pollution. The concentration of V, As and Pb in decadal sections of the bark pocket increased 30 to 50 fold from 1900-09 to 1960-69, indicating increased atmospheric deposition of these metals. The trend coincided with the establishment and expansion of heavy industries in Kyushu, Japan, resulting in locally high levels of air pollution. V, As and Pb subsequently declined, reflecting lower industrial emissions following air pollution control legislation from the late 1960's and decline in heavy industries. Ni, Cu and Zn showed a relatively small, 7 to 10 fold increase over time. Lead isotope ratios in the bark pockets shifted from about 0.84 to 0.86 for 207Pb/206Pb and from 2.04 to 2.10 for 208Pb/206Pb, showing that the origin of atmospheric lead changed over time from coal to more diverse sources.

  6. The genetic basis of adaptive melanism in pocket mice.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Michael W; Hoekstra, Hopi E; D'Agostino, Susan L

    2003-04-29

    Identifying the genes underlying adaptation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Here, we describe the molecular changes underlying adaptive coat color variation in a natural population of rock pocket mice, Chaetodipus intermedius. Rock pocket mice are generally light-colored and live on light-colored rocks. However, populations of dark (melanic) mice are found on dark lava, and this concealing coloration provides protection from avian and mammalian predators. We conducted association studies by using markers in candidate pigmentation genes and discovered four mutations in the melanocortin-1-receptor gene, Mc1r, that seem to be responsible for adaptive melanism in one population of lava-dwelling pocket mice. Interestingly, another melanic population of these mice on a different lava flow shows no association with Mc1r mutations, indicating that adaptive dark color has evolved independently in this species through changes at different genes.

  7. Ethics pocket cards: an educational tool for busy clinicians.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Rebecca L; Levi, Benjamin H; Blackhall, George F; Green, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The adage "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" is widely used in healthcare settings and can be applied to the work of institutional clinical ethics committees. The model of clinical ethics consultation, however, is inherently reactive: a crisis or question emerges, and ethics experts are called to help. In an effort to employ a proactive component to the model of clinical ethics consultation (as well as to standardize our educational interventions), we developed ethics pocket cards. The purpose of this article is to: (1) describe the rationale for using ethics pocket cards, (2) provide examples of our cards, and (3) begin a dialogue about the potential uses of ethics pocket cards. In doing so, we hope to explore how such portable, economical devices can advance the goals of ethics consultation as well as the educational aims of ethics committees.

  8. Pocket-Sized Echocardiography Devices: One Stop Shop Service?

    PubMed

    Seraphim, Andreas; Paschou, Stavroula A; Grapsa, Julia; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of portable, pocket-sized echocardiography devices in various healthcare systems has raised new questions with regards to their realistic use in clinical practice. Several studies have already attempted to provide information regarding their safety and diagnostic potential, the training required to operate them, as well as their direct comparison with standard echocardiography machines. This manuscript is a review of the literature of the documents or position papers which employ the use of pocket or handheld devices. Following review of the literature, we suggest that these miniaturized devices can provide a valuable diagnostic tool that can complement and improve the diagnostic yield of clinical examination. When operated by appropriately trained professionals, they can provide a limited but very reliable echocardiographic assessment. Pocket-sized echocardiography is a part of physical examination and should not be considered a complete echocardiographic scan. Optimal training is required for the smooth operation of handheld echocardiography.

  9. Pocket-Sized Echocardiography Devices: One Stop Shop Service?

    PubMed Central

    Seraphim, Andreas; Paschou, Stavroula A; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of portable, pocket-sized echocardiography devices in various healthcare systems has raised new questions with regards to their realistic use in clinical practice. Several studies have already attempted to provide information regarding their safety and diagnostic potential, the training required to operate them, as well as their direct comparison with standard echocardiography machines. This manuscript is a review of the literature of the documents or position papers which employ the use of pocket or handheld devices. Following review of the literature, we suggest that these miniaturized devices can provide a valuable diagnostic tool that can complement and improve the diagnostic yield of clinical examination. When operated by appropriately trained professionals, they can provide a limited but very reliable echocardiographic assessment. Pocket-sized echocardiography is a part of physical examination and should not be considered a complete echocardiographic scan. Optimal training is required for the smooth operation of handheld echocardiography. PMID:27081437

  10. A needle trap device packed with a sol-gel derived, multi-walled carbon nanotubes/silica composite for sampling and analysis of volatile organohalogen compounds in air.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Abdolrahman; Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Shahna, Farshid Ghorbani; Soltanian, Ali Reza

    2013-06-27

    A needle trap device (NTD) packed with silica composite of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared based on sol-gel technique was utilized for sampling and analysis of volatile organohalogen compounds (HVOCs) in air. The performance of the NTD packed with MWCNTs/silica composite as sorbent was examined in a variety of sampling conditions and was compared with NTDs packed with PDMS as well as SPME with Carboxen/PDMS-coated fibers. The limit of detection of NTDs for the GC/MS detection system was 0.01-0.05 ng mL(-1) and the limit of quantitation was 0.04-0.18 ng mL(-1). The RSD were 1.1-7.8% for intra-NTD comparison intended for repeatability of technique. The NTD-MWCNTs/silica composite showed better analytical performances compared to the NTD-PDMS composite and had the same analytical performances when compared to the SPME-Carboxen/PDMS fibers. The results show that NTD-MWCNTs-GC/MS is a powerful technique for active sampling of occupational/environmental pollutants in air.

  11. NOTE: Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Raman, Natarajan V.; Enke, Charles A.

    2005-05-01

    Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag.

  12. Trapping polar molecules in an ac trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-12-15

    Polar molecules in high-field seeking states cannot be trapped in static traps as Maxwell's equations do not allow a maximum of the electric field in free space. It is possible to generate an electric field that has a saddle point by superposing an inhomogeneous electric field to an homogeneous electric field. In such a field, molecules are focused along one direction, while being defocused along the other. By reversing the direction of the inhomogeneous electric field the focusing and defocusing directions are reversed. When the fields are being switched back and forth at the appropriate rate, this leads to a net focusing force in all directions. We describe possible electrode geometries for creating the desired fields and discuss their merits. Trapping of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} ammonia molecules in a cylindrically symmetric ac trap is demonstrated. We present measurements of the spatial distribution of the trapped cloud as a function of the settings of the trap and compare these to both a simple model assuming a linear force and to full three-dimensional simulations of the experiment. With the optimal settings, molecules within a phase-space volume of 270 mm{sup 3} (m/s){sup 3} remain trapped. This corresponds to a trap depth of about 5 mK and a trap volume of about 20 mm{sup 3}.

  13. Evaluation of Cation Hydrolysis Schemes with a Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, Brian W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is the use of two models of pocket calculators. The Hewlett-Packard HP67 and the Texas Instruments TI59, to solve problems arising in connection with ionic equilibria in solution. A three-parameter regression program is described and listed as a specific example, the hydrolysis of hexavalent uranium, is provided. (BT)

  14. Portable Anthrax Testing with Lab-in-a-Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, Melissa; Koskelo, Markku; Edwards, Thayne; Kadner, Steve; Beckes-Talcot, Judy; Harper, Jason; Shawwa, Luay

    2014-10-24

    BaDx (Bacillus anthracis Diagnostics) is a lab-in-a-pocket device to sample, sense, and diagnose bacteria that cause anthrax. It accomplishes these tasks in environments with no power, refrigerated storage, or laboratory equipment. BaDx was designed to be used with minimal or no training, and to keep handlers safe.

  15. Portable Anthrax Testing with Lab-in-a-Pocket

    ScienceCinema

    Finley, Melissa; Koskelo, Markku; Edwards, Thayne; Kadner, Steve; Beckes-Talcot, Judy; Harper, Jason; Shawwa, Luay

    2016-07-12

    BaDx (Bacillus anthracis Diagnostics) is a lab-in-a-pocket device to sample, sense, and diagnose bacteria that cause anthrax. It accomplishes these tasks in environments with no power, refrigerated storage, or laboratory equipment. BaDx was designed to be used with minimal or no training, and to keep handlers safe.

  16. Simulation of Population Processes with a Programmable Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, N. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a set of simulation models for use in teaching population dynamics. These models are designed specifically for use with a programmable pocket calculator, and can be used to demonstrate growth of populations with discrete or overlapping generations and also to explore effects of density-dependent and -independent mortality. (Author/CS)

  17. Advanced Geometric Optics on a Programmable Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Allen

    1979-01-01

    Presents a ray-tracing procedure based on some ideas of Herzberger and the matrix approach to geometrical optics. This method, which can be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator, applies to any conic surface, including paraboloids, spheres, and planes. (Author/GA)

  18. Acoustic trapping in bubble-bounded micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, P.; McDougall, C.; Glynne-Jones, P.; MacDonald, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for controllably producing longitudinal acoustic trapping sites inside microfluidic channels. Air bubbles are injected into a micro-capillary to create bubble-bounded `micro-cavities'. A cavity mode is formed that shows controlled longitudinal acoustic trapping between the two air/water interfaces along with the levitation to the centre of the channel that one would expect from a lower order lateral mode. 7 μm and 10 μm microspheres are trapped at the discrete acoustic trapping sites in these micro-cavities.We show this for several lengths of micro-cavity.

  19. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  20. Ion trap simulation tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  1. AmeriFlux US-Cop Corral Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Cop Corral Pocket. Site Description - The Corral Pocket site is located in a semi-arid grassland in southeastern Utah, just east of Canyonlands National park. For the greater part of the year, 38-80% of the ground is essentially bare. Vegetation is primarily native perennial C3/C4 grasses with annual ground converge ranging from 8-35%. Leaving the remaining 0-15% coverage to interspersed annual grasses, the remaining 0-15% coverage is occupied by annual grasses. 6-8 weeks during the late fall or winter, Livestock grazing is responsible for the majority of aboveground vegetation loss and subsequent high variability of ground coverage.

  2. A futuristic vision of pocket ultrasound machines: watch this space

    PubMed Central

    Magotti, Robert; Benzie, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Australian medical ultrasound started in 1959 with the establishment of the Ultrasonics Institute. Since then the technology has advanced tremendously. We are now not only able to obtain clearer images on high specification ultrasound machines but also on pocket‐sized ultrasound machines that are compact, lightweight and affordable. Method: The following descriptive review will examine the indication for use of pocket ultrasound machines in different clinical settings as well as provide evidence of its image clarity and accuracy. Potentially eligible studies were sought primarily through searches of the electronic databases PubMed, Medline (1996–Present), Embase (1996–Present) and Cochrane Library. Conclusion: Pocket ultrasound machines, with appropriate ultrasound knowledge and training, can be incorporated successfully in patient management. The addition of point‐of‐care ultrasound has been shown to improve management recommendations and outcomes. PMID:28191219

  3. Gas pockets in a wastewater rising main: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pozos-Estrada, Oscar; Fuentes-Mariles, Oscar A; Pozos-Estrada, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of an existing wastewater rising main (WWRM) in which an extreme transient event produced by simultaneous power failure of the pumps caused the rupture of a 1.2 m (48 in) prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP), causing an important leakage of sewage. The event and the methodology followed in order to validate the diagnostics of the failure are described. The detail study included in situ observation of the system, experimental investigation in a setup, hydraulic analysis, as well as details of the structural strength of the WWRM. After the extensive investigation and several simulations of fluid transients for different scenarios and flow conditions, it was found that stationary small gas pockets accumulated at high points of the WWRM were identified as the principal contributory factor of the failure. This case study serves as clear warning of the consequences of operating a WWRM with gas pockets at its high points.

  4. GPCR crystal structures: Medicinal chemistry in the pocket.

    PubMed

    Shonberg, Jeremy; Kling, Ralf C; Gmeiner, Peter; Löber, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    Recent breakthroughs in GPCR structural biology have significantly increased our understanding of drug action at these therapeutically relevant receptors, and this will undoubtedly lead to the design of better therapeutics. In recent years, crystal structures of GPCRs from classes A, B, C and F have been solved, unveiling a precise snapshot of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, some receptors have been crystallized in different functional states in complex with antagonists, partial agonists, full agonists, biased agonists and allosteric modulators, providing further insight into the mechanisms of ligand-induced GPCR activation. It is now obvious that there is enormous diversity in the size, shape and position of the ligand binding pockets in GPCRs. In this review, we summarise the current state of solved GPCR structures, with a particular focus on ligand-receptor interactions in the binding pocket, and how this can contribute to the design of GPCR ligands with better affinity, subtype selectivity or efficacy.

  5. The use of a programmable pocket calculator in clinical dietetics.

    PubMed

    Schlaepfer, L V; Shmerling, D H

    1979-03-09

    The application of programmable pocket calculators to clinical dietetics is described. The development of programs for the HP-67 and 97 for the evaluation of nutritional intakes of patients with obesity, renal disease, etc. and for the calculation and interpretation of food intakes in nutritional surveys is given in detail. The calculators simplify the practical work, shorten the calculation time substantially and allow direct incorporation of newly published data into analysis.

  6. The Toxicity of Sterile Filtrate from Parodontal Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Graham, J. Wallace

    1937-01-01

    The local effect of the absorption of toxic material from pyorrhœa pockets on the hard and soft tissues around the teeth is well known. In this experiment an attempt was made to study the toxic effect on remote structures by injecting the sterile filtrate fresh from pyorrhœa pockets into various animals. The filtrate was obtained from patients with chronic pyorrhœa by removing the contents from parodontal pockets and passing them through a Seitz filter. The sterile filtrate obtained was then injected into cats, guinea-pigs, rabbits, and rats, in varying amounts. In the group of four cats, all showed fatty degeneration of the liver and two showed extreme fatty degeneration of the kidney tubules. Five guinea-pigs receiving one injection of ½ c.c. of filtrate showed no pathological change in the liver or kidney. One out of three guinea-pigs receiving two injections of filtrate showed fatty degeneration of the liver, while five out of six pigs receiving one injection of 1 c.c.,—i.e. double the quantity—showed definite fatty degeneration of the liver. One out of two rabbits showed similar changes and of six rats injected, all died in from five to seven days. The experiment suggests that substances are elaborated in parodontal pockets which are highly toxic and tend to injure the liver and kidney of animals in the process of their elimination. Such toxic material proved fatal in fifteen of the twenty-five animals injected. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:19991211

  7. Pocket-sized versus standard ultrasound machines in abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Tse, K H; Luk, W H; Lam, M C

    2014-06-01

    The pocket-sized ultrasound machine has emerged as an invaluable tool for quick assessment in emergency and general practice settings. It is suitable for instant and quick assessment in cardiac imaging. However, its applicability in the imaging of other body parts has yet to be established. In this pictorial review, we compared the performance of the pocketsized ultrasound machine against the standard ultrasound machine for its image quality in common abdominal pathology.

  8. Cracking the Hidden Job Market. Pocket Job Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Amy

    This book is the third in a series of six pocket-sized books written for career changers and laid-off workers. Each book is written at a 7th- to 10th-grade reading level and contains examples, hands-on self-discovery exercises, and step-by-step advice for a successful job search. This book identifies steps for finding the unadvertised jobs--80-95…

  9. Intraperiodontal pocket: An ideal route for local antimicrobial drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sreeja C.; Anoop, K. R.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal pockets act as a natural reservoir filled with gingival crevicular fluid for the controlled release delivery of antimicrobials directly. This article reflects the present status of nonsurgical controlled local intrapocket delivery of antimicrobials in the treatment of periodontitis. These sites have specialty in terms of anatomy, permeability, and their ability to retain a delivery system for a desired length of time. A number of antimicrobial products and the composition of the delivery systems, its use, clinical results, and their release are summarized. The goal in using an intrapocket device for the delivery of an antimicrobial agent is the achievement and maintenance of therapeutic drug concentration for the desired period of time. Novel controlled drug delivery system are capable of improving patient compliance as well as therapeutic efficacy with precise control of the rate by which a particular drug dosage is released from a delivery system without the need for frequent administration. These are considered superior drug delivery system because of low cost, greater stability, non-toxicity, biocompatibility, non-immunogenicity, and are biodegradable in nature. This review also focus on the importance and ideal features of periodontal pockets as a drug delivery platform for designing a suitable dosage form along with its potential advantage and limitations. The microbes in the periodontal pocket could destroy periodontal tissues, and a complete knowledge of these as well as an ideal treatment strategy could be helpful in treating this disease. PMID:22470888

  10. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  11. Trapping in TITANs Cooler Penning Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kootte, Brian; Lascar, Daniel; Paul, Stefan; Gwinner, Gerald; Dilling, Jens; Titan Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Penning trap mass spectrometry provides an excellent means of determining the masses of nuclei to high precision. Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) have been successfully used at TRIUMFs Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) to enhance the precision of mass measurements for short-lived species. The gain in precision can theoretically scale with the charge state of the ion, but recent measurements of beam properties have shown that the process of charge breeding ions to higher charge states increases the energy spread of the ion bunch sent to the Penning trap. This reduces the gain from using HCIs. In order to maximize the precision of mass measurements, we are currently performing offline commissioning of a Cooler PEnning Trap (CPET) with the purpose of sympathetically cooling HCI bunches to an energy of 1 eV/q using a plasma of electrons. This will require implementing a nested potential configuration to trap the ions and electrons in the same region so they can interact via coulomb scattering. Recent progress in testing the trapping of electrons and singly charged ions in CPET, leading towards the cooling of HCIs prior to mass measurements in TITANs will be discussed.

  12. Comparative kinematical analyses of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) snap traps.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Kampowski, Tim; Metzger, Amélie; Speck, Olga; Speck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Although the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) can be considered as one of the most extensively investigated carnivorous plants, knowledge is still scarce about diversity of the snap-trap motion, the functionality of snap traps under varying environmental conditions, and their opening motion. By conducting simple snap-trap closure experiments in air and under water, we present striking evidence that adult Dionaea snaps similarly fast in aerial and submersed states and, hence, is potentially able to gain nutrients from fast aquatic prey during seasonal inundation. We reveal three snapping modes of adult traps, all incorporating snap buckling, and show that millimeter-sized, much slower seedling traps do not yet incorporate such elastic instabilities. Moreover, opening kinematics of young and adult Dionaea snap traps reveal that reverse snap buckling is not performed, corroborating the assumption that growth takes place on certain trap lobe regions. Our findings are discussed in an evolutionary, biomechanical, functional-morphological and biomimetic context.

  13. Comparative kinematical analyses of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) snap traps

    PubMed Central

    Kampowski, Tim; Metzger, Amélie; Speck, Olga; Speck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) can be considered as one of the most extensively investigated carnivorous plants, knowledge is still scarce about diversity of the snap-trap motion, the functionality of snap traps under varying environmental conditions, and their opening motion. By conducting simple snap-trap closure experiments in air and under water, we present striking evidence that adult Dionaea snaps similarly fast in aerial and submersed states and, hence, is potentially able to gain nutrients from fast aquatic prey during seasonal inundation. We reveal three snapping modes of adult traps, all incorporating snap buckling, and show that millimeter-sized, much slower seedling traps do not yet incorporate such elastic instabilities. Moreover, opening kinematics of young and adult Dionaea snap traps reveal that reverse snap buckling is not performed, corroborating the assumption that growth takes place on certain trap lobe regions. Our findings are discussed in an evolutionary, biomechanical, functional–morphological and biomimetic context. PMID:27335756

  14. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  15. Ecological and evolutionary traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Runge, M.C.; Sherman, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Organisms often rely on environmental cues to make behavioral and life-history decisions. However, in environments that have been altered suddenly by humans, formerly reliable cues might no longer be associated with adaptive outcomes. In such cases, organisms can become 'trapped' by their evolutionary responses to the cues and experience reduced survival or reproduction. Ecological traps occur when organisms make poor habitat choices based on cues that correlated formerly with habitat quality. Ecological traps are part of a broader phenomenon, evolutionary traps, involving a dissociation between cues that organisms use to make any behavioral or life-history decision and outcomes normally associated with that decision. A trap can lead to extinction if a population falls below a critical size threshold before adaptation to the novel environment occurs. Conservation and management protocols must be designed in light of, rather than in spite of, the behavioral mechanisms and evolutionary history of populations and species to avoid 'trapping' them.

  16. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  17. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  18. Evaluating steam trap performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, N.Y.

    1985-08-08

    This paper presents a method for evaluating the performance level of steam traps by preparing an economic analysis of several types to determine the equivalent uniform annual cost. A series of tests on steam traps supplied by six manufacturers provided data for determining the relative efficiencies of each unit. The comparison was made using a program developed for the Texas Instruments T1-59 programmable calculator to evaluate overall steam trap economics.

  19. Assembly mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei BILBO1 at the flagellar pocket collar.

    PubMed

    Vidilaseris, Keni; Lesigang, Johannes; Morriswood, Brooke; Dong, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket is a bulb-like invagination of the plasma membrane that encloses the base of the single flagellum in trypanosomes. It is the site of all endo- and exocytic activity in the parasite and has thus been proposed to be a therapeutic target. At the neck of the flagellar pocket is an electron-dense cytoskeletal structure named the flagellar pocket collar. The protein BILBO1 was the first characterized and remains the only known component of the flagellar pocket collar, with essential functions in the biogenesis of both the flagellar pocket and flagellar pocket collar. We recently reported that the filamentous assembly of Trypanosoma brucei BILBO1 (TbBILBO1) is mediated by its central coiled coil domain and C-terminal leucine zipper. Here, we discuss how TbBILBO1 might assemble at the flagellar pocket collar in T. brucei.

  20. Steam Trap Users’ Guide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    traps do not work well in a system where the condensate can back against the operating mechanism of the trap and open it when there is no condensate flow ...a flow through the trap. h. Float and thermostatic traps are widely used in low pressure heating 0 systems . If they are properly installed below the... system or trap problem. * Blowdown strainer. SOUND CHECK HOT TRAPS: • Listen to trap operate. * Check for continuous flow : - low pitch condensate flow

  1. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    PubMed

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Regad, Leslie; Reynès, Christelle; Spérandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely, some key pocket

  2. Practical Pocket PC Application w/Biometric Security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Julian

    2004-01-01

    I work in the Flight Software Engineering Branch, where we provide design and development of embedded real-time software applications for flight and supporting ground systems to support the NASA Aeronautics and Space Programs. In addition, this branch evaluates, develops and implements new technologies for embedded real-time systems, and maintains a laboratory for applications of embedded technology. The majority of microchips that are used in modern society have been programmed using embedded technology. These small chips can be found in microwaves, calculators, home security systems, cell phones and more. My assignment this summer entails working with an iPAQ HP 5500 Pocket PC. This top-of-the-line hand-held device is one of the first mobile PC's to introduce biometric security capabilities. Biometric security, in this case a fingerprint authentication system, is on the edge of technology as far as securing information. The benefits of fingerprint authentication are enormous. The most significant of them are that it is extremely difficult to reproduce someone else's fingerprint, and it is equally difficult to lose or forget your own fingerprint as opposed to a password or pin number. One of my goals for this summer is to integrate this technology with another Pocket PC application. The second task for the summer is to develop a simple application that provides an Astronaut EVA (Extravehicular Activity) Log Book capability. The Astronaut EVA Log Book is what an astronaut would use to report the status of field missions, crew physical health, successes, future plans, etc. My goal is to develop a user interface into which these data fields can be entered and stored. The applications that I am developing are created using eMbedded Visual C++ 4.0 with the Pocket PC 2003 Software Development Kit provided by Microsoft.

  3. Pocket atlas of head and neck MRI anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This pocket atlas depicts the anatomy of the head and neck as seen in magnetic resonance (MR) images. The collection of 140 high-resolution images covers all major areas - neck, larynx, oropharynx, tongue, nasopharynx, skull base, sinuses, and temporal bone - displayed in sagittal, axial, and coronal MR image planes. The images show maximum fat/muscle contrast for better visualization of fascial planes. In certain areas of the anatomy, such as the neck and temporal bone, surface coils were used to achieve significant advantages in image quality over standard head or body coils.

  4. Fluorescence characterization of the hydrophobic pocket of cyclophilin B.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Carpentier, M; Lansiaux, C

    2008-01-01

    Human cyclophilin B is a monomeric protein that contains two tryptophan residues, Trp104 and 128. Trp128-residue belongs to the binding site of cyclosporin A and is the homologous of Trp 121 in CyPA, while Trp104 residue belongs to the hydrophobic pocket. In the present work, we studied the dynamics of Trp residue(s) of cyclophilin B and of the CyPB(w128A) mutant and of TNS-mutant complex. Our results showed that Trp-104 and TNS show restricted motions within their environments and that energy transfer between the two fluorophores is occurring.

  5. Optical trapping of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Jarrah; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Ghaffari, Saeedeh; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-15

    Optical trapping is a technique for immobilizing and manipulating small objects in a gentle way using light, and it has been widely applied in trapping and manipulating small biological particles. Ashkin and co-workers first demonstrated optical tweezers using a single focused beam. The single beam trap can be described accurately using the perturbative gradient force formulation in the case of small Rayleigh regime particles. In the perturbative regime, the optical power required for trapping a particle scales as the inverse fourth power of the particle size. High optical powers can damage dielectric particles and cause heating. For instance, trapped latex spheres of 109 nm in diameter were destroyed by a 15 mW beam in 25 sec, which has serious implications for biological matter. A self-induced back-action (SIBA) optical trapping was proposed to trap 50 nm polystyrene spheres in the non-perturbative regime. In a non-perturbative regime, even a small particle with little permittivity contrast to the background can influence significantly the ambient electromagnetic field and induce a large optical force. As a particle enters an illuminated aperture, light transmission increases dramatically because of dielectric loading. If the particle attempts to leave the aperture, decreased transmission causes a change in momentum outwards from the hole and, by Newton's Third Law, results in a force on the particle inwards into the hole, trapping the particle. The light transmission can be monitored; hence, the trap can become a sensor. The SIBA trapping technique can be further improved by using a double-nanohole structure. The double-nanohole structure has been shown to give a strong local field enhancement. Between the two sharp tips of the double-nanohole, a small particle can cause a large change in optical transmission, thereby inducing a large optical force. As a result, smaller nanoparticles can be trapped, such as 12 nm silicate spheres and 3.4 nm hydrodynamic radius

  6. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  7. Improved accuracy in periodontal pocket depth measurement using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether periodontal pocket could be satisfactorily visualized by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to suggest quantitative methods for measuring periodontal pocket depth. Methods We acquired OCT images of periodontal pockets in a porcine model and determined the actual axial resolution for measuring the exact periodontal pocket depth using a calibration method. Quantitative measurements of periodontal pockets were performed by real axial resolution and compared with the results from manual periodontal probing. Results The average periodontal pocket depth measured by OCT was 3.10±0.15 mm, 4.11±0.17 mm, 5.09±0.17 mm, and 6.05±0.21 mm for each periodontal pocket model, respectively. These values were similar to those obtained by manual periodontal probing. Conclusions OCT was able to visualize periodontal pockets and show attachment loss. By calculating the calibration factor to determine the accurate axial resolution, quantitative standards for measuring periodontal pocket depth can be established regardless of the position of periodontal pocket in the OCT image. PMID:28261520

  8. Contralateral Abdominal Pocketing in Salvation of Replanted Fingertips with Compromised Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hyung-Sup; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pocketing is one of the most useful methods in salvation of compromised replanted fingertips. Abdominal pocketing has generally been performed in the ipsilateral lower abdominal quadrant, but we have also performed contralateral pocketing at our institute. To determine which approach is more beneficial, a total of 40 patients underwent an abdominal pocketing procedure in either the ipsilateral or contralateral lower abdominal quadrant after fingertip replantation. Dates of abdominal pocketing after initial replantation, detachment after abdominal pocketing, range of motion (ROM) before abdominal pocketing, and sequential ROM after the detachment operation and date of full ROM recovery and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) score were recorded through medical chart review. Mean detachment date, mean abduction of shoulder after the detachment operation, and mean days to return to full ROM were not significantly different between the ipsilateral and contralateral pocketing groups. However, the mean DASH score was significantly lower in the contralateral group than the ipsilateral group. There were also fewer postoperative wound complications in the contralateral group than in the ipsilateral group. We, therefore, recommend contralateral abdominal pocketing rather than ipsilateral abdominal pocketing to increase patient comfort and reduce pain and complications. PMID:25379539

  9. Contralateral abdominal pocketing in salvation of replanted fingertips with compromised circulation.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyung-Sup; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pocketing is one of the most useful methods in salvation of compromised replanted fingertips. Abdominal pocketing has generally been performed in the ipsilateral lower abdominal quadrant, but we have also performed contralateral pocketing at our institute. To determine which approach is more beneficial, a total of 40 patients underwent an abdominal pocketing procedure in either the ipsilateral or contralateral lower abdominal quadrant after fingertip replantation. Dates of abdominal pocketing after initial replantation, detachment after abdominal pocketing, range of motion (ROM) before abdominal pocketing, and sequential ROM after the detachment operation and date of full ROM recovery and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) score were recorded through medical chart review. Mean detachment date, mean abduction of shoulder after the detachment operation, and mean days to return to full ROM were not significantly different between the ipsilateral and contralateral pocketing groups. However, the mean DASH score was significantly lower in the contralateral group than the ipsilateral group. There were also fewer postoperative wound complications in the contralateral group than in the ipsilateral group. We, therefore, recommend contralateral abdominal pocketing rather than ipsilateral abdominal pocketing to increase patient comfort and reduce pain and complications.

  10. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly - if not exclusively - belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis.

  11. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly – if not exclusively – belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis. PMID:24983705

  12. Substitutions of Thr30 provide mechanistic insight into tryptophan-mediated activation of TRAP binding to RNA.

    PubMed

    Payal, Vandana; Gollnick, Paul

    2006-01-01

    TRAP is an 11 subunit RNA binding protein that regulates expression of genes involved in tryptophan biosynthesis and transport in Bacillus subtilis. TRAP is activated to bind RNA by binding up to 11 molecules of l-tryptophan in pockets formed by adjacent subunits. The precise mechanism by which tryptophan binding activates TRAP is not known. Thr30 is in the tryptophan binding pocket. A TRAP mutant in which Thr30 is substituted with Val (T30V) does not bind tryptophan but binds RNA constitutively, suggesting that Thr30 plays a key role in the activation mechanism. We have examined the effects of other substitutions of Thr30. TRAP proteins with small beta-branched aliphatic side chains at residue 30 bind RNA constitutively, whereas those with a small polar side chain show tryptophan-dependent RNA binding. Several mutant proteins exhibited constitutive RNA binding that was enhanced by tryptophan. Although the tryptophan and RNA binding sites on TRAP are distinct and are separated by approximately 7.5 A, several substitutions of residues that interact with the bound RNA restored tryptophan binding to T30V TRAP. These observations support the hypothesis that conformational changes in TRAP relay information between the tryptophan and RNA binding sites of the protein.

  13. Modelling and experimental validation of Textile Pockets based active inflatable device.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, A; Basset, M; Orjuela, R; Dupuis, R; Drean, J Y

    2014-11-01

    This paper aims with the mathematical modelling of an active inflatable device. This device is composed of a compressor, an Electro-pneumatic Pressure Converter (EPC) and an Inflatable Textile fabric Pocket (ITP). The later has interesting mechanical properties and is fabricated using Jacquard knitting technique which allows automatic production of unlimited varieties of pattern weaving without any mould. Thanks to these features, these ITPs have provided a better alternative to the classical airbags made by stretchable polymer material. The proposed mathematical model is obtained by combining sub-models of two main parts of the whole system. In this way, a generalised and flexible model is obtained which can easily take into consideration the ITPs of different shapes. The pressure dynamics inside the ITP are considered by taking into account the air flow rate, variation of the volume of ITP and the length of pneumatic lines joining ITP with compressed air source. The parameters of the whole mathematical model are obtained via identification techniques. The effectiveness of the model is assessed through several experimental tests with the help of a servo hydraulic fatigue testing machine.

  14. Quadrupole ion traps.

    PubMed

    March, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    The extraordinary story of the three-dimensional radiofrequency quadrupole ion trap, accompanied by a seemingly unintelligible theoretical treatment, is told in some detail because of the quite considerable degree of commercial success that quadrupole technology has achieved. The quadrupole ion trap, often used in conjunction with a quadrupole mass filter, remained a laboratory curiosity until 1979 when, at the American Society for Mass Spectrometry Conference in Seattle, George Stafford, Jr., of Finnigan Corp., learned of the Masters' study of Allison Armitage of a combined quadrupole ion trap/quadrupole mass filter instrument for the observation of electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectra of simple compounds eluting from a gas chromatograph. Stafford developed subsequently the mass-selective axial instability method for obtaining mass spectra from the quadrupole ion trap alone and, in 1983, Finnigan Corp. announced the first commercial quadrupole ion trap instrument as a detector for a gas chromatograph. In 1987, confinement of ions generated externally to the ion trap was demonstrated and, soon after, the new technique of electrospray ionization was shown to be compatible with the ion trap.

  15. Does widowhood explain gender differences in out-of-pocket medical spending among the elderly?

    PubMed

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Shoven, John B; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2013-05-01

    Despite the presence of Medicare, out-of-pocket medical spending is a large expenditure risk facing the elderly. While women live longer than men, elderly women incur higher out-of-pocket medical spending than men at each age. In this paper, we examine whether differences in marital status and living arrangements can explain this difference. We find that out-of-pocket medical spending is approximately 24 percent higher when an individual becomes widowed, a large portion of which is spending on nursing homes. Our results suggest a substantial role of living arrangements in out-of-pocket medical spending. Our estimates combined with differences in rates of widowhood across gender suggest that marital status can explain about one third of the gender difference in total out-of-pocket medical spending, leaving a large portion unexplained. On the other hand, gender differences in widowhood more than explain the observed gender difference in out-of-pocket spending on nursing homes.

  16. Stratigraphic traps 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains studies of fields with traps that are mainly stratigraphic in nature. Structure plays a role in the traps of several fields, but overall, it is clear that the main trapping features with the group of fields in this volume are stratigraphic. The first six fields in this volume, Alabama Ferry, Rospo Mare, Walker Creek, Bindley, Lexington, and Newburg/South Westhope, have carbonate reservoirs. The latter two of these, Lexington and Newburg/South Westhope, also have sandstone reservoirs. The remaining fields, East Texas, East Clinton, Stockholm Southwest, Sorrento, Port Acres, and Lagoa Parda, have only sandstone reservoirs.

  17. A salt bridge turns off the foot-pocket in class-II HDACs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingwei; Yang, Zuolong; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Hai-Bin; Li, Min; Wu, Ruibo

    2016-08-21

    Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) are promising anticancer targets and several selective inhibitors have been created based on the architectural differences of foot-pockets among HDACs. However, the "gate-keeper" of foot-pockets is still controversial. Herein, it is for the first time revealed that a conserved R-E salt bridge plays a critical role in keeping foot-pockets closed in class-II HDACs by computational simulations. This finding is further substantiated by our mutagenesis experiments.

  18. Laser Supported Reduction of Specific Microorganisms in the Periodontal Pocket with the Aid of an Er,Cr:YSGG Laser: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutknecht, N.; Van Betteray, C.; Ozturan, S.; Vanweersch, L.; Franzen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a radial firing tip of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser as an adjunct to a nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Methods. Twelve patients with chronic or aggressive periodontitis were treated by conventional periodontal treatment using ultrasonic devices and hand instruments and, additionally, in two quadrants with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A new radial firing tip (RFPT 14-5, Biolase) was used with 1.5 W, 30 Hz, 11% air, 20% water, and pulse duration 140 μs. Microbiological smears were taken before treatment, one day after lasing, and three and six months after lasing. Pocket depths of all periodontal sites were measured before and six months after treatment. Results. The total bacterial load of Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inside the pocket was reduced significantly throughout the whole examination time. Greater pocket depth reductions were observed in all groups. There was a slight higher reduction of pocket depth in the lased group after six months. Conclusions. These results support the thesis that Er,Cr:YSGG laser supported periodontal treatment leads to a significant reduction of periopathogenes and thereby helps the maintenance of periodontal health. PMID:25879057

  19. Recrystallization of atomically balanced amorphous pockets in Si: A source of point defects

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria

    2007-10-15

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulation techniques to study the regrowth behavior of amorphous pockets in Si. We demonstrate that crystallization depends on the morphology of the pocket-crystal interface. Although our simulated amorphous pockets had not any excess nor deficit of atoms with respect to perfect crystal, after regrowth we found residual defects. Most of them are single Si interstitials and vacancies, but also larger defects have been encountered. We have determined their atomic structures and calculated their formation energies. These complexes are more stable than amorphous pockets, and may trigger the formation of extended defects or favor damage accumulation.

  20. Exploitation of pocket gophers and their food caches by grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    I investigated the exploitation of pocket gophers (Thomomys talpoides) by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in the Yellowstone region of the United States with the use of data collected during a study of radiomarked bears in 1977-1992. My analysis focused on the importance of pocket gophers as a source of energy and nutrients, effects of weather and site features, and importance of pocket gophers to grizzly bears in the western contiguous United States prior to historical extirpations. Pocket gophers and their food caches were infrequent in grizzly bear feces, although foraging for pocket gophers accounted for about 20-25% of all grizzly bear feeding activity during April and May. Compared with roots individually excavated by bears, pocket gopher food caches were less digestible but more easily dug out. Exploitation of gopher food caches by grizzly bears was highly sensitive to site and weather conditions and peaked during and shortly after snowmelt. This peak coincided with maximum success by bears in finding pocket gopher food caches. Exploitation was most frequent and extensive on gently sloping nonforested sites with abundant spring beauty (Claytonia lanceolata) and yampah (Perdieridia gairdneri). Pocket gophers are rare in forests, and spring beauty and yampah roots are known to be important foods of both grizzly bears and burrowing rodents. Although grizzly bears commonly exploit pocket gophers only in the Yellowstone region, this behavior was probably widespread in mountainous areas of the western contiguous United States prior to extirpations of grizzly bears within the last 150 years.

  1. Airplane stability calculations with a card programmable pocket calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Programs are presented for calculating airplane stability characteristics with a card programmable pocket calculator. These calculations include eigenvalues of the characteristic equations of lateral and longitudinal motion as well as stability parameters such as the time to damp to one-half amplitude or the damping ratio. The effects of wind shear are included. Background information and the equations programmed are given. The programs are written for the International System of Units, the dimensional form of the stability derivatives, and stability axes. In addition to programs for stability calculations, an unusual and short program is included for the Euler transformation of coordinates used in airplane motions. The programs have been written for a Hewlett Packard HP-67 calculator. However, the use of this calculator does not constitute an endorsement of the product by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Ductal carcinoma of the breast in the pacemaker generator's pocket.

    PubMed

    Zonca, P; Herokova, J; Cambal, M; Jacobi, C A

    2009-01-01

    Authors present a case of a 78-year-old female patient with invasive ductal adenocarcinoma in the pacemaker, s pocket. A decubitus-like tumor had developed in this place, and has been missinterpretated as a benign lesion for 5 months. Diagnosis was done with a time delay. An excisional biopsy revealed annvasive ductal adenocarcinoma. The first step was the implantation of a new pacemaker generator performed on the opposite side. The second step was a modified radical mastectomy, according to Madden, and the removal of the originally implanted pacemaker generator. Radiotherapy and hormonal adjuvant therapy were applied after surgery. The patient was followed-up at an out-patient clinic, and died 25 months after diagnosis because of generalization of the disease (Fig. 2, Ref. 35). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  3. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  4. Versatile electrostatic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to create either a double-well or a donut-shaped trapping field. The profile of the {sup 15}ND{sub 3} packet in each of these four trapping potentials is measured, and the dependence of the well-separation and barrier height of the double-well and donut potential on the hexapole and dipole term are discussed.

  5. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  6. Optical trapping of nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Brooke C.; Crawford, Alice; Kishore, Rani B.; Helmerson, Kristian; Halas, Naomi J.; Levin, Carly

    2007-09-01

    We investigate near-resonant trapping of Rayleigh particles in optical tweezers. Although optical forces due to a near-resonant laser beam have been extensively studied for atoms, the situation for larger particles is that the laser wavelength is far from any absorption resonance. Theory predicts, however, that the trapping force exerted on a Rayleigh particle is enhanced, and may be three to fifty times larger for frequencies near resonance than for frequencies far off resonance. The ability to selectively trap only particles with a given absorption peak may have many practical applications. In order to investigate near-resonant trapping we are using nanoshells, particles with a dielectric core and metallic coating that can exhibit plasmon resonances. The resonances of the nanoshells can be tuned by adjusting the ratio of the radius of the dielectric core, r I, to the overall radius, r II, which includes the thickness of the metallic coating. Our nanoshells, fabricated at Rice University, consist of a silica core with a gold coating. Using back focal plane detection, we measure the trap stiffness of a single focus optical trap (optical tweezers), from a diode laser at 853 nm for nanoshells with several different r I/r II ratios.

  7. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  8. Endoscopy-Assisted Ear Surgery for Treatment of Chronic Otitis Media With Cholesteatoma, Adhesion, or Retraction Pockets.

    PubMed

    Ulku, Cagatay Han

    2017-03-08

    The objective of this study was to analyze the results of endoscopy-assisted ear surgery for the treatment of chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma, adhesion, or retraction pockets.Fifty-one patients who underwent oto-endoscopy-assisted canal wall up tympanomastoid surgery and/or limited anterior atticotomy with tympanoplasty for chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma, adhesion, or retraction pocket from 2006 to 2013 have been included in this study. Eradication of the disease from the middle ear and mastoid air cells was achieved by combination of the oto-microscobic and oto-endoscopic approaches. Second look surgery was performed 18 months later from the initial surgery in selected patients. Age, gender, pre-/postoperative otoscopy findings/audiograms, type of the used prostheses, and follow-up time were obtained from the patient's file. Anatomic integrity rates of the tympanic membrane, the mean gains of air bone gap, on pure-tone audiogram at 4 frequencies and existence of the residual disease were reviewed parameters. Functional evaluation was made in patients with intact tympanic membrane.Of the 51 patients, the ratios of the chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma and isolated adhesive otitis or retraction pocket cases were 74.5% (38/51) and 25.5% (13/51), respectively. Ossicular chain reconstruction was made with PORP in 27 patients and TORP in 20 patients, whereas the ossicular chain was intact in 4 patients. Anatomic integrity rates of the tympanic membrane were 90.2% (46/51). The overall (n = 46) pre-/postoperative mean ABG obtained at 4 frequencies were 28.3 ± 12.26 and 9.18 ± 5.68 dB (P < 0.0001) respectively. Residual cholesteatoma rate was 10.5% (34/38) for chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma patients. However, there was no recurrence or new cholesteatoma formation in isolated retraction pockets or adhesive otitis patients.Oto-endoscopic eradication of the cholesteatoma or epithelial tissue from hidden area after the all

  9. Detection of gas pockets in pressurised wastewater mains using dynamic system response analysis.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C; Clemens, F

    2007-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is mostly collected in combined sewer system and transported to a WWTP through pressure mains. These pressure mains form an element of the system that did not receive much attention lately with respect to monitoring of performance and maintenance. For that reason, their state of functioning is often not known. Failure of operation is only noticed when during storm conditions the capacity of the system drops, resulting in undesirable discharge to the surface water. A recently made inventory showed that about half of the pressure mains show increased pressure loss for no obvious reason. Reduction of the systems nominal capacity can result from many causes, like increased wall roughness, scaling and the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. The occurrence of gas-pockets may be caused by degassing of dissolved gas, but also by air entrapment at the pump inlet or at air valves. A research project is started that will be carried out from 2003 to 2005. This project focuses on three goals: the description of the gas-water transport phenomena in wastewater pressure mains, a method to detect and diagnose gas problems, and to overcome future problems by either applying remedial measures or by developing improved design methods for wastewater pressure systems. This paper describes the layout of the experimental set-up to detect and diagnose gas problems and the first results of the experiments are presented and discussed. The results are used to validate a model (Wanda) developed by Delft Hydraulics that describes the phenomena involved in surges in air/water transport.

  10. Characteristics and tolerances of the pocket mouse and incidence of disease. [CNS lesions during space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, R. G.; Kraft, L. M.; Simmonds, R. C.; Bailey, O. T.; Dunlap, W. A.; Haymaker, W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies carried out on the pocket mouse colony on Apollo XVII are reported. They revealed no serological evidence of viral disease, no pathogenic enterobacteria or respiratory Mycoplasma on culture, a 25% incidence of sarcosporidiosis, and a 2% incidence of chronic meningitis or meningoencephalitis. It is concluded that the pocket mouse is a highly adaptive animal and very well-suited to space flight.

  11. The Role of Electronic Pocket Dictionaries as an English Learning Tool among Chinese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jian, Hua-Li; Sandnes, Frode Eika; Law, Kris M. Y.; Huang, Yo-Ping; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study addressed the role of electronic pocket dictionaries as a language learning tool among university students in Hong Kong and Taiwan. The target groups included engineering and humanities students at both undergraduate and graduate level. Speed of reference was found to be the main motivator for using an electronic pocket dictionary.…

  12. 77 FR 73769 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Four Subspecies of Mazama Pocket Gopher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, propose to list four subspecies of Mazama pocket gopher (Olympia, Tenino, Yelm, and Roy Prairie) as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). We additionally propose to designate critical habitat for these subspecies. We have determined that the Tacoma pocket gopher is extinct, and that the listing of three other......

  13. Planview Geometry and morphological characteristics of pocket beaches on the Catalan coast (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D.; Guillén, J.; López, L.; Pellegrino, V.

    2009-07-01

    Coastal planform studies are a relevant initial stage before launching detailed dynamic field experiments. The aim of this study is to define the planform characteristics of 72 Catalan pocket beaches, natural and man-made, and to determine their sheltering effect, embaymentization and their status of equilibrium. Planform measurements were performed on SIGPAC, 1:5000 orthophoto sets and wave climate was provided by Puertos del Estado (Wana model). Planform parameters were applied and coastal planview indexes were determined. The study shows that the Catalan pocket beaches display a wide range of indentation, suggesting that no single structural, tectonic or morphological control dominates their planform. The man-made pocket beaches typically display indentations which are smaller than those shown by natural pocket beaches. Headland spacing and beach area are positively correlated. The more indented bays are, the shorter their beaches become. Low-indented pocket beaches are the widest and the longest ones. Deep indentation contributes towards beach protection and energy dissipation which counteracts rip efficiency and inhibits the formation of mega-rips. Pocket beaches often show gradual and moderate alongshore changes in texture and beach morphology. One third of the Catalan pocket beaches are "sediment starved", i.e., 60% and more of their embayed shorelines are deprived of beach sediments. Examination of the status of equilibrium demonstrates that most of the Catalan pocket beaches are in an unstable mode, with indentation ratios that are unrelated to the wave obliquity.

  14. Switching Oxide Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.

    2003-01-01

    We consider radiation-induced charge trapping in SiO2 dielectric layers, primarily from the point of view of CMOS devices. However, SiO2 insulators are used in many other ways, and the same defects occur in other contexts. The key studies, which determined the nature of the oxide charge traps, were done primarily on gate oxides in CMOS devices, because that was the main radiation problem in CMOS at one time. There are two major reviews of radiation-induced oxide charge trapping already in the literature, which discuss the subject in far greater detail than is possible here. The first of these was by McLean et al. in 1989, and the second, ten years later, was intended as an update, because of additional, new work that had been reported. Basically, the picture that has emerged is that ionizing radiation creates electron-hole pairs in the oxide, and the electrons have much higher mobility than the holes. Therefore, the electrons are swept out of the oxide very rapidly by any field that is present, leaving behind any holes that escape the initial recombination process. These holes then undergo a polaron hopping transport toward the Si/SiO2 interface (under positive bias). Near the interface, some fraction of them fall into deep, relatively stable, long-lived hole traps. The nature and annealing behavior of these hole traps is the main focus of this paper.

  15. Circadian periodicity of resistance to ionizing radiation in the pocket mouse.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, R. G.; Hayden, P.; Gambino, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the response of pocket mice to Co 60 irradiation delivered at two times of day - namely, the predicted high and low points of the metabolic rate. The validity of torpor as an assay of the circadian period of body temperature in pocket mice and as a basis for selecting irradiation times is examined. A study is made of the mitotic activity in the pocket mouse intestinal epithelium as an example of a physiological rhythm which might influence radiation sensitivity. The results of tests in which pocket mice were exposed to ionizing radiation at two different times of day are cited. It is found that under the investigated conditions pocket mice irradiated during their metabolically active period (2330 hr) live significantly longer than those irradiated while their metabolic rate is low (0900 hr).

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles.

    PubMed

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-08-04

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field.

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark J.; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-01-01

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field. PMID:26247952

  18. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  19. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  20. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  1. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) For Fuel Assembly Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Michael Reichenberger; Phillip Ugorowski

    2013-09-01

    Neutron sensors capable of real-time measurement of thermal flux, fast flux, and temperature in a single miniaturized probe are needed in irradiation tests required to demonstrate the performance of candidate new fuels, and cladding materials. In-core ceramic-based miniature neutron detectors or “Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors” (MPFDs) have been studied at Kansas State University (KSU). The first MPFD prototypes were tested in various neutron fields at the KSU TRIGA research reactor with successful results. Currently, a United States Department of Energy-sponsored joint KSU/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) effort is underway to develop a high-temperature, high-pressure version of the MPFD using radiation-resistant, high temperature materials, which would be capable of withstanding irradiation test conditions in high performance material and test reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, this more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, existing and advanced reactor designs, high performance MTRs, and transient test reactors has the potential to lead to higher accuracy and resolution data from irradiation testing, more detailed core flux measurements and enhanced fuel assembly processing. Prior evaluations by KSU indicate that these sensors could also be used to monitor burn-up of nuclear fuel. If integrated into nuclear fuel assemblies, MPFDs offer several advantages to current spent fuel management systems.

  2. Temporal patterns in seedling establishment on pocket gopher disturbances.

    PubMed

    Forbis, Tara A; Larmore, Jason; Addis, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Disturbances often facilitate seedling establishment, and can change the species composition of a community by increasing recruitment of disturbance-adapted species. To understand the effects of pocket gopher disturbances on alpine seedling dynamics, we examined the gopher disturbances' effects on seedling emergence and survival on gopher disturbances 0 to 5 years old. In contrast to results from most other ecosystems, these recently created gopher mounds had lower seedling emergence and survival rates than undisturbed areas. A lack of correlation between species' abundances on gopher mounds and undisturbed sites in one of the two communities studied suggested that a suite of disturbance-adapted species recruited onto the mounds. To explain low seedling emergence on recent gopher mounds, we quantified gopher mound seed banks and studied recruitment in a site with mounds that ranged from 0 to >20 years old. Seed numbers in first-year gopher mound soils were extremely low relative to undisturbed soils, and this pattern was mirrored in seedling establishment patterns over the long term. Gopher disturbance depressed seedling emergence density for the first 5 years. Subsequently, emergence density increased until at least 20 years following the disturbance. Emergence on disturbances more than 20 years old was higher than on undisturbed sites. Therefore, gopher disturbances probably facilitate seedling establishment in alpine dry and moist meadow; however, this process takes place over decades.

  3. Inertial Pocket Navigation System: Unaided 3D Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Munoz Diaz, Estefania

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation systems use dead-reckoning to estimate the pedestrian's position. There are two types of pedestrian dead-reckoning, the strapdown algorithm and the step-and-heading approach. Unlike the strapdown algorithm, which consists of the double integration of the three orthogonal accelerometer readings, the step-and-heading approach lacks the vertical displacement estimation. We propose the first step-and-heading approach based on unaided inertial data solving 3D positioning. We present a step detector for steps up and down and a novel vertical displacement estimator. Our navigation system uses the sensor introduced in the front pocket of the trousers, a likely location of a smartphone. The proposed algorithms are based on the opening angle of the leg or pitch angle. We analyzed our step detector and compared it with the state-of-the-art, as well as our already proposed step length estimator. Lastly, we assessed our vertical displacement estimator in a real-world scenario. We found that our algorithms outperform the literature step and heading algorithms and solve 3D positioning using unaided inertial data. Additionally, we found that with the pitch angle, five activities are distinguishable: standing, sitting, walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs. This information complements the pedestrian location and is of interest for applications, such as elderly care. PMID:25897501

  4. Exploring the inhibitor binding pocket of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Fendel, Uta; Tocilescu, Maja A; Kerscher, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Numerous hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including several detergents are known to inhibit the ubiquinone reductase reaction of respiratory chain complex I (proton pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Guided by the X-ray structure of the peripheral arm of complex I from Thermus thermophilus we have generated a large collection of site-directed mutants in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica targeting the proposed ubiquinone and inhibitor binding pocket of this huge multiprotein complex at the interface of the 49-kDa and PSST subunits. We could identify a number of residues where mutations changed I(50) values for representatives from all three groups of hydrophobic inhibitors. Many mutations around the domain of the 49-kDa subunit that is homologous to the [NiFe] centre binding region of hydrogenase conferred resistance to DQA (class I/type A) and rotenone (class II/type B) indicating a wider overlap of the binding sites for these two types of inhibitors. In contrast, a region near iron-sulfur cluster N2, where the binding of the n-alkyl-polyoxyethylene-ether detergent C(12)E(8) (type C) was exclusively affected, appeared comparably well separated. Taken together, our data provide structure-based support for the presence of distinct but overlapping binding sites for hydrophobic inhibitors possibly extending into the ubiquinone reduction site of mitochondrial complex I.

  5. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  6. Measurement of Trap Length for an Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2009-01-01

    The trap length along the beam axis for an optical trap formed with an upright, oil-immersion microscope was measured. The goals for this effort were twofold. It was deemed useful to understand the depth to which an optical trap can reach for purposes of developing a tool to assist in the fabrication of miniature devices. Additionally, it was desired to know whether the measured trap length favored one or the other of two competing theories to model an optical trap. The approach was to trap a microsphere of known size and mass and raise it from its initial trap position. The microsphere was then dropped by blocking the laser beam for a pre-determined amount of time. Dropping the microsphere in a free-fall mode from various heights relative to the coverslip provides an estimate of how the trapping length changes with depth in water in a sample chamber on a microscope slide. While it was not possible to measure the trap length with sufficient precision to support any particular theory of optical trap formation, it was possible to find regions where the presence of physical boundaries influenced optical traps, and determine that the trap length, for the apparatus studied, is between 6 and 7 m. These results allow more precise control using optical micromanipulation to assemble miniature devices by providing information about the distance over which an optical trap is effective.

  7. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  8. Water-trapped Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO2 as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  9. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  10. Practical axial optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Mack, A. H.; Schlingman, D. J.; Regan, L.; Mochrie, S. G. J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new method for calibrating optical trapping measurements in which tension is applied in the direction of the laser beam to a molecule tethered between a surface and an optically trapped bead. Specifically, we present a generally-applicable procedure for converting from the measured scattering intensity and the measured stage displacement to applied tension and bead-coverslip separation, using measurements of the light intensity scattered from an untethered, trapped bead. Our calibration accounts for a number of effects, including aberrations and the interference of forward-reflected bead-scattered light with the trapping beam. To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we show measurements of the DNA force-versus-extension relation using a range of laser intensities, and show that these measurements match the expected extensible wormlike-chain (WLC) behavior. Finally, we also demonstrate a force-clamp, in which the tension in a tether is held fixed while the extension varies as a result of molecular events. PMID:23126750

  11. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  12. Loading an Optical Trap with Diamond Nanocrystals Containing Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers from a Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple and effective method of loading particles into an optical trap. Our primary application of this method is loading photoluminescent material, such as diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, for coupling the mechanical motion of the trapped crystal with the spin of the NV centers. Highly absorptive material at the trapping laser frequency, such as tartrazine dye, is used as media to attach nanodiamonds and burn into a cloud of air-borne particles as the material is swept near the trapping laser focus on a glass slide. Particles are then trapped with the laser used for burning or transferred to a second laser trap at a different wavelength. Evidence of successful loading diamond nanocrystals into the trap presented includes high sensitivity of the photoluminecscence (PL) to the excitation laser and the PL spectra of the optically trapped particles

  13. Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Cis-β-Methylstyrene:Distal Pocket Flexibility Tunes Catalytic Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexander N.; Chatfield, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase, the most versatile heme protein, has a hybrid active site pocket that shares structural features with peroxidases and cytochrome P450s. The simulation studies presented here show that the enzyme possesses a remarkable ability to efficiently utilize its hybrid structure, assuming structurally different peroxidase-like and P450-like distal pocket faces and thereby enhancing the inherent catalytic capability of the active center. We find that during epoxidation of cis-β-methylstyrene (CBMS), the native peroxidase-like aspect of the distal pocket is diminished as the polar Glu183 side chain is displaced away from the active center and the distal pocket takes on a more hydrophobic, P450-like, aspect. The P450-like distal pocket provides a significant enthalpic stabilization of ~4 kcal/mol of the 14 kcal/mol reaction barrier for gas-phase epoxidation of CMBS by an oxyferryl heme-thiolate species. This stabilization comes from breathing of the distal pocket. As until recently the active site of chloroperoxidase was postulated to be inflexible, these results suggest a new conceptual understanding of the enzyme’s versatility: catalytic reactivity is tuned by flexibility of the distal pocket. PMID:23020548

  14. Efficacy of a physicians' pocket guide about prenatal substance use: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Midmer, Deana; Kahan, Meldon; Kim, Theresa; Ordean, Alice; Graves, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    A pocket guide on management of substance use during pregnancy was developed by a group of Canadian care providers. One hundred and fifteen family medicine residents in 6 Canadian teaching sites were randomized to receive either the pocket guide or a paper summary on similar clinical topics, based on UpToDate, a comprehensive Web-based resource. At baseline, both groups completed a survey containing questions on beliefs, attitudes, experience, and training on pregnancy and substance use. Participants then answered 28 multiple choice questions about substance use in pregnancy, using either the pocket guide or UpToDate. Finally participants were asked to rate ease of use for the 2 resources. The results showed that the pocket guide group had higher knowledge scores than the UpToDate group overall and at each study site (61.27% vs. 42.86%, P < .001). The residents found the pocket guide easier to use than UpToDate (mean = 2.73 vs. 4.36, P < .001), and were more likely to want to use it again (96% for pocket card, 78% for UpToDate, P = .005). It is concluded that the pocket guide is a practical source of clinical information at point of care, particularly for "orphan" subjects such as substance use in pregnancy.

  15. What induces pocket openings on protein surface patches involved in protein-protein interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyrisch, Susanne; Helms, Volkhard

    2009-02-01

    We previously showed for the proteins BCL-XL, IL-2, and MDM2 that transient pockets at their protein-protein binding interfaces can be identified by applying the PASS algorithm to molecular dynamics (MD) snapshots. We now investigated which aspects of the natural conformational dynamics of proteins induce the formation of such pockets. The pocket detection protocol was applied to three different conformational ensembles for the same proteins that were extracted from MD simulations of the inhibitor bound crystal conformation in water and the free crystal/NMR structure in water and in methanol. Additional MD simulations studied the impact of backbone mobility. The more efficient CONCOORD or normal mode analysis (NMA) techniques gave significantly smaller pockets than MD simulations, whereas tCONCOORD generated pockets comparable to those observed in MD simulations for two of the three systems. Our findings emphasize the influence of solvent polarity and backbone rearrangements on the formation of pockets on protein surfaces and should be helpful in future generation of transient pockets as putative ligand binding sites at protein-protein interfaces.

  16. Geometric Measures of Large Biomolecules: Surface, Volume and Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Geometry plays a major role in our attempt to understand the activity of large molecules. For example, surface area and volume are used to quantify the interactions between these molecules and the water surrounding them in implicit solvent models. In addition, the detection of pockets serves as a starting point for predictive studies of biomolecule-ligand interactions. The alpha shape theory provides an exact and robust method for computing these geometric measures. Several implementations of this theory are currently available. We show however that these implementations fail on very large macromolecular systems. We show that these difficulties are not theoretical; rather, they are related to the architecture of current computers that rely on the use of cache memory to speed up calculation. By rewriting the algorithms that implement the different steps of the alpha shape theory such that we enforce locality, we show that we can remediate these cache problems; the corresponding code, UnionBall has an apparent (n) behavior over a large range of values of n (up to tens of millions), where n is the number of atoms. As an example, it takes 136 seconds with UnionBall to compute the contribution of each atom to the surface area and volume of a viral capsid with more than five million atoms on a commodity PC. UnionBall includes functions for computing the surface area and volume of the intersection of two, three and four spheres that are fully detailed in an appendix. UnionBall is available as an OpenSource software. PMID:21823134

  17. MILLISECOND IMAGING OF RADIO TRANSIENTS WITH THE POCKET CORRELATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C. J.; Backer, D. C.; Bower, G. C.; Gutierrez-Kraybill, C.; Williams, P. K. G.; Jones, G.; Barott, W. C.; Werthimer, D. E-mail: jones_gl@caltech.edu

    2011-11-20

    We demonstrate a signal-processing concept for imaging the sky at millisecond rates with radio interferometers. The 'Pocket Correlator' (PoCo) correlates the signals from multiple elements of a radio interferometer fast enough to image brief, dispersed pulses. By the nature of interferometry, a millisecond correlator functions like a large, single-dish telescope, but with improved survey speed, spatial localization, calibration, and interference rejection. To test the concept, we installed PoCo at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to search for dispersed pulses from the Crab pulsar, B0329+54, and M31 using total-power, visibility-based, and image-plane techniques. In 1.7 hr of observing, PoCo detected 191 giant pulses from the Crab pulsar brighter than a typical 5{sigma} sensitivity limit of 60 Jy over pulse widths of 3 ms. Roughly 40% of pulses from pulsar B0329+54 were detected by using novel visibility-based techniques. Observations of M31 constrain the rate of pulses brighter than 190 Jy in a three-degree region surrounding the galaxy to <4.3 hr{sup -1}. We calculate the computational demand of various visibility-based pulse search algorithms and demonstrate how compute clusters can help meet this demand. Larger implementations of the fast imaging concept will conduct blind searches for millisecond pulses in our Galaxy and beyond, providing a valuable probe of the interstellar/intergalactic media, discovering new kinds of radio transients, and localizing them to constrain models of their origin.

  18. Deconnable self-reading pocket dosimeter containment with self-contained light

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Robyn L.; Arnold, Greg N.; McBride, Ryan G.

    1996-01-01

    A container for a self-reading pocket dosimeter includes a transparent tube for receiving the self-reading pocket dosimeter, a light source mounted at one end of the transparent tube, and an eyepiece mounted on an opposite end of the transparent tube for viewing a read-out of the self-reading pocket dosimeter. The container may further include an activation device for selectively supplying power to the light source. The container both protects the dosimeter from being contaminated and provides a light source for viewing the dosimeter.

  19. Docking studies of nickel-peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitors: exploring the new binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Datong; Wang, Jianwu; Cai, Zhengting; Xu, Weiren

    2006-06-20

    The binding modes of a series of known activity inhibitors docking to Peptide deformylase (PDF) have been studied using molecular docking software AutoDock3.0.5. In this study, good correlation (R(2)=0.894) between calculated binding energies and experimental inhibitory activities is obtained. We find that some shallow pockets near the known active pocket are very important which can accommodate the side-chains of the inhibitor. Moreover, a new binding pocket is also explored. All these may provide something useful for designing the potent inhibitors.

  20. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: II. Characteristics and tolerances of the pocket mouse and incidence of disease.

    PubMed

    Linberg, R G; Kraft, L M; Simmonds, R C; Bailey, O T; Dunlap, W A; Haymaker, W

    1975-04-01

    Pocket mice are facultative homoiotherms with the ability to drop their metabolic rate dramatically while at rest or in response to environmental stresses. Under these conditions, they characteristically enter a state of prolonged torpor. These animals require no drinking water and they can live in darkness for many months without apparent ill effect. They tolerate a wide range of ambient temperature, ralative humidity, and oxygen pressure and have survied without food for a mean of 14 d at an ambient temperature of 20 degrees C (68 degrees F). Studies carried out on the pocket mouse colony used for the Apollo XVII flight revealed, in the animals tested, no serological evidence of viral disease, no pathogenic enterobacteria or respiratory Mycoplasma on culture, a 25% incidence of sarcosporidiosis, and a 2% incidence of chronic meningitis or meningoencephalitis. The conclusion reached is that the pocket mouse is a highly adaptive animal and very well suited for space flight.

  1. Calibration of optical traps by dual trapping of one bead.

    PubMed

    Dutov, Pavel; Schieber, Jay

    2013-11-15

    We introduce a method for optical trap calibration that is suitable for viscoelastic material. The method is designed for use on experimental setups with two optical tweezers and is based on pulling a trapped particle with one trap while holding it with the other. No piezo stage is needed, and only one optical trap must be movable with galvo mirrors, piezo mirrors, or acousto-optical deflectors. The method combines advantages of commonly known PSD-fitting and fast-sweeping methods, allowing calibration of a completely fixed trap in a fluid of unknown viscosity/viscoelasticity. A detailed method description, a theoretical derivation, and an experimental comparison to other methods are reported.

  2. Flow through an Array of Superhydrophopic Pillars: The Role of the Air-Water Interface Shape on Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    In this study, measurements of the pressure drop and the velocity fields associated with the flow of water through a regular array of superhydrophobic pillars were systematically performed to investigate the role of the air-water interface shape on drag reduction. A microfluidic channel was created with circular and superhydrophobic apple-core-shaped pillars bridging across the entire channel. The apple-core-shaped pillars were designed to trap an air pocket along the side of the pillars. The shape of the interface was systematically modified from concave to convex by changing the static pressure within the microchannel. For superhydrophobic pillars having a circular cross section, D /D0 = 1.0, a drag reduction of 7% and a slip velocity of 20% the average channel velocity along the air-water interface were measured. At large static pressures, the interface was driven into the pillars resulting in a decrease in the effective size of the pillars, an increase in the effective spacing between pillars and a pressure drop reduction of as much as 18% when the interface was compressed to D /D0 = 0.8. At low static pressures, the pressure drop increased significantly even as the slip velocity increased as the expanding air-water interface constricted flow through the array of pillars. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1334962.

  3. Development of an ASP (Air Stabilized Platform)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, L. H.

    1980-07-01

    A type of platform termed Air Stabilized Platform or ASP for short, was developed. The effect of the compressibility of air was given in terms of an air pocket factor f sub air. Functional relationships for f sub air with respect to internal draft of the airpocket and its geometry are developed. Several generic platform designs based on the ASP concept were designed and model tested. The platforms were moored by spread mooring, tension leg mooring or were free floating. Realistic applications of the ASP as support platforms for floating industrial plants were considered.

  4. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  5. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  6. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    an inspiring speech at the MIT Physics of Computation 1st Conference in 1981, Feynman proposed the development of a computer that would obey the...on ion trap based 36 quantum computing for physics and computer science students would include lecture notes, slides, lesson plans, a syllabus...reading lists, videos, demonstrations, and laboratories. 37 LIST OF REFERENCES [1] R. P. Feynman , “Simulating physics with computers,” Int. J

  7. Filter vapor trap

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  8. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ze-Guo; Zheng, Li-Yang; Xu, Ye-Long; Nayar, Priyanka; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-11-01

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  9. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... job training programs (such as those related to the CETA program) or job recruiting services for the... persons from the pocket qualified to participate in the CETA program on a continuous basis. HUD...

  10. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... job training programs (such as those related to the CETA program) or job recruiting services for the... persons from the pocket qualified to participate in the CETA program on a continuous basis. HUD...

  11. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... job training programs (such as those related to the CETA program) or job recruiting services for the... persons from the pocket qualified to participate in the CETA program on a continuous basis. HUD...

  12. EpiPen Out-Of-Pocket Costs More Than Doubled Over Decade

    MedlinePlus

    ... pocket spending for generic EpiPen because of the cost-sharing their insurance plan requires," he explained. The study's senior author, Rena Conti, said current drug pricing practices erode patient and public health. " ...

  13. Out-of-pocket health care expenditures, by insurance status, 2007-10.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Mary K; Poisal, John A; Cowan, Cathy A

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-pocket health care spending in the United States totaled $306.2 billion in 2010 and represented 11.8 percent of total national health expenditures, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' National Health Expenditure Accounts. Spending by people with employer-sponsored health insurance and those covered by Medicare accounted for over 80 percent of total out-of-pocket spending. People without comprehensive medical coverage accounted for less than 8 percent of all out-of-pocket expenditures in 2010. Between 2007 and 2010 per person out-of-pocket spending grew most rapidly for people primarily covered by employer-sponsored insurance and declined for people primarily covered by Medicare and those without coverage.

  14. Compensated electron and hole pockets in an underdoped high- Tc superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Suchitra E.; Harrison, N.; Goddard, P. A.; Altarawneh, M. M.; Mielke, C. H.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Andersen, O. K.; Lonzarich, G. G.

    2010-06-01

    We report quantum oscillations in the underdoped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x over a wide range in magnetic field 28≤μ0H≤85T corresponding to ≈12 oscillations, enabling the Fermi surface topology to be mapped to high resolution. As earlier reported by Sebastian [Nature (London) 454, 200 (2008)10.1038/nature07095], we find a Fermi surface comprising multiple pockets, as revealed by the additional distinct quantum oscillation frequencies and harmonics reported in this work. We find the originally reported broad low-frequency Fourier peak at ≈535T to be clearly resolved into three separate peaks at ≈460 , ≈532 , and ≈602T , in reasonable agreement with the reported frequencies of Audouard [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 157003 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.157003]. However, our increased resolution and angle-resolved measurements identify these frequencies to originate from two similarly sized pockets with greatly contrasting degrees of interlayer corrugation. The spectrally dominant frequency originates from a pocket (denoted α ) that is almost ideally two-dimensional in form (exhibiting negligible interlayer corrugation). In contrast, the newly resolved weaker adjacent spectral features originate from a deeply corrugated pocket (denoted γ ). On comparison with band structure, the d -wave symmetry of the interlayer dispersion locates the minimally corrugated α pocket at the “nodal” point knodal=(π/2,π/2) , and the significantly corrugated γ pocket at the “antinodal” point kantinodal=(π,0) within the Brillouin zone. The differently corrugated pockets at different locations indicate creation by translational symmetry breaking—a spin-density wave has been suggested from the suppression of Zeeman splitting for the spectrally dominant pocket. In a broken-translational symmetry scenario, symmetry points to the nodal (α) pocket corresponding to holes, with the weaker antinodal (γ) pocket corresponding to electrons—likely responsible

  15. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector -- FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger

    2012-09-01

    A research program has been initiated by the NEET program for developing and testing compact miniature fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When implemented, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Materials Test Reactors (MTRs).Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, high performance reactors and commercial nuclear power plants. Deployment of Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) in US DOE-NE program irradiation tests will address several challenges: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe, MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different then current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions in typical high performance MTR irradiation tests. New high-fidelity reactor physics codes will need a small, accurate, multipurpose in-core sensor to validate the codes without perturbing the validation experiment; MPFDs fill this requirement. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs; allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be simultaneously deployed; obtaining data required to visualize the reactor flux and temperature profiles. This report summarizes the research progress for year 1 of this 3 year project. An updated design of the MPFD has been developed, materials and tools to support the new design have been procured, construction methods to support the new design have been initiated at INL’s HTTL and KSU’s SMART Laboratory, plating methods are being updated at KSU, new

  16. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector. Final Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, T.; Rempe, Joy; McGregor, Douglas; Ugorowski, Philip; Reichenberger, Michael; Ito, Takashi; Villard, J. -F.

    2014-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to accurately

  17. Interplay between Magnetism, Superconductivity, and Orbital Order in 5-Pocket Model for Iron-Based Superconductors: Parquet Renormalization Group Study.

    PubMed

    Classen, Laura; Xing, Rui-Qi; Khodas, Maxim; Chubukov, Andrey V

    2017-01-20

    We report the results of the parquet renormalization group (RG) analysis of the phase diagram of the most general 5-pocket model for Fe-based superconductors. We use as an input the orbital structure of excitations near the five pockets made out of d_{xz}, d_{yz}, and d_{xy} orbitals and argue that there are 40 different interactions between low-energy fermions in the orbital basis. All interactions flow under the RG, as one progressively integrates out fermions with higher energies. We find that the low-energy behavior is amazingly simple, despite the large number of interactions. Namely, at low energies the full 5-pocket model effectively reduces either to a 3-pocket model made of one d_{xy} hole pocket and two electron pockets or a 4-pocket model made of two d_{xz}/d_{yz} hole pockets and two electron pockets. The leading instability in the effective 4-pocket model is a spontaneous orbital (nematic) order, followed by s^{+-} superconductivity. In the effective 3-pocket model, orbital fluctuations are weaker, and the system develops either s^{+-} superconductivity or a stripe spin-density wave. In the latter case, nematicity is induced by composite spin fluctuations.

  18. Interplay between Magnetism, Superconductivity, and Orbital Order in 5-Pocket Model for Iron-Based Superconductors: Parquet Renormalization Group Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, Laura; Xing, Rui-Qi; Khodas, Maxim; Chubukov, Andrey V.

    2017-01-01

    We report the results of the parquet renormalization group (RG) analysis of the phase diagram of the most general 5-pocket model for Fe-based superconductors. We use as an input the orbital structure of excitations near the five pockets made out of dx z, dy z, and dx y orbitals and argue that there are 40 different interactions between low-energy fermions in the orbital basis. All interactions flow under the RG, as one progressively integrates out fermions with higher energies. We find that the low-energy behavior is amazingly simple, despite the large number of interactions. Namely, at low energies the full 5-pocket model effectively reduces either to a 3-pocket model made of one dx y hole pocket and two electron pockets or a 4-pocket model made of two dx z/dy z hole pockets and two electron pockets. The leading instability in the effective 4-pocket model is a spontaneous orbital (nematic) order, followed by s+- superconductivity. In the effective 3-pocket model, orbital fluctuations are weaker, and the system develops either s+- superconductivity or a stripe spin-density wave. In the latter case, nematicity is induced by composite spin fluctuations.

  19. Retiree out-of-pocket healthcare spending: a study of consumer expectations and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Allison K; Jackson, Howell E

    2013-01-01

    Even though most American retirees benefit from Medicare coverage, a mounting body of research predicts that many will face large and increasing out-of-pocket expenditures for healthcare costs in retirement and that many already struggle to finance these costs. It is unclear, however, whether the general population understands the likely magnitude of these out-of-pocket expenditures well enough to plan for them effectively. This study is the first comprehensive examination of Americans' expectations regarding their out-of-pocket spending on healthcare in retirement. We surveyed over 1700 near retirees and retirees to assess their expectations regarding their own spending and then compared their responses to experts' estimates. Our main findings are twofold. First, overall expectations of out-of-pocket spending are mixed. While a significant proportion of respondents estimated out-of-pocket costs in retirement at or above expert estimates of what the typical retiree will spend, a disproportionate number estimated their future spending substantially below what experts view as likely. Estimates by members of some demographic subgroups, including women and younger respondents, deviated relatively further from the experts' estimates. Second, respondents consistently misjudged spending uncertainty. In particular, respondents significantly underestimated how much individual health experience and changes in government policy can affect individual out-of-pocket spending. We discuss possible policy responses, including efforts to improve financial planning and ways to reduce unanticipated financial risk through reform of health insurance regulation.

  20. Structure-based drug design: exploring the proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Zürcher, Martina; Diederich, François

    2008-06-20

    The proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites is central for increasing binding activity and selectivity of hits and leads in medicinal chemistry. In our structure-based design approach toward the generation of potent enzyme inhibitors, we encountered a variety of challenges in gaining suitable binding affinity from the occupation of such pockets. We summarize them here for the first time. A fluorine scan of tricyclic thrombin inhibitors led to the discovery of favorable orthogonal dipolar C-F...CO interactions. Efficient cation-pi interactions were established in the S4 pocket of factor Xa, another serine protease from the blood coagulation cascade. Changing from mono- to bisubstrate inhibitors of catechol O-methyltransferase, a target in the L-Dopa-based treatment of Parkinson's disease, enabled the full exploitation of a previously unexplored hydrophobic pocket. Conformational preorganization of a pocket at an enzyme active site is crucial for harvesting binding affinity. This is demonstrated for two enzymes from the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, IspE and IspF, which are pursued as antimalarial targets. Disrupting crystallographically defined water networks on the way into a pocket might cost all of the binding free enthalpy gained from its occupation, as revealed in studies with tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, a target against shigellosis. Investigations of the active site of plasmepsin II, another antimalarial target, showed that principles for proper apolar cavity filling, originally developed for synthetic host-guest systems, are also applicable to enzyme environments.

  1. Magnetic trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Sokolov, A V; Chebakov, K A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevskii, N N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2011-08-31

    For the first time ultra-cold thulium atoms were trapped in a magnetic quadrupole trap with a small field gradient (20 Gs cm{sup -1}). The atoms were loaded from a cloud containing 4x10{sup 5} atoms that were preliminarily cooled in a magneto-optical trap to the sub-Doppler temperature of 80 {mu}K. As many as 4x10{sup 4} atoms were trapped in the magnetic trap at the temperature of 40 {mu}K. By the character of trap population decay the lifetime of atoms was determined (0.5 s) and an upper estimate was obtained for the rate constant of inelastic binary collisions for spin-polarised thulium atoms in the ground state (g{sub in} < 10{sup -11}cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). (magnetic traps)

  2. Atom trap trace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  3. Observation of Cold Collisions between Trapped Ions and Trapped Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew T.; Cetina, Marko; Oručević, Fedja; Vuletić, Vladan

    2009-06-01

    We study cold collisions between trapped ions and trapped atoms in the semiclassical (Langevin) regime. Using Yb+ ions confined in a Paul trap and Yb atoms in a magneto-optical trap, we investigate charge-exchange collisions of several isotopes over three decades of collision energies down to 3μeV (kB×35mK). The minimum measured rate coefficient of 6×10-10cm3s-1 is in good agreement with that derived from a Langevin model for an atomic polarizability of 143 a.u.

  4. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    SciTech Connect

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  5. Effect of baclofen on the acid pocket at the gastroesophageal junction.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, E; Boecxstaens, V; Farré, R; Bisschops, R; Dewulf, D; Gasbarrini, A; Pauwels, A; Blondeau, K; Tack, J

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies established that a pocket of highly acidic gastric juice is present postprandially at the gastroesophageal junction in man. The GABA-B agonist baclofen inhibits postprandial reflux events through its effects on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The aim of the current study was to investigate whether baclofen would affect the location and the extent of the postprandial acid pocket in healthy volunteers. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent acid pocket studies on two different occasions, at least 1 week apart. LES position was determined preprandially with pull-through manometry. Dual pH electrode and manometry probe stepwise pull-through (1 cm/minute, LES-10 to +5 cm) was performed at 30-minute intervals for 150 minutes, with administration of placebo or baclofen 40 mg after the first and ingestion of a liquid meal after the second pull-through. After placebo, a significant drop in intragastric gastric pH was present at the gastroesophageal junction after the meal, reflecting the acid pocket, and this was associated with a drop in LES pressure. Baclofen did not affect the presence of the acid pocket, but prevented the postprandial drop in LES pressure, and the extent of the acid pocket above the upper margin of the manometrically located LES was significantly decreased by baclofen (1.6 ± 0.7 vs. 0.3 ± 0.4 cm at 60 minutes, 2.2 ± 0.6 vs. 0.2 ± 0.6 at 90 minutes, and 1.5 ± 0.5 vs. 0.7 ± 0.7 cm at 120 minutes, all P < 0.05). Baclofen does not alter the intragastric acid pocket, but limits its extension into the distal esophagus, probably through an increase in postprandial LES pressure.

  6. Thermal Replication Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The hallmark of living matter is the replication of genetic molecules and their active storage against diffusion. We have argued in the past that thermal convection can host the million-fold accumulation even of single nucleotides and at the same time trigger exponential replication. Accumulation is driven by thermophoresis and convection in elongated chambers, replication by the inherent temperature cycling in convection. Optothermal pumping [2,3] allows to implement the thermal trap efficiently in a toroidal or linear geometry. Based on this method, we were in a position to combine accumulation and replication of DNA in the same chamber. As we are missing a solid chemistry of prebiotic replication, we used as a proxy reaction for to replication the polymerase chain reaction. Convective flow both drives the DNA replicating polymerase chain reaction (PCR) while concurrent thermophoresis accumulates the replicated 143 base pair DNA in bulk solution. The time constant for accumulation is 92 s while DNA is doubled every 50 s. The length of the amplified DNA is checked with thermophoresis. Finite element simulations confirm the findings. The experiments explore conditions in pores of hydrothermal rock which can serve as a model environment for the origin of life and has prospects towards the first autonomous evolution, hosting the Darwin process by molecular selection using the thermophoretic trap. On the other side, the implemented continuous evolution will be able to breed well specified DNA or RNA molecules in the future.

  7. Nano trap for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümel, R.

    2012-07-01

    A new ac/dc monopole trap for neutral polar particles, introduced and explored by Blümel (2011 Phys. Rev. A 83 045402 and 2011 Eur. Phys. J. D 64 85-101), is significantly advanced in several directions. (1) Previously shown to work only for polar classical particles and polar macro-molecules, the trap is shown to work for polar diatomic molecules. (2) A homogeneous electric field, optionally switched on for improved stability in the angular direction, leads to stable trapping in higher order stability regions of the Mathieu equation. (3) Based on the Floquet formalism, analytical and numerical calculations are presented that show that the trap is quantum mechanically stable. (4) Definition and derivation of a quantum pseudo-potential allow a qualitative understanding of the quantum trapping mechanism. (5) It is shown that the proposed ac/dc trap may be realized experimentally using currently available scanning tunnelling microscopy technology.

  8. Nanofriction in cold ion traps.

    PubMed

    Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sliding friction between crystal lattices and the physics of cold ion traps are so far non-overlapping fields. Two sliding lattices may either stick and show static friction or slip with dynamic friction; cold ions are known to form static chains, helices or clusters, depending on the trapping conditions. Here we show, based on simulations, that much could be learnt about friction by sliding, through, for example, an electric field, the trapped ion chains over a corrugated potential. Unlike infinite chains, in which the theoretically predicted Aubry transition to free sliding may take place, trapped chains are always pinned. Yet, a properly defined static friction still vanishes Aubry-like at a symmetric-asymmetric structural transition, found for decreasing corrugation in both straight and zig-zag trapped chains. Dynamic friction is also accessible in ringdown oscillations of the ion trap. Long theorized static and dynamic one-dimensional friction phenomena could thus become accessible in future cold ion tribology.

  9. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  10. DNA Separation Using Photoelectrophoretic Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Braiman, Avital; Thundat, Thomas George; Rudakov, Fedor M

    2011-01-01

    In our recent publications we presented a design that allows formation of highly localized and optically controlled electrophoretic traps. 1,2 We demonstrated that electrophoretic traps can be utilized for biomolecule photoconcentration, optically directed transport, and separation by size. 1,2 In the current publication we suggest a hybrid design for biomolecule separation which implements electrophoretic traps in tandem with well-established electrophoretic techniques. We perform Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate that the resolution of well-established electrophoretic techniques can be greatly enhanced by introducing photoelectrophoretic traps.

  11. Geomagnetically trapped anomalous cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Selesnick, R.S.; Cummings, A.C.; Cummings, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    Since its launch in July 1992, the polar-orbiting satellite SAMPEX has been collecting data on geomagnetically trapped heavy ions, predominantly O, N, and Ne, at energies {ge}15 MeV/nucleon and in a narrow L shell range L = 2. Their location, elemental composition, energy spectra, pitch angle distribution, and time variations all support the theory that these particles originated as singly ionized interplanetary anomalous cosmic rays that were stripped of electrons in the Earth`s upper atmosphere and subsequently trapped. The O are observed primarily at pitch angles outside the atmospheric loss cones, consistent with a trapped population, and their distribution there is nearly isotropic. The abundances relative to O of the N, possible Ne, and especially C are lower than the corresponding interplanetary values, which may be indicative of the trapping efficiencies. The distributions of trapped N, O, and Ne in energy and L shell suggest that most of the ions observed at the SAMPEX altitude of {approximately}600 km are not fully stripped when initially trapped. A comparison of the trapped intensity with the much lower interplanetary intensity of anomalous cosmic rays provides model-dependent estimates of the product of the trapping probability and the average trapped particle lifetime against ionization losses in the residual atmosphere for particles that mirror near the SAMPEX altitude. 36 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Trapped-electron runaway effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Fisch, N. J.; Peysson, Y.

    2015-08-01

    In a tokamak, trapped electrons subject to a strong electric field cannot run away immediately, because their parallel velocity does not increase over a bounce period. However, they do pinch toward the tokamak center. As they pinch toward the center, the trapping cone becomes more narrow, so eventually they can be detrapped and run away. When they run away, trapped electrons will have a very different signature from circulating electrons subject to the Dreicer mechanism. The characteristics of what are called trapped-electron runaways are identified and quantified, including their distinguishable perpendicular velocity spectrum and radial extent.

  13. Functional importance of a peripheral pocket in mammalian cytochrome P450 2B enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Hee; Liu, Jingbao; Lee, Ga-Young; Halpert, James R; Wilderman, P Ross

    2015-10-15

    The functional importance of a peripheral pocket found in previously published X-ray crystal structures of CYP2B4 and CYP2B6 was probed using a biophysical approach. Introduction of tryptophan within the pocket of CYP2B4 at F202 or I241 leads to marked impairment of 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC) or 7-benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylation efficiency; a similar substitution at F195, near the surface access to the pocket, does not affect these activities. The analogous CYP2B6 F202W mutant is inactive in the 7-EFC O-dealkylation assay. The stoichiometry of 7-EFC deethylation suggested that the decreased activity of F202W and I241W in CYP2B4 and lack of activity of F202W in CYP2B6 coincided with a sharp increase in the flux of reducing equivalents through the oxidase shunt to produce excess water. The results indicate that the chemical identity of residues within this peripheral pocket, but not at the mouth of the pocket, is important in substrate turnover and redox coupling, likely through effects on active site topology.

  14. Medicare Advantage Members’ Expected Out-Of-Pocket Spending For Inpatient And Skilled Nursing Facility Services

    PubMed Central

    Keohane, Laura M.; Grebla, Regina C.; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N.

    2015-01-01

    Inpatient and skilled nursing facility (SNF) cost sharing in Medicare Advantage (MA) plans may reduce unnecessary use of these services. However, large out-of-pocket expenses potentially limit access to care and encourage beneficiaries at high risk of needing inpatient and postacute care to avoid or leave MA plans. In 2011 new federal regulations restricted inpatient and skilled nursing facility cost sharing and mandated limits on out-of-pocket spending in MA plans. After these regulations, MA members in plans with low premiums averaged $1,758 in expected out-of-pocket spending for an episode of seven hospital days and twenty skilled nursing facility days. Among members with the same low-premium plan in 2010 and 2011, 36 percent of members belonged to plans that added an out-of-pocket spending limit in 2011. However, these members also had a $293 increase in average cost sharing for an inpatient and skilled nursing facility episode, possibly to offset plans’ expenses in financing out-of-pocket limits. Some MA beneficiaries may still have difficulty affording acute and postacute care despite greater regulation of cost sharing. PMID:26056208

  15. Functional Importance of a Peripheral Pocket in Mammalian Cytochrome P450 2B Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun-Hee; Liu, Jingbao; Lee, Ga-Young; Halpert, James R.; Wilderman, P. Ross

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of a peripheral pocket found in previously published X-ray crystal structures of CYP2B4 and CYP2B6 was probed using a biophysical approach. Introduction of tryptophan within the pocket of CYP2B4 at F202 or I241 leads to marked impairment of 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC) or 7-benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylation efficiency; a similar substitution at F195, near the surface access to the pocket, does not affect these activities. The analogous CYP2B6 F202W mutant is inactive in the 7-EFC O-dealkylation assay. The stoichiometry of 7-EFC deethylation suggested that the decreased activity of F202W and I241W in CYP2B4 and lack of activity of F202W in CYP2B6 coincided with a sharp increase in the flux of reducing equivalents through the oxidase shunt to produce excess water. The results indicate that the chemical identity of residues within this peripheral pocket, but not at the mouth of the pocket, is important in substrate turnover and redox coupling, likely through effects on active site topology. PMID:26319176

  16. Molecular Docking Studies to Explore Potential Binding Pockets and Inhibitors for Chikungunya Virus Envelope Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong T V; Yu, Haibo; Keller, Paul A

    2017-03-11

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) envelope glycoproteins are considered important potential targets for anti-CHIKV drug discovery due to their crucial roles in virus attachment and virus entry. In this study, using two available crystal structures of the immature and mature forms of envelope glycoproteins, virtual screenings based on blind dockings and focused dockings were carried out to identify potential binding pockets and hit compounds for the virus. The chemical library database of compounds, NCI Diversity Set II, was used in these docking studies. In addition to reproducing previously reported examples, new binding pockets were identified, e.g., Pocket 2 in the 3N40, and Pocket 2 and Pocket 3 in the 3N42. Convergences in conformational sampling in docking using AutoDock Vina were evaluated. An analysis of docking results was carried out to understand interactions of the envelope glycoproteins complexes. Some key residues for interactions, for example Gly91 and His230, are identified as possessing important roles in the fusion process.

  17. Engagement Angle Modeling for Multiple-circle Continuous Machining and Its Application in the Pocket Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, Shixiong; MA, Wei; BAI, Haiping; WANG, Chengyong; SONG, Yuexian

    2017-03-01

    The progressive cutting based on auxiliary paths is an effective machining method for the material accumulating region inside the mould pocket. But the method is commonly based on the radial depth of cut as the control parameter, further more there is no more appropriate adjustment and control approach. The end-users often fail to set the parameter correctly, which leads to excessive tool load in the process of actual machining. In order to make more reasonable control of the machining load and tool-path, an engagement angle modeling method for multiple-circle continuous machining is presented. The distribution mode of multiple circles, dynamic changing process of engagement angle, extreme and average value of engagement angle are carefully considered. Based on the engagement angle model, numerous application techniques for mould pocket machining are presented, involving the calculation of the milling force in multiple-circle continuous machining, and rough and finish machining path planning and load control for the material accumulating region inside the pocket, and other aspects. Simulation and actual machining experiments show that the engagement angle modeling method for multiple-circle continuous machining is correct and reliable, and the related numerous application techniques for pocket machining are feasible and effective. The proposed research contributes to the analysis and control tool load effectively and tool-path planning reasonably for the material accumulating region inside the mould pocket.

  18. Medicare Advantage Members' Expected Out-Of-Pocket Spending For Inpatient And Skilled Nursing Facility Services.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Laura M; Grebla, Regina C; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N

    2015-06-01

    Inpatient and skilled nursing facility (SNF) cost sharing in Medicare Advantage (MA) plans may reduce unnecessary use of these services. However, large out-of-pocket expenses potentially limit access to care and encourage beneficiaries at high risk of needing inpatient and postacute care to avoid or leave MA plans. In 2011 new federal regulations restricted inpatient and skilled nursing facility cost sharing and mandated limits on out-of-pocket spending in MA plans. After these regulations, MA members in plans with low premiums averaged $1,758 in expected out-of-pocket spending for an episode of seven hospital days and twenty skilled nursing facility days. Among members with the same low-premium plan in 2010 and 2011, 36 percent of members belonged to plans that added an out-of-pocket spending limit in 2011. However, these members also had a $293 increase in average cost sharing for an inpatient and skilled nursing facility episode, possibly to offset plans' expenses in financing out-of-pocket limits. Some MA beneficiaries may still have difficulty affording acute and postacute care despite greater regulation of cost sharing.

  19. Barriers to Patient-physician Communication About Out-of-pocket Costs

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, G Caleb; Casalino, Lawrence P; Tseng, Chien-Wen; McFadden, Diane; Meltzer, David O

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Though many patients and physicians believe that they should discuss out-of-pocket costs, research suggests that they infrequently do. OBJECTIVE To examine barriers preventing patient-physician communication about out-of-pocket costs among study subjects recalling a time when they wanted to discuss these costs but did not do so. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional surveys of 133 general internists and 484 of their patients from 3 academic and 18 community practices in a large midwestern metropolitan region. MEASUREMENTS Patient- and physician-reported barriers to discussing out-of-pocket costs. MAIN RESULTS Overall, 54 patients (11%) and 27 physicians (20%) were able to recall a specific time when they wanted to discuss out-of-pocket costs but did not do so. Among patients, a wide variety of barriers were reported including their own discomfort (19%), insufficient time (13%), a belief that their physician did not have a viable solution (11%), and concerns about the impact of discussions on quality of care (9%). Among physicians, the most common barriers reported were insufficient time (67%) and a belief that they did not have a solution to offer (19%). CONCLUSIONS Efforts to promote discussions of out-of-pocket costs should emphasize the legitimacy of patients’ concerns and brief actionable alternatives that physicians can take to address them. PMID:15242471

  20. Traps and seals II. Stratigraphic/capillary traps

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    This text is a reprint belonging to a series of reprint volumes which in turn are part of the Treatise of Petroleum Geology. This volume contains papers that describe different stratigraphically controlled trap types, the preservation of porosity, and the importance of capillarity in trapping hydrocarbons.

  1. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Area 1 trap limits. The Area 1 trap limit is 800 traps. Federally permitted lobster fishing vessels shall not fish with, deploy in, possess in, or haul back...

  2. Solar energy trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for trapping solar energy for heating a fluid that could be subsequently used in turbines and similar devices. The apparatus includes an elongated vertical light pipe having an open end through which the visible spectrum of electromagnetic radiation from the sun passes to strike a tubular absorber. The light pipe has a coated interior surface of a low absorptivity and a high reflectivity at the visible wavelengths and a high absorptivity/emissivity ratio at infrared wavelengths. The tubular absorber has a coating on the surface for absorbing visible wavelengths to heat the fluid passing through. Infrared wave lengths are radiated from the tubular absorber back into the light pipe for heating fluid passing through a tubular coil wound around it.

  3. The effects of cosmic Particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: V. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. Part I. physiological studies.

    PubMed

    Leon, H A; Suri, K; McTigue, M; Smith, J; Cooper, W; Miquel, J; Ashley, W W; Behnke, A R; Saunders, J F

    1975-04-01

    Tests were carried out on pocket mice to ascertain their tolerance to elevated oxygen pressures alone and to a combination of hyperoxta and heat in excess of that expected during the flight of the mice on Apollo XVII. the mice withstood oxygen partial pressures up to 12 pst at normal room temperature (24 degrees C, 75 degrees F) over a period of 7 days. A few mice previously exposed to increased PO2 died in the course of exposure to an oxygen pressure of 10 pst or 12 psi (517 mm or 620 mm Hg) for 13 d in ambient heat of 32 degrees C (90 degrees F). Supplemental vitamin E and physiological saline loading given prior to exposure had no apparent protective effect. The overall conclusion was that the pocket mice which were to go on Apollo XVII could readily survive the ambient atmosphere to which they would be exposed.

  4. Generating "fragment-based virtual library" using pocket similarity search of ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Khashan, Raed S

    2015-01-01

    As the number of available ligand-receptor complexes is increasing, researchers are becoming more dedicated to mine these complexes to aid in the drug design and development process. We present free software which is developed as a tool for performing similarity search across ligand-receptor complexes for identifying binding pockets which are similar to that of a target receptor. The search is based on 3D-geometric and chemical similarity of the atoms forming the binding pocket. For each match identified, the ligand's fragment(s) corresponding to that binding pocket are extracted, thus forming a virtual library of fragments (FragVLib) that is useful for structure-based drug design. The program provides a very useful tool to explore available databases.

  5. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. II - Effects on lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, G. A.; Corbett, R. L.; Klein, G.

    1975-01-01

    An electron microscope examination was carried out on the lungs of 11 pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that breathed oxygen at 10 psi or 12 psi partial pressure over a period of 7 d, at the end of which time they were decompressed to sea-level O2 pressure, either suddenly or in 30, 60, or 90 min. Vesiculation was noted in the endothelium of the alveolar-capillary wall in most of the animals and, occasionally, blebbing. Some mitochrondria were swollen in a few of the animals. Alveolar exudate was, in general, sparse. Compared with the lungs of other rodents, the lungs of pocket mice appeared relatively resistant to the toxic effects of oxygen. This conclusion needs, however, to be tempered by the fact that 5% N2 was used in the tests reported here. Nonetheless, the results suggest that the oxygen pressures anticipated on the flight of Apollo XVII should be well tolerated by the pocket mice.

  6. Eyes shut homolog is required for maintaining the ciliary pocket and survival of photoreceptors in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Miao; Liu, Yu; Li, Jing; Natale, Brianna N.; Cao, Shuqin; Wang, Dongliang; Amack, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in the extracellular matrix protein eyes shut homolog (EYS) cause photoreceptor degeneration in patients with retinitis pigmentosa 25 (RP25). Functions of EYS remain poorly understood, due in part to the lack of an EYS gene in mouse. We investigated the localization of vertebrate EYS proteins and engineered loss-of-function alleles in zebrafish. Immunostaining indicated that EYS localized near the connecting cilium/transition zone in photoreceptors. EYS also strongly localized to the cone outer segments and weakly to the rod outer segments and cone terminals in primate retinas. Analysis of mutant EYS zebrafish revealed disruption of the ciliary pocket in cone photoreceptors, indicating that EYS is required for maintaining the integrity of the ciliary pocket lumen. Mutant zebrafish exhibited progressive loss of cone and rod photoreceptors. Our results indicate that EYS protein localization is species-dependent and that EYS is required for maintaining ciliary pocket morphology and survival of photoreceptors in zebrafish. PMID:27737822

  7. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Conserved Hydrophobic Pocket of Flavivirus Methyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongping; Liu, Lihui; Zou, Gang; Zhao, Yiwei; Li, Zhong; Lim, Siew Pheng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Li, Hongmin

    2010-01-01

    The flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) sequentially methylates the N7 and 2′-O positions of the viral RNA cap (GpppA-RNA → m7GpppA-RNA → m7GpppAm-RNA), using S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) as a methyl donor. We report here that sinefungin (SIN), an AdoMet analog, inhibits several flaviviruses through suppression of viral MTase. The crystal structure of West Nile virus MTase in complex with SIN inhibitor at 2.0-Å resolution revealed a flavivirus-conserved hydrophobic pocket located next to the AdoMet-binding site. The pocket is functionally critical in the viral replication and cap methylations. In addition, the N7 methylation efficiency was found to correlate with the viral replication ability. Thus, SIN analogs with modifications that interact with the hydrophobic pocket are potential specific inhibitors of flavivirus MTase. PMID:20685660

  8. Neurology diagnostics security and terminal adaptation for PocketNeuro project.

    PubMed

    Chemak, C; Bouhlel, M-S; Lapayre, J-C

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents new approaches of medical information security and terminal mobile phone adaptation for the PocketNeuro project. The latter term refers to a project created for the management of neurological diseases. It consists of transmitting information about patients ("desk of patients") to a doctor's mobile phone during a visit and examination of a patient. These new approaches for the PocketNeuro project were analyzed in terms of medical information security and adaptation of the diagnostic images to the doctor's mobile phone. Images were extracted from a DICOM library. Matlab and its library were used as software to test our approaches and to validate our results. Experiments performed on a database of 30 256 x 256 pixel-sized neuronal medical images indicated that our new approaches for PocketNeuro project are valid and support plans for large-scale studies between French and Swiss hospitals using secured connections.

  9. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paumel, K.; Moysan, J.; Chatain, D.; Corneloup, G.; Baqué, F.

    2011-08-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  10. Mass trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass trapping has been found to be highly effective for control of pest fruit flies when populations are low and a highly effective lure is available for the target species. Successful population control through mass trapping is an indicator that attract-and-kill bait stations may be equally succes...

  11. Nontoxic Antifreeze for Insect Traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Propylene glycol in water is a safe and effective alternative to ethylene glycol as a capture liquid in insect traps (pitfalls, flight intercepts, pan traps). Propylene glycol formulations are readily available because it is the primary (95%) ingredient in certain automotive antifreeze formulations...

  12. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  13. Dimensions of diastemata and associated periodontal food pockets in donkey cheek teeth.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, N; Burden, F A; Baedt, L Gosden; Shaw, D J; Dixon, P M

    2009-01-01

    Equine cheek teeth (CT) diastemata often cause deep periodontal food pocketing and are therefore regarded as a painful dental disorder of equidae. However there appears to be no information available on the size or shape of these diastemata. This post mortem study examined 16 donkey skulls (mean age = 32-years) containing 45 CT diastemata to define the anatomical shape and dimensions of these diastemata, and of the associated periodontal food pockets that occur with this disorder. Diastemata were found to more commonly involve mandibular (56.0%) compared with maxillary CT (44.0%), and 71.0% of these diastemata had adjacent intercurrent dental disorders that may have predisposed donkeys to the diastemata. The median widths of all diastemata were 2.0-mm at the occlusal surface and 3.1-mm at the gingival margin, with no diferences in widths between the lateral or medial aspects of diastemata. Diastemata were defined as open (60.00%) or valve (40.00%) based on their gross appearance. This classification was confirmed to be accurate by measurements that showed valve diastemata to have an occlusal to gingival width ratio of 0.4, in contrast to open diastemata where this ratio was 1.07. Food was impacted in 89.0% of diastemata, but all diastemata had adjacent periodontal disease. Periodontal food pocketing was present adjacent to 76.0% of diastemata, more commonly on the lateral aspect (73.0% prevalence; mean pocket depth = 4.1-mm) than the medial aspect (47.0% prevalence; mean pocket depth = 2.4-mm). The depth of periodontal pockets of diastemata was not associated with the height of the erupted crowns of adjacent CT.

  14. Nanocarpets for Trapping Microscopic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noca, Flavio; Chen, Fei; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Michael; Hoenk, Michael; Kowalczyk, Robert; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Nanocarpets that is, carpets of carbon nanotubes are undergoing development as means of trapping microscopic particles for scientific analysis. Examples of such particles include inorganic particles, pollen, bacteria, and spores. Nanocarpets can be characterized as scaled-down versions of ordinary macroscopic floor carpets, which trap dust and other particulate matter, albeit not purposefully. Nanocarpets can also be characterized as mimicking both the structure and the particle-trapping behavior of ciliated lung epithelia, the carbon nanotubes being analogous to cilia. Carbon nanotubes can easily be chemically functionalized for selective trapping of specific particles of interest. One could, alternatively, use such other three-dimensionally-structured materials as aerogels and activated carbon for the purposeful trapping of microscopic particles. However, nanocarpets offer important advantages over these alternative materials: (1) Nanocarpets are amenable to nonintrusive probing by optical means; and (2) Nanocarpets offer greater surface-to-volume ratios.

  15. PocketVO -- A Simple Tool for Accessing Multiwavelength Images through the VO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, R.; Raddick, M. J.; Fernandes, I. F.

    2008-08-01

    Several existing Web-based tools allow users to access astronomical images and data from different surveys, almost all integrated with or accessible via Virtual Observatory (VO) portals. These tools are often too complex for most untrained users, including students and amateur astronomers. In this paper we present PocketVO, a simple interface to existing services such as the Sesame name resolver and many image cutout services. PocketVO provides a simple interface for untrained users for the display of astronomical images. We provide examples and also discuss possible extensions.

  16. How the Proximal Pocket May Influence the Enantiospecificities of Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Epoxidations of Olefins

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexander N.; Chatfield, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase-catalyzed enantiospecific epoxidations of olefins are of significant biotechnological interest. Typical enantiomeric excesses are in the range of 66%–97% and translate into free energy differences on the order of 1 kcal/mol. These differences are generally attributed to the effect of the distal pocket. In this paper, we show that the influence of the proximal pocket on the electron transfer mechanism in the rate-limiting event may be just as significant for a quantitatively accurate account of the experimentally-measured enantiospecificities. PMID:27517911

  17. Ion-beam amorphization of semiconductors: A physical model based on the amorphous pocket population

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, K.R.C.; Jaraiz, M.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Rubio, J.E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Barbolla, J.; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a model for damage accumulation up to amorphization, based on the ion-implant damage structures commonly known as amorphous pockets. The model is able to reproduce the silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature for C, Si, and Ge ion implants. Its use as an analysis tool reveals an unexpected bimodal distribution of the defect population around a characteristic size, which is larger for heavier ions. The defect population is split in both size and composition, with small, pure interstitial and vacancy clusters below the characteristic size, and amorphous pockets with a balanced mixture of interstitials and vacancies beyond that size.

  18. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    DOE PAGES

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; ...

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  19. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Wilson, S. D.; He, Rui -Hua

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  20. Coastal geomorphological study of pocket beaches in Crete, with the use of planview indices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, George; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Poulos, Serafim; Kampanis, Nikos

    2013-04-01

    The formation of pocket beaches is a result of a large number of processes and mechanisms that vary on space and time scales. This study aims in defining the planform characteristics of pocket beaches in Crete Isl. and to determine their sheltering effect, embaymentization and their status of equilibrium. Thus, data from 30 pocket beaches along the coastline of Crete, with different geomorphological and hydrodynamical setting, were collected. Planform parameters were applied and coastal planview indices from the bibliography were applied. The parameters included: length and orientation of the headlands between the pocket beach; length between the bay entrance and the center of the beach; lengths of the i) embayed shoreline, ii) embayed beach, iii) beach segment located at the shadow of a headland; linear distance and orientation between the edges of the embayed beach; direction of the incident wave energy flux; wave crest obliquity to the control line; beach area, maximum beach width and headland orientation and river/ torrent catchment areas in beach zones that an active river system existed (Bowman et al.2009). For the morphological mapping of the study areas, 1:5000 orthophoto maps were used. Wave regime has been calculated with the use of prognostic equations and utilising local wind data (mean annual frequency of wind speed and direction), provided by the Wind and Wave Atlas of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The diffraction and refraction of the waves has been simulated with the use of numerical models. The study shows that Cretan pocket beaches display a wide range of indentation, suggesting that is the result of several parameters that include tectonics, coastal hydrodynamics and river catchment areas. The more indented bays are, the shorter their beaches become, while low-indented pocket beaches are the widest and the longest ones. Beaches with headland with large length appear to be more protected and receive smaller amount of wave energy. Most of the

  1. Out-of-pocket spending and medication adherence among dialysis patients in twelve countries.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Richard A; Greer, Scott L; Albert, Justin M; Young, Eric W; Piette, John D

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined drug costs and adherence in similar patient cohorts across countries. Using representative samples of hemodialysis patients from twelve countries, we examined out-of-pocket medication spending and cost-related nonadherence. Mean monthly spending ranged from $8 in the United Kingdom to $114 in the United States. The proportion of patients reporting nonadherence because of cost ranged from 3 percent in Japan to 29 percent in the United States. Out-of-pocket spending was related to national pharmaceutical financing policies and predicted national nonadherence rates. However, inconsistencies in the relationship between patient costs and nonadherence suggested that other social or policy factors also matter.

  2. Improved Traps for Removing Gases From Coolant Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holladay, John; Ritchie, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Two documents discuss improvements in traps for removing noncondensable gases (e.g., air) from heat-transfer liquids (e.g., water) in spacecraft cooling systems. Noncondensable gases must be removed because they can interfere with operation. A typical trap includes a cylindrical hydrophobic membrane inside a cylindrical hydrophilic membrane, all surrounded by an outer cylindrical impermeable shell. The input mixture of gas bubbles and liquid flows into the annular volume between the membranes. Bubbles pass into the central hollow of the hydrophobic membrane and are vented. The liquid flows outward through the hydrophilic membrane and is recirculated.

  3. The trapped human experiment.

    PubMed

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  4. The Impact of the US Food and Drug Administration Chlorofluorocarbon Ban on Out-of-pocket Costs and Use of Albuterol Inhalers Among Individuals With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Anupam B.; Ho, Oliver; Goldman, Dana P.; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The US Clean Air Act prohibits use of nonessential ozone-depleting substances. In 2005, the US Food and Drug Administration announced the ban of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) albuterol inhalers by December 31, 2008. The policy resulted in the controversial replacement of generic CFC inhalers by more expensive, branded hydrofluoroalkane inhalers. The policy’s impact on out-of-pocket costs and utilization of albuterol is unknown. OBJECTIVE To study the impact of the US Food and Drug Administration’s CFC ban on out-of-pocket costs and utilization of albuterol inhalers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Using private insurance data from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2010, we investigated the effect of the CFC ban on out-of-pocket costs and utilization of albuterol inhalers among individuals with asthma (109 428 adults; 37 281 children), as well as asthma-related hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and outpatient visits. We estimated multivariable models adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, and mean out-of-pocket costs of albuterol inhalers in an individual’s drug plan. We analyzed whether effects varied between adults vs children and those with persistent vs nonpersistent asthma. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Pharmacy claims for albuterol inhalers, as well as asthma-related hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and outpatient visits. RESULTS The mean out-of-pocket albuterol cost rose from $13.60 (95% CI, $13.40–$13.70) per prescription in 2004 to $25.00 (95% CI, $24.80–$25.20) immediately after the 2008 ban. By the end of 2010, costs had lowered to $21.00 (95% CI, $20.80–$21.20) per prescription. Overall albuterol inhaler use steadily declined from 2004 to 2010. Steep declines in use of generic CFC inhalers occurred after the fourth quarter of 2006 and were almost fully offset by increases in use of hydrofluoroalkane inhalers. In multivariable analyses, a $10 increase in out-of-pocket albuterol prescription costs was estimated to

  5. Trap-mulching Argentine ants.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jules; Sorenson, Clyde E; Waldvogel, Michael G

    2006-10-01

    Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), management is constrained, in large part, by polydomy where nestmates are distributed extensively across urban landscapes, particularly within mulch. Management with trap-mulching is a novel approach derived from trap-cropping where ants are repelled from a broad domain of nest sites to smaller defined areas, which are subsequently treated with insecticide. This concept was field-tested with mulch surrounding ornamental trees replaced with a narrow band of pine (Pinus spp.) needle mulch (trap) within a much larger patch of repellent aromatic cedar (Juniperus spp.) mulch. After ants reestablished around the trees, the pine needle mulch band was treated with 0.06% fipronil (Termidor). Poor results were obtained when the trap extended from the tree trunk to the edge of the mulched area. When the trap was applied as a circular band around the tree trunk reductions in the number of foraging ants were recorded through 14 d compared with an untreated mulch control, but not for longer periods. Reductions in the number of ant nests within mulch were no different between the trap mulch and any of the other treatments. We conclude that trap-mulching offers limited benefits, and that successful management of Argentine ants will require implementation of complementary or perhaps alternative strategies.

  6. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  7. [Residual pocket depth after periodontal regenerative procedures. Clinical relevance and interpretation of meta-analyses data].

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Patrick R; Hauri, Dimitri; Krähenmann, Michael A; Puhan, Milo A; Attin, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Meta-analyses allow to combine results systematically and to obtain more precise quantitative results on the efficacy of a therapy. For the clinician, the comparison of two therapy modalities is particularly of interest. Several meta-analyses exist in the field of periodontal regenerative procedures. The problem is that the results are difficult to interpret for the clinician. It is only the clinical effect that can indicate the superiority of a certain treatment modality, e.g. remaining periodontal pockets. The aim of the present systematic review was the re-evaluation of studies of existing meta-analyses and to determine the probability of remaining periodontal pockets of more than 3 respectively 5 mm after active therapy. The probability of remaining periodontal pockets over 3 respectively 5 mm was significantly higher after periodontal flap procedure without regenerative procedures, compared to guided tissue regeneration (GTR) or the use of enamel matrix derivatives. Moreover, the probability of remaining pockets over 3 mm was with GTR on average 57% and with the use of enamel maxtrix derivatives 74%. Using the cut-off value of 5 mm this probability was reduced to 8 and 17%, respectively. A new clinical attachment that was less than 50% of the original level was to be expected in 29% (GTR) and 15% using enamel matrix derivatives. This statistical interpretation permits not only the clinician, but also the patient to compare the efficacy of the different treatment modalities using the probability of primary clinical effect outcomes.

  8. A Mobile Computing Solution for Collecting Functional Analysis Data on a Pocket PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, James; Dixon, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper provides a task analysis for creating a computerized data system using a Pocket PC and Microsoft Visual Basic. With Visual Basic software and any handheld device running the Windows MOBLE operating system, this task analysis will allow behavior analysts to program and customize their own functional analysis data-collection…

  9. Access to Rural Mental Health Services: Service Use and Out-of-Pocket Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziller, Erika C.; Anderson, Nathaniel J.; Coburn, Andrew F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine rural-urban differences in the use of mental health services (mental health and substance abuse office visits, and mental health prescriptions) and in the out-of-pocket costs paid for these services. Methods: The pooled 2003 and 2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys were used to assess differences in mental health service use…

  10. Globin domain interactions control heme pocket conformation and oligomerization of globin coupled sensors.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Shannon; Burns, Justin L; Vansuch, Gregory E; Chica, Bryant; Weinert, Emily E

    2016-11-01

    Globin coupled sensors (GCS) are O2-sensing proteins used by bacteria to monitor the surrounding gaseous environment. To investigate the biphasic O2 dissociation kinetics observed for full-length GCS proteins, isolated globin domains from Pectobacterium carotovorum ssp. carotovorum (PccGlobin), and Bordetella pertussis (BpeGlobin), have been characterized. PccGlobin is found to be dimeric, while BpeGlobin is monomeric, indicating key differences in the globin domain dimer interface. Through characterization of wild type globin domains and globin variants with mutations at the dimer interface and within the distal pocket, dimerization of the globin domain is demonstrated to correlate with biphasic dissociation kinetics. Furthermore, a distal pocket tyrosine is identified as the primary hydrogen bond donor, while a secondary hydrogen bond donor within the distal heme pocket is involved in conformation(s) that lead to the second O2 dissociation rate. These findings highlight the role of the globin dimer interface in controlling properties of both the heme pocket and full-length GCS proteins.

  11. Out of Pocket Payment for Obstetrical Complications: A Cost Analysis Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yavangi, Mahnaz; Sohrabi, Mohammad Reza; Riazi, Sahand

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to determine the total expenditure and out of pocket payment on pregnancy complications in Tehran, the capital of Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted on 1172 patients who admitted in two general teaching referral Hospitals in Tehran. In this study, we calculated total and out of pocket inpatient costs for seven pregnancy complications including preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), abortion, ante-partum hemorrhage, preterm delivery, premature rupture of membranes and post-dated pregnancy. We used descriptive analysis and analysis of variance test to compare these pregnancy complications. Results: The average duration of hospitalization was 3.28 days and the number of visits by physicians for a patient was 9.79 on average. The average total cost for these pregnancy complications was 735.22 Unites States Dollars (USD) (standard deviation [SD] = 650.53). The average out of packet share was 277.08 USD (SD = 350.74), which was 37.69% of total expenditure. IUGR with payment of 398.76 USD (SD = 418.54) (52.06% of total expenditure) had the greatest amount of out of pocket expenditure in all complications. While, abortion had the minimum out of pocket amount that was 148.77 USD (SD = 244.05). Conclusions: Obstetrics complications had no catastrophic effect on families, but IUGR cost was about 30% of monthly household non-food costs in Tehran so more financial protection plans and insurances are recommended for these patients. PMID:24404365

  12. The Single Needle Lockstitch Machine. [Constructing and Setting Pockets.] Module 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on constructing and setting pockets, one in a series on the single needle lockstitch sewing machine for student self-study, contains three sections. Each section includes the following parts: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student information, student self-check, check-out activities, and an…

  13. Do Nurse-Led Skill Training Interventions Affect Informal Caregivers' Out-of-Pocket Expenditures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Thorpe, Joshua M.; Chestnutt, Deborah; Molloy, Margory; Boling, John C.; Davis, Linda Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This paper is a report of a study of the Assistance, Support, and Self-health Initiated through Skill Training (ASSIST) randomized control trial. The aim of this paper is to understand whether participating in ASSIST significantly changed the out-of-pocket (OOP) costs for family caregivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) or…

  14. Approaches for identification of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Zhu, Xiaojie; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-11

    The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon), was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD), it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs.

  15. Adaptation of a Pocket PC for Use as a Wearable Voice Dosimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popolo, Peter S.; Svec, Jan G.; Titze, Ingo R.

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the adaptation of a commercially available Pocket PC for use as a voice dosimeter, a wearable device that measures the vocal dose of teachers or other individuals on the job, at home, and elsewhere during the course of an entire day. An engineering approach for designing a voice dosimeter is described, and design data are…

  16. Optimal ligand descriptor for pocket recognition based on the Beta-shape.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Kwan; Won, Chung-In; Cha, Jehyun; Lee, Kichun; Kim, Deok-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Structure-based virtual screening is one of the most important and common computational methods for the identification of predicted hit at the beginning of drug discovery. Pocket recognition and definition is frequently a prerequisite of structure-based virtual screening, reducing the search space of the predicted protein-ligand complex. In this paper, we present an optimal ligand shape descriptor for a pocket recognition algorithm based on the beta-shape, which is a derivative structure of the Voronoi diagram of atoms. We investigate six candidates for a shape descriptor for a ligand using statistical analysis: the minimum enclosing sphere, three measures from the principal component analysis of atoms, the van der Waals volume, and the beta-shape volume. Among them, the van der Waals volume of a ligand is the optimal shape descriptor for pocket recognition and best tunes the pocket recognition algorithm based on the beta-shape for efficient virtual screening. The performance of the proposed algorithm is verified by a benchmark test.

  17. Effect of the Written and Combined Warnings on the Cigarette Pockets on University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gercek, Cem; Dogan, Nuri

    2012-01-01

    The general aim of this study is to analyze the effects of the written and combined (written and pictures) warning statements on the cigarette pockets on university students. The sample of the study includes a total of 231 undergraduate students. The participants were divided into two groups: the first group was presented only written warnings,…

  18. 78 FR 54214 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removing Five Subspecies of Mazama Pocket Gopher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... statement that it is not possible to conclusively determine that Brush Prairie pocket gopher is not T.... mazama using standard, scientifically accepted morphological characteristics to separate the species. Our... that the summary statement for Factor E in our threats analysis for all nine subspecies was not...

  19. Total and Out-of-Pocket Expenditures for Prescription Drugs among Older Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambamoorthi, Usha; Shea, Dennis; Crystal, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The burden of prescription drug costs on Medicare beneficiaries has become a critical policy issue in improving the Medicare program, yet few studies have provided detailed and current information on that burden. The present study estimates total and out-of-pocket expenditures for prescription drugs and the burden of these costs in…

  20. Pseudogap-generated a coexistence of Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huaisong; Gao, Deheng; Feng, Shiping

    2017-03-01

    One of the most intriguing puzzle is why there is a coexistence of Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets in the pseudogap phase of cuprate superconductors? This puzzle is calling for an explanation. Based on the t - J model in the fermion-spin representation, the coexistence of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets in cuprate superconductors is studied by taking into account the pseudogap effect. It is shown that the pseudogap induces an energy band splitting, and then the poles of the electron Green's function at zero energy form two contours in momentum space, however, the electron spectral weight on these two contours around the antinodal region is gapped out by the pseudogap, leaving behind the low-energy electron spectral weight only located at the disconnected segments around the nodal region. In particular, the tips of these disconnected segments converge on the hot spots to form the closed Fermi pockets, generating a coexistence of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. Moreover, the single-particle coherent weight is directly related to the pseudogap, and grows linearly with doping. The calculated result of the overall dispersion of the electron excitations is in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The theory also predicts that the pseudogap-induced peak-dip-hump structure in the electron spectrum is absent from the hot-spot directions.

  1. Estimating Leaf Area Index (LAI) in Vineyards Using the PocketLAI Smart-App.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Francesca; Movedi, Ermes; Coduto, Davide; Parisi, Simone; Brancadoro, Lucio; Pagani, Valentina; Guarneri, Tommaso; Confalonieri, Roberto

    2016-11-26

    Estimating leaf area index (LAI) of Vitis vinifera using indirect methods involves some critical issues, related to its discontinuous and non-homogeneous canopy. This study evaluates the smart app PocketLAI and hemispherical photography in vineyards against destructive LAI measurements. Data were collected during six surveys in an experimental site characterized by a high level of heterogeneity among plants, allowing us to explore a wide range of LAI values. During the last survey, the possibility to combine remote sensing data and in-situ PocketLAI estimates (smart scouting) was evaluated. Results showed a good agreement between PocketLAI data and direct measurements, especially for LAI ranging from 0.13 to 1.41 (R² = 0.94, RRMSE = 17.27%), whereas the accuracy decreased when an outlying value (vineyard LAI = 2.84) was included (R² = 0.77, RRMSE = 43.00%), due to the saturation effect in case of very dense canopies arising from lack of green pruning. The hemispherical photography showed very high values of R², even in presence of the outlying value (R² = 0.94), although it showed a marked and quite constant overestimation error (RRMSE = 99.46%), suggesting the need to introduce a correction factor specific for vineyards. During the smart scouting, PocketLAI showed its reliability to monitor the spatial-temporal variability of vine vigor in cordon-trained systems, and showed a potential for a wide range of applications, also in combination with remote sensing.

  2. Investigation of dielectric pocket induced variations in tunnel field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upasana; Narang, Rakhi; Saxena, Manoj; Gupta, Mridula

    2016-04-01

    The performance of conventional Tunnel FETs struggling from ambipolar issues, insufficient on-current, lower transconductance value, higher delay and lower cut off frequency has been improved by introducing several material and device engineering concepts in past few years. Keeping this in view, another interesting and reliable option i.e. Dielectric Pocket TFET (featuring a dielectric pocket placement near tunneling junction) has been comprehensively and qualitatively demonstrated using ATLAS device simulator. The architecture has been explored in terms of various device electrostatic parameters such as potential, energy band profile, electron and hole concentration, electric field variation and band to band generation rate (GBTB) near the tunneling junction where the Dielectric Pocket (DP) has been introduced. Subsequently, a detailed investigation by changing the position and dielectric constant of pocket at respective junctions has been made where DP induced variations in drain current, transconductance and parasitic capacitance have been examined. The work highlights major improvements over conventional TFET in terms of lower subthreshold swing and threshold voltage, higher drain current and transconductance, improved on-to-off current ratio, suppressed ambipolar conduction and improved dynamic power dissipation issues for low voltage analog and digital applications.

  3. Solution of Cubic Equations by Iteration Methods on a Pocket Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamdad, Farzad

    2004-01-01

    A method to provide students a vision of how they can write iteration programs on an inexpensive programmable pocket calculator, without requiring a PC or a graphing calculator is developed. Two iteration methods are used, successive-approximations and bisection methods.

  4. Biochemical and serological characterization of Bacteroides intermedius strains isolated from the deep periodontal pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlén, G; Wikström, M; Renvert, S; Gmür, R; Guggenheim, B

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one fluorescence-positive black-pigmented Bacteroides strains obtained from 51 patients with deep periodontal pockets (greater than 6 mm) were identified and characterized. Fifty of these strains were presumptively identified as Bacteroides intermedius according to the indole reaction. This was confirmed by further biochemical characterization. The 50 strains from diseased sites were then compared with 16 B. intermedius strains isolated from periodontally healthy individuals with no signs of destructive periodontal disease. Tests for antimicrobial susceptibility showed similar patterns for all 50 pocket-derived strains, except for one beta-lactamase-positive strain that was resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin. Forty-seven strains were tested for binding of three monoclonal antibodies defining three distinct serogroups of B. intermedius. Thirty-one strains belonged to serogroup I, three to serogroup II and thirteen to serogroup III. In comparison to the strains from the shallow periodontal pockets, serogroup I was significantly overrepresented in the patient group with periodontal disease. We conclude that saccharolytic black-pigmented Bacteroides species from deep periodontal pockets constituted, with very rare exceptions, a biochemically homogeneous but antigenically heterogeneous group of B. intermedius and that serogroup I is predominantly found in deep periodontal lesions. PMID:2229351

  5. Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator Pocket Infection Due to a Previously Undescribed Cupriavidus Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua B.; Vitko, Nicholas P.; Voskuil, Martin I.; Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R.

    2010-01-01

    The genus Cupriavidus consists of Gram-negative, nonfermenting bacteria most of which are environmental organisms, though some species have been associated with human disease. We report the recovery and identification of an isolate that represents a previously undescribed species of Cupriavidus from an implantable cardiac defibrillator pocket infection. PMID:20427695

  6. Brine Pockets in the Icy Shell on Europa: Distribution, Chemistry, and Habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Yu; Shock, E. L.; Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    On Earth, sea ice is rich in brine, salt, and gas inclusions that form through capturing of seawater during ice formation. Cooling of the ice over time leads to sequential freezing of captured sea-water, precipitation of salts, exsolution of gases, and formation of brine channels and pockets. Distribution and composition of brines in sea ice depend on the rate of ice formation, vertical temperature gradient, and the age of the ice. With aging, the abundance of brine pockets decreases through downward migration. De- spite low temperatures and elevated salinities, brines in sea ice provide a habitat for photosynthetic and chemosynthetic organisms. On Europa, brine pockets and channels could exist in the icy shell that may be from a few km to a few tens of km thick and is probably underlain by a water ocean. If the icy shell is relatively thick, convection could develop, affecting the temperature pattern in the ice. To predict the distribution and chemistry of brine pockets in the icy shell we have combined numerical models of the temperature distribution within a convecting shell, a model for oceanic chemistry, and a model for freezing of Europan oceanic water. Possible effects of brine and gas inclusions on ice rheology and tectonics are discussed.

  7. Out-of-Pocket Net Price for College. Data Point. NCES 2014-902

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Laura; Paslov, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This Data Point uses data from four administrations of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000, NPSAS:04, NPSAS:08, and NPSAS:12) to briefly present trends in out-of-pocket net price for college, the amount that students and their families must pay to attend college after subtracting grants, loans, work-study, and all other…

  8. Characteristics of a trapped-vortex (TV) combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, K.-Y.; Gross, L. P.; Trump, D. D.; Roquemore, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of a Trapped-Vortex (TV) combustor are presented. A vortex is trapped in the cavity established between two disks mounted in tandem. Fuel and air are injected directly into the cavity in such a way as to increase the vortex strength. Some air from the annular flow is also entrained into the recirculation zone of the vortex. Lean blow-out limits of the combustor are determined for a wide range of annular air flow rates. These data indicate that the lean blow-out limits are considerably lower for the TV combustor than for flames stabilized using swirl or bluff-bodies. The pressure loss through the annular duct is also low, being less than 2% for the flow conditions in this study. The instantaneous shape of the recirculation zone of the trapped vortex is measured using a two-color PIV technique. Temperature profiles obtained with CARS indicate a well mixed recirculation zone and demonstrate the impact of primary air injection on the local equivalence ratio.

  9. Out-of-Pocket Payments, Health Care Access and Utilisation in South-Eastern Nigeria: A Gender Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Onah, Michael N.; Govender, Veloshnee

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-pocket (OOP) payments have severe consequences for health care access and utilisation and are especially catastrophic for the poor. Although women comprise the majority of the poor in Nigeria and globally, the implications of OOP payments for health care access from a gender perspective have received little attention. This study seeks to fill this gap by using a combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis to investigate the gendered impact of OOPs on healthcare utilisation in south-eastern Nigeria. 411 households were surveyed and six single-sex Focus Group Discussions conducted. This study confirmed the socioeconomic and demographic vulnerability of female-headed households (FHHs), which contributed to gender-based inter-household differences in healthcare access, cost burden, choices of healthcare providers, methods of funding healthcare and coping strategies. FHHs had higher cost burdens from seeking care and untreated morbidity than male-headed households (MHHs) with affordability as a reason for not seeking care. There is also a high utilisation of patent medicine vendors (PMVs) by both households (PMVs are drug vendors that are unregulated, likely to offer very low-quality treatment and do not have trained personnel). OOP payment was predominantly the means of healthcare payment for both households, and households spoke of the difficulties associated with repaying health-related debt with implications for the medical poverty trap. It is recommended that the removal of user fees, introduction of prepayment schemes, and regulating PMVs be considered to improve access and provide protection against debt for FHHs and MHHs. The vulnerability of widows is of special concern and efforts to improve their healthcare access and broader efforts to empower should be encouraged for them and other poor households. PMID:24728103

  10. Early wound healing and refractive response of different pocket configurations following presbyopic inlay implantation

    PubMed Central

    Konstantopoulos, Aris; Liu, Yu-Chi; Teo, Ericia Pei Wen; Lwin, Nyein Chan; Yam, Gary Hin Fai; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Presbyopic inlays have mostly been implanted under a corneal flap. Implantation in a pocket has advantages including less postoperative dry eye and neurotrophic effect, and better biomechanical corneal stability. This study investigated the effect of different pocket and flocket dimensions on corneal stability and refractive power after Raindrop™ implantation, and the associated wound healing response. Methodology Ten New Zealand White rabbits had bilateral pocket Raindrop™ implantation. Eyes were allocated to 4 groups: pockets with 4mm, 6mm, and 8mm diameters, and 8mm flocket. They were examined pre-operatively, at day 1, weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 post-surgery with anterior segment optical coherence tomography, corneal topography and in-vivo confocal microscopy. After euthanasia (week 4), CD11b, heat shock protein (HSP) 47 and fibronectin corneal immunohistochemistry was performed. Results Corneal thickness (mean±SD) increased from 360.0±16.2μm pre-operatively to 383.9±32.5, 409.4±79.3, 393.6±35.2, 396.4±50.7 and 405±20.3μm on day 1, weeks 1,2,3 and 4 respectively (p<0.008, all time-points). Corneal refractive power increased by 11.1±5.5, 7.5±2.5, 7.5±3.1, 7.0±3.6 and 6.3±2.9D (p<0.001). Corneal astigmatism increased from 1.1±0.3D to 2.3±1.6, 1.7±0.7, 1.8±1.0, 1.6±0.9 and 1.6±0.9D respectively (p = 0.033). CT, refractive power change and astigmatism were not different between groups. The 8mm pocket and 8mm flocket groups had the least stromal keratocyte reflectivity. CD11b, fibronectin or HSP47 weren’t detected. Conclusions Anatomical and refractive stability was achieved by 1 week; the outcomes were not affected by pocket or flocket configuration. No scarring or inflammation was identified. The 8mm pocket and flocket showed the least keratocyte activation, suggesting they might be the preferred configuration. PMID:28235010

  11. The migration of fragments of glass from the pockets to the surfaces of clothing.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, S; Geddes, T; Lovelock, T J

    2011-05-20

    During the last decade or so there has been some discussion in the forensic community in the United Kingdom concerning whether it is necessary to search the pockets for glass particles in garments attributed to suspects arrested for glass breaking crimes. The removal of this practice would help expedite the searching and recovery process since examining only the surfaces of clothing would reduce the cost of recovering glass evidence. However, it is believed by many scientists that some glass fragments originally acquired in pockets can migrate to the surfaces of clothing prior to examination by the forensic scientist. As glass fragments have been encountered in the pockets of garments during examinations of casework items in the LGC Laboratories, the implications of this change in practice needs to be assessed. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate this possibility that fragments of glass migrate from a pocket of a garment to its surfaces during police and laboratory handling after a person is suspected of breaking glass during an offence. If this occurs to a significant extent then it could affect the evaluation of the glass evidence when using a Bayesian approach. Sixty fragments of glass were seeded into a pocket of a fleece jacket and a pair of denim jeans. Three experiments were performed; one examined a searching, recovery and blanking procedure, another examined the pre-laboratory 'handling' process of an item in an evidence bag, and the third experiment looked at the removal of an object from a pocket laden with glass and subsequent removal and packaging of the garment. Up to two (3.3%) fragments were recovered from the surfaces of the fleece jacket and the denim jeans via the searching, recovery and blanking procedure. Similar numbers were also recovered from the insides of the evidence bags. Up to four (6.7%) fragments were recovered from the surface of the fleece jacket and up to five (8.3%) fragments were recovered from the surface of the

  12. Hepatitis B Virus Capsids Have Diverse Structural Responses to Small-Molecule Ligands Bound to the Heteroaryldihydropyrimidine Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Katen, Sarah P.; Francis, Samson; Chirapu, Srinivas; Finn, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Though the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is an important participant in many aspects of the viral life cycle, its best-characterized activity is self-assembly into 240-monomer capsids. Small molecules that target core protein (core protein allosteric modulators [CpAMs]) represent a promising antiviral strategy. To better understand the structural basis of the CpAM mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the HBV capsid in complex with HAP18. HAP18 accelerates assembly, increases protein-protein association more than 100-fold, and induces assembly of nonicosahedral macrostructures. In a preformed capsid, HAP18 is found at quasiequivalent subunit-subunit interfaces. In a detailed comparison to the two other extant CpAM structures, we find that the HAP18-capsid structure presents a paradox. Whereas the two other structures expanded the capsid diameter by up to 10 Å, HAP18 caused only minor changes in quaternary structure and actually decreased the capsid diameter by ∼3 Å. These results indicate that CpAMs do not have a single allosteric effect on capsid structure. We suggest that HBV capsids present an ensemble of states that can be trapped by CpAMs, indicating a more complex basis for antiviral drug design. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis B virus core protein has multiple roles in the viral life cycle—assembly, compartment for reverse transcription, intracellular trafficking, and nuclear functions—making it an attractive antiviral target. Core protein allosteric modulators (CpAMs) are an experimental class of antivirals that bind core protein. The most recognized CpAM activity is that they accelerate core protein assembly and strengthen interactions between subunits. In this study, we observe that the CpAM-binding pocket has multiple conformations. We compare structures of capsids cocrystallized with different CpAMs and find that they also affect quaternary structure in different ways. These results suggest that the capsid “breathes” and is

  13. Trapped charge-driven degradation of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Namyoung; Kwak, Kwisung; Jang, Min Seok; Yoon, Heetae; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Byun, Junseop; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-11-01

    Perovskite solar cells have shown unprecedent performance increase up to 22% efficiency. However, their photovoltaic performance has shown fast deterioration under light illumination in the presence of humid air even with encapulation. The stability of perovskite materials has been unsolved and its mechanism has been elusive. Here we uncover a mechanism for irreversible degradation of perovskite materials in which trapped charges, regardless of the polarity, play a decisive role. An experimental setup using different polarity ions revealed that the moisture-induced irreversible dissociation of perovskite materials is triggered by charges trapped along grain boundaries. We also identified the synergetic effect of oxygen on the process of moisture-induced degradation. The deprotonation of organic cations by trapped charge-induced local electric field would be attributed to the initiation of irreversible decomposition.

  14. Trapped charge-driven degradation of perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Namyoung; Kwak, Kwisung; Jang, Min Seok; Yoon, Heetae; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Byun, Junseop; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells have shown unprecedent performance increase up to 22% efficiency. However, their photovoltaic performance has shown fast deterioration under light illumination in the presence of humid air even with encapulation. The stability of perovskite materials has been unsolved and its mechanism has been elusive. Here we uncover a mechanism for irreversible degradation of perovskite materials in which trapped charges, regardless of the polarity, play a decisive role. An experimental setup using different polarity ions revealed that the moisture-induced irreversible dissociation of perovskite materials is triggered by charges trapped along grain boundaries. We also identified the synergetic effect of oxygen on the process of moisture-induced degradation. The deprotonation of organic cations by trapped charge-induced local electric field would be attributed to the initiation of irreversible decomposition. PMID:27830709

  15. An Exploratory Examination of "Pockets of Success" in Creating Urban High Schools of Opportunity for LSES Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine "pockets of success" through the voices of participant stakeholders in low socio-economic status urban high schools and communities to identify opportunities and structures that can improve post-secondary outcomes for students. Examining those pockets of success to rise above the…

  16. Analysis of ASTER data for mapping bauxite rich pockets within high altitude lateritic bauxite, Jharkhand, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Arindam; Singh, Vivek Kr.; Parveen, Reshma; Kumar, K. Vinod; Jeyaseelan, A. T.; Dhanamjaya Rao, E. N.

    2013-04-01

    Bauxite deposits of Jharkhand in India are resulted from the lateritization process and therefore are often associated with the laterites. In the present study, ASTER (Advanced Space borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) image is processed to delineate bauxite rich pockets within the laterites. In this regard, spectral signatures of lateritic bauxite samples are analyzed in the laboratory with reference to the spectral features of gibbsite (main mineral constituent of bauxite) and goethite (main mineral constituent of laterite) in VNIR-SWIR (visible-near infrared and short wave infrared) electromagnetic domain. The analysis of spectral signatures of lateritic bauxite samples helps in understanding the differences in the spectral features of bauxites and laterites. Based on these differences; ASTER data based relative band depth and simple ratio images are derived for spatial mapping of the bauxites developed within the lateritic province. In order to integrate the complementary information of different index image, an index based principal component (IPC) image is derived to incorporate the correlative information of these indices to delineate bauxite rich pockets. The occurrences of bauxite rich pockets derived from density sliced IPC image are further delimited by the topographic controls as it has been observed that the major bauxite occurrences of the area are controlled by slope and altitude. In addition to above, IPC image is draped over the digital elevation model (DEM) to illustrate how bauxite rich pockets are distributed with reference to the topographic variability of the terrain. Bauxite rich pockets delineated in the IPC image are also validated based on the known mine occurrences and existing geological map of the bauxite. It is also conceptually validated based on the spectral similarity of the bauxite pixels delineated in the IPC image with the ASTER convolved laboratory spectra of bauxite samples.

  17. Real-Time Ligand Binding Pocket Database Search Using Local Surface Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Chikhi, Rayan; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increasing number of structures of unknown function accumulated by ongoing structural genomics projects, there is an urgent need for computational methods for characterizing protein tertiary structures. As functions of many of these proteins are not easily predicted by conventional sequence database searches, a legitimate strategy is to utilize structure information in function characterization. Of a particular interest is prediction of ligand binding to a protein, as ligand molecule recognition is a major part of molecular function of proteins. Predicting whether a ligand molecule binds a protein is a complex problem due to the physical nature of protein-ligand interactions and the flexibility of both binding sites and ligand molecules. However, geometric and physicochemical complementarity is observed between the ligand and its binding site in many cases. Therefore, ligand molecules which bind to a local surface site in a protein can be predicted by finding similar local pockets of known binding ligands in the structure database. Here, we present two representations of ligand binding pockets and utilize them for ligand binding prediction by pocket shape comparison. These representations are based on mapping of surface properties of binding pockets, which are compactly described either by the two dimensional pseudo-Zernike moments or the 3D Zernike descriptors. These compact representations allow a fast real-time pocket searching against a database. Thorough benchmark study employing two different datasets show that our representations are competitive with the other existing methods. Limitations and potentials of the shape-based methods as well as possible improvements are discussed. PMID:20455259

  18. Innovation: the classic traps.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  19. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  20. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  1. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatori, Sho C.; de Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-03-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently `explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies.

  2. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  3. Unconventional trapping of ultracold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S. S.; Sarkisov, D.; Steyerl, A.; Brenner, Th.; Butterworth, J.; Geltenbort, P.; Hino, M.; Okumura, K.; Utsuro, M.

    1999-09-01

    In unconventional storage experiments we filled ultracold neutrons (UCN) into a Fomblin-grease coated trap and then immediately removed the UCN from the storage volume by an absorber, until their residual density in the trap was measured to be negligible. When subsequently the absorber was withdrawn a significant number of UCN of higher energies emerged from the trap. Their appearance cannot be attributed to heating or cooling of residual UCN. Further experiments were performed to investigate the origin of these UCN which we call `late UCN'. We noticed that application of a magnetic field gradient at the trap wall as well as a replacement of Fomblin grease on the surface by Fomblin oil gave rise to small but measurable alterations of storage behavior. These phenomena are consistent with the hypothesis of temporary adhesion of a few UCN to a rough wall.

  4. In situ trap properties in CCDs: the donor level of the silicon divacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D. J.; Wood, D.; Murray, N. J.; Gow, J. P. D.; Chroneos, A.; Holland, A.

    2017-01-01

    The silicon divacancy is one of the main defects of concern in radiation damage studies of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) and, being immobile at room temperature, the defect is accessible to a variety of characterisation techniques. As such, there is a large amount of (often conflicting) information in the literature regarding this defect. Here we study the donor level of the divacancy, one of three energy levels which lie between the silicon valence and conduction bands. The donor level of the divacancy acts as a trap for holes in silicon and therefore can be studied through the use of a p-channel CCD. The method of trap-pumping, linked closely to the process of pocket-pumping, has been demonstrated in the literature over the last two years to allow for in-situ analysis of defects in the silicon of CCDs. However, most work so far has been a demonstartion of the techinique. We begin here to use the technique for detailed studies of a specific defect centre in silicon, the donor level of the divacancy. The trap density post-irradiation can be found, and each instance of the trap identified independently of all others. Through the study of the trap response at different clocking frequencies one can measure directly the defect emission time constant, and through tracking this at different temperatures, it is possible to use Shockley-Read-Hall theory to calculate the trap energy level and cross-section. A large population of traps, all with parameters consistent with the donor level of the divacancy, has been studied, leading to a measure of the distribution of properties. The emission time constant, energy level and cross-section are found to have relatively large spreads, significantly beyond the small uncertainty in the measurement technique. This spread has major implications on the correction of charge transfer inefficiency effects in space applications in which high precision is required.

  5. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  6. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: X. Results of ear examination.

    PubMed

    Haymaker, W; Leon, H A; Barrows, W F; Suri, K; Kraft, L M; Turnbill, C E; Webster, D B; Ashley, W W; Look, B C; Simmonds, R C; Cooper, W; Platt, W T; Behnke, A R; Erway, L C; Cruty, M R; Benton, E V; Ellis, J T; Bailey, O T; Vogel, F S; Lloyd, B; Zeman, W; Billingham, J; Samorajski, T

    1975-04-01

    In the five pocket mice flown on Apollo XVII, no evidence was found that the inner ear had been damaged, though poor fixation precluded detailed study. On the other hand, the middle ear cavity was involved in all the mice, hemorrhage having occurrred in response to excursions in pressure within the canister that housed the mice during their flight. The same occurred in flight control mice which had been subjected to pressure excursions of much the same magnitude. A greater degree of exudation into air cells and greater leukotaxis were noted in the flight animals than in the control animals. There was no increase in leukocyte population along the paths of the 23 cosmic ray particles registered in the subscalp dosimeters that traversed the middle ear cavities of the flight mice. The increased exudation and the greater response by leukocytes in the flight mice may have been causally related to the lesions found in their olfactory mucosa but there were no data in support of this possibility.

  7. Rotational dynamics and heating of trapped nanovaterite particles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Richards, Joseph M.; Mazilu, Michael; Spalding, Gabriel C.; Skelton Spesyvtseva, Susan E.; Craig, Derek; Dholakia, Kishan

    2016-09-01

    Rotational control over optically trapped particles has gained significant prominence in recent years. The marriage between light fields possessing optical angular momentum and the material properties of microparticles has been useful to controllably spin particles in liquid, air and vacuum. The rotational degree of freedom adds new functionality to optical traps: in addition to allowing fundamental tests of optical angular momentum, the transfer of spin angular momentum in particular can allow measurements of local viscosity and exert local stresses on cellular systems. We demonstrate optical trapping and controlled rotation of nanovaterite crystals. These particles represent the smallest birefringent crystals ever trapped and set into rotation. Rotation rates of up to 5kHz in water are recorded, representing the fastest rotation to date for dielectric particles in liquid. Laser-induced heating results in the superlinear behaviour of the rotation rate as a function of trap power. We study both the rotational and translational modes of trapped nanovaterite crystals. The particle temperatures derived from those two optomechanical modes are in good agreement, which is supported by a numerical model revealing that the observed heating is dominated by absorption of light by the particles rather than by the surrounding liquid. A comparison is performed with trapped silica particles of similar size. The use of nanovaterite particles open up new studies for levitated optomechanics in vacuum as well as microrheological properties of cells or biological media. Their size and low heating offers prospects of viscosity measurements in ultra-small volumes and potentially simpler uptake by cellular media.

  8. The first Latin-American risk stratification system for cardiac surgery: can be used as a graphic pocket-card score.

    PubMed

    Carosella, Victorio C; Navia, Jose L; Al-Ruzzeh, Sharif; Grancelli, Hugo; Rodriguez, Walter; Cardenas, Cesar; Bilbao, Jorge; Nojek, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    This study aims to develop the first Latin-American risk model that can be used as a simple, pocket-card graphic score at bedside. The risk model was developed on 2903 patients who underwent cardiac surgery at the Spanish Hospital of Buenos Aires, Argentina, between June 1994 and December 1999. Internal validation was performed on 708 patients between January 2000 and June 2001 at the same center. External validation was performed on 1087 patients between February 2000 and January 2007 at three other centers in Argentina. In the development dataset the area under receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was 0.73 and the Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) test was P=0.88. In the internal validation ROC curve was 0.77. In the external validation ROC curve was 0.81, but imperfect calibration was detected because the observed in-hospital mortality (3.96%) was significantly lower than the development dataset (8.20%) (P<0.0001). Recalibration was done in 2007, showing excellent level of agreement between the observed and predicted mortality rates on all patients (P=0.92). This is the first risk model for cardiac surgery developed in a population of Latin-America with both internal and external validation. A simple graphic pocket-card score allows an easy bedside application with acceptable statistic precision.

  9. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hägi, Tobias T.; Klemensberger, Sabrina; Bereiter, Riccarda; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cosgarea, Raluca; Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a) to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b) to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Material and Methods Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a) hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR), b) ultrasonication (US), c) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP) and d) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX). The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz), the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness) as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD. Results After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10). The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10). Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm) in comparison with US (14±12 µm), EAP (6±7 µm) and EAP-CHX (11±10) µm). Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts. Conclusion The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air

  10. Effects of oxide traps, interface traps, and border traps'' on metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Reber, R.A. Jr.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Riewe, L.C. )

    1993-05-15

    We have identified several features of the 1/[ital f] noise and radiation response of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices that are difficult to explain with standard defect models. To address this issue, and in response to ambiguities in the literature, we have developed a revised nomenclature for defects in MOS devices that clearly distinguishes the language used to describe the physical location of defects from that used to describe their electrical response. In this nomenclature, oxide traps'' are simply defects in the SiO[sub 2] layer of the MOS structure, and interface traps'' are defects at the Si/SiO[sub 2] interface. Nothing is presumed about how either type of defect communicates with the underlying Si. Electrically, fixed states'' are defined as trap levels that do not communicate with the Si on the time scale of the measurements, but switching states'' can exchange charge with the Si. Fixed states presumably are oxide traps in most types of measurements, but switching states can either be interface traps or near-interfacial oxide traps that can communicate with the Si, i.e., border traps'' [D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. [bold NS]-[bold 39], 269 (1992)]. The effective density of border traps depends on the time scale and bias conditions of the measurements. We show the revised nomenclature can provide focus to discussions of the buildup and annealing of radiation-induced charge in non-radiation-hardened MOS transistors, and to changes in the 1/[ital f] noise of MOS devices through irradiation and elevated-temperature annealing.

  11. Out-of-pocket healthcare payments on chronic conditions impoverish urban poor in Bangalore, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The burden of chronic conditions is on the rise in India, necessitating long-term support from healthcare services. Healthcare, in India, is primarily financed through out-of-pocket payments by households. Considering scarce evidence available from India, our study investigates whether and how out-of-pocket payments for outpatient care affect individuals with chronic conditions. Methods A large census covering 9299 households was conducted in Bangalore, India. Of these, 3202 households that reported presence of chronic condition were further analysed. Data was collected using a structured household-level questionnaire. Out-of-pocket payments, catastrophic healthcare expenditure, and the resultant impoverishment were measured using a standard technique. Results The response rate for the census was 98.5%. Overall, 69.6% (95%CI=68.0-71.2) of households made out-of-pocket payments for outpatient care spending a median of 3.2% (95%CI=3.0-3.4) of their total income. Overall, 16% (95%CI=14.8-17.3) of households suffered financial catastrophe by spending more than 10% of household income on outpatient care. Occurrence and intensity of financial catastrophe were inequitably high among poor. Low household income, use of referral hospitals as place for consultation, and small household size were associated with a greater likelihood of incurring financial catastrophe. The out-of-pocket spending on chronic conditions doubled the number of people living below the poverty line in one month, with further deepening of their poverty. In order to cope, households borrowed money (4.2% instances), and sold or mortgaged their assets (0.4% instances). Conclusions This study provides evidence from India that the out-of-pocket payment for chronic conditions, even for outpatient care, pushes people into poverty. Our findings suggest that improving availability of affordable medications and diagnostics for chronic conditions, as well as strengthening the gate keeping function of

  12. Environmental Assessment: Proposed Photovoltaic Array, Hill Air Force Base, Utah

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-28

    FQI Floristic Quality Index HAP Hazardous Air Pollutant kW Kilowatt kWh Kilowatt Hours MS4 Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems MW Megawatt...0.82, the wildlife community index (WCI) is 0.36, and the floristic quality index (FQI) is 0.52. There are several Northern Pocket Gopher burrows

  13. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  14. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  15. Microinstrument gradient-force optical trap.

    PubMed

    Collins, S D; Baskin, R J; Howitt, D G

    1999-10-01

    A micromachined fiber-optic trap is presented. The trap consists of four single-mode, 1064-nm optical intersection. The beam fibers mounted in a micromachined silicon and glass housing. Micromachining provides the necessary precision to align the four optical fibers so that the outputs have a common intersection forms a strong three-dimensional gradient-force trap with trapping forces comparable with that of optical tweezers. Characterization of the multibeam fiber trap is illustrated for capture of polystyrene microspheres, computer simulations of the trap stiffness, and experimental determination of the trapping forces.

  16. Effect of bait in live trapping Peromyscus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1948-01-01

    SUMMARY: Evidence from live trapping tests indicated that Peromyscus leucopus did not leave their home ranges because of the attraction of trap bait in nearby areas. A trap line down the center of a heavily live-trapped area caught as many mice before the area trapping as afterward. Thus, there was reason to believe that the area trapping did not serve to pre-bait the mice. Two unbaited lines of live traps caught an equal number of Peromyscus. When one line was baited with rolled oats and peanut butter the efficiency of the traps was improved to the extent that the baited line captured more than twice as many mice as the unbaited line. It is concluded that for the species and habitat tested it is safe to make population calculations based on the assumption that the animals remain within their home ranges and do not tend to move into the trapped area because of the attraction of the trap bait.

  17. Live trapping of hawks and owls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, R.E.; Cope, J.B.; Robbins, C.S.

    1945-01-01

    1. Hawks of six species (80 individuals) and owls of five species (37 individuals) were trapped for banding from November 1, 1943, to. May 26,1944. 2. In general, pole traps proved better than hand-operated traps or automatic traps using live bait. 3. Verbail pole traps proved very efficient, and were much more humane than padded steel traps because they rarely injured a captured bird. 4: Unbaited Verbail traps took a variety of raptors, in rough proportion to their local abundance, although slightly more of beneficial species were caught than of harmful types. 5. Hawks and owls were retrapped more readily in Verbail traps than in other types tried. 6. The number of song birds caught in Verbail traps was negligible. 7. Crows and vultures were not taken in Verbail traps, but possibly could be caught with bait.

  18. The Impact of Health Insurance Programs on Out-of-Pocket Expenditures in Indonesia: An Increase or a Decrease?

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; De Allegri, Manuela; Souares, Aurelia; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    We used panel data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey to investigate the impact of health insurance programs on reducing out-of-pocket expenditures. We employed three linear panel data models, two of which accounted for endogeneity: pooled ordinary least squares (OLS), pooled two-stage least squares (2SLS) for instrumental variable (IV), and fixed effects (FE). The study revealed that two health insurance programs had a significantly negative impact on out-of-pocket expenditures by using IV estimates. In the IV model, Askeskin decreased out-of-pocket expenditures by 34% and Askes by 55% compared with non-Askeskin and non-Askes, respectively, while Jamsostek was found to bear a nonsignificant effect on out-of-pocket expenditures. In the FE model, only Askeskin had a significant negative effect with an 11% reduction on out-of-pocket expenditures. This study showed that two large existing health insurance programs in Indonesia, Askeskin and Askes, effectively reduced household out-of-pocket expenditures. The ability of programs to offer financial protection by reducing out-of-pocket expenditures is likely to be a direct function of their benefits package and co-payment policies. PMID:23873263

  19. Raf kinase inhibitory protein function is regulated via a flexible pocket and novel phosphorylation-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Granovsky, Alexey E; Clark, Matthew C; McElheny, Dan; Heil, Gary; Hong, Jia; Liu, Xuedong; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Koide, Shohei; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-03-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP/PEBP1), a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein family that possesses a conserved ligand-binding pocket, negatively regulates the mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Mutation of a conserved site (P74L) within the pocket leads to a loss or switch in the function of yeast or plant RKIP homologues. However, the mechanism by which the pocket influences RKIP function is unknown. Here we show that the pocket integrates two regulatory signals, phosphorylation and ligand binding, to control RKIP inhibition of Raf-1. RKIP association with Raf-1 is prevented by RKIP phosphorylation at S153. The P74L mutation increases kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation, enhancing Raf-1/MAPK signaling. Conversely, ligand binding to the RKIP pocket inhibits kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation by a noncompetitive mechanism. Additionally, ligand binding blocks RKIP association with Raf-1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies reveal that the pocket is highly dynamic, rationalizing its capacity to interact with distinct partners and be involved in allosteric regulation. Our results show that RKIP uses a flexible pocket to integrate ligand binding- and phosphorylation-dependent interactions and to modulate the MAPK signaling pathway. This mechanism is an example of an emerging theme involving the regulation of signaling proteins and their interaction with effectors at the level of protein dynamics.

  20. Characterization of vertical strain silicon MOSFET incorporating dielectric pocket (SDP-VMOSFET)

    SciTech Connect

    Napiah, Z. A. F. M. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Makhtar, N. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Othman, M. A. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Idris, M. I. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Arith, F. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Yasin, N. Y. M. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Taib, S. N. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com

    2014-02-24

    The vertical Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) leads to a double channel width that can increase the packaging density. The strained silicon MOSFET was introduced to modify the carrier transport properties of silicon in order to enhance transport of both electrons and holes within strained layer. Dielectric pocket was act to control encroachment of the drain doping into the channel and reduce short channel effects (SCE). SDP-VMOSFET which was a combination of those advantages was proposed to overcome the SCE in term of leakage current, threshold voltage roll-off also Drain Induce Barrier Lowering (DIBL). As a result, SDP-VMOSFET produces a better threshold voltage and DIBL compared to related structures. Meanwhile, it gives slightly increased for leakage current compared to Vertical MOSFET Incorporating Dielectric Pocket. The characteristics of the SDP-VMOSFET are analyzed in order to optimize the performance of the device and leading to the next generation of IC technology.

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  2. Development of purely structure-based pharmacophores for the topoisomerase I-DNA-ligand binding pocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drwal, Malgorzata N.; Agama, Keli; Pommier, Yves; Griffith, Renate

    2013-12-01

    Purely structure-based pharmacophores (SBPs) are an alternative method to ligand-based approaches and have the advantage of describing the entire interaction capability of a binding pocket. Here, we present the development of SBPs for topoisomerase I, an anticancer target with an unusual ligand binding pocket consisting of protein and DNA atoms. Different approaches to cluster and select pharmacophore features are investigated, including hierarchical clustering and energy calculations. In addition, the performance of SBPs is evaluated retrospectively and compared to the performance of ligand- and complex-based pharmacophores. SBPs emerge as a valid method in virtual screening and a complementary approach to ligand-focussed methods. The study further reveals that the choice of pharmacophore feature clustering and selection methods has a large impact on the virtual screening hit lists. A prospective application of the SBPs in virtual screening reveals that they can be used successfully to identify novel topoisomerase inhibitors.

  3. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. IV - Observations on the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, O. T.; Ordy, J. M.; Haymaker, W.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments designed to ascertain the effects of oxygen at 8, 10, and 12 psi partial pressure on the brains of pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) were carried out at room temperature (24 C, 75 F) and at 32 C (90 F). The animals exposed to 8-12 psi at 32 C had been in earlier KO2 oxygen tests. Five animals exposed either to 10 or 12 psi (517 mm or 620 mm Hg) O2 partial pressure at 32 C died during the course of the tests, possibly as a consequence of injury sustained by the earlier O2 partial pressure testing. Autopsy was not carried out. In the other 36 exposed animals, no pathological changes were observed in the brain. It is thus highly probable that oxygen pressures at the hyperbaric levels to which the pocket mice would be exposed during the Apollo XVII mission would not result in any lesions in the brain.

  4. A chip of fiber optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Heming; Hu, Huizhu; Zhang, Lei; Ge, Xiaojia; Shen, Yu

    2016-10-01

    A chip of fiber optical trap paves the way to realize the miniaturization and portability of devices based on dual beam optical trap, without loss of stability. We have designed two types of chip of fiber optical trap according to our theoretical simulation. The first one integrates dual beam optical trap with microfluidic chip, called a chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. It is generally used in chemical, biological, medical and other high-throughput experiments. The second one is a chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap. It is used to measure precisely the coefficient of viscosity or the Brownian movement of micro-object's in liquid. This paper focuses on the chip of fiber optical trap. We present two types of chips of fiber optical trap and detail their designs, fabrication and validation. The chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap is integrated with optical fiber and microfluidic chip made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). We have achieved the micro-sized alignment of optical paths and the trapping of micro-sized particles in the chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. In addition, it is easy to fabrication and clean. The chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap was based on a cubic micro-cavity made by a rectangular capillary tube and sealed by PDMS. We have achieved micro-sized alignment accuracy, high trapping efficiency and better trapping stability in the chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap as well.

  5. Job Interviews: 10 Steps to Success! Pocket Job Series No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Amy

    This book is the fourth in a series of six pocket-sized books written for career changers and laid-off workers. Each book is written at a 7th- to 10th-grade reading level and contains examples, hands-on self-discovery exercises, and step-by-step advice for a successful job search. This book provides a step-by-step process for succeeding in any…

  6. PoLi: A Virtual Screening Pipeline Based On Template Pocket And Ligand Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ambrish; Srinivasan, Bharath; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Often in pharmaceutical research, the goal is to identify small molecules that can interact with and appropriately modify the biological behavior of a new protein target. Unfortunately, most proteins lack both known structures and small molecule binders, prerequisites of many virtual screening, VS, approaches. For such proteins, ligand homology modeling, LHM, that copies ligands from homologous and perhaps evolutionarily distant template proteins, has been shown to be a powerful VS approach to identify possible binding ligands. However, if we want to target a specific pocket for which there is no homologous holo template protein structure, then LHM will not work. To address this issue, in a new pocket based approach, PoLi, we generalize LHM by exploiting the fact that the number of distinct small molecule ligand binding pockets in proteins is small. PoLi identifies similar ligand binding pockets in a holo-template protein library, selectively copies relevant parts of template ligands and uses them for VS. In practice, PoLi is a hybrid structure and ligand based VS algorithm that integrates 2D fingerprint-based and 3D shape-based similarity metrics for improved virtual screening performance. On standard DUD and DUD-E benchmark databases, using modeled receptor structures, PoLi achieves an average enrichment factor of 13.4 and 9.6 respectively, in the top 1% of the screened library. In contrast, traditional docking based VS using AutoDock Vina and homology-based VS using FINDSITEfilt have an average enrichment of 1.6 (3.0) and 9.0 (7.9) on the DUD (DUD-E) sets respectively. Experimental validation of PoLi predictions on dihydrofolate reductase, DHFR, using differential scanning fluorimetry, DSF, identifies multiple ligands with diverse molecular scaffolds, thus demonstrating the advantage of PoLi over current state-of-the-art VS methods. PMID:26225536

  7. Efficiency of cellular growth when creating small pockets of electric current along the walls of cells.

    PubMed

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Zila, Vojtech; Klimova, Lucie

    2014-04-01

    Pulses up to 11 Tesla magnetic fields may generate pockets of currents along the walls of cellular material and may interfere with the overall ability of cell division. We used prokaryotic cells (Escherichia coli) and eukaryotic cells (murine fibroblasts) and exposed them to magnetic pulses of intensities ranging from 1 millitesla (mT) to 11,000 mT. We found prokaryotic cells to be more sensitive to magnetic field pulses than eukaryotic cells.

  8. The Lixiscope: a Pocket-size X-ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    A Low Intensity X ray Imaging device with the acronym LIXISCOPE is described. The Lixiscope has a small format and is powered only by a 2.7V battery. The high inherent gain of the Lixiscope permits the use of radioactive sources in lieu of X-ray machines in some fluoroscopic applications. In this mode of operation the complete X ray imaging system is truly portable and pocket-sized.

  9. Morphological Adaptations for Digging and Climate-Impacted Soil Properties Define Pocket Gopher (Thomomys spp.) Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Marcy, Ariel E.; Fendorf, Scott; Patton, James L.; Hadly, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Species ranges are mediated by physiology, environmental factors, and competition with other organisms. The allopatric distribution of five species of northern Californian pocket gophers (Thomomys spp.) is hypothesized to result from competitive exclusion. The five species in this environmentally heterogeneous region separate into two subgenera, Thomomys or Megascapheus, which have divergent digging styles. While all pocket gophers dig with their claws, the tooth-digging adaptations of subgenus Megascapheus allow access to harder soils and climate-protected depths. In a Northern Californian locality, replacement of subgenus Thomomys with subgenus Megascapheus occurred gradually during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Concurrent climate change over this transition suggests that environmental factors – in addition to soil – define pocket gopher distributional limits. Here we show 1) that all pocket gophers occupy the subset of less energetically costly soils and 2) that subgenera sort by percent soil clay, bulk density, and shrink-swell capacity (a mineralogical attribute). While clay and bulk density (without major perturbations) stay constant over decades to millennia, low precipitation and high temperatures can cause shrink-swell clays to crack and harden within days. The strong yet underappreciated interaction between soil and moisture on the distribution of vertebrates is rarely considered when projecting species responses to climatic change. Furthermore, increased precipitation alters the weathering processes that create shrink-swell minerals. Two projected outcomes of ongoing climate change—higher temperatures and precipitation—will dramatically impact hardness of soil with shrink-swell minerals. Current climate models do not include factors controlling soil hardness, despite its impact on all organisms that depend on a stable soil structure. PMID:23717675

  10. Computational approaches for identification of conserved/unique binding pockets in the A chain of ricin

    SciTech Connect

    Ecale Zhou, C L; Zemla, A T; Roe, D; Young, M; Lam, M; Schoeniger, J; Balhorn, R

    2005-01-29

    Specific and sensitive ligand-based protein detection assays that employ antibodies or small molecules such as peptides, aptamers, or other small molecules require that the corresponding surface region of the protein be accessible and that there be minimal cross-reactivity with non-target proteins. To reduce the time and cost of laboratory screening efforts for diagnostic reagents, we developed new methods for evaluating and selecting protein surface regions for ligand targeting. We devised combined structure- and sequence-based methods for identifying 3D epitopes and binding pockets on the surface of the A chain of ricin that are conserved with respect to a set of ricin A chains and unique with respect to other proteins. We (1) used structure alignment software to detect structural deviations and extracted from this analysis the residue-residue correspondence, (2) devised a method to compare corresponding residues across sets of ricin structures and structures of closely related proteins, (3) devised a sequence-based approach to determine residue infrequency in local sequence context, and (4) modified a pocket-finding algorithm to identify surface crevices in close proximity to residues determined to be conserved/unique based on our structure- and sequence-based methods. In applying this combined informatics approach to ricin A we identified a conserved/unique pocket in close proximity (but not overlapping) the active site that is suitable for bi-dentate ligand development. These methods are generally applicable to identification of surface epitopes and binding pockets for development of diagnostic reagents, therapeutics, and vaccines.

  11. Estimating Leaf Area Index (LAI) in Vineyards Using the PocketLAI Smart-App

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Francesca; Movedi, Ermes; Coduto, Davide; Parisi, Simone; Brancadoro, Lucio; Pagani, Valentina; Guarneri, Tommaso; Confalonieri, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Estimating leaf area index (LAI) of Vitis vinifera using indirect methods involves some critical issues, related to its discontinuous and non-homogeneous canopy. This study evaluates the smart app PocketLAI and hemispherical photography in vineyards against destructive LAI measurements. Data were collected during six surveys in an experimental site characterized by a high level of heterogeneity among plants, allowing us to explore a wide range of LAI values. During the last survey, the possibility to combine remote sensing data and in-situ PocketLAI estimates (smart scouting) was evaluated. Results showed a good agreement between PocketLAI data and direct measurements, especially for LAI ranging from 0.13 to 1.41 (R2 = 0.94, RRMSE = 17.27%), whereas the accuracy decreased when an outlying value (vineyard LAI = 2.84) was included (R2 = 0.77, RRMSE = 43.00%), due to the saturation effect in case of very dense canopies arising from lack of green pruning. The hemispherical photography showed very high values of R2, even in presence of the outlying value (R2 = 0.94), although it showed a marked and quite constant overestimation error (RRMSE = 99.46%), suggesting the need to introduce a correction factor specific for vineyards. During the smart scouting, PocketLAI showed its reliability to monitor the spatial-temporal variability of vine vigor in cordon-trained systems, and showed a potential for a wide range of applications, also in combination with remote sensing. PMID:27898028

  12. Comparison of three classes of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. Emphasis on different substrate binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Eklund, H; Müller-Wille, P; Horjales, E; Futer, O; Holmquist, B; Vallee, B L; Höög, J O; Kaiser, R; Jörnvall, H

    1990-10-24

    Conformational models of the three characterized classes of mammalian liver alcohol dehydrogenase were constructed using computer graphics based on the known three-dimensional structure of the E subunit of the horse enzyme (class I) and the primary structures of the three human enzyme classes. This correlates the substrate-binding pockets of the class I subunits (alpha, beta and gamma in the human enzyme) with those of the class II and III subunits (pi and chi, respectively) for three enzymes that differ in substrate specificity, inhibition pattern and many other properties. The substrate-binding sites exhibit pronounced differences in both shape and properties. Comparing human class I subunits with those of class II and III subunits there are no less than 8 and 10 replacements, respectively, out of 11 residues in the substrate pocket, while in the human class I isozyme variants, only 1-3 of these 11 positions differ. A single residue, Val294, is conserved throughout. The liver alcohol dehydrogenases, with different substrate-specificity pockets, resemble the patterns of other enzyme families such as the pancreatic serine proteases. The inner part of the substrate cleft in the class II and III enzymes is smaller than in the horse class I enzyme, because both Ser48 and Phe93 are replaced by larger residues, Thr and Tyr, respectively. In class II, the residues in the substrate pocket are larger in about half of the positions. It is rich in aromatic residues, four Phe and one Tyr, making the substrate site distinctly smaller than in the class I subunits. In class III, the inner part of the substrate cleft is narrow but the outer part considerably wider and more polar than in the class I and II enzymes. In addition, Ser (or Thr) and Tyr in class II and III instead of His51 may influence proton abstraction/donation at the active site.

  13. Trapping biases of Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens revealed by comparison of captures in CDC traps, ovitraps, and gravid traps.

    PubMed

    Hesson, Jenny C; Ignell, Rickard; Hill, Sharon R; Östman, Örjan; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate three trapping methods for their effectiveness at capturing Culex pipiens and Culex torrentium, both enzootic vectors of bird-associated viruses in Europe. The comparisons, performed in two regions in Sweden, were among CDC traps baited with carbon dioxide, gravid traps, and ovitraps baited with hay infusion. The proportions of the two Culex species in a catch differed between trap types, with CDC traps catching a lower proportion of Cx. torrentium than both gravid traps and ovitraps. Between gravid traps and ovitraps, there was no difference in the proportions of the two species. The results indicate that Cx. torrentium may go undetected or underestimated compared to Cx. pipiens when using carbon dioxide baited CDC traps. The new insight of trap bias presented here adds an important dimension to consider when investigating these vectors of bird-associated viruses in the field.

  14. Trap induction and trapping in eight nematode-trapping fungi (Orbiliaceae) as affected by juvenile stage of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongyan; Aminuzzaman, F M; Xu, Lingling; Lai, Yiling; Li, Feng; Liu, Xingzhong

    2010-06-01

    This study measured trap induction and trapping on agar disks as affected by juvenile stages (J1, J2, J3, and J4) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and by species of nematode-trapping fungi. Eight species of nematode-trapping fungi belonging to the family Orbiliaceae and producing four kinds of traps were studied: adhesive network-forming Arthrobotrys oligospora, A. vermicola, and A. eudermata, constricting ring-forming Drechslerella brochopaga, and Dr. stenobrocha, adhesive column-forming Dactylellina cionopaga, and adhesive knob-forming Da. ellipsospora, and Da. drechsleri. The number of traps induced generally increased with increasing juvenile stages of C. elegans. The ability to capture the juveniles tended to be similar among isolates that produced the same kind of trap but differed among species that produced different kinds of traps. Trapping by Dr. stenobrocha and Da. cionopaga was correlated with trap number and with juvenile stage. A. oligospora and A. vermicola respectively captured more than 92 and 88% of the J1, J3, and J4 but captured a lower percentage of J2. The knob-producing isolates captured more younger than elder juveniles. Partial correlation analyses demonstrated that the trap induction of the most fungal species positively correlated with the juvenile size and motility, which was juvenile stage dependent. Overall, trap induction and trapping correlated with C. elegans juvenile stage (size and motility) in six species of trapping fungi.

  15. Natural Air Purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA environmental research has led to a plant-based air filtering system. Dr. B.C. Wolverton, a former NASA engineer who developed a biological filtering system for space life support, served as a consultant to Terra Firma Environmental. The company is marketing the BioFilter, a natural air purifier that combines activated carbon and other filter media with living plants and microorganisms. The filter material traps and holds indoor pollutants; plant roots and microorganisms then convert the pollutants into food for the plant. Most non-flowering house plants will work. After pollutants have been removed, the cleansed air is returned to the room through slits in the planter. Terra Firma is currently developing a filter that will also disinfect the air.

  16. Identification of the Binding Position of Amilorides in the Quinone Binding Pocket of Mitochondrial Complex I.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeshi; Murai, Masatoshi; Morisaka, Hironobu; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2015-06-16

    We previously demonstrated that amilorides bind to the quinone binding pocket of bovine mitochondrial complex I, not to the hitherto suspected Na⁺/H⁺ antiporter-like subunits (ND2, ND4, and ND5) [Murai, M., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, 2739-2746]. To characterize the binding position of amilorides within the pocket in more detail, we conducted specific chemical labeling [alkynylation (-C≡CH)] of complex I via ligand-directed tosyl (LDT) chemistry using a newly synthesized amide-type amiloride AAT as a LDT chemistry reagent. The inhibitory potency of AAT, in terms of its IC50 value, was markedly higher (∼1000-fold) than that of prototypical guanidine-type amilorides such as commercially available EIPA and benzamil. Detailed proteomic analyses in combination with click chemistry revealed that the chemical labeling occurred at Asp160 of the 49 kDa subunit (49 kDa Asp160). This labeling was significantly suppressed in the presence of an excess amount of other amilorides or ordinary inhibitors such as quinazoline and acetogenin. Taking into consideration the fact that 49 kDa Asp160 was also specifically labeled by LDT chemistry reagents derived from acetogenin [Masuya, T., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 2307-2317, 7816-7823], we found this aspartic acid to elicit very strong nucleophilicity in the local protein environment. The structural features of the quinone binding pocket in bovine complex I are discussed on the basis of this finding.

  17. Multiscale Monte Carlo Sampling of Protein Sidechains: Application to Binding Pocket Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Nilmeier, Jerome; Jacobson, Matt

    2008-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo sidechain sampling procedure and apply it to assessing the flexibility of protein binding pockets. We implemented a multiple “time step” Monte Carlo algorithm to optimize sidechain sampling with a surface generalized Born implicit solvent model. In this approach, certain forces (those due to long-range electrostatics and the implicit solvent model) are updated infrequently, in “outer steps”, while short-range forces (covalent, local nonbonded interactions) are updated at every “inner step”. Two multistep protocols were studied. The first protocol rigorously obeys detailed balance, and the second protocol introduces an approximation to the solvation term that increases the acceptance ratio. The first protocol gives a 10-fold improvement over a protocol that does not use multiple time steps, while the second protocol generates comparable ensembles and gives a 15-fold improvement. A range of 50–200 inner steps per outer step was found to give optimal performance for both protocols. The resultant method is a practical means to assess sidechain flexibility in ligand binding pockets, as we illustrate with proof-of-principle calculations on six proteins: DB3 antibody, thermolysin, estrogen receptor, PPAR-γ, PI3 kinase, and CDK2. The resulting sidechain ensembles of the apo binding sites correlate well with known induced fit conformational changes and provide insights into binding pocket flexibility. PMID:19119325

  18. Spatial Decomposition of Translational Water-Water Correlation Entropy in Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Crystal N; Kurtzman, Tom; Gilson, Michael K

    2016-01-12

    A number of computational tools available today compute the thermodynamic properties of water at surfaces and in binding pockets by using inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) to analyze explicit-solvent simulations. Such methods enable qualitative spatial mappings of both energy and entropy around a solute of interest and can also be applied quantitatively. However, the entropy estimates of existing methods have, to date, been almost entirely limited to the first-order terms in the IST's entropy expansion. These first-order terms account for localization and orientation of water molecules in the field of the solute but not for the modification of water-water correlations by the solute. Here, we present an extension of the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory (GIST) approach which accounts for water-water translational correlations. The method involves rewriting the two-point density of water in terms of a conditional density and utilizes the efficient nearest-neighbor entropy estimation approach. Spatial maps of this second order term, for water in and around the synthetic host cucurbit[7]uril and in the binding pocket of the enzyme Factor Xa, reveal mainly negative contributions, indicating solute-induced water-water correlations relative to bulk water; particularly strong signals are obtained for sites at the entrances of cavities or pockets. This second-order term thus enters with the same, negative, sign as the first order translational and orientational terms. Numerical and convergence properties of the methodology are examined.

  19. Spontaneous activation of visual pigments in relation to openness/closedness of chromophore-binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wendy Wing Sze; Frederiksen, Rikard; Ren, Xiaozhi; Luo, Dong-Gen; Yamashita, Takahiro; Shichida, Yoshinori; Cornwall, M Carter; Yau, King-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Visual pigments can be spontaneously activated by internal thermal energy, generating noise that interferes with real-light detection. Recently, we developed a physicochemical theory that successfully predicts the rate of spontaneous activity of representative rod and cone pigments from their peak-absorption wavelength (λmax), with pigments having longer λmax being noisier. Interestingly, cone pigments may generally be ~25 fold noisier than rod pigments of the same λmax, possibly ascribed to an ‘open’ chromophore-binding pocket in cone pigments defined by the capability of chromophore-exchange in darkness. Here, we show in mice that the λmax-dependence of pigment noise could be extended even to a mutant pigment, E122Q-rhodopsin. Moreover, although E122Q-rhodopsin shows some cone-pigment-like characteristics, its noise remained quantitatively predictable by the ‘non-open’ nature of its chromophore-binding pocket as in wild-type rhodopsin. The openness/closedness of the chromophore-binding pocket is potentially a useful indicator of whether a pigment is intended for detecting dim or bright light. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18492.001 PMID:28186874

  20. Identification of Distant Drug Off-Targets by Direct Superposition of Binding Pocket Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    Correctly predicting off-targets for a given molecular structure, which would have the ability to bind a large range of ligands, is both particularly difficult and important if they share no significant sequence or fold similarity with the respective molecular target (“distant off-targets”). A novel approach for identification of off-targets by direct superposition of protein binding pocket surfaces is presented and applied to a set of well-studied and highly relevant drug targets, including representative kinases and nuclear hormone receptors. The entire Protein Data Bank is searched for similar binding pockets and convincing distant off-target candidates were identified that share no significant sequence or fold similarity with the respective target structure. These putative target off-target pairs are further supported by the existence of compounds that bind strongly to both with high topological similarity, and in some cases, literature examples of individual compounds that bind to both. Also, our results clearly show that it is possible for binding pockets to exhibit a striking surface similarity, while the respective off-target shares neither significant sequence nor significant fold similarity with the respective molecular target (“distant off-target”). PMID:24391782

  1. Spatial Decomposition of Translational Water–Water Correlation Entropy in Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A number of computational tools available today compute the thermodynamic properties of water at surfaces and in binding pockets by using inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) to analyze explicit-solvent simulations. Such methods enable qualitative spatial mappings of both energy and entropy around a solute of interest and can also be applied quantitatively. However, the entropy estimates of existing methods have, to date, been almost entirely limited to the first-order terms in the IST’s entropy expansion. These first-order terms account for localization and orientation of water molecules in the field of the solute but not for the modification of water–water correlations by the solute. Here, we present an extension of the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory (GIST) approach which accounts for water–water translational correlations. The method involves rewriting the two-point density of water in terms of a conditional density and utilizes the efficient nearest-neighbor entropy estimation approach. Spatial maps of this second order term, for water in and around the synthetic host cucurbit[7]uril and in the binding pocket of the enzyme Factor Xa, reveal mainly negative contributions, indicating solute-induced water–water correlations relative to bulk water; particularly strong signals are obtained for sites at the entrances of cavities or pockets. This second-order term thus enters with the same, negative, sign as the first order translational and orientational terms. Numerical and convergence properties of the methodology are examined. PMID:26636620

  2. Targeting the Central Pocket in Human Transcription Factor TEAD as a Potential Cancer Therapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Pobbati, Ajaybabu V.; Han, Xiao; Hung, Alvin W.; Weiguang, Seetoh; Huda, Nur; Chen, Guo-Ying; Kang, CongBao; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Luo, Xuelian; Hong, Wanjin; Poulsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The human TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) is required for YAP-mediated transcription in the Hippo pathway. Hyperactivation of TEAD’s co-activator YAP contributes to tissue overgrowth and human cancers, suggesting that pharmacological interference of TEAD-YAP activity may be an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a central pocket in the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of TEAD that is targetable by small molecule inhibitors. Our X-ray crystallography studies reveal that flufenamic acid, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), binds to the central pocket of TEAD2 YBD. Our biochemical and functional analyses further demonstrate that binding of NSAIDs to TEAD inhibits TEAD-YAP-dependent transcription, cell migration and proliferation, indicating that the central pocket is important for TEAD function. Therefore, our studies discover a novel way of targeting TEAD transcription factors and set the stage for therapeutic development of specific TEAD-YAP inhibitors against human cancers. PMID:26592798

  3. Characterization of a Novel Water Pocket Inside the Human Cx26 Hemichannel Structure

    PubMed Central

    Araya-Secchi, Raul; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Kang, Seung-gu; Huynh, Tien; Bernardin, Alejandro; Escalona, Yerko; Garate, Jose-Antonio; Martínez, Agustin D.; García, Isaac E.; Sáez, Juan C.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-01-01

    Connexins (Cxs) are a family of vertebrate proteins constituents of gap junction channels (GJCs) that connect the cytoplasm of adjacent cells by the end-to-end docking of two Cx hemichannels. The intercellular transfer through GJCs occurs by passive diffusion allowing the exchange of water, ions, and small molecules. Despite the broad interest to understand, at the molecular level, the functional state of Cx-based channels, there are still many unanswered questions regarding structure-function relationships, perm-selectivity, and gating mechanisms. In particular, the ordering, structure, and dynamics of water inside Cx GJCs and hemichannels remains largely unexplored. In this work, we describe the identification and characterization of a believed novel water pocket—termed the IC pocket—located in-between the four transmembrane helices of each human Cx26 (hCx26) monomer at the intracellular (IC) side. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize hCx26 internal water structure and dynamics, six IC pockets were identified per hemichannel. A detailed characterization of the dynamics and ordering of water including conformational variability of residues forming the IC pockets, together with multiple sequence alignments, allowed us to propose a functional role for this cavity. An in vitro assessment of tracer uptake suggests that the IC pocket residue Arg-143 plays an essential role on the modulation of the hCx26 hemichannel permeability. PMID:25099799

  4. Medicare beneficiary out-of-pocket costs: are Medicare Advantage Plans a better deal?

    PubMed

    Biles, Brian; Hersch Nicholas, Lauren; Guterman Stuart, Stuart

    2006-05-01

    The creators of the Medicare Advantage (MA) program envisioned that seniors would opt out of fee-for-service Medicare to take advantage of the lower premiums, lower cost-sharing, and additional benefits available in private plans. Earlier research, however, indicates that out-of-pocket costs for MA enrollees vary widely by health status and plan benefit package. This issue brief examines out-of-pocket costs for beneficiaries in good, fair, and poor health throughout the country. In 2005, annual out-of-pocket costs for plan members ranged from under $100 for beneficiaries in good health to over $6,000 for those in poor health. Costs for beneficiaries in poor health would actually have been higher than fee-for-service in 19 of the 88 MA plans examined. Despite the high payments, relative to fee-for-service costs, that MA plans receive from Medicare to enrich enrollee benefits, these plans may not always be a good deal for sicker beneficiaries who use more health services.

  5. Laser Trapping of Radioactive Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    2013-04-01

    Stuart Freedman conceived the idea of laser trapping radioactive atoms for the purpose of studying beta correlation effects. ``This is really the theorist's view of a radioactive source,'' as he fondly claimed. It is ideal because the atoms form a point source, compressed in both position and momentum space, with no material walls nearby. The Berkeley group succeeded in trapping ^21Na (half-life = 22 s) atoms [Lu et al., PRL 72, 3791 (1994)], and determined its beta-neutrino correlation coefficient a=0.5502(60) to be in agreement with the Standard Model [Vetter et al., PRC 77, 035502 (2008)]. Other groups have joined this effort with searches for scalar or tensor couplings in the weak interaction. Moreover, the technique has been extended to trap very short lived ^8He (0.1 s) to study its halo structure or the very long lived ^81Kr (230,000 yr) to map the movement of groundwater.

  6. Positron trapping at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dupasquier, A. ); Romero, R.; Somoza, A. )

    1993-10-01

    The standard positron trapping model has often been applied, as a simple approximation, to the interpretation of positron lifetime spectra in situations of diffusion-controlled trapping. This paper shows that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate, and presents a model based on the correct solution of the diffusion equation, in the version appropriate for studying positron trapping at grain boundaries. The model is used for the analysis of new experimental data on positron lifetime spectra in a fine-grained Al-Ca-Zn alloy. Previous results on similar systems are also discussed and reinterpreted. The analysis yields effective diffusion coefficients not far from the values known for the base metals of the alloys.

  7. Dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Seo Ho; Lu Mingwu; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-15

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of highly magnetic lanthanides open the door to explorations of novel phases of strongly correlated matter such as lattice supersolids and quantum liquid crystals. We recently reported the first MOTs of the five high-abundance isotopes of the most magnetic atom, dysprosium. Described here are details of the experimental technique employed for repumper-free Dy MOTs containing up to half a billion atoms. Extensive characterization of the MOTs' properties--population, temperature, loading, metastable decay dynamics, and trap dynamics--is provided.

  8. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  9. Salisbury hospital's steam trap success.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    With the Carbon Reduction Commitment now fully in force, and the NHS tasked with achieving tough carbon emission reduction targets in line with both UK and EU mandates, healthcare estates teams across the country are seeking cost-effective ways to reduce energy consumption. Against this backdrop, Salisbury District Hospital has implemented a concerted energy-saving programme, key elements of which include replacing existing bucket steam traps with higher performing, lower maintenance, and more effective GEM venturi steam traps from Thermal Energy International (TEI), installing a new gas CHP engine, and looking into fitting a TEI condensate economiser system.

  10. Fermionized Dipolar Bosons Trapped in a Harmonic Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kościk, Przemysław

    2017-03-01

    We explore entanglement properties of systems of identical dipolar bosons confined in a 1D harmonic trap by using explicitly correlated Jastrow-type wavefunctions. Results for the linear entropy in dependence on the dimensionless coupling and the number of particles are provided and discussed.

  11. Poling effect of a charge-trapping layer in glass waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y.; Marckmann, C. J.; Jacobsen, R. S.; Kristensen, M.

    Germanium-doped multi-layer waveguides containing a silicon oxy-nitride layer as a charge trapper are thermally poled in an air environment. Compared to the waveguides without the trapping layer, the induced linear electro-optic coefficient increases more than 20%. A comparable rise in the internal field is found. Our results demonstrate an optimization of the optical nonlinearity by shaping the built-in internal field with the charge-trapping layer.

  12. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  13. The History of Laser Trapping of Atoms and Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkin, Arthur

    2003-03-01

    This subject began in 1970 with the demonstration of relatively large radiation pressure forces on small transparent macroscopic particles. Two components of the force were identified: a scattering force in the direction of the incident laser beam and a gradient component in the direction of the intensity gradient. This led to the discovery of stable optical trapping and manipulation of small neutral particles, using these two components. Such trapping was used to levitate particles in air, and also in vacuum with feedback damping. The use of feedback gives a sensitive force measurement technique with applications to the measurement of optical, electric, magnetic, and viscous forces in the subpiconewton range. Early work on understanding of similar scattering and gradient light forces on atoms led to the first experiment on focusing and defocusing of atoms by light and the invention of the single beam gradient or tweezers trap for atoms. By 1980 the fundamentals of the field had been established [1]. Experiments in the mid-1980s on optical tweezer trapping and cooling of atoms resulted in a revolution in atomic physics experimental techniques. The almost simultaneous demonstration of tweezer trapping of macroscopic dielectric particles and the serendipitous discovery of trapping of living biological particles has opened a new field of applications of tweezers to biological sciences. It is now possible to use optical tweezers to separate living single cells, measure the mechanical properties of cellular cytoplasm, and study single biological molecules in vitro [2]. The growing role of optical forces in recent work on Bose-Einstein condensation will be briefly discussed. [1] A. Ashkin, Science 210, 1081 (1980). [2] A. Ashkin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 4853 (1997).

  14. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A [Albuquerque, NM; Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM; Linker, Kevin L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  15. Hydrodynamic trap for single particles and cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanyeri, Melikhan; Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    Trapping and manipulation of microscale and nanoscale particles is demonstrated using the sole action of hydrodynamic forces. We developed an automated particle trap based on a stagnation point flow generated in a microfluidic device. The hydrodynamic trap enables confinement and manipulation of single particles in low viscosity (1–10 cP) aqueous solution. Using this method, we trapped microscale and nanoscale particles (100 nm–15 μm) for long time scales (minutes to hours). We demonstrate particle confinement to within 1 μm of the trap center, corresponding to a trap stiffness of ∼10−5–10−4 pN∕nm. PMID:20585593

  16. Mapping protein pockets through their potential small-molecule binding volumes: QSCD applied to biological protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Keith; Patel, Nehal M.; Ledel, Aric; Moallemi, Ciamac C.; Wintner, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated a method, Quantized Surface Complementarity Diversity (QSCD), of defining molecular diversity by measuring shape and functional complementarity of molecules to a basis set of theoretical target surfaces [Wintner E.A. and Moallemi C.C., J. Med. Chem., 43 (2000) 1993]. In this paper we demonstrate a method of mapping actual protein pockets to the same basis set of theoretical target surfaces, thereby allowing categorization of protein pockets by their properties of shape and functionality. The key step in the mapping is a `dissection' algorithm that breaks any protein pocket into a set of potential small molecule binding volumes. It is these binding volumes that are mapped to the basis set of theoretical target surfaces, thus measuring a protein pocket not as a single surface but as a collection of molecular recognition environments.

  17. Ion Trapping in the Accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1985-02-18

    The beam space charge (- for {bar p}'s) will attract positive ions. In the absence of additional fields (clearing electrodes, e.g.) these ions will be trapped in the beam potential well. The depth of this potential well has been calculated for some geometries relevant for the accumulator.

  18. Mass Trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT In field tests conducted in south Florida to test grape juice as an alternative inexpensive bait for Anastrepha suspensa Loew, high numbers of Zaprionus indianus Gupta were captured in traps baited with aqueous grape juice. These experiments included comparisons of grape juice with standard...

  19. Asymmetric Penning trap coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernandez, David J.

    2010-07-12

    By using a matrix technique, which allows to identify directly the ladder operators, the coherent states of the asymmetric Penning trap are derived as eigenstates of the appropriate annihilation operators. They are compared with those obtained through the displacement operator method.

  20. VACUUM TRAP AND VALVE COMBINATION

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.; Levenson, L.

    1963-02-19

    This patent relates to a vacuum trap and valve combination suitable for use in large ultra-high vacuum systems. The vacuum trap is a chamber having an inlet and outlet opening which may be made to communicate with a chamber to be evacuated and a diffusion pump, respectively. A valve is designed to hermeticaliy seal with inlet opening and, when opened, block the line-of- sight'' between the inlet and outlet openings, while allowing a large flow path between the opened vaive and the side walls of the trap. The interior of the trap and the side of the valve facing the inlet opening are covered with an impurity absorbent, such as Zeolite or activated aluminum. Besides the advantage of combining two components of a vacuum system into one, the present invention removes the need for a baffle between the pump and the chamber to be evacuated. In one use of a specific embodiment of this invention, the transmission probability was 45 and the partial pressure of the pump fluid vapor in the vacuum chamber was at least 100 times lower than its vapor pressure. (AEC)

  1. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Sho C.; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently ‘explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  2. Growth suppression by an E2F-binding-defective retinoblastoma protein (RB): contribution from the RB C pocket.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, L L; Su, H; Baskaran, R; Knudsen, E S; Wang, J Y

    1998-07-01

    Growth suppression by the retinoblastoma protein (RB) is dependent on its ability to form complexes with transcription regulators. At least three distinct protein-binding activities have been identified in RB: the large A/B pocket binds E2F, the A/B pocket binds the LXCXE peptide motif, and the C pocket binds the nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase. Substitution of Trp for Arg 661 in the B region of RB (mutant 661) inactivates both E2F and LXCXE binding. The tumor suppression function of mutant 661 is not abolished, because this allele predisposes its carriers to retinoblastoma development with a low penetrance. In cell-based assays, 661 is shown to inhibit G1/S progression. This low-penetrance mutant also induces terminal growth arrest with reduced but detectable activity. We have constructed mutations that disrupt C pocket activity. When overproduced, the RB C-terminal fragment did not induce terminal growth arrest but could inhibit G1/S progression, and this activity was abolished by the C-pocket mutations. In full-length RB, the C-pocket mutations reduced but did not abolish RB function. Interestingly, combination of the C-pocket and 661 mutations completely abolished RB's ability to cause an increase in the percentage of cells in G1 and to induce terminal growth arrest. These results suggest that the A/B or C region can induce a prolongation of G1 through mechanisms that are independent of each other. In contrast, long-term growth arrest requires combined activities from both regions of RB. In addition, E2F and LXCXE binding are not the only mechanisms through which RB inhibits cell growth. The C pocket also contributes to RB-mediated growth suppression.

  3. Ligation and quaternary structure induced changes in the heme pocket of hemoglobin: a transient resonance Raman study.

    PubMed

    Friedman, J M; Stepnoski, R A; Stavola, M; Ondrias, M R; Cone, R L

    1982-04-27

    The extent to which ligation and quaternary structure modify the heme-heme pocket configuration is determined by generating and analyzing transient resonance Raman spectra from various photolyzed and partially photolyzed hemoglobins (Hb). From small frequently shifts in Raman band I (approximately 1355 cm-1) it is determined that ligation induces a configurational change about the heme. The extent to which ligation modifies the heme pocket is influenced by the quaternary structure. With respect to the structural parameter responsible for variations in the pi orbital electron density of the porphyrin, the degree of alteration of the heme pocket configuration relative to deoxy-Hb(T) follows the sequence: liganded Hb(R) greater than liganded Hb(R) + IHP greater than liganded Hb(T) [alpha chain greater than beta chain] greater than deoxy-Hb(R). This progression of configurations also forms a sequence with respect to the "retentiveness" of the heme pocket as reflected in the ligand dynamics associated with geminate recombination. The results indicate that the heme-heme pocket of the R-state Hb's, relative to those of the T-state species, favors ligand retention in a dynamic, as well as thermodynamic, sense. The analysis of these and other related data implicates a ligation and quaternary structure modulated electronic and/or electrostatic interaction between the pi system of the porphyrin and the surrounding heme pocket as the basis for this variation in ligand dynamics as well as for the energetics of cooperativity.

  4. LAMP using a disposable pocket warmer for anthrax detection, a highly mobile and reliable method for anti-bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Ben; Maki, Takayuki; Obara, Takeyuki; Fukumoto, Hitomi; Hagisawa, Kohsuke; Matsushita, Yoshitaro; Okutani, Akiko; Bazartseren, Boldbaastar; Inoue, Satoshi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-01-01

    A quick, reliable detection system is necessary to deal with bioterrorism. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a DNA amplification method that can amplify specific DNA fragments in isothermal conditions. We developed a new highly mobile and practical LAMP anthrax detection system that uses a disposable pocket warmer without the need for electricity (pocket-warmer LAMP). In our tests, the detection limit of the pocket-warmer LAMP was 1,000 copies of Bacillus anthracis pag and capB gene fragments per tube. The pocket-warmer LAMP also detected B. anthracis genes from DNA extracted from 0.1 volume of a B. anthracis colony. The lower detection limit of the pocket-warmer LAMP was not significantly different from that of a conventional LAMP using a heat block, and was not changed under cold (4 degrees C) or warm (37 degrees C) conditions in a Styrofoam box. The pocket-warmer LAMP could be useful against bioterrorism, and as a sensitive, reliable detection tool in areas with undependable electricity infrastructures.

  5. Computational Assessment of Potassium and Magnesium Ion Binding to a Buried Pocket in GTPase-Associating Center RNA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An experimentally well-studied model of RNA tertiary structures is a 58mer rRNA fragment, known as GTPase-associating center (GAC) RNA, in which a highly negative pocket walled by phosphate oxygen atoms is stabilized by a chelated cation. Although such deep pockets with more than one direct phosphate to ion chelation site normally include magnesium, as shown in one GAC crystal structure, another GAC crystal structure and solution experiments suggest potassium at this site. Both crystal structures also depict two magnesium ions directly bound to the phosphate groups comprising this controversial pocket. Here, we used classical molecular dynamics simulations as well as umbrella sampling to investigate the possibility of binding of potassium versus magnesium inside the pocket and to better characterize the chelation of one of the binding magnesium ions outside the pocket. The results support the preference of the pocket to accommodate potassium rather than magnesium and suggest that one of the closely binding magnesium ions can only bind at high magnesium concentrations, such as might be present during crystallization. This work illustrates the complementary utility of molecular modeling approaches with atomic-level detail in resolving discrepancies between conflicting experimental results. PMID:27983843

  6. Funnel traps capture a higher proportion of juvenile Great Tits Parus major than automatic traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senar, J.C.; Domenech, J.; Conroy, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We compared capture rates of Great Tits at funnel traps, where several birds can be captured at once so that some decoy effect may appear, to those obtained at automatic traps, where only one bird can be trapped at a time, at trapping stations in northeastern Spain. Juvenile birds were mainly captured at funnel traps (79% of juvenile captures), whereas adult plumaged birds were captured at both types of traps (51% of captures were at the funnel traps) (test between ages, P<0.001). Juvenile Great Tits had lower body condition as measured by ptilochronology (P<0.01). These birds are more easily trapped in funnel traps, which may be acting as decoy traps, and thus are vulnerable to the same kinds of biases (eg age or body condition) that have been previously documented for decoy traps.

  7. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  8. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  9. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  10. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  11. Low-Ozone Pockets in Stratospheric Anticyclones as a Process-oriented Diagnostic of Coupled Chemistry-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, V.; Randall, C. E.; Manney, G. L.; Garcia, R.; Bernath, P.

    2006-12-01

    U. K. Met Office global analyses are used to identify anticyclone and Arctic/Antarctic vortex positions at vertical levels spanning the stratosphere on each day. EOS-MLS and satellite occultation measurements of ozone are then investigated within 3 different air mass types; 1) polar vortex, 2) anticyclone, and 3) "ambient" (not inside a 1 or 2). The evolution of ozone (and other tracers) within the anticyclones is viewed separate from data in either the vortex or in "ambient" regions. A definition of low-ozone pockets (LOPs) is proposed based on the MLS ozone and Met Office anticyclone data. It has been automated and applied to the data available from August 2004 through June 2006. A "2-year climatology" of MLS LOPs identified using this algorithm will be shown in both hemispheres. Multiple LOPs have been identified during both the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 Arctic winters and in the Antarctic in 2004 and 2005 from September through the final warming. These LOPs are compared to an independent climatology of LOPs observed by the SAGE II, HALOE, POAM III, and ACE occultation instruments. LOP position and movement within "parent anticyclones" will be shown. The same anticyclone and LOP definition will be used to identify the occurence of these structures in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). Observations of anticyclones and LOPs in the satellite data and meteorological analyses will be compared to the frequency and geographical distribution of anticyclones and LOPs in a 30-year WACCM simulation. It is proposed here that anticyclone and LOP frequency can be used as "process-oriented diagnostic" to interpret the accuracy of both model dynamics and chemistry in the stratosphere.

  12. Antiproton Trapping for Advanced Space Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gerald A.

    1998-01-01

    The Summary of Research parallels the Statement of Work (Appendix I) submitted with the proposal, and funded effective Feb. 1, 1997 for one year. A proposal was submitted to CERN in October, 1996 to carry out an experiment on the synthesis and study of fundamental properties of atomic antihydrogen. Since confined atomic antihydrogen is potentially the most powerful and elegant source of propulsion energy known, its confinement and properties are of great interest to the space propulsion community. Appendix II includes an article published in the technical magazine Compressed Air, June 1997, which describes CERN antiproton facilities, and ATHENA. During the period of this grant, Prof. Michael Holzscheiter served as spokesman for ATHENA and, in collaboration with Prof. Gerald Smith, worked on the development of the antiproton confinement trap, which is an important part of the ATHENA experiment. Appendix III includes a progress report submitted to CERN on March 12, 1997 concerning development of the ATHENA detector. Section 4.1 reviews technical responsibilities within the ATHENA collaboration, including the Antiproton System, headed by Prof. Holzscheiter. The collaboration was advised (see Appendix IV) on June 13, 1997 that the CERN Research Board had approved ATHENA for operation at the new Antiproton Decelerator (AD), presently under construction. First antiproton beams are expected to be delivered to experiments in about one year. Progress toward assembly of the ATHENA detector and initial testing expected in 1999 has been excellent. Appendix V includes a copy of the minutes of the most recently documented collaboration meeting held at CERN of October 24, 1997, which provides more information on development of systems, including the antiproton trapping apparatus. On February 10, 1998 Prof. Smith gave a 3 hour lecture on the Physics of Antimatter, as part of the Physics for the Third Millennium Lecture Series held at MSFC. Included in Appendix VI are notes and

  13. (Integrated Diffractive Mirrors (IDM) Ion Traps)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-04

    trap electrodes. Fluorescence from trapped ions is collected at high solid angle coverage for subsequent coupling into optical fiber (not shown). 2-6...integrated optics and fiber ribbon. The width of all optics was set by the ground electrode width of 80 μm. Since the trapping potential minimum was...signal. Thermal relaxation of the cables during the bake actually forced the trap carrier up and out of the socket on two occasions. We installed a

  14. Simplified Quantum Logic with Trapped Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-23

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A ATOMIC , MOLECULAR, AND OPTICAL PHYSICS THIRD SERIES, VOLUME 55, NUMBER 4 APRIL 1997Simplified quantum logic with trapped ions C...Received 17 December 1996! We describe a simplified scheme for quantum logic with a collection of laser-cooled trapped atomic ions. Building on the...in a system of laser-cooled trapped atomic ions. In the simplest form of the ion trap quantum computer, two internal electronic levels of each ion in

  15. High Optical Access Trap 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2016-01-26

    The High Optical Access (HOA) trap was designed in collaboration with the Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer (MUSIQC) team, funded along with Sandia National Laboratories through IARPA's Multi Qubit Coherent Operations (MQCO) program. The design of version 1 of the HOA trap was completed in September 2012 and initial devices were completed and packaged in February 2013. The second version of the High Optical Access Trap (HOA-2) was completed in September 2014 and is available at IARPA's disposal.

  16. Effect of pore structure on gas trapping in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadian, Sadjad; Geistlinger, Helmut; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Capillary trapping of nonwetting phase in porous media plays an important role in many geological processes. For example, large portions of hydrocarbons cannot be extracted from reservoirs due to capillary forces, while in carbon sequestration processes; capillary trapping might improve the storage efficiency. An important case is when the wetting phase (mostly water) displaces a low-viscosity low-density fluid. In such cases, like water encroachment into gas reservoirs or rising of water table in soils, competition of gravity, viscous, and capillary forces determines the final configuration of the fluids in invaded zone. The trapped nonwetting phase and its distribution within the porous media will affect many other processes such as flow of the other fluids and mass transfer phenomena. Thus, investigating the parameters affecting phase trapping and distribution, especially their relation to pore structure, which controls the capillary action, is required. The aim is to predict gas trapping from structural properties of the material. We conducted a series of column experiments, in which water displaces air at a range of flow rates in different glass-bead packs. The final 3D configuration and morphology of fluids was observed using X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT). We extracted 3D structure of porous media as well as of the trapped gas phase, and quantified them in terms of volume ratios, interfacial area, and morphology. Then we investigated the relations of the trapped phase to capillary forces (pore structure) and viscous forces (front velocity). The results give us new insights to explore the flow and dissolution processes: We found no systematic dependency of the front velocity of the invading water phase in the velocity range from 0.1 to 0.6 cm/min what corresponds to capillary numbers from 2 to 12 ×10^-6. Our experimental results indicate that the capillary trapping mechanism is controlled by the local pore structure and local connectivity and not by

  17. Stokes Trap: Multiplexed particle trapping and manipulation using fluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Anish; Schroeder, Charles

    We report the development of the Stokes Trap, which is a multiplexed microfluidic trap for control over an arbitrary number of small particles in a microfluidic device. Our work involves the design and implementation of ``smart'' flow-based devices by coupling feedback control with microfluidics, thereby enabling new routes for the fluidic-directed assembly of particles. Here, we discuss the development of a new method to achieve multiplexed microfluidic trapping of an arbitrary number of particles using the sole action of fluid flow. In particular, we use a Hele-Shaw microfluidic cell to generate hydrodynamic forces on particles in a viscous-dominated flow defined by the microdevice geometry and imposed peripheral flow rates. This platform allows for a high degree of flow control over individual particles and can be used for manufacturing novel particles for fundamental studies, using fluidic-directed assembly. From a broader perspective, our work provides a solid framework for guiding the design of next-generation, automated on-chip assays.

  18. Interactions between Hofmeister anions and the binding pocket of a protein.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jerome M; Kang, Kyungtae; Sherman, Woody; Héroux, Annie; Sastry, G Madhavi; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Lockett, Matthew R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-25

    This paper uses the binding pocket of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII, EC 4.2.1.1) as a tool to examine the properties of Hofmeister anions that determine (i) where, and how strongly, they associate with concavities on the surfaces of proteins and (ii) how, upon binding, they alter the structure of water within those concavities. Results from X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry show that most anions associate with the binding pocket of HCAII by forming inner-sphere ion pairs with the Zn(2+) cofactor. In these ion pairs, the free energy of anion-Zn(2+) association is inversely proportional to the free energetic cost of anion dehydration; this relationship is consistent with the mechanism of ion pair formation suggested by the "law of matching water affinities". Iodide and bromide anions also associate with a hydrophobic declivity in the wall of the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that anions, upon associating with Zn(2+), trigger rearrangements of water that extend up to 8 Å away from their surfaces. These findings expand the range of interactions previously thought to occur between ions and proteins by suggesting that (i) weakly hydrated anions can bind complementarily shaped hydrophobic declivities, and that (ii) ion-induced rearrangements of water within protein concavities can (in contrast with similar rearrangements in bulk water) extend well beyond the first hydration shells of the ions that trigger them. This study paints a picture of Hofmeister anions as a set of structurally varied ligands that differ in size, shape, and affinity for water and, thus, in their ability to bind to—and to alter the charge and hydration structure of—polar, nonpolar, and topographically complex concavities on the surfaces of proteins.

  19. Ecological genetics of adaptive color polymorphism in pocket mice: geographic variation in selected and neutral genes.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Hopi E; Drumm, Kristen E; Nachman, Michael W

    2004-06-01

    Patterns of geographic variation in phenotype or genotype may provide evidence for natural selection. Here, we compare phenotypic variation in color, allele frequencies of a pigmentation gene (the melanocortin-1 receptor, Mc1r), and patterns of neutral mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in rock pocket mice (Chaetodipus intermedius) across a habitat gradient in southern Arizona. Pocket mice inhabiting volcanic lava have dark coats with unbanded, uniformly melanic hairs, whereas mice from nearby light-colored granitic rocks have light coats with banded hairs. This color polymorphism is a presumed adaptation to avoid predation. Previous work has demonstrated that two Mc1r alleles, D and d, differ by four amino acids, and are responsible for the color polymorphism: DD and Dd genotypes are melanic whereas dd genotypes are light colored. To determine the frequency of the two Mc1r allelic classes across the dark-colored lava and neighboring light-colored granite, we sequenced the Mc1r gene in 175 individuals from a 35-km transect in the Pinacate lava region. We also sequenced two neutral mtDNA genes, COIII and ND3, in the same individuals. We found a strong correlation between Mc1r allele frequency and habitat color and no correlation between mtDNA markers and habitat color. Using estimates of migration from mtDNA haplotypes between dark- and light-colored sampling sites and Mc1r allele frequencies at each site, we estimated selection coefficients against mismatched Mc1r alleles, assuming a simple model of migration-selection balance. Habitat-dependent selection appears strong but asymmetric: selection is stronger against light mice on dark rock than against melanic mice on light rock. Together these results suggest that natural selection acts to match pocket mouse coat color to substrate color, despite high levels of gene flow between light and melanic populations.

  20. Effectiveness of a Specially Designed Dental Model for Training, Evaluation, and Standardization of Pocket Probing.

    PubMed

    Sunaga, Masayo; Minabe, Masato; Inagaki, Koji; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dental model in training, evaluation, and standardization of examiners in pocket probing and to determine the appropriate thresholds of accuracy and measuring time when using this model for evaluation of probing skills without measuring patients' pockets repeatedly. In 2011-12, a total of 66 dental professionals and 20 dental students in Japan measured the probing depths of 24 artificial teeth using the six-point method on a dental model. All examiners measured the probing depths of six tooth groups and then checked the correct depths in each group. Each examiner measured four groups in a group-by-group manner. For each group, the measuring time and examiner's accuracy were recorded. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for various thresholds of measuring time were drawn for thresholds of accuracies to determine the passing mark as a skilled examiner. The accuracy significantly increased from the first to the fourth measurements, and the measuring time was significantly reduced for both the professionals and students. The total measuring time was significantly longer for the students than the professionals. The students' accuracy was significantly lower than that of the professionals in the first measurement group. The increasing rate of accuracy was significantly higher for the students than the professionals. These results and ROC curves suggested that the dental model is effective for periodontal pocket probing training and for the evaluation and standardization of examiners' probing skill at a preclinical level. An examiner having accuracy ≥80% within four minutes for six tooth measurements in this model could be considered a skilled examiner.

  1. Charge trapping/de-trapping in nitrided SiO2 dielectrics and its influence on device reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambour, Kenneth; Hjalmarson, Harold; Nguyen, Duc; Kouhestani, Camron; Devine, Roderick

    2012-02-01

    Field effect devices with insulator gate dielectrics are excellent test vehicles to probe the physics of defects and charge trapping in the insulator/ semiconductor structure. p-channel field effect device reliability under negative bias stressing has been identified to originate from at least two terms: a) charged defect generation at the Si substrate/SiOxNy interface and b) charge trapping at neutral defect pre-cursors in the ``bulk'' of the SiOxNy beyond the interface. Measurements of transistor characteristics enable extraction of the two terms. We report the results of such measurements and demonstrate that short time effects are associated primarily with electric field assisted tunneling of holes from the inversion layer to neutral traps. This is confirmed by bias stressing measurements at different frequencies in the range 1 Hz to 2 MHz. First principles modeling of the tunneling/trapping phenomena is presented. K.Kambour worked under contract FA9453-08-C-0245 with the Air Force Research Laboratory/RVSE. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. 50 CFR 697.27 - Trap transferability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Measures § 697.27 Trap transferability. (a) Federal lobster permit holders may elect to participate in a program that allows them to transfer trap allocation to other participating Federal lobster permit holders... Federal Trap Transfer Program: (i) An individual must possess a valid Federal lobster permit; and (ii)...

  3. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Trapping program. 31.16 Section 31.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED)...

  4. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Trapping program. 31.16 Section 31.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED)...

  5. An innovative mosquito trap for testing attractants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe a simple trap modification for testing or using attractants to collect flying mosquitoes. The trap also can test the effectiveness of spatial repellents. The proposed design may facilitate standardized testing of mosquito attractants and repellents. The trap uses a standard Centers f...

  6. Bonded Field-Replaceable Rotor Blade Pocket For the CH-54B. Volume 1. Design Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    Condon of the Military Tht flndingi In thlt rtport art not to bt conitnwd M an official dMigntMd by othar authorizad document*. petition unten to...for public release; distribution unlimited. IT. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (ol l/ M tbtltKl •ntarttf (n Block 30, II Ullnml tnm Ktport) II...Repairable Blades - CH-^B Installation of Field Replaceable Pockets on CH-5ltB Blades Maintenance of CH-5l*B Blades M . AMTR ACT rCMNaM an nnrM «I

  7. Reversal of negative charges on the surface of Escherichia coli thioredoxin: pockets versus protrusions.

    PubMed

    Mancusso, Romina; Cruz, Eduardo; Cataldi, Marcela; Mendoza, Carla; Fuchs, James; Wang, Hsin; Yang, Xiaomin; Tasayco, María Luisa

    2004-04-06

    Recent studies of proteins with reversed charged residues have demonstrated that electrostatic interactions on the surface can contribute significantly to protein stability. We have used the approach of reversing negatively charged residues using Arg to evaluate the effect of the electrostatics context on the transition temperature (T(m)), the unfolding Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG), and the unfolding enthalpy change (DeltaH). We have reversed negatively charged residues at a pocket (Asp9) and protrusions (Asp10, Asp20, Glu85), all located in interconnecting segments between elements of secondary structure on the surface of Arg73Ala Escherichia coli thioredoxin. DSC measurements indicate that reversal of Asp in a pocket (Asp9Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -7.3 degrees C) produces a larger effect in thermal stability than reversal at protrusions: Asp10Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -3.1 degrees C, Asp20Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = 2.0 degrees C, Glu85Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = 3.9 degrees ). The 3D structure of thioredoxin indicates that Asp20 and Glu85 have no nearby charges within 8 A, while Asp9 does not only have Asp10 as sequential neighbor, but it also forms a 5-A long-range ion pair with the solvent-exposed Lys69. Further DSC measurements indicate that neutralization of the individual charges of the ion pair Asp9-Lys69 with nonpolar residues produces a significant decrease in stability in both cases: Asp9Ala/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -3.7 degrees C, Asp9Met/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -5.5 degrees C, Lys69Leu/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -5.1 degrees C. However, thermodynamic analysis shows that reversal or neutralization of Asp9 produces a 9-15% decrease in DeltaH, while both reversal of Asp at protrusions and neutralization of Lys69 produce negligible changes. These results correlate well with the NMR analysis, which demonstrates that only the substitution of Asp9 produces extensive conformational changes and these changes occur in the surroundings of Lys69. Our results led us to

  8. Progress in antiandrogen design targeting hormone binding pocket to circumvent mutation based resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaohong; He, Yang; Zhou, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Current clinically used antiandrogens such as flutamide, bicalutamide, and newly approved enzalutamide mainly target the hormone binding pocket (HBP) of AR. However, over time, drug resistance invariably develops and switches these antiandrogens from antagonist to agonist of the AR. Accumulated evidence indicates that AR mutation is an important cause for the drug resistance. This review will give an overview of the mutation based resistance of the current clinically used antiandrogens and the rational drug design to overcome the resistance, provides a promising strategy for the development of the new generation of antiandrogens targeting HBP. PMID:25852559

  9. The human olfactory receptor 17-40: requisites for fitting into the binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Buonocore, Anna; Centini, Marisanna; Facino, Roberto Maffei; Hatt, Hanns

    2011-06-01

    To gain structural insight on the interactions between odorants and the human olfactory receptor, we did homology modelling of the receptor structure, followed by molecular docking simulation with ligands. Molecular dynamics simulation on the structures resulting from docking served to estimate the binding free energy of the various odorant families. A correlation with the odorous properties of the ligands is proposed. We also investigated which residues were involved in the binding of a set of properly synthesised ligands and which were required for fitting inside the binding pocket. Olfactive stimulation of the olfactory receptor with odorous molecules was also investigated, using calcium imaging or electrophysiological recordings.

  10. Combat and training developer's test support package for the Pocket RADIAC, AN/UDR-13

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, D.D.; Trull, C.L.

    1991-03-01

    The pocket RADIAC (PR) consists of nuclear sensors in a small, compact, lightweight unit that will detect and measure radiation in terms of initial neutron and gamma radiation total dose from a nuclear detonation, total dose and dose rate from neutron induced gamma radiation at and immediately adjacent to ground zero, and total dose and dose rate gamma radiation resulting from nuclear fallout. The data obtained in both the initial radiation and the fallout will be provided on demand in a digital display. A visual and an optional audible alarm will alert the user at a default dose rate level. This alarm can be reset by the operator.

  11. Evaluation of centrifugation parameters for density gradient experiments by means of a programmable pocket calculator.

    PubMed

    Kreutzfeldt, C

    1980-10-01

    A calculation program is proposed suitable for programmable pocket calculators (e.g. HP series) to estimate s20,w f omega2 dt values from density gradient centrifugation data. The program can be applied to linear or exponential density gradients prepared from sucrose or glycerol solutions spun in zonal rotors or swinging bucket rotors. A wide solute concentration range and temperature range is accounted for. Constants for empirical density calculation of glycerol and sucrose solutions concentrated in % (w/v) are estimated. Experimental verification of the program was carried out.

  12. [Species composition of anaerobic microflora in parodontal pocket depending upon disease stage].

    PubMed

    Zyrianova, N V; Grigor'ian, A S; Grudianov, A I; Frolova, O A; Shil'nikova, I I; Kobozev, M I

    2009-01-01

    With the help of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) the dynamic of species composition of anaerobic microflora in cases of generalized parodontitis was established. It was detected that disease severity increase was followed by the increase of the number of anaerobic microflora species in parodontal pocket; at that it was impossible to connect the presence of some determined type of microorganism with the inflammatory parodontal process intensity. It was shown that proteins fimbrilin and gingipain were not the only parodontitis pathogenic factors although the first one (fimbrilin) could be connected with aggressive disease flow. The suggested PCR scheme could be useful for early disease stage diagnostic and substantiation of antimicrobial therapy method selection.

  13. A Mobile Computing Solution for Collecting Functional Analysis Data on a Pocket PC

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, James; Dixon, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    The present paper provides a task analysis for creating a computerized data system using a Pocket PC and Microsoft Visual Basic. With Visual Basic software and any handheld device running the Windows Moble operating system, this task analysis will allow behavior analysts to program and customize their own functional analysis data-collection system. The program will allow the user to select the type of behavior to be recorded, choose between interval and frequency data collection, and summarize data for graphing and analysis. We also provide suggestions for customizing the data-collection system for idiosyncratic research and clinical needs. PMID:17624078

  14. Management of a Periodontal Pocket Using a Removable Orthodontic Appliance and Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Köseoğlu, Serhat; Fidancıoğlu, Ahmet; Sağlam, Mehmet; Savran, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As documented in the literature, bony defects can be managed by an orthodontic approach. Methods. This case report describes the treatment of a bony defect caused by orthodontic malposition through phase I periodontal therapy and a simple removable orthodontic appliance used for the first time in a 20-year-old girl. Results. The periodontal pocket was reduced from 8 mm to 3 mm shortly after treatment. Conclusion. This case report concludes that orthodontic therapy can be used successfully in treatment of bony defects caused by mesially tilted molars. PMID:26421197

  15. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  16. Trapping of radiation in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.; Alford, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    The authors analyze the problem of radiation trapping (imprisonment) by the method of Holstein. The process is described by an integrodifferential equation which shows that the effective radiative decay rate of the system depends on the size and the shape of the active medium. Holstein obtains a global decay rate for a particular geometry by assuming that the radiating excited species evolves into a steady state spatial mode. The authors derive a new approximation for the trapped decay which has a space dependent decay rate and is easy to implement in a detailed computer simulation of a plasma confined within an arbitrary geometry. They analyze the line shapes that are relevant to a near-atmospheric-pressure mixture of He and Xe. This line-shape analysis can be utilized in either the Holstein formulae or the space-dependent decay approximation.

  17. Rotation sensing with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, W. C.; Hamilton, P.

    2017-03-01

    We present a protocol for rotation measurement via matter-wave Sagnac interferometry using trapped ions. The ion trap based interferometer encloses a large area in a compact apparatus through repeated round-trips in a Sagnac geometry. We show how a uniform magnetic field can be used to close the interferometer over a large dynamic range in rotation speed and measurement bandwidth without contrast loss. Since this technique does not require the ions to be confined in the Lamb–Dicke regime, Doppler laser cooling should be sufficient to reach a sensitivity of { S }=1.4× {10}-6 {{rad}} {{{s}}}-1 {{{H}}{{z}}}-1/2. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Wes Campbell was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  18. Trapping waves in Earth's plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Eric O.

    2014-12-01

    Earth's magnetic field traps donut-shaped bands of radiation in a belt around the planet that react to solar eruptions by growing and shrinking. The Van Allen belts consist of two rings filled with particles from the solar wind and cosmic rays. Within the outer ring of the Van Allen belt sits the plasmasphere, which is the innermost part of the planet's magnetic field and home to low-energy charged particles.

  19. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  20. Trapper readies trap for lizard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    State-licensed animal trapper James Dean sets the open door of an animal trap on KSC. He hopes to catch a large monitor lizard spotted recently near S.R. 3, a route into the Center, by several area residents. The lizard is not a native of the area, and possibly a released pet. Dean is working with the cooperation of KSC and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  1. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  2. Galactic Chemical Evolution and Solar s-process Abundances: Dependence on the 13C-pocket Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Wiescher, M.; Käppeler, F.

    2014-05-01

    We study the s-process abundances (A >~ 90) at the epoch of the solar system formation. Asymptotic giant branch yields are computed with an updated neutron capture network and updated initial solar abundances. We confirm our previous results obtained with a Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model: (1) as suggested by the s-process spread observed in disk stars and in presolar meteoritic SiC grains, a weighted average of s-process strengths is needed to reproduce the solar s distribution of isotopes with A > 130; and (2) an additional contribution (of about 25%) is required in order to represent the solar s-process abundances of isotopes from A = 90 to 130. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of different internal structures of the 13C pocket, which may affect the efficiency of the 13C(α, n)16O reaction, the major neutron source of the s process. First, keeping the same 13C profile adopted so far, we modify by a factor of two the mass involved in the pocket; second, we assume a flat 13C profile in the pocket, and we test again the effects of the variation of the mass of the pocket. We find that GCE s predictions at the epoch of the solar system formation marginally depend on the size and shape of the 13C pocket once a different weighted range of 13C-pocket strengths is assumed. We obtain that, independently of the internal structure of the 13C pocket, the missing solar system s-process contribution in the range from A = 90 to 130 remains essentially the same.

  3. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potenital and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  4. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  5. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-05-15

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  6. Scalable Designs for Planar Ion Trap Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, R. E.

    2007-03-01

    Recent progress in quantum operations with trapped ion qubits has been spectacular for qubit counts up to approximately ten ions. Two qubit quantum gates, quantum error correction, simple quantum algorithms and entanglement of up to 8 qubits have been demonstrated by groups including those at NIST, University of Michigan, University of Innsbruck and Oxford. Interesting problems in quantum information processing including quantum simulations of condensed matter systems and quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communication systems require hundreds or thousands of qubits. Initial designs for an ion trap ``Quantum CCD'' using spatially multiplexed planar ion traps as well as initial experiments using planar ion traps are promising routes to scaling up the number of trapped ions to more interesting levels. We describe designs for planar ion traps fabricated using silicon VLSI techniques. This approach allows the control voltages required for the moving and positioning the ions in the array to be connected vertically through the silicon substrate to underlying CMOS electronics. We have developed techniques that allow the ion trap structures to be fabricated monolithically on top of the CMOS electronics. The planar traps have much weaker trapping depths than the more conventional multi-level traps. However, the trap depths are still adequate for trapping hot ions from many ion sources. The planar traps also involve more complex configurations for laser cooling and micromotion control. Initial solutions to these problems will be presented. Laser access to the ions can be provided by laser beams grazing the trap surface or by using vertical slots through the trap chip. We will also discuss limits imposed by power dissipation and ion transport through trap junctions (e.g. crosses and Ys). We have fabricated these VLSI based traps in a number of configurations. Initial fabrication and packaging challenges will be discussed. D. Kielpinski, C. Monroe, and D.J. Wineland

  7. Efficacy of commercial traps and food odor attractants for mass trapping of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Lasa, Rodrigo; Velázquez, Olinda E; Ortega, Rafael; Acosta, Emilio

    2014-02-01

    One of the most important factors for the success of a mass trapping strategy to control a fruit fly involves the selection of an effective trap-lure combination. Because different species of fruit flies respond differently to the physical characteristics of a trap and to bait volatiles, the evaluation of commercial traps and lures that have proved useful against other tephtrids is necessary to determine their efficacy for mass trapping of Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Under caged conditions, a commercial hemispherical trap with lateral holes (Maxitrap Plus) proved more attractive to A. ludens (both sexes) than five other commercial traps that were all baited with hydrolyzed protein. Among these traps, bottom invaginated traps and traps with invaginated lateral holes constructed with transparent cylinders had the best physical retention properties. When evaluated under field conditions, the lure was critical for the efficacy of the trap, and one of the traps that performed poorly in attraction and retention cage tests (MS2) resulted as one of the most effective traps when baited with CeraTrap lure. Considering the use of different trap models under field conditions, CeraTrap liquid bait was more effective in A. ludens capture than Biolure dry synthetic bait, but both lures were not replaced during the entire course of the experiment. The percentage of captured females was also slightly higher using CeraTrap lure (67.2%) than using Biolure baits (54.5-58.8%). In field tests, 75-81% of females were mated and no significant differences were observed among trap-lure combinations. Trap selectivity against nontarget adult lacewings also differed among trap-lure combinations.

  8. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  9. Role of pocket flexibility in the modulation of estrogen receptor alpha by key residue arginine 394.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yunsong; Peng, Sufen; Zhang, Aiqian; Wang, Liansheng

    2011-02-01

    Estradiol derivatives, with similar structures as estradiol (E2) or estradiol metabolites, have been recognized to have detrimental health effects on wildlife and humans. However, data at the molecular level about interactions of these compounds with biological targets are still lacking. Herein, a flexible docking approach was used to characterize the molecular interaction of nine estradiol derivatives with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in the ligand-binding domain. All ligands were docked in the buried hydrophobic cavity of the steroid hormone pocket. In addition, the plasticity of an active site was also identified by reversing amino acid arginine 394 for better ligand-receptor binding affinity. Finally, bioassays based on genetically modified yeast strains were used to validate the quality of molecular simulation because of their rapidity and high sensitivity. The experimental findings about logarithm values of the median effective concentration (EC50) value had a linear correlation with computational binding affinity from molecular docking, which described a pattern of interaction between estradiol derivatives and ER. The estrogenic activity of all compounds, although more or less lower than E2, was proved to possess high severe environmental risks. Considering the sidechain flexibility in the ligand binding pocket, 17α-ethylestradiol-3-cyclopentylether was reported to correlate highly significantly with known induced fit conformational changes based upon proof-of-principle calculations on human ERα with the preservation of a strong salt bridge between glutamic acid 353 and arginine 394.

  10. A substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2013-07-05

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxyl transfer reactions by efficiently coordinating multiple reactions between spatially distinct active sites. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the bicarbonate- and MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To complete the overall reaction, the tethered biotin prosthetic group must first gain access to the biotin carboxylase domain and become carboxylated and then translocate to the carboxyltransferase domain, where the carboxyl group is transferred from biotin to pyruvate. Here, we report structural and kinetic evidence for the formation of a substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of PC from Rhizobium etli. Structures of the carboxyltransferase domain reveal that R. etli PC occupies a symmetrical conformation in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain and that the carboxyltransferase domain active site is conformationally rearranged upon pyruvate binding. This conformational change is stabilized by the interaction of the conserved residues Asp(590) and Tyr(628) and results in the formation of the biotin binding pocket. Site-directed mutations at these residues reduce the rate of biotin-dependent reactions but have no effect on the rate of biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation. Given the conservation with carboxyltransferase domains in oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, the structure-based mechanism described for PC may be applicable to the larger family of biotin-dependent enzymes.

  11. Local adaptation in the rock pocket mouse (Chaetodipus intermedius): natural selection and phylogenetic history of populations.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, H E; Krenz, J G; Nachman, M W

    2005-02-01

    Elucidating the causes of population divergence is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Rock pocket mice, Chaeotdipus intermedius, are an ideal system in which to study intraspecific phenotypic divergence because of the extensive color variation observed within this species. Here, we investigate whether phenotypic variation in color is correlated with local environmental conditions or with phylogenetic history. First, we quantified variation in pelage color (n=107 mice) and habitat color (n=51 rocks) using a spectrophotometer, and showed that there was a correlation between pelage color and habitat color across 14 sampled populations (R2=0.43). Analyses of mtDNA sequences from these same individuals revealed strong population structure in this species across its range, where most variation (63%) was partitioned between five geographic regions. Using Mantel tests, we show that there is no correlation between color variation and mtDNA phylogeny, suggesting that pelage coloration has evolved rapidly. At a finer geographical scale, high levels of gene flow between neighboring melanic and light populations suggest the selection acting on color must be quite strong to maintain habitat-specific phenotypic distributions. Finally, we raise the possibility that, in some cases, migration between populations of pocket mice inhabiting different lava flows may be responsible for similar melanic phenotypes in different populations. Together, the results suggest that color variation can evolve very rapidly over small geographic scales and that gene flow can both hinder and promote local adaptation.

  12. Double gate graphene nanoribbon field effect transistor with single halo pocket in channel region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    A new structure for graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistors (GNRFETs) is proposed and investigated using quantum simulation with a nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. Tunneling leakage current and ambipolar conduction are known effects for MOSFET-like GNRFETs. To minimize these issues a novel structure with a simple change of the GNRFETs by using single halo pocket in the intrinsic channel region, "Single Halo GNRFET (SH-GNRFET)", is proposed. An appropriate halo pocket at source side of channel is used to modify potential distribution of the gate region and weaken band to band tunneling (BTBT). In devices with materials like Si in channel region, doping type of halo and source/drain regions are different. But, here, due to the smaller bandgap of graphene, the mentioned doping types should be the same to reduce BTBT. Simulations have shown that in comparison with conventional GNRFET (C-GNRFET), an SH-GNRFET with appropriately halo doping results in a larger ON current (Ion), smaller OFF current (Ioff), a larger ON-OFF current ratio (Ion/Ioff), superior ambipolar characteristics, a reduced power-delay product and lower delay time.

  13. Microbial Diversity Similarities in Periodontal Pockets and Atheromatous Plaques of Cardiovascular Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Serra e Silva Filho, Wagner; Casarin, Renato C. V.; Nicolela Junior, Eduardo L.; Passos, Humberto M.; Sallum, Antônio W.; Gonçalves, Reginaldo B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective The immune and infectious alterations occurring in periodontitis have been shown to alter the development and severity of cardiovascular disease. One of these relationships is the translocation of oral bacteria to atheroma plaques, thereby promoting plaque development. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess, by 16s cloning and sequencing, the microbial diversity of the subgingival environment and atheroma plaques of patients concomitantly suffering from periodontitis and obstructive coronary artery atherosclerosis (OCAA). Methods Subgingival biofilm and coronary balloons used in percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty were collected from 18 subjects presenting with generalized moderate to severe periodontitis and OCAA. DNA was extracted and the gene 16S was amplified, cloned and sequenced. Results Significant differences in microbial diversity were observed between both environments. While subgingival samples mostly contained the phylum Firmicutes, in coronary balloons, Proteobacteria (p<0.05) was predominant. In addition, the most commonly detected genera in coronary balloons were Acinetobacter, Alloprevotella, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Sphingomonas and Moraxella, while in subgingival samples Porphyromonas, Filifactor, Veillonella, Aggregatibacter and Treponema (p<0.05) were found. Interestingly, 17 identical phylotypes were found in atheroma and subgingival samples, indicating possible bacterial translocation between periodontal pockets and coronary arteries. Conclusion Periodontal pockets and atheromatous plaques of cardiovascular disease patients can present similarities in the microbial diversity. PMID:25329160

  14. The PocketSpacecraft.com Integrated eXploration Environment (PIXE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The PocketSpacecraft.com Integrated eXploration Environment (PIXE) is an integrated generic spacecraft design, simulation, manufacturing, and operations system for the low cost mass exploration of space by amateur and professional Principle Investigators (PIs). PIs use an online tool to design Thin-Film Spacecraft/Lander/Rovers (TF-SLRs) using a library of predefined spacecraft and mission components to specify TF-SLRs in quantities ranging from one to thousands per mission, each with a typical mass <1g, surface area <1m2, and Pocket Spacecraft: Mission to the Moon' has been traditionally and crowd funded and is being prepared for flight with the goal of achieving low lunar orbit in 2016.

  15. Cophylogeny and disparate rates of evolution in sympatric lineages of chewing lice on pocket gophers.

    PubMed

    Light, Jessica E; Hafner, Mark S

    2007-12-01

    Although molecular-based phylogenetic studies of hosts and parasites are increasingly common in the literature, no study to date has examined two congeneric lineages of parasites that live in sympatry on the same lineage of hosts. This study examines phylogenetic relationships among chewing lice (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae) of the Geomydoecus coronadoi and Geomydoecus mexicanus species complexes and compares these to phylogenetic patterns in their hosts (pocket gophers of the rodent family Geomyidae). Sympatry of congeneric lice provides a natural experiment to test the hypothesis that closely related lineages of parasites will respond similarly to the same host. Sequence data from the mitochondrial COI and the nuclear EF-1alpha genes confirm that the two louse complexes are reciprocally monophyletic and that individual clades within each species complex parasitize a different species of pocket gopher. Phylogenetic comparisons reveal that both louse complexes show a significant pattern of cophylogeny with their hosts. Comparisons of rates of nucleotide substitution at 4-fold degenerate sites in the COI gene indicate that both groups of lice have significantly higher basal mutation rates than their hosts. The two groups of lice have similar basal rates of mutation, but lice of the G. coronadoi complex show significantly elevated rates of nucleotide substitution at all sites. These rate differences are hypothesized to result from population-level phenomena, such as effective population size, founder effects, and drift, that influence rates of nucleotide substitution.

  16. RsiteDB: a database of protein binding pockets that interact with RNA nucleotide bases.

    PubMed

    Shulman-Peleg, Alexandra; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J

    2009-01-01

    We present a new database and an on-line search engine, which store and query the protein binding pockets that interact with single-stranded RNA nucleotide bases. The database consists of a classification of binding sites derived from protein-RNA complexes. Each binding site is assigned to a cluster of similar binding sites in other protein-RNA complexes. Cluster members share similar spatial arrangements of physico-chemical properties, thus can reveal novel similarity between proteins and RNAs with different sequences and folds. The clusters provide 3D consensus binding patterns important for protein-nucleotide recognition. The database search engine allows two types of useful queries: first, given a PDB code of a protein-RNA complex, RsiteDB can detail and classify the properties of the protein binding pockets accommodating extruded RNA nucleotides not involved in local RNA base pairing. Second, given an unbound protein structure, RsiteDB can perform an on-line structural search against the constructed database of 3D consensus binding patterns. Regions similar to known patterns are predicted to serve as binding sites. Alignment of the query to these patterns with their corresponding RNA nucleotides allows making unique predictions of the protein-RNA interactions at the atomic level of detail. This database is accessible at http://bioinfo3d.cs.tau.ac.il/RsiteDB.

  17. Poverty, out-of-pocket payments and access to health care: evidence from Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Falkingham, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Most countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have either initiated or are contemplating reform of the health sector. With negative real income growth and falling government revenues, a key concern of many governments is to secure additional finance through non-budgetary sources such as hypothecated payroll taxes, voluntary insurance, and increased private finance through patient cost-sharing. However, before such reforms can be considered, information is needed both on the current levels and distribution of household expenditures on health care, and the extent to which increased charges may affect access to health services, especially amongst the poor. This paper uses the Tajikistan Livings Standard Survey to investigate the level and distribution of out-of-pocket payments for health care in Tajikistan and to examine the extent to which such payments act as barriers to health-care access. The data show that there are significant differences in health-care utilisation rates across socio-economic groups and that these differences are related to ability to pay. Official and informal payments are acting both to deter people from seeking medical assistance and once advice has been sought, from receiving the most appropriate treatment. Despite informal exemptions, out-of-pocket payments for health care are exacting a high toll on household welfare with households being forced to sell assets or go into debt to meet the costs of care. Urgent action is needed to ensure equity in access to health care.

  18. ACA dependent coverage provision reduced high out-of-pocket health care spending for young adults.

    PubMed

    Busch, Susan H; Golberstein, Ezra; Meara, Ellen

    2014-08-01

    Since September 2010 the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has required that insurers allow children to remain as dependents on their parents' private insurance plans until age twenty-six. Studies have shown that this provision increased coverage rates among young adults. In this article we analyze whether the provision also protected young adults from large and uncertain out-of-pocket expenses. We found that the policy was associated with a statistically significant reduction in the share of young adults facing annual out-of-pocket expenditures greater than $1,500 (decreasing from 4.2 percent to 2.9 percent), compared to an increase in the proportion of their slightly older peers facing such expenditures (increasing from 4.4 percent to 5.4 percent), a net difference of -2.4 percentage points, or 57 percent. We conclude that the dependent coverage provision in the ACA provides financial protection for young adults at a time when they often face high debt burden but low wages.

  19. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein—TbBILBO1

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  20. Laparoscopic splenopexy of a pediatric wandering spleen by creation of a retroperitoneal pocket.

    PubMed

    Hedeshian, Mohir H; Hirsh, Michael P; Danielson, Paul D

    2005-12-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare condition in which the spleen is attached by a long, vascular pedicle and lacks its usual peritoneal attachments and supporting ligaments. This condition predisposes the spleen to torsion and infarction. We report the case of a 2-year-old boy with a history of intermittent abdominal pain and early satiety who presented with abdominal pain and severe gastric distention. A work-up including computed tomographic and ultrasonographic imaging suggested a wandering spleen. The diagnosis was confirmed during laparoscopy, and splenopexy was performed by anchoring the spleen in a retroperitoneal pocket in the left upper quadrant at the level of the tenth rib. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of minimally invasive splenopexy for wandering spleen that involves the creation of a retroperitoneal pocket without the use of mesh. The authors believe that this is a safe and effective method that takes advantage of laparoscopy and avoids the risk of infection and complications associated with the use of synthetic material.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with gas pockets using linearized boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; Bose, Sanjeeb; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to be effective for surface drag reduction under laminar regime by both experiments and simulations (see for example, Ou and Rothstein, Phys. Fluids 17:103606, 2005). However, such drag reduction for fully developed turbulent flow maintaining the Cassie-Baxter state remains an open problem due to high shear rates and flow unsteadiness of turbulent boundary layer. Our work aims to develop an understanding of mechanisms leading to interface breaking and loss of gas pockets due to interactions with turbulent boundary layers. We take advantage of direct numerical simulation of turbulence with slip and no-slip patterned boundary conditions mimicking the superhydrophobic surface. In addition, we capture the dynamics of gas-water interface, by deriving a proper linearized boundary condition taking into account the surface tension of the interface and kinematic matching of interface deformation and normal velocity conditions on the wall. We will show results from our simulations predicting the dynamical behavior of gas pocket interfaces over a wide range of dimensionless surface tensions. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  2. Single reconstructed Fermi surface pocket in an underdoped single-layer cuprate superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, M. K.; Harrison, N.; McDonald, R. D.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Modic, K. A.; Barišić, N.; Greven, M.

    2016-01-01

    The observation of a reconstructed Fermi surface via quantum oscillations in hole-doped cuprates opened a path towards identifying broken symmetry states in the pseudogap regime. However, such an identification has remained inconclusive due to the multi-frequency quantum oscillation spectra and complications accounting for bilayer effects in most studies. We overcome these impediments with high-resolution measurements on the structurally simpler cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg1201), which features one CuO2 plane per primitive unit cell. We find only a single oscillatory component with no signatures of magnetic breakdown tunnelling to additional orbits. Therefore, the Fermi surface comprises a single quasi-two-dimensional pocket. Quantitative modelling of these results indicates that a biaxial charge density wave within each CuO2 plane is responsible for the reconstruction and rules out criss-crossed charge stripes between layers as a viable alternative in Hg1201. Lastly, we determine that the characteristic gap between reconstructed pockets is a significant fraction of the pseudogap energy. PMID:27448102

  3. Child Wasting in Emergency Pockets: A Meta-Analysis of Small-Scale Surveys from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Altare, Chiara; Delbiso, Tefera Darge; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-01-01

    Child undernutrition is a major public health concern in Ethiopia (stunting national prevalence: 44%; wasting: 10%), despite the overall improvement in child health status during the last decade. Hundreds of small-scale surveys are conducted in Ethiopia’s emergency pockets under ENCU’s supervision. We reviewed the evidence from small-scale surveys conducted between 2008 and 2013 with two objectives: to provide a summary estimate of wasting prevalence from emergency pockets and to examine reasons for variation in prevalence estimates. We created a dataset by combining data from the Complex Emergency Database, the Famine Early Warning System Network and the Armed Conflict Location Event Data. We conducted a meta-analysis of small-scale surveys using a random effects model with known within-study heterogeneity. The influence of survey covariates on estimated prevalence was investigated with meta-regression techniques. We included 158 surveys in the analysis. A high degree of heterogeneity among surveys was observed. The overall estimate of wasting prevalence was 10.6% (95% CI 9.8–11.4), with differences among regions and between residents and refugees. Meta-regression results showed that vaccination coverage, child mortality, diarrhea prevalence and food insecurity are significantly associated with wasting prevalence. Child care and displacement status were not. Aggregated analysis of small-scale surveys provides insights into the prevalence of wasting and factors explaining its variation. It can also guide survey planning towards areas with limited data availability. PMID:26828512

  4. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Steven; Metsaelae, Markus; Zieger, Peter C.; Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Gilijamse, Joop J.; Meijer, Gerard; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de

    2007-12-15

    We report on the Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping of {sup 14}NH (a{sup 1}{delta}) radicals. In the trap, the molecules are excited on the spin-forbidden A{sup 3}{pi}<-a{sup 1}{delta} transition and detected via their subsequent fluorescence to the X{sup 3}{sigma}{sup -} ground state. The 1/e trapping time is 1.4{+-}0.1 s, from which a lower limit of 2.7 s for the radiative lifetime of the a{sup 1}{delta}, v=0, J=2 state is deduced. The spectral profile of the molecules in the trapping field is measured to probe their spatial distribution. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH followed by optical pumping of the trapped molecules to the electronic ground state is an important step toward accumulation of these radicals in a magnetic trap.

  5. Evaluation of trapping-web designs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukacs, P.M.; Anderson, D.R.; Burnham, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    The trapping web is a method for estimating the density and abundance of animal populations. A Monte Carlo simulation study is performed to explore performance of the trapping web for estimating animal density under a variety of web designs and animal behaviours. The trapping performs well when animals have home ranges, even if the home ranges are large relative to trap spacing. Webs should contain at least 90 traps. Trapping should continue for 5-7 occasions. Movement rates have little impact on density estimates when animals are confined to home ranges. Estimation is poor when animals do not have home ranges and movement rates are rapid. The trapping web is useful for estimating the density of animals that are hard to detect and occur at potentially low densities. ?? CSIRO 2005.

  6. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  7. Subpicosecond oxygen trapping in the heme pocket of the oxygen sensor FixL observed by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kruglik, Sergei G; Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Yamashita, Taku; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2007-05-01

    Dissociation of oxygen from the heme domain of the bacterial oxygen sensor protein FixL constitutes the first step in hypoxia-induced signaling. In the present study, the photodissociation of the heme-O2 bond was used to synchronize this event, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution was implemented to characterize the heme configuration of the primary photoproduct. TR(3) measurements on heme-oxycomplexes are highly challenging and have not yet been reported. Whereas in all other known six-coordinated heme protein complexes with diatomic ligands, including the oxymyoglobin reported here, heme iron out-of-plane motion (doming) occurs faster than 1 ps after iron-ligand bond breaking; surprisingly, no sizeable doming is observed in the oxycomplex of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum FixL sensor domain (FixLH). This assessment is deduced from the absence of the iron-histidine band around 217 cm(-1) as early as 0.5 ps. We suggest that efficient ultrafast oxygen rebinding to the heme occurs on the femtosecond time scale, thus hindering heme doming. Comparing WT oxy-FixLH, mutant proteins FixLH-R220H and FixLH-R220Q, the respective carbonmonoxy-complexes, and oxymyoglobin, we show that a hydrogen bond of the terminal oxygen atom with the residue in position 220 is responsible for the observed behavior; in WT FixL this residue is arginine, crucially implicated in signal transmission. We propose that the rigid O2 configuration imposed by this residue, in combination with the hydrophobic and constrained properties of the distal cavity, keep dissociated oxygen in place. These results uncover the origin of the "oxygen cage" properties of this oxygen sensor protein.

  8. Temperature and trapping characterization of an acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers--towards in-trap temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda; Evander, Mikael; Lilliehorn, Tobias; Almqvist, Monica; Nilsson, Johan; Laurell, Thomas; Johansson, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    An acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers (MITs) for applications in non-contact trapping of cells or particles in a microfluidic channel was characterized by measuring the temperature increase and trapping strength. The fluid temperature was measured by the fluorescent response of Rhodamine B in the microchannel. The trapping strength was measured by the area of a trapped particle cluster counter-balanced by the hydrodynamic force. One of the main objectives was to obtain quantitative values of the temperature in the fluidic channel to ensure safe handling of cells and proteins. Another objective was to evaluate the trapping-to-temperature efficiency for the trap as a function of drive frequency. Thirdly, trapping-to-temperature efficiency data enables identifying frequencies and voltage values to use for in-trap temperature regulation. It is envisioned that operation with only in-trap temperature regulation enables the realization of small, simple and fast temperature-controlled trap systems. The significance of potential gradients at the trap edges due to the finite size of the miniaturized transducers for the operation was emphasized and expressed analytically. The influence of the acoustic near field was evaluated in FEM-simulation and compared with a more ideal 1D standing wave. The working principle of the trap was examined by comparing measurements of impedance, temperature increase and trapping strength with impedance transfer calculations of fluid-reflector resonances and frequencies of high reflectance at the fluid-reflector boundary. The temperature increase was found to be moderate, 7°C for a high trapping strength, at a fluid flow of 0.5mms(-1) for the optimal driving frequency. A fast temperature response with a fall time of 8s and a rise time of 11s was observed. The results emphasize the importance of selecting the proper drive frequency for long term handling of cells, as opposed to the more pragmatic way of selecting the

  9. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  10. Evidence for a small hole pocket in the Fermi surface of underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy

    PubMed Central

    Doiron-Leyraud, N.; Badoux, S.; René de Cotret, S.; Lepault, S.; LeBoeuf, D.; Laliberté, F.; Hassinger, E.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, R.; Park, J.-H..; Vignolles, D.; Vignolle, B.; Taillefer, L.; Proust, C.

    2015-01-01

    In underdoped cuprate superconductors, the Fermi surface undergoes a reconstruction that produces a small electron pocket, but whether there is another, as yet, undetected portion to the Fermi surface is unknown. Establishing the complete topology of the Fermi surface is key to identifying the mechanism responsible for its reconstruction. Here we report evidence for a second Fermi pocket in underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy, detected as a small quantum oscillation frequency in the thermoelectric response and in the c-axis resistance. The field-angle dependence of the frequency shows that it is a distinct Fermi surface, and the normal-state thermopower requires it to be a hole pocket. A Fermi surface consisting of one electron pocket and two hole pockets with the measured areas and masses is consistent with a Fermi-surface reconstruction by the charge–density–wave order observed in YBa2Cu3Oy, provided other parts of the reconstructed Fermi surface are removed by a separate mechanism, possibly the pseudogap. PMID:25616011

  11. How the ACA's Health Insurance Expansions Have Affected Out-of-Pocket Cost-Sharing and Spending on Premiums.

    PubMed

    Glied, Sherry; Solís-Román, Claudia; Parikh, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    One important benefit gained by the millions of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is protection from high out-of-pocket health spending. While Medicaid unambiguously reduces out-of-pocket premium and medical costs for low-income people, it is less certain that marketplace coverage and other types of insurance purchased to comply with the law's individual mandate also protect from high health spending. Goal: To compare out-of-pocket spending in 2014 to spending in 2013; assess how this spending changed in states where many people enrolled in the marketplaces relative to states where few people enrolled; and project the decline in the percentage of people paying high amounts out-of-pocket. Methods: Linear regression models were used to estimate whether people under age 65 spent above certain thresholds. Key findings and conclusions: The probability of incurring high out-of-pocket costs and premium expenses declined as marketplace enrollment increased. The percentage reductions were greatest among those with incomes between 250 percent and 399 percent of poverty, those who were eligible for premium subsidies, and those who previously were uninsured or had very limited nongroup coverage. These effects appear largely attributable to marketplace enrollment rather than to other ACA provisions or to economic trends.

  12. Women Saw Large Decrease In Out-Of-Pocket Spending For Contraceptives After ACA Mandate Removed Cost Sharing.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nora V; Polsky, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The Affordable Care Act mandates that private health insurance plans cover prescription contraceptives with no consumer cost sharing. The positive financial impact of this new provision on consumers who purchase contraceptives could be substantial, but it has not yet been estimated. Using a large administrative claims data set from a national insurer, we estimated out-of-pocket spending before and after the mandate. We found that mean and median per prescription out-of-pocket expenses have decreased for almost all reversible contraceptive methods on the market. The average percentages of out-of-pocket spending for oral contraceptive pill prescriptions and intrauterine device insertions by women using those methods both dropped by 20 percentage points after implementation of the ACA mandate. We estimated average out-of-pocket savings per contraceptive user to be $248 for the intrauterine device and $255 annually for the oral contraceptive pill. Our results suggest that the mandate has led to large reductions in total out-of-pocket spending on contraceptives and that these price changes are likely to be salient for women with private health insurance.

  13. On the pH dependent behavior of the firefly bioluminescence: protein dynamics and water content in the active pocket.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Rhee, Young Min

    2013-06-20

    Understanding bioluminescence presents fascinating challenges for fundamental sciences and numerous opportunities for practical applications. As a representative example, the firefly bioluminescent system has been intensively studied in both experimental and computational areas. However, there are still remaining questions regarding especially the detailed protein dynamics and the mechanisms of its color modulation. Here, we report on the pH dependent behavior of the firefly bioluminescence primarily based on molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the overall protein structure is generally resilient to pH variations. As the protein does not exhibit any structural distortions that can affect the emission property, we next focus on the dynamics in the active pocket and its effect on color modulation by adopting different protonation states in the pocket. With this, we observe red-shifted emissions at acidic conditions as consistent with previous studies. Most importantly, we find that a water molecule in the active pocket can mediate flexible motions of neighboring groups, which can subsequently modify the emission properties to a substantial degree. Based on the observations, we propose that the active pocket is in a dry condition during the luminescence process. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the role of the dynamics near the active pocket in modulating bioluminescence.

  14. Study Of Physician And Patient Communication Identifies Missed Opportunities To Help Reduce Patients' Out-Of-Pocket Spending.

    PubMed

    Ubel, Peter A; Zhang, Cecilia J; Hesson, Ashley; Davis, J Kelly; Kirby, Christine; Barnett, Jamison; Hunter, Wynn G

    2016-04-01

    Some experts contend that requiring patients to pay out of pocket for a portion of their care will bring consumer discipline to health care markets. But are physicians prepared to help patients factor out-of-pocket expenses into medical decisions? In this qualitative study of audiorecorded clinical encounters, we identified physician behaviors that stand in the way of helping patients navigate out-of-pocket spending. Some behaviors reflected a failure to fully engage with patients' financial concerns, from never acknowledging such concerns to dismissing them too quickly. Other behaviors reflected a failure to resolve uncertainty about out-of-pocket expenses or reliance on temporary solutions without making long-term plans to reduce spending. Many of these failures resulted from systemic barriers to health care spending conversations, such as a lack of price transparency. For consumer health care markets to work as intended, physicians need to be prepared to help patients navigate out-of-pocket expenses when financial concerns arise during clinical encounters.

  15. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: V. preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. Part II. effects on lungs.

    PubMed

    Harrison, G A; Corbett, R L; Klein, G

    1975-04-01

    An electron microscope examination was carried out on the lungs of 11 pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that breathed oxygen at 10 psi or 12 psi partial pressure over a period of 7 d, at the end of which time they were decompressed to sea-level O2 pressure, either suddenly or in 30, 60, or 90 min. Vesiculation was noted in the endothelium of the alveolarcapillary wall in most of the animals and, occasionally, blebbing. Some mitochrondria were swollen in a few of the animals. Alveolar exudate was, in general, sparse. Compared with the lungs of other rodents, the lungs of pocket mice appeared relatively resistant to the toxic effects of oxygen. This conclusion needs, however, to be tempered by the fact that 5% N2 was used in the tests reported here. Nonetheless, the results suggest that the oxygen pressures anticipated on the flight of Apollo XVII should be well tolerated by the pocket mice.

  16. Development of a syringe pump assisted dynamic headspace sampling technique for needle trap device.

    PubMed

    Eom, In-Yong; Niri, Vadoud H; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2008-07-04

    This paper describes a new approach that combines needle trap devices (NTDs) with a dynamic headspace sampling technique (purge and trap) using a bidirectional syringe pump. The needle trap device is a 22-G stainless steel needle 3.5-in. long packed with divinylbenzene sorbent particles. The same sized needle, without packing, was used for purging purposes. We chose an aqueous mixture of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylene (BTEX) and developed a sequential purge and trap (SPNT) method, in which sampling (trapping) and purging cycles were performed sequentially by the use of syringe pump with different distribution channels. In this technique, a certain volume (1 mL) of headspace was sequentially sampled using the needle trap; afterwards, the same volume of air was purged into the solution at a high flow rate. The proposed technique showed an effective extraction compared to the continuous purge and trap technique, with a minimal dilution effect. Method evaluation was also performed by obtaining the calibration graphs for aqueous BTEX solutions in the concentration range of 1-250 ng/mL. The developed technique was compared to the headspace solid-phase microextraction method for the analysis of aqueous BTEX samples. Detection limits as low as 1 ng/mL were obtained for BTEX by NTD-SPNT.

  17. The Composite Insect Trap: An Innovative Combination Trap for Biologically Diverse Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Laura; Stehouwer, Rachel; Heberling, Jacob Mason; Shea, Katriona

    2011-01-01

    Documentation of insect diversity is an important component of the study of biodiversity, community dynamics, and global change. Accurate identification of insects usually requires catching individuals for close inspection. However, because insects are so diverse, most trapping methods are specifically tailored to a particular taxonomic group. For scientists interested in the broadest possible spectrum of insect taxa, whether for long term monitoring of an ecosystem or for a species inventory, the use of several different trapping methods is usually necessary. We describe a novel composite method for capturing a diverse spectrum of insect taxa. The Composite Insect Trap incorporates elements from four different existing trapping methods: the cone trap, malaise trap, pan trap, and flight intercept trap. It is affordable, resistant, easy to assemble and disassemble, and collects a wide variety of insect taxa. Here we describe the design, construction, and effectiveness of the Composite Insect Trap tested during a study of insect diversity. The trap catches a broad array of insects and can eliminate the need to use multiple trap types in biodiversity studies. We propose that the Composite Insect Trap is a useful addition to the trapping methods currently available to ecologists and will be extremely effective for monitoring community level dynamics, biodiversity assessment, and conservation and restoration work. In addition, the Composite Insect Trap will be of use to other insect specialists, such as taxonomists, that are interested in describing the insect taxa in a given area. PMID:21698160

  18. Luminescence and charge carrier trapping in YPO4:Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awater, Roy H. P.; Niemeijer-Berghuijs, Louise C.; Dorenbos, Pieter

    2017-04-01

    YPO4 doped with Bi3+ and/or Tb3+ samples were prepared in air. X-ray excited luminescence measurements showed emission from isolated Bi3+ and Bi-pairs, and also emission from Bi2+ was observed. Based on the obtained spectroscopic data, the electron binding energies in the ground and excited states of Bi3+ and Bi2+ were placed inside the vacuum referred binding energy (VRBE) scheme, and this was used to explain the luminescence of bismuth doped YPO4. The VRBE scheme and additional thermoluminescence glow curves show that bismuth can act both as electron and as hole trap in YPO4.

  19. Habitat selection and the perceptual trap.

    PubMed

    Patten, Michael A; Kelly, Jeffrey F

    2010-12-01

    The concept of "ecological traps" was introduced over three decades ago. An ecological trap occurs when, by various mechanisms, low-quality (yielding low fitness) habitat is more attractive than good habitat, thus coaxing individuals to settle there despite a resultant loss of fitness. Empirical work on such traps has increased dramatically in the past decade, but the converse-avoidance of high-quality habitat because it is less attractive, what we term a "perceptual trap" has remained largely unexplored. Even so, depending on conditions (growth rate, strength of habitat preference, and mortality rate), such perceptual traps can be more limiting than ecological traps to population persistence. An example from field experiments with the Lesser Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) lends empirical support to the concept, and several other potential examples suggest that these traps are perhaps more prevalent than has been appreciated. Because demographic Allee effects are expected to prevent a population from growing sufficiently in a habitat that is avoided, a perceptual trap may persist even though fitness is high. Unlike an ecological trap, which may be negated by increasing habitat quality, biologists will be hard pressed to negate a perceptual trap, which will require determining which cues an animal uses to select high-quality habitat and then devising a means of enhancing those cues so that an animal is lured into the habitat.

  20. Introduced species as evolutionary traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Sherman, P.W.; Blossey, B.; Runge, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Invasive species can alter environments in such a way that normal behavioural decision-making rules of native species are no longer adaptive. The evolutionary trap concept provides a useful framework for predicting and managing the impact of harmful invasive species. We discuss how native species can respond to changes in their selective regime via evolution or learning. We also propose novel management strategies to promote the long-term co-existence of native and introduced species in cases where the eradication of the latter is either economically or biologically unrealistic.

  1. Gyrotactic trapping: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorai, S.

    2016-04-01

    Gyrotactic trapping is a mechanism proposed by Durham et al. ["Disruption of vertical motility by shear triggers formation of thin Phytoplankton layers," Science 323, 1067-1070 (2009)] to explain the formation of thin phytoplankton layer just below the ocean surface. This mechanism is examined numerically using a rational model based on the generalized Taylor dispersion theory. The crucial role of sedimentation speed in the thin layer formation is demonstrated. The effects of variation in different parameters on the thin layer formation are also investigated.

  2. New way to trap carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to efficiently capture carbon dioxide out of thin air” (16 April, http://ow.ly/LHvpz; see also p4), which described a novel synthetic resin that can capture carbon dioxide (CO2) and remove it from the atmosphere much faster than trees can. The article noted that the resin absorbs CO2 in dry air and releases it again in humid air.

  3. GeoPad and GeoPocket: GIS-Enabled Field Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, P. A.; van der Pluijm, B.

    2005-12-01

    Over the past three years we have successfully incorporated and evaluated the use of field-based information technology in introductory through senior-level field courses offered at the University of Michigan's Camp Davis Geology Field Station, near Jackson, WY. The use of GeoPads (field-durable Tablet PCs) and GeoPockets (field-durable Pocket PCs) -- both equipped with GIS, GPS, wireless networking, electronic notebook and other pertinent software -- have significantly enhanced our field exercises and excursions, for both students and instructors. In addition to describing our on-going work, the results of an external, independent review of GeoPad-curriculum integration are presented. For example, using GeoPads to teach field mapping not only supports the traditional approaches and advantages of field instruction, but also offers important benefits in the development of students' spatial reasoning skills. Students are able to record observations and directly create geologic maps in the field, using a combination of an electronic field notebook (Microsoft OneNote) tightly integrated with intuitive, pen-enabled GIS software (ArcGIS-ArcMap). Specifically, this arrangement permits students to analyze and manipulate their data in multiple contexts and representations -- while still in the field -- using both traditional 2-D map views, as well as richer 3-D contexts. Such enhancements provide students with powerful exploratory tools that aid the development of spatial reasoning skills, allowing more intuitive interactions with 2-D representations of our 3-D world. Additionally, field-based GIS mapping enables better error-detection, through immediate interaction with current observations in the context of both supporting data (e.g., topographic maps, aerial photos, magnetic surveys) and students' ongoing observations. GeoPockets provide instructional staff with a more portable, though less feature-rich device, which is highly suitable to the role of "electronic

  4. [Out-of-pocket medical spending for care in patients with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Westhoff, G; Listing, J; Zink, A

    2004-10-01

    We examined out-of-pocket medical expenditures (OoP) of 869 patients with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis (ACR criteria, disease duration <2 years) using data from a prospective observational cohort. Out-of-pocket costs were retrospectively assessed for a period of 6 months by a list of 14 cost domains. Of the patients, 82% had costs due to copayments for prescribed drugs and 56% for over-the-counter drugs. Within six months each patient spent an average of 47 (+/- 67) Euro as co-payment and 45 (+/- 96) Euro for over-the-counter drugs. A comparable sum was spent for complementary and alternative medicine (47+/-250 Euro), which was used by 14% of the patients. The mean total OoP expenditure caused by RA was 628 Euro p.a. (median 306, IQ 66-334 Euro). The median costs accounted for approximately 2% of the average disposable yearly income in Germany. Out-of-pocket spending increased with functional limitations, poor health condition and pain as well as with level of education. A multivariate logistical regression analysis showed that patients with these characteristics spent about twice as much as patients with mild disease or low educational level. The odds ratios for having more than 306 Euro OoP-costs p.a. were OR=2.6 (CI 1.7-4) for patients with severe vs. moderate functional disability (HAQ> or =1.5 vs <1.5), OR=2.4 (CI 1.4-4.4) for patients in poor vs. good health condition (NRS 7-10 vs 0-3), and OR=2.1 for patients with severe vs. mild pain (CI 1.4-3.3). The level of OoP spending also varied by employment status (OR=0.28; CI 0.1-0.6 for jobless vs employed patients). Despite almost universal insurance coverage in Germany, patients with rheumatoid arthritis were exposed to substantial OoP expenditures. As policymakers discuss cost sharing and design of benefit packages to contain health spending, it is important to consider the expenditures that persons with chronic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis already have.

  5. Method for establishing a combustion zone in an in situ oil shale retort having a pocket at the top

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1980-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort having a top boundary of unfragmented formation and containing a fragmented permeable mass has a pocket at the top, that is, an open space between a portion of the top of the fragmented mass and the top boundary of unfragmented formation. To establish a combustion zone across the fragmented mass, a combustion zone is established in a portion of the fragmented mass which is proximate to the top boundary. A retort inlet mixture comprising oxygen is introduced to the fragmented mass to propagate the combustion zone across an upper portion of the fragmented mass. Simultaneously, cool fluid is introduced to the pocket to prevent overheating and thermal sloughing of formation from the top boundary into the pocket.

  6. Design of a Novel Low Cost Point of Care Tampon (POCkeT) Colposcope for Use in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Christopher T.; Krieger, Marlee S.; Gallagher, Jennifer E.; Asma, Betsy; Muasher, Lisa C.; Schmitt, John W.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current guidelines by WHO for cervical cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries involves visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) of the cervix, followed by treatment during the same visit or a subsequent visit with cryotherapy if a suspicious lesion is found. Implementation of these guidelines is hampered by a lack of: trained health workers, reliable technology, and access to screening facilities. A low cost ultra-portable Point of Care Tampon based digital colposcope (POCkeT Colposcope) for use at the community level setting, which has the unique form factor of a tampon, can be inserted into the vagina to capture images of the cervix, which are on par with that of a state of the art colposcope, at a fraction of the cost. A repository of images to be compiled that can be used to empower front line workers to become more effective through virtual dynamic training. By task shifting to the community setting, this technology could potentially provide significantly greater cervical screening access to where the most vulnerable women live. The POCkeT Colposcope’s concentric LED ring provides comparable white and green field illumination at a fraction of the electrical power required in commercial colposcopes. Evaluation with standard optical imaging targets to assess the POCkeT Colposcope against the state of the art digital colposcope and other VIAM technologies. Results Our POCkeT Colposcope has comparable resolving power, color reproduction accuracy, minimal lens distortion, and illumination when compared to commercially available colposcopes. In vitro and pilot in vivo imaging results are promising with our POCkeT Colposcope capturing comparable quality images to commercial systems. Conclusion The POCkeT Colposcope is capable of capturing images suitable for cervical lesion analysis. Our portable low cost system could potentially increase access to cervical cancer screening in limited resource settings through task shifting to community

  7. Financial burden of medical out-of-pocket spending by state and the implications of the 2014 Medicaid expansions.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Kyle J; Waidmann, Timothy; Blumberg, Linda J

    2013-08-01

    This study is the first to offer a detailed look at the burden of medical out-of-pocket spending, defined as total family medical out-of-pocket spending as a proportion of income, for each state. It further investigates which states have greater shares of individuals with high burden levels and no Medicaid coverage but would be Medicaid eligible under the 2014 rules of the Affordable Care Act should their state choose to participate in the expansion. This work suggests which states have the largest populations likely to benefit, in terms of lowering medical spending burden, from participating in the 2014 adult Medicaid expansions.

  8. Docking and Migration of Carbon Monoxide in Nitrogenase: The Case for Gated Pockets from IR Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Leland B.; Leontyev, Igor; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei; Scott, Aubrey D.; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence for a CO docking site near the FeMo-cofactor in nitrogenase has been obtained by FT-IR monitored low temperature photolysis. We investigated the possible migration paths for CO from this docking site using molecular dynamics calculations. The simulations support the notion of a gas channel with multiple internal pockets from the active site to the protein exterior. Travel between pockets is gated by motion of protein residues. Implications for the mechanism of nitrogenase reactions with CO and N2 are discussed. PMID:25919807

  9. Polaronic trapping in magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raebiger, Hannes

    2012-02-01

    GaN doped with iron is an interesting candidate material for magnetic semiconductors, as p-d coupling between the localized Fe-d and extended N-p hole states is expected to facilitate long-range ferromagnetic alignment of the Fe spins [1]. This picture of extended states in GaN:Fe, however, falls apart due to a polaronic localization of the hole carriers nearby the Fe impurities. To elucidate the carrier localization in GaN:Fe and related iron doped III-V semiconductors, I present a systematic study using self-interaction corrected density-functional calculations [2]. These calculations predict three distinct scenarios. (i) Some systems do sustain extended host-like hole states, (ii) some exhibit polaronic trapping, (iii) and some exhibit carrier trapping at Fe-d orbitals. These behaviors are described in detail to give an insight as to how to distinguish them experimentally. I thank T. Fujita, C. Echeverria-Arrondo, and A. Ayuela for their collaboration.[4pt] [1] T. Dietl et al, Science, 287, 1019 (2000).[0pt] [2] S. Lany and A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. B, 80, 085202 (2009).

  10. 9H-Purine Scaffold Reveals Induced-Fit Pocket Plasticity of the BRD9 Bromodomain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 2-amine-9H-purine scaffold was identified as a weak bromodomain template and was developed via iterative structure based design into a potent nanomolar ligand for the bromodomain of human BRD9 with small residual micromolar affinity toward the bromodomain of BRD4. Binding of the lead compound 11 to the bromodomain of BRD9 results in an unprecedented rearrangement of residues forming the acetyllysine recognition site, affecting plasticity of the protein in an induced-fit pocket. The compound does not exhibit any cytotoxic effect in HEK293 cells and displaces the BRD9 bromodomain from chromatin in bioluminescence proximity assays without affecting the BRD4/histone complex. The 2-amine-9H-purine scaffold represents a novel template that can be further modified to yield highly potent and selective tool compounds to interrogate the biological role of BRD9 in diverse cellular systems. PMID:25703523

  11. WDR5 Intearcts with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein via the Histone H3-binding Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Kingston, R

    2008-01-01

    WDR5 is a component of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) complex, which methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and was identified as a methylated Lys-4 histone H3-binding protein. Here, we present a crystal structure of WDR5 bound to an MLL peptide. Surprisingly, we find that WDR5 utilizes the same pocket shown to bind histone H3 for this MLL interaction. Furthermore, the WDR5-MLL interaction is disrupted preferentially by mono- and di-methylated Lys-4 histone H3 over unmodified and tri-methylated Lys-4 histone H3. These data implicate a delicate interplay between the effector, WDR5, the catalytic subunit, MLL, and the substrate, histone H3, of the MLL complex. We suggest that the activity of the MLL complex might be regulated through this interplay.

  12. Results of examination of the nasal mucosa. [in Apollo 17 BIOCORE pocket mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Vogel, F. S.; Lloyd, B.; Benton, E. V.; Cruty, M. R.; Haymaker, W.; Leon, H. A.; Billingham, J.; Turnbill, C. E.; Teas, V.

    1975-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium, but not the nasal respiratory epithelium, of the four pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that survived their flight on Apollo XVII showed both diffuse alterations and numerous disseminated focal lesions. The olfactory mucosa of the mouse that died during flight was also affected, but to a minor degree insofar as could be determined. All this was in contrast to the normal appearance of the olfactory mucosa of the numerous control animals. A number of possible causes were considered: systemic or regional infection; inhaled particulate material (seed dust); by-products from the KO2 bed in aerosol or particulate form; gas contaminants originating in the flight package; volatile substances from the dead mouse; weightlessness; and cosmic ray particle radiation. Where feasible, studies were conducted in an effort to rule in or rule out some of these potentially causative factors. No definitive conclusions were reached as to the cause of the lesions in the flight mice.

  13. Successful salvage of ventricular-assist devices in the setting of pump pocket infection.

    PubMed

    Manahan, Michele A; Goldberg, Nelson H; Silverman, Ronald P

    2006-10-01

    Implantable ventricular-assist devices (VADs) have been approved for use both as a bridge to heart transplantation and as a destination therapy. Rising numbers of patients are surviving with these devices for several years. However, infections of these foreign bodies are serious and frequent complications, often requiring removal of the implant, with serious health consequences. Given the increased use of VADs as life-preserving destination therapy, explantation of these devices in the face of infection is impractical. We evaluated and successfully treated 2 patients with VAD pocket infections referred by the cardiac surgery service at our institution using aggressive surgical and pharmacologic therapy, with the goal of preserving the VADs. However, this is still a largely unsolved dilemma requiring further exploration into prevention and treatment since these devastating infections will likely become a more frequent reconstructive challenge.

  14. Results of examination of the calvarium, brain, and meninges. [in Apollo 17 BIOCORE pocket mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Zeman, W.; Turnbill, C. E.; Clayton, R. K.; Bailey, O. T.; Samorajski, T.; Vogel, F. S.; Lloyd, B.; Cruty, M. R.; Benton, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Tissue reactions were found around the monitor (dosimeter) assemblies that had been implanted beneath the scalp of the five pocket mice that flew on Apollo XVII. Mitosis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation was considerably reduced in comparison with that in control animals. Otherwise the brain tissue as well as the meninges in the flight animals appeared unaltered. Since the animals were exposed primarily to high Z-high energy (HZE) cosmic-ray particles at the lower end of the high LET spectrum, the lack of changes in the brain cannot be taken as evidence that the brain will suffer no damage from the heavier HZE particles on prolonged manned missions.

  15. Process-based model linking pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae) activity to sediment transport and soil thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kyungsoo; Amundson, Ronald; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2005-11-01

    Burrowing organisms assist in shaping earth surfaces and are simultaneously affected by the environment they inhabit; however, a conceptual framework is not yet available to describe this feedback. We introduce a model that connects the population density of soil-burrowing animals to sediment transport via energy. The model, combined with available data from California hillslopes where soil erosion is driven by pocket gophers (Thomomys bottae), suggests that a gopher annually expends ˜9 kJ of energy, or ˜1% of reported burrowing energy expenditure, in generating sediment transport. The model is used to evaluate the case that gophers prefer to populate thicker soils. The results suggest that this behavior may drastically dampen the spatial and temporal variations of soil thickness and gopher populations, implying that burrowing organisms may create landscapes distinct from those affected by abiotic processes.

  16. Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for periodontal pockets: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribac, Valentin; Todea, Carmen; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2016-03-01

    The applications of lasers in medicine, both in the field of diagnosis and treatment are gaining momentum. In dentistry in particular, numerous types of lasers with a wide range of characteristics are being utilized in all fields. In consequence, a lot of experience and knowledge has been gained in the last two decades in this domain; this resulted in the development of novel technologies and devices. A brief overview is made in the first part of this article on these topics. The treatment of periodontal disease with laser therapy is pointed out, as well as the photodynamic therapy which is using LLLT for the activation of the sensitizing gel that is introduced in the periodontal pockets. This paper reviews also the application of photodynamic therapy in clinical trials which have different results; a standardization of the protocol utilized for this procedure is concluded to be necessary.

  17. Approaching an organic semimetal: Electron pockets at the Fermi level for a p-benzoquinonemonoimine zwitterion.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luis G; Velev, Julian; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Alvira, Jose; Vega, Omar; Diaz, Gerson; Routaboul, Lucie; Braunstein, Pierre; Doudin, Bernard; Losovyj, Yaroslav B; Dowben, Peter A

    2012-08-01

    There is compelling evidence of electron pockets, at the Fermi level, in the band structure for an organic zwitterion molecule of the p-benzoquinonemonoimine type. The electronic structure of the zwitterion molecular film has a definite, although small, density of states evident at the Fermi level as well as a nonzero inner potential and thus is very different from a true insulator. In spite of a small Brillouin zone, significant band width is observed in the intermolecular band dispersion. The results demonstrate that Bloch's theorem applies to the wave vector dependence of the electronic band structure formed from the molecular orbitals of adjacent molecules in a molecular thin film of a p-benzoquinonemonoimine type zwitterion.

  18. Using wireless (Pocket)PCs in Large Introductory Courses to Expand Discourse and Interactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, B. A.; Knoop, P. A.; Samson, P. J.; Teasley, S. D.

    2005-12-01

    Teaching methods in introductory, undergraduate courses traditionally rely on static textbooks and/or course packs, with presentation delivered as a monologue in front of a mostly passive, large audience. The concepts presented in class are often best illustrated using visualizations and/or demonstrations, but even the most stunning of images or spectacular exhibits, while motivating, offer students only passive participation in the learning process. Add to this the advent of course websites with lecture notes and PowerPoint presentations and the students are left with little incentive to attend, much less participate. Clearly this model does not provide much opportunity or motivation for today's students to learn and think more critically about the arguments being developed. What is needed is a coupling of the rich imagery of many fields with advances in technology and in learning, toward revitalizing pedagogical approaches in survey-level courses and student-instructor interaction. Our IT-enhanced classroom project couples the use of peer instruction techniques in large classes (as originally described by Mazur, 1997) with the use of interactive spatial concept challenges, utilizing wireless PocketPCs (handhelds) or student-owned wireless-enabled laptops. The technologies employed (web, PocketPC/laptop, WiFi) are off-the-shelf technologies and the Peer Instruction technique is increasingly documented in undergraduate science classes. However, the combination is not employed due to its initial cost, wrongly perceived level of effort to implement, availability of engaging activities and modest volume of data on student learning. We'll show our development, implementation and preliminary cognitive assessment efforts of this IT-enhanced classroom experience, involving interactive image quizzes and data manipulation in large introductory classes at the University of Michigan.

  19. An Inserted α/β Subdomain Shapes the Catalytic Pocket of Lactobacillus johnsonii Cinnamoyl Esterase

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Clara; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Molloy, Sara; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander; Gonzalez, Claudio F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Microbial enzymes produced in the gastrointestinal tract are primarily responsible for the release and biochemical transformation of absorbable bioactive monophenols. In the present work we described the crystal structure of LJ0536, a serine cinnamoyl esterase produced by the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2. Methodology/Principal Findings We crystallized LJ0536 in the apo form and in three substrate-bound complexes. The structure showed a canonical α/β fold characteristic of esterases, and the enzyme is dimeric. Two classical serine esterase motifs (GlyXSerXGly) can be recognized from the amino acid sequence, and the structure revealed that the catalytic triad of the enzyme is formed by Ser106, His225, and Asp197, while the other motif is non-functional. In all substrate-bound complexes, the aromatic acyl group of the ester compound was bound in the deepest part of the catalytic pocket. The binding pocket also contained an unoccupied area that could accommodate larger ligands. The structure revealed a prominent inserted α/β subdomain of 54 amino acids, from which multiple contacts to the aromatic acyl groups of the substrates are made. Inserts of this size are seen in other esterases, but the secondary structure topology of this subdomain of LJ0536 is unique to this enzyme and its closest homolog (Est1E) in the Protein Databank. Conclusions The binding mechanism characterized (involving the inserted α/β subdomain) clearly differentiates LJ0536 from enzymes with similar activity of a fungal origin. The structural features herein described together with the activity profile of LJ0536 suggest that this enzyme should be clustered in a new group of bacterial cinnamoyl esterases. PMID:21876742

  20. Distinct pose of discodermolide in taxol binding pocket drives a complementary mode of microtubule stabilization.

    PubMed

    Khrapunovich-Baine, Marina; Menon, Vilas; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Smith, Amos B; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Fiser, Andras; Horwitz, Susan Band; Xiao, Hui

    2009-12-15

    The microtubule cytoskeleton has proven to be an effective target for cancer therapeutics. One class of drugs, known as microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs), binds to microtubule polymers and stabilizes them against depolymerization. The prototype of this group of drugs, Taxol, is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used extensively in the treatment of human ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas. Although electron crystallography and photoaffinity labeling experiments determined that the binding site for Taxol is in a hydrophobic pocket in beta-tubulin, little was known about the effects of this drug on the conformation of the entire microtubule. A recent study from our laboratory utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) in concert with various mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has provided new information on the structure of microtubules upon Taxol binding. In the current study we apply this technique to determine the binding mode and the conformational effects on chicken erythrocyte tubulin (CET) of another MSA, discodermolide, whose synthetic analogues may have potential use in the clinic. We confirmed that, like Taxol, discodermolide binds to the taxane binding pocket in beta-tubulin. However, as opposed to Taxol, which has major interactions with the M-loop, discodermolide orients itself away from this loop and toward the N-terminal H1-S2 loop. Additionally, discodermolide stabilizes microtubules mainly via its effects on interdimer contacts, specifically on the alpha-tubulin side, and to a lesser extent on interprotofilament contacts between adjacent beta-tubulin subunits. Also, our results indicate complementary stabilizing effects of Taxol and discodermolide on the microtubules, which may explain the synergy observed between the two drugs in vivo.

  1. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; de Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy. PMID:25590933

  2. S1 Pocket of a Bacterially Derived Subtilisin-like Protease Underpins Effective Tissue Destruction*

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wilson; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Kennan, Ruth M.; Reeve, Shane B.; Steer, David L.; Reboul, Cyril; Smith, A. Ian; Pike, Robert N.; Rood, Julian I.; Whisstock, James C.; Porter, Corrine J.

    2011-01-01

    The ovine footrot pathogen, Dichelobacter nodosus, secretes three subtilisin-like proteases that play an important role in the pathogenesis of footrot through their ability to mediate tissue destruction. Virulent and benign strains of D. nodosus secrete the basic proteases BprV and BprB, respectively, with the catalytic domain of these enzymes having 96% sequence identity. At present, it is not known how sequence variation between these two putative virulence factors influences their respective biological activity. We have determined the high resolution crystal structures of BprV and BprB. These data reveal that that the S1 pocket of BprV is more hydrophobic but smaller than that of BprB. We show that BprV is more effective than BprB in degrading extracellular matrix components of the host tissue. Mutation of two residues around the S1 pocket of BprB to the equivalent residues in BprV dramatically enhanced its proteolytic activity against elastin substrates. Application of a novel approach for profiling substrate specificity, the Rapid Endopeptidase Profiling Library (REPLi) method, revealed that both enzymes prefer cleaving after hydrophobic residues (and in particular P1 leucine) but that BprV has more restricted primary substrate specificity than BprB. Furthermore, for P1 Leu-containing substrates we found that BprV is a significantly more efficient enzyme than BprB. Collectively, these data illuminate how subtle changes in D. nodosus proteases may significantly influence tissue destruction as part of the ovine footrot pathogenesis process. PMID:21990366

  3. Estimating Client Out-of-Pocket Costs for Accessing Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tchuenche, Michel; Haté, Vibhuti; McPherson, Dacia; Palmer, Eurica; Thambinayagam, Ananthy; Loykissoonlal, Dayanund; Forsythe, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, South Africa launched a countrywide effort to scale up its voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) program on the basis of compelling evidence that circumcision reduces men’s risk of acquiring HIV through heterosexual intercourse. Even though VMMC is free there, clients can incur indirect out-of-pocket costs (for example transportation cost or foregone income). Because these costs can be barriers to increasing the uptake of VMMC services, we assessed them from a client perspective, to inform VMMC demand creation policies. Costs (calculated using a bottom-up approach) and demographic data were systematically collected through 190 interviews conducted in 2015 with VMMC clients or (for minors) their caregivers at 25 VMMC facilities supported by the government and the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in eight of South Africa’s nine provinces. The average age of VMMC clients was 22 years and nearly 92% were under 35 years of age. The largest reported out-of-pocket expenditure was transportation, at an average of US$9.20 (R 100). Only eight clients (4%) reported lost days of work. Indirect expenditures were childcare costs (one client) and miscellaneous items such as food or medicine (20 clients). Given competing household expense priorities, spending US$9.20 (R100) per person on transportation to access VMMC services could be a significant burden on clients and households, and a barrier to South Africa’s efforts to create demand for VMMC. Thus, we recommend a more focused analysis of clients’ transportation costs to access VMMC services. PMID:27783635

  4. Pocket pathologist: A mobile application for rapid diagnostic surgical pathology consultation

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Douglas J.; Parwani, Anil V.; Cable, Bill; Cucoranu, Ioan C.; McHugh, Jeff S.; Kolowitz, Brian J.; Yousem, Samuel A.; Palat, Vijaykumar; Reden, Anna Von; Sloka, Stephen; Lauro, Gonzalo Romero; Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Telepathology allows the digital transmission of images for rapid access to pathology experts. Recent technologic advances in smartphones have allowed them to be used to acquire and transmit digital images of the glass slide, representing cost savings and efficiency gains over traditional forms of telepathology. We report our experience with developing an iPhone application (App - Pocket Pathologist) to facilitate rapid diagnostic pathology teleconsultation utilizing a smartphone. Materials and Methods: A secure, web-based portal (http://pathconsult.upmc.com/) was created to facilitate remote transmission of digital images for teleconsultation. The App augments functionality of the web-based portal and allows the user to quickly and easily upload digital images for teleconsultation. Image quality of smartphone cameras was evaluated by capturing images using different adapters that directly attach phones to a microscope ocular lens. Results: The App was launched in August 2013. The App facilitated easy submission of cases for teleconsultation by limiting the number of data entry fields for users and enabling uploading of images from their smartphone's gallery wirelessly. Smartphone cameras properly attached to a microscope create static digital images of similar quality to a commercial digital microscope camera. Conclusion: Smartphones have great potential to support telepathology because they are portable, provide ubiquitous internet connectivity, contain excellent digital cameras, and can be easily attached to a microscope. The Pocket Pathologist App represents a significant reduction in the cost of creating digital images and submitting them for teleconsultation. The iPhone App provides an easy solution for global users to submit digital pathology images to pathology experts for consultation. PMID:24843822

  5. The same pocket in menin binds both MLL and JUND but has opposite effects on transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Gurung, Buddha; Wan, Bingbing; Matkar, Smita; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Wan, Ke; Merchant, Juanita L.; Hua, Xianxin; Lei, Ming

    2013-04-08

    Menin is a tumour suppressor protein whose loss or inactivation causes multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1), a hereditary autosomal dominant tumour syndrome that is characterized by tumorigenesis in multiple endocrine organs. Menin interacts with many proteins and is involved in a variety of cellular processes. Menin binds the JUN family transcription factor JUND and inhibits its transcriptional activity. Several MEN1 missense mutations disrupt the menin-JUND interaction, suggesting a correlation between the tumour-suppressor function of menin and its suppression of JUND-activated transcription. Menin also interacts with mixed lineage leukaemia protein 1 (MLL1), a histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase, and functions as an oncogenic cofactor to upregulate gene transcription and promote MLL1-fusion-protein-induced leukaemogenesis. A recent report on the tethering of MLL1 to chromatin binding factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) by menin indicates that menin is a molecular adaptor coordinating the functions of multiple proteins. Despite its importance, how menin interacts with many distinct partners and regulates their functions remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of human menin in its free form and in complexes with MLL1 or with JUND, or with an MLL1-LEDGF heterodimer. These structures show that menin contains a deep pocket that binds short peptides of MLL1 or JUND in the same manner, but that it can have opposite effects on transcription. The menin-JUND interaction blocks JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated JUND phosphorylation and suppresses JUND-induced transcription. In contrast, menin promotes gene transcription by binding the transcription activator MLL1 through the peptide pocket while still interacting with the chromatin-anchoring protein LEDGF at a distinct surface formed by both menin and MLL1.

  6. Chapter 1: Physics with Trapped Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Martina; Madsen, Niels; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Ion traps, which were first introduced in the late 1950s and early 1960s, have established themselves as indispensable tools in many areas of physics, chemistry and technology. This chapter gives a brief survey of the operating principles and development of ion traps, together with a short description of how ions are loaded and detected. This is followed by a brief account of some of the current applications of ion traps.

  7. Trapping of intense light in hollow shell

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Shixia; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Weng, Suming; Wang, Jingwei; Xu, Han; Zhuo, Hongbin; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-09-15

    A small hollow shell for trapping laser light is proposed. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that under appropriate laser and plasma conditions a part of the radiation fields of an intense short laser pulse can enter the cavity of a small shell through an over-critical density plasma in an adjacent guide channel and become trapped. The trapped light evolves into a circulating radial wave pattern until its energy is dissipated.

  8. Scanning capacitance detection and charge trapping in NOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terris, Bruce D.; Barrett, Rick; Mamin, H. Jonathon

    1993-06-01

    Charge trapping in thin films of silicon nitride has long been studied for use as a non-volatile semiconductor memory. Recently, this technology has been combined with scanned probe technologies with the sharp probe tip serving as the upper electrode in a Si3N4- SiO2Si (NOS) structure. By applying a voltage pulse between the tip and silicon substrate, charge carriers can be made to tunnel through the oxide and be trapped in the nitride. This trapped charge causes a shift in the capacitance-voltage curve along the voltage axis; the voltage at which depletion occurs is increased. It has been proposed that such a system could be used as a high density data storage device. We have begun to explore some of the issues related to such an application, including data lifetime and data rates. In thermally accelerated life tests, no sign of charge spreading was seen after 100 days at 150 degree(s)C and from the rate of charge decay we would predict room temperature lifetimes in excess of 1 million years. We have also used an air-bearing spindle to conduct high speed measurements on a spinning NOS sample and obtained data rates as high as 500 kHz with carrier-to-noise ratios of approximately 60 dB in a 3 kHz bandwidth.

  9. Spin readout of trapped electron qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Pai; Matthiesen, Clemens; Häffner, Hartmut

    2017-01-01

    We propose a scheme to read out the spin of a single electron quantum bit in a surface Paul trap using oscillating magnetic-field gradients. The readout sequence is composed of cooling, driving, amplification, and detection of the electron's motion. We study the scheme in the presence of noise and trap anharmonicities at liquid-helium temperatures. An analysis of the four procedures shows short measurement times (25 μ s ) and high fidelities (99.7 % ) are achievable with realistic experimental parameters. Our scheme performs the function of fluorescence detection in ion trapping schemes, highlighting the potential to build all-electric quantum computers based on trapped electron-spin qubits.

  10. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  11. Ecological traps: current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Robin; Swearer, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological traps, which occur when animals mistakenly prefer habitats where their fitness is lower than in other available habitats following rapid environmental change, have important conservation and management implications. Empirical research has focused largely on assessing the behavioural effects of traps, by studying a small number of geographically close habitat patches. Traps, however, have also been defined in terms of their population-level effects (i.e. as preferred habitats of sufficiently low quality to cause population declines), and this is the scale most relevant for management. We systematically review the ecological traps literature to (i) describe the geographical and taxonomic distribution of efforts to study traps, (ii) examine how different traps vary in the strength of their effects on preference and fitness, (iii) evaluate the robustness of methods being used to identify traps, and (iv) determine whether the information required to assess the population-level consequences of traps has been considered. We use our results to discuss key knowledge gaps, propose improved methods to study traps, and highlight fruitful avenues for future research. PMID:26865295

  12. Cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, Markus; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de; Morigi, Giovanna; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2011-09-15

    The efficiency of cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules is theoretically investigated for the case in which the infrared transition between two rovibrational states is used as a cycling transition. The molecules are assumed to be trapped either by a radiofrequency or optical trapping potential, depending on whether they are charged or neutral, and confined inside a high-finesse optical resonator that enhances radiative emission into the cavity mode. Using realistic experimental parameters and COS as a representative molecular example, we show that in this setup, cooling to the trap ground state is feasible.

  13. Non-destructive ion trap mass spectrometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Frankevich, Vladimir E.; Soni, Manish H.; Nappi, Mario; Santini, Robert E.; Amy, Jonathan W.; Cooks, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to an ion trap mass spectrometer of the type having an ion trapping volume defined by spaced end caps and a ring electrode. The ion trap includes a small sensing electrode which senses characteristic motion of ions trapped in said trapping volume and provides an image current. Ions are excited into characteristic motion by application of an excitation pulse to the trapped ions. The invention also relates to a method of operating such an ion trap.

  14. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-07

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution.

  15. Membrane-Based Gas Traps for Ammonia, Freon-21, and Water Systems to Simplify Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M. C.

    2003-01-01

    Gas traps are critical for the smooth operation of coolant loops because gas bubbles can cause loss of centrifugal pump prime, interference with sensor readings, inhibition of heat transfer, and blockage of passages to remote systems. Coolant loops are ubiquitous in space flight hardware, and thus there is a great need for this technology. Conventional gas traps will not function in micro-gravity due to the absence of buoyancy forces. Therefore, clever designs that make use of adhesion and momentum are required for adequate separation, preferable in a single pass. The gas traps currently used in water coolant loops on the International Space Station are composed of membrane tube sets in a shell. Each tube set is composed of a hydrophilic membrane (used for water transport and capture of bubbles) and a hydrophobic membrane (used for venting of air bubbles). For the hydrophilic membrane, there are two critical pressures, the pressure drop and the bubble pressure. The pressure drop is the decrease in system pressure across the gas trap. The bubble pressure is the pressure required for air bubbles to pass across the water filled membrane. A significant difference between these pressures is needed to ensure complete capture of air bubbles in a single pass. Bubbles trapped by the device adsorb on the hydrophobic membrane in the interior of the hydrophilic membrane tube. After adsorption, the air is vented due to a pressure drop of approximately 1 atmosphere across the membrane. For water systems, the air is vented to the ambient (cabin). Because water vapor can also transport across the hydrophobic membrane, it is critical that a minimum surface area is used to avoid excessive water loss (would like to have a closed loop for the coolant). The currently used gas traps only provide a difference in pressure drop and bubble pressure of 3-4 psid. This makes the gas traps susceptible to failure at high bubble loading and if gas venting is impaired. One mechanism for the latter

  16. Optimizing Trap Design and Trapping Protocols for Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Renkema, Justin M; Buitenhuis, Rosemarije; Hallett, Rebecca H

    2014-12-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is a recent invasive pest of fruit crops in North America and Europe. Carpophagous larvae render fruit unmarketable and may promote secondary rot-causing organisms. To monitor spread and develop programs to time application of controls, further work is needed to optimize trap design and trapping protocols for adult D. suzukii. We compared commercial traps and developed a new, easy-to-use plastic jar trap that performed well compared with other designs. For some trap types, increasing the entry area led to increased D. suzukii captures and improved selectivity for D. suzukii when populations were low. However, progressive entry area enlargement had diminishing returns, particularly for commercial traps. Unlike previous studies, we found putting holes in trap lids under a close-fitting cover improved captures compared with holes on sides of traps. Also, red and black traps outperformed yellow and clear traps when traps of all colors were positioned 10-15 cm apart above crop foliage. In smaller traps, attractant surface area and entry area, but not other trap features (e.g., headspace volume), appeared to affect D. suzukii captures. In the new, plastic jar trap, tripling attractant volume (360 vs 120 ml) and weekly attractant replacement resulted in the highest D. suzukii captures, but in the larger commercial trap these measures only increased by-catch of large-bodied Diptera. Overall, the plastic jar trap with large entry area is affordable, durable, and can hold high attractant volumes to maximize D. suzukii capture and selectivity.

  17. Nano-photonic Light Trapping In Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Dennis M., Jr.

    Over the last several decades there have been significant advances in the study and understanding of light behavior in nanoscale geometries. Entire fields such as those based on photonic crystals, plasmonics and metamaterials have been developed, accelerating the growth of knowledge related to nanoscale light manipulation. Coupled with recent interest in cheap, reliable renewable energy, a new field has blossomed, that of nanophotonic solar cells. In this thesis, we examine important properties of thin-film solar cells from a nanophotonics perspective. We identify key differences between nanophotonic devices and traditional, thick solar cells. We propose a new way of understanding and describing limits to light trapping and show that certain nanophotonic solar cell designs can have light trapping limits above the so called ray-optic or ergodic limit. We propose that a necessary requisite to exceed the traditional light trapping limit is that the active region of the solar cell must possess a local density of optical states (LDOS) higher than that of the corresponding, bulk material. Additionally, we show that in addition to having an increased density of states, the absorber must have an appropriate incoupling mechanism to transfer light from free space into the optical modes of the device. We outline a portfolio of new solar cell designs that have potential to exceed the traditional light trapping limit and numerically validate our predictions for select cases. We emphasize the importance of thinking about light trapping in terms of maximizing the optical modes of the device and efficiently coupling light into them from free space. To further explore these two concepts, we optimize patterns of superlattices of air holes in thin slabs of Si and show that by adding a roughened incoupling layer the total absorbed current can be increased synergistically. We suggest that the addition of a random scattering surface to a periodic patterning can increase incoupling by

  18. Culicoides midge trap enhancement with animal odour baits in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Mands, V; Kline, D L; Blackwell, A

    2004-12-01

    Examples of the commercial trap Mosquito Magnet Pro (MMP emitting attractant 1-octen-3-ol in carbon dioxide 500 mL/min generated from propane fuel), were run 24 h/day on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, during June-August 2001 and evaluated for catching Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). From 30 days trapping, the catch averaged 2626 +/- 1358 Culicoides females/trap/day (mean +/- SE, range 558 +/- 139 to 6088 +/- 3597, for five sets of six consecutive nights), predominantly the pest Culicoides impunctatus Goetghebuer (68% overall), plus C. vexans (Staeger) > C. delta Edwards > C. pulicaris (L.) > C. lupicaris Downs & Kettle > C. albicans (Winnertz) > other Culicoides spp. Attempts were made to enhance the odour baiting system by adding hexane-extracts (2.1 mg/day) of hair samples from large host animals, resulting in the following effects on Culicoides collections: sheep - 53 %, red deer - 26 %, calf + 20%, pony + 40%, water buffalo + 262%, with greatest increases for C. impunctatus and C. pulicaris. Serial concentrations of these animal extracts (10(-1) - 10(-3) x 2.2 g/mL) were assayed on parous female C. impunctatus response in a Y-tube olfactometer (air-flow 150 mL/min), and by electroantennogram (EAG) on Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen laboratory-reared parous females. Positive behavioural responses to host odours were dose-dependent: the water buffalo extract being most active (threshold 0.22 g/mL), similar to deer, whereas other host extracts were > or = 10-fold less active. Correspondingly, the EAG threshold was lowest for water buffalo, 10-fold greater for deer, calf and pony, but not detected for sheep. If the active component(s) of these host extracts can be identified and synthesized, they might be employed to improve the capture of Culicoides midges for local control by removal trapping.

  19. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  20. Resonance Trapping in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour, Nader H.

    1998-09-01

    We study dynamics of a planetary system that consists of a star and two planets taking into account dynamical friction. Numerical integrations of a restricted planar circular three body model of this system indicate resonance capture. The main purpose of this paper is to present the results of an extensive numerical experiment performed on this model and also to present analytical arguments for the observed resonance trapping and its consequences. The equations of motion are written in terms of Delaunay variables and the recently developed method of partial averaging near resonance* is employed in order to account for the behavior of the system at resonance. * C.Chicone, B.Mashhoon and D.Retzloff, Ann.Inst.Henri Poincare, Vol.64, no 1, 1996, p.87-125.

  1. How varying pest and trap densities affect Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) capture in pheromone traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is an important insect pest in food processing facilities. Pheromone trapping is frequently used to monitor red flour beetle populations in structures; however, the optimal trap density and the relationship between trap ...

  2. New tools for surveillance of adult yellow fever mosquitoes: comparison of trap catches with human landing rates in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Krockel, Ulla; Rose, Andreas; Eiras, Alvaro E; Geier, Martin

    2006-06-01

    A novel mosquito trapping system, the BG-Sentinel trap, was evaluated as a monitoring tool for adult Aedes aegypti in field tests in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Human landing/biting collections, a gas-powered CO2 trap, and a Fay-Prince trap with only visual cues serving as references to evaluate the efficacy of the new trap. The BG-Sentinel is a simple suction trap that uses upward-directed air currents as well as visual cues to attract mosquitoes. The trap was tested with a new dispenser system (BG-Lure) that releases artificial human skin odors and needs no CO2. In comparison with the two other traps, the BG-Sentinel caught significantly more Ae. aegypti. Although human landing rates were the highest, there was no significant difference between human landing rates and the capture rates of the BG-Sentinel trap. The finding indicates that the trap can be considered as an acceptable alternative to human landing/biting collections in the surveillance of adult host-seeking dengue vectors. The addition of BG-Lure to the gas-powered CO2 trap greatly increased its efficacy. This combination, however, was not significantly more effective than the BG-Sentinel without CO2. In a 6-month comparison between the BG-Sentinel and a sticky ovitrap for gravid females, the BG-Sentinel proved to be a far more efficient and sensitive tool to measure the density of Ae. aegypti populations.

  3. The structure of apo ArnA features an unexpected central binding pocket and provides an explanation for enzymatic cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Utz; Hertlein, Simon; Grimm, Clemens

    2015-03-01

    The bacterial protein ArnA is an essential enzyme in the pathway leading to the modification of lipid A with the pentose sugar 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose. This modification confers resistance to polymyxins, which are antibiotics that are used as a last resort to treat infections with multiple drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. ArnA contains two domains with distinct catalytic functions: a dehydrogenase domain and a transformylase domain. The protein forms homohexamers organized as a dimer of trimers. Here, the crystal structure of apo ArnA is presented and compared with its ATP- and UDP-glucuronic acid-bound counterparts. The comparison reveals major structural rearrangements in the dehydrogenase domain that lead to the formation of a previously unobserved binding pocket at the centre of each ArnA trimer in its apo state. In the crystal structure, this pocket is occupied by a DTT molecule. It is shown that formation of the pocket is linked to a cascade of structural rearrangements that emerge from the NAD(+)-binding site. Based on these findings, a small effector molecule is postulated that binds to the central pocket and modulates the catalytic properties of ArnA. Furthermore, the discovered conformational changes provide a mechanistic explanation for the strong cooperative effect recently reported for the ArnA dehydrogenase function.

  4. Functional Consequences of the Open Distal Pocket of Dehaloperoxidase-Hemoglobin Observed by Time-Resolved X-ray Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junjie; Srajer, Vukica; Franzen, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Using time-resolved X-ray crystallography, we contrast a bifunctional dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin (DHP) with previously studied examples of myoglobin and hemoglobin in order to understand the functional role of the distal pocket of globins. One key functional difference between the DHP and other globins is the requirement that H2O2 enter the distal pocket of oxyferrous DHP in order to displace O2 from the heme Fe atom and thereby activate the heme for the peroxidase function. The open architecture of DHP permits more than one molecule to simultaneously enter the distal pocket of the protein above the heme in order to facilitate the unique peroxidase cycle starting from the oxyferrous state. The time-resolved X-ray data show that the distal pocket of DHP lacks a protein valve found in the two other globins that have been studied previously. The photolyzed CO ligand trajectory in DHP does not have a docking site. Rather the CO moves immediately to the Xe-binding site. From there CO can escape, but also recombine an order of magnitude more rapidly than in other globins. The contrast with DHP dynamics and function more precisely defines the functional role of the multiple conformational states of myoglobin. Taken together with the high reduction potential of DHP, the open distal site helps to explain how a globin can also function as a peroxidase. PMID:24116924

  5. Identification of fragments targeting an alternative pocket on HIV-1 gp41 by NMR screening and similarity searching.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shidong; Gochin, Miriam

    2013-09-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41 fusion intermediate is a promising drug target for inhibiting viral entry. However, drug development has been impeded by challenges inherent in mediating the underlying protein-protein interaction. Here we report on the identification of fragments that bind to a C-terminal sub-pocket adjacent to the well-known hydrophobic pocket on the NHR coiled coil. Using a specifically designed assay and ligand-based NMR screening of a fragment library, we identified a thioenylaminopyrazole compound with a dissociation constant of ~500 μM. Interaction with the C-terminal sub-pocket was confirmed by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR experiments, which also yielded the binding mode. Shape-based similarity searching detected additional phenylpyrazole and phenyltriazole fragments within the library, enriching the hit rate over random screening, and revealing molecular features required for activity. Discovery of the novel scaffolds and binding mechanism suggests avenues for extending the interaction surface and improving the potency of a hydrophobic pocket binding inhibitor.

  6. Non-hydrolyzable Diubiquitin Probes Reveal Linkage-Specific Reactivity of Deubiquitylating Enzymes Mediated by S2 Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Flierman, Dennis; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J.; Ekkebus, Reggy; Geurink, Paul P.; Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Komander, David; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin chains are important post-translational modifications that control a large number of cellular processes. Chains can be formed via different linkages, which determines the type of signal they convey. Deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) regulate ubiquitylation status by trimming or removing chains from attached proteins. DUBs can contain several ubiquitin-binding pockets, which confer specificity toward differently linked chains. Most tools for monitoring DUB specificity target binding pockets on opposing sides of the active site; however, some DUBs contain additional pockets. Therefore, reagents targeting additional pockets are essential to fully understand linkage specificity. We report the development of active site-directed probes and fluorogenic substrates, based on non-hydrolyzable diubiquitin, that are equipped with a C-terminal warhead or a fluorogenic activity reporter moiety. We demonstrate that various DUBs in lysates display differential reactivity toward differently linked diubiquitin probes, as exemplified by the proteasome-associated DUB USP14. In addition, OTUD2 and OTUD3 show remarkable linkage-specific reactivity with our diubiquitin-based reagents. PMID:27066941

  7. NMR second site screening for structure determination of ligands bound in the hydrophobic pocket of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Edina; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Guangyan; Gochin, Miriam

    2009-03-04

    The development of nonpeptide fusion inhibitors through rational drug design has been hampered by the limited accessibility of the gp41 coiled coil target, which is highly hydrophobic, and the absence of structural data defining details of small molecule interactions. Here we describe a new approach for obtaining structural information on small molecules bound in the hydrophobic pocket of gp41, using a paramagnetic probe peptide which binds adjacent to the pocket along an extended coiled coil. Ligand binding in the pocket leads to paramagnetic relaxation effects or pseudocontact shifts of ligand protons. These effects are distance and/or orientation dependent, permitting determination of ligand pose in the pocket. The method is demonstrated with a fast-exchanging ligand. Multiple measurements at different coiled coil and probe peptide ratios enabled accurate determination of the NMR parameters. Use of a labeled probe peptide stabilizes an otherwise aggregation-prone coiled coil and also enables modulation of the paramagnetic effect to study ligands of various affinities. Ultimately, this technique can provide essential information for structure-based design of nonpeptide fusion inhibitors.

  8. Outer trapped surfaces in Vaidya spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Ishai

    2007-03-15

    It is proven that in Vaidya spacetimes of bounded total mass, the outer boundary, in spacetime, of the region containing outer trapped surfaces, is the event horizon. Further, it is shown that the region containing trapped surfaces in these spacetimes does not always extend to the event horizon.

  9. Trapping antimatter for space propulsion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, W.A.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Lewis, R.A.; Rochet, J.; Schwartz, W.L.; Smith, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    Production and trapping of antiprotons for space propulsion applications are reviewed. Present and foreseeable production rates at Fermilab are discussed, and experiments on trapping, confinement and transport of large quantities of antiprotons are outlined. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Optimization of RF multipole ion trap geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghänel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-02-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) traps are ideal places to store cold ions for spectroscopic experiments. Specific multipole configurations are suited best for different applications but have to be modified to allow e.g. for a proper overlap of a laser beam waist with the ion cloud. Therefore the corresponding trapping fields should be shaped accordingly. To achieve this goal highly accurate electrical potentials of rf multipole traps and the resulting effective trapping potentials are calculated using the boundary element method (BEM). These calculations are used to evaluate imperfections and to optimize the field geometry. For that purpose the complex fields are reduced to a small set of multipole expansion coefficients. Desirable values for these coefficients are met by systematic changes of real trap dimensions from CAD designs. The effect of misalignment of a linear quadrupole, the optimization of an optically open Paul trap, the influence of steering electrodes (end electrode and ring electrode) on a 22-pole ion trap and the effect of the micro motion on the lowest reachable temperatures in such a trap are discussed.

  11. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2008-05-23

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  12. 49 CFR 236.728 - Circuit, trap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circuit, trap. 236.728 Section 236.728... Circuit, trap. A term applied to a circuit used where it is desirable to provide a track circuit but where it is impracticable to maintain a track circuit....

  13. Instability of some equatorially trapped waves

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Adrian; Germain, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    [1] A high-frequency asymptotics approach within the Lagrangian framework shows that some exact equatorially trapped three-dimensional waves are linearly unstable when their steepness exceeds a specific threshold. Citation: Constantin, A., and P. Germain (2013), Instability of some equatorially trapped waves, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 118, 2802–2810, doi:10.1002/jgrc.20219. PMID:26213669

  14. An Experimental Analysis of Social Traps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brechner, Kevin C.

    1977-01-01

    Social traps, such as the overgrazing of pasturelands, overpopulation, and the extinction of species, are situations where individuals in a group respond for their own advantage in a manner damaging to the group. Alaboratory analog was devised to simulate conditions that produce social traps. The intent was to cause an immediate positive…

  15. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  16. 24 CFR 3280.606 - Traps and cleanouts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... separately trapped by approved water seal “P” traps. All traps shall be effectively vented. (2) Dual fixtures... shall have a water seal of not less than 2 inches and not more than 4 inches and shall be set true to... drainage and vent requirements. (3) Prohibited traps. A trap which depends for its seal upon...

  17. 24 CFR 3280.606 - Traps and cleanouts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... required. Each plumbing fixture, except listed toilets, shall be separately trapped by approved water seal... the gage of the tubing. (5) Trap seal. Each “P” trap shall have a water seal of not less than 2 inches...) Prohibited traps. A trap which depends for its seal upon concealed interior partitions shall not be...

  18. Enhanced trapping of stable flies via olfactory and visual cues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult stable flies are highly attracted to the so-called Alsynite cylinder trap; however this trap is expensive. Here we report the development of a cheaper and better white panel trap with options of adding visual and olfactory stimuli for enhanced stable fly trapping. The white panel trap attracte...

  19. Validity of a Smartphone-Based Fall Detection Application on Different Phones Worn on a Belt or in a Trouser Pocket.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Joan; Willard, Sarah; Aguiar, Bruno; De Witte, Luc P

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of a smartphone-based fall detection application when different smartphone models are worn on a belt or in a trouser pocket. Eight healthy adults aged between 18 and 24 years old simulated 10 different types of true falls, 5 different types of falls with recovery, and 11 daily activities, five consecutive times. Participants wore one smartphone in a pocket that was attached to their belt and another one in their trouser pocket. All smartphones were equipped with a built-in accelerometer and the fall detection application. Four participants tested the application on a Samsung S3 and four tested the application on a Samsung S3 mini. Sensitivity scores were .75 (Samsung S3 belt), .88 (Samsung S3 mini trouser pocket), and .90 (Samsung S3 mini belt/Samsung S3 trouser pocket). Specificity scores were .87 (Samsung S3 trouser pocket), .91 (Samsung S3 mini trouser pocket), .97 (Samsung S3 belt), and .99 (Samsung S3 mini belt). These results suggest that an application on a smartphone can generate valid fall alarms when worn on a belt or in a trouser pocket. However, sensitivity should be improved before implementation of the application in practice.

  20. The evaluation of chorionic membrane in guided tissue regeneration for periodontal pocket therapy: a clinical and radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Kothiwale, Shaila V

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal regenerative therapy is aimed at reconstruction and to restore the architecture and function of lost or injured tissues. Melcher (J Periodontol 47(5):256-260, 1976) introduced the concept of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) for osseous reconstructive surgery. The aim of the present innovative clinical and radiographic study was to evaluate the effect of chorionic membrane (CM) in GTR in periodontal pocket therapy. Ten patients with moderate to severe periodontitis were selected in the single blind randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients were treated with periodontal pocket therapy along with CM in study sites and the control sites were treated with periodontal pocket therapy alone. The clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and 12 months. The radiographic parameters were recorded at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Clinical parameters included gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), pocket probing depth (PPD) and relative attachment level (RAL). Digital images were analysed for bone gain (BG) and density. Data were evaluated using t test. Statistical significant differences were found in both sites at 12 months for GI, PI, PPD and RAL. Highly significant reduction was seen in GI 0.40 ± 0.08 (p = 0.0001), PI (0.41 ± 0.18), PPD 2.50 ± 0.53 mm (p = 0.0431) and increased BG 0.86 ± 0.18 (p < 0.0001) were observed in study sites. This shows that CM when used with pocket therapy can have influence on clinical parameters. Radiographic findings from this study demonstrated significant BG and density in sites treated with CM as compared to control sites.